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Sample records for boreal coniferous forest

  1. Carbon in boreal coniferous forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westman, C.J.; Ilvesniemi, H.; Liski, J.; Mecke, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology; Fritze, H.; Helmisaari, H.S.; Pietikaeinen, J.; Smolander, A. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Vantaa (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The working hypothesis of the research was that the soil of boreal forests is a large carbon store and the amount of C is still increasing in young soils, like in the forest soils of Finland, which makes these soils important sinks for atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Since the processes defining the soil C balance, primary production of plants and decomposition, are dependent on environmental factors and site properties, it was assumed that the organic carbon pool in the soil is also dependent on the same factors. The soil C store is therefore likely to change in response to climatic warming. The aim of this research was to estimate the C balance of forest soil in Finland and predict changes in the balance in response to changes in climatic conditions. To achieve the aim (1) intensive empirical experimentation on the density of C in different pools in the soil and on fluxes between the pools was done was done, (2) the effect of site fertility and climate on the amount and properties of organic C in forest soil was investigated and (3) dynamic modelling for investigating dynamics of the soil C storage was used

  2. The importance of micrometeorological variations for photosynthesis and transpiration in a boreal coniferous forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schurgers, Guy; Lagergren, F.; Molder, M.;

    2015-01-01

    the importance of vertical variations in light, temperature, CO2 concentration and humidity within the canopy for fluxes of photosynthesis and transpiration of a boreal coniferous forest in central Sweden. A leaf-level photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model was used for aggregating these processes to canopy...... abovecanopy and within-canopy humidity, and despite large gradients in CO2 concentration during early morning hours after nights with stable conditions, neither humidity nor CO2 played an important role for vertical heterogeneity of photosynthesis and transpiration....

  3. Occurrence and Distribution of Synthetic Organic Substances in Boreal Coniferous Forest Soils Fertilized with Hygienized Municipal Sewage Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Mats Tysklind; Kenneth Sahlén; Richard Lindberg

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of synthetic organic substances following application of dried and granulated (hygienized) municipal sewage sludge in Swedish boreal coniferous forests were investigated. Elevated concentrations of triclosan (TCS), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were detected in the humus layer. Concentrations of ethinyl estradiol (EE2), norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin (FQs), and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were not signi...

  4. Nitrous oxide uptake rates in boreal coniferous forests are associated with soil characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljanen, Henri; Biasi, Christina; Martikainen, Pertti

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a strong greenhouse gas and a significant contributor to the destruction of the ozone layer. The radiative forcing of N2O is considered to be 320 more efficient than carbon dioxide.The major portion of global N2O is emitted from agricultural soils. There are studies suggesting that N2O has also a sink in forest soils. However there is relatively limited knowledge on factors controlling N2O consumption in forest soils. Hence N2O consumption was studied in boreal coniferous forests having different forest cover, soil chemical and physical structure and land-use history. The N2O consumption was measured by static chamber technique in the field across spatio-seasonal sampling design. Typical and atypical denitrifiers were quantified with nosZ functional gene marker. Additionally chemical and physical environmental parameters were analyzed to link N2O flux, microbial community and composition of soils. Nitrous oxide uptake could be associated with specific ecosystem and environmental conditions. Soil physical structure and land-use history were shown to be prior factors determining the strength of the uptake rate.

  5. Spatial and Temporal Variation in Feather Moss Associated Nitrogen Fixation in Coniferous and Deciduous Dominated Alaskan Boreal Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, M.; Mack, M. C.; Johnstone, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Dominant canopy tree species have strong effects on the composition and function of understory species. In boreal forests, forest floor bryophytes and their associated microbes are a primary source of ecosystem nitrogen (N) inputs, and thus an important process regulating ecosystem productivity. Bryophyte composition and abundance varies with forest composition, yet how such changes can affect ecosystem processes such as N fixation is still poorly understood. Our goal is to investigate how cyanobacteria-based N fixation occurring in the two most common feather mosses in the Alaskan boreal forest (Pleurozium schreberi and Hylocomium splendens) varies among coniferous and deciduous forest types, over the growing season, and across a nutrient availability gradient. Twelve patches of H. splendens and P. schreberi were identified in three pairs (blocks) of adjacent stands of paper birch (Betula neoalaskana) and black spruce (Picea mariana) near Fairbanks, interior Alaska. Sampling occurred in one block in June, July, August, and September 2014, and in the three blocks once in August 2014. Moss leaf area, moisture and weight, as well as environmental variables such as air temperature and canopy cover were recorded. Fixation rates were consistently higher for P. schreberi than for H. splendens. Overall, N fixation rates were lower in birch than in spruce stands and peaked in August, or July for P. schreberi in birch stands. Moreover, fixation rates varied along the nutrient availability gradient, with fixation rates higher where nutrient availability was lower. This difference was especially clear in spruce stands. Our preliminary results suggest that moss species, canopy type, and environmental factors all influence N fixation rates in Alaskan boreal forests. Our results will enhance the knowledge of the processes that drive N fixation in boreal forests, which is important for predicting ecosystem consequences of changing forest composition.

  6. Occurrence and Distribution of Synthetic Organic Substances in Boreal Coniferous Forest Soils Fertilized with Hygienized Municipal Sewage Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Tysklind

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence and distribution of synthetic organic substances following application of dried and granulated (hygienized municipal sewage sludge in Swedish boreal coniferous forests were investigated. Elevated concentrations of triclosan (TCS, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs were detected in the humus layer. Concentrations of ethinyl estradiol (EE2, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin (FQs, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were not significantly influenced. Maximum concentrations in humus were as follows (in ng/g dry matter: TCS; 778; PBDEs; 25; and PCB7; 16.7. Fertilization did not alter the levels of the substances in mineral soil, ground water, and various types of samples related to air. Further research within this area is needed, including ecotoxicological effects and fate, in order to improve the knowledge regarding the use of sludge as a fertilizing agent. Continuous annual monitoring, with respect to sampling and analysis, should be conducted on the already-fertilized fields.

  7. Seasonality and nitrogen supply modify carbon partitioning in understory vegetation of a boreal coniferous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselquist, N J; Metcalfe, D B; Marshall, J D; Lucas, R W; Högberg, P

    2016-03-01

    Given the strong coupling between the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles, there is substantial interest in understanding how N availability affects C cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, especially in ecosystems limited by N. However, most studies in temperate and boreal forests have focused on the effects of N addition on tree growth. By comparison, less is known about the effects of N availability on the cycling of C in understory vegetation despite some evidence that dwarf shrubs, mosses, and lichens play an important role in the forest C balance. In this study, we used an in situ 13CO2 pulse-labeling technique to examine the short-term dynamics of C partitioning in understory vegetation in three boreal Pinus sylvestris forest stands exposed to different rates of N addition: a low and high N addition that receive annual additions of NH4NO3 of 20 and 100 kg N/ha, respectively, and this is a typo. It should be an unfertilized control. Labeling was conducted at two distinct periods (early vs. late growing season), which provided a seasonal picture of how N addition affects C dynamics in understory vegetation. In contrast to what has been found in trees, there was no obvious trend in belowground C partitioning in ericaceous plants in response to N additions or seasonality. Increasing N addition led to a greater percentage of 13C being incorporated into ericaceous leaves with a high turnover, whereas high rates of N addition strongly reduced the incorporation of 13C into less degradable moss tissues. Addition of N also resulted in a greater percentage of the 13C label being respired back to the atmosphere and an overall reduction in total understory carbon use efficiency. Taken together, our results suggest a faster cycling of C in understory vegetation with increasing N additions; yet the magnitude of this general response was strongly dependent on the amount of N added and varied seasonally. These results provide some of the first in situ C and N partitioning

  8. Assessing seasonality of biochemical CO2 exchange model parameters from micrometeorological flux observations at boreal coniferous forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Vesala

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The seasonality of the NEE of the northern boreal coniferous forests was investigated by means of inversion modelling using eddy covariance data. Eddy covariance data was used to optimize the biochemical model parameters. Our study sites consisted of three Scots pine (l. Pinus sylvestris forests and one Norway spruce (l. Picea abies forest that were located in Finland and Sweden. We obtained temperature and seasonal dependence for the biochemical model parameters: the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vc(max and the maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax. Both of the parameters were optimized without assumptions about their mutual magnitude. The values obtained for the biochemical model parameters were similar at all the sites during summer time. To describe seasonality, different temperature fits were made for the spring, summer and autumn periods. During summer, average Jmax across the sites was 54.0 μmol m−2 s−1 (variance 31.2 μmol m−2 s−1 and Vc(max was 12.0 μmol m−2 s−1 (variance 6.6 μmol m−2 s−1 at 17°C. The sensitivity of the model to LAI and atmospheric soil water stress was also studied. The impact of seasonality on annual GPP was 17% when only summertime parameterization was used throughout the year compared to seasonally changing parameterizations.

  9. Nitrogen in soil water of coniferous forests

    OpenAIRE

    Rappe George, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In boreal and temperate forests, long-term elevated nitrogen (N) load may eventually saturate forest ecosystems with N, i.e. total N ecosystem input exceed ecosystem sinks for N, and N losses via soil water transport may then increase and negatively impact environmental quality. This thesis is based upon four studies (reported in papers I-IV), and the overall aims were to assess and analyse effects on soil water N in coniferous forests of two types of anthropogenic disturbance: “chemical...

  10. Nutrient relations in coniferous forests

    OpenAIRE

    Ladanai, Svetlana

    2008-01-01

    The environment controls physiological processes in plants and thus their growth. The question how forests will respond to global environmental changes is addressed with different approaches and using two coniferous tree species: Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) I have used the relationship (nitrogen productivity) between a plant's growth rate and the amount of nitrogen in the plant to analyse the growth response to temperature. Data on needle dry m...

  11. EcM fungal community structure, but not diversity, altered in a Pb-contaminated shooting range in a boreal coniferous forest site in Southern Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Nan; Jumpponen, Ari; Niskanen, Tuula; Liimatainen, Kare; Jones, Kenneth L; Koivula, Teija; Romantschuk, Martin; Strömmer, Rauni

    2011-04-01

    Boreal forests contain diverse fungal communities that form essential ectomycorrhizal symbioses with trees. To determine the effects of lead (Pb) contamination on ectomycorrhizal fungal communities associated with the dominant pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), we surveyed sporocarps for 3 years, analyzed morphotyped ectomycorrhizal root tips by direct sequencing, and 454-sequenced fungal communities that grew into in-growth bags during a 2-year incubation at a shooting range where sectors vary in the Pb load. We recorded a total of 32 ectomycorrhizal fungi that formed conspicuous sporocarps, 27 ectomycorrhizal fungal phylotypes from 294 root tips, and 116 ectomycorrhizal fungal operation taxonomic unit (OTUs) from a total of 8194 internal transcribed spacer-2 454 sequences. Our ordination analyses by nonparametric multidimensional scaling (NMS) indicated that the Pb enrichment induced a shift in the ectomycorrhizal community composition. This was visible as indicative trends in the sporocarp and root tip data sets, but was explicitly clear in the communities observed in the in-growth bags. The compositional shift in the ectomycorrhizal community was mainly attributable to an increase in the frequencies of OTUs assigned to genus Thelephora and to a decrease in the OTUs assigned to Pseudotomentella, Suillus, and Tylospora in Pb-contaminated areas when compared with the control. While the compositional shifts are clear, their functional consequences for the dominant trees or soil ecosystem function remain undetermined. PMID:21223331

  12. Ecohydrology of Interior Alaska boreal forest systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, J.; Bolton, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    The ecohydrology of boreal forest ecosystems of Interior Alaska is not well understood largely because of challenges posed by the presence of discontinuous permafrost. Near-surface permafrost results in storage-dominated systems with cold, poorly drained soils, and slow growing, low statured coniferous trees (Picea mariana) or CDE's. The transition to permafrost-free areas can occur over a few meters and is accompanied by a vegetation community dominated by large deciduous trees (Populus sp. and Betula sp.) or DDE's. Typically, areas with permafrost are on north facing slopes and valley bottoms, and areas without permafrost are south facing. In Alaska's boreal forest, the permafrost is very warm and vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Once permafrost begins to thaw, the vegetation community shifts from coniferous to deciduous dominated. Streamflow in watersheds with a larger permafrost distribution tends to be higher and more responsive to precipitation events than in watersheds with low permafrost distribution. In fact, precipitation events in the low permafrost areas do not infiltrate past the rooting zone of the deciduous trees (~5-40 cm). This suggests that the deciduous trees may remove water from the system via uptake and transpiration. We focus on how vegetation water use affects boreal forest hydrology in areas of discontinuous permafrost. Specifically, we ask: what are the patterns of vegetation water use in areas with and without permafrost? This study focuses on the CDE and DDE systems. Our research sites are established on low and high locations on each aspect (south facing DDE, north facing CDE) to capture the variability associated with the different hillside drainage properties. At each of the four sites during the growing season, we measured various aspects of plant water use dynamics, including water flux, water content, water sources, depth of water uptake in the soil, and water stress. We use a Bayesian framework to analyze the data. We

  13. Reserve selection in boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Lundström, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Most boreal forests in North Europe are intensively managed, and the forest landscape is far from its natural stage leading to hundreds of species being threatened in Sweden alone. Reserves are established to protect biodiversity, but since the resources available for conservation do not cover all species in need of protection, effective prioritization is essential. In this thesis, a reserve selection model based on a goal programming approach was developed, finding the optimal age comp...

  14. Estimating the compensation strength of coniferous forests for climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn, Boris; Boy, Michael; Spracklen, Dominick; Kulmala, Markku; Carslaw, Ken; Trawny, Katrin; Jacobi, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Since several years it is been realised that our climate conditions are changing. Scenarios to approximate future conditions as realistic as possible have been constructed and projections for different areas on Earths have been made. However, several complex processes such as aerosols and feedback cycles are not fully understood. One of those feedback cycles is the interactions between different vegetation types and the atmosphere. Each vegetation type has its climate optimum conditions. Changing those a new distribution of plants and trees has to follow or the ecosystem has to adapt. This is usually a lengthy process but critical for coniferous forests such as in boreal regions. Especially the question how much of the changing climate conditions can be compensated by the forest on a shorter time scale. Spracklen et al. (2008) explained that the forest takes up carbon dioxide and increases its leaf area index, thus biomass at future conditions. This will decrease its surface albedo. Compared to a surface without forest the albedo effect was estimated to be +2.3 W m-2 for current cnditions. On the contrary the forest emits notable amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under stress conditions that significantly take part in atmospheric new particle formation. These new particles grow and result nowadays in a doubling of the cloud condensation number (CCN) over Scandinavia leading to a energy reduction by about -2.9 W m-2, thus a net cooling of -0.6 W m-2 (-0.3 °C) was estimated. This study focusses on the increase of the cooling (compensating) effect at future conditions with elevated temperature conditions. Therefore, we defined four nucleation parameters including the effect of ozone and water vapour on new particle formation as well as the global radiation as a proxy for OH related compounds. In doing so we found a good agreement with field observations for the nucleation parameter which included all effects. Hence, we apply this parameter for expected

  15. Ecological Sustainability of Birds in Boreal Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Venier; Mikko Mönkkönen; Robert Howe; Pekka Helle; JoAnn Hanowski; Gerald Niemi; Daniel Welsh

    1998-01-01

    We review characteristics of birds in boreal forests in the context of their ecological sustainability under both natural and anthropogenic disturbances. We identify the underlying ecological factors associated with boreal bird populations and their variability, review the interactions between boreal bird populations and disturbance, and describe some tools on how boreal bird populations may be conserved in the future. The boreal system has historically been an area with extensive disturbance...

  16. Acidification-induced chemical changes in coniferous forest soils in southern Sweden 1988-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acidification of south-Swedish coniferous forest soils continues and soil nutrient status is no longer sustainable in a long-term perspective. - Thirty-two Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands in southern Sweden were studied for a period of 12 years to evaluate acidification-induced chemical changes in the soil. Soil, at 20-30 cm depth in the mineral layer, was sampled three times during this period (1988, 1993 and 1999). The results show that pH(BaCl2) in mineral soil decreased by, on average, 0.17 units between 1988 and 1999, accompanied by an increase in aluminium (Al) concentration and a decrease in base saturation in the soil. In 1999, the base saturation was below 5% in 58% of the 32 sites compared with 16% in 1988 and 7% in 1993. Concentrations of calcium (Ca), potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) are low and decreasing. Based on C/N ratios in humus, 45% of the sites may be subjected to leaching of considerable amounts of nitrate. The results show that the acidification of coniferous forest soils in southern Sweden is continuing, and that the negative effects on the nutrient status in soil are extensive. The results are compared with reference values for productive, long-term sustainably managed boreal coniferous or mixed forest soils and implications for long-term sustainability are discussed

  17. Effects of long-range transported pollutants on vegetation in boreal coniferous forests: Results from an five year investigation in the Solholmfjell area, Gjerstad, Aust-Agder; Effekter av langtransporterte luftforurensninger i boreal barskog: resultater av fem aars undersoekelser i Solhomfjell-omraadet, Gjerstad, Aust-Agder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oekland, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The conference paper relates to a project on investigating the effects of long-range transported pollutants in Norway. The paper gives a brief description of the more important results obtained in the project. The aim of the project was to investigate the pollution load in vegetation, soils and trees in Norwegian forest areas of the coniferous type. The project included the collection of samples from 200 test areas in a period of five years. 11 refs.

  18. Global greenhouse to icehouse and back again: The origin and future of the Boreal Forest biome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Ralph E.; Cross, Aureal T.

    2009-02-01

    The Boreal Forest biome (Taiga), dominated by evergreen and deciduous coniferous trees (Pinaceae), is circumpolar in its present distribution, covering a significant part of the total land area of the Northern Hemisphere and representing perhaps a third of the total forest area of the planet. Nothing comparable to this extant biome existed during the global "greenhouse" interval of the Late Mesozoic and Paleogene. Latitudinal temperature gradients should have confined boreal taxa to extremely high latitudes, but evergreen taxa do not appear to have been competitive in the lowlands of the high arctic, where the vegetation consisted of a unique circumpolar forest dominated by deciduous conifers and broad-leaved taxa. Probable sources for the pinaceous taxa that now characterize boreal latitudes were the Paleogene evergreen montane coniferous forests of the western North American Cordillera. Taphonomic factors limit the fossil record for such forests, but assemblages such as the Eocene Thunder Mountain (Idaho) and Bull Run (Nevada) floras were dominated by evergreen and deciduous Pinaceae that dominate extant montane, subalpine, and Boreal Forest associations. In response to post-Eocene global cooling, such forests presumably would have migrated to lower elevations, eventually spreading across high-latitude North America, subsequently reaching Eurasia via the Beringian corridor. This high-diversity coniferous forest was differentially winnowed and modified during subsequent migration southward in both the New and Old World. Despite its extensive geographic distribution, the Boreal Forest may be the youngest of the major forest biomes. If global warming ultimately results in a significant redistribution of terrestrial vegetation, the history of the Boreal Forest may well be reversed. Northward migration of the Boreal Forest may be characterized by loss of taxa and extensive community reorganization as individual taxa are pushed to their limits with respect to rates of

  19. Net aboveground biomass declines of four major forest types with forest ageing and climate change in western Canada's boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Han Y H; Luo, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Biomass change of the world's forests is critical to the global carbon cycle. Despite storing nearly half of global forest carbon, the boreal biome of diverse forest types and ages is a poorly understood component of the carbon cycle. Using data from 871 permanent plots in the western boreal forest of Canada, we examined net annual aboveground biomass change (ΔAGB) of four major forest types between 1958 and 2011. We found that ΔAGB was higher for deciduous broadleaf (DEC) (1.44 Mg ha(-1)  year(-1) , 95% Bayesian confidence interval (CI), 1.22-1.68) and early-successional coniferous forests (ESC) (1.42, CI, 1.30-1.56) than mixed forests (MIX) (0.80, CI, 0.50-1.11) and late-successional coniferous (LSC) forests (0.62, CI, 0.39-0.88). ΔAGB declined with forest age as well as calendar year. After accounting for the effects of forest age, ΔAGB declined by 0.035, 0.021, 0.032 and 0.069 Mg ha(-1)  year(-1) per calendar year in DEC, ESC, MIX and LSC forests, respectively. The ΔAGB declines resulted from increased tree mortality and reduced growth in all forest types except DEC, in which a large biomass loss from mortality was accompanied with a small increase in growth. With every degree of annual temperature increase, ΔAGB decreased by 1.00, 0.20, 0.55 and 1.07 Mg ha(-1)  year(-1) in DEC, ESC, MIX and LSC forests, respectively. With every cm decrease of annual climatic moisture availability, ΔAGB decreased 0.030, 0.045 and 0.17 Mg ha(-1)  year(-1) in ESC, MIX and LSC forests, but changed little in DEC forests. Our results suggest that persistent warming and decreasing water availability have profound negative effects on forest biomass in the boreal forests of western Canada. Furthermore, our results indicate that forest responses to climate change are strongly dependent on forest composition with late-successional coniferous forests being most vulnerable to climate changes in terms of aboveground biomass.

  20. The Elusive Boreal Forest Thaumarchaeota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Bomberg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Archaea have, with increasing frequency, been found to colonize both agricultural and forest soils in temperate and boreal regions. The as yet uncultured group I.1c of the Thaumarchaeota has been of special interest. These Archaea are widely distributed in mature vegetated acidic soils, but little has been revealed of their physiological and biological characteristics. The I.1c Thaumarchaeota have been recognized as a microbial group influenced by plant roots and mycorrhizal fungi, but appear to have distinct features from their more common soil dwelling counterparts, such as the Nitrosotalea or Nitrososphaera. They appear to be highly dependent on soil pH, thriving in undisturbed vegetated soils with a pH of 5 or below. Research indicate that these Archaea require organic carbon and nitrogen sources for growth and that they may live both aerobically and anaerobically. Nevertheless, pure cultures of these microorganisms have not yet been obtained. This review will focus on what is known to date about the uncultured group I.1c Thaumarchaeota formerly known as the “Finnish Forest Soil” (FFS Archaea.

  1. Boreal forest health and global change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, S; Bernier, P; Kuuluvainen, T; Shvidenko, A Z; Schepaschenko, D G

    2015-08-21

    The boreal forest, one of the largest biomes on Earth, provides ecosystem services that benefit society at levels ranging from local to global. Currently, about two-thirds of the area covered by this biome is under some form of management, mostly for wood production. Services such as climate regulation are also provided by both the unmanaged and managed boreal forests. Although most of the boreal forests have retained the resilience to cope with current disturbances, projected environmental changes of unprecedented speed and amplitude pose a substantial threat to their health. Management options to reduce these threats are available and could be implemented, but economic incentives and a greater focus on the boreal biome in international fora are needed to support further adaptation and mitigation actions. PMID:26293953

  2. Pinus sylvestris as a missing source of nitrous oxide and methane in boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Katerina Machacova; Jaana Bäck; Anni Vanhatalo; Elisa Halmeenmäki; Pasi Kolari; Ivan Mammarella; Jukka Pumpanen; Manuel Acosta; Otmar Urban; Mari Pihlatie

    2016-01-01

    Boreal forests comprise 73% of the world’s coniferous forests. Based on forest floor measurements, they have been considered a significant natural sink of methane (CH4) and a natural source of nitrous oxide (N2O), both of which are important greenhouse gases. However, the role of trees, especially conifers, in ecosystem N2O and CH4 exchange is only poorly understood. We show for the first time that mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees consistently emit N2O and CH4 from both stems and...

  3. Mechanisms of 137Cs migration in coniferous forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field and laboratory studies demonstrate two processes involved in 137Cs migration in coniferous forest soil. The data illustrate that the effects of leaching and litter accumulation combine, over the time interval since deposition, to achieve the observed distribution of 137Cs in the soil profile. Today, under normal field conditions the rate of 137Cs leaching from forest humus is low and even extreme environmental conditions do not increase greatly the extent of 137Cs mobilisation by leaching. A three-phase model of 137Cs migration in the organic horizons of coniferous forest soils is proposed. The phases are discrete but at any point in time the behaviour of some portion of deposited 137Cs will be characteristic of one of the three phases. In the first phase 137Cs intercepted by the canopy is washed to the forest floor where a proportion (20-40% is reported) rapidly percolates through the organic horizons reaching the underlying soil; the remainder is retained in the organic horizons. In the second phase, which our study estimates to last about 5 years, the 137Cs contained within the Ol and Of horizons moves to the Oh horizon. Accumulation of relatively uncontaminated litter on top of the Ol horizon contributes to this migration, while 137Cs mobilised from the Ol and Of horizons by decomposition is leached to the Oh horizon. The 137Cs which reaches the Oh horizon, either by leaching or by decomposition and burial, enters the third phase in which the pace of migration is greatly reduced. Decomposition is slowest in the Oh horizon and the accumulation and turnover of Oh material is also very slow. At the site investigated in this study the bulk of the deposited 137Cs is in this third phase and we suggest that this phase will persist for many years to come

  4. Radio-ecological conditions of band coniferous forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Band coniferous forests are located at the right bank of Irtysh river in two oblasts of Kazakhstan - East Kazakhstan and Pavlodar.This is a unique and only forest of this type. Something similar to this natural treasure with climate-regulating, sanitary, soil-protective, water-preserving functions can be found in Canada only. Total area of the band forest comprises 870500 hectares. The forest is mainly presented by pines (Pinus silvestris). These forests are of relict nature and are of great environmental, social and economic value. The band forests located in northern, north-western and western parts of SNTS were subjected several time to radioactive impacts from atmospheric nuclear tests performed at SNTS. Nuclear clouds from 12 ground and 28 atmospheric explosions passed over these territories. Four nuclear tests performed on 29th of August 1949, 29th of July 1955, 7th of August 1962 and 26th of November 1962 resulted in higher radiation dose rates registered on land there. It seems that this particular tests stipulated radioactive contamination of the forests. The first nuclear test performed on 29th of August 1949 resulted in considerable radioactive contamination of the band forests. Contamination was registerd in Novopokrovskij and Beskaragajskij districts of Semipalatinsk oblast as well as in several districts of Altai Territory. The second test that could bring radioactive contamination to the forests was performed on 7th of August 1962 when instead of planned atmospheric explosion, there was achieved surface explosion with comparatively high radioactive contamination of the lands towards Altai Territory. Within the State program ''Forest preservation and expansion of forest in the Republic of Kazakhstan'' there was performed in 2006 a radiological surveying of the lands in pipe forest of near-Irtysh region. There were studied soil and vegetation as well as woods of the band coniferous forests. Part of territory, wherethrough nuclear clouds went

  5. Silviculture's Role in Managing Boreal Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa B. Jain

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Boreal forests, which are often undeveloped, are a major source of raw materials for many countries. They are circumpolar in extent and occupy a belt to a width of 1000 km in certain regions. Various conifer and hardwood species ranging from true firs to poplars grow in boreal forests. These species exhibit a wide range of shade tolerance and growth characteristics, and occupy different successional positions. The climate is subarctic, with short growing seasons, and the soils are shallow. Both wildfires and timber harvesting play an important role in shaping the structure and composition of boreal forests. Both uneven-aged and even-aged silvicultural systems can be used to produce commercial harvests, but systems can also be designed to meet a variety of other forest management objectives. Wildlife habitat maintenance, water production or conservation, and fire hazard reduction are only some of the objectives for which silvicultural systems can be designed. Coarse wood debris, snags, shrubs, canopy layers, and species composition are examples of forest attributes that can be managed using silvicultural systems. Systems can be designed to sustain predator habitat, yet provide a continual production of wood products. Uneven-aged systems tend to favor the regeneration and development of shade-tolerant species, whereas even-aged systems tend to favor shade-intolerant species. These systems and all of their permutations can create and maintain a suite of different stand compositions and structures that can be used to meet a wide variety of management objectives.

  6. Simulating aerosol nucleation bursts in a coniferous forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammet, H. [Tartu Univ. (Estonia). Dept. of Environmental Physics; Kulmala, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Div. of Atmospheric Sciences, Dept. of Physical Sciences

    2007-07-01

    We modified a numerical model of atmospheric aerosol nucleation bursts to include the dry deposition of ions and freshly nucleated particles onto tree needles in a coniferous forest. The dry deposition is estimated using the Churchill-Bernstein approximation, which is adapted from the theory of heat transfer. The model includes an improved submodel of the sink of ions and nucleation mode particles onto large particles of the background aerosol. The user can edit the values of 95 input parameters by altering a control file. The computing time on an ordinary PC is counted in seconds in case of a typical task, which is characterized by several thousands of time steps and several thousands of size sections. The numerical examples show that, during atmospheric aerosol nucleation events, the dry deposition of ions and nanometer scale particles onto the conifer needles has a considerable effect on the respective concentrations. (orig.)

  7. Forest commons in boreal Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Holmgren, Eva

    2009-01-01

    This thesis examines the influences of Swedish forest commons on forest condition, management and the local economy. The approach is rationalistic, i.e. outcomes of forestry activities are assessed in relation to aims. According to the stated objectives, forest commons should serve as exemplars for improved forest management, focusing on increased and sustained timber production. They should provide sustainable economic support for farmers and the local economy, providing a sound basis for ta...

  8. Climate change moisture stresses on northern coniferous forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The predictions of general circulation models suggest major climatic changes for high latitude tundra ecosystems and lower latitude forested ecosystems. Of particular interest to Canadians is the predicted shift in the boreal forest climate northward, with a considerable northern expansion of the grasslands of western Canada. Reductions in soil moisture would have both direct and indirect effects on forest composition and productivity. The most important likely physical factors subject to alteration are permafrost, hydrological regimes and fire. Under warmer and drier conditions, potential fire burn frequency will increase, and might lead to greater proportions of jack pine than previously present. It is anticipated that permafrost will disappear from the extensive discontinuous permafrost zone where soil permafrost temperatures are presently -3 degree C or higher. In wet sites, melting of the permafrost could lead to drowning of forests as soils subside and become temporarily waterlogged. In more northerly areas, forest growth may increase in drier areas as the depth of the active layer increases. Fire may be a significant feed-back mechanism that could enhance the greenhouse effect. The estimated proportion of carbon in Canadian peatlands is in the order of 170 gigatonnes, whereas one-tenth of a gigatonne of carbon is released annually by fossil fuel combustion in Canada. 11 refs

  9. Deciduous trees are a large and overlooked sink for snowmelt water in the boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young-Robertson, Jessica M.; Bolton, W. Robert; Bhatt, Uma S.; Cristóbal, Jordi; Thoman, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The terrestrial water cycle contains large uncertainties that impact our understanding of water budgets and climate dynamics. Water storage is a key uncertainty in the boreal water budget, with tree water storage often ignored. The goal of this study is to quantify tree water content during the snowmelt and growing season periods for Alaskan and western Canadian boreal forests. Deciduous trees reached saturation between snowmelt and leaf-out, taking up 21–25% of the available snowmelt water, while coniferous trees removed resulting in an additional 0.3–3 billion m3 of snowmelt water removed from the soil per year. This study is the first to show that deciduous tree water uptake of snowmelt water represents a large but overlooked aspect of the water balance in boreal watersheds.

  10. Botany: Constraints to growth of boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Paul; Linder, Sune

    2000-06-01

    Understanding how the growth of trees at high latitudes in boreal forest is controlled is important for projections of global carbon sequestration and timber production in relation to climate change. Is stem growth of boreal forest trees constrained by the length of the growing season when stem cambial cells divide, or by the length of the period when resources can be captured? In both cases, the timing of the thaw in the spring is critical: neither cambial cell division nor uptake of nutrients and carbon dioxide can occur while the soil is frozen. Here we argue, on the basis of long-term observations made in northern Saskatchewan and Sweden, that the time between the spring thaw and the autumn freeze determines the amount of annual tree growth, mainly through temperature effects on carbon-dioxide uptake in spring and on nutrient availability and uptake during summer, rather than on cambial cell division.

  11. Effects of disturbance and climate change on ecosystem performance in the Yukon River Basin boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Bruce K.; Rigge, Matthew B.; Brisco, Brian; Mrnaghan, Kevin; Rover, Jennifer R.; Long, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    A warming climate influences boreal forest productivity, dynamics, and disturbance regimes. We used ecosystem models and 250 m satellite Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data averaged over the growing season (GSN) to model current, and estimate future, ecosystem performance. We modeled Expected Ecosystem Performance (EEP), or anticipated productivity, in undisturbed stands over the 2000–2008 period from a variety of abiotic data sources, using a rule-based piecewise regression tree. The EEP model was applied to a future climate ensemble A1B projection to quantify expected changes to mature boreal forest performance. Ecosystem Performance Anomalies (EPA), were identified as the residuals of the EEP and GSN relationship and represent performance departures from expected performance conditions. These performance data were used to monitor successional events following fire. Results suggested that maximum EPA occurs 30–40 years following fire, and deciduous stands generally have higher EPA than coniferous stands. Mean undisturbed EEP is projected to increase 5.6% by 2040 and 8.7% by 2070, suggesting an increased deciduous component in boreal forests. Our results contribute to the understanding of boreal forest successional dynamics and its response to climate change. This information enables informed decisions to prepare for, and adapt to, climate change in the Yukon River Basin forest.

  12. Boreal Forests of Kamchatka: Structure and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus P. Eichhorn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Central Kamchatka abounds in virgin old-growth boreal forest, formed primarily by Larix cajanderi and Betula platyphylla in varying proportions. A series of eight 0.25–0.30 ha plots captured the range of forests present in this region and their structure is described. Overall trends in both uplands and lowlands are for higher sites to be dominated by L. cajanderi with an increasing component of B. platyphylla with decreasing altitude. The tree line on wet sites is commonly formed by mono-dominant B. ermanii forests. Basal area ranged from 7.8–38.1 m2/ha and average tree height from 8.3–24.7 m, both being greater in lowland forests. Size distributions varied considerably among plots, though they were consistently more even for L. cajanderi than B. platyphylla. Upland sites also contained a dense subcanopy of Pinus pumila averaging 38% of ground area. Soil characteristics differed among plots, with upland soils being of lower pH and containing more carbon. Comparisons are drawn with boreal forests elsewhere and the main current threats assessed. These forests provide a potential baseline to contrast with more disturbed regions elsewhere in the world and therefore may be used as a target for restoration efforts or to assess the effects of climate change independent of human impacts.

  13. Browning boreal forests of western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbyla, David

    2011-12-01

    The GIMMS NDVI dataset has been widely used to document a 'browning trend' in North American boreal forests (Goetz et al 2005, Bunn et al 2007, Beck and Goetz 2011). However, there has been speculation (Alcaraz-Segura et al 2010) that this trend may be an artifact due to processing algorithms rather than an actual decline in vegetation activity. This conclusion was based primarily on the fact that GIMMS NDVI did not capture NDVI recovery within most burned areas in boreal Canada, while another dataset consistently showed post-fire increasing NDVI. I believe that the results of Alcaraz-Segura et al (2010) were due simply to different pixel sizes of the two datasets (64 km2 versus 1 km2 pixels). Similar results have been obtained from tundra areas greening in Alaska, with the results simply due to these pixel size differences (Stow et al 2007). Furthermore, recent studies have documented boreal browning trends based on NDVI from other sensors. Beck and Goetz (2011) have shown the boreal browning trend derived from a different sensor (MODIS) to be very similar to the boreal browning trend derived from the GIMMS NDVI dataset for the circumpolar boreal region. Parent and Verbyla (2010) found similar declining NDVI patterns based on NDVI from Landsat sensors and GIMMS NDVI in boreal Alaska. Zhang et al (2008) found a similar 'browning trend' in boreal North America based on a production efficiency model using an integrated AVHRR and MODIS dataset. The declining NDVI trend in areas of boreal North America is consistent with tree-ring studies (D'Arrigo et al 2004, McGuire et al 2010, Beck et al 2011). The decline in tree growth may be due to temperature-induced drought stress (Barber et al 2000) caused by higher evaporative demands in a warming climate (Lloyd and Fastie 2002). In a circumpolar boreal study, Lloyd and Bunn (2007) found that a negative relationship between temperature and tree-ring growth occurred more frequently in warmer parts of species' ranges

  14. Formation, fate and leaching of chloroform in coniferous forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Chloroform may be formed in coniferous forest soil. → The formed chloroform may enter the groundwater in μg/L concentrations. → Clear seasonal patterns in chloroform formation in soil are observed. → Sorption and degradation affects the fate of chloroform in forest soil. - Abstract: Chloroform is a common groundwater pollutant but also a natural compound in forest ecosystems. Leaching of natural chloroform from forest soil to groundwater was followed by regular analysis of soil air and groundwater from multilevel wells at four different sites in Denmark for a period of up to 4 a. Significant seasonal variation in chloroform was observed in soil air 0.5 m below surface ranging at one site from 120 ppb by volume in summer to 20 ppb during winter. With depth, the seasonal variation diminished gradually, ranging from 30 ppb in summer to 20 ppb during winter, near the groundwater table. Chloroform in the shallowest groundwater ranged from 0.5-1.5 μg L-1 at one site to 2-5 μg L-1 at another site showing no clear correlation with season. Comparing changes in chloroform in soil air versus depth with on-site recorded meteorological data indicated that a clear relationship appears between rain events and leaching of chloroform. Chloroform in top soil air co-varied with CO2 given a delay of 3-4 weeks providing evidence for its biological origin. This was confirmed during laboratory incubation experiments which further located the fermentation layer as the most chloroform producing soil horizon. Sorption of chloroform to soils, examined using 14C-CHCl3, correlated with organic matter content, being high in the upper organic rich soils and low in the deeper more minerogenic soils. The marked decrease in chloroform in soil with depth may in part be due to microbial degradation which was shown to occur at all depths by laboratory tests using 14C-CHCl3.

  15. Declining plant nitrogen supply and carbon accumulation in ageing primary boreal forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högberg, Mona N.; Yarwood, Stephanie A.; Trumbore, Susan; Högberg, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forest soils are commonly characterized by a low plant nitrogen (N) supply. A high tree below-ground allocation of carbon (C) to roots and soil microorganisms in response to the shortage of N may lead to high microbial immobilisation of N, thus aggravating the N limitation. We studied the N supply at a Swedish boreal forest ecosystem chronosequence created by new land rising out of the sea due to iso-static rebound. The youngest soils develop with meadows by the coast, followed by a zone of dinitrogen fixing alder trees, and primary boreal conifer forest on ground up to 560 years old. With increasing ecosystem age, the proportion of microbial C out of the total soil C pool from the youngest to the oldest coniferous ecosystem was constant (c. 1-1.5%), whereas immobilised N (microbial N out of total soil N) increased and approached the levels commonly observed in similar boreal coniferous forests (c. 6-7 %), whereas gross N mineralization declined. Simultaneously, plant foliar N % decreased and the natural abundance of N-15 in the soil increased. More specifically, the difference in N-15 between plant foliage and soil increased, which is related to greater retention of N-15 relative to N-14 by ectomycorrhizal fungi as N is taken up from the soil and some N is transferred to the plant host. In the conifer forest, where these changes were greatest, we found increased fungal biomass in the F- and H-horizons of the mor-layer, in which ectomycorrhizal fungi are known to dominate (the uppermost horizon with litter and moss is dominated by saprotrophic fungi). Hence, we propose that the decreasing N supply to the plants and the subsequent decline in plant production in ageing boreal forests is linked to high tree belowground C allocation to C limited ectomycorrhizal fungi (and other soil microorganisms), a strong sink for available soil N. Data on organic matter C-14 suggested that the largest input of recently fixed plant C occurred in the younger coniferous forest

  16. Pinus sylvestris as a missing source of nitrous oxide and methane in boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machacova, Katerina; Bäck, Jaana; Vanhatalo, Anni; Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Kolari, Pasi; Mammarella, Ivan; Pumpanen, Jukka; Acosta, Manuel; Urban, Otmar; Pihlatie, Mari

    2016-03-01

    Boreal forests comprise 73% of the world’s coniferous forests. Based on forest floor measurements, they have been considered a significant natural sink of methane (CH4) and a natural source of nitrous oxide (N2O), both of which are important greenhouse gases. However, the role of trees, especially conifers, in ecosystem N2O and CH4 exchange is only poorly understood. We show for the first time that mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees consistently emit N2O and CH4 from both stems and shoots. The shoot fluxes of N2O and CH4 exceeded the stem flux rates by 16 and 41 times, respectively. Moreover, higher stem N2O and CH4 fluxes were observed from wet than from dry areas of the forest. The N2O release from boreal pine forests may thus be underestimated and the uptake of CH4 may be overestimated when ecosystem flux calculations are based solely on forest floor measurements. The contribution of pine trees to the N2O and CH4 exchange of the boreal pine forest seems to increase considerably under high soil water content, thus highlighting the urgent need to include tree-emissions in greenhouse gas emission inventories.

  17. Pinus sylvestris as a missing source of nitrous oxide and methane in boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machacova, Katerina; Bäck, Jaana; Vanhatalo, Anni; Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Kolari, Pasi; Mammarella, Ivan; Pumpanen, Jukka; Acosta, Manuel; Urban, Otmar; Pihlatie, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Boreal forests comprise 73% of the world's coniferous forests. Based on forest floor measurements, they have been considered a significant natural sink of methane (CH4) and a natural source of nitrous oxide (N2O), both of which are important greenhouse gases. However, the role of trees, especially conifers, in ecosystem N2O and CH4 exchange is only poorly understood. We show for the first time that mature Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees consistently emit N2O and CH4 from both stems and shoots. The shoot fluxes of N2O and CH4 exceeded the stem flux rates by 16 and 41 times, respectively. Moreover, higher stem N2O and CH4 fluxes were observed from wet than from dry areas of the forest. The N2O release from boreal pine forests may thus be underestimated and the uptake of CH4 may be overestimated when ecosystem flux calculations are based solely on forest floor measurements. The contribution of pine trees to the N2O and CH4 exchange of the boreal pine forest seems to increase considerably under high soil water content, thus highlighting the urgent need to include tree-emissions in greenhouse gas emission inventories.

  18. Uptake, turnover and transport of radiocaesium in boreal forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was mainly addressed to aspects on the redistribution of the Chernobyl fallout within and output from a coniferous forest ecosystem. The only detected pathway for Cs to exit the ecosystem was via discharge from mires. About 40% of the deposition on mires discharged via stream water during the snow-melt 1986. The residual fraction discharged at an annual rate of 30% from water saturated fractions and about 2% from drier fractions of the studied mire. No loss of Cs from ridges and moraine slopes to ground water was detected. The main transfer from the canopy to the forest floor occurred during the first year. The estimated transfer from throughfall and litterfall during May 1986 to May 1996 was 50% of the estimated total deposition in the ecosystem. The contribution from herbivory was estimated to 1% of the deposition. In 1987 the fraction of Cs that was retained in the above ground parts of a Scots pine stand was only 4%. The Cs intercepted in mosses and lichens were slowly transferred to the litter and humus layers. Cs in vegetation with green parts above ground during the fallout decreased rapidly during the first vegetation season The ranking in Cs of the studied plants was fireweed 137Cs. Moose meat, berries and mushrooms produced in the boreal region will give rise to a small but significant internally absorbed dose to man during several years. 57 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs

  19. Regional-scale surface flux observations across the boreal forest during BOREAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oncley, S.P.; Lenschow, D.H.; Campos, T.L.;

    1997-01-01

    study area to the subarctic tundra. Typical midsummer, midday, large-scale net ecosystem exchanges of carbon dioxide were about -10 mu mol m(-2) s(-1) for primarily deciduous forests, about -6 mu mol m(-2) s(-1) for the primarily coniferous regions between and including the two BOREAS study areas......A major role of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Electra aircraft during the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) was to measure fluxes of momentum, sensible and latent heat, carbon dioxide, and ozone on a transect that crossed the entire boreal forest biome....... The observations spanned the growing season (late May to mid-September 1994) and extended the fluxes obtained in two intensive study areas to larger spatial scales to help provide a data set that is useful for comparison with and validation of large-scale models and satellite retrievals. We found the deciduous...

  20. Quantifying the missing link between albedo and productivity of boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovi, Aarne; Liang, Jingjing; Korhonen, Lauri; Kobayashi, Hideki; Rautiainen, Miina

    2016-04-01

    Albedo and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FAPAR) determine the shortwave radiation balance and productivity of forests. Several studies have examined the relation between forest structure and albedo in the boreal zone. Studies regarding FAPAR are fewer and the relations between albedo and FAPAR are still poorly understood. To study these relations we simulated shortwave black sky albedo and canopy FAPAR, using the FRT forest reflectance model. We used two sets of field plots as input data. The plots were located in Alaska, USA (N = 584) and in Finland (N = 506) between Northern latitudes of 60° and 68° , and they represent naturally grown and more intensively managed (regularly thinned) forests, respectively. The simulations were carried out with sun zenith angles (SZA) typical to the biome, ranging from 40° to 80° . The simulated albedos in coniferous plots decreased with increasing tree height, whereas canopy FAPAR showed an opposite trend. The albedo of broadleaved plots was notably higher than that of coniferous plots. No species differences in canopy FAPAR were seen, except for pine forests in Finland that showed lowest FAPAR among species. Albedo and canopy FAPAR were negatively correlated (r ranged from -0.93 to -0.69) in coniferous plots. The correlations were notably weaker (r ranged from -0.64 to 0.05) if plots with broadleaved trees were included. To show the influence of forest management, we further examined the response of albedo and FAPAR to forest density (basal area) and fraction of broadleaved trees. Plots with low basal area showed high albedos but also low canopy FAPAR. When comparing the sparse plots to dense ones, the relative decrease in canopy FAPAR was larger than the relative increase in albedo. However, at large SZAs the basal area could be lowered to approx. 20 m2 ha‑1 before FAPAR was notably reduced. Increasing the proportion of broadleaved trees from 0% to 100% increased the albedos to approximately

  1. Quantifying the missing link between albedo and productivity of boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovi, Aarne; Liang, Jingjing; Korhonen, Lauri; Kobayashi, Hideki; Rautiainen, Miina

    2016-04-01

    Albedo and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FAPAR) determine the shortwave radiation balance and productivity of forests. Several studies have examined the relation between forest structure and albedo in the boreal zone. Studies regarding FAPAR are fewer and the relations between albedo and FAPAR are still poorly understood. To study these relations we simulated shortwave black sky albedo and canopy FAPAR, using the FRT forest reflectance model. We used two sets of field plots as input data. The plots were located in Alaska, USA (N = 584) and in Finland (N = 506) between Northern latitudes of 60° and 68° , and they represent naturally grown and more intensively managed (regularly thinned) forests, respectively. The simulations were carried out with sun zenith angles (SZA) typical to the biome, ranging from 40° to 80° . The simulated albedos in coniferous plots decreased with increasing tree height, whereas canopy FAPAR showed an opposite trend. The albedo of broadleaved plots was notably higher than that of coniferous plots. No species differences in canopy FAPAR were seen, except for pine forests in Finland that showed lowest FAPAR among species. Albedo and canopy FAPAR were negatively correlated (r ranged from -0.93 to -0.69) in coniferous plots. The correlations were notably weaker (r ranged from -0.64 to 0.05) if plots with broadleaved trees were included. To show the influence of forest management, we further examined the response of albedo and FAPAR to forest density (basal area) and fraction of broadleaved trees. Plots with low basal area showed high albedos but also low canopy FAPAR. When comparing the sparse plots to dense ones, the relative decrease in canopy FAPAR was larger than the relative increase in albedo. However, at large SZAs the basal area could be lowered to approx. 20 m2 ha-1 before FAPAR was notably reduced. Increasing the proportion of broadleaved trees from 0% to 100% increased the albedos to approximately

  2. Invariant community structure of soil bacteria in subtropical coniferous and broadleaved forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Weixin; Shao, Yuanhu; Zou, Xiaoming; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Lixia; Wan, Songze; Rao, Xingquan; Li, Zhian; Fu, Shenglei

    2016-01-01

    Soil bacteria may be influenced by vegetation and play important roles in global carbon efflux and nutrient cycling under global changes. Coniferous and broadleaved forests are two phyletically distinct vegetation types. Soil microbial communities in these forests have been extensively investigated but few studies have presented comparable data regarding the characteristics of bacterial communities in subtropical forests. We investigated soil bacterial biomass and community composition in three pairs of coniferous and broadleaved forests across a subtropical climatic gradient. We found that bacterial biomass differed between the coniferous and broadleaved forests across the subtropical climate gradient; however, this difference disappeared at some individual sites. In contrast, the same 90 bacterial genera were found in both forest types, and their relative abundances didn't differ between the forest types, with the exception of one genus that was more abundant in broadleaved forests. Soil nitrogen or moisture was associated with bacterial groups in the coniferous and broadleaved forests, respectively. Thus, we inferred that these forests can respond differently to future changes in nitrogen deposition or precipitation. This study highlights soil bacterial invariant community composition in contrasting subtropical forests and provides a new perspective on the potential response and feedback of forests to global changes. PMID:26754326

  3. Formation, fate and leaching of chloroform in coniferous forest soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, Christian N., E-mail: calbers@ruc.dk [Dept. Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, O. Voldgade 10, DK-1350, Copenhagen (Denmark); Laier, Troels; Jacobsen, Ole S. [Dept. Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, O. Voldgade 10, DK-1350, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Chloroform may be formed in coniferous forest soil. {yields} The formed chloroform may enter the groundwater in {mu}g/L concentrations. {yields} Clear seasonal patterns in chloroform formation in soil are observed. {yields} Sorption and degradation affects the fate of chloroform in forest soil. - Abstract: Chloroform is a common groundwater pollutant but also a natural compound in forest ecosystems. Leaching of natural chloroform from forest soil to groundwater was followed by regular analysis of soil air and groundwater from multilevel wells at four different sites in Denmark for a period of up to 4 a. Significant seasonal variation in chloroform was observed in soil air 0.5 m below surface ranging at one site from 120 ppb by volume in summer to 20 ppb during winter. With depth, the seasonal variation diminished gradually, ranging from 30 ppb in summer to 20 ppb during winter, near the groundwater table. Chloroform in the shallowest groundwater ranged from 0.5-1.5 {mu}g L{sup -1} at one site to 2-5 {mu}g L{sup -1} at another site showing no clear correlation with season. Comparing changes in chloroform in soil air versus depth with on-site recorded meteorological data indicated that a clear relationship appears between rain events and leaching of chloroform. Chloroform in top soil air co-varied with CO{sub 2} given a delay of 3-4 weeks providing evidence for its biological origin. This was confirmed during laboratory incubation experiments which further located the fermentation layer as the most chloroform producing soil horizon. Sorption of chloroform to soils, examined using {sup 14}C-CHCl{sub 3}, correlated with organic matter content, being high in the upper organic rich soils and low in the deeper more minerogenic soils. The marked decrease in chloroform in soil with depth may in part be due to microbial degradation which was shown to occur at all depths by laboratory tests using {sup 14}C-CHCl{sub 3}.

  4. Effects of air pollution and simulated acid rain on the ground vegetation of coniferous forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descriptive and experimental studies on the ground vegetation of coniferous forests in Bavaria indicated the following phenomena: a. In N-limited pine forests recent eutrophication effects occur. b. The structure of the moss layer in coniferous forests sensitively reacts to very acid throughfall water (pH < 3.2). c. Oxalis acetosella is a forest herb with a relatively high Ca-demand for optimum growth and is thusly sensitive to distinct acid-caused Ca-losses in the top soil, or inhibition of Ca-uptake. (orig.)

  5. Bird communities of coniferous forests in the Acadian region: their habitat associations and responses to forest management

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report documents project activities for bird communities of coniferous forests in the Acadian Region. The objectives of this project are to: (1)...

  6. Bird communities of coniferous forests in the Acadian region: their habitat associations and responses to forest management

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual report documents project activities for bird communities of coniferous forests in the Acadian Region. The objectives of this project are to: 1 quantify...

  7. Soil fractal features of subalpine coniferous forests in western Sichuan under different anthropogenic disturbances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Yongmei; CHEN Jingsong

    2006-01-01

    Fractal theory,used to study natural figures and images with self-similarity but without characteristic lengths,offers an effective tool to investigate quantitatively the complex systems such as soil.In this paper,we have discussed about our study of the fractal features of the subalpine coniferous forests,soil particles,and microaggregates under different intensities of anthropogenic disturbances in the Miyaluo area of west Sichuan and investigated the effects of the disturbances on the forest soils attributed to different fractal dimensions.The study introduces a new way to investigate the recovery and reestablishment of subalpine coniferous forests.

  8. Input of trace substances to coniferous forests by fog interception at high elevations of Black Forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of trace substances to a coniferous forest has been estimated by means of a one-dimensional cloud droplet deposition model. For a period of 21 months the liquid water content has been measured and 89 samples of cloud water from the weather station Feldberg have been analysed for chemical composition. These data and meteorological routine observations have been used as input parameters for the deposition model. Deposition calculations to a 40 years old coniferous forest for the period 1982-1991 showed that the cloud water deposition amounts to 33% of the precipitation amount on the average and varies between 23 and 43% in single years. The highest cloud water deposition rates occur during fall and winter. The trace substance concentration in cloud water has been found to be higher than in precipitation, by a factor between 6 and 12, depending on the type of ions. Typically seasonal variations of normalized ion concentrations could be shown to exist as well as dependencies on wind direction. Air mass transport from the industries of the Stuttgart area resulted in higher trace substance concentrations in cloud water. The deposition of trace substances via fog interception during the summer months is as high and in the winter months higher than that by wet deposition. The forests at high elevations of Black Forest are charged appreciably by fog interception. (orig.). 31 figs., 5 tabs., 39 refs

  9. Carbon and Nitrogen Transformations in Surface Soils Under Ermans Birch and Dark Coniferous Forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Xiao-Wen; HAN Shi-Jie; HU Yan-Ling; ZHOU Yu-Mei

    2009-01-01

    Soil samples were taken from an Ermans birch (Betula ermanii)-dark coniferous forest (Picea jezoensis and Abies nephrolepis) ecotone growing on volcanic ejecta in the northern slopc of Changbai Mountains of Northeast China,to compare soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) transformations in the two forests.The soil type is Umbri-Gelic Cambosols in Chinese Soil Taxonomy.Soil samples were incubated aerobically at 20 ℃ and field capacity of 700 g kg-1 over a period of 27 weeks.The amount of soil microbial biomass and net N mineralization were higher in the Ermans birch than the dark coniferous forest (P<0.05),whereas the cumulative C mineralization (as CO2 emission) in the dark coniferous forest exceeded that in the Ermans birch (P<0.05).Release of the cumulative dissolved organic C and dissolved organic N were greater in the Ermans birch than the dark coniferous forest (P<0.05).The results suggested that differences of forest types could result in considerable change in soil C and N transformations.

  10. Mercury in coniferous and deciduous upland forests in northern New England, USA: implications of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J. B.; Friedland, A. J.

    2015-11-01

    Climatic changes in the northeastern US are expected to cause coniferous stands to transition to deciduous stands over the next hundred years. Mercury (Hg) sequestration in forest soils may change as a result. In order to understand potential effects of such a transition, we studied aboveground vegetation and soils at paired coniferous and deciduous stands on eight mountains in Vermont and New Hampshire, USA. Organic horizons at coniferous stands accumulated more total Hg (THg; 42 ± 6 g ha-1) than deciduous stands (30 ± 4 g ha-1). Total Hg pools in the mineral horizons were similar for coniferous (46 ± 8 g ha-1) and deciduous stands (45 ± 7 g ha-1). Soil properties (C, % clay, and pH) explained 56 % of the variation in mineral soil Hg concentration when multiply regressed. Foliar and bole wood Hg concentrations were generally greater for coniferous species than deciduous species. Using allometric equations, we estimated that aboveground accumulation of Hg in foliage and woody biomass was similar between vegetation types but that coniferous stands have significantly smaller annual litterfall fluxes (0.03 g ha-1 yr-1) than deciduous stands (0.24 g ha-1 yr-1). We conclude that organic horizon Hg accumulation is influenced by vegetation type but mineral horizon Hg accumulation is primarily controlled by soil properties. Further investigations into the effect of vegetation type on volatilization, atmospheric deposition, and leaching rates are needed to constrain regional Hg cycling rates.

  11. Antioxidant Potential of Bark Extracts from Boreal Forest Conifers

    OpenAIRE

    Jean Legault; Karl Girard-Lalancette; Dominic Dufour; André Pichette

    2013-01-01

    The bark of boreal forest conifers has been traditionally used by Native Americans to treat various ailments and diseases. Some of these diseases involve reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can be prevented by the consumption of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds that can be found in medicinal plants. In this study, ultrasonic assisted extraction has been performed under various solvent conditions (water:ethanol mixtures) on the bark of seven boreal forest conifers used by Native American...

  12. Variation in litter decomposition-temperature relationships between coniferous and broadleaf forests in Huangshan Mountain,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xing-bing; SONG Fu-qiang; ZHANG Peng; LIN Yong-hui; TIAN Xing-jun; REN Li-li; CHEN Cheng; LI Xiao-na; Tan Hai-xia

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the differences in the decompositions of leaf litter, lignin and carbohydrate between coniferous forest and broadleaf forest at 20℃ and 30℃ in Huangshan Mountain, Anhui Province, China. Results showed that at 20℃ mass loss of leaf litter driven by microbial decomposers was higher in broadleaf forest than that in coniferous forest, whereas the difference in mass loss of leaf litter was not significant at 30℃. The temperature increase did not affect the mass loss of leaf litter for coniferous forest treatment, but significantly reduced the decomposition rate for broadleaf forest treatment. The functional decomposers of microorganism in broadleaf forest produced a higher lignin decomposition rate at 20℃, compared to that in coniferous forest, but the difference in lignin decomposition was not found between two forest types at 30℃. Improved temperature increased the lignin decomposition for both broadleaf and coniferous forest. Additionally, the functional group of microorganism from broadleaf forest showed marginally higher carbohydrate loss than that from coniferous forest at both temperatures. Temperature increase reduced the carbohydrate decomposition for broadleaf forest, while only a little reduce was found for coniferous forest. Remarkable differences occurred in responses between most enzymes (Phenoloxidase, peroxidase, β-glucosidase and endocellulase) and decomposition rate of leaf litter to forest type and temperature, although there exist strong relationships between measured enzyme activities and decomposition rate in most cases. The reason is that more than one enzyme contribute to the mass loss of leaf litter and organic chemical components. In conclusion, at a community scale the coniferous and broadleaf forests differed in their temperature-decomposition relationships.

  13. Mercury in coniferous and deciduous upland forests in Northern New England, USA: implications from climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J. B.; Friedland, A. J.

    2015-07-01

    Climatic changes in the northeastern US are expected to cause coniferous stands to transition to deciduous stands over the next hundred years. Mercury (Hg) sequestration in forest soils may change as a result. In order to understand potential effects of this transition, we studied aboveground vegetation and soils at paired coniferous and deciduous stands on eight mountains in Vermont and New Hampshire, US. Organic horizons at coniferous stands accumulated more Total Hg (THg) (42 ± 6 g ha-1) than deciduous stands (30 ± 4 g ha-1). Total Hg pools in the mineral horizons were similar for coniferous (46 ± 8 g ha-1) and deciduous stands (45 ± 7 g ha-1). Soil properties (C, % clay, and pH) explained 56 % of the variation in mineral soil Hg concentration when multiple regressed. Foliar and bole wood Hg concentrations were generally greater for coniferous species than deciduous species. We estimated Hg mean residence time (MRT) in the organic and mineral horizons at coniferous and deciduous stands using a simple two-box model. Organic horizon MRT were longer at coniferous stands (183 ± 44 yr) than deciduous stands (65 ± 15 yr). Mineral soil horizon MRT values were also longer for coniferous stands (386 ± 57 yr) than for deciduous stands (188 ± 27 yr). We concluded that organic horizon Hg accumulation is influenced by vegetation type but mineral horizons are primarily affected by soil properties. Further investigations into the effect of vegetation type on volatilization, atmospheric deposition, and leaching rates are needed to constrain regional Hg cycling rates.

  14. Water holding effect of subalpine dark coniferous forest soil in Gongga Mountain, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Zhi-hua; LU Zhao-hua; GUAN Wen-bin

    2003-01-01

    Because of the distinction of soil property and humus content, soil water content is not ideal to indicate whether it is suitable to the growth of plant. Mainly based on the PF-a numerical value denoting the water regime of soil and connected with the growth of plant, the study combined the moisture percentage of soil with PF to research in quantity the interrelation between the moisture percentage and PF in different succession phases of subalpine dark coniferous forest in Gongga Mountain. The results showed that: (1) In the same PF value, the moisture percentage in humus horizon increased gradually with the development of the succession of the dark coniferous forest; The moisture percentage of over-mature forest was the highest and>mature forest>half-mature forest>young growth forest; (2) With the increase of soil depth, the soil bulk density increased and the moisture percentage decreased, but the difference in the percentage of moisture was not notable in different succession phases. (3) In different succession series, the vegetation affected the soil water characteristics by increasing the soil organic matter, improving the soil construction, receding the soil bulk density and enhancing the soil porosity; (4) The humus horizon of the dark coniferous forest soil has the highest water holding capability in this region.

  15. 中国寒温带针叶林生物多样性的研究进展%Research Progress on the Cold Temperate Coniferous Forest Biodiversity in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱道光; 曾昭文; 王继丰; 崔福星; 倪红伟

    2014-01-01

    寒温带针叶林(北方针叶林或泰加林),主要分布于高纬度地区的一种主要森林类型,是地球上第二大陆地生物群区(仅次于热带森林),不仅是全球重要的木材资源分布区,而且是全球气候变化最显著的地区之一。过整理总结大量文献的基础上,提出在全球变化较为剧烈的环境背景下,认识寒温带针叶林植被的生态学效应,掌握寒温带针叶林各个时期物种变化的演替规律,进而为科学地管理我国寒温带针叶林提供合理的建议,以保证寒温带针叶林生态系统具有较高的生物多样性和生产力,具有重要的理论和实际意义。%Cold Temperate coniferous forest (taiga or boreal forest) is the second largest land biomes on the Earth (rank only second to tropical forests ) which mainly located in the high latitude, it is not only major distribution area of timber resources all over the world, but is also one of the most obvious global climate change area. By gathering and summarizing the extensive literatures, it is proposed that ecological effects on boreal coniferous forest vegetation at the condition of the serious global environmental change, and the succession law of species changes of boreal coniferous forest during various periods, in order to provide reasonable recommendations about scientific management of boreal coniferous forest, and it has important theoretical and practical significance that ensures boreal coniferous forest ecosystems with high biodiversity and productivity.

  16. Substantial secondary organic aerosol formation in a coniferous forest: observations of both day- and nighttime chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Alex K. Y.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Li, Shao-Meng; Sjostedt, Steve J.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Liggio, John; Macdonald, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Substantial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) formation was investigated in a coniferous forest mountain region in Whistler, British Columbia. A largely biogenic aerosol growth episode was observed, providing a unique opportunity to investigate BSOA formation chemistry in a forested environment with limited influence from anthropogenic emissions. Positive matrix factorization of aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement identified two types of BSOA (BSOA-1 and BSOA...

  17. Nitrification in acid coniferous forests: Some soils do, some soils don't

    OpenAIRE

    Nugroho, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrification is a key process in the global nitrogen cycle. Ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) were long thought to be the sole microorganisms capable of autotrophic ammonia oxidation, the rate-limited step in nitrification. This thesis elucidates the relation between the presence of AOB, environmental factors and nitrification rates in the soil layer of acid coniferous forests. Especially, the question why some acid forests show nitrification while others do not, is addressed in this thesis.

  18. Habitat Requirements of Breeding Black-Backed Woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus in Managed, Unburned Boreal Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junior A. Tremblay

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated home-range characteristics and habitat selection by Black-backed Woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus in an unburned, boreal forest landscape managed by mosaic harvesting in Quebec, Canada. Habitat selection by this species was specifically examined to determine home-range establishment and foraging activities. We hypothesized that Black-backed Woodpeckers would respond to harvesting by adjusting their home-range size as a function of the amount of dead wood available. Twenty-two birds were tracked using radiotelemetry, and reliable estimates of home-range size were obtained for seven breeding individuals (six males and one female. The average home-range size was 151.5 ± 18.8 ha (range: 100.4–256.4 ha. Our results indicate that this species establishes home ranges in areas where both open and forested habitats are available. However, during foraging activities, individuals preferentially selected areas dominated by old coniferous stands. The study also showed that the spatial distribution of preferred foraging habitat patches influenced space use, with home-range area increasing with the median distance between old coniferous habitat patches available within the landscape. Finally, these data show that Black-backed Woodpeckers may successfully breed in an unburned forest with at least 35 m3 • ha-1 of dead wood, of which 42% (15 m3 • ha-1 is represented by dead wood at the early decay stage.

  19. Indirect estimations and spatial variation in leaf area index of coniferous, deciduous and mixed forest stands in Forsmark and Laxemar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two sites in Sweden are investigated for a potential deep repository of the nuclear waste, the Laxemar investigation area (57 deg 5 min N, 16 deg 7 min E) and the Forsmark investigation area (60 deg 4 min N, 18 deg 2 min E). In the characterisation of these sites, development of site descriptive models is an important part. Leaves are the main surface were an exchange of matter and energy between the atmosphere and the biosphere takes place, and leaf area index (LAI) of the vegetation cover is an important variable correlated to a number of ecophysiological parameters and hereby an important parameter in ecosystem models. In the investigation areas, LAI of boreal and temperate ecosystems were therefore estimated indirectly through optical measurements using the LAI-2000 (LI-COR, Cambridge UK) and TRAC (Tracing Radiation and Architecture of Canopies). On average, measured maximum LAI was 3.40 in Laxemar and 3.43 in Forsmark; minimum LAI was 1.65 in Laxemar and 1.97 in Forsmark. Forest inventory data showed that LAI is positively correlated with basal area, stand height, stand volume and breast height tree diameter. For the coniferous stands, there was also a linearly negative relationship with age. In the Laxemar investigation area, there were no significant relationships for LAI with a satellite derived kNN (kNearest Neighbor) data set with stand height, stand volume and stand age. The kNN data set can therefore not be used to extrapolate measured LAI over the Laxemar investigation area. There were significant relationships between LAI and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) for coniferous, deciduous and mixed forest stands in the Laxemar investigation area. A NDVI image could be used to extrapolate LAI over the entire investigation area. For the Forsmark investigation area, effective LAI for all stands were correlated to NDVI and this relationship could then be used for extrapolation. The effective LAI image was afterwards corrected for average

  20. Indirect estimations and spatial variation in leaf area index of coniferous, deciduous and mixed forest stands in Forsmark and Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Analysis, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2006-12-15

    Two sites in Sweden are investigated for a potential deep repository of the nuclear waste, the Laxemar investigation area (57 deg 5 min N, 16 deg 7 min E) and the Forsmark investigation area (60 deg 4 min N, 18 deg 2 min E). In the characterisation of these sites, development of site descriptive models is an important part. Leaves are the main surface were an exchange of matter and energy between the atmosphere and the biosphere takes place, and leaf area index (LAI) of the vegetation cover is an important variable correlated to a number of ecophysiological parameters and hereby an important parameter in ecosystem models. In the investigation areas, LAI of boreal and temperate ecosystems were therefore estimated indirectly through optical measurements using the LAI-2000 (LI-COR, Cambridge UK) and TRAC (Tracing Radiation and Architecture of Canopies). On average, measured maximum LAI was 3.40 in Laxemar and 3.43 in Forsmark; minimum LAI was 1.65 in Laxemar and 1.97 in Forsmark. Forest inventory data showed that LAI is positively correlated with basal area, stand height, stand volume and breast height tree diameter. For the coniferous stands, there was also a linearly negative relationship with age. In the Laxemar investigation area, there were no significant relationships for LAI with a satellite derived kNN (kNearest Neighbor) data set with stand height, stand volume and stand age. The kNN data set can therefore not be used to extrapolate measured LAI over the Laxemar investigation area. There were significant relationships between LAI and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) for coniferous, deciduous and mixed forest stands in the Laxemar investigation area. A NDVI image could be used to extrapolate LAI over the entire investigation area. For the Forsmark investigation area, effective LAI for all stands were correlated to NDVI and this relationship could then be used for extrapolation. The effective LAI image was afterwards corrected for average

  1. Investigations of boreal forest bidirectional reflectance factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, H. Peter

    To monitor the Earth's biosphere using satellites, remote sensing science must develop robust forest reflectance models with which to extract canopy properties such as leaf area index, biomass, and percentage canopy cover from observed canopy reflectance values. At present such algorithms are generally based on regression equations which have been derived and evaluated at localized areas of solar zenith and view angles, and incorporate a priori knowledge of the scene. Of particular interest here is the treatment of the understorey which has distinct spectral reflectance properties. Recent studies suggest this layer in the boreal ecosphere has a significant influence on the CO2 budget during the northern growing season. Previous treatments of this layer in canopy reflectance models have been limited, often treating the layer as either non-reflecting, or isotropic with the same average reflectance as the overstorey. In-field observations demonstrate that this isn't the case. The recently developed Four-Scale Model [Chen and Leblanc, 1997] provides a new description of canopy reflectance that considers four levels of canopy architecture, the distributions of tree crowns, branches, shoots, and leaves. In doing so, the four proportions of sunlit and shaded overstorey and understorey are determined and treated as relevant contributors to the overall canopy reflectance. One purpose of this study is to examine the potential of further developing this model into a linear kernel form suitable for inversion, providing both the ability to extrapolate from observed reflectance values at certain view/illumination geometries to canopy BRF at other geometries and to allow extraction of information about the canopy based on observed BRF values. The FLAIR model (F_our- Scale L_inear Kernel Model for A_ni_sotropic R_eflectance) is the result of this development, following the philosophy that the model must remain applicable to a wide range of canopy types, understorey conditions, and

  2. Estimating leaf area index in coniferous and deciduous forests in Sweden using Landsat optical sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklundh, Lars

    2003-03-01

    This paper reports on research to estimate leaf area index (LAI) in Swedish forests with satellite sensor data. The study is part of a research programme that aims at generating input data for process-oriented forest carbon models. Field-work was carried out in two areas in Sweden about 530 km apart, in the nemoral and boreo-nemoral forest regions. Various ways of estimating LAI in the field were tested, including litter-traps, allometric equations, and light transmission measurements. The capability of Landsat TM and ETM+ for LAI-mapping was investigated with the Nilson and Kuusk forest reflectance model. Results point to channel 3 and the mid-IR channels as particularly important for LAI estimation in coniferous stands, however, modelled reflectances were strongly influenced by background reflectances (particularly at low densities) and leaf optical properties. Top-of-canopy reflectances were derived from Landsat TM and ETM+, and their relationships with field-estimated LAI analysed. Among several vegetation indices tested, the Moisture Stress Index (TM5 / TM4) was one of the best indices for LAI in coniferous stands. In deciduous stands relationships based on the Simple Ratio were superior, however, the explanatory power in deciduous stands was lower than in coniferous stands.

  3. [FY 2014 progress report]: Bird Communities of Coniferous Forests in the Acadian Region: Their Responses to Management and Habitat Associations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This FY2014 progress report documents project activities for bird communities of coniferous forests in the Acadian Region. The goal of the project is to examine...

  4. [FY 2015 progress report]: Bird Communities of Coniferous Forests in the Acadian Region: Their Responses to Management and Habitat Associations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This FY2015 progress report documents project activities for bird communities of coniferous forests in the Acadian Region. The goal of the project is to examine...

  5. Forest harvest contribution to Boreal freshwater methyl mercury load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, Rose-Marie; Drott, Andreas; Jiskra, Martin; Wiederhold, Jan G.; Björn, Erik; Skyllberg, Ulf

    2016-06-01

    Effects of Boreal forest harvest on mercury (Hg) and methyl mercury (MeHg) soil pools and export by stream runoff were quantified by comparing 10 reference watersheds (REFs) covered by >80 year old Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) forests with 10 similar watersheds subjected to clear-cutting (CCs). While total Hg soil storage did not change, MeHg pools increased seven times (p = 0.006) in the organic topsoil 2 years after clear-cutting. In undulating terrain, situated above the postglacial marine limit (ML) of the ancient Baltic Sea, the mass ratio between flux-weighted MeHg and dissolved organic carbon (MeHg/DOC) in stream runoff increased 1.8 times (p forest harvest. When recalculated to 100% clear-cutting of the watershed, the annual MeHg stream export increased 3.8 times (p = 0.047). Below the ML, where the terrain was flatter, neither the MeHg/DOC ratio nor the annual export of MeHg differed between REFs and CCs, likely because of the larger contribution of MeHg exported from peaty soils and small wetlands. The most robust measure, MeHg/DOC, was used to calculate MeHg loadings to Boreal headwaters. If the forest harvest effect lasts 10 years, clear-cutting increases MeHg runoff by 12-20% in Sweden and 2% in the Boreal zone as a whole. In Sweden, having intensely managed forests, 37% and 56% of MeHg are exported from peatlands and forest soils, respectively, and forest clear-cutting is adding another 6.6%. In the Boreal zone as a whole peatlands and forests soils contribute with 53% and 46%, respectively, and clear-cutting is estimated to add another 1.0%. An expected rapid increase in Boreal forest harvest and disturbance urge for inclusion of land use effects in mercury biogeochemical cycling models at different scales.

  6. Evaluation of the importance of nonlinear spectral mixing in coniferous forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Mario R.; Ni, Wenge; Cardoso Pereira, Jose M.; Huete, Alfredo R.

    1998-12-01

    We developed a simple technique to evaluate the importance of non-linear mixing in coniferous forests with different overstory structural characteristics and different backgrounds. The methodology consists on using a hybrid forest reflectance model for reflectance simulation, and on using factor analysis and target testing for unmixing the forest reflectance into three components: a forest canopy component (free of background effects), a background component (free of canopy effects) and a background-and-canopy dependent component. This third component is considered responsible for non-linearities since it depends simultaneously on the background reflectance and on the canopy transmittance. After running the model, the contribution of the third (non-linear) component to the total forest reflectance was evaluated and compared over different forest scenarios parameterized with data collected on maritime pine stands in Central Portugal.

  7. Nitrogen balance along a boreal forest fire chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palviainen, Marjo; Pumpanen, Jukka; Berninger, Frank; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Sun, Hui; Köster, Egle; Köster, Kajar

    2016-04-01

    Fire is a major natural disturbance factor in boreal forests, and the frequency of forest fires is predicted to increase due to climate change in boreal regions. Because boreal forests comprise 30% of the global forest area, increases in the annual area burned may have significant implications for global carbon and nitrogen (N) cycles. The productivity of boreal forests is limited by low N availability. Fires cause N loss from ecosystems through oxidation and volatilization of N stored in biomass and soil. N balance may be poorly buffered against forest fires especially in sub-arctic ecosystems where atmospheric N deposition is low. Although forest fires alter N dynamics, there are little quantitative data available on N pools and fluxes through post-fire succession in sub-arctic boreal forests. We studied changes in N pools and fluxes, and the overall N balance across a 155-year forest fire chronosequence in sub-arctic Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forests in Värriö Strict Nature Reserve situated in Finnish Lapland (67°46' N, 29°35' E). Soil was the largest N pool in all forest age classes and comprised 69-82% of the total ecosystem N pool. The total ecosystem N pool varied from 622 kg ha-1 in the recently burned forest to 960 kg ha-1 in the 155-year-old forest. The forests were N sinks in all age classes the annual N accumulation rate being 2.28 kg ha-1 yr-1 which was distributed almost equally between soil and biomass. The observed changes in ecosystem N pools were consistent with the computed N balance 2.10 kg ha-1 yr-1 over the 155-year post-fire period (Balance= (atmospheric deposition + N fixation) - (leaching + N2O emissions)). The results indicated that N deposition is an important component of the N balance and the N outputs are small (13% of the inputs) in the studied ecosystems. N2O fluxes were negligible (≤ 0.01 kg ha-1 yr-1) compared to the other N fluxes. The biological N fixation increased with succession and constituted 9% of the total N

  8. Nitrogen and carbon reallocation in fungal mycelia during decomposition of boreal forest litter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna B Boberg

    Full Text Available Boreal forests are characterized by spatially heterogeneous soils with low N availability. The decomposition of coniferous litter in these systems is primarily performed by basidiomycete fungi, which often form large mycelia with a well-developed capacity to reallocate resources spatially- an advantageous trait in heterogeneous environments. In axenic microcosm systems we tested whether fungi increase their biomass production by reallocating N between Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine needles at different stages of decomposition. We estimated fungal biomass production by analysing the accumulation of the fungal cell wall compound chitin. Monospecific systems were compared with systems with interspecific interactions. We found that the fungi reallocated assimilated N and mycelial growth away from well-degraded litter towards fresh litter components. This redistribution was accompanied by reduced decomposition of older litter. Interconnection of substrates increased over-all fungal C use efficiency (i.e. the allocation of assimilated C to biomass rather than respiration, presumably by enabling fungal translocation of growth-limiting N to litter with higher C quality. Fungal connection between different substrates also restricted N-mineralization and production of dissolved organic N, suggesting that litter saprotrophs in boreal forest ecosystems primarily act to redistribute rather than release N. This spatial integration of different resource qualities was hindered by interspecific interactions, in which litters of contrasting quality were colonised by two different basidiomycete species. The experiments provide a detailed picture of how resource reallocation in two decomposer fungi leads to a more efficient utilisation of spatially separated resources under N-limitation. From an ecosystem point of view, such economic fungal behaviour could potentially contribute to organic matter accumulation in the litter layers of boreal forests.

  9. Developing a Student-Scientist Partnership: Boreal Forest Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Shannon; Huczek, George; Muir, Bradley

    1998-03-01

    A student-scientist partnership outreach program was funded by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) to involve students and teachers in scientific investigations pertinent to global change research occurring within the boreal region of Canada. Boreal Forest Watch was planned, designed and piloted by an interdisciplinary group of education and science professionals from the University of New Hampshire, the Prince Albert National Park, and several schools in central Saskatchewan, Canada. A two goal approach was adopted to 1) ensure the educational significance of the program and 2) introduce scientifically valid methods for collection of research data pertinent to global change scientists. Professional educators and school administrators from Saskatchewan were recruited to assist in project planning to ensure that the proposed activities fit within the existing curriculum framework. This process was essential for successful adoption of the program by participating teachers. The process and approach of initiating Boreal Forest Watch are presented in this paper. This program became fully functional in September, 1996 with the training of several participating teachers. Perspectives of the program and its future are provided by members of the design team. Boreal Forest Watch is a unique opportunity for both Canadian students and their teachers to explore their natural environment, learn scientific methods and principles, and contribute data to the global change research community.

  10. The Silvics of Some East European and Siberian Boreal Forest Tree Species

    OpenAIRE

    Korzukin, M.D.; Rubinina, A.E.; G. B. Bonan; Solomon, A.M.; Antonovsky, M.Y.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, the boreal forest has received increased scientific attention in light of projected climatic warming to boreal regions from increased concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The ecological consequences of such a warming could be significant. However, before the consequences of climatic change can be properly investigated, the ecology of boreal forest tree species must be adequately understood. Though the life-histories of many North American boreal forest tree species a...

  11. Adaptation and mitigation strategies in Northern Eurasian boreal forests

    OpenAIRE

    A. Shvidenko; F. Kraxner; Obersteiner, M.; D. Schepaschenko

    2011-01-01

    Boreal forests of Northern Eurasia are experiencing ongoing changes in climate, strong impacts by humans including transformation of previously untouched landscapes, and dramatically accelerating disturbance regimes. Current global and regional climatic models predict for this region the most dramatic climatic change over the globe. Unregulated and often destructive anthropogenic impacts on the environment and natural landscapes may substantially accelerate the negative consequences of climat...

  12. Resilience of Alaska's Boreal Forest to Climatic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, F. S., III; McGuire, A. D.; Ruess, R. W.; Hollingsworth, T. N.; Mack, M. C.; Johnstone, J. F.; Kasischke, E. S.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Jones, J. B.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Kielland, K.; Kofinas, G. P.; Turetsky, M. R.; Yarie, J.; Lloyd, A. H.; Taylor, D. L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the resilience of Alaska s boreal forest system to rapid climatic change. Recent warming is associated with reduced growth of dominant tree species, plant disease and insect outbreaks, warming and thawing of permafrost, drying of lakes, increased wildfire extent, increased postfire recruitment of deciduous trees, and reduced safety of hunters traveling on river ice. These changes have modified key structural features, feedbacks, and interactions in the boreal forest, including reduced effects of upland permafrost on regional hydrology, expansion of boreal forest into tundra, and amplification of climate warming because of reduced albedo (shorter winter season) and carbon release from wildfires. Other temperature-sensitive processes for which no trends have been detected include composition of plant and microbial communities, long-term landscape-scale change in carbon stocks, stream discharge, mammalian population dynamics, and river access and subsistence opportunities for rural indigenous communities. Projections of continued warming suggest that Alaska s boreal forest will undergo significant functional and structural changes within the next few decades that are unprecedented in the last 6000 years. The impact of these social ecological changes will depend in part on the extent of landscape reorganization between uplands and lowlands and on policies regulating subsistence opportunities for rural communities.

  13. Resilience of Alaska’s boreal forest to climatic change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, F.S.; McGuire, Anthony; Ruess, R.W.; Hollingsworth, Teresa N.; Mack, M.C.; Johnstone, J.F.; Kasischke, E.S.; Euskirchen, E.S.; Jones, J.B.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Kielland, K.; Kofinas, G.; Turetsky, M.R.; Yarie, J.; Lloyd, A.H.; Taylor, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the resilience of Alaska’s boreal forest system to rapid climatic change. Recent warming is associated with reduced growth of dominant tree species, plant disease and insect outbreaks, warming and thawing of permafrost, drying of lakes, increased wildfire extent, increased postfire recruitment of deciduous trees, and reduced safety of hunters traveling on river ice. These changes have modified key structural features, feedbacks, and interactions in the boreal forest, including reduced effects of upland permafrost on regional hydrology, expansion of boreal forest into tundra, and amplification of climate warming because of reduced albedo (shorter winter season) and carbon release from wildfires. Other temperature-sensitive processes for which no trends have been detected include composition of plant and microbial communities, long-term landscape-scale change in carbon stocks, stream discharge, mammalian population dynamics, and river access and subsistence opportunities for rural indigenous communities. Projections of continued warming suggest that Alaska’s boreal forest will undergo significant functional and structural changes within the next few decades that are unprecedented in the last 6000 years. The impact of these social–ecological changes will depend in part on the extent of landscape reorganization between uplands and lowlands and on policies regulating subsistence opportunities for rural communities.

  14. Forest landscape change in boreal Sweden 1850-2000

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsson, Anna-Lena

    2001-01-01

    In the project described in this thesis, structural changes that have occurred in the boreal Swedish forest during the last 150 years were studied through analysis of historical records. Historical perspectives on forest landscapes provide a better understanding of natural disturbance dynamics as well as anthropogenic changes and a frame of reference for assessing current ecological patterns and processes. The studies were performed at various spatial scales, and were conducted in two differe...

  15. Photosynthesis of ground vegetation in boreal Scots pine forests

    OpenAIRE

    Kulmala, Liisa

    2011-01-01

    Research on carbon uptake in boreal forests has mainly focused on mature trees, even though ground vegetation species are effective assimilators and can substantially contribute to the CO2 uptake of forests. Here, I examine the photosynthesis of the most common species of ground vegetation in a series of differently aged Scots pine stands, and at two clear-cut sites with substantial differences in fertility. In general, the biomass of evergreen species was highest at poor sites and below cano...

  16. Boreal forest albedo and its spatial and temporal variation

    OpenAIRE

    Kuusinen, Nea

    2014-01-01

    Surface albedo refers to the fraction of solar irradiance that is reflected by a surface. Accurate characterisation of the albedo of various land cover types is required for evaluating the energy exchange between the Earth s surface and the atmosphere. The optical and structural properties of a surface determine its albedo. Boreal forest albedo can vary due to factors such as tree species composition, forest structure, understorey vegetation composition, and seasonal changes in vegetation and...

  17. Development of biogenic VOC emission inventories for the boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, V.

    2008-07-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by vegetation, especially forests, can affect local and regional atmospheric photochemistry through their reactions with atmospheric oxidants. Their reaction products may also participate in the formation and growth of new particles which affect the radiation balance of the atmosphere, and thus climate, by scattering and absorbing shortwave and longwave radiation and by modifying the radiative properties, amount and lifetime of clouds. Globally, anthropogenic VOC emissions are far surpassed by the biogenic ones, making biogenic emission inventories an integral element in the development of efficient air quality and climate strategies. The inventories are typically constructed based on landcover information, measured emissions of different plants or vegetation types, and empirical dependencies of the emissions on environmental variables such as temperature and light. This thesis is focused on the VOC emissions from the boreal forest, the largest terrestrial biome with characteristic vegetation patterns and strong seasonality. The isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions of the most prevalent boreal tree species in Finland, Scots pine, have been measured and their seasonal variation and dependence on temperature and light have been studied. The measured emission data and other available observations of the emissions of the principal boreal trees have been used in a biogenic emission model developed for the boreal forests in Finland. The model utilizes satellite landcover information, Finnish forest classification and hourly meteorological data to calculate isoprene, monoterpene, sesquiterpene and other VOC emissions over the growing season. The principal compounds emitted by Scots pine are DELTA3-carene and alpha-pinene in the south boreal zone and alpha- and beta-pinene in the north boreal zone. The monoterpene emissions are dependent on temperature and have a clear seasonal cycle with high emissions in spring

  18. Biogenic Emissions of Light Alkenes from a Coniferous Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhew, R. C.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Martinez, L.; Shen, S.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Koss, A.; Lerner, B. M.; Miller, B. R.; Smith, J. N.; Guenther, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Alkenes are reactive hydrocarbons that play important roles in the photochemical production of tropospheric ozone and in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. The light alkenes (C2-C4) originate from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources and include C2H4 (ethene), C3H6 (propene) and C4H8 (1-butene, 2-butene, 2-methylpropene). Light alkenes are used widely as chemical feedstocks because their double bond makes them versatile for industrial reactions. Their biogenic sources are poorly characterized, with most global emissions estimates relying on laboratory-based studies; net ecosystem emissions have been measured at only one site thus far. Here we report net ecosystem fluxes of light alkenes and isoprene from a semi-arid ponderosa pine forest in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, USA. Canopy scale fluxes were measured using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) techniques on the 28-meter NCAR tower in the Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory. Updrafts and downdrafts were determined by sonic anemometry and segregated into 'up' and 'down' reservoirs over the course of an hour. Samples were then measured on two separate automated gas chromatographs (GCs). The first GC measured light hydrocarbons (C2-C6 alkanes and C2-C5 alkenes) by flame ionization detection (FID). The second GC measured halocarbons (methyl chloride, CFC-12, and HCFC-22) by electron capture detection (ECD). Additional air measurements from the top of the tower included hydrocarbons and their oxidation products by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Three field intensives were conducted during the summer of 2014. The REA flux measurements showed that ethene, propene and the butene emissions have significant diurnal cycles, with maximum emissions at midday. The light alkenes contribute significantly to the overall biogenic source of reactive hydrocarbons and have a temporal variability that may be associated with physical and biological parameters. These ecosystem scale measurements

  19. Effects of mercury deposition and coniferous forests on the mercury contamination of fish in the South Central United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenner, Ray W; Chumchal, Matthew M; Jones, Christina M; Lehmann, Christopher M B; Gay, David A; Donato, David I

    2013-02-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that is found in aquatic food webs and is hazardous to human and wildlife health. We examined the relationship between Hg deposition, land coverage by coniferous and deciduous forests, and average Hg concentrations in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)-equivalent fish (LMBE) in 14 ecoregions located within all or part of six states in the South Central U.S. In 11 ecoregions, the average Hg concentrations in 35.6-cm total length LMBE were above 300 ng/g, the threshold concentration of Hg recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the issuance of fish consumption advisories. Percent land coverage by coniferous forests within ecoregions had a significant linear relationship with average Hg concentrations in LMBE while percent land coverage by deciduous forests did not. Eighty percent of the variance in average Hg concentrations in LMBE between ecoregions could be accounted for by estimated Hg deposition after adjusting for the effects of coniferous forests. Here we show for the first time that fish from ecoregions with high atmospheric Hg pollution and coniferous forest coverage pose a significant hazard to human health. Our study suggests that models that use Hg deposition to predict Hg concentrations in fish could be improved by including the effects of coniferous forests on Hg deposition. PMID:23286301

  20. Belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities respond to liming in three southern Swedish coniferous forest stands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Rasmus; Clemmensen, Karina

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on changes in the belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in southern Swedish coniferous forests as a consequence of liming with 3-7 ton limestone per hectare 16 years prior to the study. A total of 107 ectomycorrhizal fungi were identified from 969 independently sa...... community composition. We discuss the observed community changes in relation to ectomycorrhizal functionality and biodiversity in limed forests.......In this study we report on changes in the belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in southern Swedish coniferous forests as a consequence of liming with 3-7 ton limestone per hectare 16 years prior to the study. A total of 107 ectomycorrhizal fungi were identified from 969 independently...... sampled root tips by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA. Forty, 59 and 51 species were identified in three pine and spruce forests. Within all sites only about 25% of the species overlapped between the limed and the reference areas. However, the most abundant species...

  1. [Quantitative analysis of different restoration stages during natural succession processes of subalpine dark brown coniferous forests in western Sichuan, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiang-Ming; Liu, Shi-Rong; Shi, Zuo-Min; Zhang, Yuan-Dong; Chen, Bao-Yu

    2007-08-01

    By adopting space as a substitute for time, and based on the approaches of inter-specific association, PCA and optimal division, the restoration stages of various secondary forest communities originated from the natural succession processes of bamboo-dark brown coniferous and moss-dark brown coniferous old-growth forests after clear-cut were quantified at different temporal series (20, 30, 30, 40, 50 and 160-200 years). The results showed that Betula albo-sinensis, Salix rehderiana, Acer mono, A. laxiflorum, Prunus tatsienensis, Hydrangea xanthoneura, Tilia chinensis and Salix dolia were the declining species groups with progressive restoration processes from secondary forest to mature moss and bamboo-dark brown coniferous forests, Sorbus hupehensis, S. koehneana and P. pilosiuscula were the transient species groups, and Abies faxoniana, Picea purpurea, Tsuga chinensis and P. wilsonii were the progressive species groups. During the period of 20-40 years restoration, the secondary forests were dominated by broad-leaved tree species, such as B. albo-sinensis, and the main forest types were moss--B. albo-sinensis forest and bamboo--B. albo-sinensis forest. Through 50 years natural succession, the secondary forests turned into conifer/broad-leaved mixed forest dominated by B. albo-sinensis and A. faxoniana, and the main forest types were moss--B. albo-sinensis--A. faxoniana forest and bamboo--B. albo-sinensis--A. faxoniana forest. The remained 160-200 years old coniferous forests without cutting were dominated by old-growth stage A. faxoniana, and the main forest types were moss--A. faxoniana forest and bamboo--A. faxoniana forest.

  2. Nutrient and Litter Patterns in Three Subalpine Coniferous Forests of Western Sichuan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Bo; LIU Qing; WU Yan; HE Hai

    2006-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to quantify litterfall, and litter and nutrient accumulation in forest floor, and to acquire information on litter decomposition and nitrogen and phosphorus-release patterns in three different subalpine coniferous forests, a plantation (Pl), a secondary forest (SF), and a primitive forest (PF), in western Sichuan, China. The litter trap method was used to evaluate litterfall with the litterbag method being utilized for litterdecomposition. Seasonal patterns of litterfall were similar in the three forests, with two peaks occurring in September-November and March-May. The plantation revealed an annual litterfall of 4.38 × 103 kg ha-1, which was similar to those of SF and PF, but Pl had a lower mass loss rate and a higher C/N ratio. The C/N ratio may be a sound predictor for the decomposition differences. N concentrations of leaf litter in both the secondary forest and primitive forest increased first and then decreased, and the percentages of their final/initial values were 108.9% and 99.9%, respectively. P concentration in the three forests increased by the end of the study. The results of litterfall and decomposition indicated that in the plantation the potential to provide nutrients for soil organic matter was similar to those of SF and PF; however, its slower decomposition rate could result in a somewhat transient accumulation of litter in the forest floor.

  3. Susceptible conditions for debarking by deer in subalpine coniferous forests in central Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hayato Iijima; Takuo Nagaike

    2016-01-01

    Background:Recently, deer have expanded their distribution to higher altitude ranges including subalpine forests. However, culling deer and construction of deer fence in subalpine forests are difficult because of steep slopes and complex topography. Thus it is necessary to clarify the factors which are associated with debarking by deer for the effective protection of subalpine forests. In this study, we examined which factors are associated with debarking by sika deer (Cervus nippon) in subalpine coniferous forests. Methods:We conducted our survey in Minami-Alps National Park, central Japan. We established 24 10 m × 40 m plots and surveyed the occurrence of debarking on saplings>30 cm in height and3 cm in DBH, as well as sapling density within each plot. Minimum distances to nearest grassland of plots were calculated (tentatively assuming grassland would attract deer and would cause high debarking pressure in the surrounding subalpine forests). Results:The mean percentage of debarked live saplings was higher than that of live trees. The mean percentage of debarked saplings which had already died was 81.6 %. Debarking of saplings increased with lower elevation, taller sapling size, and marginally increased near grassland. Sapling density was lower in plots with low basal area of conspecific trees near grassland and differed among species. Sapling density marginally decreased with decreasing elevation and increasing stand tree density. Debarking of trees was positively related to small DBH and low elevation, and marginally increased near grassland and differed among species. Conclusions:Our results suggest that tall saplings in subalpine forests of low elevation or near subalpine grassland were susceptible to debarking by deer and monitoring of these areas may permit the early detection of the impacts of deer in subalpine coniferous forests.

  4. Global estimates of boreal forest carbon stocks and flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Corey J. A.; Warkentin, Ian G.

    2015-05-01

    The boreal ecosystem is an important global reservoir of stored carbon and a haven for diverse biological communities. The natural disturbance dynamics there have historically been driven by fire and insects, with human-mediated disturbances increasing faster than in other biomes globally. Previous research on the total boreal carbon stock and predictions of its future flux reveal high uncertainty in regional patterns. We reviewed and standardised this extensive body of quantitative literature to provide the most up-to-date and comprehensive estimates of the global carbon balance in the boreal forest. We also compiled century-scale predictions of the carbon budget flux. Our review and standardisation confirmed high uncertainty in the available data, but there is evidence that the region's total carbon stock has been underestimated. We found a total carbon store of 367.3 to 1715.8 Pg (1015 g), the mid-point of which (1095 Pg) is between 1.3 and 3.8 times larger than any previous mean estimates. Most boreal carbon resides in its soils and peatlands, although estimates are highly uncertain. We found evidence that the region might become a net carbon source following a reduction in carbon uptake rate from at least the 1980s. Given that the boreal potentially constitutes the largest terrestrial carbon source in the world, in one of the most rapidly warming parts of the globe (Walsh, 2014), how we manage these stocks will be influential on future climate dynamics.

  5. Relationship of Thematic Mapper simulator data to leaf area index of temperate coniferous forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David L.; Spanner, Michael A.; Running, Steven W.; Teuber, Kurt B.

    1987-01-01

    Regional relationships between remote sensing data and the leaf area index (LAI) of coniferous forests were analyzed using data acquired by an Airborne Thematic Mapper. Eighteen coniferous forest stands with a range of projected leaf area index of 0.6-16.1 were sampled from an environmental gradient in moisture and temperature across west-central Oregon. Spectral radiance measurements to account for atmospheric effects were acquired above the canopies from a radiometer mounted on a helicopter. A strong positive relationship was observed between LAI of closed canopy forest stands and the ratio of near-infrared and red spectral bands. A linear regression based on LAI explained 83 percent of the variation in the ratio of the atmospherically corrected bands. A log-linear equation fit the asymptotic characteristic of the relationship better, explaining 91 percent of the variance. The positive relationship is explained by a strong asymptotic inverse relationship between LAI and red radiation and a relatively flat response between LAI and near-infrared radiation.

  6. Effects of boreal forest vegetation on global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, Gordon B.; Pollard, David; Thompson, Starley L.

    1992-10-01

    TERRESTRIAL ecosystems are thought to play an important role in determining regional and global climate1-6 one example of this is in Amazonia, where destruction of the tropical rainforest leads to warmer and drier conditions4-6. Boreal forest ecosystems may also affect climate. As temperatures rise, the amount of continental and oceanic snow and ice is reduced, so the land and ocean surfaces absorb greater amounts of solar radiation, reinforcing the warming in a 'snow/ice/albedo' feedback which results in large climate sensitivity to radiative forcings7-9. This sensitivity is moderated, however, by the presence of trees in northern latitudes, which mask the high reflectance of snow10,11, leading to warmer winter temperatures than if trees were not present12-14. Here we present results from a global climate model which show that the boreal forest warms both winter and summer air temperatures, relative to simulations in which the forest is replaced with bare ground or tundra vegetation. Our results suggest that future redistributions of boreal forest and tundra vegetation (due, for example, to extensive logging, or the influence of global warming) could initiate important climate feedbacks, which could also extend to lower latitudes.

  7. Energy balance of a sparse coniferous high-latitude forest under winter conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, E.; Bruin, H.A.R. de

    2001-01-01

    . Measurements of the global radiation (direct plus diffuse incoming shortwave radiation) above the forest revealed a considerable attenuation of the global radiation at low solar elevation. A relation for the atmospheric turbidity as function of the solar elevation angle is suggested. The global radiation......Measurements carried out in Northern Finland on radiation and turbulent fluxes over a sparse, sub-arctic boreal forest with snow covered ground were analysed. The measurements represent late winter conditions characterised by low solar elevation angles. During the experiment (12-24 March 1997) day...... and night were about equally long. At low solar elevation angles the forest shades most of the snow surface. Therefore an important part of the radiation never reaches the snow surface but is absorbed by the forest. The sensible heat flux above the forest was fairly large, reaching more than 100 W m(-2...

  8. Soil CO2 efflux among four coniferous forest types of Kashmir Himalaya, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Javid Ahmad; Ganie, Khursheed Ahmad; Sundarapandian, Somaiah

    2015-11-01

    Soil CO2 efflux was measured in four different coniferous forest types (Cedrus deodara (CD), Pinus wallichiana (PW), mixed coniferous (MC), and Abies pindrow (AP)) for a period of 2 years (April 2012 to December 2013). The monthly soil CO2 efflux ranged from 0.8 to 4.1 μmoles CO2 m(-2) s(-1) in 2012 and 1.01 to 5.48 μmoles CO2 m(-2) s(-1) in 2013. The soil CO2 efflux rate was highest in PW forest type in both the years, while it was lowest in MC and CD forest types during 2012 and 2013, respectively. Soil temperature (TS) at a depth of 10 cm ranged from 3.8 to 19.4 °C in 2012 and 3.5 to 19.1 °C in 2013 in all the four forest types. Soil moisture (MS) ranged from 19.8 to 58.6% in 2012 and 18.5 to 58.6% in 2013. Soil CO2 efflux rate was found to be significantly higher in summer than the other seasons and least during winter. Soil CO2 efflux showed a significant positive relationship with TS (R2=0.52 to 0.74), SOC% (R2=0.67), pH (R2=0.68), and shrub biomass (R2=0.51), whereas, only a weak positive relationship was found with soil moisture (R2=0.16 to 0.41), tree density (R2=0.25), tree basal area (R2=0.01), tree biomass (R2=0.07), herb biomass (R2=0.01), and forest floor litter (R2=0.02). Thus, the study indicates that soil CO2 efflux in high mountainous areas is greatly influenced by seasons, soil temperature, and other environmental factors. PMID:26514798

  9. Soil CO2 efflux among four coniferous forest types of Kashmir Himalaya, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Javid Ahmad; Ganie, Khursheed Ahmad; Sundarapandian, Somaiah

    2015-11-01

    Soil CO2 efflux was measured in four different coniferous forest types (Cedrus deodara (CD), Pinus wallichiana (PW), mixed coniferous (MC), and Abies pindrow (AP)) for a period of 2 years (April 2012 to December 2013). The monthly soil CO2 efflux ranged from 0.8 to 4.1 μmoles CO2 m(-2) s(-1) in 2012 and 1.01 to 5.48 μmoles CO2 m(-2) s(-1) in 2013. The soil CO2 efflux rate was highest in PW forest type in both the years, while it was lowest in MC and CD forest types during 2012 and 2013, respectively. Soil temperature (TS) at a depth of 10 cm ranged from 3.8 to 19.4 °C in 2012 and 3.5 to 19.1 °C in 2013 in all the four forest types. Soil moisture (MS) ranged from 19.8 to 58.6% in 2012 and 18.5 to 58.6% in 2013. Soil CO2 efflux rate was found to be significantly higher in summer than the other seasons and least during winter. Soil CO2 efflux showed a significant positive relationship with TS (R2=0.52 to 0.74), SOC% (R2=0.67), pH (R2=0.68), and shrub biomass (R2=0.51), whereas, only a weak positive relationship was found with soil moisture (R2=0.16 to 0.41), tree density (R2=0.25), tree basal area (R2=0.01), tree biomass (R2=0.07), herb biomass (R2=0.01), and forest floor litter (R2=0.02). Thus, the study indicates that soil CO2 efflux in high mountainous areas is greatly influenced by seasons, soil temperature, and other environmental factors.

  10. The fate of airborne lead pollution in boreal forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    Klaminder, Jonatan

    2005-01-01

    Lead has a more than three-millennia-long pollution history in Europe. Metal production, burning of coal and use of leaded petrol resulted in a significant pollution of the atmosphere. As a consequence of atmospheric fallout, the Swedish boreal forest is strongly contaminated by airborne lead pollution. High levels of lead in the soil and soil pore water are of concern because the soil fauna, plants and aquatic biota may respond negatively to this toxic element. The fate of the accumulated po...

  11. Significant and persistent impact of timber harvesting on soil microbial communities in Northern coniferous forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Martin; Howes, Charles G; VanInsberghe, David; Yu, Hang; Bachar, Dipankar; Christen, Richard; Henrik Nilsson, Rolf; Hallam, Steven J; Mohn, William W

    2012-12-01

    Forest ecosystems have integral roles in climate stability, biodiversity and economic development. Soil stewardship is essential for sustainable forest management. Organic matter (OM) removal and soil compaction are key disturbances associated with forest harvesting, but their impacts on forest ecosystems are not well understood. Because microbiological processes regulate soil ecology and biogeochemistry, microbial community structure might serve as indicator of forest ecosystem status, revealing changes in nutrient and energy flow patterns before they have irreversible effects on long-term soil productivity. We applied massively parallel pyrosequencing of over 4.6 million ribosomal marker sequences to assess the impact of OM removal and soil compaction on bacterial and fungal communities in a field experiment replicated at six forest sites in British Columbia, Canada. More than a decade after harvesting, diversity and structure of soil bacterial and fungal communities remained significantly altered by harvesting disturbances, with individual taxonomic groups responding differentially to varied levels of the disturbances. Plant symbionts, like ectomycorrhizal fungi, and saprobic taxa, such as ascomycetes and actinomycetes, were among the most sensitive to harvesting disturbances. Given their significant ecological roles in forest development, the fate of these taxa might be critical for sustainability of forest ecosystems. Although abundant bacterial populations were ubiquitous, abundant fungal populations often revealed a patchy distribution, consistent with their higher sensitivity to the examined soil disturbances. These results establish a comprehensive inventory of bacterial and fungal community composition in northern coniferous forests and demonstrate the long-term response of their structure to key disturbances associated with forest harvesting. PMID:22855212

  12. Effects of ground fires on element dynamics in mountainous coniferous forest in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Näthe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances such as fires are a natural phenomenon of forested ecosystems, having a different impact on (micro- climate (e.g. emissions of gases and aerosols, ecology (destruction of flora and fauna and nutrient cycles especially in the soils. Forest fires alter the spatial distribution (forest floor vs. mineral soil, binding forms (organic vs. inorganic and availability (water solubility of organic substances and nutrients. The effects of fires on chemical, biological and physical soil properties in forested ecosystems have been intensively studied in the last decades, especially in the Mediterranean area and North America. However, differences in fire intensity, forest type (species, age and location (climate, geological substrate, nutrient status lead to divergent results. Furthermore, only a few case studies focused on the effects of ground fires in hilly landscapes, on the vertical and lateral water-driven fluxes of elements (C, N, nutrients, as well as on the input of fire-released terrestrial nutrients into aquatic ecosystems. Thus, this study will evaluate the effects of low-severity fires on nutrient cycling in a coniferous forest in a hilly landscape connected to an aquatic system. At three spatially independent sites three paired plots (control and manipulated were chosen at a forested site in Thuringia, Germany. All plots are similar in the vegetation cover and pedogenetic properties.In relation to control sites, this study will examine the effects of low-severity fires on:a the mobilization of organic carbon and nutrients (released from ash material and the forest floor via leachate and erosion paths,b the binding form (inorganic/organic of elements and organic compounds, and c the particle size fraction (DOM/POM of elements and organic compounds.The goal of this study is a better understanding of the impact of forest fires on element cycling and release in a hilly landscape connected to an aquatic system, supposedly driven by

  13. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010: an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site in 2010 were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow than in the other years studied. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce; mixed forest (Birch and conifers; and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen; indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO, urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2 and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes. None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

  14. The summertime Boreal forest field measurement intensive (HUMPPA-COPEC-2010: an overview of meteorological and chemical influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the background, instrumentation, goals, and the regional influences on the HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field measurement campaign, conducted at the Boreal forest research station SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relation in Hyytiälä, Finland from 12 July–12 August 2010. The prevailing meteorological conditions during the campaign are examined and contrasted with those of the past six years. Back trajectory analyses show that meteorological conditions at the site were characterized by a higher proportion of southerly flow. As a result the summer of 2010 was anomalously warm and high in ozone making the campaign relevant for the analysis of possible future climates. A comprehensive land use analysis, provided on both 5 and 50 km scales, shows that the main vegetation types surrounding the site on both the regional and local scales are: coniferous forest (Scots pine and/or Norway spruce; mixed forest (Birch and conifers; and woodland scrub (e.g. Willows, Aspen; indicating that the campaign results can be taken as representative of the Boreal forest ecosystem. In addition to the influence of biogenic emissions, the measurement site was occasionally impacted by sources other than vegetation. Specific tracers have been used here to identify the time periods when such sources have impacted the site namely: biomass burning (acetonitrile and CO, urban anthropogenic pollution (pentane and SO2 and the nearby Korkeakoski sawmill (enantiomeric ratio of chiral monoterpenes. None of these sources dominated the study period, allowing the Boreal forest summertime emissions to be assessed and contrasted with various other source signatures.

  15. Climatic factors and reindeer grazing -- the effects on soil carbon dynamics in subarctic boreal pine forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Kajar; Köster, Egle; Berninger, Frank; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2016-04-01

    Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L.) are the most important large mammalian herbivores in the northern ecosystems, affecting plant diversity, soil nutrient cycling and soil organic matter decomposition. Changes caused by reindeer in vegetation have indirect effects on physical features of the soil e.g. soil microclimate, root biomass and also on soil carbon dynamics. In a field experiment in Finnish Lapland, Värriö Strict Nature Reserve (67° 46' N, 29° 35' E) we investigated how the reindeer grazing in subarctic boreal forest combined with climate (air temperature and precipitation) affects soil temperature, soil water content, and ultimately the CO2 efflux from forest soils. The study was carried out in the growing seasons of the years 2013 and 2014, where 2013 was an extremely dry year (specially the summer), and the year 2014 was a "normal" year in means of precipitations. Our study areas are located in the northern boreal subarctic coniferous forest at the zone of the last intact forest landscapes in Fennoscandia, where large areas of relatively undisturbed subarctic Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests can still be found. We established the experiment as a split plot experiment with 2 blocks and 5 sub-plots per treatment that were divided into grazed and non-grazed parts, separated with a fence. The sample plots are located along the borderline between Finland and Russia, where the ungrazed area was excluded from reindeer already in 1918, to prevent the Finnish reindeer from going to the Russian side and there are not many reindeer on Russian side of the area. Our study showed that in subarctic mature pine forests, soil temperatures were higher, and soil water content was fluctuating more on grazed areas compared to non-grazed areas in both years. In both years, the soil water content on the grazed area was highest in June. The situation changed somewhere in the second half of July when the moisture content in the non-grazed area was higher. We found

  16. Improving winter leaf area index estimation in coniferous forests and its significance in estimating the land surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Chen, Jing M.; Pavlic, Goran; Arain, Altaf

    2016-09-01

    Winter leaf area index (LAI) of evergreen coniferous forests exerts strong control on the interception of snow, snowmelt and energy balance. Simulation of winter LAI and associated winter processes in land surface models is challenging. Retrieving winter LAI from remote sensing data is difficult due to cloud contamination, poor illumination, lower solar elevation and higher radiation reflection by snow background. Underestimated winter LAI in evergreen coniferous forests is one of the major issues limiting the application of current remote sensing LAI products. It has not been fully addressed in past studies in the literature. In this study, we used needle lifespan to correct winter LAI in a remote sensing product developed by the University of Toronto. For the validation purpose, the corrected winter LAI was then used to calculate land surface albedo at five FLUXNET coniferous forests in Canada. The RMSE and bias values for estimated albedo were 0.05 and 0.011, respectively, for all sites. The albedo map over coniferous forests across Canada produced with corrected winter LAI showed much better agreement with the GLASS (Global LAnd Surface Satellites) albedo product than the one produced with uncorrected winter LAI. The results revealed that the corrected winter LAI yielded much greater accuracy in simulating land surface albedo, making the new LAI product an improvement over the original one. Our study will help to increase the usability of remote sensing LAI products in land surface energy budget modeling.

  17. Recent pollen spectra from the deciduous and coniferous-deciduous forests of Northeastern Minnesota: a study in pollen dispersal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, C.R.

    1966-01-01

    Pollen samples were taken along nine transects across local vegetational belts bordering bogs or ponds in overall deciduous and coniferous-deciduous forest regions. Three types of pollen rain are distinguished: local, extralocal, and regional. Local pollen rain is derived from plants that grow at or

  18. Climate-Induced Boreal Forest Change: Predictions versus Current Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, Amber J.; Tchebakova, Nadezda M.; French, Nancy H. F.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Shugart, Herman H.; Stocks, Brian J.; Sukhinin, Anatoly I.; Parfenova, E. I.; Chapin, F. Stuart, III; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    For about three decades, there have been many predictions of the potential ecological response in boreal regions to the currently warmer conditions. In essence, a widespread, naturally occurring experiment has been conducted over time. In this paper, we describe previously modeled predictions of ecological change in boreal Alaska, Canada and Russia, and then we investigate potential evidence of current climate-induced change. For instance, ecological models have suggested that warming will induce the northern and upslope migration of the treeline and an alteration in the current mosaic structure of boreal forests. We present evidence of the migration of keystone ecosystems in the upland and lowland treeline of mountainous regions across southern Siberia. Ecological models have also predicted a moisture-stress-related dieback in white spruce trees in Alaska, and current investigations show that as temperatures increase, white spruce tree growth is declining. Additionally, it was suggested that increases in infestation and wildfire disturbance would be catalysts that precipitate the alteration of the current mosaic forest composition. In Siberia, five of the last seven years have resulted in extreme fire seasons, and extreme fire years have also been more frequent in both Alaska and Canada. In addition, Alaska has experienced extreme and geographically expansive multi-year outbreaks of the spruce beetle, which had been previously limited by the cold, moist environment. We suggest that there is substantial evidence throughout the circumboreal region to conclude that the biosphere within the boreal terrestrial environment has already responded to the transient effects of climate change. Additionally, temperature increases and warming-induced change are progressing faster than had been predicted in some regions, suggesting a potential non-linear rapid response to changes in climate, as opposed to the predicted slow linear response to climate change.

  19. Transient structures of wave patterns arising in the wave regeneration of subalpine coniferous forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Shin-Ichi

    2001-12-01

    In wave-regeneration phenomena observed in the subalpine coniferous forests, mainly consisting of Abies species, the blighted forests present various shapes in the course of development, spots at the initial stage turning into arches and finally into long whitish stripes. Because the wave-regeneration could not be followed in the field without long term studies, a simple model has been elaborated to simulate the various different dieback structures observed in the real forests. This model, based on cellular automata, is employed to analyze the power spectral density of canopy tree height fluctuations in the wave-regenerated forests. The results demonstrate that almost all the dieback structures observed in the field can be generated by this simple model, by varying the wind direction and its strength by some stochasticity. The power spectrum density presents various shapes in the course of development, white noise type at the initial stage turning into Lorentz type and finally into 1/f type power spectrum (spatial Fourier frequency).

  20. Mirror image hydrocarbons from Tropical and Boreal forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpenes, emitted in large quantities by trees to attract pollinators and repel herbivores, can exist in mirror image forms called enantiomers. In this study such enantiomeric pairs have been measured in ambient air over extensive forest ecosystems in South America and northern Europe. For the dominant monoterpene, α-pinene, the (−-form was measured in large excess over the (+-form over the Tropical rainforest, whereas the reverse was observed over the Boreal forest. Interestingly, over the Tropical forest (−-α-pinene did not correlate with its own enantiomer, but correlated well with isoprene. The results indicate a remarkable ecosystem scale enantiomeric fingerprint and a nexus between the biosphere and atmosphere.

  1. Using a LIDAR Vegetation Model to Predict UHF SAR Attenuation in Coniferous Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Swanson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Attenuation of radar signals by vegetation can be a problem for target detection and GPS reception, and is an important parameter in models describing vegetation backscatter. Here we first present a model describing the 3D distribution of stem and foliage structure based on small footprint scanning LIDAR data. Secondly we present a model that uses ray-tracing methodology to record detailed interactions between simulated radar beams and vegetation components. These interactions are combined over the SAR aperture and used to predict two-way attenuation of the SAR signal. Accuracy of the model is demonstrated using UHF SAR observations of large trihedral corner reflectors in coniferous forest stands. Our study showed that the model explains between 66% and 81% of the variability in observed attenuation.

  2. Recent burning of boreal forests exceeds fire regime limits of the past 10,000 years

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Ryan; Chipman, Melissa L.; Philip E Higuera; Stefanova, Ivanka; Brubaker, Linda B.; Hu, Feng Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire activity in boreal forests is anticipated to increase dramatically, with far-reaching ecological and socioeconomic consequences. Paleorecords are indispensible for elucidating boreal fire regime dynamics under changing climate, because fire return intervals and successional cycles in these ecosystems occur over decadal to centennial timescales. We present charcoal records from 14 lakes in the Yukon Flats of interior Alaska, one of the most flammable ecoregions of the boreal forest bi...

  3. A comparative study on radiocaesium (137Cs) uptake from coniferous forest soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocaesium (137Cs) uptake from a coniferous forest ecosystem with soil characterized by a high fraction of organic matter and low pH was studied using sheep's fescue (Festuca ovina) as indicator in a pot experiment and compared with bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), and heather (Calluna vulgaris) taken from an area of coniferous forest. Results obtained on an average basis showed a slight variation within 137Cs uptake values in all tested plants. Based upon the soil-plant relationship (Bq kg−1 plant DM/Bq kg−1 soil DM), 137Cs transfer factors (TF) were calculated. Sheep's fescue TF in the two harvests (growing periods of 13 weeks each) ranged from 0.03 to 3.45, with a mean of 0.35 ± 0.42. Field plants showed higher 137Cs TF when compared with sheep's fescue. Bilberry TF ranged from 0.28 to 2.30, with a mean of 0.85 ± 0.49. Lingonberry TF ranged from 0.57 to 4.46 with a mean of 1.35 ± 0.78. Heather TF ranged from 1.80 to 8.89 with a mean of 3.31 ± 1.53. Radiocaesium transfer coefficients (TC, Bq kg−1 plant DM/Bq m−2) of field plants were also calculated. Heather 137Cs TC was the highest among all tested plants and ranged from 0.38 to 0.64 with a mean of 0.49 ± 0.05. The results demonstrated that 137Cs transfer parameters of pot experiment with sheep's fescue show no significant differences between the obtained transfer factors, using soils from bilberry, lingonberry, and heather sites. (author)

  4. A comparative study on radiocaesium (137Cs) uptake from coniferous forest soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocaesium (137Cs) uptake from a coniferous forest ecosystem with soil characterized by a high fraction of organic matter and low pH was studied using sheep's fescue (Festuca ovina) as indicator in a pot experiment and compared with bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), and heather (Calluna vulgaris) taken from an area of coniferous forest. Results obtained on an average basis showed a slight variation within 137Cs uptake values in all tested plants. Based upon the soil-plant relationship (Bq kg-1 plant DM/Bq kg-1 soil DM), 137Cs transfer factors (TF) were calculated. Sheep's fescue TF in the two harvests (growing periods of 13 weeks each) ranged from 0.03 to 3.45, with a mean of 0.35 ± 0.42. Field plants showed higher 137Cs TF when compared with sheep's fescue. Bilberry TF ranged from 0.28 to 2.30, with a mean of 0.85 ± 0.49. Lingonberry TF ranged from 0.57 to 4.46 with a mean of 1.35 ± 0.78. Heather TF ranged from 1.80 to 8.89 with a mean of 3.31 ± 1.53. Radiocaesium transfer coefficients (TC, Bq kg-1 plant DM/Bq m-2) of field plants were also calculated. Heather 137Cs TC was the highest among all tested plants and ranged from 0.38 to 0.64 with a mean of 0.49 ± 0.05. The results demonstrated that 137Cs transfer parameters of pot experiment with sheep's fescue show no significant differences between the obtained transfer factors, using soils from bilberry, lingonberry, and heather sites. (author)

  5. The influence of storm-induced microsites to tree regeneration patterns in boreal and hemiboreal forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vodde, F.; Jogiste, K.; Kubota, Y.; Kuuluvainen, T.; Koster, K.; Lukjanova, A.; Metslaid, M.; Yoshida, T.

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed studies dealing with regeneration under variable conditions in boreal and hemiboreal forests as affected by different microsite types by tree species functional groups. Generally, the importance of storm-induced microsites for regeneration dynamics in boreal forests depends on several fa

  6. Monitoring of Chernobyl fallout 137Cs in semi-natural coniferous forest of central Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring the behaviour of 137Cs in semi-natural coniferous forest ecosystem of central Sweden was investigated between 1990 and 1994. Results demonstrated that soil in the area of study is thin layer characterised with high organic matter fraction and acidic pH. Most of Chernobyl fallout deposited 137Cs retained in the upper 5 cm with venial migration into deeper layers of soil profile The activity concentration of 137Cs in the dominant plants showed some variation, which presumed to be due to high variations in the different soil parameters and species-specificity of plants in 137Cs uptake. Fractionation of soil bound 137Cs using sequential extracted procedure predicted that easily extractable 137Cs fraction that includes water soluble and NH4OAc exchangeable comprises ∼25% of total soil radiocaesium inventory in the upper 5 cm layer of forest soil. These fractions, represent the soil mobile 137Cs in the forest ecosystem. About 37% of total forest soil 137Cs inventory could be accounted for soil organically bound 137Cs that include oxidizable and acid digestible organic matter. These fractions require a long term big-degradation process by soil micro-organisms, before becoming available for plant uptake. More over a substantial fraction Of 137Cs was firmly bound onto soil compartments of organic and/or mineral nature as a residual (36%). This means that binding processes of 137Cs onto humic forest soil with high fraction of organic matter and acidic reaction is time dependent. The most distinguished soil parameters that might influenced 137Cs transfer to and/or uptake by natural plants in the area of study were soil OM%, and soil pH. Soil biological activity might also be considered, (although it was not determined in this study). The long term 137Cs availability in this type of forest soil must be related to the organically bound 137Cs fractions. (author)

  7. Substantial secondary organic aerosol formation in a coniferous forest: observations of both day- and nighttime chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alex K. Y.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Li, Shao-Meng; Sjostedt, Steve J.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Liggio, John; Macdonald, Anne Marie

    2016-06-01

    Substantial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) formation was investigated in a coniferous forest mountain region in Whistler, British Columbia. A largely biogenic aerosol growth episode was observed, providing a unique opportunity to investigate BSOA formation chemistry in a forested environment with limited influence from anthropogenic emissions. Positive matrix factorization of aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) measurement identified two types of BSOA (BSOA-1 and BSOA-2), which were primarily generated by gas-phase oxidation of monoterpenes and perhaps sesquiterpenes. The temporal variations of BSOA-1 and BSOA-2 can be explained by gas-particle partitioning in response to ambient temperature and the relative importance of different oxidation mechanisms between day and night. While BSOA-1 arises from gas-phase ozonolysis and nitrate radical chemistry at night, BSOA-2 is likely less volatile than BSOA-1 and consists of products formed via gas-phase oxidation by OH radical and ozone during the day. Organic nitrates produced through nitrate radical chemistry can account for 22-33 % of BSOA-1 mass at night. The mass spectra of BSOA-1 and BSOA-2 have higher values of the mass fraction of m/z 91 (f91) compared to the background organic aerosol. Using f91 to evaluate BSOA formation pathways in this unpolluted, forested region, heterogeneous oxidation of BSOA-1 is a minor production pathway of BSOA-2.

  8. Fractionation of caesium (137Cs) in coniferous forest soil in central Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequential extraction procedure (SEP) was applied for fractionation of Chernobyl fallout 137Cs bound onto soils of a coniferous forest ecosystem located in central Sweden. Results of sequentially extracted 137Cs fractions demonstrated that 8% (mean value) of the total deposited 137Cs was water soluble (F1) and 13% was NH4OAc extractable (F2). Oxidation of F2 residuals by H2O2 led to a release of 15% of soil-bound 137Cs (F3). Acid digestion of F3 residuals showed a possibility of releasing an extra amount of soil-bound 137Cs, 22% of the total soil 137Cs inventory (F4). These two fractions (F3 and F4) include strongly bound 137Cs that seems to require longer biodegradation processes by soil microflora and microfauna before becoming available for uptake by plants and fungi. More than 37% of the total soil 137Cs inventory was bound onto soil residuals in a non-extractable form that includes slowly degradable organic matter and other soil residual compartments. The distribution coefficient (Kd) was rather low and shows an inverse relation with the increase of percentage of soil organic matter, which indicates a week binding of 137Cs onto forest soil. In contrast, chemical fractionation of soil bound 137Cs showed a substantial fraction of 137Cs was strongly bound onto soil as organically bound 137Cs. Apparently, the binding processes of radiocaesium onto forest soil seems to be time dependent

  9. Trichloromethyl compounds--natural background concentrations and fates within and below coniferous forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Christian Nyrop; Hansen, Poul Erik; Jacobsen, Ole Stig

    2010-11-15

    Pollution with organochlorines has received major attention due to various environmental effects, but it is now increasingly recognized, that they also take part in biogeochemical cycles and that natural background concentrations exist for several chlorinated compounds. We here report the natural occurrence and cycling of organic compounds with a trichloromethyl moiety in common. The study areas are temperate coniferous forests. Trichloromethyl compounds can be found in all compartments of the forests (groundwater, soil, vegetation and throughfall), but not all compounds in all compartments. The atmospheric input of trichloromethyl compounds is found to be minor, with significant contributions for trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), only. In top soil, where the formation of the compounds is expected to occur, there is a clear positive relationship between chloroform and trichloroacetyl containing compounds. Other positive relations occur, which in combination with chlorination experiments performed in the laboratory, point to the fact that all the trichloromethyl compounds may be formed concurrently in the soil, and their subsequent fates then differ due to different physical, chemical and biological properties. TCAA cannot be detected in soil and groundwater, but sorption and mineralization experiments performed in the laboratory in combination with analyses of vegetation, show that TCAA is probably formed in the top soil and then partly taken up by the vegetation and partly mineralized in the soil. Based on this and previous studies, a conceptual model for the natural cycling of trichloromethyl compounds in forests is proposed.

  10. Forest-climate feedbacks mediated through fire in the Eastern boreal forests of Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, P. Y.; Girardin, M. P.; Desjardins, R. L.; Gauthier, S.; Karimi-Zindashty, Y.; Worth, D.; Beaudoin, A.; Luo, Y.; Wang, S.

    2010-12-01

    Boreal forests are one of the largest biomes on earth, covering 27% of the world’s forests. In Canada, the dynamics of the boreal forests are largely dominated by large scale disturbances, with crown fires being the most geographically and temporally common. The probability of fire occurrence is strongly coupled to climate, making fire regimes quite variable across the country. Recent trends in fire regimes as well as predicted trends under climate scenarios also vary spatially. We present the results of two studies in which we have evaluated the climate - fire - forest feedbacks in parts of the boreal forest. Results show that feedbacks can be substantial and can alter the importance and even the direction of forest impacts on the climate system. The first feedback investigated was the link between fire-driven changes in forest cover properties and albedo in the boreal forests of Eastern Canada. Repeated disturbances in closed canopy forest dominated by black spruce (Picea mariana) on coarse soils sometimes push stands into an alternate stable open lichen woodland state. These lichen woodlands have a high albedo on account of the pale ground cover. Calculations show that the increase in albedo due to the opening of the canopy has a greater radiative forcing effect than that of the CO2 emitted to the atmosphere on account of the burning of the original forest. In these regions, climate-driven fire regimes thus generate a negative feedback to the climate system through their effects on forest cover properties. The second feedback investigated is linked to a recent decrease in fire frequency in Eastern Canada, and how this decrease might be affecting the growth-enhancing effect of a warmer climate because of its impact on the age-class distribution of the forest. The fire regime drives the age class distribution of forest landscapes. Since age class distribution drives landscape-level productivity, we have studied how this effect interacts with climate warming in

  11. Sorption of niobium on boreal forest soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption of niobium (Nb) was investigated on humus and mineral soil samples taken from various depths of a four-metre deep forest soil pit on Olkiluoto Island, southwestern Finland. Mass distribution coefficients, Kd, were determined in batch sorption tests. The steady state of Nb sorption was observed in the mineral soil samples already after one week of equilibration, and sorption decreased with depth from a very high value of 185000 mL/g at 0.7 m to 54000 mL/g at 3.4 m. The reason behind this decrease is probably the tenfold reduction in the specific surface area of the soil at the same depth range. Distribution coefficients were clearly lower in the humus layer (1000 mL/g). The Kd values determined in pure water at a pH range of 4.7-6.5 were at a high level (above 55000 mL/g), but decreased dramatically above pH 6.5, corresponding to the change in the major Nb species from the neutral Nb(OH)5 to the low-sorbing anionic Nb(OH)6- and Nb(OH)72-. However, the Kd values in the model soil solution were in the slightly alkaline range an order of magnitude higher than in pure water, which is probably caused by the formation of calcium niobate surface precipitate or electrostatic interaction between surface-sorbed calcium and solute Nb. Among nine soil constituent minerals kaolinite performed best in retaining Nb in both pure water and model soil solution at pH 8, whereas potassium feldspar showed the poorest sorption. The Kd value for kaolinite was above 500000 mL/g in both solutions, while the respective potassium feldspar values were in the range of 120-220 mL/g.

  12. Sorption of niobium on boreal forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederlund, Mervi; Hakanen, Martti; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry

    2015-07-01

    The sorption of niobium (Nb) was investigated on humus and mineral soil samples taken from various depths of a four-metre deep forest soil pit on Olkiluoto Island, southwestern Finland. Mass distribution coefficients, K{sub d}, were determined in batch sorption tests. The steady state of Nb sorption was observed in the mineral soil samples already after one week of equilibration, and sorption decreased with depth from a very high value of 185000 mL/g at 0.7 m to 54000 mL/g at 3.4 m. The reason behind this decrease is probably the tenfold reduction in the specific surface area of the soil at the same depth range. Distribution coefficients were clearly lower in the humus layer (1000 mL/g). The K{sub d} values determined in pure water at a pH range of 4.7-6.5 were at a high level (above 55000 mL/g), but decreased dramatically above pH 6.5, corresponding to the change in the major Nb species from the neutral Nb(OH){sub 5} to the low-sorbing anionic Nb(OH){sub 6}{sup -} and Nb(OH){sub 7}{sup 2-}. However, the K{sub d} values in the model soil solution were in the slightly alkaline range an order of magnitude higher than in pure water, which is probably caused by the formation of calcium niobate surface precipitate or electrostatic interaction between surface-sorbed calcium and solute Nb. Among nine soil constituent minerals kaolinite performed best in retaining Nb in both pure water and model soil solution at pH 8, whereas potassium feldspar showed the poorest sorption. The K{sub d} value for kaolinite was above 500000 mL/g in both solutions, while the respective potassium feldspar values were in the range of 120-220 mL/g.

  13. Vertical distribution of radiocesium in coniferous forest soil after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with the description of the vertical distribution of radiocaesium (137Cs and 134Cs) in a representative coniferous forest soil, investigated 10 months after the Fukushima radioactive fallout. During soil sampling, the forest floor components (understory plants, litter (Ol-) and fermented layers (Of)) were collected and treated separately. The results indicate that radiocesium is concentrated in the forest floor, and high radiocesium transfer factor observed in the undergrowth plants (3.3). This made the forest floor an active exchanging interphase for radiocesium. The raw organic layer (Ol + Of) holds 52% (5.3 kBq m−2) of the Fukushima-derived and 25% (0.7 kBq m−2) of the pre-Fukushima 137Cs at the time of the soil sampling. Including the pre-Fukushima 137Cs, 99% of the total soil inventory was in the upper 10 cm, in which the organic matter (OM) content was greater than 10%, suggesting the subsequent distribution most likely depends on the OM turnover. However, the small fraction of the Fukushima-derived 137Cs at a depth of 16 cm is most likely due to the infiltration of radiocesium-circumscribed rainwater during the fallout before that selective adsorption prevails and reduces the migration of soluble 137Cs. The values of the depth distribution parameters revealed that the distribution of the Fukushima-derived 137Cs was somewhat rapid. - Highlights: • Radiocesium seems in rapid remobilization phase in forest floor. • 99% of radiocesium was contained in horizons where organic matter is more than 10%. • Of-layer tends to accumulate radiocesium and determine its subsequent distribution. • Radiocesium-circumscirbed rain water transported radiocesium in deeper soil layer

  14. Comparison of coniferous forest carbon stocks between old-growth and young second-growth forests on two soil types in central British Columbia, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredeen, A.L.; Bois, C.H.; Janzen, D.T.; Sanborn, P.T. [Northern British Columbia Univ., Prince George, BC (Canada). Faculty of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies

    2005-06-01

    More than half of the world's terrestrial organic soil and vegetation carbon (C) currently resides in forests, with one half of this in boreal forests alone. Forests therefore represent significant reservoirs of carbon. A study was conducted at the Aleza Lake Research Forest (ALRF) near Prince George, British Columbia to compare the C stocks in 4 old-growth sub-boreal spruce (SBS) forests with 4 corresponding young, planted second-growth stands in soils of contrasting textures. The 2 dominant soil textures were coarse and fine grained soils over a total of 16 plots. The C stocks were assessed for hybrid interior spruce-dominated upland forests within the ALRF. For each plot, the carbon content of tree biomass was estimated using the measured values of Lamlom and Savidge. All woody debris stocks including tree stumps were also evaluated and soil C stocks were sampled according to modified National Forest Inventory Sampling Guidelines. C stocks were also tested for mineral soil texture, age-class and their interaction effects. The average total C stocks for old-growth stands ranged from 423 Mg C per hectare to 324 Mg C per hectare, between Pacific Northwest temperate forest and upland boreal forests. It was concluded that sub-boreal forests of central British Columbia are intermediate in terms of aboveground and total carbon stocks between the wetter and more productive coastal forests to the south and west and the less productive boreal stands to the north and east. It was concluded that conservation of non-biomass C stocks in old-growth forests is important in minimizing greenhouse gas emissions resulting from sub-boreal forest management activities. 60 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  15. Variation and balance of positive air ion concentrations in a boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hõrrak, U.; Aalto, P. P.; Salm, J.; Komsaare, K.; Tammet, H.; Mäkelä, J. M.; Laakso, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2008-02-01

    Air ions are characterized on the basis of measurements carried out in a boreal forest at the Hyytiälä SMEAR station, Finland, during the BIOFOR III campaign in spring 1999. The air ions were discriminated as small ions (charged molecular aggregates of the diameter of less than 2.5 nm), intermediate ions (charged aerosol particles of the diameter of 2.5-8 nm), and large ions (charged aerosol particles of the diameter of 8-20 nm). Statistical characteristics of the ion concentrations and the parameters of ion balance in the atmosphere are presented separately for the nucleation event days and non-event days. In the steady state, the ionization rate is balanced with the loss of small ions, which is expressed as the product of the small ion concentration and the ion sink rate. The widely known sinks of small ions are the recombination with small ions of opposite polarity and attachment to aerosol particles. The dependence of small ion concentration on the concentration of aerosol particles was investigated applying a model of the bipolar diffusion charging of particles by small ions. When the periods of relative humidity above 95% and wind speed less than 0.6 m s-1 were excluded, then the small ion concentration and the theoretically calculated small ion sink rate were closely negatively correlated (correlation coefficient -87%). However, an extra ion loss term of the same magnitude as the ion loss onto aerosol particles is needed for a quantitative explanation of the observations. This term is presumably due to the small ion deposition on coniferous forest. The hygroscopic growth correction of the measured aerosol particle size distributions was also found to be necessary for the proper estimation of the ion sink rate. In the case of nucleation burst events, the concentration of small positive ions followed the general balance equation, no extra ion loss in addition to the deposition on coniferous forest was detected, and the hypothesis of the conversion of ions

  16. Stable isotopic study of effects of N deposition on ammonium cycling in a boreal forest in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng-Gong; Gao, Wen-Long; Kou, Liang; Zhang, Jin-Bo; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    There is still lacking of study on the effect of N deposition on microbial N cycling in boreal forests. Here we present results from a N deposition stimulation experiment to show that relatively low rate of N deposition (40 kg NH4Cl-N hm‑2 a‑1) caused a decoupling of ammonium cycling in mineral soil of a boreal coniferous forest in the Great Xing' an Mountain region of China. The uncoupled microbial NH4+ cycling is likely due to reduced NH4+ immobilization possibly as a result of a change in soil N status. Soil autotrophic nitrification rates decreased as NH4+ immobilization decreased. However, the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) also presented a decreasing trend as NH4+ immobilization decreased, which explains the reduction in autotrophic nitrification. In addition, gross NO3- production and NO3- retention processes (NO3- immobilization, and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium DNRA) in the soil did not change with enhanced N deposition. These results demonstrate that soil microbial NH4+ consumption processes are more prone to be affected by enhanced N deposition.

  17. Antioxidant Potential of Bark Extracts from Boreal Forest Conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Jean; Girard-Lalancette, Karl; Dufour, Dominic; Pichette, André

    2013-01-01

    The bark of boreal forest conifers has been traditionally used by Native Americans to treat various ailments and diseases. Some of these diseases involve reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can be prevented by the consumption of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds that can be found in medicinal plants. In this study, ultrasonic assisted extraction has been performed under various solvent conditions (water:ethanol mixtures) on the bark of seven boreal forest conifers used by Native Americans including: Pinus strobus, Pinus resinosa, Pinus banksiana, Picea mariana, Picea glauca, Larix laricina, and Abies balsamea. The total phenolic content, as well as ORACFL potency and cellular antioxidant activity (IC50), were evaluated for all bark extracts, and compared with the standardized water extract of Pinus maritima bark (Pycnogenol), which showed clinical efficiency to prevent ROS deleterious effects. The best overall phenolic extraction yield and antioxidant potential was obtained with Picea glauca and Picea mariana. Interestingly, total phenolic content of these bark extracts was similar to Pycnogenol but their antioxidant activity were higher. Moreover, most of the extracts did not inhibit the growth of human skin fibroblasts, WS1. A significant correlation was found between the total phenolic content and the antioxidant activity for water extracts suggesting that these compounds are involved in the activity. PMID:26784337

  18. Antioxidant Potential of Bark Extracts from Boreal Forest Conifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Legault

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The bark of boreal forest conifers has been traditionally used by Native Americans to treat various ailments and diseases. Some of these diseases involve reactive oxygen species (ROS that can be prevented by the consumption of antioxidants such as phenolic compounds that can be found in medicinal plants. In this study, ultrasonic assisted extraction has been performed under various solvent conditions (water:ethanol mixtures on the bark of seven boreal forest conifers used by Native Americans including: Pinus strobus, Pinus resinosa, Pinus banksiana, Picea mariana, Picea glauca, Larix laricina, and Abies balsamea. The total phenolic content, as well as ORACFL potency and cellular antioxidant activity (IC50, were evaluated for all bark extracts, and compared with the standardized water extract of Pinus maritima bark (Pycnogenol, which showed clinical efficiency to prevent ROS deleterious effects. The best overall phenolic extraction yield and antioxidant potential was obtained with Picea glauca and Picea mariana. Interestingly, total phenolic content of these bark extracts was similar to Pycnogenol but their antioxidant activity were higher. Moreover, most of the extracts did not inhibit the growth of human skin fibroblasts, WS1. A significant correlation was found between the total phenolic content and the antioxidant activity for water extracts suggesting that these compounds are involved in the activity.

  19. Carbon balance of an old hemi-boreal pine forest in Southern Estonia determined by different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soosaar, Kaido; Repp, Kalev; Lõhmus, Krista; Uri, Veiko; Rannik, Kaire; Krasnova, Alisa; Ostonen, Ivika; Kukumägi, Mai; Maddison, Martin; Mander, Ülo

    2016-04-01

    The Soontaga Forest Station is located in hemi-boreal 200-years old pine forest (South Estonia; 58o01'N 26o04'E) with a second layer of spruce. The station has the instrumentation to assess the exchange of carbon dioxide (net ecosystem exchange, NEE), soil respiration, tree biomass (above and below ground biomass) and different environmental and meteorological parameters. In this study we quantified carbon balance by analyzing eddy-covariance CO2 flux data (carbon exchange) vs chamber-based measurements (ecosystem respiration) and CO2assimilation (soil and biomass). The annual NEE in this mature coniferous forest was -2.3 t C ha yr‑1, showing a clear diurnal and seasonal trend. During the daytime in summer the forest sequestered CO2, while during the night and late night CO2 emitted from the ecosystem to the atmosphere. Within the growing period, the sequestration of CO2 by plants was greater than soil respiration. Thus, the ecosystem sequestered carbon. Most of the carbon is bound in tree biomass (above and below ground biomass) but as well into soil, while the sequestration in soil increases with stand age. In addition, the biomass of understory, especially belowground litter, is playing essential part in carbon input. A modelling approach of long-term C budget in the Soontaga pine forest is presented.

  20. Effects of ionizing radiation on the boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Field-Irradiator-Gamma (FIG) project chronically exposed a section of the boreal forest to ionizing radiation by placing a 137Cs source on tope of a 20-m tower at a forest site in southeastern Manitoba. The irradiation continued from 1973 to 1986 and the forest was exposed to radiological dose rates ranging from 65 mGy.h-1 to 0.005 mGy.h-1 along a gradient extending 500 m from the source. The irradiation killed the tree canopy close to the irradiator, resulting in the formation of a herbaceous zone of vegetation at high dose rates. After 14 years of irradiation, some tree species were still being affected at dose rates as low as about 1 mGy.h-1. The data gathered at the FIG site can be used to identify radiological dose rates that forest communities can tolerate. This information allows decisions to be made concerning guidelines for protection of the general environment from radionuclide emissions from various anthropogenic sources, such as nuclear reactors and uranium tailings. This report reviews the previous data collected at the FIG site during the pre-irradiation and irradiation phases and the methodology used to establish a baseline for future comparisons. Permanently marked sampling plots are a particular strength to the study, whereby researchers can compare the present forest community with that measured during the past 25 years. (author). 53 refs., 6 tabs., 22 figs

  1. Nitrification and denitrification in subalpine coniferous forests of different restoration stages in western Sichuan,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi; CHEN Jinsong; LIU Qing; WU Yan

    2007-01-01

    Nitrification is the biological conversion of organic or inorganic nitrogen compounds from a reduced to a more oxidized state.Denitrification is generally referred to as the microbial reduction of nitrate to nitrite and further gaseous forms of nitric oxide,nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen.They are functionally interconnected processes in the soil nitrogen cycle that are involved in the control of longterm nitrogen losses in ecosystems through nitrate leaching and gaseous N losses.In" order to better understand how nitrification and denitrification change during the process of ecosystem restoration and how they are affected by various controlling factors,gross nitrification rates and denitrification rates were determined using the barometric process separation (BaPS) technique in subalpine coniferous forests of different restoration stages.The results showed that forest restoration stage had no significant effects on gross nitrification rates or denitrification rates (One-way ANOVA (analysis of variance),p < 0.05).There was no significant difference in the temperature coefficient (Q10) for gross nitrification rate among all the forest sites (One-wayANOVA,p < 0.05).Gross nitrification rates were positively correlated with water content (p <0.05),but not with soil pH,organic matter,total nitrogen,or C/N ratios.Denitrification rates in all the forest soils were low and not closely correlated with water content,soil pH,organic matter,or total nitrogen.Nevertheless,we found that C/N ratios obviously affected denitrification rates (p < 0.05).Results from this research suggest that gross nitrification is more responsible for the nitrogen loss from soils compared with denitrification.

  2. Species Diversity Based on Vertical Structure as Indicators of Artificial Restoration for Coniferous Forests in Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiaoying; ZHANG Yunchun; Eshetu Yirdaw; LUO Peng; YI Shaoliang; Wu Ning

    2006-01-01

    Five indices of species richness, species diversity and species evenness were used to assess α diversity of four types of coniferous forests undergone different artificial regeneration time. The study was based on the vertical structure of forests, involving growth-forms of total plants as well as vertical layers of woody plants. The results showed that, except for the fourth layer of woody plants, the vertical structure of the four forests exhibited significant difference in terms of their species richness, species diversity and species evenness, suggesting that α species diversity index provided more detailed information and was a better index reflecting the regeneration processes in this region. It was recommended that silvicultural management of artificially regenerated forests should be strengthened to conserve the biodiversity of the forests, optimize forest structure and, in the long run, promote sustainable development of forest ecosystems.

  3. Plantation-Seeding Forest Plantations – the New Method for Regeneration of Coniferous Forests at Large Clearings on Burned Lands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Tarakanov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The new method of restoration of coniferous stands on large felling areas on burnt lands that lack seed trees is discussed. It involves limited planting of big grafted seedlings of quality wood, that have a high level of seed production, with the purpose of the subsequent natural sowing on these territories. Results of two-year-old research on approbation of the method on cuttings on large felling areas on burnt lands in conditions of the mid-Ob' river pine forests are stated. A good viability of «seed cultures» is noted. There is damage of the grafting pines by elk. Therefore there is a problem of protecting plantations against elk. For preservation of a high level of genetic variability of pine stands it is desirable to use in «seed cultures» the best trees from local plantings.

  4. Thermokarst rates intensify due to climate change and forest fragmentation in an Alaskan boreal forest lowland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Mark J; Genet, Hélène; McGuire, Anthony D; Euskirchen, Eugénie S; Zhang, Yujin; Brown, Dana R N; Jorgenson, Mark T; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Breen, Amy; Bolton, William R

    2016-02-01

    Lowland boreal forest ecosystems in Alaska are dominated by wetlands comprised of a complex mosaic of fens, collapse-scar bogs, low shrub/scrub, and forests growing on elevated ice-rich permafrost soils. Thermokarst has affected the lowlands of the Tanana Flats in central Alaska for centuries, as thawing permafrost collapses forests that transition to wetlands. Located within the discontinuous permafrost zone, this region has significantly warmed over the past half-century, and much of these carbon-rich permafrost soils are now within ~0.5 °C of thawing. Increased permafrost thaw in lowland boreal forests in response to warming may have consequences for the climate system. This study evaluates the trajectories and potential drivers of 60 years of forest change in a landscape subjected to permafrost thaw in unburned dominant forest types (paper birch and black spruce) associated with location on elevated permafrost plateau and across multiple time periods (1949, 1978, 1986, 1998, and 2009) using historical and contemporary aerial and satellite images for change detection. We developed (i) a deterministic statistical model to evaluate the potential climatic controls on forest change using gradient boosting and regression tree analysis, and (ii) a 30 × 30 m land cover map of the Tanana Flats to estimate the potential landscape-level losses of forest area due to thermokarst from 1949 to 2009. Over the 60-year period, we observed a nonlinear loss of birch forests and a relatively continuous gain of spruce forest associated with thermokarst and forest succession, while gradient boosting/regression tree models identify precipitation and forest fragmentation as the primary factors controlling birch and spruce forest change, respectively. Between 1950 and 2009, landscape-level analysis estimates a transition of ~15 km² or ~7% of birch forests to wetlands, where the greatest change followed warm periods. This work highlights that the vulnerability and resilience of

  5. Short-term Response of Breeding Barred Owls to Forestry in a Boreal Mixedwood Forest Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben T. Olsen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Forestry and other activities are increasing in the boreal mixedwood of Alberta, with a concomitant decrease in older forest. The Barred Owl (Strix varia is an old-growth indicator species in some jurisdictions in North America. Hence, we radio-tagged Barred Owls in boreal mixedwood in Alberta to determine whether harvesting influenced habitat selection. We used three spatial scales: nest sites, i.e., nest tree and adjacent area of 11.7 m radius around nests, nesting territory of 1000 m radius around nests, and home range locations within 2000 m radius of the home range center. Barred Owls nested primarily in balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera snags > 34 cm dbh and nest trees were surrounded by large, > 34 cm dbh, balsam poplar trees and snags. Nesting territories contained a variety of habitats including young < 80-yr-old, deciduous-dominated stands, old deciduous and coniferous-dominated stands, treed bogs, and recent clear-cuts. However, when compared to available habitat in the study area, they were more likely to contain old conifer-dominated stands and recent cutblocks. We assumed this is because all of the recent harvest occurred in old stands, habitat preferred by the owls. When compared with random sites, locations used for foraging and roosting at the home range scale were more likely to be in young deciduous-dominated stands, old conifer-dominated stands and cutblocks > 30 yr old, and less likely to occur in old deciduous-dominated stands and recent cutblocks. Hence, although recent clearcuts occurred in territories, birds avoided these microhabitats during foraging. To meet the breeding requirements of Barred Owls in managed forests, 10–20 ha patches of old deciduous and mixedwood forest containing large Populus snags or trees should be maintained. In our study area, nest trees had a minimum dbh of 34 cm. Although cut areas were incorporated into home ranges, the amount logged was low, i.e., 7%, in our area. Hence more research is

  6. Annual cycle of volatile organic compound exchange between a boreal pine forest and the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Rantala, P.; Aalto, J; Taipale, R.; T. M. Ruuskanen; J. Rinne

    2015-01-01

    Long-term flux measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) over boreal forests are rare, although the forests are known to emit considerable amounts of VOCs into the atmosphere. Thus, we measured fluxes of several VOCs and oxygenated VOCs over a Scots-pine-dominated boreal forest semi-continuously between May 2010 and December 2013. The VOC profiles were obtained with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, and the fluxes were calculated using vertical concentrati...

  7. Annual cycle of volatile organic compound exchange between a boreal pine forest and the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Rantala, P.; Aalto, J; Taipale, R.; T. M. Ruuskanen; J. Rinne

    2015-01-01

    Long-term flux measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) over boreal forests are rare, although the forests are known to emit considerable amounts of VOCs into the atmosphere. Thus, we measured fluxes of several VOCs and oxygenated VOCs over a Scots pine dominated boreal forest semi-continuously between May 2010 and December 2013. The VOC profiles were obtained with a proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometry, and the fluxes were calculated using vertical concentrati...

  8. Effects of Sloped Terrain and Forest Stand Maturity on Evapotranspiration in a Boreal Forested Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabelle, P. E.; Nadeau, D.; Parent, A. C.; Rousseau, A. N.; Jutras, S.; Anctil, F.

    2015-12-01

    The boreal forests are the predominant landscape of Canada, occupying 49% of its boreal zone or 27% of the country. Despite the tremendous amount of literature on such ecosystems, some gaps persist in our understanding of boreal forest evapotranspiration (ET), given that direct measurements are costly to obtain and therefore scarce in these remote territories. This is especially the case on sloped terrain, since the eddy covariance method is not traditionally used in such situations. These gaps lead to the implementation of the EVAP experimental project, which intends to produce a major leap in our understanding of the water and energy budgets of a sloped boreal forest. Starting in summer 2015, we heavily instrumented a watershed in the Montmorency Forest (47°17' N; 71°10' W), Quebec, Canada. Located in the Laurentian Mountains, the forest has a mean elevation of 750 m with peaks at 1000 m. The setup includes a 20-m flux tower with two separate sets of eddy correlation and net radiation measurements facing opposite directions, located over an almost mature boreal forest (logged ~20 years ago, 8-10 m trees). Eddy fluxes are also measured under the canopy with a similar setup, while a sub-watershed is instrumented with a 10-m flux tower using homologous instruments, this time on a much younger forest stand (logged ~10 years ago, 4-5 m trees). Both sites are characterized by a significant slope (~20%), facing northeast for the 20-m tower and west for the 10-m tower. With several other instruments, we are measuring every major components of both water and energy budgets, including the outgoing discharge of the watershed and subwatershed. The different slope orientations and local topography of both sites allow us to quantify the relationships between solar exposition, topographic shading and ET rates; these relationships being transposable to other mountainous forested catchments. We also investigate the presence of slope flows and assess their impact on local ET

  9. Structuring Effects of Deer in Boreal Forest Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steeve D. Côté

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many deer populations have recently increased worldwide leading to strong direct and indirect ecological and socioeconomical impacts on the composition, dynamic, and functions of forest ecosystems. Deer directly modify the composition and structure of vegetation communities, but they also indirectly affect other species of the ecosystem by modifying the structure of the vegetation. Here we review the results of a research program on overabundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus in the boreal forest of Anticosti Island (Québec, Canada aimed at identifying deer densities compatible with forest regeneration. Various silvicultural systems and treatments failed to regenerate deer habitat at high deer densities, but planting size-adapted seedlings could be effective at moderate densities. Using a controlled deer density experiment, we found vegetation recovery at deer densities ≤ 15 deer/km2. The same experiment revealed that other groups of organisms such as insects and birds responded favorably to a reduction of deer density. We also found that alternative successional trajectories may occur after a certain period of heavy browsing during early succession. We conclude that one of the most important remaining research gaps is the need to identify habitat-specific threshold densities at which deer impacts occur and then to design effective wildlife and forest management strategies to limit deer impacts and sustain ecosystem integrity.

  10. Forest structure and downed woody debris in boreal, temperate, and tropical forest fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, William A; González, Grizelle; Hudak, Andrew T; Hollingsworth, Teresa Nettleton; Hollingsworth, Jamie

    2008-12-01

    Forest fragmentation affects the heterogeneity of accumulated fuels by increasing the diversity of forest types and by increasing forest edges. This heterogeneity has implications in how we manage fuels, fire, and forests. Understanding the relative importance of fragmentation on woody biomass within a single climatic regime, and along climatic gradients, will improve our ability to manage forest fuels and predict fire behavior. In this study we assessed forest fuel characteristics in stands of differing moisture, i.e., dry and moist forests, structure, i.e., open canopy (typically younger) vs. closed canopy (typically older) stands, and size, i.e., small (10-14 ha), medium (33 to 60 ha), and large (100-240 ha) along a climatic gradient of boreal, temperate, and tropical forests. We measured duff, litter, fine and coarse woody debris, standing dead, and live biomass in a series of plots along a transect from outside the forest edge to the fragment interior. The goal was to determine how forest structure and fuel characteristics varied along this transect and whether this variation differed with temperature, moisture, structure, and fragment size. We found nonlinear relationships of coarse woody debris, fine woody debris, standing dead and live tree biomass with mean annual median temperature. Biomass for these variables was greatest in temperate sites. Forest floor fuels (duff and litter) had a linear relationship with temperature and biomass was greatest in boreal sites. In a five-way multivariate analysis of variance we found that temperature, moisture, and age/structure had significant effects on forest floor fuels, downed woody debris, and live tree biomass. Fragment size had an effect on forest floor fuels and live tree biomass. Distance from forest edge had significant effects for only a few subgroups sampled. With some exceptions edges were not distinguishable from interiors in terms of fuels. PMID:19205181

  11. Thermokarst Rates Intensify Due to Climate Change and Forest Fragmentation in an Alaskan Boreal Forest Lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M. J.; Genet, H.; McGuire, A. D.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Zhang, Y.; Brown, D. N.; Jorgenson, T.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Breen, A. L.; Bolton, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    Lowland boreal forest ecosystems in Alaska are dominated by wetlands comprised of a complex mosaic of fens, collapse scar-bogs, low shrub/scrub, and forests growing on elevated ice rich permafrost soils. Thermokarst has affected the lowlands of the Tanana Flats in central Alaska for centuries, as thawing permafrost collapses forests that transition to wetlands. Located within the discontinuous permafrost zone, this region has significantly warmed over the past half-century, and much of these carbon-rich permafrost soils are now within ~0.5o C of thawing. Increases in the collapse of lowland boreal forests in response to warming may have consequences for the climate system. This study evaluates the trajectories and potential drivers of 60 years of forest change in a landscape subjected to permafrost thaw in unburned dominant forest types (paper birch and black spruce) associated with location on elevated permafrost plateau and across multiple time periods (1949, 1978, 1986, 1998 and 2009) using historical and contemporary aerial and satellite images for change detection. We developed (i) a deterministic statistical model to evaluate the potential climatic controls on forest change using gradient boosting and regression tree analysis, and (ii) a 30x30 m land cover map of the Tanana Flats to estimate the potential landscape-level losses of forest area due to thermokarst from 1949 to 2009. Over the 60-year period, we observed a nonlinear loss of birch forests and a relatively continuous gain of spruce forest associated with thermokarst and forest succession, respectively. Gradient boosting and regression tree models identify precipitation and forest fragmentation as the primary factors controlling birch and spruce forest change, respectively. Between 1950-2009 landscape-level analysis estimates a transition of ~15 km² of birch forest area to wetlands on the Tanana Flats, where the greatest change followed warm periods. This work highlights the vulnerability of lowland

  12. Spatial patterns and storage of organic chlorine and chloride in coniferous forest soil in south-east Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Wesström, Karin

    2002-01-01

    The concentration and storage of organic chlorine and chloride were determined in soil, to a depth of 40 cm, in a coniferous forest in the Stubbetorp catchment area in south-east Sweden. Also, the spatial distribution of the two forms of chlorine was determined. Soil samples were collected at 49 of the nodes in a grid with approximately 105 m between the nodes. The analysis of spatial variability suggested that no spatial autocorrelation was present either within the variable organic chlorine...

  13. Methane oxidation in soil profiles of Dutch and Finnish coniferous forests with different soil texture and atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saari, A.; Martikainen, P.J.; Ferm, A.; Ruuskanen, J.; Boer, W. de; Troelstra, S.R.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    We studied methane oxidation capacity in soil profiles of Dutch and Finnish coniferous forests. The Finnish sites (n = 9) had nitrogen depositions from 3 to 36 kg N ha⁻¹ a⁻¹. The deposition of N on the Dutch sites (n = 13) was higher ranging from 50 to 92 kg N ha⁻¹ a⁻¹. The Dutch sites had also lime

  14. Responses of aboveground and belowground forest carbon stocks to disturbances in boreal forests of Northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; He, Hong S.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Liang, Yu; Gong, Peng; Wu, Wuzhiwei; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests represents about 1/3 of forest area and 1/3 of forest carbon on earth. Carbon dynamics of boreal forests are sensitive to climate change, natural (e.g., fire) and anthropogenic (e.g., harvest) disturbances. Field-based studies suggest that disturbances alter species composition, stand structure, and litter decomposition, and have significant effects on boreal forest carbon dynamics. Most of these studies, however, covered a relatively short period of time (e.g., few decades), which is limited in revealing such long-term effects of disturbances. Models are therefore developed as important tools in exploring the long-term (e.g., hundreds of years) effects of disturbances on forest carbon dynamics. In this study, we applied a framework of coupling forest ecosystem and landscape model to evaluating the effect of fire, harvest and their interactions on carbon stocks in a boreal forest landscape of Northeastern China. We compared the simulation results under fire, harvest and fire-harvest interaction scenarios with the simulated value of succession scenario at 26 landtypes over 150 years at a 10-year time step. Our results suggest that aboveground and belowground carbon are significantly reduced by fire and harvest over 150years. Fire reduced aboveground carbon by 2.3±0.6 ton/ha, harvest by 6.0±1.4 ton/ha, and fire and harvest interaction by 8.0±1.9 tons/ha. Fire reduced belowground carbon by 4.6±3.4 ton/ha, harvest by 5.0±3.5 ton/ha, and fire-harvest interaction by 5.7±3.7 tons/ha. The divergent response of carbon stocks among landtypes and between disturbance scenarios was due to the spatial interactions between fire, harvest, and species composition. Our results indicated that boreal forests carbon stocks prediction needs to consider the effects of fire and harvest for improving the estimation accuracy.

  15. Nitrogen balance of a boreal Scots pine forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. J. Korhonen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The productivity of boreal forests is considered to be limited by low nitrogen (N availability. Increased atmospheric N deposition has altered the functioning and N cycling of these N-sensitive ecosystems. The most important components of N pools and fluxes were measured in a boreal Scots pine stand in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The measurement at the site allowed direct estimations of nutrient pools in the soil and biomass, inputs from the atmosphere and outputs as drainage flow and gaseous losses from two micro-catchments. N was accumulating to the system with a rate of 7 kg N ha−1 yr−1. Nitrogen input as atmospheric deposition was 7.4 kg N ha−1 yr−1. Dry deposition and organic N in wet deposition contributed over half of the input in deposition. Total outputs were 0.4 kg N ha−1 yr−1, the most important outputs being N2O emission to the atmosphere and organic N flux in drainage flow. Nitrogen uptake and retranslocation were as important sources of N for plant growth. Most of the uptaken N originated from decomposition of organic matter, and the fraction of N that could originate directly from deposition was about 30%. In conclusion, atmospheric N deposition fertilizes the site considerably.

  16. Decreases in Soil Moisture and Organic Matter Quality Suppress Microbial Decomposition Following a Boreal Forest Fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Sandra R.; Berhe, Asmeret A.; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2015-08-01

    Climate warming is projected to increase the frequency and severity of wildfires in boreal forests, and increased wildfire activity may alter the large soil carbon (C) stocks in boreal forests. Changes in boreal soil C stocks that result from increased wildfire activity will be regulated in part by the response of microbial decomposition to fire, but post-fire changes in microbial decomposition are poorly understood. Here, we investigate the response of microbial decomposition to a boreal forest fire in interior Alaska and test the mechanisms that control post-fire changes in microbial decomposition. We used a reciprocal transplant between a recently burned boreal forest stand and a late successional boreal forest stand to test how post-fire changes in abiotic conditions, soil organic matter (SOM) composition, and soil microbial communities influence microbial decomposition. We found that SOM decomposing at the burned site lost 30.9% less mass over two years than SOM decomposing at the unburned site, indicating that post-fire changes in abiotic conditions suppress microbial decomposition. Our results suggest that moisture availability is one abiotic factor that constrains microbial decomposition in recently burned forests. In addition, we observed that burned SOM decomposed more slowly than unburned SOM, but the exact nature of SOM changes in the recently burned stand are unclear. Finally, we found no evidence that post-fire changes in soil microbial community composition significantly affect decomposition. Taken together, our study has demonstrated that boreal forest fires can suppress microbial decomposition due to post-fire changes in abiotic factors and the composition of SOM. Models that predict the consequences of increased wildfires for C storage in boreal forests may increase their predictive power by incorporating the observed negative response of microbial decomposition to boreal wildfires.

  17. Volatile organic compound emission rates from mixed deciduous and coniferous forests in Northern Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isebrands, J. G.; Guenther, A. B.; Harley, P.; Helmig, D.; Klinger, L.; Vierling, L.; Zimmerman, P.; Geron, C.

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regions of the world to understand regional and global impacts and to implement possible mitigation strategies. The mixed deciduous and coniferous forests of northern Wisconsin, USA, were predicted to have significant VOC emission rates because they are comprised of many genera (i.e. Picea, Populus, Quercus, Salix) known to be high VOC emitters. In July 1993, a study was conducted on the Chequamegon National Forest near Rhinelander, WI, to identify and quantify VOC emitted from major trees, shrubs, and understory herbs in the mixed northern forests of this region. Emission rates were measured at various scales - at the leaf level with cuvettes, the branch level with branch enclosures, the canopy level with a tower based system, and the landscape level with a tethered balloon air sampling system. Area-average emission rates were estimated by scaling, using biomass densities and species composition along transects representative of the study site. Isoprene (C 5H 8) was the primary VOC emitted, although significant quantities of monoterpenes (C 10H 16) were also emitted. The highest emission rates of isoprene (at 30°C and photosynthetically active radiation of 1000 μmol m -2 s -1) were from northern red oak ( Quercus rubra, >110 μg(C) g -1 h -1); aspen ( Populus tremuloides, >77); willow ( Salix spp., >54); and black spruce ( Picea mariana, >10). Emission rates of hybrid poplar clones ranged from 40 to 90 μg(C) g -1 h -1 at 25°C; those of Picea provenances were generally VOC to the atmosphere. Accurate estimates of these emissions are required for determining appropriate regulatory air pollution control strategies. Future studies are needed to extrapolate these estimates to other landscapes

  18. [Tree uprooting of coniferous-broad leaved Korean pine mixed forest in Lesser Khingan Mountains, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiao-wen; Hou, Jie-jian; Wang, Li-hai; Wang, Xing-long; Rong, Bin-bin

    2016-02-01

    The morphological parameters, root wad indexes and site conditions of 127 uprooting trees from 76 plots (20 mx20 m) in Lesser Khingan coniferous-broad leaved Korean pine mixed forest were measured. Then the influencing factors of uprooting differences and the relationship between uprooting trees and disturbed soil were analyzed. Results showed that the number of uprooting trees varied significantly among species. Abies nephrolepis suffered the most serious uprooting damage, then Pinus koraiensis, and Ulmus spp. the least. Deciduous species had a stronger uprooting-resistant capacity than broad-leaved species. With the increase of tree DBH and height, tree' s uprooting resistance declined rapidly first and then was gradually enhanced, and finally reached the minimum at diameter class of 20 cm and height class of 14 m, respectively. The smaller the taper degree and projected area of crown were, the stronger the uprooting resistance was. Uprooting rate was negatively correlated with stand density. Trees lying in wet ground, flat terrain, medium low altitude area and windward slope had a greater risk of uprooting. There were significant positive correlation between the depth, area and volume of disturbed soil and the DBH, height, volume of uprooting trees.

  19. [Tree uprooting of coniferous-broad leaved Korean pine mixed forest in Lesser Khingan Mountains, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiao-wen; Hou, Jie-jian; Wang, Li-hai; Wang, Xing-long; Rong, Bin-bin

    2016-02-01

    The morphological parameters, root wad indexes and site conditions of 127 uprooting trees from 76 plots (20 mx20 m) in Lesser Khingan coniferous-broad leaved Korean pine mixed forest were measured. Then the influencing factors of uprooting differences and the relationship between uprooting trees and disturbed soil were analyzed. Results showed that the number of uprooting trees varied significantly among species. Abies nephrolepis suffered the most serious uprooting damage, then Pinus koraiensis, and Ulmus spp. the least. Deciduous species had a stronger uprooting-resistant capacity than broad-leaved species. With the increase of tree DBH and height, tree' s uprooting resistance declined rapidly first and then was gradually enhanced, and finally reached the minimum at diameter class of 20 cm and height class of 14 m, respectively. The smaller the taper degree and projected area of crown were, the stronger the uprooting resistance was. Uprooting rate was negatively correlated with stand density. Trees lying in wet ground, flat terrain, medium low altitude area and windward slope had a greater risk of uprooting. There were significant positive correlation between the depth, area and volume of disturbed soil and the DBH, height, volume of uprooting trees. PMID:27396108

  20. Pollen flux and vertical dispersion in coniferous and deciduous broadleaved mixed forest in the Changbai Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU QingHai; LI YueCong; ZHOU LiPing; LI YiYin; ZHANG ZhenQing; LIN FengYou

    2007-01-01

    The pollen flux in coniferous and deciduous broadleaved mixed forest in the Changbai Mountains is presented in one year's experiments. The results indicate that arboreal pollen percentages are more than 65% and pollen flux is higher than 5000 grain·cm-2·a-1, while less than 2% and lower than 1000 grain·cm-2·a-1 for shrubby pollen, and less than 20% and lower than 3000 grain·cm-2·a-1 for herbaceous pollen for most samples at different heights. The pollen assemblages are similar to those in the samples under 8 m height where Pinus and Quercus are dominant and followed by the few non-local pollen types, and Fraxinus percentages are high with a few non-local pollen types at 16 m to 32 m height as well as non-local pollen clearly increased at 40 m height. Comparisons between pollen assemblages and vegetation composition suggest that similarities are higher for pollen trap samples than for surface moss samples.

  1. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water in two old-growth coniferous forests: quantifying patterns and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jeffrey M; Meinzer, Frederick C; Brooks, J Renée; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Coulombe, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Although hydraulic redistribution of soil water (HR) by roots is a widespread phenomenon, the processes governing spatial and temporal patterns of HR are not well understood. We incorporated soil/plant biophysical properties into a simple model based on Darcy's law to predict seasonal trajectories of HR. We investigated the spatial and temporal variability of HR across multiple years in two old-growth coniferous forest ecosystems with contrasting species and moisture regimes by measurement of soil water content (theta) and water potential (Psi) throughout the upper soil profile, root distribution and conductivity, and relevant climate variables. Large HR variability within sites (0-0.5 mm d(-1)) was attributed to spatial patterns of roots, soil moisture and depletion. HR accounted for 3-9% of estimated total site water depletion seasonally, peaking at 0.16 mm d(-1) (ponderosa pine; Pinus ponderosa) or 0.30 mm d(-1) (Douglas-fir; Pseudotsuga menziesii), then declining as modeled pathway conductance dropped with increasing root cavitation. While HR can vary tremendously within a site, among years and among ecosystems, this variability can be explained by natural variability in Psi gradients and seasonal courses of root conductivity. PMID:17286824

  2. Carbonaceous aerosols from prescribed burning of a boreal forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identity and ambient mass concentrations of radiatively important carbonaceous aerosols were measured for a boreal forest prescribed burn conducted in northern Ontario, CAN in August 1989. Nonsize-segregated airborne particles were collected for smoldering-fire and full-fire conditions using a helicopter sampling platform. Total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were measured. Smoke plume mass concentrations of the OC and EC particles were greatest for full-fire conditions and had ranges of 1.560 to 2.160 mg/m-1 (OC) and 0.120 to 0.160 mg/m-3 (EC) with OC:EC ratios of 10 to 18, respectively. Smoldering fire conditions showed smoke plume OC and EC levels of 0.570--1.030 mg/m-3 (OC) and 0.006--0.050 mg/m-3 (EC) and much higher ratios of OC:EC (21 to 95). These aerosol data indicate the formation of EC particles is greatest during full-fire combustion of boreal forest material relative to smoldering combustion. However, EC particles comprise a minor fraction of the particulate carbon smoke aerosols for both full-fire and smoldering conditions; the major component of carbonaceous smoke aerosols emitted during the prescribed burn is OC. Overall, the OC and EC in-plume smoke aerosol data show nonuniform production of these particles during various stages of the prescribed burn, and major differences in the type of carbonaceous aerosol that is generated (OC versus EC)

  3. Hydroxyl radical measurements and oxidation capacity in a boreal forest environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, K.; Tatum Ernest, C.; Novelli, A.; Paasonen, P.; Sipilä, M.; Petäjä, T.; Nölscher, A.; Taraborrelli, D.; Keronen, P.; Trawny, K.; Kubistin, D.; Oswald, R.; Axinte, R.; Hosaynali Beygi, Z.; Auld, J.; Klüpfel, T.; Mesarchaki, E.; Song, W.; Valverde Canossa, J.; González Orozco, D.; Königstedt, R.; Bohn, B.; Rudolf, M.; Fischer, H.; Williams, J.; Crowley, J.; Martinez, M.; Harder, H. D.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-12-01

    Forests cover about one third of the earth's total land surface and are known to be an important global source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) that are partly very reactive towards OH. Different types of forests are known to emit various characteristic BVOCs significantly influencing atmospheric oxidation chemistry. Measurements of OH and HO2 radicals in forest environments, however, reveal a serious lack of understanding of the underlying processes. The HUMPPA-COPEC intensive field campaign took place in summer 2010 at the SMEAR II station, located in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland, as collaboration between the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry and the University of Helsinki. The main goal of the campaign was to investigate the summertime emissions and photochemistry in a boreal forest. Comprehensive measurements including observations of many VOCs, HOx, and total OH reactivity were conducted to increase our understanding of atmospheric self-cleaning processes based on detailed analysis of production and loss mechanisms of the hydroxyl radical. Also the HOx budget in a coniferous forest was examined by using direct calculations from measured species as well as an observationally constrained chemical box model in steady state. For HUMPPA-COPEC chemical reaction schemes considering isoprene as the predominant primary BVOC lead to an over prediction of the measured OH concentration by a factor of up to 4. However, only a minor fraction of the measured total OH reactivity can be explained by measured isoprene. A preliminary terpene mechanism, taking the most abundant terpenes measured during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 and their oxidation products into account, improves the agreement between simulated and measured OH, but is not sufficient to explain the missing OH reactivity in all cases. HO2 is described reasonably well by the model for conditions where the modeled and measured total OH reactivity agree. For lower than measured reactivity, the HO2 mixing ratios

  4. Thermal infrared as a tool to detect tree water stress in a coniferous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourtier, M.; Chanzy, A.; Bes, B.; Davi, H.; Hanocq, J. F.; Mariotte, N.; Sappe, G.

    2009-04-01

    temperature indices. Throughout the experimentation, there were only short dry periods, 2008 being a wet year. During these periods, temperature indices increased while transpiration ratios decreased showing that an observable increase in surface temperature is induced by water stress. To assess the exploitable signal magnitude, a declining tree having negligible transpiration but a canopy structure, which was still comparable to a healthy tree, was monitored. A difference in surface temperature between the healthy tree and the declining tree get to an average of 4 °C. This gives keys of interpretation of thermal infrared measurements (sensitivity, magnitude) in case of silver fir forest. If encouraging results were obtained, the study showed that the range of magnitude remains modest. Therefore, the influence of climatic conditions, which also influence surface temperature, must be accounted very carefully. To reach operational results spatial study at the forest scale is now required. Keywords: Fir, Abies alba, thermal infrared, water stress, transpiration, surface temperature, remote sensing Duchemin B., D. Guyon, J.P. Lagouarde, 1998. Potential and limits of NOAA-AVHRR temporal composite data for phenology and water stress monitoring of temperate forest ecosystems. International Journal of remote sensing, volume: 20, 5, p 23. Duchemin B., Lagouarde J.P., 1998. Apport des capteurs satellitaires à large champ pour l'estimation de variables de fonctionnement des écosystèmes forestiers tempérés. Thesis. p120. Noilhan J., Planton S., 1989. A simple parameterization of land surface processes for meteorological models. Monthly weather review, volume 117, 3. Pierce L. L., Running S.W., Riggs G.A., 1990. Remote detection of canopy water stress in coniferous forests using the NS001 Thematic Mapper Simulator and the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Photogrammetric engineering and remote sensing, volume: 56, 1, p 8.

  5. boreal forest when timber prices and tree growth are stochastic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timo Pukkala

    2015-01-01

    Background:Decisions on forest management are made under risk and uncertainty because the stand development cannot be predicted exactly and future timber prices are unknown. Deterministic calculations may lead to biased advice on optimal forest management. The study optimized continuous cover management of boreal forest in a situation where tree growth, regeneration, and timber prices include uncertainty. Methods:Both anticipatory and adaptive optimization approaches were used. The adaptive approach optimized the reservation price function instead of fixed cutting years. The future prices of different timber assortments were described by cross-correlated auto-regressive models. The high variation around ingrowth model was simulated using a model that describes the cross-and autocorrelations of the regeneration results of different species and years. Tree growth was predicted with individual tree models, the predictions of which were adjusted on the basis of a climate-induced growth trend, which was stochastic. Residuals of the deterministic diameter growth model were also simulated. They consisted of random tree factors and cross-and autocorrelated temporal terms. Results:Of the analyzed factors, timber price caused most uncertainty in the calculation of the net present value of a certain management schedule. Ingrowth and climate trend were less significant sources of risk and uncertainty than tree growth. Stochastic anticipatory optimization led to more diverse post-cutting stand structures than obtained in deterministic optimization. Cutting interval was shorter when risk and uncertainty were included in the analyses. Conclusions:Adaptive optimization and management led to 6%–14%higher net present values than obtained in management that was based on anticipatory optimization. Increasing risk aversion of the forest landowner led to earlier cuttings in a mature stand. The effect of risk attitude on optimization results was small.

  6. Logging and Fire Effects in Siberian Boreal Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukavskaya, E.; Buryak, L.; Ivanova, G.; Kalenskaya, O.; Bogorodskaya, A.; Zhila, S.; McRae, D.; Conard, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Russian boreal zone supports a huge terrestrial carbon pool. Moreover, it is a tremendous reservoir of wood products concentrated mainly in Siberia. The main natural disturbance in these forests is wildfire, which modifies the carbon budget and has potentially important climate feedbacks. In addition, both legal and illegal logging increase landscape complexity and fire hazard. We investigated a number of sites in different regions of Siberia to evaluate the impacts of fire and logging on fuel loads, carbon emissions, tree regeneration, soil respiration, and microbocenosis. We found large variations of fire and logging effects among regions depending on growing conditions and type of logging activity. Partial logging had no negative impact on forest conditions and carbon cycle. Illegal logging resulted in increase of fire hazard, and higher carbon emissions than legal logging. The highest fuel loads and carbon emissions were found on repeatedly burned unlogged sites where first fire resulted in total tree mortality. Repeated fires together with logging activities in drier conditions and on large burned sites resulted in insufficient regeneration, or even total lack of tree seedlings. Soil respiration was less on both burned and logged areas than in undisturbed forest. The highest structural and functional disturbances of the soil microbocenosis were observed on logged burned sites. Understanding current interactions between fire and logging is important for modeling ecosystem processes and for managers to develop strategies of sustainable forest management. Changing patterns in the harvest of wood products increase landscape complexity and can be expected to increase emissions and ecosystem damage from wildfires, inhibit recovery of natural ecosystems, and exacerbate impacts of wildland fire on changing climate and air quality. The research was supported by NASA LCLUC Program, RFBR grant # 12-04-31258, and Russian Academy of Sciences.

  7. Annual variations of atmospheric VOC concentrations in a boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakola, H.; Hellen, H.; Tarvainen, V. (Finnish Meteorological Institute Air Quality Research, Helsinki (Finland)); Baeck, J. (Dept. of Forest Ecology, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Patokoski, J.; Rinne, J. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-07-01

    Ambient atmospheric concentrations of monoterpene compounds were measured above a boreal forest in Hyytiaelae, Finland during 2000-2007. For most of the time, two samples per week were collected, although there are some gaps in the data due to analytical or other issues. The monoterpene concentrations reached their maximum in summer, although they were found to be quite high also during winter. The main compounds found during winter were alpha-pinene, DELTA3-carene, beta-pinene and camphene. In summer 1,8-cineol and sabinene were also present in the samples. The concentrations of alpha-pinene, beta-pinene/myrcene, camphene, DELTA3-carene increased during the measurement period both in winter and in summer. This increase cannot be explained by meteorological conditions. The possible explanations could be human activities in the vicinity of the sampling site in addition to forest growth. The seasonal cycles of daytime concentrations were found to follow emission fluxes modeled using a simple temperature dependent parameterisation. The measured monoterpene concentrations were used, together with emission rate measurements, for estimating ambient atmospheric beta-caryophyllene concentration which cannot be directly measured due to its high reactivity against ozone. (orig.)

  8. Seasonal Effects of Habitat on Sources and Rates of Snowshoe Hare Predation in Alaskan Boreal Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dashiell Feierabend

    greater influence on the sources of predation than the amount of cover in any given location within a habitat. Our observations illustrate the vulnerability of hares to predators in even the densest coniferous habitat available in the boreal forest, and indicate strong seasonal changes in the rates and sources of predation.

  9. Regional Instability in the Abundance of Open Stands in the Boreal Forest of Eastern Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Rija Rapanoela; Frédéric Raulier; Sylvie Gauthier

    2016-01-01

    Fires are a key disturbance of boreal forests. In fact, they are the main source of renewal and evolution for forest stands. The variability of fire through space and time results in a diversified forest mosaic, altering their species composition, structure and productivity. A resilient forest is assumed to be in a state of dynamic equilibrium with the fire regime, so that the composition, age structure and succession stages of forests should be consistent with the fire regime. Dense spruce-m...

  10. Nitrogen balance of a boreal Scots pine forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. J. Korhonen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The productivity of boreal forests is considered to be limited by low nitrogen (N availability. Increased atmospheric N deposition has altered the functioning and N cycling of these N-sensitive ecosystems by increasing the availability of reactive nitrogen. The most important components of N pools and fluxes were measured in a boreal Scots pine stand in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The measurements at the site allowed direct estimations of nutrient pools in the soil and biomass, inputs from the atmosphere and outputs as drainage flow and gaseous losses from two micro-catchments. N was accumulating in the system, mainly in woody biomass, at a rate of 7 kg N ha−1 yr−1. Nitrogen input as atmospheric deposition was 7.4 kg N ha−1 yr−1. Dry deposition and organic N in wet deposition contributed over half of the inputs in deposition. Total outputs were 0.4 kg N ha−1 yr−1, the most important outputs being N2O emission to the atmosphere and organic N flux in drainage flow. Nitrogen uptake and retranslocation were equally important sources of N for plant growth. Most of the assimilated N originated from decomposition of organic matter, and the fraction of N that could originate directly from deposition was about 30%. In conclusion, atmospheric N deposition fertilizes the site considerably, but there are no signs of N saturation. Further research is needed to estimate soil N2 fluxes (emission and fixation, which may amount up to several kg N ha−1 yr−1.

  11. Remote Sensing Techniques in Monitoring Post-Fire Effects and Patterns of Forest Recovery in Boreal Forest Regions: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Thuan Chu; Xulin Guo

    2013-01-01

    The frequency and severity of forest fires, coupled with changes in spatial and temporal precipitation and temperature patterns, are likely to severely affect the characteristics of forest and permafrost patterns in boreal eco-regions. Forest fires, however, are also an ecological factor in how forest ecosystems form and function, as they affect the rate and characteristics of tree recruitment. A better understanding of fire regimes and forest recovery patterns in different environmental and ...

  12. Small scale temporal distribution of radiocesium in undisturbed coniferous forest soil: Radiocesium depth distribution profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramage, Mengistu T; Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    The depth distribution of pre-Fukushima and Fukushima-derived (137)Cs in undisturbed coniferous forest soil was investigated at four sampling dates from nine months to 18 months after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. The migration rate and short-term temporal variability among the sampling profiles were evaluated. Taking the time elapsed since the peak deposition of pre-Fukushima (137)Cs and the median depth of the peaks, its downward displacement rates ranged from 0.15 to 0.67 mm yr(-1) with a mean of 0.46 ± 0.25 mm yr(-1). On the other hand, in each examined profile considerable amount of the Fukushima-derived (137)Cs was found in the organic layer (51%-92%). At this moment, the effect of time-distance on the downward distribution of Fukushima-derived (137)Cs seems invisible as its large portion is still found in layers where organic matter is maximal. This indicates that organic matter seems the primary and preferential sorbent of radiocesium that could be associated with the physical blockage of the exchanging sites by organic-rich dusts that act as a buffer against downward propagation of radiocesium, implying radiocesium to be remained in the root zone for considerable time period. As a result, this soil section can be a potential source of radiation dose largely due to high radiocesium concentration coupled with its low density. Generally, such kind of information will be useful to establish a dynamic safety-focused decision support system to ease and assist management actions. PMID:26803260

  13. A comparison between simulated and measured CO2 and water flux in a subtropical coniferous forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>Using data from eddy covariance measurements in a subtropical coniferous forest, a test and evaluation have been made for the model of Carbon Exchange in the Vegetation-Soil-Atmosphere (CEVSA) that simulates energy transfers and water, carbon and nitrogen cycles based on ecophysiological processes. In the present study, improvement was made in the model in calculating LAI, carbon allocation among plant organs, litter fall, decomposition and evapotranspiration. The simulated seasonal variations in carbon and water vapor flux were consistent with the measurements. The model explained 90% and 86% of the measured variations in evapotranspiration and soil water content. However, the modeled evapotranspiration and soil water content were lower than the measured systematically, because the model assumed that water was lost as runoff if it was beyond the soil saturation water content, but the soil at the flux site with abundant rainfall is often above water saturated. The improved model reproduced 79% and 88% of the measured variations in gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Re), but only 31% of the variations in measured net ecosystem exchange (NEP) despite the fact that the modeled annual NEP was close to the observation. The modeled NEP was generally lower in winter and higher in summer than the observations. The simulated responses of photosynthesis and respiration to water vapor deficit at high temperatures were different from measurements. The results suggested that the improved model underestimated ecosystem photosynthesis and respiration in extremely condition. The present study shows that CEVSA can simulate the seasonal pattern and magnitude of CO2 and water vapor fluxes, but further improvement in simulating photosynthesis and respiration at extreme temperatures and water deficit is required.

  14. A preliminary evaluation of throughfall sampling techniques in a mature coniferous forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Darryl.E.Carlyle-Moses; Chad.E.Lishman; Adam.J.McKee

    2014-01-01

    Rainfall, throughfall and stemflow were measured and canopy interception loss was derived for 14 rainfall events from June 22 to Au-gust 30, 2008 within a mature declining hybrid white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss × P. engelmannii Parry ex Engelm.)-subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) - lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Dougl. ex Loud.) stand in south-central British Columbia, Can-ada. Stemflow was negligible during the study period, while, respectively, throughfall and canopy interception loss accounted for approximately 59.4% and 40.6% of the 50.1 mm of cumulative rainfall. Throughfall variability was assessed with three approaches involving roving and stationary wedge-type gauges, and stationary trough gauges. Throughfall exhibited large spatial variability with the coefficient of variability of study period throughfall sampled using 16 stationary trough gauges being 30.3%, while it was 38.0% and 28.7% for 32 stationary and 32 roving wedge gauges, respectively. Our analysis suggests that a roving gauge method is better than a stationary approach since the errors associated with event mean throughfalls are summed quadratically and a greater portion of the canopy area is sampled. Trough gauges were more efficient than wedge gauges; however, this efficiency was less than expected given their much larger sampling areas, suggesting that spatial autocor-relation lengths of throughfall may be longer than the trough systems. The spatial distribution of throughfall showed a high degree of temporal persistence throughout the study suggesting the existence of stable“wet”and“dry”inputs to the floors of these coniferous forests.

  15. Small scale temporal distribution of radiocesium in undisturbed coniferous forest soil: Radiocesium depth distribution profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramage, Mengistu T; Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    The depth distribution of pre-Fukushima and Fukushima-derived (137)Cs in undisturbed coniferous forest soil was investigated at four sampling dates from nine months to 18 months after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. The migration rate and short-term temporal variability among the sampling profiles were evaluated. Taking the time elapsed since the peak deposition of pre-Fukushima (137)Cs and the median depth of the peaks, its downward displacement rates ranged from 0.15 to 0.67 mm yr(-1) with a mean of 0.46 ± 0.25 mm yr(-1). On the other hand, in each examined profile considerable amount of the Fukushima-derived (137)Cs was found in the organic layer (51%-92%). At this moment, the effect of time-distance on the downward distribution of Fukushima-derived (137)Cs seems invisible as its large portion is still found in layers where organic matter is maximal. This indicates that organic matter seems the primary and preferential sorbent of radiocesium that could be associated with the physical blockage of the exchanging sites by organic-rich dusts that act as a buffer against downward propagation of radiocesium, implying radiocesium to be remained in the root zone for considerable time period. As a result, this soil section can be a potential source of radiation dose largely due to high radiocesium concentration coupled with its low density. Generally, such kind of information will be useful to establish a dynamic safety-focused decision support system to ease and assist management actions.

  16. Influence of Forest-Cover Types on Spring Thaw Timing in the Southern Boreal Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, H. F.; Helgason, W.; Barr, A.; Black, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    The boreal forest is one of the largest of the world's biomes covering about 11% of its terrestrial surface and accounting for about 18% of its total terrestrial carbon pool. The timing of spring thaw, resulting in a lengthening or shortening of the growing season, has a strong influence on boreal forest productivity and associated carbon dioxide exchange with the atmosphere. A study of the influence of forest-cover type upon spring-thaw timing in the southern Canadian boreal forest has been undertaken using 18 years of soil temperature measurements at depths of 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 cm. Soil was considered to be thawing during days of consistent near-zero soil temperature (daily mean of -0.5 to 0.5 °C and standard deviation of near zero). We compared the temporal pattern (first and last day) of soil thaw at three mature forest stands: trembling aspen, black spruce, and jack pine located in central Saskatchewan (~54°N, ~105°W). The soil freezing depth was deepest at the jack pine site (>100 cm) and shallowest at the black spruce site (<50 cm during most years). The mean last day of thaw at the 5-cm depth was earliest for the aspen site followed by jack pine and black spruce, respectively, with approximately 4 days difference among sites. Deeper in the soil profile, the trend of soil thaw remained in the same order, however, with much larger differences among sites: jack pine thawed 16 days later than aspen and black spruce thawed 18 days later than jack pine. Our analysis will relate the observed site differences in thaw timing to differences in site (soil and canopy) characteristics. Developing an improved understanding of the factors influencing the inter-annual and inter-site variability of soil thaw at these sites is required to appropriately characterize the ecological and hydrological responses of these sites to projected climate change.

  17. Thermokarst rates intensify due to climate change and forest fragmentation in an Alaskan boreal forest lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M.; Genet, Helene; McGuire, Anthony; Euskirchen, Eugénie S.; Zhang, Yujin; Brown, Dana R. N.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Romanovsky, V.; Breen, Amy L.; Bolton, W.R.

    2016-01-01

    Lowland boreal forest ecosystems in Alaska are dominated by wetlands comprised of a complex mosaic of fens, collapse-scar bogs, low shrub/scrub, and forests growing on elevated ice-rich permafrost soils. Thermokarst has affected the lowlands of the Tanana Flats in central Alaska for centuries, as thawing permafrost collapses forests that transition to wetlands. Located within the discontinuous permafrost zone, this region has significantly warmed over the past half-century, and much of these carbon-rich permafrost soils are now within ~0.5 °C of thawing. Increased permafrost thaw in lowland boreal forests in response to warming may have consequences for the climate system. This study evaluates the trajectories and potential drivers of 60 years of forest change in a landscape subjected to permafrost thaw in unburned dominant forest types (paper birch and black spruce) associated with location on elevated permafrost plateau and across multiple time periods (1949, 1978, 1986, 1998, and 2009) using historical and contemporary aerial and satellite images for change detection. We developed (i) a deterministic statistical model to evaluate the potential climatic controls on forest change using gradient boosting and regression tree analysis, and (ii) a 30 × 30 m land cover map of the Tanana Flats to estimate the potential landscape-level losses of forest area due to thermokarst from 1949 to 2009. Over the 60-year period, we observed a nonlinear loss of birch forests and a relatively continuous gain of spruce forest associated with thermokarst and forest succession, while gradient boosting/regression tree models identify precipitation and forest fragmentation as the primary factors controlling birch and spruce forest change, respectively. Between 1950 and 2009, landscape-level analysis estimates a transition of ~15 km² or ~7% of birch forests to wetlands, where the greatest change followed warm periods. This work highlights that the vulnerability and resilience of

  18. Modeling the impacts of organic layer depth on forest stand recovery from disturbance in the North American boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trugman, A. T.; Medvigy, D.; Fenton, N.; Bergeron, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The boreal forest contains over 30 percent of Earth's terrestrial carbon, stored mainly as organic matter in soils. Warming temperatures have decreased the fire return interval at many locations, potentially opening more boreal forest space to early-successional deciduous species. However, previous observational studies have shown that the residual forest organic layer depth after a fire can be directly related to fire severity and that this organic layer depth plays a critical role in determining post-fire secondary succession in the North American boreal forest. In this study, we use a numerical model constrained by field data to evaluate: (1) the extent to which the organic layer inhibits deciduous seedling establishment; (2) whether differences in seedling establishment after mild and severe burns affect mature forest structure and composition on decadal to century time scales. Our modeling experiments were carried out with the Ecosystem Demography model version 2 (ED2) terrestrial biosphere model. ED2 is designed to explicitly track the growth and mortality of individual trees, which compete for light, water, and nutrients using an open nitrogen cycle. Our simulations feature parameterizations for aspen and black spruce species-types as well as a new dynamic soil organic layer module with species-specific litter decay rates. The updated boreal forest model is validated using several datasets across the North American boreal forest that range from daily carbon and energy fluxes to multi-century basal area chronosequences including: (1) sub-daily to monthly eddy covariance measurements taken in Delta Junction, Alaska and Manitoba, Canada; (2) decade-long forest inventory data from the Cooperative Alaska Forest Inventory taken throughout the Alaskan boreal forest; and (3) multi-century basal area chronosequences measured in Manitoba and Quebec. We then use the model to identify the controls that the soil organic layer exerts on secondary succession between aspen

  19. Diurnal Variations of Greenhouse Gas Fluxes from Mixed Broad-leaved and Coniferous Forest Soil in Dinghushan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUCunyu; ZHANGDeqiang; WANGYuesi; ZHOUGuoyi; LIUShizhong; TANGXuli

    2005-01-01

    The subtropical mixed broad-leaved and coniferous forest, a typical successional monsoon forest, is one of the major forests in the subtropics of China. Therefore, it is very important to estimate the fluxes of the greenhouse gases from the forest soil in order to evaluate the impact of subtropical forests on the greenhouse gas emissions or absorptions. This study investigated the diurnal variations of fluxes of three greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, and N2O) from a mixed broad-leaved and coniferous forest soil. A static chamber-gas chromatograph technique was used to measure the fluxes of three greenhouse gases. By using the improved gas chromatography sampling system, the fluxes were analyzed with a single injection. In order to find out the effects of litter and seedling on the emissions or absorptions of these greenhouse gases, three treatments were set in the fleld:(1)bare soil surface (litter was removed previously); (3) litter + soil; (3) seedling + litter + soil. The experimental results demonstrated that the forest soil was a source of CO2, N2O and a weak sink of CH4.The daily fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O from the soil surface were in the range of 488.99~700.57, 0.049~0.108 and -0.025~ -0.053 mg/(m2·h ), respectively. CO2 from the litter decomposition accounted for about 1/3 of the total CO2 emission from the soil surface, while the litter and seedling had no significant effect on the fluxes of CH4 and N2O. The fluxes of CO2 and N2O measured at 9:00 -11:00 a.m. were significantly different from their daily averages. Therefore, caution must be taken if the CO2 and N2O fluxes measured within 9:00-11:00 a.m. are used for extrapolation.

  20. Modeling the early-phase redistribution of radiocesium fallouts in an evergreen coniferous forest after Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, P.; Gonze, M.-A.; Mourlon, Ch.

    2015-10-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the scientific community gained numerous data on the transfer of radiocesium in European forest ecosystems, including information regarding the short-term redistribution of atmospheric fallout onto forest canopies. In the course of international programs, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) developed a forest model, named TREE4 (Transfer of Radionuclides and External Exposure in FORest systems), 15 years ago. Recently published papers on a Japanese evergreen coniferous forest contaminated by Fukushima radiocesium fallout provide interesting and quantitative data on radioactive mass fluxes measured within the forest in the months following the accident. The present study determined whether the approach adopted in the TREE4 model provides satisfactory results for Japanese forests or whether it requires adjustments. This study focused on the interception of airborne radiocesium by forest canopy, and the subsequent transfer to the forest floor through processes such as litterfall, throughfall, and stemflow, in the months following the accident. We demonstrated that TREE4 quite satisfactorily predicted the interception fraction (20%) and the canopy-to-soil transfer (70% of the total deposit in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest. This dynamics was similar to that observed in the Höglwald spruce forest. However, the unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall (31% in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest could not be reproduced in our simulations (2.5%). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed; and sensitivity of the results to uncertainty in deposition conditions was analyzed. - Highlights: • Transfer of radiocesium atmospheric fallout in evergreen forests was modeled. • The model was tested using observations from Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents. • Model predictions of canopy interception and depuration agree with measurements. • Unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall for the

  1. Offset of the potential carbon sink from boreal forestation by decreases in surface albedo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon uptake by forestation is one method proposed to reduce net carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere and so limit the radiative forcing of climate change. But the overall impact of forestation on climate will also depend on other effects associated with the creation of new forests. In particular the albedo of a forested landscape is generally lower than that of cultivated land, especially when snow is lying, and decreasing albedo exerts a positive radiative forcing on climate. Here I simulate the radiative forcings associated with changes in surface albedo as a result of forestation in temperate and boreal forest areas, and translate these forcings into equivalent changes in local carbon stock for comparison with estimated carbon sequestration potentials. I suggest that in many boreal forest areas, the positive forcing induced by decreases in albedo can offset the negative forcing that is expected from carbon sequestration. Some high-latitude forestation activities may therefore increase climate change, rather that mitigating it as intended

  2. Effects of wildfire and prescribed burning on soil fauna in boreal coniferous forests

    OpenAIRE

    Malmström, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Fire is considered as the most important disturbance agent in many ecosystems. In northern Europe, fire suppression is today highly effective. This has led to a reduction of species that are dependent on fire for their long-term survival. Above ground positive responses of animal diversity to fire are common, whereas the knowledge of the responses of soil fauna to fire is fairly poor. The main aim of this thesis was to determine effects of wildfire and prescribed burning on survival and recov...

  3. Combining MODIS and Landsat imagery to estimate and map boreal forest cover loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, P.; Hansen, M.C.; Stehman, S.V.; Loveland, T.R.; Pittman, K.

    2008-01-01

    Estimation of forest cover change is important for boreal forests, one of the most extensive forested biomes, due to its unique role in global timber stock, carbon sequestration and deposition, and high vulnerability to the effects of global climate change. We used time-series data from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to produce annual forest cover loss hotspot maps. These maps were used to assign all blocks (18.5 by 18.5??km) partitioning the boreal biome into strata of high, medium and low likelihood of forest cover loss. A stratified random sample of 118 blocks was interpreted for forest cover and forest cover loss using high spatial resolution Landsat imagery from 2000 and 2005. Area of forest cover gross loss from 2000 to 2005 within the boreal biome is estimated to be 1.63% (standard error 0.10%) of the total biome area, and represents a 4.02% reduction in year 2000 forest cover. The proportion of identified forest cover loss relative to regional forest area is much higher in North America than in Eurasia (5.63% to 3.00%). Of the total forest cover loss identified, 58.9% is attributable to wildfires. The MODIS pan-boreal change hotspot estimates reveal significant increases in forest cover loss due to wildfires in 2002 and 2003, with 2003 being the peak year of loss within the 5-year study period. Overall, the precision of the aggregate forest cover loss estimates derived from the Landsat data and the value of the MODIS-derived map displaying the spatial and temporal patterns of forest loss demonstrate the efficacy of this protocol for operational, cost-effective, and timely biome-wide monitoring of gross forest cover loss. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  4. Remote Sensing Techniques in Monitoring Post-Fire Effects and Patterns of Forest Recovery in Boreal Forest Regions: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuan Chu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency and severity of forest fires, coupled with changes in spatial and temporal precipitation and temperature patterns, are likely to severely affect the characteristics of forest and permafrost patterns in boreal eco-regions. Forest fires, however, are also an ecological factor in how forest ecosystems form and function, as they affect the rate and characteristics of tree recruitment. A better understanding of fire regimes and forest recovery patterns in different environmental and climatic conditions will improve the management of sustainable forests by facilitating the process of forest resilience. Remote sensing has been identified as an effective tool for preventing and monitoring forest fires, as well as being a potential tool for understanding how forest ecosystems respond to them. However, a number of challenges remain before remote sensing practitioners will be able to better understand the effects of forest fires and how vegetation responds afterward. This article attempts to provide a comprehensive review of current research with respect to remotely sensed data and methods used to model post-fire effects and forest recovery patterns in boreal forest regions. The review reveals that remote sensing-based monitoring of post-fire effects and forest recovery patterns in boreal forest regions is not only limited by the gaps in both field data and remotely sensed data, but also the complexity of far-northern fire regimes, climatic conditions and environmental conditions. We expect that the integration of different remotely sensed data coupled with field campaigns can provide an important data source to support the monitoring of post-fire effects and forest recovery patterns. Additionally, the variation and stratification of pre- and post-fire vegetation and environmental conditions should be considered to achieve a reasonable, operational model for monitoring post-fire effects and forest patterns in boreal regions.

  5. Variation and balance of positive air ion concentrations in a boreal forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Hõrrak

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Air ions are characterized on the basis of measurements carried out in a boreal forest at the Hyytiälä SMEAR station, Finland, during the BIOFOR III campaign in spring 1999. The air ions were discriminated as small ions (charged molecular aggregates of the diameter of less than 2.5 nm, intermediate ions (charged aerosol particles of the diameter of 2.5–8 nm, and large ions (charged aerosol particles of the diameter of 8–20 nm. Statistical characteristics of the ion concentrations and the parameters of ion balance in the atmosphere are presented separately for the nucleation event days and non-event days. In the steady state, the ionization rate is balanced with the loss of small ions, which is expressed as the product of the small ion concentration and the ion sink rate. The widely known sinks of small ions are the recombination with small ions of opposite polarity and attachment to aerosol particles. The dependence of small ion concentration on the concentration of aerosol particles was investigated applying a model of the bipolar diffusion charging of particles by small ions. When the periods of relative humidity above 95% and wind speed less than 0.6 m s−1 were excluded, then the small ion concentration and the theoretically calculated small ion sink rate were closely negatively correlated (correlation coefficient −87%. However, an extra ion loss term of the same magnitude as the ion loss onto aerosol particles is needed for a quantitative explanation of the observations. This term is presumably due to the small ion deposition on coniferous forest. The hygroscopic growth correction of the measured aerosol particle size distributions was also found to be necessary for the proper estimation of the ion sink rate. In the case of nucleation burst events, the concentration of small positive ions followed the general balance equation, no extra ion loss in addition to the deposition on coniferous forest was detected, and the

  6. Effect of Tree Species and Mycorrhizal Colonization on the Archaeal Population of Boreal Forest Rhizospheres▿

    OpenAIRE

    Bomberg, Malin; Timonen, Sari

    2008-01-01

    Group 1.1c Crenarchaeota are the predominating archaeal group in acidic boreal forest soils. In this study, we show that the detection frequency of 1.1c crenarchaeotal 16S rRNA genes in the rhizospheres of the boreal forest trees increased following colonization by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus. This effect was very clear in the fine roots of Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies, and Betula pendula, the most common forest trees in Finland. The nonmycorrhizal fine roots had a clearly ...

  7. Soil Terpene Emissions in a Subalpine Coniferous Forest: Tree Species, Soil Temperature and Moisture Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, D.; Duhl, T.; Greenberg, J.; Guenther, A. B.; Monson, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Some studies have shown soils can contribute significantly to the canopy level fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in some ecosystem types during some seasons. Yet patterns of soil VOCs fluxes as well as controls are poorly known and so the potential importance of soil VOCs emissions on the total global BVOCs emissions from terrestrial sources remains unclear. We measured soil terpene emission at a high-elevation, mixed conifer, subalpine forest site at the Niwot Ridge Ameriflux Site in Colorado. Given the important role of terpenes on the formation of secondary organic aerosols and given that high amounts of terpenes are produced and stored in coniferous tissues (e. g. roots and litter) we focused only on these compounds in this study. The objectives were to quantify soil terpene flux and its contribution to the canopy level flux and to identify environmental variables controlling soil terpene emissions in this forest, such as tree species, tree species density, total soil organic matter content, soil temperature and soil moisture . During the summer 2009 (August), soil terpene emission rates were measured in soil chambers regularly distributed in a 200 x 200 m area around the flux tower. To test the effect of the tree species on soil emissions, additional chambers were placed on relative pure stands of each one of the representative species. The average total monoterterpene emission rate during August 2009 was 21 μg C m-2 h-1. These emissions represent 9% of the total terpene canopy fluxes reported in this forest during the same period on previous summers (August 2007, 238 μg C m-2 h-1). The range of monoterpene emission was found to be high; emissions went up to 368 μg C m-2 h-1 under specific conditions. Total sesquiterpene emissions were much lower than monoterpenes (0.04 ± 0.01 μg C m-2 h-1). Due to the high variability found, no clear effect of the space distribution was identified. However, soil terpene emissions were significantly affected by

  8. Carbon dioxide and water vapour exchange from understory species in boreal forest.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Arp, W.J.; Chapin, F.S.

    2004-01-01

    Although recent eddy covariance measurements in boreal forests provide CO2 and energy exchange data for the whole ecosystem, very little is known about the role of the understory vegetation. We conducted chamber flux measurements in an Alaskan black spruce forest in order to compare CO2 and water va

  9. Boreal Forests in Permafrost Landscapes: Changing Structure and Function in Response to Climate Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, J. L.; Quinton, W. L.; Sonnentag, O.

    2014-12-01

    Boreal forests occupy latitudes that are experiencing the greatest rates of warming on earth, a pattern that is expected to continue over the coming decades. Much of the Boreal is underlain by permafrost, which can be expected to have important consequences for forest structure, composition and functioning as the climate warms. The southern margin of permafrost is especially susceptible to warming, since in this region, the permafrost is discontinuous, relatively thin, warm and ice-rich. In the discontinuous permafrost zone, permafrost often forms the physical foundation on which trees develop, forming tree-covered peat plateaus where trees contribute to permafrost maintenance and aggradation processes through reductions in radiation load and changes in snow accumulation. Forests are restricted to peat plateaus while wetland communities occupy intervening permafrost-free areas. The extent and distribution of each land cover type is an important determinant of how boreal forest-wetland landscapes in the discontinuous permafrost zone function as part of the climate system. Climate warming is rapidly thawing permafrost leading to ground surface subsidence and transformation of the forests into wetlands, increasing both the areal extent and connectivity of the latter. In this presentation, we will use an integrative framework at the ForestGEO Scotty Creek Forest Dynamics Plot site near Fort Simpson, Northwest Territories, Canada to demonstrate the changes in ecological, hydrological and biosphere-atmosphere interactions within this boreal forest-wetland landscape characterized by rapidly degrading permafrost.

  10. Atmospheric ions, boreal forests and impacts on climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, H. E.; Nieminen, T.; Franchin, A.; Järvinen, E.; Kontkanen, J.; Hirsikko, A.; Hõrrak, U.; Mirme, A.; Tammet, H.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.

    2012-04-01

    than 2 nm in diameter by charging the aerosol sample with unipolar corona chargers (Manninen et al., 2009). According to earlier studies, the atmospheric nucleation and cluster activation take place at the mobility diameter range of 1.5-2 nm. Therefore, the ion spectrometers allow direct measurements at exactly the size where atmospheric nucleation takes place. The results indicate that the ion-induced nucleation contributes ~1-30% to the NPF events in most atmospheric conditions (Manninen et al., 2010). In other words, neutral particle formation seems to dominate over ion-mediated mechanisms, at least in the boreal forest conditions. Acknowledgements. This research was supported by the Academy of Finland Center of Excellence program (project number 1118615). Hirsikko, A. et al.: Atmospheric ions and nucleation: a review of observations, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 767-798, 2011. IPCC, Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK and New York, NY, USA, 996 pp, 2007. Kulmala, M., and Kerminen, V.-M.: On the growth of atmospheric nanoparticles, Atmos. Res., 90, 132-150, 2008. Manninen, H.E. et al.: Long-term field measurements of charged and neutral clusters using Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS). Boreal Env. Res. 14, 591-605, 2009. Manninen, H.E. et al., EUCAARI ion spectrometer measurements at 12 European sites - analysis of new particle formation events, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 7907-7927, 2010. Mirme, A. et al.: A Wide-range multi-channel Air Ion Spectrometer, Boreal Environ. Res., 12, 247-264, 2007. Tammet, H.: Symmetric inclined grid mobility analyzer for the measurement of charged clusters and fine nanoparticles in atmospheric air. Aerosol Science and Technology, 45, 468 - 479, 2011.

  11. Traditional use of medicinal plants in the boreal forest of Canada: review and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Uprety Yadav; Asselin Hugo; Dhakal Archana; Julien Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The boreal forest of Canada is home to several hundred thousands Aboriginal people who have been using medicinal plants in traditional health care systems for thousands of years. This knowledge, transmitted by oral tradition from generation to generation, has been eroding in recent decades due to rapid cultural change. Until now, published reviews about traditional uses of medicinal plants in boreal Canada have focused either on particular Aboriginal groups or on restricte...

  12. Vertical and seasonal dynamics of fungal communities in boreal Scots pine forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santalahti, Minna; Sun, Hui; Jumpponen, Ari; Pennanen, Taina; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2016-11-01

    Fungal communities are important for carbon (C) transformations in boreal forests that are one of the largest C pools in terrestrial ecosystems, warranting thus further investigation of fungal community dynamics in time and space. We investigated fungal diversity and community composition seasonally and across defined soil horizons in boreal Scots pine forest in Finland using 454 pyrosequencing. We collected a total of 120 samples from five vertical soil horizons monthly from March to October; in March, under snow. Boreal forest soil generally harbored diverse fungal communities across soil horizons. The communities shifted drastically and rapidly over time. In late winter, saprotrophs dominated the community and were replaced by ectomycorrhizal fungi during the growing season. Our studies are among the first to dissect the spatial and temporal dynamics in boreal forest ecosystems and highlights the ecological importance of vertically distinct communities and their rapid seasonal dynamics. As climate change is predicted to result in warmer and longer snow-free winter seasons, as well as increase the rooting depth of trees in boreal forest, the seasonal and vertical distribution of fungal communities may change. These changes are likely to affect the organic matter decomposition by the soil-inhabiting fungi and thus alter organic C pools. PMID:27515733

  13. Above-ground sulfur cycling in adjacent coniferous and deciduous forest and watershed sulfur retention in the Georgia Piedmont, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellato, R.; Peters, N.E.; Meyers, T.P.

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition and above-ground cycling of sulfur (S) were evaluated in adjacent deciduous and coniferous forests at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed (PMRW), Georgia U.S.A. Total atmospheric S deposition (wet plus dry) was 12.9 and 12.7 kg ha-1 yr-1 for the deciduous and coniferous forests, respectively, from October 1987 through November 1989. Dry deposition contributes more than 40% to the total atmospheric S deposition, and SO2 is the major source (~55%) of total dry S deposition. Dry deposition to these canopies is similar to regional estimates suggesting that 60-km proximity to emission sources does not noticeably impact dry deposition at PMRW. Below-canopy S fluxes (throughfall plus stemflow) in each forest are 37% higher annually in the deciduous forest than in the coniferous forest. An excess in below-canopy S flux in the deciduous forest is attributed to leaching and higher dry deposition than in the coniferous forest. Total S deposition to the forest floor by throughfall, stemflow and litterfall was 2.4 and 2.8 times higher in the deciduous and coniferous forests, respectively, than annual S growth requirement for foliage and wood. Although A deposition exceeds growth requirement, more than 95% of the total atmospheric S deposition was retained by the watershed in 1988 and 1989. The S retention at PMRW is primarily due to SO2+4 adsorption by iron oxides and hydroxides in watershed soils. The S content in while oak and loblolly pine boles have increased more than 200% in the last 20 yr, possibly reflecting increases in emissions.

  14. Changes in species composition and diversity in the restoration process of sub-alpine dark brown coniferous forests in western Sichuan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangming MA; Shirong LIU; Zuomin SHI; Yuandong ZHANG; Bing KANG; Baoyu CHEN

    2008-01-01

    By adopting the concept of space as a substi-tute for time, we analyzed the dynamics of species com-position and diversity of different restoration sequences (20, 30, 40, 50 years) in two secondary forest types in western Sichuan Province, distributed in a northerly or northwesterly direction. The analysis was based on the results of measurements of 50 plots located at elevations between 3100-3600 m. The forests originated from nat-ural regeneration in combination with reforestation of spruce when the old-growth bamboo-dark brown con-iferous forests and moss-dark brown coniferous old growth forests were harvested. Similar old-growth dark brown coniferous forests at ages ranging between 160 and 200 years were selected as the reference forests for comparisons. We recorded 167 species of vascular plants from 44 families and 117 genera. There was no significant difference in terms of the number of species among secondary forests. But the importance values of dominant species varied during the restoration pro-cesses. The dominant species in the secondary forests is Betula albo-sinensis, while Abiesfaxoniana is the dom-inant species in old-growth dark brown coniferous for-ests. Species richness increased significantly with restoration processes. It increased quickly in secondary forests during the period from 30 to 40 years, but decreased significantly in the old-growth dark brown coniferous forests. The species richness among growth forms decreased in the following order: herb layer> sh-rub layer > tree layer. The maximum value of the even-ness index occurred in secondary forests at age 40 and remained relatively stable in the bamboo-birch forests, but the evenness index tended to decrease in moss-birch forests and slightly increased in the old-growth moss-dark brown coniferous forests. There was a statistically significant difference in the evenness index between the tree and shrub layers as well as between the tree layer and the herb layer, but there was no

  15. Main dynamics and drivers of boreal forests fire regimes during the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Chiara; Lehsten, Veiko; Blarquez, Olivier; Clear, Jennifer; Carcaillet, Christopher; Bradshaw, Richard HW

    2015-04-01

    Forest fire is one of the most critical ecosystem processes in the boreal megabiome, and it is likely that its frequency, size and severity have had a primary role in vegetation dynamics since the Last Ice Age (Kasischke & Stocks 2000). Fire not only organizes the physical and biological attributes of boreal forests, but also affects biogeochemical cycling, particularly the carbon balance (Balshi et al. 2007). Due to their location at climatically sensitive northern latitudes, boreal forests are likely to be significantly affected by global warming with a consequent increase in biomass burning (Soja et al. 2007), a variation in vegetation structure and composition (Johnstone et al. 2004) and a rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (Bond-Lamberty et al. 2007). Even if the ecological role of wildfire in boreal forest is widely recognized, a clearer understanding of the environmental factors controlling fire dynamics and how variations in fire regimes impact forest ecosystems is essential in order to place modern fire processes in a meaningful context for projecting ecosystem behaviour in a changing environment (Kelly et al. 2013). Because fire return intervals and successional cycles in boreal forests occur over decadal to centennial timescales (Hu et al. 2006), palaeoecological research seems to be one of the most promising tool for elucidating ecosystem changes over a broad range of environmental conditions and temporal scales. Within this context, our first aim is to reconstruct spatial and temporal patterns of boreal forests fire dynamics during the Holocene based on sedimentary charcoal records. As a second step, trends in biomass burning will be statistically analysed in order to disentangle between regional and local drivers. The use of European and north-American sites will give us the unique possibility to perform a large scale analysis on one of the broadest biome in the world and to underline the different patterns of fire in these two

  16. Modelling canopy radiation budget through multiple scattering approximation: a case study of coniferous forest in Mexico City Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silván-Cárdenas, Jose L.; Corona-Romero, Nirani

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we describe some results from a study on hyperspectral analysis of coniferous canopy scattering for the purpose of estimating forest biophysical and structural parameters. Georeferenced airborne hyperspectral measurements were taken from a flying helicopter over a coniferous forest dominated by Pinus hartweguii and Abies religiosa within the Federal District Conservation Land in Mexico City. Hyperspectral data was recorded in the optical range from 350 to 2500 nm at 1nm spectral resolution using the FieldSpec 4 (ASD Inc.). Spectral measurements were also carried out in the ground for vegetation and understory components, including leaf, bark, soil and grass. Measurements were then analyzed through a previously developed multiple scattering approximation (MSA) model, which represents above-canopy spectral reflectance through a non-linear combination of pure spectral components (endmembers), as well as through a set of photon recollision probabilities and interceptance fractions. In this paper we provide an expression for the canopy absorptance as the basis for estimating the components of canopy radiation budget using the MSA model. Furthermore, since MSA does not prescribe a priori the endmembers to incorporate in the model, a multiple endmember selection method (MESMSA) was developed and tested. Photon recollision probabilities and interceptance fractions were estimated by fitting the model to airborne spectral reflectance and selected endmembers where then used to estimate the canopy radiation budget at each measured location.

  17. Management effects on carbon fluxes in boreal forests (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroth, A.; Mölder, M.; Lagergren, F.; Vestin, P.; Hellström, M.; Sundqvist, E.; Norunda Bgs Team

    2010-12-01

    Disturbance by management or natural causes such as wind throw or fire are believed to be one of the main factors that are controlling the carbon balance of vegetation. In Northern Europe a large fraction of the forest area is managed with clear cutting and thinning as the main silvicultural methods. The effect of clear-cutting on carbon dioxide exchanges were studied in different chrono-sequences located in Sweden, Finland, UK and France, respectively. The combined results from these studies showed that a simple model could be developed describing relative net ecosystem exchange as a function of relative rotation length (age). A stand with a rotation length of 100 years, typical for Swedish conditions, looses substantial amounts of carbon during the first 12-15 years and the time it takes to reach cumulative balance after clear-cut, is 25-30 years. The mean net ecosystem exchange over the whole rotation length equals 50% of the maximum uptake. An interesting question is if it is possible to harvest without the substantial carbon losses that take place after clear-cutting. Selective harvest by thinning could potentially be such a method. We therefore studied the effect of thinning on soil and ecosystem carbon fluxes in a mixed pine and spruce forest in Central Sweden, the Norunda forest, located in the semi-boreal zone at 60.08°N, 17.48 °E. The CO2 fluxes from the forest were measured by eddy covariance method and soil effluxes were measured by automatic chambers. Maximum canopy height of the ca. 100 years-old forest was 28 m. The stand was composed of ca 72% pine, 28% before the thinning while the composition after the thinning became 82% pine and 18% spruce. The thinning was made in November/December 2008 in a half- circle from the tower with a radius of 200 m. The LAI decreased from 4.5 to 2.8 after the thinning operation. Immediately after the thinning, we found significantly higher soil effluxes, probably due to increased decomposition of dead roots. The

  18. Effect of Forest Fire on Regional Carbon Dioxide Exchange Over Boreal Forest in Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, H.; Otsuki, M.; Harazono, Y.; Ueyama, M.; Iwata, T.

    2010-12-01

    Forest fire is a major disturbance in boreal forest ecosystems and significantly influences carbon exchange processes by combustion of vegetation and surface organic soils. In Interior Alaska, area of 7.6x106 ha was burned during 2000-2009 by forest fires. Fire occurrence frequency in the next decade may increase with current warming trend. Hence, it is important to include carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange at fire scars to accurately estimate regional CO2 exchange. To quantify CO2 exchange, CO2 flux and meteorological data were obtained at an undisturbed black spruce forest and a fire scar (five years after fire) in Interior Alaska, and responses of photosynthesis and respiration to meteorological variables were examined in each site. Photosynthesis at the fire scar was reduced to approximately 50 % of photosynthesis at the undisturbed black spruce forest due to loss of vegetation. Respiration at the fire scar was also reduced to 50 % of the undisturbed black spruce forest. This is attributable to decrease of biomass and surface organic matter. Annual net exchanges of CO2 at both sites were uptake of 519 and 256 gCO2/m2/year for the undisturbed black spruce forest and the fire scar, respectively. We used light-use efficiency model to estimate spatial distributions of photosynthesis and respiration using remote sensing imagery, NCEP/NCAR reanalysis meteorology and NASA solar radiation. The model was parameterized using observations at the undisturbed black spruce forest and the fire scar. Estimated regional average of CO2 uptake was reduced by 10 % compared to an estimated value with which fire scars were not included. Further improvement is expected by incorporating severity of forest fires that determine reduction of photosynthesis and respiration after fires.

  19. Observation and modelling of HOx radicals in a boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, K.; Novelli, A.; Martinez, M.; Auld, J.; Axinte, R.; Bohn, B.; Fischer, H.; Keronen, P.; Kubistin, D.; Nölscher, A. C.; Oswald, R.; Paasonen, P.; Petäjä, T.; Regelin, E.; Sander, R.; Sinha, V.; Sipilä, M.; Taraborrelli, D.; Tatum Ernest, C.; Williams, J.; Lelieveld, J.; Harder, H.

    2014-08-01

    Measurements of OH and HO2 radicals were conducted in a pine-dominated forest in southern Finland during the HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 (Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles in Air - Comprehensive Organic Precursor Emission and Concentration study) field campaign in summer 2010. Simultaneous side-by-side measurements of hydroxyl radicals were conducted with two instruments using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), indicating small systematic disagreement, OHLIF / OHCIMS = (1.31 ± 0.14). Subsequently, the LIF instrument was moved to the top of a 20 m tower, just above the canopy, to investigate the radical chemistry at the ecosystem-atmosphere interface. Comprehensive measurements including observations of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the total OH reactivity were conducted and analysed using steady-state calculations as well as an observationally constrained box model. Production rates of OH calculated from measured OH precursors are consistent with those derived from the steady-state assumption and measured total OH loss under conditions of moderate OH reactivity. The primary photolytic sources of OH contribute up to one-third to the total OH production. OH recycling, which occurs mainly by HO2 reacting with NO and O3, dominates the total hydroxyl radical production in this boreal forest. Box model simulations agree with measurements for hydroxyl radicals (OHmod. / OHobs. = 1.00 ± 0.16), while HO2 mixing ratios are significantly under-predicted (HO2mod. / HO2obs. = 0.3 ± 0.2), and simulated OH reactivity does not match the observed OH reactivity. The simultaneous under-prediction of HO2 and OH reactivity in periods in which OH concentrations were simulated realistically suggests that the missing OH reactivity is an unaccounted-for source of HO2. Detailed analysis of the HOx production, loss, and recycling pathways suggests that in periods of high total OH reactivity there are

  20. Observation and modelling of HOx radicals in a boreal forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hens

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of OH and HO2 radicals were conducted in a pine-dominated forest in southern Finland during the HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 (Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles in Air – Comprehensive Organic Precursor Emission and Concentration study field campaign in summer 2010. Simultaneous side-by-side measurements of hydroxyl radicals were conducted with two instruments using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF, indicating small systematic disagreement, OHLIF / OHCIMS = (1.31 ± 0.14. Subsequently, the LIF instrument was moved to the top of a 20 m tower, just above the canopy, to investigate the radical chemistry at the ecosystem–atmosphere interface. Comprehensive measurements including observations of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs and the total OH reactivity were conducted and analysed using steady-state calculations as well as an observationally constrained box model. Production rates of OH calculated from measured OH precursors are consistent with those derived from the steady-state assumption and measured total OH loss under conditions of moderate OH reactivity. The primary photolytic sources of OH contribute up to one-third to the total OH production. OH recycling, which occurs mainly by HO2 reacting with NO and O3, dominates the total hydroxyl radical production in this boreal forest. Box model simulations agree with measurements for hydroxyl radicals (OHmod. / OHobs. = 1.00 ± 0.16, while HO2 mixing ratios are significantly under-predicted (HO2mod. / HO2obs. = 0.3 ± 0.2, and simulated OH reactivity does not match the observed OH reactivity. The simultaneous under-prediction of HO2 and OH reactivity in periods in which OH concentrations were simulated realistically suggests that the missing OH reactivity is an unaccounted-for source of HO2. Detailed analysis of the HOx production, loss, and recycling pathways suggests that in periods of high total OH reactivity

  1. Northeastern North America as a potential refugium for boreal forests in a warming climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orangeville, L; Duchesne, L; Houle, D; Kneeshaw, D; Côté, B; Pederson, N

    2016-06-17

    High precipitation in boreal northeastern North America could help forests withstand the expected temperature-driven increase in evaporative demand, but definitive evidence is lacking. Using a network of tree-ring collections from 16,450 stands across 583,000 km(2) of boreal forests in Québec, Canada, we observe a latitudinal shift in the correlation of black spruce growth with temperature and reduced precipitation, from negative south of 49°N to largely positive to the north of that latitude. Our results suggest that the positive effect of a warmer climate on growth rates and growing season length north of 49°N outweighs the potential negative effect of lower water availability. Unlike the central and western portions of the continent's boreal forest, northeastern North America may act as a climatic refugium in a warmer climate.

  2. Traditional use of medicinal plants in the boreal forest of Canada: review and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uprety Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The boreal forest of Canada is home to several hundred thousands Aboriginal people who have been using medicinal plants in traditional health care systems for thousands of years. This knowledge, transmitted by oral tradition from generation to generation, has been eroding in recent decades due to rapid cultural change. Until now, published reviews about traditional uses of medicinal plants in boreal Canada have focused either on particular Aboriginal groups or on restricted regions. Here, we present a review of traditional uses of medicinal plants by the Aboriginal people of the entire Canadian boreal forest in order to provide comprehensive documentation, identify research gaps, and suggest perspectives for future research. Methods A review of the literature published in scientific journals, books, theses and reports. Results A total of 546 medicinal plant taxa used by the Aboriginal people of the Canadian boreal forest were reported in the reviewed literature. These plants were used to treat 28 disease and disorder categories, with the highest number of species being used for gastro-intestinal disorders, followed by musculoskeletal disorders. Herbs were the primary source of medicinal plants, followed by shrubs. The medicinal knowledge of Aboriginal peoples of the western Canadian boreal forest has been given considerably less attention by researchers. Canada is lacking comprehensive policy on harvesting, conservation and use of medicinal plants. This could be explained by the illusion of an infinite boreal forest, or by the fact that many boreal medicinal plant species are widely distributed. Conclusion To our knowledge, this review is the most comprehensive to date to reveal the rich traditional medicinal knowledge of Aboriginal peoples of the Canadian boreal forest. Future ethnobotanical research endeavours should focus on documenting the knowledge held by Aboriginal groups that have so far received less attention

  3. The arthropod community of boreal Norway spruce forests responds variably to stump harvesting

    OpenAIRE

    Kataja-aho, Saana; Hannonen, Paloma; Liukkonen, Titta; Rosten, Hertta; Koivula, Matti J.; Koponen, Seppo; Haimi, Jari

    2016-01-01

    Forest fuel harvesting increases the need to collect not just logging residues but also tree stumps from harvested stands. This biomass removal has raised concern over forest biodiversity. Here, the effects of stump harvesting on spiders, ants, harvestmen, ground beetles and epiedaphic springtails occupying boreal Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest floor were studied two and five years after harvesting by comparing pitfall trap samples from clear-cut sites with and without subsequent stump ha...

  4. The impact of climate change on forest fire danger rating in China's boreal forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guang; DI Xue-ying; GUO Qing-xi; SHU Zhan; ZENG Tao; YU Hong-zhou; WANG Chao

    2011-01-01

    The Great Xing'an Mountains boreal forests were focused on in the northeastern China.The simulated future climate scenarios of IPCC SRES A2a and B2a for both the baseline period of 1961-1990 and the future scenario periods were downscaled by the Delta Method and the Weather Generator to produce daily weather data.After the verification with local weather and fire data, the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index System was used to assess the forest fire weather situation under climate change in the study region.An increasing trend of fire weather severity was found over the 21st century in the study region under the both future climate change scenarios, compared to the 1961-1990 baseline period.The annual mean/maximum fire weather index was predicted to rise continuously during 2010-2099, and by the end of the 21st century it is predicted to rise by 22%-52% across much of China's boreal forest.The significant increases were predicted in the spring from of April to June and in the summer from July to August.In the summer, the fire weather index was predicted to be higher than the current index by as much as 148% by the end of the 21st century.Under the scenarios of SRES A2a and B2a, both the chance of extremely high fire danger occurrence and the number of days of extremely high fire danger occurrence was predieted to increase in the study region.It is anticipated that the number of extremely high fire danger days would increase from 44 days in 1980s to 53-75 days by the end of the 21st century.

  5. Plants go with the flow : predicting spatial distribution of plant species in the boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Zinko, Ursula

    2004-01-01

    The main objectives of this thesis are to study if a topographic wetness index (TWI) could be used as a tool for predicting the spatial distribution of vascular plant species richness in the boreal forest as well as to study congruence in species richness between vascular plants, liverworts, mosses and lichens. A wetness index ln(a/tanβ) based on topography was used to assign a specific TWI-value to every 20 x 20m grid in two 25 km2 boreal forest landscapes (differing in average soil pH) in n...

  6. Significant and persistent impact of timber harvesting on soil microbial communities in Northern coniferous forests

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, Martin; Howes, Charles G; VanInsberghe, David; Yu, Hang; Bachar, Dipankar; Christen, Richard; Henrik Nilsson, Rolf; Hallam, Steven J.; Mohn, William W

    2012-01-01

    Forest ecosystems have integral roles in climate stability, biodiversity and economic development. Soil stewardship is essential for sustainable forest management. Organic matter (OM) removal and soil compaction are key disturbances associated with forest harvesting, but their impacts on forest ecosystems are not well understood. Because microbiological processes regulate soil ecology and biogeochemistry, microbial community structure might serve as indicator of forest ecosystem status, revea...

  7. An energy-based model accounting for snow accumulation and snowmelt in a coniferous forest and in an open area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matějka, Ondřej; Jeníček, Michal

    2016-04-01

    An energy balance approach was used to simulate snow water equivalent (SWE) evolution in an open area, forest clearing and coniferous forest during winter seasons 2011/12 and 2012/13 in the Bystřice River basin (Krušné Mountains, Czech Republic). The aim was to describe the impact of vegetation on snow accumulation and snowmelt under different forest canopy structure and trees density. Hemispherical photographs were used to describe the forest canopy structure. Energy balance model of snow accumulation and melt was set up. The snow model was adjusted to account the effects of forest canopy on driving meteorological variables. Leaf area index derived from 32 hemispherical photographs of vegetation and sky was used to implement the forest influence in the snow model. The model was evaluated using snow depth and SWE data measured at 16 localities in winter seasons from 2011 to 2013. The model was able to reproduce the SWE evolution in both winter seasons beneath the forest canopy, forest clearing and open area. The SWE maximum in forest sites was by 18% lower than in open areas and forest clearings. The portion of shortwave radiation on snowmelt rate was by 50% lower in forest areas than in open areas due to shading effect. The importance of turbulent fluxes was by 30% lower in forest sites compared to openings because of wind speed reduction up to 10% of values at corresponding open areas. Indirect estimation of interception rates was derived. Between 14 and 60% of snowfall was intercept and sublimated in the forest canopy in both winter seasons. Based on model results, the underestimation of solid precipitation (heated precipitation gauge used for measurement) at the weather station Hřebečná was revealed. The snowfall was underestimated by 40% in winter season 2011/12 and by 13% in winter season 2012/13. Although, the model formulation appeared sufficient for both analysed winter seasons, canopy effects on the longwave radiation and ground heat flux were not

  8. Influence of different tree-harvesting intensities on forest soil carbon stocks in boreal and northern temperate forest ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Nicholas; Gundersen, Per; Jönsson-Belyazid, Ulrika;

    2015-01-01

    Effective forest governance measures are crucial to ensure sustainable management of forests, but so far there has been little specific focus in boreal and northern temperate forests on governance measures in relation to management effects, including harvesting effects, on soil organic carbon (SOC......) stocks. This paper reviews the findings in the scientific literature concerning the effects of harvesting of different intensities on SOC stocks and fluxes in boreal and northern temperate forest ecosystems to evaluate the evidence for significant SOC losses following biomass removal. An overview...... of existing governance measures related to SOC is given, followed by a discussion on how scientific findings could be incorporated in guidelines and other governance measures. The currently available information does not support firm conclusions about the long-term impact of intensified forest harvesting...

  9. Nitrogen Additions Affect Root Dynamics in a Boreal Forest Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. M.; Treseder, K. K.

    2004-12-01

    As with many ecosystems, North American boreal forests are increasingly subjected to anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. To examine potential effects on plant growth, we created nitrogen fertilization plots in three sites along an Alaskan fire chronosequence composed of forests aged 5, 17, and 80 years. Each site had been exposed to two years of nitrogen fertilization, with four control plots and four nitrogen plots per site. General observations indicate that aboveground net primary productivity appears to be nitrogen limited in each site. We hypothesized that nitrogen fertilization would positively influence root dynamics as well, with nitrogen additions resulting in an increase in standing root biomass and length. To test our hypothesis, we used a minirhizotron camera to collect sequential images of roots in the top 10 cm of soil in both nitrogen fertilized and control plots in each site. Images were collected monthly during the growing season, with a total of five sampling times between May 2003 and May 2004. We then analyzed the images with WinRhizotron root measurement software. Nitrogen fertilization had varying effects on root biomass among the three sites, with a significant site by N interaction (P = 0.039). A decrease in root biomass was observed in the 5 and 80 year old sites, dropping from 207 g/m2 to 79 g/m2 and from 230 g/m2 to 129 g/m2 for the youngest and oldest sites, respectively. In contrast, root biomass increased from 52 g/m2 to 107 g/m2 in the 17 year old site. (Values are for the top 10 cm of soil only, and likely underestimate total root stocks.) Patterns in standing root lengths diverged from those of root biomass, with a 2.5-fold overall increase under nitrogen fertilization across all sites (P = 0.004). There were no significant differences among sites in nitrogen response. Standing root biomass and length differed from one another in their responses to nitrogen fertilization because nitrogen additions decreased specific root weight (as g

  10. Growth decline linked to warming-induced water limitation in hemi-boreal forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuchen Wu

    Full Text Available Hemi-boreal forests, which make up the transition from temperate deciduous forests to boreal forests in southern Siberia, have experienced significant warming without any accompanying increase in precipitation during the last 80 years. This climatic change could have a profound impact on tree growth and on the stability of forest ecosystems in this region, but at present evidence for these impacts is lacking. In this study, we report a recent dramatic decline in the growth of hemi-boreal forests, based on ring width measurements from three dominant tree-species (Pinus sylvestris, Larix sibirica and Larix gmelinii, sampled from eight sites in the region. We found that regional tree growth has become increasingly limited by low soil water content in the pre- and early-growing season (from October of the previous year to July of the current year over the past 80 years. A warming-induced reduction in soil water content has also increased the climate sensitivity of these three tree species. Beginning in the mid-1980s, a clear decline in growth is evident for both the pine forests and the larch forests, although there are increasing trends in the proxy of soil water use efficiencies. Our findings are consistent with those from other parts of the world and provide valuable insights into the regional carbon cycle and vegetation dynamics, and should be useful for devising adaptive forest management strategies.

  11. Land cover mapping, fire regeneration, and scaling studies in the Canadian boreal forest with 1 km AVHRR and Landsat TM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, L.T.; Hall, F.G.; Loveland, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    A multitemporal 1 km advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. The land cover classification was developed by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). Quantitative areal proportions of the major boreal forest components were determined for a 821 km ?? 619 km region, ranging from the southern grasslands-boreal forest ecotone to the northern boreal transitional forest. The boreal wetlands (mostly lowland black spruce, tamarack, mosses, fens, and bogs) occupied approximately 33% of the region, while lakes accounted for another 13%. Upland mixed coniferous-deciduous forests represented 23% of the ecosystem. A SW-NE productivity gradient across the region is manifested by three levels of tree stand density for both the boreal wetland conifer and the mixed forest classes, which are generally aligned with isopleths of regional growing degree days. Approximately 30% of the region was directly affected by fire disturbance within the preceding 30-35 years, especially in the Canadian Shield Zone where large fire-regeneration patterns contribute to the heterogeneous boreal landscape. Intercomparisons with land cover classifications derived from 30-m Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data provided important insights into the relative accuracy of the 1 km AVHRR land cover classification. Primarily due to the multitemporal NDVI image compositing process, the 1 km AVHRR land cover classes have an effective spatial resolution in the 3-4 km range; therefore fens, bogs, small water bodies, and small patches of dry jack pine cannot be resolved within

  12. Organosulfates and Carboxylic Acids in Secondary Organic Aerosols in Coniferous Forests in Rocky Mountains (USA), Sierra Nevada Mountains (USA) and Northern Europe (Finland and Denmark)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasius, M.; Hansen, A. M. K.; Kristensen, K.; Kristensen, T. B.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Hallar, A. G.; Petäjä, T.; Surratt, J. D.; Worton, D. R.; Bilde, M.; Kulmala, M. T.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Levels and chemical composition of secondary organic aerosols affect their climate effects and properties. Organosulfates (OS) are formed through heterogeneous reactions involving oxidized sulfur compounds, primarily originating from anthropogenic sources. Availability of authentic standards have until now been an obstacle to quantitative investigations of OS in atmospheric aerosols. We have developed a new, facile method for synthesis and purification of OS standards. Here we have used 7 standards to quantify OS and nitrooxy organosulfates (NOS) observed in aerosols collected at four sites in coniferous forests in USA and Europe during spring or summer. The two American sites were Storm Peak Laboratory, Colorado (Rocky Mountains, elevation 3220 m a.s.l) and Sierra Nevada Mountains, California (as part of BEARPEX 2007 and 2009). The European sites were Hyytiälä Forest Station, Finland (in the boreal zone) and Silkeborg, Denmark (temperate forest). Aerosol filter samples were extracted and analyzed using a high performance liquid chromatograph coupled through an electrospray inlet to a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HPLC-QTOF-MS). We identified 11 carboxylic acids using authentic standards, while 16 different OS and 8 NOS were identified based on their molecular mass and MS fragmentation patterns, as well as comparison with available standards. OS were ubiquitous in the atmospheric aerosol samples, even at the high elevation mountain station. Levels of carboxylic acids from oxidation of monoterpenes were 8-25 ng m-3 at Silkeborg and Storm Peak Laboratory, while concentrations at the sites with strong regional monoterpene emissions (Sierra Nevada Mountains and Hyytiälä) were much higher (10-200 ng m-3). At all sites, the dominant group of OS were derived from isoprene (IEPOX) and related compounds, while OS of monoterpenes showed lower concentrations, except at Hyytiälä during periods of north-westerly winds when monoterpene OS were at similar or

  13. Draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sordidicola S170, a potential plant growth promoter isolated from coniferous forest soil in the Czech Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lladó, Salvador; Xu, Zhuofei; Sørensen, Søren Johannes;

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia species are key players in the accumulation of carbon from cellulose decomposition in coniferous forest ecosystems. We report here the draft genome of Burkholderia sordidicola strain S170, containing features associated with known genes involved in plant growth promotion, the biologi...

  14. The role of forest floor and trees to the ecosystem scale methane budget of boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlatie, Mari; Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Peltola, Olli; Haikarainen, Iikka; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Santalahti, Minna; Putkinen, Anuliina; Fritze, Hannu; Urban, Otmar; Machacova, Katerina

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests are considered as a sink of atmospheric methane (CH4) due to the activity of CH4 oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) in the soil. This soil CH4 sink is especially strong for upland forest soils, whereas forests growing on organic soils may act as small sources due to the domination of CH4 production by methanogens in the anaerobic parts of the soil. The role of trees to the ecosystem-scale CH4 fluxes has until recently been neglected due to the perception that trees do not contribute to the CH4 exchange, and also due to difficulties in measuring the CH4 exchange from trees. Findings of aerobic CH4 formation in plants and emissions from tree-stems in temperate and tropical forests during the past decade demonstrate that our understanding of CH4 cycling in forest ecosystems is not complete. Especially the role of forest canopies still remain unresolved, and very little is known of CH4 fluxes from trees in boreal region. We measured the CH4 exchange of tree-stems and tree-canopies from pine (Pinus sylvestris), spruce (Picea abies) and birch (Betula pubescens, Betula pendula) trees growing in Southern Finland (SMEAR II station) on varying soil conditions, from upland mineral soils to paludified soil. We compared the CH4 fluxes from trees to forest-floor CH4 exchange, both measured by static chambers, and to CH4 fluxes measured above the forest canopy by a flux gradient technique. We link the CH4 fluxes from trees and forest floor to physiological activity of the trees, such as transpiration, sap-flow, CO2 net ecosystem exchange (NEE), soil properties such as temperature and moisture, and to the presence of CH4 producing methanogens and CH4 oxidizing methanotrophs in trees or soil. The above canopy CH4 flux measurements show that the whole forest ecosystem was a small source of CH4 over extended periods in the spring and summer 2012, 2014 and 2015. Throughout the 2013-2014 measurements, the forest floor was in total a net sink of CH4, with variation

  15. Chemical characteristics of Siberian boreal forest fire emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engling, G.; Popovicheva, O.; Fan, T. S.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Diapouli, E.; Kozlov, V.

    2014-12-01

    Smoke emissions from Siberian boreal forest fires exert critical impacts on the aerosol/climate system of subarctic regions and the Arctic. It is, therefore, crucial to assess the ability of such particles to absorb/scatter incoming solar radiation as well as act as cloud condensation nuclei, which is closely linked to the physical and chemical aerosol properties. However, observations of Siberian wildfire emissions are limited, and no systematic database of smoke particle properties is available for this region to date. As part of this study, ambient aerosol samples were collected during two smoke episodes in Tomsk, Siberia, in the summers of 2012 and 2013. In addition, the chemical composition and optical properties of smoke particles derived from the combustion of typical Siberian fuels, including pine wood and debris, were determined during chamber burn experiments in a large aerosol/combustion chamber under controlled combustion conditions representative of wildfires and prescribed burns. Detailed multi-component characterization of individual particles and bulk properties was accomplished with a suite of techniques, including various types of chromatography, microscopy, spectroscopy, and thermo-optical analysis. Individual particle analysis by SEM-EDX combined with cluster analysis revealed characteristic smoke structural components and major types of particles, which allowed to discriminate between flaming and smoldering regimes, reflected in specific morphological and chemical microstructure. The physicochemical properties representing the combustion phase (smoldering versus flaming) and the degree of processing (fresh versus aged) were assessed in the ambient aerosol based on the chamber burn results. For instance, some chemical transformation (aging of smoke particles) was noticed over a period of two days in the absence of sun light in the combustion chamber for certain chemical species, while the molecular tracer levoglucosan appeared to be rather

  16. Boreal forest soil nitrous oxide production and consumption responds positively to temperature and a warmer climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckeridge, K. M.; Edwards, K.; Ziegler, S. E.; Billings, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) is both produced and consumed in soils. In strict denitrification, nitrogen (N)-oxides are reduced stepwise by microbial enzymes until dinitrogen (N2) is produced. N2O may be lost and/or consumed during this process, by microbes that may or may not possess the enzyme required for the final step of the reduction chain. In cold, N-limited, boreal forest soils consumption may dominate, resulting in low net N2O flux to the atmosphere, though the ubiquity of this pattern and the temperature response of these processes are unclear. To accurately predict the temperature response of net soil efflux of N2O in the boreal biome, we must understand fundamental, temperature responses of the boreal soil denitrifier community. Using boreal forest organic and mineral soils collected from three climate regions along the Newfoundland and Labrador Boreal Ecosystem Latitudinal Transect, Canada, we measured soil N2O fluxes during ~60 h lab incubations, in which conditions for denitrification were optimized. Organic soils from the warmer climate and incubated at the warmest temperature produced the most N2O. These soils also experienced net consumption of N2O earlier in the incubation than other soils. All mineral soils, regardless of location along the climate gradient, exhibited net N2O consumption earliest in the incubation at the warmest incubation temperature. Ongoing analyses of headspace N2O and N2 d15N and relative abundances of denitrifying communities during the incubation will reveal mechanisms driving changes in [N2O] over time, but these data suggest warmer temperatures in these boreal soils promote enhanced rates of both N2O production and consumption, with 'hot moments' of net N2O efflux during which production far exceeds consumption. If these results are applicable in situ, a warming climate may result in greater net N2O flux from boreal forest soils such as these.

  17. Changed vegetation composition in coniferous forests near to motorways in Southern Germany: The effects of traffic-born pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To estimate the effect of traffic emissions on the vegetation composition of coniferous forests near to motorways, three transects of 520 m length were studied by analysing vegetation composition, soil parameters and deposition data in the Munich-area, Southern Germany. The detected patterns suggest that motorways have an impact on the vegetation composition in the neighbourhood of roads. Depending on the wind direction, the influences of the motorways reaches up to 230 m on downwind side and up to 80 m on upwind side. The vegetation is mainly affected by the deposition of nitrogen deriving from fuel combustion and by basic substances added to road salt. By monitoring vegetation changes near to motorways, it is possible to estimate the areas where harmful alterations of the ecosystem can be expected. - Vegetation near motorways was strongly influenced by traffic-borne nitrogen

  18. Balancing the Relationship Between Protection and Sustainable Management in Canada′s Boreal Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Carlson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protection and sustainable forest management are related but unique, with protection focusing on minimising risk to ecosystems and sustainable management emphasising economic development. Given these distinct roles, a defining characteristic of the relationship between the two approaches is their relative abundance and distribution. The relationship is currently imbalanced, with only 12% of Canada allocated to protection, indicating that ecological values have historically been traded off in favour of resource production. The intactness of Canada′s boreal forest provides an opportunity for a more holistic approach that conserves its globally significant environmental attributes while also supporting resource production. The Boreal Forest Conservation Framework proposes a balanced relationship that allocates land approximately equally between protection and sustainable management. It is a framework that has been endorsed by industry, Aboriginal, and conservation organisations, and is supported by conservation science. Recent commitments to comprehensive land-use planning at regional scales are consistent with the collaborative approach promoted by the Boreal Forest Conservation Framework, and suggest that conservation objectives are likely to receive increased attention in Canada′s boreal region relative to recent history. Ensuring that land-use planning is proactive and balanced will be essential to forging a cooperative relationship between sustainable management and protection in the region.

  19. Estimating seasonal variations in cloud droplet number concentration over the boreal forest from satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. H. Janssen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal variations in cloud droplet number concentration (NCD in low-level stratiform clouds over the boreal forest are estimated from MODIS observations of cloud optical and microphysical properties, using a sub-adiabatic cloud model to interpret vertical profiles of cloud properties. An uncertainty analysis of the cloud model is included to reveal the main sensitivities of the cloud model. We compared the seasonal cycle in NCD obtained using 9 years of satellite data, to surface concentrations of potential cloud activating aerosols, measured at the SMEAR II station at Hyytiälä in Finland. The results show that NCD and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations have no clear correlation at seasonal time scale. The fraction of aerosols that actually activate as cloud droplet decreases sharply with increasing aerosol concentrations. Furthermore, information on the stability of the atmosphere shows that low NCD is linked to stable atmospheric conditions. Combining these findings leads to the conclusion that cloud droplet activation for the studied clouds over the boreal forest is limited by convection. Our results suggest that it is important to take the strength of convection into account when studying the influence of aerosols from the boreal forest on cloud formation, although they do not rule out the possibility that aerosols from the boreal forest affect other types of clouds with a closer coupling to the surface.

  20. Estimating seasonal variations in cloud droplet number concentration over the boreal forest from satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. H. Janssen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal variations in cloud droplet number concentration (NCD in low-level stratiform clouds over the boreal forest are estimated from MODIS observations of cloud optical and microphysical properties, using a sub-adiabatic cloud model to interpret vertical profiles of cloud properties. An uncertainty analysis of the cloud model is included to reveal the main sensitivities of the cloud model. We compared the seasonal cycle in NCD, obtained using 9 yr of satellite data, to surface concentrations of potential cloud activating aerosols, measured at the SMEAR II station at Hyytiälä in Finland. The results show that NCD and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations have no clear correlation at seasonal time scale. The fraction of aerosols that actually activate as cloud droplet decreases sharply with increasing aerosol concentrations. Furthermore, information on the stability of the atmosphere shows that low NCD is linked to stable atmospheric conditions. Combining these findings leads to the conclusion that cloud droplet activation for the studied clouds over the boreal forest is limited by convection. Our results suggest that it is important to take the strength of convection into account when studying the influence of aerosols from the boreal forest on cloud formation, although they do not rule out the possibility that aerosols from the boreal forest affect other types of clouds with a closer coupling to the surface.

  1. Disturbance legacies and climate jointly drive tree growth and mortality in an intensively studied boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    B. Bond-Lamberty; Rocha, AV; K. Calvin; Holmes, B; Wang, C; Goulden, ML

    2014-01-01

    Most North American forests are at some stage of post-disturbance regrowth, subject to a changing climate, and exhibit growth and mortality patterns that may not be closely coupled to annual environmental conditions. Distinguishing the possibly interacting effects of these processes is necessary to put short-term studies in a longer term context, and particularly important for the carbon-dense, fire-prone boreal forest. The goals of this study were to combine dendrochronological sampling, inv...

  2. Thresholds controlling shifts in forest cover types in the boreal region of Interior Alaska: inter- actions between climate, fire and edaphic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Johnstone, J. F.; Rupp, S.; Duffy, P. A.; Kielland, K.; Chapin, F. S.

    2007-12-01

    There is a general consensus that future warming in the North American Boreal Region will cause a reduction in coniferous species common to cool, wet sites and an increase in deciduous/coniferous species found on warmer drier sites. In addition, it is believed that much of the change in forest cover will occur during secondary succession following disturbance and that the frequency of disturbance is likely to increase in response to climate warming; however, neither the rate at forest cover will change, nor the mechanisms thereof are well understood. Here, we summarize results from recent studies in Alaska that are being carried out as part of the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research Project and research being funded by the Joint Fire Science Program and NASA. We have examined factors important in regulating the change in the extent of black spruce (Picea mariana), a dominant forest type across the North American boreal region. Depth of burning of the surface organic layer is a fire severity measure that is important in regulating the post-fire environment in black spruce forests. In particular, seeds from deciduous trees have extremely low germination rates in post-fire organic soils that are greater than 3 cm deep. In addition, we found the growth of deciduous species in burned stands is inversely proportional to the depth of the remaining organic soil, with the highest growth observed on sites with exposed mineral soils. Other factors controlling seedling survival and growth include soil temperature and moisture, nutrient availability, and the fact that deciduous and coniferous species have different capabilities in absorbing different forms of soil nitrogen. These additional factors are also controlled by the amount of organic soil remaining after the fire. Finally, our research has shown that the depth of the remaining organic soil after fires is controlled both by topography and climate, with the frequency of sites with organic layers shallower than 3

  3. Leaf Area Index (LAI Estimation of Boreal Forest Using Wide Optics Airborne Winter Photos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Stenberg

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A new simple airborne method based on wide optics camera is developed for leaf area index (LAI estimation in coniferous forests. The measurements are carried out in winter, when the forest floor is completely snow covered and thus acts as a light background for the hemispherical analysis of the images. The photos are taken automatically and stored on a laptop during the flights. The R2 value of the linear regression of the airborne and ground based LAI measurements was 0.89.

  4. Root Diseases in Coniferous Forests of the Inland West : Potential Implications of Fuels Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Rippy, Raini C; Jane E Stewart; Zambino, Paul J; Klopfenstein, Ned B; Tirocke, Joanne M; Kim, Mee-Sook; Thies, Walter G

    2005-01-01

    After nearly 100 years of fire exclusion, introduced pests, and selective harvesting, a change in forest composition has occurred in many Inland West forests of North America. This change in forest structure has frequently been accompanied by increases in root diseases and/or an unprecedented buildup of fuels. Consequently, many forest managers are implementing plans for fuels treatments to lower the risk of severe wildfires. Impacts on root disease should be considered before selecting appro...

  5. Reindeer grazing in subarctic boreal forest - influences on the soil carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Kajar; Berninger, Frank; Köster, Egle; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2015-04-01

    Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L.) are the most important large mammalian herbivores in the northern ecosystems , which have many effects on plant diversity, soil nutrient cycling and soil organic matter decomposition. Changes caused by reindeer in vegetation have indirect effects on physical features of the soil e.g. soil microclimate, root biomass and also on soil C dynamics. Earlier, the role of reindeer grazing in ground vegetation dynamics and in soil carbon (C) dynamics has been mostly investigated in open tundra heaths. The objectives of this study were to examine if and how the reindeer grazing (and the possible temperature changes in soil caused by heavy grazing) is affecting the soil C dynamics (CO2 efflux from the soil, C storage in soil, microbial biomass in the soil). In a field experiment in Finnish Lapland, in Värriö Strict Nature Reserve (67° 46' N, 29° 35' E) we have assessed the changes occurring in above- and belowground biomasses, and soil C dynamics (CO2 efflux, soil C content, soil microbial biomass C) among areas grazed and ungrazed by reindeer. Our study areas are located in the northern boreal subarctic coniferous forest at the zone of the last intact forest landscapes in Fennoscandia, where large areas of relatively undisturbed subarctic Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests can still be found. The sample plots located in the Värriö Strict Nature Reserve (10 sample plots in total established in year 2013) are situated along the borderline between Finland and Russia, where the ungrazed area was excluded from the reindeer grazing already in 1918, to prevent the Finnish reindeer from going to the Russian side and there are not many reindeer on Russian side of the area. To characterize the stands we have established circular sample plots on areas with a radius of 11.28 m, where different tree characteristics were measured (diameter at 1.3 m, height, height of a tree, crown height, crown diameter, stand age, etc.). On every sample plot

  6. The impact of bryophytes on the carbon stocks of northern boreal forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, U.; Moroni, M. T.; Shaw, C. H.; Kurz, W. A.

    2012-04-01

    Dead organic matter (DOM), organic layer, and mineral soil carbon (C) dynamics in cool and humid northern boreal forests are expected to differ from those of drier or warmer boreal forests, because processes such as paludification and woody debris (WD) burial within the organic layer by overgrowing moss are more pronounced in regions with low average temperatures, vigorous moss layers, and long fire-return intervals. However, very few studies have provided field-measured data for these mostly remote regions. Hence, C cycling models such as the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3) have rarely been validated with field data from northern boreal forest soils, resulting in large uncertainties for estimated C stocks in a large proportion of the boreal forest ecozone. We present (i) measured data on organic layer and mineral soil (0-45 cm) C stocks in 18 old-growth and disturbed high-boreal black spruce stands in Labrador, Canada; (ii) a comparison of field-measured soil C stocks with those predicted using the CBM-CFS3; and (iii) special characteristics of the DOM and soil C dynamics of northern boreal forest soils that require modifications of model parameters and structure. Measured organic layer C stocks (30.4-47.4 Mg C ha-1) were within the range reported for other boreal forests. However, mineral soil C stocks (121.5-208.1 Mg C ha-1) contributed 58-76% to total ecosystem C stocks. Mineral soil C stocks were thus considerably higher than observed in other upland boreal forests in drier or warmer regions, but similar to values reported for black spruce on poorly drained sites and peat soils. In addition, large amounts of deadwood C (4.7-18.2 Mg C ha-1) were found to be buried within the organic layer, contributing up to 31% to total organic layer C stocks. The comparison of field-measured and CBM-CFS3 modeled C stocks showed that organic layer and mineral soil DOM in Labrador black spruce stands likely decays at lower rates than assumed by CBM

  7. Contribution to climate stability via expansion of azonal boreal forests in the Ukrainian Carpathians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijnik, M. [Wageningen Univ. (Netherlands). Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy Group

    2002-10-01

    Since World War II, the forests in Ukraine's Carpathian region have suffered over exploitation. The upper border of the Carpathian forests crept to a lower elevation with the contraction of the azonal boreal forests of the Ukraine and the ability of the forests to perform their shelter functions and climate stabilization has decreased. For that reason, Ukraine has initiated a program for afforestation and reforestation which is aimed at planting trees in about 2 million hectares of low-productivity and waste lands and creating forest stands along rivers, canals and water bodies. It is expected that this program will increase the forest area by nearly 20 per cent, considerably improving the environmental situation in the country. Afforestation will lessen the threat of further degradation of the upper layer of fertile soil, and stabilize micro climate conditions as well as the water balance of the rivers. The forest resource base of the country will also increase. This study assessed the potential effects of the expansion of azonal boreal forests in the Carpathians on the carbon cycle and climate stability. It also addressed policy implementation costs. Initially, the study will consider a storage option, where trees are planted for a period of 50 years. Results show that afforestation and reforestation in the Carpathian mountains for the sole purpose of carbon uptake would not be very beneficial. However, the benefit would lie in soil and water protection. Future studies will focus on developing a dynamic optimization model to indicate optimal expansion of azonal boreal forests in the Carpathians. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  8. Seasonal Variation in the Carbon Isotope Ratio of Ecosystem Respiration in Two Coniferous Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, N. G.; Bowling, D.; Schauer, A.; Irvine, J.; Bond, B. J.; Law, B.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2003-12-01

    We examined weekly variation in the stable carbon isotope signature of ecosystem respiration (δ 13CR) using the Keeling plot approach at two forests in Oregon USA: a wet (>2300 mm annual precipitation) 20-year-old Pseudotsuga menziesii plantation located in the Coast Range near the Pacific Ocean, and a dry ( ˜520 mm annual precipitation) 250-year-old Pinus ponderosa forest located on the eastern slope of the Cascade Mountains. The two forests experience similar regional weather patterns with wet winters and dry summers, but the coastal site has milder temperatures and greater soil and atmospheric water content. Air was sampled on 51 and 42 separate nights at the Pinus and Pseudotsuga forests, respectively, between 2001 and 2002. Both forests exhibited greater intra-annual variation in δ 13CR than has been previously observed in C3 ecosystems (>8.0 ‰ over the year). Mean annual δ 13CR matched that expected based on annual precipitation, averaging -25.4 ‰ at the Pinus forest and -26.2 ‰ at the Pseudotsuga forest. Variability in δ 13CR at both sites was highest during seasons when rainfall was abundant (autumn, winter and spring) and lowest during summer drought. During the period of drought, soil temperature was positively correlated with δ 13CR at both forests. When all seasons were analyzed, δ 13CR was negatively correlated with soil water content at both forests. The Pseudotsuga forest was more strongly coupled to soil and atmospheric water content than the Pinus forest. This difference could be related to availability of a deep water source at the Pinus forest that buffers it from drought effects. δ 13CR at the Pinus forest was significantly but weakly related to canopy conductance suggesting that δ 13CR is coupled to canopy gas exchange. δ 13CR was significantly correlated between the two forests after removal of outliers associated with extreme, site-specific meteorological events (i.e. local freezes), demonstrating that δ 13CR is coupled

  9. Forest-stream linkages: effects of terrestrial invertebrate input and light on diet and growth of brown trout (Salmo trutta in a boreal forest stream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Erős

    Full Text Available Subsidies of energy and material from the riparian zone have large impacts on recipient stream habitats. Human-induced changes, such as deforestation, may profoundly affect these pathways. However, the strength of individual factors on stream ecosystems is poorly understood since the factors involved often interact in complex ways. We isolated two of these factors, manipulating the flux of terrestrial input and the intensity of light in a 2×2 factorial design, where we followed the growth and diet of two size-classes of brown trout (Salmo trutta and the development of periphyton, grazer macroinvertebrates, terrestrial invertebrate inputs, and drift in twelve 20 m long enclosed stream reaches in a five-month-long experiment in a boreal coniferous forest stream. We found that light intensity, which was artificially increased 2.5 times above ambient levels, had an effect on grazer density, but no detectable effect on chlorophyll a biomass. We also found a seasonal effect on the amount of drift and that the reduction of terrestrial prey input, accomplished by covering enclosures with transparent plastic, had a negative impact on the amount of terrestrial invertebrates in the drift. Further, trout growth was strongly seasonal and followed the same pattern as drift biomass, and the reduction of terrestrial prey input had a negative effect on trout growth. Diet analysis was consistent with growth differences, showing that trout in open enclosures consumed relatively more terrestrial prey in summer than trout living in covered enclosures. We also predicted ontogenetic differences in the diet and growth of old and young trout, where we expected old fish to be more affected by the terrestrial prey reduction, but we found little evidence of ontogenetic differences. Overall, our results showed that reduced terrestrial prey inputs, as would be expected from forest harvesting, shaped differences in the growth and diet of the top predator, brown trout.

  10. Forest and land inventory using ERTS imagery and aerial photography in the boreal forest region of Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    Satellite imagery and small-scale (1:120,000) infrared ektachrome aerial photography for the development of improved forest and land inventory techniques in the boreal forest region are presented to demonstrate spectral signatures and their application. The forest is predominately mixed, stands of white spruce and poplar, with some pure stands of black spruce, pine and large areas of poorly drained land with peat and sedge type muskegs. This work is part of coordinated program to evaluate ERTS imagery by the Canadian Forestry Service.

  11. Water repellency under coniferous and deciduous forest - Experimental assessment and impact on overland flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butzen, Verena; Seeger, Manuel; Marruedo, Amaia; Jonge, de Lianne; Wengel, René; Ries, Johannes B.; Casper, Markus C.

    2015-01-01

    Current climate change makes it necessary to gain a deeper understanding of the runoff generation processes in Central European forests. A changing climate might affect soil water repellency (SWR) which can be seen as an import trigger for overland flow generation in forested areas. In this study

  12. Dynamics and pattern of a managed coniferous forest landscape in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Thomas A.; Ripple, William J.; Bradshaw, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    We examined the process of fragmentation in a managed forest landscape by comparing rates and patterns of disturbance (primarily clear-cutting) and regrowth between 1972 and 1988 using Landsat imagery. A 2589-km(exp 2) managed forest landscape in western Oregon was classified into two forest types, closed-canopy conifer forest (CF) (typically, greater than 60% conifer cover) and other forest and nonforest types (OT) (typically, less than 40 yr old or deciduous forest). The percentage of CF declined from 71 to 58% between 1972 and 1988. Declines were greatest on private land, least in wilderness, and intermediate in public nonwilderness. High elevations (greater than 914 m) maintained a greater percentage of CF than lower elevations (less than 914 m). The percentage of the area at the edge of the two cover types increased on all ownerships and in both elevational zones, whereas the amount of interior habitat (defined as CF at least 100 m from OT) decreased on all ownerships and elevational zones. By 1988 public lands contained approximately 45% interior habitat while private lands had 12% interior habitat. Mean interior patch area declined from 160 to 62 ha. The annual rate of disturbance (primarily clear-cutting) for the entire area including the wilderness was 1.19%, which corresponds to a cutting rotation of 84 yr. The forest landscape was not in a steady state or regulated condition which is not projected to occur for at least 40 yr under current forest plans. Variability in cutting rates within ownerships was higher on private land than on nonreserve public land. However, despite the use of dispersed cutting patterns on public land, spatial patterns of cutting and remnant forest patches were nonuniform across the entire public ownership. Large remaining patches (less than 5000 ha) of contiguous interior forest were restricted to public lands designated for uses other than timber production such as wilderness areas and research natural areas.

  13. Patterns of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrogen (DON fluxes in deciduous and coniferous forests under historic high nitrogen deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sleutel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous recent studies have indicated that dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrogen (DON play an important role in C and N cycling in natural ecosystems, and have shown that N deposition alters the concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic substances and may increase leaching losses from forests. Our study was set up to accurately quantify concentrations and flux patterns of DOC, DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN in deciduous and coniferous forest in Flanders under historical high nitrogen deposition. We measured DOC, DON and DIN concentrations at two weekly intervals in a silver birch (SB stand, a corsican pine (CP stand and a pine stand with higher N deposition (CPN, and used the SWAP model (calibrated with PEST for generating accurate water and matter fluxes. The input with precipitation was an important source of DON, but not for DOC. Release of DOC from the forest floor was minimally affected by forest type, but higher N deposition (CPN stand caused an 82% increase of DOC release from the forest floor. Adsorption to mineral soil material rich in iron and/or aluminum oxyhydroxides was suggested to be the most important process removing DOC from the soil solution, responsible for substantial retention (67–84% of DOC entering the mineral soil profile with forest floor leachate. Generally, DON was less reactive (i.e. less removal from the soil solution than DOC, resulting in decreasing DOC/DON ratios with soil depth. We found increased DOC retention in the mineral soil as a result of higher N deposition (84 kg N ha−1 yr−1 additional DOC retention in CPN compared to CP. Overall DON leaching losses were 2.2, 3.3 and 5.0 kg N ha−1 yr−1 for SB, CP and CPN, respectively, contributing between 9–28% to total dissolved N (TDN leaching. DON loss from SB and CP was not much higher than from unpolluted forests, and its relative contribution to TDN leaching was mainly determined by

  14. Multidecadal analysis of forest growth and albedo in boreal Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeš, Petr; Stenberg, Pauline; Mõttus, Matti; Manninen, Terhikki; Rautiainen, Miina

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that forests serve as carbon sinks. However, the balancing effect of afforestation and increased forest density on global warming due to carbon storage may be lost by low albedo (thus high absorption) of the forests. In the last 30 years, there has been a steady increase in the growing stock of Finnish forests by nearly a quarter while the area of the forests has remained virtually unchanged. Such increase in forest density together with the availability of detailed forest inventories provided by the Multi-Source National Forest Inventory (MS-NFI) in high spatial resolution makes Finland an ideal candidate for exploring the effects of increased forest density on satellite derived estimates of bio-geochemical products e.g. albedo (directional-hemispherical reflectance, DHR), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by canopies (fAPAR), leaf area index (LAI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in both current and long-term perspective. In this study, we first used MODIS-based vegetation satellite products for Finnish forests to study their seasonal patterns and interrelations. Next, the peak growing season observations are linked to the MS-NFI database to yield the generic relationships between forest density and the satellite-derived vegetation indicators. Finally, long-term GIMMS3g datasets between 1982 and 2011 (2008 for DHR) are analyzed and interpreted using forest inventory data. The vegetation peak growing season NIR DHR and VIS DHR showed weak to moderate negative correlation with fAPAR, whereas there was no correlation between NIR DHR and fAPAR. Next, we show that the spectral albedos in the near-infrared region (NIR DHR) showed weak negative correlation with forest biomass, basal area or canopy cover whereas, as expected, the spectral albedo in the visible region (VIS DHR) correlated negatively with these measures of forest density. Interestingly, the increase in forest density (biomass per ha) of Finnish

  15. Earlier springs decrease peak summer productivity in North American boreal forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the northern high latitudes, alternative hypotheses with regards to how warming-related shifts in seasonality influence ecosystem productivity exist. Increased plant growth associated with a longer growing season may enhance ecosystem productivity, but shifts to earlier springs may also negatively influence soil moisture status and productivity during the peak of the growing season. Here, we analyzed nearly three decades (1982–2008) of observational records and derived products, including satellite microwave and optical imagery as well as upscaled ecosystem flux observations, to better understand how shifts in seasonality impact hydrology and productivity in the North American boreal forests. We identified a dominant adverse influence of earlier springs on peak summer forest greenness, actual evapotranspiration and productivity at interannual time scales across the drier western and central sections of the North American boreal forests. In the vast regions where this spring onset mechanism operates, ecosystem productivity gains from earlier springs during the early portion of the growing season are effectively cancelled through corresponding losses in the later portion. Our results also indicate that recent decadal shifts towards earlier springs and associated drying in the midst of the growing season over western North American boreal forests may have contributed to the reported declines in summer productivity and increases in tree mortality and fire activity. With projections of accelerated northern high-latitude warming and associated shifts to earlier springs, persistent soil moisture deficits in peak summer may be an effective mechanism for regional-scale boreal forest dieback through their strong influence on productivity, tree mortality and disturbance dynamics. (letter)

  16. Fungal Community Shifts in Structure and Function across a Boreal Forest Fire Chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Santalahti, Minna; Pumpanen, Jukka; Köster, Kajar; Berninger, Frank; Raffaello, Tommaso; Jumpponen, Ari; Asiegbu, Fred O; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2015-11-01

    Forest fires are a common natural disturbance in forested ecosystems and have a large impact on the microbial communities in forest soils. The response of soil fungal communities to forest fire is poorly documented. Here, we investigated fungal community structure and function across a 152-year boreal forest fire chronosequence using high-throughput sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region and a functional gene array (GeoChip). Our results demonstrate that the boreal forest soil fungal community was most diverse soon after a fire disturbance and declined over time. The differences in the fungal communities were explained by changes in the abundance of basidiomycetes and ascomycetes. Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi contributed to the increase in basidiomycete abundance over time, with the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) representing the genera Cortinarius and Piloderma dominating in abundance. Hierarchical cluster analysis by using gene signal intensity revealed that the sites with different fire histories formed separate clusters, suggesting differences in the potential to maintain essential biogeochemical soil processes. The site with the greatest biological diversity had also the most diverse genes. The genes involved in organic matter degradation in the mature forest, in which ECM fungi were the most abundant, were as common in the youngest site, in which saprotrophic fungi had a relatively higher abundance. This study provides insight into the impact of fire disturbance on soil fungal community dynamics. PMID:26341215

  17. Geographical gradients in boreal forest albedo and structure in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Lukes, Petr; Rautiainen, Miina; Manninen, Terhikki; Stenberg, Pauline; Mottus, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Land surface albedo is an essential climate variable controlling the planetary radiative energy budget, yet it is still among the main uncertainties of the radiation budget in the current climate modeling. To date, albedo satellite products have not been linked to extensive forest inventory data sets due to the lack of ground reference data. Here, we used comprehensive and detailed maps of forest inventory variables to couple forest structure and MODIS albedo products for both winter and summ...

  18. Soil NH4+/NO3-nitrogen characteristics in primary forests and the adaptability of some coniferous species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xiaoyang; SONG Jinfeng

    2007-01-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems,soil nutrient regimes at a plant's living site generally represent the plant's "nutrition habitat".Plant species frequently well adapt to their original "nutrition habitat" during a long process of evolution,and the apparent preference for ammonium or nitrate nitrogen source (NH4+ or NO3-) might be an important aspect of the adaptation.Plants typically favor the nitrogen form most abundant in their natural habitats.Nitrate has been recognized as the dominant mineral nitrogen form in most agricultural soils and the main nitrogen source for crops,but it is not usually the case in forest ecosystems.A large number of studies show that the "nutrition habitats" associated with primary forest soils are typically dominated by NH4+ rather than NO3-,generally with NO3-content much lower than NH4+.Low levels of NO3-in these forest soils generally correspond to low net rates of nitrification.The probable reasons for this phenomenon include:1) nitrification limitations and/or inhibitions caused by lower pH,lower NH4+ availability (autotrophic nitrifiers cannot successfully compete for NH4+ with heterotrophic organisms and plants),or allelopathic inhibitors (tannins or higher-molecular-weight proanthocyanidins) in the soil;or 2)substantial microbial acquisition of nitrate in the soils,which makes net nitrification rates substantially less than gross nitrification rates even though the latter are relatively high.Many coniferous species (especially such late successional tree species as Tsuga heterophylla,Pinus banksiana,Picea glauca,Pseudotsuga meziesii,Picea abies,etc.) fully adapt to their original NH4+-dominated "nutrition habitats" so that their capacities of absorbing and using non-reduced forms of nitrogen (e.g.,NO3-) substantially decrease.These conifers typically show distinct preference to NH4+ and reduced growth due to nitrogen-metabolism disorder when NO3-is the main nitrogen source.The physiological and biochemical mechanisms that account for

  19. Effects of land use and fine-scale environmental heterogeneity on net ecosystem production over a temperate coniferous forest landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In temperate coniferous forests, spatial variation in net ecosystem production (NEP) is often associated with variation in stand age and heterogeneity in environmental factors such as soil depth. However, coarse spatial resolution analyses used to evaluate the terrestrial contribution to global NEP do not generally incorporate these effects. In this study, a fine-scale (25 m grid) analysis of NEP over a 164-km2 area of productive coniferous forests in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States was made to evaluate the effects of including fine scale information in landscape-scale NEP assessments. The Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) sensor resolved five cover classes in the study area and further differentiated between young, mature and old-growth conifer stands. ETM+ was also used to map current leaf area index (LAI) based on an empirical relationship of observed LAI to spectral vegetation indices. A daily time step climatology, based on 18 years of meteorological observations, was distributed (1 km resolution) over the mountainous terrain of the study area using the DAYMET model. Estimates of carbon pools and flux associated with soil, litter, coarse woody debris and live trees were then generated by running a carbon cycle model (Biome-BGC) to a state that reflected the current successional status and LAI of each grid cell, as indicated by the remote sensing observations. Estimated annual NEP for 1997 over the complete study area averaged 230 g C m2, with most of the area acting as a carbon sink. The area-wide NEP is strongly positive because of reduced harvesting in the last decade and the recovery of areas harvested between 1940 and 1990. The average value was greater than would be indicated if the entire area was assumed to be a mature conifer stand, as in a coarse-scale analysis. The mean NEP varied interannually by over a factor of two. This variation was 38% less than the interannual variation for a single point. The integration of process models with

  20. Effects of land use and fine-scale environmental heterogeneity on net ecosystem production over a temperate coniferous forest landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, David P.; Guzy, Michael; Lefsky, Michael A.; van Tuyl, Steve; Sun, Osbert; Daly, Chris; Law, Beverly E.

    2003-04-01

    In temperate coniferous forests, spatial variation in net ecosystem production (NEP) is often associated with variation in stand age and heterogeneity in environmental factors such as soil depth. However, coarse spatial resolution analyses used to evaluate the terrestrial contribution to global NEP do not generally incorporate these effects. In this study, a fine-scale (25 m grid) analysis of NEP over a 164-km2 area of productive coniferous forests in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States was made to evaluate the effects of including fine scale information in landscape-scale NEP assessments. The Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) sensor resolved five cover classes in the study area and further differentiated between young, mature and old-growth conifer stands. ETM+ was also used to map current leaf area index (LAI) based on an empirical relationship of observed LAI to spectral vegetation indices. A daily time step climatology, based on 18 years of meteorological observations, was distributed (1 km resolution) over the mountainous terrain of the study area using the DAYMET model. Estimates of carbon pools and flux associated with soil, litter, coarse woody debris and live trees were then generated by running a carbon cycle model (Biome-BGC) to a state that reflected the current successional status and LAI of each grid cell, as indicated by the remote sensing observations. Estimated annual NEP for 1997 over the complete study area averaged 230 g C m-2, with most of the area acting as a carbon sink. The area-wide NEP is strongly positive because of reduced harvesting in the last decade and the recovery of areas harvested between 1940 and 1990. The average value was greater than would be indicated if the entire area was assumed to be a mature conifer stand, as in a coarse-scale analysis. The mean NEP varied interannually by over a factor of two. This variation was 38% less than the interannual variation for a single point. The integration of process models

  1. The Snow Must Go On: Ground Ice Encasement, Snow Compaction and Absence of Snow Differently Cause Soil Hypoxia, CO2 Accumulation and Tree Seedling Damage in Boreal Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martz, Françoise; Vuosku, Jaana; Ovaskainen, Anu; Stark, Sari; Rautio, Pasi

    2016-01-01

    At high latitudes, the climate has warmed at twice the rate of the global average with most changes observed in autumn, winter and spring. Increasing winter temperatures and wide temperature fluctuations are leading to more frequent rain-on-snow events and freeze-thaw cycles causing snow compaction and formation of ice layers in the snowpack, thus creating ice encasement (IE). By decreasing the snowpack insulation capacity and restricting soil-atmosphere gas exchange, modification of the snow properties may lead to colder soil but also to hypoxia and accumulation of trace gases in the subnivean environment. To test the effects of these overwintering conditions changes on plant winter survival and growth, we established a snow manipulation experiment in a coniferous forest in Northern Finland with Norway spruce and Scots pine seedlings. In addition to ambient conditions and prevention of IE, we applied three snow manipulation levels: IE created by artificial rain-on-snow events, snow compaction and complete snow removal. Snow removal led to deeper soil frost during winter, but no clear effect of IE or snow compaction done in early winter was observed on soil temperature. Hypoxia and accumulation of CO2 were highest in the IE plots but, more importantly, the duration of CO2 concentration above 5% was 17 days in IE plots compared to 0 days in ambient plots. IE was the most damaging winter condition for both species, decreasing the proportion of healthy seedlings by 47% for spruce and 76% for pine compared to ambient conditions. Seedlings in all three treatments tended to grow less than seedlings in ambient conditions but only IE had a significant effect on spruce growth. Our results demonstrate a negative impact of winter climate change on boreal forest regeneration and productivity. Changing snow conditions may thus partially mitigate the positive effect of increasing growing season temperatures on boreal forest productivity. PMID:27254100

  2. The Snow Must Go On: Ground Ice Encasement, Snow Compaction and Absence of Snow Differently Cause Soil Hypoxia, CO2 Accumulation and Tree Seedling Damage in Boreal Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Martz

    Full Text Available At high latitudes, the climate has warmed at twice the rate of the global average with most changes observed in autumn, winter and spring. Increasing winter temperatures and wide temperature fluctuations are leading to more frequent rain-on-snow events and freeze-thaw cycles causing snow compaction and formation of ice layers in the snowpack, thus creating ice encasement (IE. By decreasing the snowpack insulation capacity and restricting soil-atmosphere gas exchange, modification of the snow properties may lead to colder soil but also to hypoxia and accumulation of trace gases in the subnivean environment. To test the effects of these overwintering conditions changes on plant winter survival and growth, we established a snow manipulation experiment in a coniferous forest in Northern Finland with Norway spruce and Scots pine seedlings. In addition to ambient conditions and prevention of IE, we applied three snow manipulation levels: IE created by artificial rain-on-snow events, snow compaction and complete snow removal. Snow removal led to deeper soil frost during winter, but no clear effect of IE or snow compaction done in early winter was observed on soil temperature. Hypoxia and accumulation of CO2 were highest in the IE plots but, more importantly, the duration of CO2 concentration above 5% was 17 days in IE plots compared to 0 days in ambient plots. IE was the most damaging winter condition for both species, decreasing the proportion of healthy seedlings by 47% for spruce and 76% for pine compared to ambient conditions. Seedlings in all three treatments tended to grow less than seedlings in ambient conditions but only IE had a significant effect on spruce growth. Our results demonstrate a negative impact of winter climate change on boreal forest regeneration and productivity. Changing snow conditions may thus partially mitigate the positive effect of increasing growing season temperatures on boreal forest productivity.

  3. Project 2: testing the current critical load maps of acidity for coniferous and deciduous forests.

    OpenAIRE

    Hornung, M.; Creamer, R.; Reynolds, B; Bell, S.; Langan, S.; Kennedy, F; Bradley, I.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: to examine the relationship between mapped exceedance of critical loads of acidity for woodlands, the Ca:A1 ratio of soil solution and forest status as measured by canopy condition and foliar chemistry

  4. Patterns of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen fluxes in deciduous and coniferous forests under historic high nitrogen deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sleutel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous recent studies have indicated that dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrogen (DON play an important role in C and N cycling in natural ecosystems, and have shown that N deposition alters the concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic substances and may increase leaching losses from forests. Our study was set up to accurately quantify concentrations and flux patterns of DOC, DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN in deciduous and coniferous forest in Flanders, Belgium, under historical high nitrogen deposition. We measured DOC, DON and DIN concentrations at two weekly intervals in a silver birch (SB stand, a corsican pine (CP stand and a pine stand with higher N deposition (CPN, and used the SWAP model (calibrated with PEST for generating accurate water and matter fluxes. The input with precipitation was an important source of DON, but not for DOC. Release of DOC from the forest floor was minimally affected by forest type, but higher N deposition (CPN stand caused an 82% increase of DOC release from the forest floor. Adsorption to mineral soil material rich in iron and/or aluminum oxyhydroxides was suggested to be the most important process removing DOC from the soil solution, responsible for substantial retention (67–84% of DOC entering the mineral soil profile with forest floor leachate. Generally, DON was less reactive (i.e. less removal from the soil solution than DOC, resulting in decreasing DOC/DON ratios with soil depth. We found increased DOC retention in the mineral soil as a result of higher N deposition (84 kg ha−1 yr−1 additional DOC retention in CPN compared to CP. Overall DON leaching losses were 2.2, 3.3 and 5.0 kg N yr−1 for SB, CP and CPN, respectively, contributing between 9–28% to total dissolved N (TDN leaching. The relative contribution to TDN leaching from DON loss from SB and CP was mainly determined by (large differences in DIN leaching. The large TDN leaching

  5. Soil Properties in Coniferous Forest Stands Along a Fly Ash Deposition Gradient in Eastern Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. KLOSE; F. MAKESCHIN

    2005-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and microbial properties of forest soils subjected to long-term fly ash depositions were analyzed in spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stands of eastern Germany on three forest sites along an emission gradient of 3 (high input), 6, and 15 km (low input) downwind of a coal-fired power plant. Past emissions resulted in an atypical high mass of mineral fly ash constituents in the organic horizons at the high input site of 128 t ha-1 compared to 58 t ha-1 at the low input site. Magnetic susceptibility measurements proved that the high mineral content of the forest floor was a result of fly ash accumulation in these forest stands. Fly ash deposition in the organic horizons at Site Ⅰ versus Ⅲsignificantly increased the pH values, effective cation exchange capacity, base saturation and, with exception of the L horizon, concentrations of mobile heavy metals Cd, Cr, and Ni, while stocks of organic C generally decreased. A principal component analysis showed that organic C content and base status mainly controlled soil microbial biomass and microbial respiration rates at these sites, while pH and mobile fractions of Cd, Cr, and Ni governed enzyme activities. Additionally,it was hypothesized that long-term fly ash emissions would eventually destabilize forest ecosystems. Therefore, the results of this study could become a useful tool for risk assessment in forest ecosystems that were subjected to past emissions from coal-fired power plants.

  6. Effects of forest canopy gap on biomass of Abies faxoniana seedlings and its allocation in subalpine coniferous forests of western Sichuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junren XIAN; Tingxing HU; Yuanbin ZHANG; Kaiyun WANG

    2008-01-01

    Using a strip transect sampling method, the density, height (≤ 100 cm), basal diameter and compo-nents of biomass of Abiesfaxoniana seedlings, living in a forest gap (FG) and under the forest canopy (FC) of sub-alpine natural coniferous forests in western Sichuan, were investigated and the relationships among different com-ponents of biomass analyzed. The results indicated that the density and average height (H) of A. faxoniana seed-lings were significantly different in the FG and under the FC, with the values being 12903 and 2017 per hm2, and 26.6 and 24.3 cm. No significant differences were found in the average basal diameter (D) and biomass. The biomass allocation in seedling components was significantly affec-ted by forest gap. In the FG, the biomass ratio of branch to stem reached a maximum of 1.54 at age 12 and then declined and fluctuated around 0.69. Under the FC, the biomass ratio of branch to stem increased with seedling growth and exceeded 1.0 at about age 15. The total bio-mass and the biomass of leaves, stems, shoots and roots grown in the FG and under the FC were significantly correlated with D2H. There were significant and positive correlations among the biomass of different components.

  7. Who is the new sheriff in town regulating boreal forest growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park Williams, A.; Xu, Chonggang; McDowell, Nate G.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change appears to be altering boreal forests. One recently observed symptom of these changes has been an apparent weakening of the positive relationship between high-latitude boreal tree growth and temperature at some sites (D'Arrigo et al 2008). This phenomenon is referred to as the 'divergence problem' or 'divergence effect' and is thought to reflect a non-linear relationship between temperature and tree growth, where recent warming has allowed other factors besides growing-season temperature to emerge as dominant regulators of annual growth rates. Figure 1 demonstrates this divergence phenomenon with records of tree-ring widths collected from 59 populations of white spruce in Alaska 1. Key tendencies among these populations include: (1) growth is most sensitive to temperature during relatively cold growing seasons (figure 1(a)), (2) populations at colder sites are more sensitive to temperature than those at warmer sites are (figure 1(a)), and (3) growth at warmer sites may respond negatively to increased temperature beyond some optimal growing-season temperature (figure 1(b)). Since temperature is rising rapidly at high latitudes, one interpretation of figures 1(a) and (b) is that warming has promoted increased growth at colder sites, but caused growth to plateau or slow at warmer sites. Corroborating this interpretation, satellite imagery and tree-ring data indicate increasing vegetation productivity near the forest-tundra boundary but declining productivity in warmer regions within forest interiors (e.g., Bunn and Goetz 2006, Beck and Goetz 2011, Beck et al 2011, Berner et al 2011). Will continued warming cause a northward migration of boreal forests, with mortality in the warmer, southern locations and expansion into the colder tundra? This question is difficult to answer because many factors besides temperature influence boreal forest dynamics. Widespread productivity declines within interior boreal forests appear to be related to warming

  8. Response of clonal plasticity of Fargesia nitida to different canopy conditions of subalpine coniferous forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianping TAO; Lixia SONG; Yongjian WANG; Weiyin ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effects of canopy conditions on clump and culm numbers, and the morphological plasticity and biomass distribution patterns of the dwarf bamboo species Fargesia nitida. Specifically, we investigated the effects of canopy condi-tions on the growth and morphological characteristics of F. nitida, and the adaptive responses of F. nitida to dif-ferent canopy conditions and its ecological senses. The results indicate that forest canopy had a significant effect on the genet density and culm number per clump, while it did not affect the ramet density. Clumps tended to be few and large in gaps and forest edge plots, and small under forest understory plots. The ramets showed an even distribution under the closed canopy, and clus-ter distribution under gaps and forest edge plots. The forest canopy had a significant effect on both the ramets'biomass and biomass allocation. Favourable light conditions promoted ramet growth and biomass accumulation. Greater amounts of biomass in gaps and forest edge plots were shown by the higher number of culms per clump and the diameter of these culms. Under closed canopy, the bamboos increased their branching angle, leaf biomass allocation, specific leaf area and leaf area ratio to exploit more favourable light conditions in these locations. The spacer length, specific spacer length and spacer branching angles all showed significant differences between gaps and closed canopy conditions. The larger specific spacer length and spacer branching angle were beneficial for bamboo growth, scattering the ramets and exploiting more favourable light conditions. In summary, this study shows that to varying degrees, F nitida exhibits both a wide ecological amplitude and high degree of morphological plasticity in response to differing forest canopy conditions. More-over, the changes in plasticity enable the plants to optimize their light usage efficiency to promote growth and increase access to resources available in

  9. Ramet Population Structure of Fargesia nitida (Mitford)Keng f. et Yi in Different Successional Stands of the Subalpine Coniferous Forest in Wolong Nature Reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hong Yu; Jian-Ping Tao; Yuan Li; Yong-Jian Wang; Yi Xi; Wei-Yin Zhang; Run-Guo Zang

    2006-01-01

    Forest structure and succession in Wolong Nature Reserve is influenced by the understory dwarf bamboo population. However, less is known about how the forest succession affects the dwarf bamboo population.To examine the bamboo ramet population growth of Fargesia nitida (Mitford) Keng f. et Yi and to determine how ramet population structure varies along the succession of coniferous forest, we sampled ramet populations of F. nitida from the following three successional stages:(i) a deciduous broad-leaved (BL)stand;(ii) a mixed broad-leaved coniferous (MI) stand;and (iii) a coniferous (CF) stand. We investigated the population structure, biomass allocation, and morphological characteristics of the bamboo ramet among the three stand types. Clonal ramets, constituting the bamboo population, tended to become short and small with succession. The ramet changed towards having a greater mass investment in leaves, branches and underground roots and rhizomes rather than in the culm. With respect to leaf traits, individual leaf mass and area in the BL stand were markedly bigger than those in both the MI and CF stands, except for no significant difference in specific leaf area. The age distribution showed that the bamboo population approached an older age with succession. The results demonstrate that the ramet population structure of F.nitida is unstable and its growth performance is inhibited by succession.

  10. Source characterization of Highly Oxidized Multifunctional Compounds in a Boreal Forest Environment using Positive Matrix Factorization

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Chao; Nie, Wei; Äijälä, Mikko; Rissanen, Matti P.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Massoli, Paola; Junninen, Heikki; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Häme, Silja; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Canonaco, Francesco; Prevot, Andre S. H.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    Highly oxidized multifunctional compounds (HOMs) have been demonstrated to be important for atmospheric secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and new particle formation (NPF), yet it remains unclear which the main atmospheric HOM formation pathways are. In this study, a nitrate ion based Chemical Ionization Atmospheric-Pressure-interface Time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-APi-TOF) was deployed to measure HOMs in the boreal forest in Hyytiälä, southern Finland. Positive matrix factorization (PMF)...

  11. Biotic stress accelerates formation of climate-relevant aerosols in boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joutsensaari, J.; Yli-Pirilä, P.; Korhonen, H.; Arola, A.; Blande, J. D.; Heijari, J.; Kivimäenpää, M.; Mikkonen, S.; Hao, L.; Miettinen, P.; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, P.; Faiola, C. L.; Laaksonen, A.; Holopainen, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Boreal forests are a major source of climate-relevant biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) and will be greatly influenced by increasing temperature. Global warming is predicted to not only increase emissions of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation directly but also induce large-scale insect outbreaks, which significantly increase emissions of reactive BVOCs. Thus, climate change factors could substantially accelerate the formation of biogenic SOAs in the troposphere. In this study, we have combined results from field and laboratory experiments, satellite observations and global-scale modelling in order to evaluate the effects of insect herbivory and large-scale outbreaks on SOA formation and the Earth's climate. Field measurements demonstrated 11-fold and 20-fold increases in monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions respectively from damaged trees during a pine sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) outbreak in eastern Finland. Laboratory chamber experiments showed that feeding by pine weevils (Hylobius abietis) increased VOC emissions from Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings by 10-50 fold, resulting in 200-1000-fold increases in SOA masses formed via ozonolysis. The influence of insect damage on aerosol concentrations in boreal forests was studied with a global chemical transport model GLOMAP and MODIS satellite observations. Global-scale modelling was performed using a 10-fold increase in monoterpene emission rates and assuming 10 % of the boreal forest area was experiencing outbreak. Results showed a clear increase in total particulate mass (local max. 480 %) and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations (45 %). Satellite observations indicated a 2-fold increase in aerosol optical depth over western Canada's pine forests in August during a bark beetle outbreak. These results suggest that more frequent insect outbreaks in a warming climate could result in substantial increase in biogenic SOA formation in the boreal zone and, thus

  12. Relationships among fires, fungi, and soil dynamics in Alaskan Boreal Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Treseder, Kathleen K.; Mack, M. C.; Cross, A

    2004-01-01

    Fires are critical pathways of carbon loss from boreal forest soils, whereas microbial communities form equally critical controls over carbon accumulation between fires. We used a chronosequence in Alaska to test Read's hypothesis that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi should dominate ecosystems with low accumulation of surface litter, and ectomycorrhizal fungi should proliferate where organic horizons are well-developed. This pattern is expected because ectomycorrhizal fungi display a greater cap...

  13. Sustainable Development of the Boreal Forest: Interaction of Ecological, Social, and Business Feedbacks

    OpenAIRE

    Gail Whiteman; Stuart Chapin, F.

    1998-01-01

    Humans are an integral component of ecosystems, just as the products of ecosystems are critical to social systems. To understand the future state of the boreal forest, we must understand the ecological, social, economic, and business interactions that link ecological and social systems into a common regional system, as well as the feedbacks that govern changes in these interactions. We analyze the negative feedbacks that promoted a sustainable interaction between ecological and social systems...

  14. Biotic stress accelerates formation of climate-relevant aerosols in boreal forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Joutsensaari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Boreal forests are a major source of climate-relevant biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA and will be greatly influenced by increasing temperature. Global warming is predicted to increase emissions of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC from vegetation directly, but will also induce large-scale insect outbreaks, which significantly increase emissions of reactive BVOC. Thus, climate change factors could substantially accelerate the formation of biogenic SOA in the troposphere. In this study, we have combined results from field and laboratory experiments, satellite observations and global scale modelling in order to evaluate the effects of insect herbivory and large-scale outbreaks on SOA formation and the Earth's climate. Field measurements demonstrated 11-fold and 20-fold increases in monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions, respectively, from damaged trees during a pine sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer outbreak in eastern Finland. Laboratory chamber experiments showed that feeding by pine weevils (Hylobius abietis increased VOC emissions from Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings by 10–50 fold resulting in 200–1000 fold increases in SOA masses formed via ozonolysis. The influence of insect damage on aerosol concentrations in boreal forests was studied with a global chemical transport model GLOMAP and MODIS satellite observations. Global scale modelling was performed using a 10-fold increase in monoterpene emission rates and assuming 10% of the boreal forest area was experiencing outbreak. Results showed a clear increase in total particulate mass (local max. 480% and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations (45%. Satellite observations indicated a two-fold increase in aerosol optical depth (AOD over western Canada's pine forests in August during a bark beetle outbreak. These results suggest that more frequent insect outbreaks in a warming climate could result in substantial increase in biogenic SOA formation in the boreal

  15. Response of water use efficiency to summer drought in boreal Scots pine forests in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yao; Markkanen, Tiina; Aurela, Mika; Mammarella, Ivan; Thum, Tea; Tsuruta, Aki; YANG, HUIYI; Aalto, Tuula

    2016-01-01

    The influence of drought on plant functioning has received considerable attention in recent years, although our understanding of the response of carbon and water coupling in terrestrial ecosystems remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the response of water use efficiency to summer drought in boreal forests at daily time scales mainly using eddy covariance flux data. In addition, simulation results from the JSBACH land surface model were evaluated against the observed results. ...

  16. Soil carbon stocks and their rates of accumulation and loss in a boreal forest landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapalee, G.; Trumbore, S.E.; Davidson, E.A.; Harden, J.W.; Veldhuis, H.

    1998-01-01

    Boreal forests and wetlands are thought to be significant carbon sinks, and they could become net C sources as the Earth warms. Most of the C of boreal forest ecosystems is stored in the moss layer and in the soil. The objective of this study was to estimate soil C stocks (including moss layers) and rates of accumulation and loss for a 733 km2 area of the BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study site in northern Manitoba, using data from smaller-scale intensive field studies. A simple process-based model developed from measurements of soil C inventories and radiocarbon was used to relate soil C storage and dynamics to soil drainage and forest stand age. Soil C stocks covary with soil drainage class, with the largest C stocks occurring in poorly drained sites. Estimated rates of soil C accumulation or loss are sensitive to the estimated decomposition constants for the large pool of deep soil C, and improved understanding of deep soil C decomposition is needed. While the upper moss layers regrow and accumulate C after fires, the deep C dynamics vary across the landscape, from a small net sink to a significant source. Estimated net soil C accumulation, averaged for the entire 733 km2 area, was 20 g C m-2 yr-1 (28 g C m-2 yr-1 accumulation in surface mosses offset by 8 g C m-2 yr-1 lost from deep C pools) in a year with no fire. Most of the C accumulated in poorly and very poorly drained soils (peatlands and wetlands). Burning of the moss layer in only 1% of uplands would offset the C stored in the remaining 99% of the area. Significant interannual variability in C storage is expected because of the irregular occurrence of fire in space and time. The effects of climate change and management on fire frequency and on decomposition of immense deep soil C stocks are key to understanding future C budgets in boreal forests.

  17. [Biogeneous carbon fluxes in the boreal forests of Central Siberia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedrova, É F

    2011-01-01

    The assessments of the carbon pool and rate of plant biomass production, phytodetritus destruction, new formations of humic matters, and removal of water-soluble decomposition products for the forest ecosystems of the forest tundra and the northern and southern parts of the Central Siberian taiga were given. The rates of the main processes (organic-matter production and degradation) were demonstrated to be balanced in the ecosystems of the forest tundra. The larch forests of the northern taiga serve as a stock for a C atmosphere, which are equivalent to 32-34% of net primary production (NPP). The secondary birch growth where the understory needle-leaved trees have been formed and the primary old-growth fir forests are characterized by the balance of the main carbon fluxes in the southern taiga. The birch forests where the understory trees are just being formed and the fir forests at the age of 50-90 years serve as a stock for an average of 26% of carbon extracted as dioxide to make NPP. PMID:21442909

  18. Boreal ditched forest and peatland are more vulnerable to forest fire than unditched areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Stephan J.; Granath, Gustav; Landahl, Anna; Fölster, Jens

    2016-04-01

    forested peatlands might be counterproductive as it promotes fire vulnerability even in cold boreal regions.

  19. Coniferous forest classification and inventory using Landsat and digital terrain data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, J.; Logan, T. L.; Woodcock, C. E.; Strahler, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Machine-processing techniques were used in a Forest Classification and Inventory System (FOCIS) procedure to extract and process tonal, textural, and terrain information from registered Landsat multispectral and digital terrain data. Using FOCIS as a basis for stratified sampling, the softwood timber volumes of the Klamath National Forest and Eldorado National Forest were estimated within standard errors of 4.8 and 4.0 percent, respectively. The accuracy of these large-area inventories is comparable to the accuracy yielded by use of conventional timber inventory methods, but, because of automation, the FOCIS inventories are more rapid (9-12 months compared to 2-3 years for conventional manual photointerpretation, map compilation and drafting, field sampling, and data processing) and are less costly.

  20. CO2 flux evaluation over the evergreen coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest in Dinghushan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>The Dinghushan flux observation site, as one of the four forest sites of ChinaFLUX, aims to acquire long-term measurements of CO2 flux over a typical southern subtropical evergreen coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest ecosystem using the open path eddy covariance method. Based on two years of data from 2003 to 2004, the characteristics of temporal variation in CO2 flux and its response to environmental factors in the forest ecosystem are analyzed. Provided two-dimensional coordinate rotation, WPL correction and quality control, poor energy-balance and underestimation of ecosystem respiration during nighttime implied that there could be a CO2 leak during the nighttime at the site. Using daytime (PAR > 1.0μmol-1·m-2·s-1) flux data during windy conditions (u* > 0.2 m·s-1), monthly ecosystem respiration (Reco) was derived through the Michaelis-Menten equation modeling the relationship between net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Exponential function was employed to describe the relationship between Reco and soil temperature at 5 cm depth (Ts05), then Reco of both daytime and nighttime was calculated respectively by the function. The major results are: (i) Derived from the Michaelis-Menten equation, the apparent quantum yield (α) was 0.0027±0.0011 mgCO2·μmol-1 photons, and the maximum photosynthetic assimilation rate (Amax) was 1.102±0.288 mgCO2·m-2·s-1. Indistinctive seasonal variation of o or Amax was consistent with weak seasonal dynamics of leaf area index (LAI) in such a lower subtropical evergreen mixed forest. (ii) Monthly accumulated Reco was estimated as 95.3±21.1 gC·m-2 mon-1, accounting for about 68% of the gross primary product (GPP). Monthly accumulated NEE was estimated as -43.2±29.6 gC·m-2·mon-1. The forest ecosystem acted as carbon sink all year round without any seasonal carbon efflux period. Annual NEE of 2003 and 2004 was estimated as -563.0 and -441.2 gC·m-2·a-1 respectively

  1. Are Boreal Ovenbirds, Seiurus aurocapilla, More Prone to Move across Inhospitable Landscapes in Alberta's Boreal Mixedwood Forest than in Southern Québec's Temperate Deciduous Forest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Bélisle

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Population life-history traits such as the propensity to move across inhospitable landscapes should be shaped by exposure to landscape structure over evolutionary time. Thus, birds that recently evolved in landscapes fragmented by natural disturbances such as fire would be expected to show greater behavioral and morphological vagility relative to conspecifics that evolved under less patchy landscapes shaped by fewer and finer-scaled disturbances, i.e., the resilience hypothesis. These predictions are not new, but they remain largely untested, even for well-studied taxa such as neotropical migrant birds. We combined two experimental translocation, i.e., homing, studies to test whether Ovenbird, Seiurus aurocapilla, from the historically dynamic boreal mixedwood forest of north-central Alberta (n = 55 is more vagile than Ovenbird from historically less dynamic deciduous forest of southern Québec (n = 89. We found no regional difference in either wing loading or the response of homing Ovenbird to landscape structure. Nevertheless, this study presents a heuristic framework that can advance the understanding of boreal landscape dynamics as an evolutionary force.

  2. Winter climate controls soil carbon dynamics during summer in boreal forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boreal forests, characterized by distinct winter seasons, store a large proportion of the global terrestrial carbon (C) pool. We studied summer soil C-dynamics in a boreal forest in northern Sweden using a seven-year experimental manipulation of soil frost. We found that winter soil climate conditions play a major role in controlling the dissolution/mineralization of soil organic-C in the following summer season. Intensified soil frost led to significantly higher concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Intensified soil frost also led to higher rates of basal heterotrophic CO2 production in surface soil samples. However, frost-induced decline in the in situ soil CO2 concentrations in summer suggests a substantial decline in root and/or plant associated rhizosphere CO2 production, which overrides the effects of increased heterotrophic CO2 production. Thus, colder winter soils, as a result of reduced snow cover, can substantially alter C-dynamics in boreal forests by reducing summer soil CO2 efflux, and increasing DOC losses. (letter)

  3. A new parametrization for ambient particle formation over coniferous forests and its potential implications for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn, B.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.; Groth, A.; Trawny, K.; Borchert, S.; Jacobi, S.

    2009-10-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation is a general phenomenon observed over coniferous forests. So far nucleation is either parameterised as a function of gaseous sulphuric acid concentration only, which is unable to explain the observed seasonality of nucleation events at different measurement sites, or as a function of sulphuric acid and organic molecules. Here we introduce different nucleation parameters based on the interaction of sulphuric acid and terpene oxidation products and elucidate the individual importance. They include basic trace gas and meteorological measurements such as ozone and water vapour concentrations, temperature (for terpene emission) and UV B radiation as a proxy for OH radical formation. We apply these new parameters to field studies conducted at conducted at Finnish and German measurement sites and compare these to nucleation observations on a daily and annual scale. General agreement was found, although the specific compounds responsible for the nucleation process remain speculative. This can be interpreted as follows: During cooler seasons the emission of biogenic terpenes and the OH availability limits the new particle formation while towards warmer seasons the ratio of ozone and water vapour concentration seems to dominate the general behaviour. Therefore, organics seem to support ambient nucleation besides sulphuric acid or an OH-related compound. Using these nucleation parameters to extrapolate the current conditions to prognosed future concentrations of ozone, water vapour and organic concentrations leads to a significant potential increase in the nucleation event number.

  4. Waterfowl populations are resilient to immediate and lagged impacts of wildfires in the boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tyler; Schmutz, Joel A.; Amundson, Courtney L.; Lindberg, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary 1. Wildfires are the principal disturbance in the boreal forest, and their size and frequency are increasing as the climate warms. Impacts of fires on boreal wildlife are largely unknown, especially for the tens of millions of waterfowl that breed in the region. This knowledge gap creates significant barriers to the integrative management of fires and waterfowl, leading to fire policies that largely disregard waterfowl. 2. Waterfowl populations across the western boreal forest of North America have been monitored annually since 1955 by the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey (BPOP), widely considered the most extensive wildlife survey in the world. Using these data, we examined impacts of forest fires on abundance of two waterfowl guilds – dabblers and divers. We modelled waterfowl abundance in relation to fire extent (i.e. amount of survey transect burned) and time since fire, examining both immediate and lagged fire impacts. 3. From 1955 to 2014, >1100 fires in the western boreal forest intersected BPOP survey transects, and many transects burned multiple times. Nonetheless, fires had no detectable impact on waterfowl abundance; annual transect counts of dabbler and diver pairs remained stable from the pre- to post-fire period. 4. The absence of fire impacts on waterfowl abundance extended from the years immediately following the fire to those more than a decade afterwards. Likewise, the amount of transect burned did not influence waterfowl abundance, with similar pair counts from the pre- to post-fire period for small (1–20% burned), medium (21–60%) and large (>60%) burns. 5. Policy implications. Waterfowl populations appear largely resilient to forest fires, providing initial evidence that current policies of limited fire suppression, which predominate throughout much of the boreal forest, have not been detrimental to waterfowl populations. Likewise, fire-related management actions, such as prescribed burning or targeted suppression

  5. Timing of plant phenophases since 1752 in the boreal forest environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubin, Eero; Tolvanen, Anne; Karhu, Jouni; Valkama, Jari

    2016-04-01

    Global warming and climate change will significantly affect on forest environment in northern latitudes. There is the strong evidence that increase of early spring and late autumn temperatures will have impacts on growth and growth cycles. In Finland the Finnish Forest Research Institute (Luke since 2015) established in 1996 National Phenological Network to study changes of phenophases all over the country representing southern, middle and northern boreal forest zones. Continuous detailed scientific monitoring includes eleven forest plant species and it forms an excellent basis to evaluate responses of forest vegetation in respect to climate change. Monitoring is done together with Universities and other Institutes. Prior to the establishment of the Finnish National Phenological Network observations has been made solely based on volunteers since 1752. This citizen-science data is very important to analyze phenophases together with the results of the National Network. The long-term data since 1752 shows e.g. an advancement in the onset of Prunus padus flowering by five days per 100 years and correspondingly three days in the rowan (Sorbus aucuparia). The latest results of the Finnish National Network (1996 - 2014) fits well to this long term trend. In the Finnish National Phenological Network we have monitored phenophases of forest spieces throughout the growth period, focusing on nine forest tree species and two dwarf shrubs. The results can be followed in real time at: http://www.metla.fi/metinfo/fenologia/index-en.htm. We have observed big differences in phenophases between southern and northern boreal zone. Onset of downy birch leafing happens one month later in the north compared with southern boreal zone. Coming into leaf has clearly occurred earlier during the research period since 1996 in the northern boreal zone compared with southern boreal zone. This indicates the response of climate change. The timing of leaf colouring and leaf fall was observed remained

  6. Remote Sensing of Forest Cover in Boreal Zones of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedykh, V. N.

    2011-12-01

    Ecological tension resulting from human activities generates a need for joint efforts of countries in the boreal zone aimed at sustainable forest development, including: conservation of forests binding carbon and ensuring stability of the atmosphere gas composition; preservation of purity and water content of forest areas as conditions ensuring sustainability of the historically formed structure of forest landscapes; and preservation of all flora and fauna species composition diversity as a condition for sustainable existence and functioning of forest ecosystems. We have to address these problems urgently due to climate warming which can interact with the forest cover. In particular, in the forest zone of Siberia, the climate aridization will inevitably result in periodic drying of shallow bogs and upland forests with thick forest litter. This will bring fires of unprecedented intensity which will lead to catastrophic atmospheric pollution. In this connection, the above problems can be solved only by the united efforts of boreal-zone countries, through establishing a uniform system for remote sensing of forests aimed at obtaining and periodic update of comprehensive information for rational decision-making in prevention of adverse human effect on the forest. A need to join efforts in this field of natural resource management is determined by disparate data which were created expressly for economic accounting units used mainly for the solution of economic timber resource problems. However, ecological tasks outlined above can be solved appropriately only by using uniform technologies that are registered within natural territorial complexes (landscapes) established throughout the entire boreal zone. Knowledge of forest state within natural territorial entities having specific physiographic conditions, with account for current and future anthropogenic load, allow one to define evidence-based forest growth potential at these landscapes to ensure development of

  7. Spatial climate-dependent growth response of boreal mixedwood forest in western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinyu; Huang, Jian-Guo; Stadt, Kenneth J.; Comeau, Philip G.; Chen, Han Y. H.

    2016-04-01

    The western Canadian mixedwood boreal forests were projected to be significantly affected by regional drought. However, drought degrees were spatially different across elevations, longitudes and latitudes, which might cause different tree growth responses to climate change in different sub-regions within western Canada. In this way, regional classification of western Canadian boreal forests and understanding spatial tree growth responses to climate might be necessary for future forest management and monitoring. In this paper, tree-ring chronologies of two dominant tree species, trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss), were obtained from mixed forest stands distributed across western Canada to study spatial tree growth response to climate based on three regional classification schemes (a phytogeographic sub-region classification, a natural sub-region classification and non-classification). Phytogeographic sub-region classification was estimated based on tree ring samples we collected in this study, while natural sub-region classification was previously developed based on analysis of regional differences in vegetation, soil, site and climate conditions. Results showed that air temperature did not significantly increase, while drought stress became more severe between 1985 to 2010. Relationships between trembling aspen growth and temperature differed between north and south parts of the study area, resulting from spatial difference in water supply. Trembling aspen growth was influenced by temperature or moisture variables of the previous years. White spruce growth was influenced primarily by moisture variables (current or previous year), and response coefficients between white spruce and drought conditions (represented by drought code) were negative in all phytogeographic sub-regions, suggesting that white spruce was more sensitive to drought stress under climate change. As a late-successional dominant species

  8. Light-induced diurnal pattern of methane exchange in a boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Elin; Crill, Patrick; Mölder, Meelis; Vestin, Patrik; Lindroth, Anders

    2013-04-01

    Boreal forests represents one third of the Earth's forested land surface area and is a net sink of methane and an important component of the atmospheric methane budget. Methane is oxidized in well-aerated forest soils whereas ponds and bog soils are sources of methane. Besides the microbial processes in the soil also forest vegetation might contribute to methane exchange. Due to a recent finding of methane consumption by boreal plants that correlated with photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), we investigate the impact of PAR on soil methane exchange at vegetated plots on the forest floor. The study site, Norunda in central Sweden, is a 120 years old boreal forest stand, dominated by Scots pine and Norway spruce. We used continuous chamber measurements in combination with a high precision laser gas analyzer (Los Gatos Research), to measure the methane exchange at four different plots in July-November 2009, and April-June 2010. The ground vegetation consisted almost entirely of mosses and blueberry-shrubs. Two of the plots acted as stable sinks of methane whereas the other two plots shifted from sinks to sources during very wet periods. The preliminary results show a clear diurnal pattern of the methane exchange during the growing season, which cannot be explained by temperature. The highest consumption occurs at high PAR levels. The amplitude of the diurnal methane exchange during the growing season is in the order of 10 μmol m-2 h-1. This indicates that besides methane oxidation by methanotrophs in the soil there is an additional removal of methane at soil level by a process related to ground vegetation.

  9. Distribution and retention of cesium in Swedish boreal forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retention and distribution of cesium in forest environments are being studied at three locations in Sweden. The main part of the cesium found in the soil was recovered in horizons rich in organic matter. The cesium was retained in the soil organic matter in a more or less extractable form. As different soil types have a different distribution pattern of organic matter the distribution of cesium will depend on the forest soil type. The clay content in Swedish forest soils is in general low which will mitigate the retention of cesium in the soil mineral horizons. The cesium present in the tree was considered to be an effect of assimilation by the tissues in the canopy as well as by the roots. The redistribution of cesium within the trees was extensive which was considered to be an effect of a high mobility of cesium in the close system of a forest environment. The cesium will remain in the forest environment for a considerable time but can be removed by forest practice, by leaching out of the soil profile or by the radioactive decay. (au)

  10. VERTICAL STRATIFICATION OF SOIL WATER STORAGE AND RELEASE DYNAMICS IN PACIFIC NORTHWEST CONIFEROUS FORESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    abstract for journal article We characterized vertical variation in the seasonal depletion of stored soil moisture in old-growth ponderosa pine (OG-PP, xeric), and young and old-growth Douglas-fir (Y-DF, OG-DF, mesic) forests to evaluate changes in water availability for root up...

  11. Soil and vegetation changes after clear-felling coniferous forests: effects of varying removal of logging residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of the intensity of logging residue harvesting on soil nutrient status and ground vegetation cover were examined over a 16-year period in two series of field experiments in Sweden. Short-term effects of slash harvesting and stump removal on soil water chemistry were studied after clear-felling a Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stand in SW Sweden. Soil water concentrations of NH4+, and NO3- and K+ were lower shortly after whole-tree harvesting (i.e. stem and slash harvesting) than shortly after conventional stem-only harvesting or complete tree harvesting (i.e. stem, slash and stump removal). However, 5 years later there were no longer differences in nutrient concentrations detected between treatments, and nutrient levels approached those normally found in drainage water from forest land. Similar studies focussed on long-term (16 years) effects were conducted on four coniferous forest sites in Sweden, two in north and the other two in the south. In each region one site was situated in a pure Scots pine stand (Pinus sylvestris L.) and the other in a pure Norway spruce stand. In general, the intensity of slash harvesting had no effect on the total pools of nitrogen or carbon in the soil. Furthermore, this study showed experimentally that the harvesting of logging residues results in long-term soil acidification and depletions of exchangeable base cations, manganese and zinc pools, which lead in turn to a reduction in base saturation levels. A major implication for practical forestry was that guidelines and recommendations concerning the large-scale utilization of logging residues should be based more on the nutritional and soil acidifying consequences of this practice than on its potential effect on soil organic matter storage. It would also be possible to mitigate the detrimental effects that slash harvesting has on site conditions by applying wood-ash or other nutrients in inorganic form. 53 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  12. Substantial secondary organic aerosol formation in a coniferous forest: observations of both day and night time chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Y. Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Substantial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA formation was investigated in a coniferous forest mountain region at Whistler, British Columbia. A largely biogenic aerosol growth episode was observed, providing a unique opportunity to investigate BSOA formation chemistry in a forested environment with limited influence from anthropogenic emissions. Positive matrix factorization of aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS measurement identified two types of BSOA (BSOA-1 and BSOA-2, which were primarily generated by gas-phase oxidation of monoterpenes and perhaps sesquiterpenes. The temporal variations of BSOA-1 and BSOA-2 can be explained by gas-particle partitioning in response to ambient temperature and the relative importance of different oxidation mechanisms between day and night. While BSOA-1 will arise from gas-phase ozonolysis and nitrate radical chemistry at night, BSOA-2 is less volatile than BSOA-1 and consists of products formed via gas-phase oxidation by the OH radical and ozone during the day. Organic nitrates produced through nitrate radical chemistry can account for 22–33 % of BSOA-1 mass at night. The mass spectra of BSOA-1 and BSOA-2 have higher values of the mass fraction of m/z 91 (f91 compared to the background organic aerosol, and so f91 is used as an indicator of BSOA formation pathways. A comparison between laboratory studies in the literature and our field observations highlights the potential importance of gas-phase formation chemistry of BSOA-2 type materials that may not be captured in smog chamber experiments, perhaps due to the wall loss of gas-phase intermediate products.

  13. Silvibacterium bohemicum gen. nov. sp. nov., an acidobacterium isolated from coniferous soil in the Bohemian Forest National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, Salvador; Benada, Oldrich; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr; García-Fraile, Paula

    2016-02-01

    During the course of a study assessing the bacterial diversity of a coniferous forest soil (pH 3.8) in the Bohemian Forest National Park (Czech Republic), we isolated strain S15(T) which corresponded to one of the most abundant soil OTUs. Strain S15(T) is represented by Gram-negative, motile, rod-like cells that are 0.3-0.5μm in diameter and 0.9-1.1μm in length. Its pH range for growth was 3-6, with optimal conditions found at approximately 4-5. It can grow at temperatures between 20°C and 28°C, with optimum growth at 22-24°C. Its respiratory quinone is MK-8, and its main fatty acid is iso-C15:0 (73.7%). The G+C DNA content was 58.2mol%. According to the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain S15(T) belongs to subdivision 1 of the phylum Acidobacteria, being affiliated to the cluster of Acidipila rosea AP8(T) and Acidobacterium capsulatum ATCC 51196(T). Analysis of the S15(T) genome revealed the presence of 404 genes that are involved in carbohydrate metabolism, which indicates the metabolic potential to degrade polysaccharides of plant and fungal origin. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the strain S15(T) represents a new genus and species within the family Acidobacteriaceae, for which the name Silvibacterium bohemicum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed (type strain S15(T)=LMG 28607(T)=CECT 8790(T)).

  14. Silvibacterium bohemicum gen. nov. sp. nov., an acidobacterium isolated from coniferous soil in the Bohemian Forest National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, Salvador; Benada, Oldrich; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr; García-Fraile, Paula

    2016-02-01

    During the course of a study assessing the bacterial diversity of a coniferous forest soil (pH 3.8) in the Bohemian Forest National Park (Czech Republic), we isolated strain S15(T) which corresponded to one of the most abundant soil OTUs. Strain S15(T) is represented by Gram-negative, motile, rod-like cells that are 0.3-0.5μm in diameter and 0.9-1.1μm in length. Its pH range for growth was 3-6, with optimal conditions found at approximately 4-5. It can grow at temperatures between 20°C and 28°C, with optimum growth at 22-24°C. Its respiratory quinone is MK-8, and its main fatty acid is iso-C15:0 (73.7%). The G+C DNA content was 58.2mol%. According to the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain S15(T) belongs to subdivision 1 of the phylum Acidobacteria, being affiliated to the cluster of Acidipila rosea AP8(T) and Acidobacterium capsulatum ATCC 51196(T). Analysis of the S15(T) genome revealed the presence of 404 genes that are involved in carbohydrate metabolism, which indicates the metabolic potential to degrade polysaccharides of plant and fungal origin. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the strain S15(T) represents a new genus and species within the family Acidobacteriaceae, for which the name Silvibacterium bohemicum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed (type strain S15(T)=LMG 28607(T)=CECT 8790(T)). PMID:26774420

  15. The influence of coniferous canopies on understorey vegetation and soils in mountain forests of the northern Calcareous Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compositional and edaphic gradients were studied in montane forests of the Bavarian Alps (Germany), in which natural mixed deciduous-coniferous tree layers have been altered by past management in favour of Picea abies. Data on species composition and ecological factors were collected in a stratified random sample of 84 quadrats comprising a gradient from pure Picea to pure Fagus sylvatica stands. Data about the understorey composition were subjected to indirect (DCA) and direct gradient analysis (RDA) with the proportion of Picea in the canopy as a constraining variable. Three principal components of a matrix containing seven descriptors of mineral soil, relief and tree layer cover were included as covariables describing the variability of primary ecological factors. Gradients of organic topsoil morphology and chemistry were extracted correspondingly. Responses of individual species, species group and topsoil attributes were studied by simple and partial correlation analysis. Mosses were significantly more abundant and diverse under Picea stands. Few graminoid and herb species were partially associated with Picea, and total understorey richness and cover did not differ systematically by stand type. No relationship between tree layer and understorey diversity was detected at the studied scale. Juvenile Fagus sylvatica was the only woody species significantly less abundant under Picea. In the topsoil lower base saturation, lower pH and larger C/N ratios in the litter layer were partially attributable to the proportion of Picea, only for base saturation a relationship was detected in greater soil depth also. The frequency of broad humus form types did not differ by tree species, nor was overall depth of organic forest floor attributable to canopy composition

  16. Simulating ozone dry deposition at a boreal forest with a multi-layer canopy deposition model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Putian; GANZEVELD Laurens; Rannik, Üllar; Zhou, Luxi; Gierens, Rosa; Taipale, Ditte; Mammarella, Ivan; Boy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A multi-layer ozone (O3) dry deposition model has been implemented into SOSAA (a model to Simulate the concentrations of Organic vapours, Sulphuric Acid and Aerosols) to improve the representation of O3 within and above the forest canopy in the planetary boundary layer where O3 is a key oxidant agent of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and thus affecting organic aerosol processes. We aim to predict the O3 uptake by a boreal forest canopy under varying environmental conditions and a...

  17. Impacts of elevated carbon dioxide and temperature on a boreal forest ecosystem (CLIMEX project)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breemen, N. van; Jenkins, A.; Wright, R.F.;

    1998-01-01

    and the growing season has been prolonged relative to the control area. This has helped to sustain an increase in plant growth relative to the control and has also promoted increased N export in stream water. Photosynthetic capacity and carbon-nitrogen ratio of new leaves of most plant species did not change......To evaluate the effects of climate change on boreal forest ecosystems, both atmospheric CO2 (to 560 ppmv) and air temperature (by 3 degrees-5 degrees C above ambient) were increased at a forested headwater catchment in southern Norway. The entire catchment (860 m(2)) is enclosed within...

  18. Growth dynamics of fine roots in a coniferous fern forest site close to Forsmark in the central part of Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seasonal growth dynamics of live and dead roots for trees and the field layer species (g/m2, varying diameter fractions) and live/dead ratios were analysed at a fresh/moist coniferous fern forest site close to the nuclear power plant at Forsmark in the central eastern parts of Sweden. The changes in depth distribution of fine roots were observed at depth intervals of the top humus horizon down to 40 cm in the mineral soil profile. The bulk of living fine roots of trees (2. The total quantity of fine roots (live + dead) amounted to 543, 434, 314 and 546 g/m2. Considerable quantities of fine roots (< 1 mm in diameter) were attributed to field-layer species (about 18% of the total biomass during the whole period of investigation). The turnover rate (the rate of construction of new roots) for tree fine roots < 1 mm in diameter amounted to at least the size of the average fine-root biomass. Our methods of estimating fine-root production and mortality, involved periodic measurements of live and dead dry weight of the fine roots from sequential core samples of the forest soil. The collected data give a proper and instant measure of the spatial and temporal distribution of fine roots in the undisturbed soil-profile. Data from other fine-root investigations suggest turnover rates in agreement with our present findings. Differences between root growth and turnover should be expected between trees of different age, tree species and different forest sites, but also between different years. Substantial variations in fine-root biomass, necromass and live/dead ratios are found in different forest sites. Correct methods for estimating the amount of live and dead fine-roots in the soil at regular time intervals are essential for any calculation of fine-root turnover. Definition of root vitality differs in literature, making it difficult to compare results from different root investigators. Our investigation clarifies the importance of using distinct morphological criteria when

  19. Rating a Wildfire Mitigation Strategy with an Insurance Premium: A Boreal Forest Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Rodriguez-Baca

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Risk analysis entails the systematic use of historical information to determine the frequency, magnitude and effects of unexpected events. Wildfire in boreal North America is a key driver of forest dynamics and may cause very significant economic losses. An actuarial approach to risk analysis based on cumulative probability distributions was developed to reduce the adverse effects of wildfire. To this effect, we developed spatially explicit landscape models to simulate the interactions between harvest, fire and forest succession over time in a boreal forest of eastern Canada. We estimated the amount of reduction of timber harvest necessary to build a buffer stock of sufficient size to cover fire losses and compared it to an insurance premium estimated in units of timber volume from the probability of occurrence and the amount of damage. Overall, the timber harvest reduction we applied was much more costly than the insurance premium even with a zero interest rate. This is due to the fact that the insurance premium is directly related to risk while the timber harvest reduction is not and, as a consequence, is much less efficient. These results, especially the comparison with a standard indicator such as an insurance premium, have useful implications at the time of choosing a mitigation strategy to protect timber supplies against risk without overly diminishing the provision of services from the forest. They are also promoting the use of insurance against disastrous events in forest management planning.

  20. Optimal conservation resource allocation under variable economic and ecological time discounting rates in boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazziotta, Adriano; Pouzols, Federico Montesino; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Kotiaho, Janne S; Strandman, Harri; Moilanen, Atte

    2016-09-15

    Resource allocation to multiple alternative conservation actions is a complex task. A common trade-off occurs between protection of smaller, expensive, high-quality areas versus larger, cheaper, partially degraded areas. We investigate optimal allocation into three actions in boreal forest: current standard forest management rules, setting aside of mature stands, or setting aside of clear-cuts. We first estimated how habitat availability for focal indicator species and economic returns from timber harvesting develop through time as a function of forest type and action chosen. We then developed an optimal resource allocation by accounting for budget size and habitat availability of indicator species in different forest types. We also accounted for the perspective adopted towards sustainability, modeled via temporal preference and economic and ecological time discounting. Controversially, we found that in boreal forest set-aside followed by protection of clear-cuts can become a winning cost-effective strategy when accounting for habitat requirements of multiple species, long planning horizon, and limited budget. It is particularly effective when adopting a long-term sustainability perspective, and accounting for present revenues from timber harvesting. The present analysis assesses the cost-effective conditions to allocate resources into an inexpensive conservation strategy that nevertheless has potential to produce high ecological values in the future. PMID:27262031

  1. Retrieval of seasonal dynamics of forest understory reflectance from semi-arid to boreal forests using MODIS BRDF data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisek, Jan; Chen, Jing; Kobayashi, Hideki; Rautiainen, Miina; Schaepman, Michael; Karnieli, Arnon; Sprintsin, Michael; Ryu, Youngryel; Nikopensius, Maris; Raabe, Kairi

    2016-04-01

    Ground vegetation (understory) provides an essential contribution to the whole-stand reflectance signal in many boreal, sub-boreal, and temperate forests. Accurate knowledge about forest understory reflectance is urgently needed in various forest reflectance modelling efforts. However, systematic collections of understory reflectance data covering different sites and ecosystems are almost missing. Measurement of understory reflectance is a real challenge because of an extremely high variability of irradiance at the forest floor, weak signal in some parts of the spectrum, spectral separability issues of over- and understory and its variable nature. Understory can consist of several sub-layers (regenerated tree, shrub, grasses or dwarf shrub, mosses, lichens, litter, bare soil), it has spatially-temporally variable species composition and ground coverage. Additional challenges are introduced by patchiness of ground vegetation, ground surface roughness, and understory-overstory relations. Due to this variability, remote sensing might be the only means to provide consistent data at spatially relevant scales. In this presentation, we report on retrieving seasonal courses of understory Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from multi-angular MODIS BRDF/Albedo data. We compared satellite-based seasonal courses of understory NDVI against an extended collection of different types of forest sites with available in-situ understory reflectance measurements. These sites are distributed along a wide latitudinal gradient on the Northern hemisphere: a sparse and dense black spruce forests in Alaska and Canada, a northern European boreal forest in Finland, hemiboreal needleleaf and deciduous stands in Estonia, a mixed temperate forest in Switzerland, a cool temperate deciduous broadleaf forest in Korea, and a semi-arid pine plantation in Israel. Our results indicated the retrieval method performs well particularly over open forests of different types. We also demonstrated

  2. Maintaining animal assemblages through single-species management: the case of threatened caribou in boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Orphé; Dupuch, Angélique; Hébert, Christian; Le Borgne, Hélène Le; Fortin, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    With the intensification of human activities, preserving animal populations is a contemporary challenge of critical importance. In this context, the umbrella species concept is appealing because preserving a single species should result in the protection of multiple co-occurring species. Practitioners, though, face the task of having to find suitable umbrellas to develop single-species management guidelines. In North America, boreal forests must be managed to facilitate the recovery of the threatened boreal caribou (Rangifer tarandus). Yet, the effect of caribou conservation on co-occurring animal species remains poorly documented. We tested if boreal caribou can constitute an effective umbrella for boreal fauna. Birds, small mammals, and insects were sampled along gradients of post-harvest and post-fire forest succession. Predictive models of occupancy were developed from the responses of 95 species to characteristics of forest stands and their surroundings. We then assessed the similarity of species occupancy expected between simulated harvested landscapes and a 90 000-km2 uncut landscape. Managed landscapes were simulated based on three levels of disturbance, two timber-harvest rotation cycles, and dispersed or aggregated cut-blocks. We found that management guidelines that were more likely to maintain caribou populations should also better preserve animal assemblages. Relative to fragmentation or harvest cycle, we detected a stronger effect of habitat loss on species assemblages. Disturbing 22%, 35%, and 45% of the landscape should result, respectively, in 80%, 60%, and 40% probability for caribou populations to be sustainable; in turn, this should result in regional species assemblages with Jaccard similarity indices of 0.86, 0.79, and 0.74, respectively, relative to the uncut landscape. Our study thus demonstrates the value of single-species management for animal conservation. Our quantitative approach allows for the evaluation of management guidelines prior

  3. Maintaining animal assemblages through single-species management: the case of threatened caribou in boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Orphé; Dupuch, Angélique; Hébert, Christian; Le Borgne, Hélène Le; Fortin, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    With the intensification of human activities, preserving animal populations is a contemporary challenge of critical importance. In this context, the umbrella species concept is appealing because preserving a single species should result in the protection of multiple co-occurring species. Practitioners, though, face the task of having to find suitable umbrellas to develop single-species management guidelines. In North America, boreal forests must be managed to facilitate the recovery of the threatened boreal caribou (Rangifer tarandus). Yet, the effect of caribou conservation on co-occurring animal species remains poorly documented. We tested if boreal caribou can constitute an effective umbrella for boreal fauna. Birds, small mammals, and insects were sampled along gradients of post-harvest and post-fire forest succession. Predictive models of occupancy were developed from the responses of 95 species to characteristics of forest stands and their surroundings. We then assessed the similarity of species occupancy expected between simulated harvested landscapes and a 90 000-km2 uncut landscape. Managed landscapes were simulated based on three levels of disturbance, two timber-harvest rotation cycles, and dispersed or aggregated cut-blocks. We found that management guidelines that were more likely to maintain caribou populations should also better preserve animal assemblages. Relative to fragmentation or harvest cycle, we detected a stronger effect of habitat loss on species assemblages. Disturbing 22%, 35%, and 45% of the landscape should result, respectively, in 80%, 60%, and 40% probability for caribou populations to be sustainable; in turn, this should result in regional species assemblages with Jaccard similarity indices of 0.86, 0.79, and 0.74, respectively, relative to the uncut landscape. Our study thus demonstrates the value of single-species management for animal conservation. Our quantitative approach allows for the evaluation of management guidelines prior

  4. Estimating Aboveground Net Primary Productivity of Black Spruce along a Climatic Gradient in the Boreal Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, J.; Varem-Sanders, T.; Bouriaud, O.

    2005-12-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is the difference between carbon assimilation by photosynthesis and plant respiration quantifies the rate at which carbon is accumulated in the living vegetation. The ability to measure net primary productivity (NPP) over a period of years using relatively inexpensive methods can be a tremendous asset when assessing the forest response to climate change. This project investigates and evaluates a new comprehensive method of estimating multi-decadal historical black spruce productivity using biomass stocks and tree ring width measurements along a climatic gradient. Black spruce aboveground NPP was calculated for even aged stands along Boreal Forest Transect Case Study (BFTCS) with similar soil and fertility characteristics. Biomass functions were modified using local DBH-height functions to determine tree level with Dbh as the sole predictor. Above ground net primary productivity was estimated from the stand level change in biomass with measured litter production rate on these sites. Tree biomass increment and litter production increases from Central Saskatchewan at the southern limit of the boreal forest where the climate is warm and dry up to Thompson (Northern Manitoba) where the climate is wetter and colder. Aboveground NPP for mature stands ranges from 671 to 1567 kg C ha-1 yr-1. Both at the southern boreal sites and northern boreal sites, the tree productivity was highly sensitivity to climate variability. The younger mixed black spruce stands are considerably more productive than older pure stands. Litter production is a major component and accounts for 30 to 60% of aboveground NPP. Practical robust estimation of aboveground NPP using tree ring measurement offers the potential for application over large spatial and temporal scale.

  5. A comparative analysis of simulated and observed photosynthetic CO2 uptake in two coniferous forest canopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrom, A.; Jarvis, P.G.; Clement, R.;

    2006-01-01

    Gross canopy photosynthesis (Pg) can be simulated with canopy models or retrieved from turbulent carbon dioxide (CO2) flux measurements above the forest canopy. We compare the two estimates and illustrate our findings with two case studies. We used the three-dimensional canopy model MAESTRA...... to simulate Pg of two spruce forests differing in age and structure. Model parameter acquisition and model sensitivity to selected model parameters are described, and modeled results are compared with independent flux estimates. Despite higher photon fluxes at the site, an older German Norway spruce (Picea...... uptake rates were a slightly smaller quantum yield and lower absorptance of the Norway spruce stand because of a more clumped canopy structure. The model did not represent the scatter in the turbulent CO2 flux densities, which was of the same order of magnitude as the non...

  6. First Polarimetric GNSS-R Measurements from a Stratospheric Flight over Boreal Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Carreno-Luengo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The first-ever dual-frequency multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems Reflectometry (GNSS-R polarimetric measurements over boreal forests and lakes from the stratosphere are presented. Data were collected during the European Space Agency (ESA sponsored Balloon Experiments for University Students (BEXUS 19 stratospheric balloon experiment using the P(Y and C/A Reflect Ometer (PYCARO instrument operated in closed-loop mode. Maps of the polarimetric ratio for L1 and L2 Global Positioning System (GPS and GLObal Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS, and for E1 Galileo signals are derived from the float phase at 27,000 m height, and the specular points are geolocalized on the Earth’s surface. Polarimetric ratio ( maps over boreal forests are shown to be in the range 2–16 dB for the different GNSS codes. This result suggests that the scattering is taking place not only over the soil, but over the different forests elements as well. Additionally to the interpretation of the experimental results a theoretical investigation of the different contributions to the total reflectivity over boreal forests is performed using a bistatic scattering model. The simulated cross- (reflected Left Hand Circular Polarization LHCP and co-polar (reflected Right Hand Circular Polarization RHCP reflectivities are evaluated for the soil, the canopy, and the canopy–soil interactions for three different biomass densities: 725 trees/ha, 150 trees/ha and 72 trees/ha. For elevation angles larger than the Brewster angle, it is found that the cross-polar signal is dominant when just single reflections over the forests are evaluated, while in the case of multiple reflections the co-polar signal becomes the largest one. The first-ever dual-frequency multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems Reflectometry (GNSS-R polarimetric measurements over boreal forests and lakes from the stratosphere are presented. Data were collected during the European Space

  7. Examining moisture and temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition in a temperate coniferous forest soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel, C. E.; Kellman, L.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature and moisture are primary environmental drivers of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition, and the development of a better understanding fo their roles in this process through depth in soils is needed. The objective of this research is to independently assess the roles of temperature and moisture in driving heterotrophic soil respiration for shallow and deep soils in a temperate red spruce forest. Minimally disturbed soil cores from shallow (0–25 cm) and deep (25–50 cm) layers wer...

  8. Origin and Availability of Large Cavities for Barrow’s Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica, a Species at Risk Inhabiting the Eastern Canadian Boreal Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Andrée Vaillancourt

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Large secondary-nesting birds such as ducks rely on appropriate cavities for breeding. The main objective of this study was to assess the availability of large cavities and the potential of a managed boreal coniferous landscape to provide nesting trees within the breeding area of the eastern population of Barrow’s Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica, a cavity-nesting species at risk in Canada. Woodpecker surveys were conducted in both conifer and mixed-wood landscapes, and cavities were sought in line transects distributed in unharvested and linear remnant stands of balsam fir (Abies balsamea and black spruce (Picea mariana as well as in cutblocks. No Pileated Woodpeckers (Dryocopus pileatus were detected in the breeding area of Barrow’s Goldeneye, but the species was present in the nearby lowland area in which trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides is abundant. Only 10 trees (0.2% of those sampled supported cavities considered suitable for Barrow’s Goldeneye in terms of dimensions and canopy openness. Most of the suitable cavities found during this study were nonexcavated apical (chimney cavities in relatively short snags that showed advanced states of decay. A diameter-at-breast-height threshold was determined for each tree species, after which the probability of cavity occurrence was enhanced in terms of potential cavity trees for Barrow’s Goldeneye. Remnant linear forest sites had lower potential tree densities than did their unharvested equivalents. Large cavities were thus a rare component in this boreal landscape, suggesting that they may be a limiting factor for this population at risk. Current even-aged forest management that mainly relies on clear-cut practices is likely to further reduce the potential of this landscape to provide trees with suitable cavities.

  9. Effects of multiple environmental factors on CO2 emission and CH4 uptake from old-growth forest soils

    OpenAIRE

    H. J. Fang; G. R. Yu; Cheng, S. L.; Zhu, T. H.; Wang, Y. S.; Yan, J H; M. Wang; Cao, M; Zhou, M.

    2010-01-01

    To assess contribution of multiple environmental factors to carbon exchanges between the atmosphere and forest soils, four old-growth forests referred to as boreal coniferous forest, temperate needle-broadleaved mixed forest, subtropical evergreen broadleaved forest and tropical monsoon rain forest were selected along eastern China. In each old-growth forest, soil CO2 and CH4 fluxes were measured from 2003 to 2005 applying the static opaque chamber and gas chromatography tec...

  10. Optimal conservation resource allocation under variable economic and ecological time discounting rates in boreal forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazziotta, Adriano; Montesino Pouzols, Federico; Mönkkönen, Mikko;

    2016-01-01

    Resource allocation to multiple alternative conservation actions is a complex task. A common trade-off occurs between protection of smaller, expensive, high-quality areas versus larger, cheaper, partially degraded areas. We investigate optimal allocation into three actions in boreal forest: current...... standard forest management rules, setting aside of mature stands, or setting aside of clear-cuts. We first estimated how habitat availability for focal indicator species and economic returns from timber harvesting develop through time as a function of forest type and action chosen. We then developed...... an optimal resource allocation by accounting for budget size and habitat availability of indicator species in different forest types. We also accounted for the perspective adopted towards sustainability, modeled via temporal preference and economic and ecological time discounting. Controversially, we found...

  11. The affection of boreal forest changes on imbalance of Nature (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tana, G.; Tateishi, R.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract: The balance of nature does not exist, and, perhaps, never has existed [1]. In other words, the Mother Nature is imbalanced at all. The Mother Nature is changing every moment and never returns to previous condition. Because of the imbalance of nature, global climate has been changing gradually. To reveal the imbalance of nature, there is a need to monitor the dynamic changes of the Earth surface. Forest cover and forest cover change have been grown in importance as basic variables for modelling of global biogeochemical cycles as well as climate [2]. The boreal area contains 1/3 of the earth's trees. These trees play a large part in limiting harmful greenhouse gases by aborbing much of the earth's carbon dioxide (CO2) [3]. The boreal area mainly consists of needleleaf evergreen forest and needleleaf deciduous forest. Both of the needleleaf evergreen forest and needleleaf deciduous forest play the important roles on the uptake of CO2. However, because of the dormant period of needleleaf evergreen forest are shorter than that of needleleaf deciduous forest, needleleaf evergreen forest makes a greater contribution to the absorbtion of CO2. Satellite sensor because of its ability to observe the Earth continuously, can provide the opportunity to monitor the dynamic changes of the Earth. In this study, we used the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data to monitor the dynamic change of boreal forest area which are mainly consist from needleleaf evergreen forest and needleleaf deciduous forest during 2003-2012. Three years MODIS data from the year 2003, 2008 and 2012 were used to detect the forest changed area. A hybrid change detection method which combines the threshold method and unsupervised classification method was used to detect the changes of forest area. In the first step, the difference of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) of the three years were calculated and were used to extract the changed areas by the

  12. Long-term effects of timber harvesting on hemicellulolytic microbial populations in coniferous forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Hilary T C; Maas, Kendra R; Wilhelm, Roland C; Mohn, William W

    2016-02-01

    Forest ecosystems need to be sustainably managed, as they are major reservoirs of biodiversity, provide important economic resources and modulate global climate. We have a poor knowledge of populations responsible for key biomass degradation processes in forest soils and the effects of forest harvesting on these populations. Here, we investigated the effects of three timber-harvesting methods, varying in the degree of organic matter removal, on putatively hemicellulolytic bacterial and fungal populations 10 or more years after harvesting and replanting. We used stable-isotope probing to identify populations that incorporated (13)C from labeled hemicellulose, analyzing (13)C-enriched phospholipid fatty acids, bacterial 16 S rRNA genes and fungal ITS regions. In soil microcosms, we identified 104 bacterial and 52 fungal hemicellulolytic operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Several of these OTUs are affiliated with taxa not previously reported to degrade hemicellulose, including the bacterial genera Methylibium, Pelomonas and Rhodoferax, and the fungal genera Cladosporium, Pseudeurotiaceae, Capronia, Xenopolyscytalum and Venturia. The effect of harvesting on hemicellulolytic populations was evaluated based on in situ bacterial and fungal OTUs. Harvesting treatments had significant but modest long-term effects on relative abundances of hemicellulolytic populations, which differed in strength between two ecozones and between soil layers. For soils incubated in microcosms, prior harvesting treatments did not affect the rate of incorporation of hemicellulose carbon into microbial biomass. In six ecozones across North America, distributions of the bacterial hemicellulolytic OTUs were similar, whereas distributions of fungal ones differed. Our work demonstrates that diverse taxa in soil are hemicellulolytic, many of which are differentially affected by the impact of harvesting on environmental conditions. However, the hemicellulolytic capacity of soil communities appears

  13. Calibration of the L-MEB model over a coniferous and a deciduous forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jennifer P.; Saleh-Contell, Kauzar; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre;

    2008-01-01

    temperatures from 2.8 to 3.8 K, depending on data set and polarization. Furthermore, the relationship between canopy optical depth and leaf area index is investigated for the deciduous site. Finally, a sensitivity study is conducted for the focus parameters, temperature, soil moisture, and precipitation....... The results found in this paper will be integrated in the operational SMOS Level 2 Soil Moisture algorithm and used in future inversions of the L-MEB model, for soil moisture retrievals over heterogeneous, partly forested areas....

  14. n-Alkane distributions as indicators of novel ecosystem development in western boreal forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Charlotte; Dungait, Jennifer; Quideau, Sylvie

    2013-04-01

    Novel ecosystem development is occurring within the western boreal forest of Canada due to land reclamation following surface mining in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region. Sphagnum peat is the primary organic matter amendment used to reconstruct soils in the novel ecosystems. We hypothesised that ecosystem recovery would be indicated by an increasing similarity in the biomolecular characteristics of novel reconstructed soil organic matter (SOM) derived from peat to those of natural boreal ecosystems. In this study, we evaluated the use of the homologous series of very long chain (>C20) n-alkanes with odd-over-even predominance as biomarker signatures to monitor the re-establishment of boreal forests on reconstructed soils. The lipids were extracted from dominant vegetation inputs and SOM from a series of natural and novel ecosystem reference plots. We observed unique very long n-alkane signatures of the source vegetation, e.g. Sphagnum sp. was dominated by C31 and aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) leaves by C25. Greater concentrations of very long chain n-alkanes were extracted from natural than novel ecosystem SOM (p<0.01), and their distribution differed between the two systems (p<0.001) and reflected the dominant vegetation input. Our results indicate that further research is required to clarify the influence of vegetation or disturbance on the signature of very long chain n-alkanes in SOM; however, the use of n-alkanes as biomarkers of ecosystem development is a promising method.

  15. Pyrogenic disturbances of the hydrothermic regime of cryogenic soils under light coniferous forests in southeastern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evdokimenko, M. D.

    2013-02-01

    Pyrogenic transformations of the physical state of cryogenic soils in the southern and middle taiga were investigated. The long-term dynamics of the microclimate on burns and the soil temperature and moisture to the depth of 120 cm were studied. Data on the postfire restoration of the ground cover are presented. Experiments on artificial sprinkling of burned areas differing in the degree of the burning out of the forest litter, the slope gradient, etc., have been performed. An experimental model demonstrating the relationships between the surface runoff and five environmental factors has been proposed. The pyrogenic destruction of the ground cover and the lower phytocenosis layers was accompanied by significant disturbances of the microclimate and anomalous thawing of the permafrost on the burns. In the pine stand on the colluvial fan after the intense fire, the soil temperature at the depth of 10 cm (in the summer) exceeded the control value by 3-5°C; in the larch forest on the southern slope of the Stanovoi Ridge, it increased by 1.5-2.0 times after the fire of medium intensity. On the mountain slopes, the surface runoff was significantly intensified, which resulted in drastic environmental and silvicultural consequences.

  16. Foliage/atmosphere exchange of mercury in a subtropical coniferous forest in south China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yao; Duan, Lei; Driscoll, Charles T.; Xu, Guangyi; Shao, Mengshu; Taylor, Mariah; Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming

    2016-07-01

    Foliage/atmosphere exchange is an important pathway of deposition and loss in the biogeochemical mercury (Hg) cycle of terrestrial ecosystems. The foliage/atmosphere fluxes of Hg0 were observed over four seasons in a Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest in south China. Hg0 exchange showed a bidirectional process but without clear compensation point. Hg0 emissions peaked midday in all four seasons, probably associated with Hg photoreduction on needle surface. Peaks in Hg0 adsorption/deposition often occurred in the morning, especially in spring and autumn. Although current-year needles accumulated Hg at a rate of 19.4 µg m-2 yr-1, they were a net Hg0 source of 1.7 µg m-2 yr-1 to the atmosphere as their release of Hg exceeded inputs. In addition, previous-year needles emitted Hg0 at an average rate of 9.2 µg m-2 yr-1. Based on the mass balance of Hg in the forest canopy, the dry deposition of Hg was estimated 52.5 µg m-2 yr-1, much higher than the wet deposition (to 14.4 µg m-2 yr-1). Although Hg in the atmosphere is considered the main source of Hg in folia, soil water may contribute to Hg0 emission by plant transpiration. These processes should be further studied in the future.

  17. Nitrogen Additions Increase the Diversity of Carbon Compounds Degraded by Fungi in Boreal Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, T. B.; Turner, K. M.; Treseder, K. K.

    2004-12-01

    Boreal forest soils in North America harbor a large reservoir of organic C, and this region is increasingly exposed to long-range atmospheric N transport from Eurasia. By examining the responses of decomposers to N deposition in these forests, we hope to improve predictions of the fate of boreal carbon pools under global change. We tested the hypothesis that the functional diversity of decomposer fungi would increase under N fertilization in boreal forests where fungal growth was otherwise N-limited, owing to a reduction in competitive exclusion of fungal groups. We collected soil and leaf litter from three Alaskan sites that represent different successional stages at 5, 17, or 80 years following severe forest fire. Each site had been exposed for two years to nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization in a factorial design, with four plots per treatment. Nutrient limitation of fungal growth varied depending on successional stage. The standing hyphal length of decomposer fungi in soil (i.e. Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) responded to neither N nor P in the 5-year old site, increased under N fertilization in the 17-year old site, and increased where N and P was added simultaneously in the 80-year old site (site x N x P interaction: P = 0.001). We used BIOLOG microplates for filamentous fungi to obtain an index of the diversity of carbon use by decomposer fungi; each of 95 wells of these plates contains a different carbon-based compound, as well as a dye that changes color upon metabolism of the compound. Saline leaf litter extracts were mixed with fungal growth medium and then added to the microplates. The number of wells displaying metabolic activity was counted following incubation for five days. We found that N fertilization raised the average number of positive wells per plate from 14 to 27 (P = 0.012), with no significant differences in responses among sites. Phosphorus additions did not alter functional diversity of fungi in any site. Since increases in functional

  18. Snowpack concentrations and estimated fluxes of volatile organic compounds in a boreal forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aaltonen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil provides an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs to atmosphere, but in boreal forests these fluxes and their seasonal variations have not been characterized in detail. Especially wintertime fluxes are almost completely unstudied. In this study, we measured the VOC concentrations inside the snowpack in a boreal Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. forest in southern Finland, using adsorbent tubes and air samplers installed permanently in the snow profile. Based on the VOC concentrations at three heights inside the snowpack, we estimated the fluxes of these gases. We measured 20 VOCs from the snowpack, monoterpenes being the most abundant group with concentrations varying from 0.11 to 16 μg m−3. Sesquiterpenes and oxygen-containing monoterpenes were also detected. Inside the pristine snowpack, the concentrations of terpenoids decreased from soil surface towards the surface of the snow, suggesting soil as the source for terpenoids. Forest damages (i.e. broken treetops and branches, fallen trees resulting from heavy snow loading during the measurement period increased the terpenoid concentrations dramatically, especially in the upper part of the snowpack. The results show that soil processes are active and efficient VOC sources also during winter, and that natural or human disturbance can increase forest floor VOC concentrations substantially. Our results stress the importance of soil as a source of VOCs during the season when other biological sources, such as plants, have lower activity.

  19. Snowpack concentrations and estimated fluxes of volatile organic compounds in a boreal forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aaltonen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil forms an important source for volatile organic compounds (VOCs, but in boreal forests these fluxes and their seasonal variations have not been characterized in detail, especially wintertime fluxes, which are almost completely unstudied. In this study, we measured the VOC concentrations inside a snowpack in a boreal Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. forest in southern Finland, using adsorbent tubes and air samplers installed permanently in the snow profile. Based on the VOC concentrations at three heights inside the snowpack, we estimated the fluxes of these gases. We measured 20 VOCs from the snowpack, monoterpenes being the most abundant group with concentrations varying from 0.11 to 16 μg m−3. Sesquiterpenes and oxygen-containing monoterpenes were also detected. Inside the pristine snowpack, the concentrations of terpenoids decreased from the soil surface towards the snow surface, suggesting soil as being the source for terpenoids. Forest damages resulting from heavy snow loading during the measurement period increased the terpenoid concentrations dramatically, especially in the upper part of the snowpack. The results show that soil processes are also active and efficient VOC sources during winter and that natural or human disturbance can increase forest floor VOC concentrations substantially. Our results stress the importance of soil as a source of VOCs during the season when other biological sources, basically plants, have lower activity.

  20. Large-scale variation in boreal and temperate forest carbon turnover rate related to climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Carvalhais, Nuno; Forkel, Matthias; Santoro, Maurizio; Tum, Markus; Schmullius, Christiane

    2016-05-01

    Vegetation carbon turnover processes in forest ecosystems and their dominant drivers are far from being understood at a broader scale. Many of these turnover processes act on long timescales and include a lateral dimension and thus can hardly be investigated by plot-level studies alone. Making use of remote sensing-based products of net primary production (NPP) and biomass, here we show that spatial gradients of carbon turnover rate (k) in Northern Hemisphere boreal and temperate forests are explained by different climate-related processes depending on the ecosystem. k is related to frost damage effects and the trade-off between growth and frost adaptation in boreal forests, while drought stress and climate effects on insects and pathogens can explain an elevated k in temperate forests. By identifying relevant processes underlying broadscale patterns in k, we provide the basis for a detailed exploration of these mechanisms in field studies, and ultimately the improvement of their representations in global vegetation models (GVMs).

  1. Alaska's Changing Fire Regime - Implications for the Vulnerability of Its Boreal Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Hoy, E. E.; Verbyla, D. L.; Rupp, T. S.; Duffy, P. A.; McGuire, A. D.; Murphy, K. A.; Jandt, R.; Barnes, J. L.; Calef, M.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    A synthesis was carried out to examine Alaska s boreal forest fire regime. During the 2000s, an average of 767 000 ha/year burned, 50% higher than in any previous decade since the 1940s. Over the past 60 years, there was a decrease in the number of lightning-ignited fires, an increase in extreme lightning-ignited fire events, an increase in human-ignited fires, and a decrease in the number of extreme human-ignited fire events. The fraction of area burned from humanignited fires fell from 26% for the 1950s and 1960s to 5% for the 1990s and 2000s, a result from the change in fire policy that gave the highest suppression priorities to fire events that occurred near human settlements. The amount of area burned during late-season fires increased over the past two decades. Deeper burning of surface organic layers in black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) forests occurred during late-growing-season fires and on more well-drained sites. These trends all point to black spruce forests becoming increasingly vulnerable to the combined changes of key characteristics of Alaska s fire regime, except on poorly drained sites, which are resistant to deep burning. The implications of these fire regime changes to the vulnerability and resilience of Alaska s boreal forests and land and fire management are discussed.

  2. Snowpack concentrations and estimated fluxes of volatile organic compounds in a boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, H.; Pumpanen, J.; Hakola, H.; Vesala, T.; Rasmus, S.; Bäck, J.

    2012-06-01

    Soil provides an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to atmosphere, but in boreal forests these fluxes and their seasonal variations have not been characterized in detail. Especially wintertime fluxes are almost completely unstudied. In this study, we measured the VOC concentrations inside the snowpack in a boreal Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forest in southern Finland, using adsorbent tubes and air samplers installed permanently in the snow profile. Based on the VOC concentrations at three heights inside the snowpack, we estimated the fluxes of these gases. We measured 20 VOCs from the snowpack, monoterpenes being the most abundant group with concentrations varying from 0.11 to 16 μg m-3. Sesquiterpenes and oxygen-containing monoterpenes were also detected. Inside the pristine snowpack, the concentrations of terpenoids decreased from soil surface towards the surface of the snow, suggesting soil as the source for terpenoids. Forest damages (i.e. broken treetops and branches, fallen trees) resulting from heavy snow loading during the measurement period increased the terpenoid concentrations dramatically, especially in the upper part of the snowpack. The results show that soil processes are active and efficient VOC sources also during winter, and that natural or human disturbance can increase forest floor VOC concentrations substantially. Our results stress the importance of soil as a source of VOCs during the season when other biological sources, such as plants, have lower activity.

  3. Vegetation Mortality within Natural Wildfire Events in the Western Canadian Boreal Forest: What Burns and Why?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J. Ferster

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wildfires are a common disturbance event in the Canadian boreal forest. Within event boundaries, the level of vegetation mortality varies greatly. Understanding where surviving vegetation occurs within fire events and how this relates to pre-fire vegetation, topography, and fire weather can inform forest management decisions. We used pre-fire forest inventory data, digital elevation maps, and records of fire weather for 37 naturally-occurring wildfires (1961 to 1982; 30 to 5500 ha covering a wide range of conditions in the western Canadian boreal forest to investigate these relationships using multinomial logistic models. Overall, vegetation mortality related to a combination of factors representing different spatial scales. Lower vegetation mortality occurred where there was lower fuel continuity and when fires occurred under non-drought conditions. Higher classification accuracy occurred for class extremes of no mortality (i.e., unburned areas within the burn event and high mortality; partial vegetation mortality classes were harder to distinguish. This research contributes to the knowledge required for natural pattern emulation strategies, and developing responses to climate change.

  4. Functions of Biodiversity of Artificial Broadleaved-Coniferous Mixed Forest%人工针阔混交林生物多样性功能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢志华

    2015-01-01

    通过对红松、刺楸人工针阔混交林和红松人工纯林生物多样性功能的试验分析,结果表明:针阔混交林能增加蚯蚓的数量,林龄25年时,混交林的蚯蚓数量比人工纯林高48.4%;人工针阔混交林招引各种鸟类达33种,每天食虫量达1500条,抑制了森林虫害的发生;人工针阔混交林日平均气温0.5 m和1.8 m处分别比红松纯林低2.4~1.0℃,相对湿度0.5 m处比红松纯林提高24%,绝对湿度提高2.3%,1.8 m处混交林相对湿度比纯林提高11%,绝对湿度比纯林提高5.2%;混交林比纯林能降低风速0.7~1.2 m s-1。针阔混交林的各项功能指标都优于纯林。%The functions of the biodiversity of the artificial pure forest for Pinus koraiensis and the artificial broad-leaved-coniferous mixed forest of Pinus koraiensis and Kalopanax septemlobus were analyzed.Result shows that:broadleaved-coniferous mixed forest can increase the number of earthworms;the numbers of earthworm in the mixed forest are 48.4% higher than that of the artificial forests while the forest age being 25 years;the broadleaved-conif-erous mixed forest can attract 33 kinds of birds,and the insectivorous number are 1 500 per day,which inhibit the occurrence of forest pests;the daily average temperature of the broadleaved-coniferous mixed forest at 0.5 m and 1.8 m is 2.4 ℃ and 1.0℃ respectively lower than that of the pure forest of Pinuskoraiensis;the relative humidity and the absolute humidity is 24% and 2.3% higher than that of the pure forest at the height of 0.5 m respectively;the relative humidity and the absolute humidity is 1 1% and 5 .2% higher than that of the pure forest at the height of 1.8 m respectively;the mixed forest can reduce the wind speed by 0.7-1.2 m s-1 than that of the pure forest.The func-tion indicators of the broadleaved-coniferous mixed forest are superior to that of the pure forest.

  5. Leaf morphological and anatomical traits from tropical to temperate coniferous forests: Mechanisms and influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Miao; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Hou, Jihua

    2016-01-22

    Leaf traits may reflect the adaptation mechanisms of plants to the environment. In this study, we investigated leaf morphological and anatomical traits in nine cold-temperate to tropical forests along a 4,200-km transect to test how they vary across latitudinal gradients. The results showed that leaf dry weight decreased (P palisade-leaf mesophyll thickness ratio increased (P mesophyll thickness ratio decreased, with increasing latitude (P palisade mesophyll thickness, but negative correlations between stomatal length and stomatal density (all P < 0.01). The observed negative correlations represented the adaptive mechanisms of leaves through their morphological and anatomical traits. These findings provided new insights into the responses of leaf morphological and anatomical traits to climate changes and important parameters for future model optimization.

  6. Radiocesium accumulation in edible wild mushrooms from coniferous forests around the Nuclear Centre of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cs-137 and K-40 have been determined in soil samples and in wild edible mushrooms from a forest ecosystem located at the Nuclear Centre of Mexico (NCM) and in several surrounding localities. The transfer factors for Cs-137 were studied in 21 mushroom species from 1993 to 1997. The Cs-137 and K-40 determinations were performed using a gamma spectrometer system of low level counting with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The local mushroom species that were found to show higher Cs-137 transfer factors were Clavariadelphus truncatus, Cortinarius caerulescens, Gomphus floccosus and Lyophyllum decastes. The Cs-137 levels obtained at the NCM in some mushroom samples were slightly lower than those from surrounding localities indicating that the nuclear facility has not emitted Cs-137 to the atmosphere

  7. Vulnerability to climate-induced changes in ecosystem services of boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Maria; Rankinen, Katri; Aalto, Tuula; Akujärvi, Anu; Nadir Arslan, Ali; Liski, Jari; Markkanen, Tiina; Mäkelä, Annikki; Peltoniemi, Mikko

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests provide an array of ecosystem services. They regulate climate, and carbon, water and nutrient fluxes, and provide renewable raw material, food, and recreational possibilities. Rapid climate warming is projected for the boreal zone, and has already been observed in Finland, which sets these services at risk. MONIMET (LIFE12 ENV/FI/000409, 2.9.2013 - 1.9.2017) is a project funded by EU Life programme about Climate Change Indicators and Vulnerability of Boreal Zone Applying Innovative Observation and Modeling Techniques. The coordinating beneficiary of the project is the Finnish Meteorological Institute. Associated beneficiaries are the Natural Resources Institute Finland, the Finnish Environment Institute and the University of Helsinki. In the MONIMET project, we use state-of-the-art models and new monitoring methods to investigate the impacts of a warming climate on the provision of ecosystem services of boreal forests. This poster presents results on carbon storage in soil and assessment of drought indices, as a preparation for assessing the vulnerability of society to climate-induced changes in ecosystem services. The risk of decreasing provision of ecosystem services depends on the sensitivity of the ecosystem as well as its exposure to climate stress. The vulnerability of society, in turn, depends on the risk of decreasing provision of a certain service in combination with society's demand for that service. In the next phase, we will look for solutions to challenges relating to the quantification of the demand for ecosystem services and differences in spatial extent and resolution of the information on future supply and demand.

  8. Diverse growth trends and climate responses across Eurasia’s boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Lena; Agafonov, Leonid; Charpentier Ljungqvist, Fredrik; Churakova (Sidorova, Olga; Düthorn, Elisabeth; Esper, Jan; Hülsmann, Lisa; Kirdyanov, Alexander V.; Moiseev, Pavel; Myglan, Vladimir S.; Nikolaev, Anatoly N.; Reinig, Frederick; Schweingruber, Fritz H.; Solomina, Olga; Tegel, Willy; Büntgen, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    The area covered by boreal forests accounts for ˜16% of the global and 22% of the Northern Hemisphere landmass. Changes in the productivity and functioning of this circumpolar biome not only have strong effects on species composition and diversity at regional to larger scales, but also on the Earth’s carbon cycle. Although temporal inconsistency in the response of tree growth to temperature has been reported from some locations at the higher northern latitudes, a systematic dendroecological network assessment is still missing for most of the boreal zone. Here, we analyze the geographical patterns of changes in summer temperature and precipitation across northern Eurasia >60 °N since 1951 AD, as well as the growth trends and climate responses of 445 Pinus, Larix and Picea ring width chronologies in the same area and period. In contrast to widespread summer warming, fluctuations in precipitation and tree growth are spatially more diverse and overall less distinct. Although the influence of summer temperature on ring formation is increasing with latitude and distinct moisture effects are restricted to a few southern locations, growth sensitivity to June-July temperature variability is only significant at 16.6% of all sites (p ≤ 0.01). By revealing complex climate constraints on the productivity of Eurasia’s northern forests, our results question the a priori suitability of boreal tree-ring width chronologies for reconstructing summer temperatures. This study further emphasizes regional climate differences and their role on the dynamics of boreal ecosystems, and also underlines the importance of free data access to facilitate the compilation and evaluation of massively replicated and updated dendroecological networks.

  9. Public Opinions and Use of Various Types of Recreational Infrastructure in Boreal Forest Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vegard Gundersen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated public preferences for use intensity and visual quality of forest recreational infrastructure. Forest infrastructure covers five classes, along a continuum from unmarked paths to paved walkways. Altogether, 39 sites were categorized into the five classes and measured with automatic counters. A sample of 545 respondents living in southeastern and middle Norway were asked to rate 15 forest scenes and 35 preconceptions of recreational settings. The path scenarios were depicted as digitally calibrated photos that systematically displayed physical path feature in boreal, semi-natural settings. Survey participants showed a clearly greater preference for photos and preconceptions of forests settings containing minor elements of forest infrastructure; unmarked paths received the highest score and forest roads/walkways/bikeways the lowest. We identified a clear mismatch between public preferences for forest infrastructure and the intensity of use; the less appreciated infrastructure was the most used. Planning and management has to consider these different needs for recreational infrastructure, and we propose an area zoning system that meets the different segments of forest visitors.

  10. The role of soil pH in linking groundwater flow and plant species density in boreal forest landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Zinko, Ursula; Dynesius, Mats; Nilsson, Christer; Seibert, Jan

    2006-01-01

    In hilly boreal landscapes topography governs groundwater flow which strongly influences soil development, and thus vegetation composition. Soil pH is known to correlate well with plant species density and composition, but in boreal forests this relationship has been little studied. Previously, we successfully used a topography-based hydrological index, the topographical wetness index (TWI), as an approximation of the variation in groundwater flow to predict local plant species density in a b...

  11. Characterization of positive air ions in boreal forest air at the Hyytiälä SMEAR station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Hõrrak

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of the concentration of positive small (or cluster air ions and naturally charged nanometer aerosol particles (aerosol ions has been studied on the basis of measurements carried out in a boreal forest at the Hyytiälä SMEAR station, Finland, during the BIOFOR III campaign in spring 1999. Statistical characteristics of the concentrations of cluster ions, two classes of aerosol ions of the sizes of 2.5–8 nm and 8–ca. 20 nm and the quantities that determine the balance of small ions in the atmosphere have been given for the nucleation event days and non-event days. The dependence of small ion concentration on the ion loss (sink due to aerosol particles was investigated applying a model of bipolar diffusion charging of particles by small ions. The small ion concentration and the ion sink were closely correlated (correlation coefficient –87% when the fog events and the hours of high relative humidity (above 95%, as well as nocturnal calms and weak wind (wind speed <0.6 m s−1 had been excluded. However, an extra ion loss term presumably due to small ion deposition on coniferous forest with a magnitude equal to the average ion loss to pre-existing particles is needed to explain the observations. Also the hygroscopic growth correction of measured aerosol particle size distributions was found to be necessary for proper estimation of the ion sink. In the case of nucleation burst events, variations in the concentration of small positive ions were in accordance with the changes caused by the ion sink due to aerosols; no clear indication of positive ion depletion by ion-induced nucleation was found. The estimated average ionization rate of the air at the Hyytiälä station in early spring, when the ground was partly covered with snow, was about 6 ion pairs cm−3 s−1. The study of the charging state of nanometer aerosol particles (2.5–8 nm revealed a strong correlation (correlation coefficient 88

  12. Characterization of positive air ions in boreal forest air at the Hyytiälä SMEAR station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hõrrak, U.; Aalto, P. P.; Salm, J.; Komsaare, K.; Tammet, H.; Mäkelä, J. M.; Laakso, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2007-07-01

    The behavior of the concentration of positive small (or cluster) air ions and naturally charged nanometer aerosol particles (aerosol ions) has been studied on the basis of measurements carried out in a boreal forest at the Hyytiälä SMEAR station, Finland, during the BIOFOR III campaign in spring 1999. Statistical characteristics of the concentrations of cluster ions, two classes of aerosol ions of the sizes of 2.5-8 nm and 8-ca. 20 nm and the quantities that determine the balance of small ions in the atmosphere have been given for the nucleation event days and non-event days. The dependence of small ion concentration on the ion loss (sink) due to aerosol particles was investigated applying a model of bipolar diffusion charging of particles by small ions. The small ion concentration and the ion sink were closely correlated (correlation coefficient -87%) when the fog events and the hours of high relative humidity (above 95%), as well as nocturnal calms and weak wind (wind speed <0.6 m s-1) had been excluded. However, an extra ion loss term presumably due to small ion deposition on coniferous forest with a magnitude equal to the average ion loss to pre-existing particles is needed to explain the observations. Also the hygroscopic growth correction of measured aerosol particle size distributions was found to be necessary for proper estimation of the ion sink. In the case of nucleation burst events, variations in the concentration of small positive ions were in accordance with the changes caused by the ion sink due to aerosols; no clear indication of positive ion depletion by ion-induced nucleation was found. The estimated average ionization rate of the air at the Hyytiälä station in early spring, when the ground was partly covered with snow, was about 6 ion pairs cm-3 s-1. The study of the charging state of nanometer aerosol particles (2.5-8 nm) revealed a strong correlation (correlation coefficient 88%) between the concentrations of particles and positively

  13. Enhanced root exudation stimulates soil nitrogen transformations in a subalpine coniferous forest under experimental warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huajun; Li, Yufei; Xiao, Juan; Xu, Zhenfeng; Cheng, Xinyin; Liu, Qing

    2013-07-01

    Despite the perceived importance of exudation to forest ecosystem function, few studies have attempted to examine the effects of elevated temperature and nutrition availability on the rates of root exudation and associated microbial processes. In this study, we performed an experiment in which in situ exudates were collected from Picea asperata seedlings that were transplanted in disturbed soils exposed to two levels of temperature (ambient temperature and infrared heater warming) and two nitrogen levels (unfertilized and 25 g N m(-2)  a(-1) ). Here, we show that the trees exposed to an elevated temperature increased their exudation rates I (μg C g(-1) root biomass h(-1) ), II (μg C cm(-1)  root length h(-1) ) and III (μg C cm(-2)  root area h(-1) ) in the unfertilized plots. The altered morphological and physiological traits of the roots exposed to experimental warming could be responsible for this variation in root exudation. Moreover, these increases in root-derived C were positively correlated with the microbial release of extracellular enzymes involved in the breakdown of organic N (R(2)  = 0.790; P = 0.038), which was coupled with stimulated microbial activity and accelerated N transformations in the unfertilized soils. In contrast, the trees exposed to both experimental warming and N fertilization did not show increased exudation rates or soil enzyme activity, indicating that the stimulatory effects of experimental warming on root exudation depend on soil fertility. Collectively, our results provide preliminary evidence that an increase in the release of root exudates into the soil may be an important physiological adjustment by which the sustained growth responses of plants to experimental warming may be maintained via enhanced soil microbial activity and soil N transformation. Accordingly, the underlying mechanisms by which plant root-microbe interactions influence soil organic matter decomposition and N cycling should be incorporated

  14. Patterns of understory diversity in mixed coniferous forests of southern California impacted by air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Edith B; Temple, Patrick J; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J; Sirulnik, Abby G; Rao, Leela E

    2007-01-01

    The forests of the San Bernardino Mountains have been subject to ozone and nitrogen (N) deposition for some 60 years. Much work has been done to assess the impacts of these pollutants on trees, but little is known about how the diverse understory flora has fared. Understory vegetation has declined in diversity in response to elevated N in the eastern U.S. and Europe. Six sites along an ozone and N deposition gradient that had been part of a long-term study on response of plants to air pollution beginning in 1973 were resampled in 2003. Historic ozone data and leaf injury scores confirmed the gradient. Present-day ozone levels were almost half of these, and recent atmospheric N pollution concentrations confirmed the continued air pollution gradient. Both total and extractable soil N were higher in sites on the western end of the gradient closer to the urban source of pollution, pH was lower, and soil carbon (C) and litter were higher. The gradient also had decreasing precipitation and increasing elevation from west to east. However, the dominant tree species were the same across the gradient. Tree basal area increased during the 30-year interval in five of the sites. The two westernmost sites had 30-45% cover divided equally between native and exotic understory herbaceous species, while the other sites had only 3-13% cover dominated by native species. The high production is likely related to higher precipitation at the western sites as well as elevated N. The species richness was in the range of 24 to 30 in four of the sites, but one site of intermediate N deposition had 42 species, while the easternmost, least polluted site had 57 species. These were primarily native species, as no site had more than one to three exotic species. In three of six sites, 20-40% of species were lost between 1973 and 2003, including the two westernmost sites. Two sites with intermediate pollution had little change in total species number over 30 years, and the easternmost site had more

  15. Uptake of 137Cs from coniferous forest soil by sheep's fescue in pot experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of Chernobyl fallout radiocaesium (137Cs) from forest soils with low nutrients, high organic matter content, and acidic pH were examined in pot experiments. Results of sheep's fescue (Festuca ovina) two harvests after growing period of 13 weeks each, showed a slight variation in the 137Cs uptake. Transfer factor (TF) for 137Cs based upon soil-to-plant relationships calculated, (Bqkg-1 plant DW/Bqkg-1 soil DW). The ranges were from 0.03 to 3.43 with a mean of 0.34 ± 0.31 for first cut and from 0.03 to 2.28 with a mean of 0.36 ± 0.33 for second cut. Variation in the uptake of 137Cs by sheep's fescue grass might be due to the influence of soil pH and OM % in conjunction with soil moisture. The effect of potassium (K+), stable caesium (Cs+), and ammonium (NH4+) that were added as chlorides on 137Cs uptake by sheep's fescue were also tested in pot experiment under the same conditions of previous set-up. Results from three harvests after growing period of 13 weeks each, demonstrated that K+ reduced the uptake of 137Cs. In contrast the addition of both stable Cs+ and NH4+ found to enhance 137Cs uptake by sheep's fescue. (author)

  16. Uptake of 137Cs from coniferous forest soil by sheeps' fescue in pot experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of the post-Chernobyl 137Cs fallout from forest soils with low nutrients, high organic matter content and acidic pH was examined in pot experiments. Results of sheep's fescue (Festuca ovina) two harvests (after growing period of 13 weeks) showed a considerable variations in 137Cs uptake. Transfer factor (TF) for 137Cs based upon soil-to-plant relationships was calculated: Bqkg-1 plant DW / Bqkg-1 soil DW. A considerable fluctuations in the values were also observed. The ranges were: from 0.03 to 3.43 with a mean of 0.35±0.43 for the first cut and from 0.03 to 2.28 with a mean of 0.36±0.42 for the second cut. This variation in the 137Cs uptake by sheep's fescue grass might be due to the influence of high soil OM% and soil pH in conjunction with soil moisture. The effect of potassium (K+), stable caesium (Cs+), and ammonium (NH4+) that were added as chlorides on 137Cs uptake by sheep's fescue were also tested in a pot experiment under the same conditions of previous set-up. Results of three harvests demonstrated that K+ reduced the uptake of 137Cs. In contrast an addition of both Cs+ and NH4+ seams to enhance the uptake of 137Cs by sheep fescue. (author)

  17. Analysis on community diversity in coniferous-broadleaved mixed forests in Wuyi Mountain%武夷山针阔混交林的群落多样性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张炜琪; 陈辉; 林文俊; 董建文; 陈世品; 赵伟村

    2016-01-01

    通过测定群落内乔木层的重要值、灌木层的Shannon-Wiener(H′)指数和Pielou(J)均匀度指数,以及郑元润改进后的M. Godron稳定性指数,对武夷山4个不同类型的针阔混交林群落进行所处演替阶段的分析和群落稳定性研究。结果表明:(1)群落A(杉木Cunninghamia lanceolata Hook.、马尾松Pinus massoniana Lamb.+赤杨叶Alniphyllum fortunei Makino.)处于从针叶林向针阔混交林演替阶段的中期;群落B(马尾松+细柄蕈树Altingia gracilipes Merr.)处于从阔叶马尾松林向阔叶混交林演替的中期;群落C(马尾松+甜槠Castanopsis eyrei Tutch.)处于从针阔混交林向阔叶混交林演替的中后期;群落D (杉木+赤杨叶)处于从针阔混交林向阔叶混交林演替的初期;(2)群落内灌木层的物种构成及多样性将影响并决定群落演替的方向;(3)4个针阔混交林乔木层仍有大量针叶树种存在,稳定性测定坐标值远离20/80这个点,表明这些森林群落均未达到顶级群落阶段,处于不稳定状态。%To measure the community succession stages and stability for four coniferous and broadleaf mixed forests communities with different forest types ( A, B, C, and D) in Wuyi Mountain, community analysis was conducted according to four indices: tree layer′s important values ( IV) , shrub′s Shannon-Wiener index ( H′) , Pielou index ( J) and M. Godron′s stability index improved by Zheng yuanrun. Our results showed as follows: ( 1 ) Community A ( Cunninghamia lanceolata Hook. and Pinus massoniana Lamb.+Alniphyllum fortunei Makino.) was in the middle successional stage from the coniferous forest to the coniferous-broadleaved mixed forest, community B ( Pinus massoniana Lamb.+Altingia gracilipes Merr.) was in the middle stage of secondary succession from Pinus-broadleaved mixed forest to evergreen broadleaved forest. Meanwhile, community C( Pinus massoniana Lamb.+Castanopsis eyrei Tutch.) was in the late stage of

  18. Black (pyrogenic carbon in boreal forests: a synthesis of current knowledge and uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Preston

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The carbon (C cycle in boreal regions is strongly influenced by fire, which converts biomass and detrital C mainly to gaseous forms (CO2 and smaller proportions of CO and CH4, and some 1–7% of mass to pyrogenic C (PyC. PyC is mainly produced as solid charred residues, including visually-defined charcoal, and a black carbon (BC fraction chemically defined by its resistance to laboratory oxidation, plus much lower proportions of volatile soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. All PyC is characterized by fused aromatic rings, but varying in cluster sizes, and presence of other elements (N, O and functional groups. There are several reasons for current interest in defining more precisely the role of PyC in the C cycle of boreal regions. First, PyC is resistant to decomposition, and therefore contributes to very stable C pools in soils and sediments. Second, it influences soil processes, mainly through its sorption properties and cation exchange capacity, and third, soot aerosols absorb solar radiation and may contribute to global warming. However, there are large gaps in the basic information needed to address these topics. While charcoal is commonly defined by visual criteria, analytical methods for BC are mainly based on various measures of oxidation resistance, or on yield of benzenepolycarboxylic acids. These methods are still being developed, and capture different fractions of the PyC "continuum". There are few quantitative reports of PyC production and stocks in boreal forests (essentially none for boreal peatlands, and results are difficult to compare due to varying experimental goals and methods, as well as inconsistent terminology. There are almost no direct field measurements of BC aerosol production from boreal wildfires, and little direct information on rates and mechanisms for PyC loss. Structural characterization of charred biomass and forest floor from wildfires generally indicates a low level of

  19. Does the amount of trees retained at clearfelling of temperate and boreal forests influence biodiversity response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedrowitz Katja

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clear-felling is one of the main methods used in many parts of the world for the production of pulp, timber and bioenergy, leading to a simplified forest structure and species composition. One of the measures to mitigate the impact of logging on biodiversity is the retention of trees at final harvest. Tree retention approaches in forestry are still rather new, although widely distributed across different continents. Several studies have been performed on the effects of retention trees on biodiversity but to date there is no evidence on the relation between the amounts of trees, i.e. the number, volume or area per ha retained, and the response of biodiversity. The overall aim of our review will be to provide forest practitioners and conservationists in temperate and boreal forests with more detailed recommendations regarding the amount of trees that should be retained in order to achieve positive effects for biodiversity compared to traditional clear-cutting.

  20. Behaviour of 137Cs in the Boreal forest ecosystem of central Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behaviour of Chernobyl fallout 137Cs in a coniferous forest ecosystem in central Sweden was investigated between 1990 and 1994. Results demonstrated that forest soil belongs to nutrient deficient type, and deposited fallout 137Cs from Chernobyl nuclear accident (CNA) was retained (85%) in the upper 5 cm of humic forest soil layer, with a venial migration deeper into soil profile. No correlation between forest soil exchangeable and total potassium (K+) and 137Cs transfer parameters was observed. However, addition of K+, found to efficiently reduce 137Cs uptake by sheep's fescue and the addition of stable caesium (133Cs+) enhanced it. The addition of ammonium (NH4+) was slightly stimulating the uptake of 137Cs by sheep's fescue in the first cut only. Field plants showed a considerably reduction in their 137Cs activity concentrations. Relative to their 137Cs levels of 1986-89, a little reduction in heather (16%) occurred eight years after CNA. In contrast the reductions in lingonberry and bilberry were 87% and 68%, respectively. Three fractions of forest soil bound 137Cs were observed due to sequential extraction procedure (SEP). The first, is easily extractable 137Cs fraction (F1+F2), it comprises 22% of total forest soil 137Cs inventory in the upper 5 cm layer. The second, is soil organically and biologically bound 137Cs (F3+F4) comprises about 30% of soil bound 137Cs. This fraction might be accounted for long-term soil available 137Cs for plant uptake after bio-degradation processes by soil microorganisms. The third, is the residual fraction (F5), it comprises more than 35% of total forest soil 137Cs inventory, and may be associated with soil components which are probably of organic nature. Sorption of 137Cs by zeolite (Mordenite) revealed that soil bound 137Cs is to some extent more mobile in forest soils with high OM% and low pH than those with low OM%. 99 refs

  1. Examining moisture and temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition in a temperate coniferous forest soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Gabriel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and moisture are primary environmental drivers of soil organic matter (SOM decomposition, and the development of a better understanding fo their roles in this process through depth in soils is needed. The objective of this research is to independently assess the roles of temperature and moisture in driving heterotrophic soil respiration for shallow and deep soils in a temperate red spruce forest. Minimally disturbed soil cores from shallow (0–25 cm and deep (25–50 cm layers were extracted from a 20 yr old red spruce stand and were then transferred to a climate chamber where they were incubated for 3 months under constant and diurnal temperature regimes. Soils were subjected to different watering treatments representing a full range of water contents. Temperature, moisture, and CO2 surface flux were assessed daily for all soils and continuously on a subset of the microcosms. The results from this study indicate that shallow soils dominate the contribution to surface flux (90% and respond more predictably to moisture than deep soils. An optimum moisture range of 0.15 to 0.60 water-filled pore space was observed for microbial SOM decomposition in shallow cores across which a relatively invariant temperature sensitivity was observed. For soil moisture conditions experienced by most field sites in this region, flux-temperature relationships alone can be used to reasonably estimate heterotrophic respiration, as in this range moisture does not alter flux, with the exception of rewetting events along the lower part of this optimal range. Outside this range, however, soil moisture determines SOM decomposition rates.

  2. Landscape heterogeneity, soil climate, and carbon exchange in a boreal black spruce forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Allison L; Wofsy, Steven C; v H Bright, Alfram

    2009-03-01

    We measured soil climate and the turbulent fluxes of CO2, H2O, heat, and momentum on short towers (2 m) in a 160-yr-old boreal black spruce forest in Manitoba, Canada. Two distinct land cover types were studied: a Sphagnum-dominated wetland, and a feathermoss (Pleurozium and Hylocomium)-dominated upland, both lying within the footprint of a 30-m tower, which has measured whole-forest carbon exchange since 1994. Peak summertime uptake of CO2, was higher in the wetland than for the forest as a whole due to the influence of deciduous shrubs. Soil respiration rates in the wetland were approximately three times larger than in upland soils, and 30% greater than the mean of the whole forest, reflecting decomposition of soil organic matter. Soil respiration rates in the wetland were regulated by soil temperature, which was in turn influenced by water table depth through effects on soil heat capacity and conductivity. Warmer soil temperatures and deeper water tables favored increased heterotrophic respiration. Wetland drainage was limited by frost during the first half of the growing season, leading to high, perched water tables, cool soil temperatures, and much lower respiration rates than observed later in the growing season. Whole-forest evapotranspiration increased as water tables dropped, suggesting that photosynthesis in this forest was rarely subject to water stress. Our data indicate positive feedback between soil temperature, seasonal thawing, heterotrophic respiration, and evapotranspiration. As a result, climate warming could cause covariant changes in soil temperature and water table depths that may stimulate photosynthesis and strongly promote efflux of CO2 from peat soils in boreal wetlands. PMID:19323205

  3. New datasets for quantifying snow-vegetation-atmosphere interactions in boreal birch and conifer forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, T. D.; Essery, R.; Rutter, N.; Huntley, B.; Baxter, R.; Holden, R.; King, M.; Hancock, S.; Carle, J.

    2012-12-01

    Boreal forests exert a strong influence on weather and climate by modifying the surface energy and radiation balance. However, global climate and numerical weather prediction models use forest parameter values from simple look-up tables or maps that are derived from limited satellite data, on large grid scales. In reality, Arctic landscapes are inherently heterogeneous, with highly variable land cover types and structures on a variety of spatial scales. There is value in collecting detailed field data for different areas of vegetation cover, to assess the accuracy of large-scale assumptions. To address these issues, a consortium of researchers funded by the UK's Natural Environment Research Council have collected extensive data on radiation, meteorology, snow cover and canopy structure at two contrasting Arctic forest sites. The chosen study sites were an area of boreal birch forest near Abisko, Sweden in March/April 2011 and mixed conifer forest at Sodankylä, Finland in March/April 2012. At both sites, arrays comprising ten shortwave pyranometers and four longwave pyrgeometers were deployed for periods of up to 50 days, under forest plots of varying canopy structures and densities. In addition, downwelling longwave irradiance and global and diffuse shortwave irradiances were recorded at nearby open sites representing the top-of-canopy conditions. Meteorological data were recorded at all sub-canopy and open sites using automatic weather stations. Over the same periods, tree skin temperatures were measured on selected trees using contact thermocouples, infrared thermocouples and thermal imagery. Canopy structure was accurately quantified through manual surveys, extensive hemispherical photography and terrestrial laser scans of every study plot. Sub-canopy snow depth and snow water equivalent were measured on fine-scale grids at each study plot. Regular site maintenance ensured a high quality dataset covering the important Arctic spring period. The data have several

  4. Comprehensive radiative forcing assesment highlights trade-offs in climate mitigation potential of managed boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Berninger, Frank; Bäck, Jaana; Boy, Michael; Kuusinen, Nea; Mäkelä, Annikki; Matthies, Brent; Minkkinen, Kari; Mogensen, Ditte; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Sievänen, Risto; Zhou, Luxi; Vanhatalo, Anni; Valsta, Lauri; Nikinmaa, Eero

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests have an important role in the mitigation of climate change. In this study we evaluated four key climate impacts of forest management: (1) carbon sequestration (in forest ecosystems and wood products), (2) surface albedo of forest area, (3) forest originating Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) and (4) avoided CO2-emissions from wood energy and product substitution. We calculated their net effect at both a single stand and regional level using Finland as a case study. We made analyses both in current climate up to a year 2050 and in the projected climate of year 2050. At the stand level, the carbon sequestration effect and avoided CO2 emissions due to substituted materials dominated in net RF in current climate. The warming effect of surface albedo of forest cover was lower or of same magnitude than cooling effect of SOAs. Together, the rarely considered SOAs and product substitution corresponded over 70% of the total cooling effect of forest cover. The cooling effect of net radiative forcing increased along the increasing site fertility. Although the carbon stocks of broadleaved trees were smaller than that of conifers their total radiative cooling effect was larger due to the integrated albedo and aerosol effects. In the projected climate of 2050, the radiative cooling of aerosols approached the level of forest carbon fixation. These results emphasize the need for holistic evaluation of climate impacts over simple carbon sequestration analysis to understand the role of forest management in climate change mitigation. Landscape level analyses emphasized the broad range of options to reach the cooling effect. The lowest harvest regime, 50% of current annual increment (CAI), yielded the largest cooling effect. Yet, harvests up to CAI produced only slightly less cooling RF if avoided emissions were considered. This result was highly sensitive to used substitution factors. Our result highlights that the combination of intensive harvests and the use of wood

  5. Site carbon storage along productivity gradients of a late-seral southern Boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranabetter, J.M. [British Columbia Ministry of Forests and Range, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    This study examined the total ecosystem carbon (TEC) range of late-seral southern Boreal forests that encompassed a typical gradient of upland plant communities and soils. Stand ages were approximately 180 years old. The study examined major pools of ecosystem carbon (C) effected by timber harvesting for use in forest management C accounting. C content was determined using a combination of direct measures and key parameter estimates of tree biomass, soil bulk density, and specific gravity of decayed wood. The aim of the study was to refine estimates for TEC as a function of plant association and indices of site productivity. The study was also conducted to obtain baseline data on the theoretical upper bounds of C pools among soil and organic horizons, coarse woody debris, and tree biomass in late-seral boreal stands. Soil, coarse woody debris, and forest biomass parameters were compared among plant associations in a randomized incomplete block design. The study showed that TEC was lowest on dry, poor-Cladonia sites and highest on subhydric, very rich-Devil's club sites. It was concluded that while C inventories based on zonal sites may be useful for developing broad estimates of TEC, they are likely to be inaccurate for detailed landscape analyses. 50 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  6. Comparing Effects of Climate Warming, Fire, and Timber Harvesting on a Boreal Forest Landscape in Northeastern China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaona; He, Hong S.; Wu, Zhiwei; Liang, Yu; Schneiderman, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    Forest management under a changing climate requires assessing the effects of climate warming and disturbance on the composition, age structure, and spatial patterns of tree species. We investigated these effects on a boreal forest in northeastern China using a factorial experimental design and simulation modeling. We used a spatially explicit forest landscape model (LANDIS) to evaluate the effects of three independent variables: climate (current and expected future), fire regime (current and ...

  7. Seasonal and inter-annual variability of energy exchange above a boreal Scots pine forest

    OpenAIRE

    S. Launiainen

    2010-01-01

    Twelve-years of eddy-covariance measurements conducted above a boreal Scots pine forest in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland, were analyzed to assess the seasonal and inter-annual variability of surface conductance (gs) and energy partitioning. The gs had distinct annual course, driven by the seasonal cycle of the Scots pine. Low gs (2–3 mm s−1 in April...

  8. Seasonal and inter annual variability of energy exchange above a boreal Scots pine forest

    OpenAIRE

    S. Launiainen

    2010-01-01

    Twelve-years of eddy-covariance measurements conducted above a boreal Scots pine forest in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland, were analyzed to assess the seasonal and inter-annual variability of surface conductance (gs) and energy partitioning. The gs had distinct annual course, driven by the seasonal cycle of the Scots pine. Low gs (2–3 mm s−1

  9. Mapping permafrost in the boreal forest with Thematic Mapper satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, L. A.; Strong, L. L.; Card, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    A geographic data base incorporating Landsat TM data was used to develop and evaluate logistic discriminant functions for predicting the distribution of permafrost in a boreal forest watershed. The data base included both satellite-derived information and ancillary map data. Five permafrost classifications were developed from a stratified random sample of the data base and evaluated by comparison with a photo-interpreted permafrost map using contingency table analysis and soil temperatures recorded at sites within the watershed. A classification using a TM thermal band and a TM-derived vegetation map as independent variables yielded the highest mapping accuracy for all permafrost categories.

  10. Changing sources of soil respiration with time since fire in a boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Czimczik, CI; Trumbore, SE; Carbone, MS; Winston, GC

    2006-01-01

    Radiocarbon signatures (Δ14C) of carbon dioxide (CO2) provide a measure of the age of C being decomposed by microbes or respired by living plants. Over a 2-year period, we measured Δ14C of soil respiration and soil CO2 in boreal forest sites in Canada, which varied primarily in the amount of time since the last stand-replacing fire. Comparing bulk respiration Δ14C with Δ14C of CO2 evolved in incubations of heterotrophic (decomposing organic horizons) and autotrophic (root and moss) components...

  11. Fire history and ecology of the boreal forest nature reserve Trillemarka-Rollagsfjell

    OpenAIRE

    Nkrumah-Boakye, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macroscopic charcoal particles (axis ≥ 0.5mm) give an indication of local fire presence to a fine spatial accuracy. I have examined the history, distribution and impact of fires on the ecology of Trillemarka-Rollagsfjell boreal forest nature reserve, located in the south of Norway. Data were obtained from a total of 225 soil core samples from 15 macro sample plots measuring 300 x 300m2. There was macroscopic charcoal in 153 of the soil samples out of 225, giving an estimated b...

  12. Response of coniferous forest ecosystems on mineral soils to nutrient additions: A review of Swedish experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohrstedt, H.Oe. [Forestry Research Inst. of Sweden, Uppsala Science Park (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the only nutrient that promotes forest growth when given individually. An extra stem growth of 15 m{sup 3}/ha is obtained during a 10 yr period following an application of 150 kg N/ha. Larger growth increases have often been the result of more intensive N fertilization. Lime or wood ash give a minor growth stimulation on sites with a carbon (C) to N ratio below 30 in the humus layer, while the opposite effect prevails on N-poor sites. Nutrients given as soluble fertilizers are readily taken up by trees. Boron deficiency may be induced in northern Sweden after N fertilization or liming. The ground vegetation may be altered by single-shot N fertilization, but long-term effects occur only for intensive regimes. Lime or wood ash may modify the flora if soil pH is significantly altered: the change will be in response to N availability. Fruit-body production of mycorrhizal fungi is disfavoured by chronic N input, but also by lime or ash. However, the mycorrhizal structures on root tips are less affected. Faunistic studies are not common and those present are mostly devoted to soil fauna. A practical N dose of 150 kg N/ha has no clear effect, but higher doses may reduce the abundance in some groups. Hardened wood ash does not significantly affect the soil fauna. Lime favours snails and earthworms, while other groups are often disfavoured. The response of aquatic fauna to terrestrial treatments has hardly been studied. N fertilization generally results in insignificant effects on fish and benthic fauna. Lime and wood ash reduce the acidity of the topsoil, but practical doses (2-3 t/ha) are too low to raise the alkalinity of runoff unless outflow areas are treated. N fertilizer use in forestry and N-free fertilizers lack effects on acidification. N fertilization may, however, be strongly acidifying if nitrification is induced and followed by nitrate leaching. N fertilization often results in increased long-term C retention in trees and soil, but does not

  13. Response of coniferous forest ecosystems on mineral soils to nutrient additions: A review of Swedish experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen (N) is the only nutrient that promotes forest growth when given individually. An extra stem growth of 15 m3/ha is obtained during a 10 yr period following an application of 150 kg N/ha. Larger growth increases have often been the result of more intensive N fertilization. Lime or wood ash give a minor growth stimulation on sites with a carbon (C) to N ratio below 30 in the humus layer, while the opposite effect prevails on N-poor sites. Nutrients given as soluble fertilizers are readily taken up by trees. Boron deficiency may be induced in northern Sweden after N fertilization or liming. The ground vegetation may be altered by single-shot N fertilization, but long-term effects occur only for intensive regimes. Lime or wood ash may modify the flora if soil pH is significantly altered: the change will be in response to N availability. Fruit-body production of mycorrhizal fungi is disfavoured by chronic N input, but also by lime or ash. However, the mycorrhizal structures on root tips are less affected. Faunistic studies are not common and those present are mostly devoted to soil fauna. A practical N dose of 150 kg N/ha has no clear effect, but higher doses may reduce the abundance in some groups. Hardened wood ash does not significantly affect the soil fauna. Lime favours snails and earthworms, while other groups are often disfavoured. The response of aquatic fauna to terrestrial treatments has hardly been studied. N fertilization generally results in insignificant effects on fish and benthic fauna. Lime and wood ash reduce the acidity of the topsoil, but practical doses (2-3 t/ha) are too low to raise the alkalinity of runoff unless outflow areas are treated. N fertilizer use in forestry and N-free fertilizers lack effects on acidification. N fertilization may, however, be strongly acidifying if nitrification is induced and followed by nitrate leaching. N fertilization often results in increased long-term C retention in trees and soil, but does not promote

  14. Contribution of Root Respiration to Total Soil Respiration in a Betula ermanii-Dark Coniferous Forest Ecotone of the Changbai Mountains, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ying; HAN Shi-Jie; ZHOU Yu-Mei; ZHANG Jun-Hui

    2005-01-01

    Total and root-severed soil respiration rates for five plots set up 50 m apart in a Betula ermanii Cham.-dark coniferous forest ecotone on a north-facing slope of the Changbai Mountains, China, were measured to evaluate the seasonal variations of soil respiration, to assess the effect of soil temperature and water content on soil respiration, and to estimate the relative contributions of root respiration to the total soil respiration. PVC cylinders in each of 5 forest types of a B. ermanii-dark coniferous forest ecotone were used to measure soil respirations both inside and outside of the cylinders. The contribution of roots to the total soil respiration rates ranged from 12.5% to 54.6%. The mean contribution of roots for the different plots varied with the season, increasing from 32.5% on June 26 to 36.6% on August 3 and to 41.8% on October 14.In addition, there existed a significant (P < 0.01) logarithmic relationship between total soil respiration rate and soil temperature at 5 cm soil depth. Also, a similar trend was observed for the soil respiration and soil water content at the surface (0-5 cm) during the same period of time.

  15. CLASSIFICATION AND TYPES OF PREFERENTIAL FLOW FOR A DARK CONIFEROUS FOREST ECOSYSTEM IN THE UPPER REACH AREA OF THE YANGTZE RIVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianzhi NIU; Xinxiao YU; Zhiqiang ZHANG; Yutao ZHAO

    2007-01-01

    Preferential flow is the ordinary phenomenon of rapid and non-equilibrium transport of water and solutes occurring in most soil. It causes latent pollution of ground and surface waters and affects runoff yield and flow concentration. This paper studies preferential flow for a dark coniferous ecosystem in the upper reach area of the Yangtze River, establishes a classification for the preferential flow and discusses types of preferential flow with a soil column experiment using a homemade apparatus and dye-tracer analysis. The preferential flow is mainly unsaturated gravitational flow in the upper layer of the slope deposit for mature forest soil, which is dominated by a wetness front, and the flow gradually transforms to macroporous flow as the soil layer deepens. The observed preferential flow in the young, middle-aged and over-mature forests that have grown on glacial lateral moraines is macroporous flow. The purpose of this research is to analyze systemically the behavior of soil water movement for a dark coniferous forest ecosystem in the upper reach area of the Yangtze River and to provide a theoretical basis for effective watershed management.

  16. Sensitivity of boreal forest carbon balance to soil thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulden, M.L.; Wofsy, S.C.; Harden, J.W.; Trumbore, S.E.; Crill, P.M.; Gower, S.T.; Fries, T.; Daube, B.C.; Fan, S.-M.; Sutton, D.J.; Bazzaz, A.; Munger, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    We used eddy covariance; gas-exchange chambers; radiocarbon analysis; wood, moss, and soil inventories; and laboratory incubations to measure the carbon balance of a 120-year-old black spruce forest in Manitoba, Canada. The site lost 0.3 ?? 0.5 metric ton of carbon per hectare per year (ton C ha-1 year-1) from 1994 to 1997, with a gain of 0.6 ?? 0.2 ton C ha-1 year-1 in moss and wood offset by a loss of 0.8 ?? 0.5 ton C ha-1 year-1 from the soil. The soil remained frozen most of the year, and the decomposition of organic matter in the soil increased 10-fold upon thawing. The stability of the soil carbon pool (~150 tons C ha-1) appears sensitive to the depth and duration of thaw, and climatic changes that promote thaw are likely to cause a net efflux of carbon dioxide from the site.

  17. Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stith T.Gower

    2010-03-03

    A strong argument can be made that there is a greater need to study the effect of warming on boreal forests more than on any other terrestrial biome. Boreal forests, the second largest forest biome, are predicted to experience the greatest warming of any forest biome in the world, but a process-based understanding of how warming will affect the structure and function of this economically and ecologically important forest biome is lacking. The effects of warming on species composition, canopy structure and biogeochemical cycles are likely to be complex; elucidating the underlying mechanisms will require long-term whole-ecosystem manipulation to capture all the complex feedbacks (Shaver et al. 2000, Rustad et al. 2001, Stromgren 2001). The DOE Program for Ecosystem Research funded a three year project (2002-2005) to use replicated heated chambers on soil warming plots in northern Manitoba to examine the direct effects of whole-ecosystem warming. We are nearing completion of our first growing season of measurements (fall 2004). In spite of the unforeseen difficulty of installing the heating cable, our heating and irrigation systems worked extremely well, maintaining environmental conditions within 5-10% of the specified design 99% of the time. Preliminary data from these systems, all designed and built by our laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, support our overall hypothesis that warming will increase the carbon sink strength of upland boreal black spruce forests. I request an additional three years of funding to continue addressing the original objectives: (1) Examine the effect of warming on phenology of overstory, understory and bryophyte strata. Sap flux systems and dendrometer bands, monitored by data loggers, will be used to quantify changes in phenology and water use. (2) Quantify the effects of warming on nitrogen and water use by overstory, understory and bryophytes. (3) Compare effects of warming on autotrophic respiration and above- and belowground

  18. Disturbance legacies and climate jointly drive tree growth and mortality in an intensively studied boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Rocha, Adrian V; Calvin, Katherine; Holmes, Bruce; Wang, Chuankuan; Goulden, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Most North American forests are at some stage of post-disturbance regrowth, subject to a changing climate, and exhibit growth and mortality patterns that may not be closely coupled to annual environmental conditions. Distinguishing the possibly interacting effects of these processes is necessary to put short-term studies in a longer term context, and particularly important for the carbon-dense, fire-prone boreal forest. The goals of this study were to combine dendrochronological sampling, inventory records, and machine-learning algorithms to understand how tree growth and death have changed at one highly studied site (Northern Old Black Spruce, NOBS) in the central Canadian boreal forest. Over the 1999-2012 inventory period, mean tree diameter increased even as stand density and basal area declined significantly. Tree mortality averaged 1.4 ± 0.6% yr-(1), with most mortality occurring in medium-sized trees; new recruitment was minimal. There have been at least two, and probably three, significant influxes of new trees since stand initiation, but none in recent decades. A combined tree ring chronology constructed from sampling in 2001, 2004, and 2012 showed several periods of extreme growth depression, with increased mortality lagging depressed growth by ~5 years. Higher minimum and maximum air temperatures exerted a negative influence on tree growth, while precipitation and climate moisture index had a positive effect; both current- and previous-year data exerted significant effects. Models based on these variables explained 23-44% of the ring-width variability. We suggest that past climate extremes led to significant mortality still visible in the current forest structure, with decadal dynamics superimposed on slower patterns of fire and succession. These results have significant implications for our understanding of previous work at NOBS, the carbon sequestration capability of old-growth stands in a disturbance-prone landscape, and the sustainable management of

  19. Belowground Competition Directs Spatial Patterns of Seedling Growth in Boreal Pine Forests in Fennoscandia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Petter Axelsson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aboveground competition is often argued to be the main process determining patterns of natural forest regeneration. However, the theory of multiple resource limitation suggests that seedling performance also depends on belowground competition and, thus, that their relative influence is of fundamental importance. Two approaches were used to address the relative importance of above- and below-ground competition on regeneration in a nutrient-poor pine (Pinus sylvestris boreal forest. Firstly, seedling establishment beneath trees stem-girdled 12 years ago show that a substantial proportion of the seedlings were established within two years after girdling, which corresponds to a time when nutrient uptake by tree roots was severely reduced without disrupting water transport to the tree canopy, which consequently was maintained. The establishment during these two years also corresponds to abundances high enough for normal stand replacement. Secondly, surveys of regeneration within forest gaps showed that surrounding forests depressed seedlings, so that satisfactory growth occurred only more than 5 m from forest edges and that higher solar radiation in south facing edges was not enough to mediate these effects. We conclude that disruption of belowground competitive interactions mediates regeneration and, thus, that belowground competition has a strong limiting influence on seedling establishment in these forests.

  20. Manganese in the litter fall-forest floor continuum of boreal and temperate pine and spruce forest ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Björn; Erhagen, Björn; Johansson, Maj-Britt;

    2015-01-01

    We have reviewed the literature on the role of manganese (Mn) in the litter fall-to-humus subsystem. Available data gives a focus on North European coniferous forests. Manganese concentrations in pine (Pinus spp.) foliar litter are highly variable both spatially and temporally within the same...... pine needle litter significantly faster (p humus as well as extractable Mn in the mineral soil increase with decreasing MAT and over a climatic gradient the Mn concentrations in Norway...... spruce mor increase more with decreasing MAT than in a gradient with Scots pine. Higher Mn concentrations in humus appear to decrease its stability and result in a higher release of carbon dioxide (CO2) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We conclude that this may explain (i) the lower amount of carbon...

  1. Total OH Reactivity Measurements in the Boreal Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praplan, A. P.; Hellén, H.; Hakola, H.; Hatakka, J.

    2015-12-01

    INTRODUCTION Atmospheric total OH reactivity (Rtotal) can be measured (Kovacs and Brune, 2001; Sinha et al., 2008) or it can be calculated according to Rtotal = ∑i kOH+X_i [Xi] where kOH+X_i corresponds to the reaction rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with a given compound Xi and [Xi] its concentration. Studies suggest that in some environments a large fraction of missing reactivity, comparing calculated Rtotal with ambient total OH reactivity measurements (Di Carlo et al., 2004; Hofzumahaus et al., 2009). In this study Rtotal has been measured using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008). Levels of the reference compound (pyrrole, C4H5N) are monitored by gas chromatography every 2 minutes and Rtotal is derived from the difference of reactivity between zero and ambient air. RESULTS Around 36 hours of preliminary total OH reactivity data (30 May until 2 June 2015) are presented in Fig. 1. Its range matches previous studies for this site (Nölscher et al., 2012; Sinha et al., 2010) and is similar to values in another pine forest (Nakashima et al., 2014). The setup used during the period presented here has been updated and more recent data will be presented, as well as a comparison with calculated OH reactivity from measured individual species. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was supported by Academy of Finland (Academy Research Fellowship No. 275608). The authors acknowledge Juuso Raine for technical support. REFERENCES Di Carlo et al. (2004). Science 304, 722-725.Hofzumahaus et al. (2009). Science 324, 1702-1704.Kovacs and Brune (2001). J. Atmos. Chem. 39, 105-122.Nakashima et al. (2014). Atmos. Env. 85, 1-8.Nölscher et al. (2012). Atmos. Chem. Phys. 12, 8257-8270.Sinha et al. (2008). Atmos. Chem. Phys. 8, 2213-2227.Sinha et al. (2010). Environ. Sci. Technol. 44, 6614-6620.

  2. Landscape hydrogeochemistry of Fe, Mn, S and trace elements (As, Co, Pb) in a boreal stream network

    OpenAIRE

    Björkvald, Louise

    2008-01-01

    The transport of elements by streams from headwater regions to the sea is influenced by landscape characteristics. This thesis focuses on the influence of landscape characteristics (e.g. proportion of wetland/forest coverage) on temporal and spatial variations of Fe, Mn, S and trace elements (As, Co, Pb) in streams located in northern Sweden, a boreal region characterized by coniferous forests and peat wetlands. Water samples from a network of 15 streams revealed a different hydrogeochemistry...

  3. Assessing the spatial and temporal variability of fAPAR 2-flux estimates in a temperate mixed coniferous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzenlechner, Birgitta; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Ludwig, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    The fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) is recognized as one of the essential climate variables as it characterizes activity and dynamics of the Earth's terrestrial biosphere (GCOS, 2010). By linking photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) to the absorption of plants, fAPAR represents a crucial variable for describing land surface and atmosphere interactions considered in global circulation models as well as in production efficiency models for estimating terrestrial carbon balances. Recent studies report discrepancies between global fAPAR satellite products regarding both absolute values and uncertainty representation, thereby stressing the need for independent ground measurements (D'Odrico et al., 2014; Picket-Heaps et al., 2014; Tao et al., 2015). However, there is a lack of basic information to better understand the spatial and temporal bias of PAR field observations, particularly in forest ecosystems. In theory, it is known that fAPAR estimates are affected by e.g. illumination conditions, leaf area index, leaf color, background brightness, which in turn may lead to considerable bias of field measurements. However, theoretical findings lack validation in the field as well as practical recommendations for field protocols. In this study, the variability of two-flux fAPAR estimates with regards to different illumination conditions (solar zenith angles, diffuse radiation conditions) are investigated. Measurements of PAR are carried out at Graswang environmental monitoring site in Southern Germany within a temperate mixed coniferous forest. A relatively new environmental monitoring technology based on Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) is applied, allowing for permanent synchronized measurements of transmitted PAR, thereby reducing temporal sampling bias. Transmitted PAR is obtained from 16 photon flux sensors, 1.3 m above the surface. With a reference sensor outside the forest measuring incoming PAR, a two-flux estimate based on the ratio of

  4. Patterns of NPP, GPP, Respiration and NEP During Boreal Forest Succession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulden, Michael L.; McMillan, Andrew; Winston, Greg; Rocha, Adrian; Manies, Kristen; Harden, Jennifer W.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2010-12-15

    We deployed a mesonet of year-round eddy covariance towers in boreal forest stands that last burned in ~1850, ~1930, 1964, 1981, 1989, 1998, and 2003 to understand how CO2 exchange changes during secondary succession.The strategy of using multiple methods, including biometry and micrometeorology, worked well. In particular, the three independent measures of NEP during succession gave similar results. A stratified and tiered approach to deploying eddy covariance systems that combines many lightweight and portable towers with a few permanent ones is likely to maximize the science return for a fixed investment. The existing conceptual models did a good job of capturing the dominant patterns of NPP, GPP, Respiration and NEP during succession. The initial loss of carbon following disturbance was neither as protracted nor large as predicted. This muted response reflects both the rapid regrowth of vegetation following fire and the prevalence of standing coarse woody debris following the fire, which is thought to decay slowly. In general, the patterns of forest recovery from disturbance should be expected to vary as a function of climate, ecosystem type and disturbance type. The NPP decline at the older stands appears related to increased Rauto rather than decreased GPP. The increase in Rauto in the older stands does not appear to be caused by accelerated maintenance respiration with increased biomass, and more likely involves increased allocation to fine root turnover, root metabolism, alternative forms of respiration, mycorrhizal relationships, or root exudates, possibly associated with progressive nutrient limitation. Several studies have now described a similar pattern of NEP following boreal fire, with 10-to-15 years of modest carbon loss followed by 50-to-100 years of modest carbon gain. This trend has been sufficiently replicated and evaluated using independent techniques that it can be used to quantify the likely effects of changes in boreal fire frequency and

  5. Tree Species Linked to Large Differences in Ecosystem Carbon Distribution in the Boreal Forest of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, A. M.; Mack, M. C.; Johnstone, J. F.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Genet, H.; McGuire, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    In the boreal forest of Alaska, increased fire severity associated with climate change is altering plant-soil-microbial feedbacks and ecosystem carbon (C) dynamics. The boreal landscape has historically been dominated by black spruce (Picea mariana), a tree species associated with slow C turnover and large soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation. Historically, low severity fires have led to black spruce regeneration post-fire, thereby maintaining slow C cycling rates and large SOM pools. In recent decades however, an increase in high severity fires has led to greater consumption of the soil organic layer (SOL) during fire and subsequent establishment of deciduous tree species in areas previously dominated by black spruce. This shift to a more deciduous dominated landscape has many implications for ecosystem structure and function, as well as feedbacks to global C cycling. To improve our understanding of how boreal tree species affect C cycling, we quantified above- and belowground C stocks and fluxes in adjacent, mid-successional stands of black spruce and Alaska paper birch (Betula neoalaskana) that established following a 1958 fire near Fairbanks, Alaska. Although total ecosystem C pools (aboveground live tree biomass + dead wood + SOL + top 10 cm of mineral soil) were similar for the two stand types, the distribution of C among pools was markedly different. In black spruce, 78% of measured C was found in soil pools, primarily in the SOL, where spruce contained twice the C stored in paper birch (4.8 ± 0.3 vs. 2.4 ± 0.1 kg C m-2). In contrast, aboveground biomass dominated ecosystem C pools in birch forest (6.0 ± 0.3 vs. 2.5 ± 0.2 kg C m-2 in birch and spruce, respectively). Our findings suggest that tree species exert a strong influence over plant-soil-microbial feedbacks and may have long-term effects on ecosystem C sequestration and storage that feedback to the climate system.

  6. Tree species richness decreases while species evenness increases with disturbance frequency in a natural boreal forest landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Daniel; Chen, Han Y H; Kingston, Steve

    2016-02-01

    Understanding species diversity and disturbance relationships is important for biodiversity conservation in disturbance-driven boreal forests. Species richness and evenness may respond differently with stand development following fire. Furthermore, few studies have simultaneously accounted for the influences of climate and local site conditions on species diversity. Using forest inventory data, we examined the relationships between species richness, Shannon's index, evenness, and time since last stand-replacing fire (TSF) in a large landscape of disturbance-driven boreal forest. TSF has negative effect on species richness and Shannon's index, and a positive effect on species evenness. Path analysis revealed that the environmental variables affect richness and Shannon's index only through their effects on TSF while affecting evenness directly as well as through their effects on TSF. Synthesis and applications. Our results demonstrate that species richness and Shannon's index decrease while species evenness increases with TSF in a boreal forest landscape. Furthermore, we show that disturbance frequency, local site conditions, and climate simultaneously influence tree species diversity through complex direct and indirect effects in the studied boreal forest. PMID:26865971

  7. Tree species richness decreases while species evenness increases with disturbance frequency in a natural boreal forest landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Daniel; Chen, Han Y H; Kingston, Steve

    2016-02-01

    Understanding species diversity and disturbance relationships is important for biodiversity conservation in disturbance-driven boreal forests. Species richness and evenness may respond differently with stand development following fire. Furthermore, few studies have simultaneously accounted for the influences of climate and local site conditions on species diversity. Using forest inventory data, we examined the relationships between species richness, Shannon's index, evenness, and time since last stand-replacing fire (TSF) in a large landscape of disturbance-driven boreal forest. TSF has negative effect on species richness and Shannon's index, and a positive effect on species evenness. Path analysis revealed that the environmental variables affect richness and Shannon's index only through their effects on TSF while affecting evenness directly as well as through their effects on TSF. Synthesis and applications. Our results demonstrate that species richness and Shannon's index decrease while species evenness increases with TSF in a boreal forest landscape. Furthermore, we show that disturbance frequency, local site conditions, and climate simultaneously influence tree species diversity through complex direct and indirect effects in the studied boreal forest.

  8. Habitat associations drive species vulnerability to climate change in boreal forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazziotta, Adriano; Triviño, Maria; Tikkanen, Olli Pekka;

    2016-01-01

    Species climate change vulnerability, their predisposition to be adversely affected, has been assessed for a limited portion of biodiversity. Our knowledge of climate change impacts is often based only on exposure, the magnitude of climatic variation in the area occupied by the species, even...... scenarios. However, climate change will potentially reduce habitat suitability for ~9–43 % of the threatened deadwood-associated species. This loss is likely caused by future increase in timber extraction and decomposition rates causing higher deadwood turnover, which have a strong negative effect on boreal...... forest biodiversity. Our results are species- and scenario-specific. Diversified forest management and restoration ensuring deadwood resources in the landscape would allow the persistence of species whose capacity of delivering important supporting ecosystem services can be undermined by climate change....

  9. Disturbance legacies and climate jointly drive tree growth and mortality in an intensively studied boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Rocha, Adrian; Calvin, Katherine V.; Holmes, Bruce; Wang, Chuankuan; Goulden, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    How will regional growth and mortality change with even relatively small climate shifts, even independent of catastrophic disturbances? This question is particularly acute for the North American boreal forest, which is carbon-dense and subject The goals of this study were to combine dendrochronological sampling, inventory records, and machine-learning algorithms to understand how tree growth and death have changed at one highly studied site (Northern Old Black Spruce, NOBS) in the central Canadian boreal forest. Over the 1999-2012 inventory period, mean DBH increased even as stand density and basal area declined significantly from 41.3 to 37.5 m2 ha-1. Tree mortality averaged 1.4±0.6% yr-1, with most mortality occurring in medium-sized trees. A combined tree ring chronology constructed from 2001, 2004, and 2012 sampling showed several periods of extreme growth depression, with increased mortality lagging depressed growth by ~5 years. Minimum and maximum air temperatures exerted a negative influence on tree growth, while precipitation and climate moisture index had a positive effect; both current- and previous-year data exerted significant effects. Models based on these variables explained 23-44% of the ring-width variability. There have been at least one, and probably two, significant recruitment episodes since stand initiation, and we infer that past climate extremes led to significant NOBS mortality still visible in the current forest structure. These results imply that a combination of successional and demographic processes, along with mortality driven by abiotic factors, continue to affect the stand, with significant implications for our understanding of previous work at NOBS and the sustainable management of regional forests.

  10. Organic matter biogeochemistry in the western boreal forest of Canada (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, C. E.; Mercier Quideau, S.

    2013-12-01

    The western boreal forest of Canada is characterized by mixed and pure stands of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.). This study presents results on the characterization and cycling of soil organic matter in these boreal ecosystems derived from examining both climatic and edaphic gradients. The extent of decomposition for pine forest floors was observed to decrease with increasing stand age and decreasing temperature along a latitudinal climatic transect as determined by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. In a survey of mature aspen, spruce and pine sites, forest floors reflected the dominant vegetative inputs as demonstrated by long chain (≥ C21) n-alkane biomarkers. Utilizing a range of techniques, including compound-specific analysis of phospholipid fatty acids in a laboratory incubation, we determined that while soil microbial communities under aspen and spruce both readily consumed 13C-glucose, their structures remained unique. We also were interested in determining the response of aspen and spruce soil microbial communities to more complex vegetation inputs, and consequently generated double labelled (13C and 15N) aspen litter using multiple pulses of 13CO2(g) and K15NO3(l). Enriched aspen leaves were then applied in the field to the forest floors of aspen and spruce stands. Nitrogen cycling readily occurred on both sites as evidenced by 15N enrichment of above-ground vegetation. While the soil microbial community structures remained distinct between the two stand types across the field incubation, there was overlap in terms of the microorganisms involved in the decomposition of the applied organic matter.

  11. Assessing various drought indicators in representing summer drought in boreal forests in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Markkanen, T.; Thum, T.; Aurela, M.; Lohila, A.; Mammarella, I.; Kämäräinen, M.; Hagemann, S.; Aalto, T.

    2016-01-01

    Droughts can have an impact on forest functioning and production, and even lead to tree mortality. However, drought is an elusive phenomenon that is difficult to quantify and define universally. In this study, we assessed the performance of a set of indicators that have been used to describe drought conditions in the summer months (June, July, August) over a 30-year period (1981-2010) in Finland. Those indicators include the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), the Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), the Soil Moisture Index (SMI), and the Soil Moisture Anomaly (SMA). Herein, regional soil moisture was produced by the land surface model JSBACH of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). Results show that the buffering effect of soil moisture and the associated soil moisture memory can impact on the onset and duration of drought as indicated by the SMI and SMA, while the SPI and SPEI are directly controlled by meteorological conditions. In particular, we investigated whether the SMI, SMA and SPEI are able to indicate the Extreme Drought affecting Forest health (EDF), which we defined according to the extreme drought that caused severe forest damages in Finland in 2006. The EDF thresholds for the aforementioned indicators are suggested, based on the reported statistics of forest damages in Finland in 2006. SMI was found to be the best indicator in capturing the spatial extent of forest damage induced by the extreme drought in 2006. In addition, through the application of the EDF thresholds over the summer months of the 30-year study period, the SPEI and SMA tended to show more frequent EDF events and a higher fraction of influenced area than SMI. This is because the SPEI and SMA are standardized indicators that show the degree of anomalies from statistical means over the aggregation period of climate conditions and soil moisture, respectively. However, in boreal forests in Finland, the high initial soil moisture

  12. Issues and potential in creating carbon sinks in the boreal forest; Potentiel et enjeux a propos de la creation de puits de carbone en foret boreale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, J.F.; Gagnon, R.; Villeneuve, C. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada); Gaboury, S. [Rio Tinto Alcan, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Lord, D. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada). Dept. des Sciences Fondamentales

    2008-09-15

    Although greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are primarily associated with the combustion of fossil fuels, they are also linked to deforestation. This article discussed the contribution of the forestry sector in mitigating climate change in the province of Quebec, which has vast areas of barren deforested land. Recent studies have shown that boreal forests have significant potential for carbon sequestration, although much uncertainty remains regarding the ability to store carbon for the long-term due to the potential for fires. Concerns regarding climate change may provide opportunities to develop important synergies between the wood products industry and bioenergy developers. This article presented a typical case of afforestation of barren boreal lands and noted the benefits of reforestation in terms of creating new habitats for species. This article also included a chart indicating the carbon sequestration potential for different types of biomass, notably tree canopies, roots, forest litter, deadwood and soil. A map showing the spatial distribution of bare boreal regions in Quebec was also included along with the total cost per hectare of carbon sequestration per tonne of carbon dioxide. It was concluded that important reforestation projects can be undertaken in the context of mitigating climate change to restore the role of carbon sinks which were lost in the unproductive barren regions. 45 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  13. Environmental Studies in the Boreal Forest Zone: Summer IPY Institute at Central Boreal Forest Reserve, Fedorovskoe, Tver area, Russia (14-28 August, 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Kurbatova, Y.; Groisman, P.; Alexeev, V.

    2007-12-01

    The Summer Institute was organized by the International Arctic Research Center (IARC) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, in collaboration with the A.N. Severtsov Institute for Ecology and Evolution of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, Russia, and the Central Forest State Nature Biosphere Reserve in Fedorovskoe, Russia. The Institute was arranged as a part of the education/outreach activities of the International Polar Year (IPY) at the University of Alaska and the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI) and was held in Russia. The Institute provided a unique opportunity for participants to learn about the climate and environment of Northern Eurasia from leading scientists and educators, in a wide spectrum of polar and Earth system science disciplines from meteorology, biology, chemistry, and earth system modeling. Additionally, the Institute attendees observed and participated in the biospheric research activities under the guidance of experienced scientists. During a two-week-interval, the School attendees heard 40 lectures, attended several field trips and participated in three brainstorming Round Table Workshop Sessions devoted to perspectives of the boreal forest zone research and major unresolved problems that it faces. Thirty professors and experts in different areas of climate and biosphere research from Russia, the United States, Germany, Finland, and Japan, shared their expertise in lectures and in round table discussions with the Institute participants. Among the Institute participants there were 31 graduate students/early career scientists from six countries (China, Russia, Estonia, Finland, UK, and the United States) and eight K-12 teachers from Russia. The two groups joined together for several workshop sessions and for the field work components of the Institute. The field work was focused on land-atmosphere interactions and wetland studies in the boreal forest zone. Several field trips in and outside the Forest

  14. Nitrogen export from a boreal stream network following forest harvesting: seasonal nitrate removal and conservative export of organic forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelker, J.; Sponseller, R.; Ring, E.; Högbom, L.; Löfgren, S.; Laudon, H.

    2016-01-01

    Clear-cutting is today the primary driver of large-scale forest disturbance in boreal regions of Fennoscandia. Among the major environmental concerns of this practice for surface waters is the increased mobilization of nutrients, such as dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) into streams. But while DIN loading to first-order streams following forest harvest has been previously described, the downstream fate and impact of these inputs is not well understood. We evaluated the downstream fate of DIN and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) inputs in a boreal landscape that has been altered by forest harvests over a 10-year period. The small first-order streams indicated substantial leaching of DIN, primarily as nitrate (NO3-) in response to harvests with NO3- concentrations increasing by ˜ 15-fold. NO3- concentrations at two sampling stations further downstream in the network were strongly seasonal and increased significantly in response to harvesting at the mid-sized stream, but not at the larger stream. DIN removal efficiency, Er, calculated as the percentage of "forestry derived" DIN that was retained within the stream network based on a mass-balance model was highest during the snowmelt season followed by the growing season, but declined continuously throughout the dormant season. In contrast, export of DON from the landscape indicated little removal and was essentially conservative. Overall, net removal of DIN between 2008 and 2011 accounted for ˜ 65 % of the total DIN mass exported from harvested patches distributed across the landscape. These results highlight the capacity of nitrogen-limited boreal stream networks to buffer DIN mobilization that arises from multiple clear-cuts within this landscape. Further, these findings shed light on the potential impact of anticipated measures to increase forest yields of boreal forests, such as increased fertilization and shorter forest rotations, which may increase the pressure on boreal surface waters in the future.

  15. The impact of boreal deciduous and evergreen forests on atmospheric CO2 seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, L.; Graven, H. D.; Keeling, R. F.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    The seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2 is largely controlled by the terrestrial biosphere. It is well known that the seasonal amplitude of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) is the largest in the far north, where forest productivity is compressed into a short growing season. Since 1960, the seasonal amplitude of atmospheric CO2 north of 45N has increased by 35-55%. The increase in the seasonal amplitude is a difficult benchmark for coupled climate-carbon models to replicate. In fact, the models vary widely in their mean seasonal cycle representation. The boreal region has a strong influence on CO2 seasonality at Barrow. Deciduous and evergreen plant functional types (PFTs) have different patterns of NEP. We identified four pairs of nearby deciduous and evergreen forest PFTs with eddy covariance measurements. Evergreen forests show an early peak in NEP in May-June, while deciduous forests have a larger peak in NEP later in June-July. The influence of each PFT on the seasonal cycle at Barrow was computed from atmospheric transport results. We normalized the amplitude influence by the growing season NEP of the tower-based PFT flux and found that deciduous forests have 1.4 to 1.8 times more influence (per unit of growing season NEP) at Barrow than evergreen PFT. This diagnosis depends on the timing of the sharp seasonal draw-down at Barrow, which occurs too late to be explained by evergreen forests. The cycle at Barrow therefore appears to be strongly influenced by deciduous PFT, despite the dominance of evergreen PFTs in boreal forests. This paradoxical conclusion is also reached when examining the seasonality of land surface fluxes calculated using atmospheric inverse methods. We examine how these different PFTs, and possible trends in relative abundance, affect the seasonality of atmosphere CO2 using FluxNet data and atmospheric transport modelling. Our results highlight the importance of parameterizing multiple PFTs or individual species within grid cells in models in

  16. Regional extent of permafrost and boreal forest degradations in the central Yakutia by ALOS-PALSAR and AVNIR2 images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yoshihiro; Fedorov, Alexander; Abe, Konomi; Ise, Hajime; Masuzawa, Tadashi

    2013-04-01

    Wet climate with largely increased in precipitation during summer and snow accumulation during winter had continued 4 years since 2004 winter in eastern Siberia. Soil moisture in the active layer had been significantly increased corresponding with thawing of permafrost near the surface during following years. The perennially water-logged active layer furthermore exacerbated the boreal forest habitat, namely withered and dead forests widely extended in this region. In the present study, we have attempted to extract the region of degraded boreal forest based on the analysis of satellite data in the left and right banks of Lena River near Yakutsk, along with expansion of the water surface area in relation to permafrost degradation. We utilized ALOS-PALSAR and AVNIR2 images taken during 2006 through 2009. After geocoding and noise reduction of PALSAR images, classification of water surface area including water-logged ground was performed with supervised classification using the threshold of a microwave backscattering coefficient. Then, we compared the distribution of the water-logged area between multi-years. In addition, during the same period, supervised classification of grassland and boreal forest was conducted using AVNIR2 images. Then, both classifications were overlaid and the multi-years change in degraded boreal forest due to water-logged conditions was extracted as well. Boreal forest in the left bank of the Lena River distributes on river terrace where density of alas lakes is quite low due to consisting of sandy loam soil with underlying permafrost with less ground ice content. In this area, water surface area expanded in concaved terrain and along the valley year by year in conjunction with change from forest to grassland. On the other hand, forest in the right bank of the Lena River distributed in the region with very high density of alas lakes due to underlying ice rich permafrost. During the same period, alas lakes expanded and boreal forest on the

  17. Changes in the quality of dissolved organic matter in soil water with time since last fire in a boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Jun'ichiro; Ohashi, Mizue; Köster, Kajar; Berninger, Frank; Miura, Ikumi; Makita, Naoki; Yamase, Keitaro; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires strongly influence carbon stocks in boreal forests by inducing combustion of the aboveground and ground biomass. Simultaneously, they greatly influence the quality of dissolved organic matter in the soils, which in turn can alter water and carbon cycles in the forest. However, little information is available on how the quality of dissolved organic matter in boreal forest soils changes with time after forest fire occurred. To examine this, we collected soil water samples in Pinus sylvestris stands located in Finnish Lapland, where fire occurred 6, 46, and 156 years ago, analyzed dissolved organic carbon and inorganic elements concentrations, and then compared them among those three stands. In the assembly, we are going to report the results.

  18. Composition of carbonaceous smoke particles from prescribed burning of a Canadian boreal forest: 1. Organic aerosol characterization by gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurek, M.A.; Laterza, C.; Newman, L.; Daum, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center; Winstead, E.L. [Science Applications International Corporation, Hampton, VA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    In this study we examine the molecular organic constituents (C8 to C40 lipid compounds) collected as smoke particles from a Canadian boreal forest prescribed burn. Of special interest are (1) the molecular identity of polar organic aerosols, and (2) the amount of polar organic matter relative to the total mass of aerosol particulate carbon. Organic extracts of smoke aerosol particles show complex distributions of the lipid compounds when analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The molecular constituents present as smoke aerosol are grouped into non-polar (hydrocarbons) and polar {minus}2 oxygen atoms) subtractions. The dominant chemical species found in the boreal forest smoke aerosol are unaltered resin compounds (C20 terpenes) which are abundant in unburned conifer wood, plus thermally altered wood lignins and other polar aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results show that smoke aerosols contain molecular tracers which are related to the biofuel consumed. These smoke tracers can be related structurally back to the consumed softwood and hardwood vegetation. In addition, combustion of boreal forest materials produces smoke aerosol particles that are both oxygen-rich and chemically complex, yielding a carbonaceous aerosol matrix that is enriched in polar substances. As a consequence, emissions of carbonaceous smoke particles from large-scale combustion of boreal forest land may have a disproportionate effect on regional atmospheric chemistry and on cloud microphysical processes.

  19. Ecosystem services of boreal forests - Carbon budget mapping at high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akujärvi, Anu; Lehtonen, Aleksi; Liski, Jari

    2016-10-01

    The carbon (C) cycle of forests produces ecosystem services (ES) such as climate regulation and timber production. Mapping these ES using simple land cover -based proxies might add remarkable inaccuracy to the estimates. A framework to map the current status of the C budget of boreal forested landscapes was developed. The C stocks of biomass and soil and the annual change in these stocks were quantified in a 20 × 20 m resolution at the regional level on mineral soils in southern Finland. The fine-scale variation of the estimates was analyzed geo-statistically. The reliability of the estimates was evaluated by comparing them to measurements from the national multi-source forest inventory. The C stocks of forests increased slightly from the south coast to inland whereas the changes in these stocks were more uniform. The spatial patches of C stocks were larger than those of C stock changes. The patch size of the C stocks reflected the spatial variation in the environmental conditions, and that of the C stock changes the typical area of forest management compartments. The simulated estimates agreed well with the measurements indicating a good mapping framework performance. The mapping framework is the basis for evaluating the effects of forest management alternatives on C budget at high resolution across large spatial scales. It will be coupled with the assessment of other ES and biodiversity to study their relationships. The framework integrated a wide suite of simulation models and extensive inventory data. It provided reliable estimates of the human influence on C cycle in forested landscapes. PMID:27420172

  20. Soil moisture sensitivity of autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration in boreal xeric pine and mesic spruce forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ťupek, Boris; Launiainen, Samuli; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Heikkinen, Jukka; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2016-04-01

    Litter decomposition rates of the most process based soil carbon models affected by environmental conditions are linked with soil heterotrophic CO2 emissions and serve for estimating soil carbon sequestration; thus due to the mass balance equation the variation in measured litter inputs and measured heterotrophic soil CO2 effluxes should indicate soil carbon stock changes, needed by soil carbon management for mitigation of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, if sensitivity functions of the applied model suit to the environmental conditions e.g. soil temperature and moisture. We evaluated the response forms of autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration to soil temperature and moisture in four boreal forest sites of the International Cooperative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (ICP Forests) by a soil trenching experiment during year 2015 in southern Finland. As expected both autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration components were primarily controlled by soil temperature and exponential regression models generally explained more than 90% of the variance. Soil moisture regression models on average explained less than 10% of the variance and the response forms varied between Gaussian for the autotrophic forest floor respiration component and linear for the heterotrophic forest floor respiration component. Although the percentage of explained variance of soil heterotrophic respiration by the soil moisture was small, the observed reduction of CO2 emissions with higher moisture levels suggested that soil moisture response of soil carbon models not accounting for the reduction due to excessive moisture should be re-evaluated in order to estimate right levels of soil carbon stock changes. Our further study will include evaluation of process based soil carbon models by the annual heterotrophic respiration and soil carbon stocks.

  1. Annual cycle of volatile organic compound exchange between a boreal pine forest and the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, P.; Aalto, J.; Taipale, R.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Rinne, J.

    2015-10-01

    Long-term flux measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) over boreal forests are rare, although the forests are known to emit considerable amounts of VOCs into the atmosphere. Thus, we measured fluxes of several VOCs and oxygenated VOCs over a Scots-pine-dominated boreal forest semi-continuously between May 2010 and December 2013. The VOC profiles were obtained with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, and the fluxes were calculated using vertical concentration profiles and the surface layer profile method connected to the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. In total fluxes that differed significantly from zero on a monthly basis were observed for 13 out of 27 measured masses. Monoterpenes had the highest net emission in all seasons and statistically significant positive fluxes were detected from March until October. Other important compounds emitted were methanol, ethanol+formic acid, acetone and isoprene+methylbutenol. Oxygenated VOCs showed also deposition fluxes that were statistically different from zero. Isoprene+methylbutenol and monoterpene fluxes followed well the traditional isoprene algorithm and the hybrid algorithm, respectively. Emission potentials of monoterpenes were largest in late spring and autumn which was possibly driven by growth processes and decaying of soil litter, respectively. Conversely, largest emission potentials of isoprene+methylbutenol were found in July. Thus, we concluded that most of the emissions of m/z 69 at the site consisted of isoprene that originated from broadleaved trees. Methanol had deposition fluxes especially before sunrise. This can be connected to water films on surfaces. Based on this assumption, we were able to build an empirical algorithm for bi-directional methanol exchange that described both emission term and deposition term. Methanol emissions were highest in May and June and deposition level increased towards autumn, probably as a result of increasing relative humidity levels leading to

  2. Successional change in photosynthetic capacities after wildfires across the North American boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, N.; Ueyama, M.; Iwata, H.; Ichii, K.; Harazono, Y.; Nagano, H.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfire is a major disturbance across the North American boreal forests. Canopy ecophysiology is important to understand recovery of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes after wildfires. We developed a big-leaf model coupled photosynthesis (Farquhar et al., 1980) and stomatal conductance (Ball et al., 1987) models. We inputted eddy covariance data from fire chronosequence across the North American boreal forests into the big-leaf model for optimizing parameters: maximum carboxylation rate at 25℃ (Vcmax25) and stomatal conductance parameters. The model was optimized with a global optimization technique: SCE-UA method (Duan et al., 1994). The estimated canopy-scale parameters were then downscaled into a leaf scale (vcmax25; values per sun leaf area) using a two-leaf radiation transfer model (de Pury and Farquhar, 1997) and leaf area index. We used 6 sites from two fire chronosequence in Alaska (1~, 3~, 5~, 15~ and 80~ years after fire; Liu et al., 2005; Iwata et al., 2011) and 6 sites from a Canadian chronosequence study (6~, 15~, 23~, 40~ and 74~ years after fire; Goulden et al., 2010). Preliminary results showed clear seasonal variations in canopy-scale Vcmax25 with the maximum during the summer. In Alaska, the downscaled vcmax25 for four years after fire exceeded those of mature forests, indicating that the photosynthetic capacity recovered quickly in the early successional stage. This quick recovery was not seen in gross primary productivity. We will show the variations of the ecophysiological parameters in terms of environment conditions and stand age. References Ball et al., 1987: In Progress in Photosynthesis Research, 221-224. de Pury and Farquhar, 1997: Plant, Cell and Environ., 20, 537-557. Duan et al., 1994: J. Hydrology, 158, 265-284. Farquhar et al., 1980: Planta, 149, 78-90. Goulden et al., 2010: Global Change Biol., 17, 855-871. Iwata et al., 2011: SOLA., 7, 105-108. Liu et al., 2005: J. Geophys. Res., 110, D13101.

  3. No diurnal variation in rate or carbon isotope composition of soil respiration in a boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the diurnal variability in the rate and stable carbon isotope ratio ((delta)13C) of soil respiration in a northern boreal forest, measured with opaque chambers after the removal of understory vegetation. The experiment was conducted in June and August 2004 at the Picea abies L. Karst-dominated Flakaliden Research Forest in northern Sweden, using unfertilized girdled-tree plots and unfertilized non-girdled tree plots. Soil respiration and (delta)13C of soil-respired carbon dioxide (CO2) were measured every 4 hours on 6 plots, with a total of 11 sampling times over each 48 hour period. The purpose was to clarify an earlier study regarding the origin of diurnal patterns of soil CO2 flux. This study explored whether the diurnal patterns were the result of photosynthetic CO2 uptake during the day by the understory or whether there were underlying trends in soil respiration driven by plant root allocation. The sampling campaigns undertaken in this study investigated whether diurnal variations in soil respiration rate and (delta)13C exist in this ecosystem when no understory vegetation is present. Shoot photosynthesis and environmental parameters were measured simultaneously. Despite significant variations in climatic conditions and shoot photosynthetic rates in non-girdled trees, no diurnal patterns in soil respiration rates and (delta)13C were noted in either treatment. The lack of detectable diurnal changes in both treatments indicates that modeling of daily boreal forest carbon balances based on single instantaneous measurements are unlikely to be misconstrued by substantial diurnal trends. However, it was suggested that spatial variable should be accounted for, given the large standard errors. The impact of tree girdling on soil respiration rates also emphasized the significance of canopy photosynthesis in driving soil processes. 37 refs., 2 figs

  4. Plant and insect diversity along an experimental gradient of larch-birch mixtures in Chinese boreal forests

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jing; Shi, Juan; Luo, Youqing; HELIÖVAARA, Kari

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining and increasing biodiversity level especially in pure plantations is one important way to improve the resistance of forests to pests in Chinese boreal forests. The present study tested the hypothesis that the increased degree of tree species mixture (quantified by the stem proportion of Betula platyphylla Suk. and Larix gmelinii (Rupr.) Rupr.) can affect the species richness and diversity of understory and insects. Twenty-one plots, ranging from pure larch stand to pure birch stand...

  5. Ectomycorrhizal-Dominated Boreal and Tropical Forests Have Distinct Fungal Communities, but Analogous Spatial Patterns across Soil Horizons

    OpenAIRE

    McGuire, Krista L.; Allison, Steven D.; Fierer, Noah; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2013-01-01

    Fungi regulate key nutrient cycling processes in many forest ecosystems, but their diversity and distribution within and across ecosystems are poorly understood. Here, we examine the spatial distribution of fungi across a boreal and tropical ecosystem, focusing on ectomycorrhizal fungi. We analyzed fungal community composition across litter (organic horizons) and underlying soil horizons (0–20 cm) using 454 pyrosequencing and clone library sequencing. In both forests, we found significant clu...

  6. Function and dynamics of woody debris in boreal forest streams

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström, Niklas

    2005-01-01

    The work in this thesis deals with (1) the effects of woody debris on stream channel morphology and retention of organic material, and (2) the dynamics of woody debris and its relation to riparian forest history and composition. The studied stream reaches are situated in mature, productive forests in the boreal zone of Sweden. Wood variables were important predictors of the frequency of debris dams, pool area, the proportion of pools formed by wood, and variation in the bankfull channel width...

  7. Using InSAR Coherence to Map Stand Age in a Boreal Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiara Pinto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The interferometric coherence parameter γ estimates the degree of correlation between two Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images and can be influenced by vegetation structure. Here, we investigate the use of repeat-pass interferometric coherence γ to map stand age, an important parameter for the study of carbon stocks and forest regeneration. In August 2009 NASA’s L-band airborne sensor UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar acquired zero-baseline data over Quebec with temporal separation ranging between 45 min and 9 days. Our analysis focuses on a 66 km2 managed boreal forest and addresses three questions: (i Can coherence from L-band systems be used to model forest age? (ii Are models sensitive to weather events and temporal baseline? and (iii How is model accuracy impacted by the spatial scale of analysis? Linear regression models with 2-day baseline showed the best results and indicated an inverse relationship between γ and stand age. Model accuracy improved at 5 ha scale (R2 = 0.75, RMSE = 5.3 as compared to 1 ha (R2 = 0.67, RMSE = 5.8. Our results indicate that coherence measurements from L-band repeat-pass systems can estimate forest age accurately and with no saturation. However, empirical model relationships and their accuracy are sensitive to weather events, temporal baseline, and spatial scale of analysis.

  8. Response of the boreal forest ecosystem to climatic change and its silvicultural implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellomaeki, S.; Haenninen, H.; Karjalainen, T. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Faculty of Forestry] [and others

    1996-12-31

    During the next 100 years, the mean annual temperature is expected to be 1-6 deg C higher than at present. It is also expected to be accompanied by a lengthening of the thermal growing season and increased precipitation. Consequently, climatic change will increase the uncertainty of the management of forest ecosystems in the future. In this context, this research project aimed to outline the ecological and silvicultural implications of climatic change with regard to (1) how the expected climatic change might modify the functioning and structure of the boreal forest ecosystem, and (2) how the silvicultural management of the forest ecosystem should be modified in order to maintain sustainable forest yield under changing climatic conditions. The experimental component of the project concerned first the effect that elevating temperature and elevating concentration of atmospheric carbon have on the ontogenetic development of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L) and on the subsequent increase in frost damage during winter. The second part of the study looked the effect of elevating temperature and elevating concentration of atmospheric carbon on the growth of Scots pine through photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, nutrient supply, and changes in crown structure. This experiment was utilised in several subprojects of the overall project

  9. Absence of snow cover reduces understory plant cover and alters plant community composition in boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyling, Juergen; Haei, Mahsa; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2012-02-01

    Snow regimes affect biogeochemistry of boreal ecosystems and are altered by climate change. The effects on plant communities, however, are largely unexplored despite their influence on relevant processes. Here, the impact of snow cover on understory community composition and below-ground production in a boreal Picea abies forest was investigated using a long-term (8-year) snow cover manipulation experiment consisting of the treatments: snow removal, increased insulation (styrofoam pellets), and control. The snow removal treatment caused longer (118 vs. 57 days) and deeper soil frost (mean minimum temperature -5.5 vs. -2.2°C) at 10 cm soil depth in comparison to control. Understory species composition was strongly altered by the snow cover manipulations; vegetation cover declined by more than 50% in the snow removal treatment. In particular, the dominant dwarf shrub Vaccinium myrtillus (-82%) and the most abundant mosses Pleurozium schreberi (-74%) and Dicranum scoparium (-60%) declined strongly. The C:N ratio in V. myrtillus leaves and plant available N in the soil indicated no altered nitrogen nutrition. Fine-root biomass in summer, however, was negatively affected by the reduced snow cover (-50%). Observed effects are attributed to direct frost damage of roots and/ or shoots. Besides the obvious relevance of winter processes on plant ecology and distribution, we propose that shifts in the vegetation caused by frost damage may be an important driver of the reported alterations in biogeochemistry in response to altered snow cover. Understory plant performance clearly needs to be considered in the biogeochemistry of boreal systems in the face of climate change.

  10. Toward Conservation of Canada’s Boreal Forest Avifauna: Design and Application of Ecological Models at Continental Extents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G. Cumming

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Human development is increasing pressure on North America’s mainly intact boreal forest. We outline the need for a comprehensive synthesis of existing data and for effective scientific tools to support conservation of this biome and of the birds that depend on it. To illustrate how broad collaborations can address these needs, we introduce and report on the Boreal Avian Modelling Project. This is a new partnership involving universities, government, private, and nongovernment groups that was created to develop spatially explicit, predictive models of boreal bird habitat associations across Canada. This initiative is designed to improve our understanding of the influence of environmental factors and human activities on boreal bird species, leading to spatially explicit predictive models of the distribution of avian populations. The intended applications of these models are land use planning and avian conservation across the nearctic boreal forest. In this essay, we present a description of the extensive collection of point count survey data assembled by the Project, and the library of spatial covariates used for modeling. We show how it is possible to account for a number of nuisance variables related to differences in survey protocol among source data sets and make some preliminary suggestions as to how future surveys could be standardized. We present a distance-sampling approach used to convert standardized point count data to density estimates, which we illustrate by providing habitat-specific densities and total population estimates for one species in a part of western Canada. We also illustrate the use of Classification and Regression Trees to develop species niche models from the standardized data. We conclude with a discussion of the need for a monitoring program for boreal birds in Canada, the role of predictive statistical models in developing such a program, and how monitoring could be related to boreal bird conservation through

  11. Nesting ecology of boreal forest birds following a massive outbreak of spruce beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, S.M.; Handel, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    We studied breeding dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata), and spruce-nesting birds from 1997 to 1998 among forests with different levels of spruce (Picea spp.) mortality following an outbreak of spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis) in Alaska, USA. We identified species using live and beetle-killed spruce for nest sites and monitored nests to determine how the outbreak influenced avian habitat selection and reproduction. We tested predictions that 1) nesting success of ground-nesting juncos would increase with spruce mortality due to proliferation of understory vegetation available to conceal nests from predators, 2) nesting success of canopy-nesting warblers would decrease with spruce mortality due to fewer live spruce in which to conceal nests, and 3) both species would alter nest-site selection in response to disturbance. Juncos did not benefit from changes in understory vegetation; nesting success in highly disturbed stands (46%) was comparable to that in undisturbed habitats throughout their range. In stands with low spruce mortality, nesting success of juncos was low (5%) and corresponded with high densities of red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). Yellow-rumped warblers nested exclusively in spruce, but success did not vary with spruce mortality. As disturbance increased, nesting warblers switched from selecting forest patches with high densities of live white spruce (Picea glauca) to patches with beetle-killed spruce. Warblers also placed nests in large-diameter live or beetle-killed spruce, depending on which was more abundant in the stand, with no differences in nesting success. Five of the 12 other species of spruce-nesting birds also used beetle-killed spruce as nest sites. Because beetle-killed spruce can remain standing for >50 years, even highly disturbed stands provide an important breeding resource for boreal forest birds. We recommend that boreal forest managers preserve uncut blocks of infested

  12. Growth dynamics of fine roots in a coniferous fern forest site close to Forsmark in the central part of Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Hans; Stadenberg, Ingela (SLU, Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    The seasonal growth dynamics of live and dead roots for trees and the field layer species (g/m2, varying diameter fractions) and live/dead ratios were analysed at a fresh/moist coniferous fern forest site close to the nuclear power plant at Forsmark in the central eastern parts of Sweden. The changes in depth distribution of fine roots were observed at depth intervals of the top humus horizon down to 40 cm in the mineral soil profile. The bulk of living fine roots of trees (< 1 mm in diameter) were found in the mineral soil horizon the total profile down to 40 cm of the mineral soil, where 89, 82, 83 and 89% of the total amount in the whole profile were found. The upper 2.5 cm part of the humus layer contained 83, 81, 100 and 100% of all roots of the humus layer on the four different sampling occasions. High amounts of living fine roots were found in the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil horizon viz. 84, 76, 91 and 69% of the total mineral soil layer. Consequently, both the top soil horizons of the humus and the mineral soil layers were heavily penetrated by living fine roots. The highest proportion of living fine roots was found in the top 2.5 cm of the humus layer. Accordingly, the live/dead ratio of fine roots (< 1 mm in diameter) decreased from the top of the humus layer to the lower part of mineral soil horizon from 8.0-0.3, 0.8-0.2, 4.4-0.4 and 3.3-0.7 (g g-1) for the four sampling occasions, respectively. We concluded that the decrease in the live/ dead ratio was related to decreased vitality with depth of the fine roots in the soil profile. The highest live/dead ratio was found in the upper 2.5 cm of the humus layer for both the tree and field-layer species. This distribution pattern was most evident for tree fine roots < 1 mm in diameter. The mean fine-root biomass (live tissue < 1 mm in diameter) of tree species for the total profile varied on the four sampling occasions between 317, 113, 139 and 248 g m-2. The related fine root necromass (dead tissue

  13. Estimating aboveground biomass in the boreal forests of the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, L.; Wylie, B. K.; Nossov, D.; Peterson, B.; Waldrop, M. P.; McFarland, J.; Alexander, H. D.; Mack, M. C.; Rover, J. A.; Chen, X.

    2011-12-01

    Quantification of aboveground biomass (AGB) in Alaska's boreal forests is essential to accurately evaluate terrestrial carbon stocks and dynamics in northern high-latitude ecosystems. However, regional AGB datasets with spatially detailed information (1 m tall), which were converted to plot-level AGB using allometric equations. We acquired Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) images from the Web Enabled Landsat Data (WELD) that provides multi-date composites of top-of-atmosphere reflectance and brightness temperature for Alaska. From the WELD images, we generated a three-year (2008 - 2010) image composite for the Yukon River Basin using a series of compositing criteria including non-saturation, non-cloudiness, maximal normalize difference vegetation index (NDVI), and maximal brightness temperature. Airborne lidar datasets were acquired for two sub-regions in the central basin in 2009, which were converted to vegetation height datasets using the bare-earth digital surface model (DSM) and the first-return DSM. We created a multiple regression model in which the response variable was the field-observed AGB and the predictor variables were Landsat-derived reflectance, brightness temperature, and spectral vegetation indices including NDVI, soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), normalized difference infrared index (NDII), and normalized difference water index (NDWI). Principal component analysis was incorporated in the regression model to remedy the multicollinearity problems caused by high correlations between predictor variables. The model fitted the observed data well with an R-square of 0.62, mean absolute error of 29.1 Mg/ha, and mean bias error of 3.9 Mg/ha. By applying this model to the Landsat mosaic, we generated a 30-m AGB map for the boreal forests in the Yukon River Basin. Validation of the Landsat-derived AGB using the lidar dataset indicated a significant correlation between the AGB estimates and the lidar

  14. Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization of Boreal Forest Land on Greenhouse Gas Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, L.; Sathre, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Forest growth on mineral soils in boreal regions is often limited by a low availability of nitrogen (N), and fertilization has shown particular promise in increasing yields in productive boreal forests. In this study we analyze the greenhouse gas (GHG) implications of increasing forest biomass production through N fertilization and using the increased production for bioenergy and biomaterials in place of non-renewable fuels and materials. We begin with a stand-level analysis of the radiative forcing implications of forest fertilization and biomass substitution, with explicit consideration of the temporal patterns of GHG emissions to and removals from the atmosphere. We model and compare the production and use of biomass from a hectare of fertilized and non-fertilized forest land in northern Sweden. We calculate the annual net emissions of CO2, N2O and CH4 for each system, over a 225-year period with 1-year time steps. We calculate the annual atmospheric concentration decay of each of these emissions, and calculate the resulting annual changes in instantaneous and cumulative radiative forcing. We find that forest fertilization can significantly increase biomass production, which increases the potential for material and energy substitution. The average carbon stock in tree biomass, forest soils and wood products all increase when fertilization is used. The additional GHG emissions due to fertilizer production and application are small compared to increases in carbon stock and substitution benefits. By the end of the 225-year simulation period, the cumulative radiative forcing reduction of the fertilized stand is over twice that of the non-fertilized stand. We then consider a steady-state landscape-level scenario where 10% of Swedish forest land is fertilized. We estimate the primary energy use and GHG emissions from forest management including production and application of N and NPK fertilizers. Based on modelled growth response, we then estimate the net GHG benefits

  15. Estimation of autotrophic soil respiration in a boreal forest using three different approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, Liisa; Pumpanen, Jukka; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2016-04-01

    It is generally challenging to separate autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration. The reason for these difficulties is connected with the intimate interaction of the key processes in soil. Root-associated microbes practically colonize the whole soil volume while decomposition processes occur in the same matrix. Therefore, autotrophic and heterotrophic processes cannot be separated in natural systems. However, there are several methods that can be used to better understand the dynamics of these two. A classical method is called 'trenching' where a trench is dug around a known volume of soil and the roots entering the soil are cut from the living trees thus blocking the C flow from them. The second way to separate autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration relies on the difference in the isotopic signature (13C) of plant-derived or decomposition-derived CO2. The third way to separate the sources is to study the differences in the short- and long-term temperature dependencies in CO2 soil emissions. This is possible especially in boreal forests where the biological activity has a strong seasonal cycle. We compared these three methods in an experiment conducted in a southern boreal middle-aged Scots pine stand in Finland. Our data provides a unique possibility to critically evaluate current methods for estimating autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration. The knowledge is needed to study further plant physiology and plant-microbe interactions in soil.

  16. Boreal forest prospects and politics: Paradoxes of first nations participation in multi-sector conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna J Willow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the prospects and politics of indigenous participation in multi-sector conservation—an integrative and proactive new approach to sustaining the integrity of vast natural ecosystems—by presenting the case of the Boreal Leadership Council (BLC, an initiative comprised of Environmental Non-Governmental Organisations (ENGOs, First Nations groups, resource-extractive corporations, and financial institutions committed to collectively addressing issues impacting Canada's boreal forest. Drawing on multi-sited participant-observation and interviews with BLC members and affiliates, I show how the BLC challenges wilderness-oriented definitions of conservation by undertaking projects that intertwine resource use, land rights, cultural preservation, and political authority, but concurrently perpetuates dominant perspectives by adhering to discursive practices that limit how environmental information can be persuasively presented. Ultimately, I argue that multi-sector conservation creates both new possibilities for indigenous empowerment and new forms of marginalisation through the reproduction of a (postcolonial geography of exclusion in which indigenous participants knowingly and strategically travel from the centre of their own worlds to peripheral positions within a larger—and inherently inequitable—sociopolitical structure.

  17. Detecting Local Drivers of Fire Cycle Heterogeneity in Boreal Forests: A Scale Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Claude Bélisle

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Severe crown fires are determining disturbances for the composition and structure of boreal forests in North America. Fire cycle (FC associations with continental climate gradients are well known, but smaller scale controls remain poorly documented. Using a time since fire map (time scale of 300 years, the study aims to assess the relative contributions of local and regional controls on FC and to describe the relationship between FC heterogeneity and vegetation patterns. The study area, located in boreal eastern North America, was partitioned into watersheds according to five scales going from local (3 km2 to landscape (2800 km2 scales. Using survival analysis, we observed that dry surficial deposits and hydrography density better predict FC when measured at the local scale, while terrain complexity and slope position perform better when measured at the middle and landscape scales. The most parsimonious model was selected according to the Akaike information criterion to predict FC throughout the study area. We detected two FC zones, one short (159 years and one long (303 years, with specific age structures and tree compositions. We argue that the local heterogeneity of the fire regime contributes to ecosystem diversity and must be considered in ecosystem management.

  18. BOREAS TE-9 In Situ Diurnal Gas Exchange of NAS Boreal Forest Stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Coyea, Marie; Dang, Qinglai

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves in boreal forest tree species. The purpose of the BOREAS TE-09 study was threefold: 1) to provide in situ gas exchange data that will be used to validate models of photosynthetic responses to light, temperature, and carbon dioxide (CO2); 2) to compare the photosynthetic responses of different tree crown levels (upper and lower); and 3) to characterize the diurnal water potential curves for these sites to get an indication of the extent to which soil moisture supply to leaves might be limiting photosynthesis. The gas exchange data of the BOREAS NSA were collected to characterize diurnal gas exchange and water potential of two canopy levels of five boreal canopy cover types: young jack pine, old jack pine, old aspen, lowland old black spruce, and upland black spruce. These data were collected between 27-May-1994 and 17-Sep-1994. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  19. Vertical Distribution of Atmospheric Pollution Lead in Swedish Boreal Forest Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the fate of anthropogenic lead (Pb)pollution in boreal forest soils, and to predict future trends, it is important to know where in the soil the pollution Pb is accumulated and how large the pollution and natural Pb inventories are in different soil horizons. We combined stable Pb isotope (206Pb/207Pb ratios) and concentration analyses to study Pb in podzol profiles and mor samples from old-growth forest stands at seven sites distributed from southern to northern Sweden. Additional samples were taken from managed forests, and from an agricultural field, to give some idea of the effects of land-use. Pb concentrations are typically 60-100 μg g-1 dry mass in the mor layer in southern Sweden and about 30 μg g-1 in northern Sweden. Pb isotope analyses show that virtually all of this Pb is pollution Pb. The isotope composition also shows that pollution Pb has penetrated downwards between 20-60 cm in the forest soils. The total pollution Pb inventories vary between 0.7-3.0 g m-2 ground surface, with larger inventories in southern compared to northern Sweden. Although the highest Pb concentrations occur in the mor layer, the largest inventories of pollution Pb are found in the Bs-horizon. The limited investigation of Pb distribution and inventories in soils from managed forests did not point to any major difference compared to the old-growth forests. The agricultural field revealed, however, a completely deviating Pb profile with all pollution Pb evenly distributed in the 20 cm thick top-soil

  20. Importance of the forest canopy to fluxes of methyl mercury and total mercury to boreal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Louis, V L; Rudd, J W; Kelly, C A; Hall, B D; Rolfhus, K R; Scott, K J; Lindberg, S E; Dong, W

    2001-08-01

    The forest canopy was an important contributor to fluxes of methyl mercury (MeHg) and total mercury (THg) to the forest floor of boreal uplands and wetlands and potentially to downstream lakes, at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), northwestern Ontario. The estimated fluxes of MeHg and THg in throughfall plus litterfall below the forest canopy were 2 and 3 times greater than annual fluxes by direct wet deposition of MeHg (0.9 mg of MeHg ha(-1)) and THg (71 mg of THg ha(-1)). Almost all of the increased flux of MeHg and THg under the forest canopy occurred as litterfall (0.14-1.3 mg of MeHg ha(-1) yr(-1) and 110-220 mg of THg ha(-1) yr(-1)). Throughfall added no MeHg and approximately 9 mg of THg ha(-1) yr(-1) to wet deposition at ELA, unlike in other regions of the world where atmospheric deposition was more heavily contaminated. These data suggest that dry deposition of Hg on foliage as an aerosol or reactive gaseous Hg (RGM) species is low at ELA, a finding supported by preliminary measurements of RGM there. Annual total deposition from throughfall and litterfall under a fire-regenerated 19-yr-old jack pine/birch forest was 1.7 mg of MeHg ha(-1) and 200 mg of THg ha(-1). We found that average annual accumulation of MeHg and THg in the surficial litter/fungal layer of soils since the last forest fire varied between 0.6 and 1.6 mg of MeHg ha(-1) and between 130 and 590 mg of THg ha(-1) among sites differing in drainage and soil moisture. When soil Hg accumulation sites were matched with similar sites where litterfall and throughfall were collected, measured fluxes of THg to the forest floor (sources) were similar to our estimates of longterm soil accumulation rates (sinks), suggesting that the Hg in litterfall and throughfall is a new and not a recycled input of Hg to forested ecosystems. However, further research is required to determine the proportion of Hg in litterfall that is being biogeochemically recycled within forest and wetland ecosystems and, thus, does

  1. The Effect of Pollution on Newly-Formed Particle Composition in Boreal Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaattovaara, Petri

    2010-05-01

    Petri Vaattovaara (1), Tuukka Petäjä (2), Jorma Joutsensaari (1), Pasi Miettinen (1), Boris Zaprudin (1,6), Aki Kortelainen (1), Juha Heijari (3,7), Pasi Yli-Pirilä (3), Pasi Aalto (2), Doug R. Worsnop (4), and Ari Laaksonen(1,5) (1) University of Eastern Finland, Finland (2) University of Helsinki, Finland (3) University of Eastern Finland, Finland (4) Aerodyne Research Inc., USA (5) Finnish Meteorological Institute, Finland (6) Currently at University of Turku, Finland (7) Currently at Maritime Research Centre, Finland Email address of the Corresponding author: Petri.Vaattovaara@uef.fi The geographical extent of the tropical, temperate and boreal forests is about 30% of the Earth's land surface. Those forests are located around the world in different climate zones effecting widely on atmospheric composition via new particle formation. The Boreal forests solely cover one third of the forests extent and are one of the largest vegetation environments, forming a circumpolar band throughout the northern hemisphere continents, with a high potential to affect climate processes [1]. In order to more fully understand the possible climatic effects of the forests, the properties of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in varying conditions (e.g. a change in meteorological parameters or in the concentrations of biogenic and antropogenic trace gases) need to be better known. In this study, we applied the UFO-TDMA (ultrafine organic tandem differential mobility analyzer [2]) and the UFH-TDMA (ultrafine hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer [3]) methods parallel to shed light on the evolution of the nucleation and Aitken mode particle compositions (via physic-chemical properties) at a virgin boreal forest site in varying conditions. The measurements were carried out at Hyytiälä forest station in Northern Europe (Finland) during 15 spring nucleation events. We also carried out a statistical analysis using linear correlations in order to explain the variability in

  2. Spatially explicit fire-climate history of the boreal forest-tundra (Eastern Canada) over the last 2000 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payette, Serge; Filion, Louise; Delwaide, Ann

    2008-07-12

    Across the boreal forest, fire is the main disturbance factor and driver of ecosystem changes. In this study, we reconstructed a long-term, spatially explicit fire history of a forest-tundra region in northeastern Canada. We hypothesized that current occupation of similar topographic and edaphic sites by tundra and forest was the consequence of cumulative regression with time of forest cover due to compounding fire and climate disturbances. All fires were mapped and dated per 100 year intervals over the last 2,000 years using several fire dating techniques. Past fire occurrences and post-fire regeneration at the northern forest limit indicate 70% reduction of forest cover since 1800 yr BP and nearly complete cessation of forest regeneration since 900 yr BP. Regression of forest cover was particularly important between 1500s-1700s and possibly since 900 yr BP. Although fire frequency was very low over the last 100 years, each fire event was followed by drastic removal of spruce cover. Contrary to widespread belief of northward boreal forest expansion due to recent warming, lack of post-fire recovery during the last centuries, in comparison with active tree regeneration more than 1,000 years ago, indicates that the current climate does not favour such expansion.

  3. A MESO-β SCALE SIMULATION OF THE EFFECTS OF BOREAL FOREST ECOSYSTEM ON THE LOWER ATMOSPHERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王汉杰; Yi-Fan LI; Aloysius K.LO

    2001-01-01

    Based on the Intensive Field Campaign (IFC-I) data of Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study(BOREAS), a three-dimensional meso-β scale model is used to simulate the effect of boreal forests on the lower atmosphere. A fine horizontal resolution of 2 km × 2 km is used in order to distinguish the vegetative heterogeneity in the boreal region. A total of 20 × 25 grid points cover the entire sub modeling area in BOREAS' South Study Area (SSA). The ecosystem types and their coverage in each grid square are extracted from the North American Land Cover Characteristics Data Base(NALCCD) generated by the U.S. Geographical Survey (USGS) and the University of Nebraska Lincoln (UNL). The topography of the study area is taken from the Digital Elevation Map (DEM)of USGS. The model outputs include the components of the energy balance budget within the canopy and at the ground, the turbulence parameters in the atmospheric boundary layer and the wind,temperature and humidity profiles extending up to a height of 1500 m. In addition to the fine time nd spatial step, the unique feature of the present model is the incorporation of both dynamic and biological effects of the Boreal forest into the model parameterization scheme. The model results compare favorably with BOREAS' IFC-1 data in 1994 when the forest was in the luxuriant growing period.

  4. High-resolution records detect human-caused changes to the boreal forest wildfire regime in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglioti, Benjamin V.; Mann, Daniel H.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Wooller, Matthew J.; Finney, Bruce P.

    2016-01-01

    Stand-replacing wildfires are a keystone disturbance in the boreal forest, and they are becoming more common as the climate warms. Paleo-fire archives from the wildland–urban interface can quantify the prehistoric fire regime and assess how both human land-use and climate change impact ecosystem dynamics. Here, we use a combination of a sedimentary charcoal record preserved in varved lake sediments (annually layered) and fire scars in living trees to document changes in local fire return intervals (FRIs) and regional fire activity over the last 500 years. Ace Lake is within the boreal forest, located near the town of Fairbanks in interior Alaska, which was settled by gold miners in AD 1902. In the 400 years before settlement, fires occurred near the lake on average every 58 years. After settlement, fires became much more frequent (average every 18  years), and background charcoal flux rates rose to four times their preindustrial levels, indicating a region-wide increase in burning. Despite this surge in burning, the preindustrial boreal forest ecosystem and permafrost in the watershed have remained intact. Although fire suppression has reduced charcoal influx since the 1950s, an aging fuel load experiencing increasingly warm summers may pose management problems for this and other boreal sites that have similar land-use and fire histories. The large human-caused fire events that we identify can be used to test how increasingly common megafires may alter ecosystem dynamics in the future.

  5. Soil Nutrients and Microbes Characteristics of Four Coniferous Forests%4种针叶林中的土壤养分与微生物特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆梅; 卫捷; 张友超

    2011-01-01

    The soil nutrient and microbes quantity of Pinus yunnanensis faranch, Pinus armandii +Keteleeria evelyniana, Keteleeria evelyniana and Cupressus duclouxiana forests in forest park of the Dian Lake, Kunming were surveyed and analyzed to study microbes characteristics and the correlation between microbes quantity and soil nutrients in different coniferous forests. The results showed that the organic matter, quick-acting nitrogen and quick-acting potassium content in the soil surface layer of Pinus armandii + Keteleeria evelyniana forest was higher than the other three coniferous forests because the soil of Pinus armandii + Keteleeria evelyniana forest was of appropriate soil bulk weight and soil porosity,which can improve soil microbes status and nutrient obviously, there was significant difference in microbes quantity among the four coniferous forests and the soil microbes quantity in the mixed forest was higher than that in the pure forest, the bacterium quantity was of absolute advantage in soil microflora, followed by antinomycete and fungus, the quantity of three microbes in soil decreased with increase of soil depth,there were very significant positive correlations between antinomycete quantity and organic matter content,quick-acting K content, quick-acting P content, soil bulk weight, there was a very significant positive correlation between bacterium quantity and organic matter content, there were positive correlations between bacterium quantity and quick-acting K content, quick-acting P content, and there were positive correlations between fungus quantity and soil bulk weight, total porosity, organic matter content, quickacting N content, quick-acting P content, quick-acting K content.%为探讨不同针叶林下土壤微生物性质差异及其与养分的关系,采用实地调查与室内实验分析相结合,对位于高原湿地滇池西岸森林公园现存4种针叶林云南松、华山松+云南油杉混交、云南油杉、柏树的林下土壤养

  6. Changes to Stream Water and Soil Temperature Regimes Pre and Post Forest Harvesting in Low Order Boreal Forest Watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, C. J.; Najaf, P.; Mackereth, R.; Steedman, R.

    2014-12-01

    Soil and stream water temperatures were logged at 15 minute intervals (1995-2008) pre and post logging at four intensively monitored zero order boreal forest watersheds in NW Ontario, Canada. Trends in post logging changes to daily average, maximum and diurnal ranges in stream water and soil temperatures are presented. Changes to the soil temperature regime were found to be spatially variable and dependent upon aspect, hill slope position and soil moisture regime. In general, soil temperature displayed a hysteretic behavior in relation to reference sites during the post logging period with significantly warmer spring and summer temperatures and similar autumn temperatures. Stream water temperature appeared to be controlled by post logging surface soil temperatures (0-15 cm) as opposed to deeper (30-40 cm) soil temperatures during the pretreatment period. Results are compared to previous studies and implications for soil microbial processes and stream benthic communities are highlighted.

  7. Mammalian Herbivores in the Boreal Forests: Their Numerical Fluctuations and Use by Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Baskin

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the boreal zone, there are about 50 native mammalian herbivore species that belong to the orders Artiodactyla, Rodentia, and Lagomorpha. Of these species, 31 occur in the Nearctic and 24 in the Palaearctic. Only six species occur in both regions. Species of the family Cervidae have probably been, and still are, the most important group for man, as they provide both meat and hides. Pelts from squirrels, muskrats, and hares were commercially harvested at the beginning of the century, but have less value today. The semi-domestic reindeer in the Palaearctic produces meat and hides on a commercial basis. It is also used for milking, to a limited extent, as is the semi-domestic moose in Russia. The Siberian musk deer is used for its musk and is raised in captivity in China. All species heavier than 1 kg are utilized by man, those with a body mass in the range 1 kg - 1 hg are sometimes used, and species lighter than 1 hg are rarely used. Here, we review the numerical fluctuations in terms of periodicity and amplitude, based on an extensive data set found in the literature, especially from the former Soviet Union. Current understanding of the underlying factors behind the population fluctuations is briefly reviewed. Management and conservation aspects of the mammalian herbivores in the boreal zone are also discussed. We conclude that there is a challenge to manage the forests for the mammalian herbivores, but there is also a challenge to manage the populations of mammalian herbivores for the forests.

  8. Effects of snow condition on microbial respiration of Scots pine needle litter in a boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Masataka; Domisch, Timo; Dannoura, Masako; Ataka, Mioko; Finér, Leena; Repo, Tapani; Osawa, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Climate warming scenarios predict decreasing snow depths and increasing winter precipitation in boreal forests ("rain on snow"). I These conditions may affect the decomposition and the microbial respiration of leaf litter, contributing a major part of tree litters, To understand how different snow conditions during winter would affect the microbial respiration of Scots pine needle litter in a boreal forest, we conducted a laboratory experiment using needle litter of two age classes (newly dropped and older litter). The experiment simulated four different winter treatments, followed by spring and early summer : (1) ambient snow cover (SNOW), (2) Compressed snow and ice encasement (ICE), (3) frozen flood (FLOOD) and (4) no snow cover at all (NO SNOW). The experiment was carried out in four walk-in dasotrons (n=3) with soil temperatures of -2° C and air temperatures of 2° C during winter and increased to 15° C and 20° C during spring, respectively . Needle litter samples were collected three times (prior to the winter, just after winter and at the end of the experiment). We evaluated the microbial respiration from the litter at several temperatures (-5° C, 0° C, 5° C and 12° C), the SIR index (an index estimating the microbial biomass), and the C/N ratio .And we calculated Q10 value (index of microbial respiration activity) using microbial respiration data. We found significant differences in microbial respiration between the newly dropped and older litter at the beginning and at the end of the experiment. However, there were no significant differences in Q10 value and the SIR (index of microbial biomass) between the different winter treatments. All samples showed decrease of microbial activity with time. Finally, we conclude that the winter snow conditions with mild air temperatures as used in our experiment, are not detrimentally affecting the Scots pine needle litter decomposition and its respiration.

  9. Mechanisms for success after long-term nutrient enrichment in a boreal forest understory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Nahanni Grainger

    Full Text Available Global levels of reactive nitrogen are predicted to rise in the coming decades as a result of increased deposition from the burning of fossil fuels and the large-scale conversion of nitrogen into a useable form for agriculture. Many plant communities respond strongly to increases in soil nitrogen, particularly in northern ecosystems where nitrogen levels are naturally very low. An experiment in northern Canada that was initiated in 1990 has been investigating the effects of long-term nutrient enrichment (fertilizer added annually on a boreal forest understory community. We used this experiment to investigate why some species increase in abundance under nutrient enrichment whereas others decline. We focused on four species that differed in their responses to fertilization: Mertensia paniculata and Epilobium angustifolium increased in abundance, Achillea millefolium remained relatively constant and Festuca altaica declined. We hypothesized that the two species that were successful in the new high-nutrient, light-limited environment would be taller, have higher specific leaf area, change phenology by growing earlier in the season and be more morphologically plastic than their less successful counterparts. We compared plant height, specific leaf area, growth spurt date and allocation to leaves in plants grown in control and fertilized plots. We demonstrated that each of the two species that came to dominate fertilized plots has a different combination of traits and responses that likely gave them a competitive advantage; M. paniculata has the highest specific leaf area of the four species whereas E. angustifolium is tallest and exhibits morphological plasticity when fertilized by increasing biomass allocation to leaves. These results indicate that rather than one strategy determining success when nutrients become available, a variety of traits and responses may contribute to a species' ability to persist in a nutrient-enriched boreal forest

  10. Patterns of NPP, GPP, respiration, and NEP during boreal forest succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulden, M.L.; Mcmillan, A.M.S.; Winston, G.C.; Rocha, A.V.; Manies, K.L.; Harden, J.W.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.

    2011-01-01

    We combined year-round eddy covariance with biometry and biomass harvests along a chronosequence of boreal forest stands that were 1, 6, 15, 23, 40, 74, and 154 years old to understand how ecosystem production and carbon stocks change during recovery from stand-replacing crown fire. Live biomass (Clive) was low in the 1 and 6 year old stands, and increased following a logistic pattern to high levels in the 74 and 154year old stands. Carbon stocks in the forest floor (Cforest floor) and coarse woody debris (CCWD) were comparatively high in the 1year old stand, reduced in the 6 through 40year old stands, and highest in the 74 and 154year old stands. Total net primary production (TNPP) was reduced in the 1 and 6year old stands, highest in the 23 through 74year old stands and somewhat reduced in the 154year old stand. The NPP decline at the 154year old stand was related to increased autotrophic respiration rather than decreased gross primary production (GPP). Net ecosystem production (NEP), calculated by integrated eddy covariance, indicated the 1 and 6 year old stands were losing carbon, the 15year old stand was gaining a small amount of carbon, the 23 and 74year old stands were gaining considerable carbon, and the 40 and 154year old stands were gaining modest amounts of carbon. The recovery from fire was rapid; a linear fit through the NEP observations at the 6 and 15year old stands indicated the transition from carbon source to sink occurred within 11-12 years. The NEP decline at the 154year old stand appears related to increased losses from Clive by tree mortality and possibly from Cforest floor by decomposition. Our findings support the idea that NPP, carbon production efficiency (NPP/GPP), NEP, and carbon storage efficiency (NEP/TNPP) all decrease in old boreal stands. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Priming effects in boreal black spruce forest soils: quantitative evaluation and sensitivity analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaosheng Fan

    Full Text Available Laboratory studies show that introduction of fresh and easily decomposable organic carbon (OC into soil-water systems can stimulate the decomposition of soil OC (SOC via priming effects in temperate forests, shrublands, grasslands, and agro-ecosystems. However, priming effects are still not well understood in the field setting for temperate ecosystems and virtually nothing is known about priming effects (e.g., existence, frequency, and magnitude in boreal ecosystems. In this study, a coupled dissolved OC (DOC transport and microbial biomass dynamics model was developed to simultaneously simulate co-occurring hydrological, physical, and biological processes and their interactions in soil pore-water systems. The developed model was then used to examine the importance of priming effects in two black spruce forest soils, with and without underlying permafrost. Our simulations showed that priming effects were strongly controlled by the frequency and intensity of DOC input, with greater priming effects associated with greater DOC inputs. Sensitivity analyses indicated that priming effects were most sensitive to variations in the quality of SOC, followed by variations in microbial biomass dynamics (i.e., microbial death and maintenance respiration, highlighting the urgent need to better discern these key parameters in future experiments and to consider these dynamics in existing ecosystem models. Water movement carries DOC to deep soil layers that have high SOC stocks in boreal soils. Thus, greater priming effects were predicted for the site with favorable water movement than for the site with limited water flow, suggesting that priming effects might be accelerated for sites where permafrost degradation leads to the formation of dry thermokarst.

  12. The role of coherent flow structures in the sensible heat fluxes of an Alaskan boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkenburg, Derek; Fochesatto, Gilberto J.; Prakash, Anupma; Cristóbal, Jordi; Gens, Rudiger; Kane, Douglas L.

    2013-08-01

    Accelerations in the flow over forests generate coherent structures which locally enhance updrafts and downdrafts, forcing rapid exchanges of energy and matter. Here, observations of the turbulent flow are made in a highly heterogeneous black spruce boreal forest in Fairbanks, Alaska at ~2.6 h (12 m) and ~0.6 h (3 m), where h is the mean canopy height of 4.7 m. Wavelet analysis is used to detect coherent structures. The sonic temperature and wind data cover 864 half-hour periods spanning winter, spring, and summer. When mean global statistics of structures are analyzed at the two levels independently, results are similar to other studies. Specifically, an average of eight structures occurs per period, their mean duration is 85 s, and their mean heat flux contribution is 48%. However, this analysis suggests that 31% of the structures detected at 2.6 h, and 13% at 0.6 h, may be influenced by wave-like flow organization. Remarkably, less than 25% of the structures detected occur synchronously in the subcanopy and above canopy levels, which speaks robustly to the lack of flow interaction within only nine vertical meters of the forest.

  13. Effects of climatic changes on carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes in boreal forest ecosystems of European part of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of possible climatic and vegetation changes on H2O and CO2 fluxes in boreal forest ecosystems of the central part of European Russia were quantified using modeling and experimental data. The future pattern of climatic conditions for the period up to 2100 was derived using the global climatic model ECHAM5 (Roeckner et al 2003 The Atmospheric General Circulation Model ECHAM 5. PART I: Model Description, Report 349 (Hamburg: Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology) p 127) with the A1B emission scenario. The possible trends of future vegetation changes were obtained by reconstructions of vegetation cover and paleoclimatic conditions in the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, as provided from pollen and plant macrofossil analysis of profiles in the Central Forest State Natural Biosphere Reserve (CFSNBR). Applying the method of paleoanalogues demonstrates that increasing the mean annual temperature, even by 1-2 deg. C, could result in reducing the proportion of spruce in boreal forest stands by up to 40%. Modeling experiments, carried out using a process-based Mixfor-SVAT model, show that the expected future climatic and vegetation changes lead to a significant increase of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and gross primary productivity (GPP) of the boreal forests. Despite the expected warming and moistening of the climate, the modeling experiments indicate a relatively weak increase of annual evapotranspiration (ET) and even a reduction of transpiration (TR) rates of forest ecosystems compared to present conditions.

  14. Nitrogen export from a boreal stream network following forest harvesting: seasonal nitrate removal and conservative export of organic forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schelker

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Boreal streams are under pressure from large scale disturbance by forestry. Recent scenarios predict an increase in forest production in Scandinavia to meet market demands and to mitigate higher anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Increased fertilization and shorter forest rotations are anticipated which will likely enhance the pressure on boreal streams in the near future. Among the major environmental impacts of forest harvesting is the increased mobilization of inorganic nitrogen (N, primarily as nitrate (NO3- into surface waters. But whereas NO3- inputs to first-order streams have been previously described, their downstream fate and impact is not well understood. We evaluated the downstream fate of N inputs in a boreal landscape that has been altered by forest harvests over a 10 year period to estimate the effects of multiple clear-cuts on aquatic N export in a boreal stream network. Small streams showed substantial leaching of NO3- in response to harvests with concentrations increasing by ~ 15 fold. NO3- concentrations at two sampling stations further downstream in the network were strongly seasonal and increased significantly in response to harvesting at the medium size, but not at the larger stream. Nitrate removal efficiency, Er, calculated as the percentage of "forestry derived" NO3- that was retained within the landscape using a mass balance model was highest during the snow melt season followed by the growing season, but declined continuously throughout the dormant season. In contrast, export of organic N from the landscape indicated little removal and was essentially conservative. Overall, net removal of NO3- between 2008 and 2011 accounted for ~ 70 % of the total NO3- mass exported from harvested patches distributed across the landscape. These results highlight the capacity and limitation of N-limited terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems to buffer inorganic N mobilization that arises from multiple clear-cuts within meso-scale boreal

  15. The Uncertainty of Biomass Estimates from Modeled ICESat-2 Returns Across a Boreal Forest Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesano, P. M.; Rosette, J.; Sun, G.; North, P.; Nelson, R. F.; Dubayah, R. O.; Ranson, K. J.; Kharuk, V.

    2014-01-01

    The Forest Light (FLIGHT) radiative transfer model was used to examine the uncertainty of vegetation structure measurements from NASA's planned ICESat-2 photon counting light detection and ranging (LiDAR) instrument across a synthetic Larix forest gradient in the taiga-tundra ecotone. The simulations demonstrate how measurements from the planned spaceborne mission, which differ from those of previous LiDAR systems, may perform across a boreal forest to non-forest structure gradient in globally important ecological region of northern Siberia. We used a modified version of FLIGHT to simulate the acquisition parameters of ICESat-2. Modeled returns were analyzed from collections of sequential footprints along LiDAR tracks (link-scales) of lengths ranging from 20 m-90 m. These link-scales traversed synthetic forest stands that were initialized with parameters drawn from field surveys in Siberian Larix forests. LiDAR returns from vegetation were compiled for 100 simulated LiDAR collections for each 10 Mg · ha(exp -1) interval in the 0-100 Mg · ha(exp -1) above-ground biomass density (AGB) forest gradient. Canopy height metrics were computed and AGB was inferred from empirical models. The root mean square error (RMSE) and RMSE uncertainty associated with the distribution of inferred AGB within each AGB interval across the gradient was examined. Simulation results of the bright daylight and low vegetation reflectivity conditions for collecting photon counting LiDAR with no topographic relief show that 1-2 photons are returned for 79%-88% of LiDAR shots. Signal photons account for approximately 67% of all LiDAR returns, while approximately 50% of shots result in 1 signal photon returned. The proportion of these signal photon returns do not differ significantly (p greater than 0.05) for AGB intervals greater than 20 Mg · ha(exp -1). The 50m link-scale approximates the finest horizontal resolution (length) at which photon counting LiDAR collection provides strong model

  16. Modelling growth-competition relationships in trembling aspen and white spruce mixed boreal forests of Western Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Guo Huang

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of competition on stem growth of Picea glauca and Populus tremuloides in boreal mixedwood stands during the stem exclusion stage. We combined traditional approaches of collecting competition data with dendrochronology to provide retrospective measurements of stem diameter growth. Several competition indices including stand basal area (BA, the sum of stem diameter at breast height (SDBH, and density (N for the broadleaf and coniferous species, as well as similar indices considering only trees with diameters greater than each subject (BAGR, SDBHGR, and NGR, were evaluated. We used a nonlinear mixed model to characterize the basal area increment over the past 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 years as a function of growth of nearby dominant trees, the size of the subject trees, deciduous and coniferous competition indices, and ecoregions. SDBHGR and BAGR were better predictors for spruce, and SDBHGR and NGR were better for aspen, respectively, than other indices. Results showed strongest correlations with long-term stem growth, as the best models integrated growth for 10-25 years for aspen and ≥ 25 for spruce. Our model demonstrated a remarkable capability (adjusted R(2>0.67 to represent this complex variation in growth as a function of site, size and competition.

  17. Modelling growth-competition relationships in trembling aspen and white spruce mixed boreal forests of Western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian-Guo; Stadt, Kenneth J; Dawson, Andria; Comeau, Philip G

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effect of competition on stem growth of Picea glauca and Populus tremuloides in boreal mixedwood stands during the stem exclusion stage. We combined traditional approaches of collecting competition data with dendrochronology to provide retrospective measurements of stem diameter growth. Several competition indices including stand basal area (BA), the sum of stem diameter at breast height (SDBH), and density (N) for the broadleaf and coniferous species, as well as similar indices considering only trees with diameters greater than each subject (BAGR, SDBHGR, and NGR), were evaluated. We used a nonlinear mixed model to characterize the basal area increment over the past 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 years as a function of growth of nearby dominant trees, the size of the subject trees, deciduous and coniferous competition indices, and ecoregions. SDBHGR and BAGR were better predictors for spruce, and SDBHGR and NGR were better for aspen, respectively, than other indices. Results showed strongest correlations with long-term stem growth, as the best models integrated growth for 10-25 years for aspen and ≥ 25 for spruce. Our model demonstrated a remarkable capability (adjusted R(2)>0.67) to represent this complex variation in growth as a function of site, size and competition.

  18. Annual Dynamics of Green House Gases in a Swedish Boreal Forested Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquist, M. G.; Klemedtsson, L.; Bishop, K.; Grip, H.; Laudon, H.; Nilsson, M.

    2003-04-01

    We investigated the spatial and temporal variation of CO_2, CH_4 and N_2O in a boreal forested catchment with respect to their atmospheric exchange and their below-ground concentration dynamics. The measurements were carried out at three sites distributed along a gently sloping 22 m transect draining into a small creek. Vegetation was dominated by a 95 year old Norway spruce stand and soil types ranged from organic (a riparian zone histosol) to mineral (podzol on sandy till). Soil gas concentrations (at 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60 cm depth) were measured weekly for 18 months, while gas fluxes were measured weekly during the snow-free season and at 4 campaigns during the winter season. During the growing season average CO_2 efflux from the three sites ranged from 0.7--1.8 g m-2 d-1, while CH_4 displayed a net uptake rate of 0.1--0.3 mg m-2 d-1. Detectable amounts of N_2O emissions appeared sporadically, but never exceeded 0.04 mg m-2 d-1. The variation in CO_2 flux had the same temporal pattern as the variation in soil temperature (5--25 cm depth; r^2 = 0.6--0.85), while ca 40% of the differences in CH_4 consumption could be accounted for by the variations in soil moisture in the top 20 cm. During winter, fluxes of CO_2 and CH_4 were of the same order of magnitude as during summer, but the N_2O emissions were considerably higher, averaging around 0.4 mg m-2 d-1. Furthermore, soil gas concentrations of N_2O during winter showed a strong positive temperature correlation with a ca10-fold increase in concentration per ^oC (r^2 = 0.93). Our results stress the importance of the winter season for the greenhouse gas dynamics of the boreal landscape, and also that both N_2O and CH_4 exchange have the potential to influence how these ecosystems interact with the Earth's radiative balance. Moreover, the strength of atmospheric CH_4 consumption rates in these systems appears to be indifferent to season, which has implications for regional estimates of CH_4 budgets. The temperature

  19. Survival of Adult Songbirds in Boreal Forest Landscapes Fragmented by Clearcuts and Natural Openings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darroch M. Whitaker

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available There exists little information on demographic responses of boreal songbirds to logging. We conducted a 4-yr (2003-2006 songbird mark-recapture study in western Newfoundland, where land cover is a naturally heterogeneous mosaic of productive spruce-fir forest, stunted taiga, and openings such as bogs, fens, and riparian zones. We compared apparent survival and rate of transience for adults of 14 species between areas having forests fragmented primarily by either natural openings or 3-7 yr-old clearcuts. Data were collected on three landscape pairs, with birds being marked on three 4-6 ha netting sites on each landscape (total = 18 netting sites. Survival rates were estimated using multi-strata mark-recapture models with landscape types specified as model strata. Landscape type was retained in the best model for only two species, Ruby-crowned Kinglet and Yellow-rumped Warbler, in both cases indicating lower apparent survival in landscapes having clearcuts. Though parameter estimates suggested lower survival in clearcut landscapes for several species, meta-analysis across all species detected no general difference between landscape types. Further, we did not detect any relation between landscape differences in survival and a species' habitat affinity, migratory strategy, or the proportion of transients in its population. Although sensitivity to logging was limited, we observed high interspecific variation in rates of breeding season apparent survival (48% [Dark-eyed Junco] to 100% [several species], overwinter apparent survival (0.3% [Ruby-crowned Kinglet] to 86.5% [Gray Jay], and transience (≈0% [several species] to 61% [Ruby-crowned Kinglet in clearcut landscapes]. For Lincoln's and White-throated Sparrows, over-winter apparent survival was >2× higher for males than females, and rate of transience was > 8× higher for White-throated Sparrow males than females. Moderately male-biased sex ratios suggested that both lower mortality and higher

  20. Measurement and modeling of bryophyte evaporation in a boreal forest chronosequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Gower, Stith T.; Amiro, Brian; Ewers, Brent

    2011-01-19

    The effects of changing climate and disturbance on forest water cycling are not well understood. In particular bryophytes contribute significantly to forest evapotranspiration (ET) in poorly-drained boreal forests, but few studies have directly measured this flux and how it changes with stand age and soil drainage. We used large chambers to measure bryophyte evaporation (E) in Canadian Picea mariana forests of varying ages and soil drainages, as well under controlled laboratory conditions, and modeled daily E using site-specific meteorological data to drive a Penman-Monteith-based model. Field measurements of E averaged 0.37 mm day-1, and ranged from 0.03 (Pleurozium schreberii in a 77-year-old dry stand) to 1.43 mm day-1 (Sphagnum riparium in a 43-year-old bog). canopy resistance ranged from ~0 (at 25 °C, some values were <0) to ~1500 s m-1 for dry, cold (5 °C) mosses. In the laboratory, moss canopy resistance was constant until a moss water content of ~6 g g-1 and then climbed sharply with further drying; no difference was observed between the three moss groups (feather mosses, hollow mosses, and hummock mosses) tested. Modeled annual E fluxes from bryophytes ranged from 0.4 mm day-1, in the well-drained stands, to ~1 mm day-1 in the 43-year-old bog, during the growing season. Eddy covariance data imply that bryophytes contributed 18-31% and 49-69% to the total ET flux, at the well- and poorly-drained stands respectively. Bryophyte E was greater in bogs than in upland stands, was driven by low-lying mosses, and did not vary with stand age; this suggests that shifts in forest age due to increasing fire will have little effect on the bryophyte contribution to ET.

  1. Millipede and centipede (Myriapoda: Diplopoda, Chilopoda assemblages in secondary succession: variance and abundance in Western German beech and coniferous forests as compared to fallow ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schreiner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Successional processes are an important element of commercial-forest ecosystems. They can be followed by studying the species composition of various animal groups, e.g. millipedes. Over the vegetation periods 2009 and 2010, we pitfall-trapped millipedes and centipedes (Myriapoda: Diplopoda, Chilopoda on 21 Western German (North Rhine-Westphalian deciduous and coniferous forest as well as fallow-ground sites of increasing age (1–165 yr and determined them to the species and sex. Diplopoda (2009: 1659/2010: 3417 individuals outnumbered the trapped Chilopoda (2009: 37/2010: 111 individuals by far while the general catching results approximately doubled from 2009 to 2010. Indirect gradient analysis (CA revealed that the influence of the habitat type on the formation of diplopod assemblages exceeded the influence of the successional stage. Although no clear trend in individual-count development over time occurred in most species detected, Julus scandinavius (Latzel, 1884 significantly increased in numbers with ageing of the deciduous (beech forests. In conclusion, J. scandinavius may be a suitable bioindicator of deciduous-forest succession. More data are necessary to transfer our results into a mathematical function describing the course of increasing J. scandinavius abundance.

  2. Satellite chlorophyll fluorescence measurements reveal large-scale decoupling of photosynthesis and greenness dynamics in boreal evergreen forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Sophia; Voigt, Maximilian; Thum, Tea; Gonsamo, Alemu; Zhang, Yongguang; Köhler, Philipp; Jung, Martin; Varlagin, Andrej; Guanter, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Mid-to-high latitude forests play an important role in the terrestrial carbon cycle, but the representation of photosynthesis in boreal forests by current modelling and observational methods is still challenging. In particular, the applicability of existing satellite-based proxies of greenness to indicate photosynthetic activity is hindered by small annual changes in green biomass of the often evergreen tree population and by the confounding effects of background materials such as snow. As an alternative, satellite measurements of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) can be used as a direct proxy of photosynthetic activity. In this study, the start and end of the photosynthetically active season of the main boreal forests are analysed using spaceborne SIF measurements retrieved from the GOME-2 instrument and compared to that of green biomass, proxied by vegetation indices including the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) derived from MODIS data. We find that photosynthesis and greenness show a similar seasonality in deciduous forests. In high-latitude evergreen needleleaf forests, however, the length of the photosynthetically active period indicated by SIF is up to 6 weeks longer than the green biomass changing period proxied by EVI, with SIF showing a start-of-season of approximately 1 month earlier than EVI. On average, the photosynthetic spring recovery as signalled by SIF occurs as soon as air temperatures exceed the freezing point (2-3 °C) and when the snow on the ground has not yet completely melted. These findings are supported by model data of gross primary production and a number of other studies which evaluated in situ observations of CO2 fluxes, meteorology and the physiological state of the needles. Our results demonstrate the sensitivity of space-based SIF measurements to light-use efficiency of boreal forests and their potential for an unbiased detection of photosynthetic activity even under the challenging conditions interposed by evergreen

  3. Recent variations in NDVI-based plant growth and their relationship with climate in boreal intact forest landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J.; Jiang, H.; Lu, X.; Zhang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs), defined as large unbroken expanses of forest landscape without signs of significant human activity, have significant ecological values. Previous studies suggest a reversal in the greening of boreal plants was exhibited in the late 1990s. In this study, we focus on variations in plant growth of boreal IFLs from 2000 to 2014 and their correlation with local climatic factors between 45°N and 70°N. The average Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) during the growing season (GS, which is from April to October) derived from MOD13C2, is used as a proxy of plant growth. Compared to a significant increase in GS NDVI of boreal plants during the 1980s and early 1990s, GS NDVI of ca. 85.7% of total IFLs in the study area exhibited insignificant change after 2000. About 10.2% of total boreal IFLs exhibited significant greening (an increase in GS NDVI), and only 4.1% of the total showed significant browning (a decrease in GS NDVI) during the study period. For greening boreal IFLs, ca. 46.0% of these showed a significant correlation between GS temperature and NDVI. For browning IFLs, an increase in precipitation during the non-growing season (NGS, which is from previous November to current March) and cooling in GS and NGS were the main climatic causes for decreases of GS NDVI. However, over 65% of browning boreal IFLs did not correlate with any climatic factor, and the browning may be associated with artificial activities. About 49.4% of no-change boreal IFLs showed significant correlation between GS NDVI and climatic factors, and 72.5% of these sensitive plants exhibited a significant positive correlation between GS temperature and NDVI. On the whole, an increase in GS and NGS temperature could promote plant growth of boreal IFLs, while an increase of NGS precipitation mainly inhibited plant growth. However, nearly half of total boreal IFLs displayed no sensitivity to any climatic factors chosen in our present work.

  4. The selection of small forest hollows for pollen analysis in boreal and temperate forest regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overballe-Petersen, Mette V; Bradshaw, Richard H.W.

    2011-01-01

    Small forest hollows represent a specialised site type for pollen analysis, since they mainly record the vegetation within an approximate radius of 20-100 m from the hollow. We discuss how to choose the most appropriate small forest hollow for pollen analysis. Hollow size, site topography, location...

  5. Regional Instability in the Abundance of Open Stands in the Boreal Forest of Eastern Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rija Rapanoela

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fires are a key disturbance of boreal forests. In fact, they are the main source of renewal and evolution for forest stands. The variability of fire through space and time results in a diversified forest mosaic, altering their species composition, structure and productivity. A resilient forest is assumed to be in a state of dynamic equilibrium with the fire regime, so that the composition, age structure and succession stages of forests should be consistent with the fire regime. Dense spruce-moss stands tend, however, to diminish in favour of more open stands similar to spruce-lichen stands when subjected to more frequent and recurring disturbances. This study therefore focused on the effects of spatial and temporal variations in burn rates on the proportion of open stands over a large geographic area (175,000 km2 covered by black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill. Britton, Sterns, Poggenb.. The study area was divided into 10 different zones according to burn rates, as measured using fire-related data collected between 1940 and 2006. To test if the abundance of open stands was unstable over time and not in equilibrium with the current fire regime, forest succession was simulated using a landscape dynamics model that showed that the abundance of open stands should increase progressively over time in zones where the average burn rate is high. The proportion of open stands generated during a specific historical period is correlated with the burn rate observed during the same period. Rising annual burn rates over the past two decades have thereby resulted in an immediate increase in the proportion of open stands. There is therefore a difference between the current proportion of open stands and the one expected if vegetation was in equilibrium with the disturbance regime, reflecting an instability that may significantly impact the way forest resources are managed. It is apparent from this study that forestry planning should consider the risks associated

  6. Salvage logging following fires can minimize boreal caribou habitat loss while maintaining forest quotas: An example of compensatory cumulative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beguin, Julien; McIntire, Eliot J B; Raulier, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Protected area networks are the dominant conservation approach that is used worldwide for protecting biodiversity. Conservation planning in managed forests, however, presents challenges when endangered species use old-growth forests targeted by the forest industry for timber supply. In many ecosystems, this challenge is further complicated by the occurrence of natural disturbance events that disrupt forest attributes at multiple scales. Using spatially explicit landscape simulation experiments, we gather insights into how these large scale, multifaceted processes (fire risk, timber harvesting and the amount of protected area) influenced both the persistence of the threatened boreal caribou and the level of timber supply in the boreal forest of eastern Canada. Our result showed that failure to account explicitly and a priori for fire risk in the calculation of timber supply led to an overestimation of timber harvest volume, which in turn led to rates of cumulative disturbances that threatened both the long-term persistence of boreal caribou and the sustainability of the timber supply itself. Salvage logging, however, allowed some compensatory cumulative effects. It minimised the reductions of timber supply within a range of ∼10% while reducing the negative impact of cumulative disturbances caused by fire and logging on caribou. With the global increase of the human footprint on forest ecosystems, our approach and results provide useful tools and insights for managers to resolve what often appear as lose-lose situation between the persistence of species at risk and timber harvest in other forest ecosystems. These tools contribute to bridge the gap between conservation and forest management, two disciplines that remain too often disconnected in practice. PMID:26321533

  7. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yue

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stand-replacing fires are the dominant fire type in North American boreal forest and leave a historical legacy of a mosaic landscape of different aged forest cohorts. To accurately quantify the role of fire in historical and current regional forest carbon balance using models, one needs to explicitly simulate the new forest cohort that is established after fire. The present study adapted the global process-based vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate boreal forest fire CO2 emissions and follow-up recovery after a stand-replacing fire, with representation of postfire new cohort establishment, forest stand structure and the following self-thinning process. Simulation results are evaluated against three clusters of postfire forest chronosequence observations in Canada and Alaska. Evaluation variables for simulated postfire carbon dynamics include: fire carbon emissions, CO2 fluxes (gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem exchange, leaf area index (LAI, and biometric measurements (aboveground biomass carbon, forest floor carbon, woody debris carbon, stand individual density, stand basal area, and mean diameter at breast height. The model simulation results, when forced by local climate and the atmospheric CO2 history on each chronosequence site, generally match the observed CO2 fluxes and carbon stock data well, with model-measurement mean square root of deviation comparable with measurement accuracy (for CO2 flux ~100 g C m−2 yr−1, for biomass carbon ~1000 g C m−2 and for soil carbon ~2000 g C m−2. We find that current postfire forest carbon sink on evaluation sites observed by chronosequence methods is mainly driven by historical atmospheric CO2 increase when forests recover from fire disturbance. Historical climate generally exerts a negative effect, probably due to increasing water stress caused by significant temperature increase without sufficient increase in precipitation. Our simulation results

  8. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, C.; Ciais, P.; Luyssaert, S.; Cadule, P.; Harden, J.; Randerson, J.; Bellassen, V.; Wang, T.; Piao, S. L.; Poulter, B.; Viovy, N.

    2013-12-01

    Stand-replacing fires are the dominant fire type in North American boreal forests. They leave a historical legacy of a mosaic landscape of different aged forest cohorts. This forest age dynamics must be included in vegetation models to accurately quantify the role of fire in the historical and current regional forest carbon balance. The present study adapted the global process-based vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate the CO2 emissions from boreal forest fire and the subsequent recovery after a stand-replacing fire; the model represents postfire new cohort establishment, forest stand structure and the self-thinning process. Simulation results are evaluated against observations of three clusters of postfire forest chronosequences in Canada and Alaska. The variables evaluated include: fire carbon emissions, CO2 fluxes (gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem exchange), leaf area index, and biometric measurements (aboveground biomass carbon, forest floor carbon, woody debris carbon, stand individual density, stand basal area, and mean diameter at breast height). When forced by local climate and the atmospheric CO2 history at each chronosequence site, the model simulations generally match the observed CO2 fluxes and carbon stock data well, with model-measurement mean square root of deviation comparable with the measurement accuracy (for CO2 flux ~100 g C m-2 yr-1, for biomass carbon ~1000 g C m-2 and for soil carbon ~2000 g C m-2). We find that the current postfire forest carbon sink at the evaluation sites, as observed by chronosequence methods, is mainly due to a combination of historical CO2 increase and forest succession. Climate change and variability during this period offsets some of these expected carbon gains. The negative impacts of climate were a likely consequence of increasing water stress caused by significant temperature increases that were not matched by concurrent increases in precipitation. Our simulation results

  9. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, C.; Ciais, P.; Luyssaert, S.; Cadule, P.; Harden, J.; Randerson, J.; Bellassen, V.; Wang, T.; Piao, S.L.; Poulter, B.; Viovy, N.

    2013-01-01

    Stand-replacing fires are the dominant fire type in North American boreal forests. They leave a historical legacy of a mosaic landscape of different aged forest cohorts. This forest age dynamics must be included in vegetation models to accurately quantify the role of fire in the historical and current regional forest carbon balance. The present study adapted the global process-based vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate the CO2 emissions from boreal forest fire and the subsequent recovery after a stand-replacing fire; the model represents postfire new cohort establishment, forest stand structure and the self-thinning process. Simulation results are evaluated against observations of three clusters of postfire forest chronosequences in Canada and Alaska. The variables evaluated include: fire carbon emissions, CO2 fluxes (gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem exchange), leaf area index, and biometric measurements (aboveground biomass carbon, forest floor carbon, woody debris carbon, stand individual density, stand basal area, and mean diameter at breast height). When forced by local climate and the atmospheric CO2 history at each chronosequence site, the model simulations generally match the observed CO2 fluxes and carbon stock data well, with model-measurement mean square root of deviation comparable with the measurement accuracy (for CO2 flux ~100 g C m−2 yr−1, for biomass carbon ~1000 g C m−2 and for soil carbon ~2000 g C m−2). We find that the current postfire forest carbon sink at the evaluation sites, as observed by chronosequence methods, is mainly due to a combination of historical CO2 increase and forest succession. Climate change and variability during this period offsets some of these expected carbon gains. The negative impacts of climate were a likely consequence of increasing water stress caused by significant temperature increases that were not matched by concurrent increases in precipitation. Our simulation

  10. Boreal forest evaporation: dependency on season, weather, soil moisture and stand age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroth, A.; Grelle, A.; Mölder, M.; Linderson, M.-L.; Lankreijer, H.; Lagergren, F.

    2003-04-01

    This paper focuses on which factors that are controlling the exchange of water vapour between boreal forests and the atmosphere. The 7-year data series from the Norunda area in central Sweden with almost continuous measurements with half-hourly time resolution was used as a basis for the analysis. The long-term measurements were made in a 100-years-old mixed pine and spruce forest. Evaporation was also measured in a clear-cut, a 30-years-old pine stand and a 60-years-old mixed pine and spruce stand in the same area. Theoretically, evaporation from a well-coupled vegetation such as a forest should primarily be controlled by vapour pressure deficit but it was shown that net radiation was the variable that explains most of the variation at all time scales. On a monthly basis, net radiation explained 86 percent of the variation. The time series also show a decreasing trend in evaporation with time that was partly explained by a decrease in net radiation but also correlated with the decreasing number of dry days per year. Transpiration measurements by sap flow techniques showed that drought began to affect transpiration at fairly low levels of soil water content and that spruce was more sensitive than pine. Measurements from the stands with different age showed that age had a large impact on the evaporation. The highest evaporation was shown by the 60-years-old stand, followed by the 30-years-old, the 100-years-old and the clear-cut. The 60-years-old stand had about twice as high evaporation as the clear-cut. There were only small differences in leaf area index between the stands (except the clear-cut) and since the weather was the same, other factors were responsible for the differences. Thus, for scaling purposes, "forests" cannot be treated as a homogeneous land-cover type with respect to evaporation.

  11. Stocks, Chemistry, and Sensitivity to Climate Change of Dead Organic Matter Along the Canadian Boreal Forest Transect Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, C.M.; Norris, C. [Pacific Forestry Centre, Natural Resources Canada, Victoria, BC, V8Z 1M5 (Canada); Bhatti, J.S. [Northern Forestry Centre, Natural Resources Canada, Edmonton, AB, T6H 3S5 (Canada); Flanagan, L.B. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, T1K 3M4 (Canada)

    2006-01-15

    Improving our ability to predict the impact of climate change on the carbon (C) balance of boreal forests requires increased understanding of site-specific factors controlling detrital and soil C accumulation. Jack pine (Pinus banksiana) and black spruce (Picea mariana) stands along the Boreal Forest Transect Case Study (BFTCS) in northern Canada have similar C stocks in aboveground vegetation and large woody detritus, but thick forest floors of poorly-drained black spruce stands have much higher C stocks, comparable to living biomass. Their properties indicate hindered decomposition and N cycling, with high C/N ratios, strongly stratified and depleted d13C and d15N values, high concentrations of tannins and phenolics, and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra typical of poorly decomposed plant material, especially roots and mosses. The thinner jack pine forest floor appears to be dominated by lichen, with char in some samples. Differences in quantity and quality of aboveground foliar and woody litter inputs are small and unlikely to account for the contrasts in forest floor accumulation and properties. These are more likely associated with site conditions, especially soil texture and drainage, exacerbated by increases in sphagnum coverage, forest floor depth, and tannins. Small changes in environmental conditions, especially reduced moisture, could trigger large C losses through rapid decomposition of forest floor in poorly drained black spruce stands in this region.

  12. Monitoring of wildfires in boreal forests using large area AVHRR NDVI composite image data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasischke, E.S.; French, N.H.F. (Environmental Research Inst. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)); Harrell, P.; Christensen, N.L. Jr. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)); Ustin, S.L. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States)); Barry, D. (U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Fairbanks, AK (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) composite image data, produced from AVHRR data collected in 1990, were evaluated for locating and mapping the areal extent of wildfires in the boreal forests of Alaska during that year. A technique was developed to map forest fire boundaries by subtracting a late-summer AVHRR NDVI image from an early summer scene. The locations and boundaries of wildfires within the interior region of Alaska were obtained from the Alaska Fire Service, and compared to the AVHRR-derived fire-boundary map. It was found that AVHRR detected 89.5% of all fires with sizes greater than 2,000ha with no false alarms and that, for most cases, the general shape of the fire boundary detected by AVHRR matched those mapped by field observers. However, the total area contained within the fire boundaries mapped by AVHRR were only 61% of those mapped by the field observers. However, the AVHRR data used in this study did not span the entire time period during which fires occurred, and it is believed the areal estimates could be improved significantly if an expanded AVHRR data set were used.

  13. Comparing soil biogeochemical processes in novel and natural boreal forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Quideau

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Emulating the variability that exists in the natural landscape prior to disturbance should be a goal of soil reconstruction and land reclamation efforts following resource extraction. Long-term ecosystem sustainability within reclaimed landscapes can only be achieved with the re-establishment of biogeochemical processes between reconstructed soils and plants. In this study, we assessed key soil biogeochemical attributes (nutrient availability, organic matter composition, and microbial communities in reconstructed, novel, anthropogenic ecosystems covering different reclamation treatments following open-cast mining for oil extraction. We compared the attributes to those present in a range of natural soils representative of mature boreal forest ecosystems in the same area of northern Alberta. Soil nutrient availability was determined in situ with resin probes, organic matter composition was described with 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and soil microbial community structure was characterized using phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Significant differences among natural ecosystems were apparent in nutrient availability and seemed more related to the dominant tree cover than to soil type. When analyzed together, all natural forests differed significantly from the novel ecosystems, in particular with respect to soil organic matter composition. However, there was some overlap between the reconstructed soils and some of the natural ecosystems in nutrient availability and microbial communities, but not in organic matter characteristics. Hence, our results illustrate the importance of considering the range of natural landscape variability, and including several soil biogeochemical attributes when comparing novel, anthropogenic ecosystems to the mature ecosystems that constitute ecological targets.

  14. C2-C10 hydrocarbon emissions from a boreal wetland and forest floor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Haapanala

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Emissions of various C2-C10 hydrocarbons and halogenated hydrocarbons from a boreal wetland and Scots pine forest floor were measured by static chamber technique in south-western Finland. Isoprene was the main non-methane hydrocarbon emitted by the wetland but also small emissions of ethene, propane, propene, 1-butene, 2-methylpropene, butane, pentane and hexane were detected. The isoprene emission from the wetland was observed to follow the commonly used isoprene emission algorithm. The mean emission potential of isoprene was 224 μg m−2 h−1 for the whole season. This is lower than the emission potentials published earlier and probably least partly due to the cold and cloudy weather during the measurements. No emissions of monoterpenes or halogenated hydrocarbons from the wetland were detected. Highest hydrocarbon emissions from the Scots pine forest floor were measured in spring and autumn. Main emitted compounds were monoterpenes. Isoprene emissions were negligible. Highest monoterpene emissions were measured in spring after the snow had melted. Emissions dropped in the summer and increased again in autumn. The total monoterpene emission rates varied from zero to 373 μg m−2 h−1. Probable source for these emissions is decaying plant litter. Also small emissions of chloroform (100–800 ng m−2 h−1, ethene, propane, propene, 2-methylpropene, cis-2-butene, pentane, hexane and heptane were detected.

  15. Comparing soil biogeochemical processes in novel and natural boreal forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quideau, S. A.; Swallow, M. J. B.; Prescott, C. E.; Grayston, S. J.; Oh, S.-W.

    2013-08-01

    Emulating the variability that exists in the natural landscape prior to disturbance should be a goal of soil reconstruction and land reclamation efforts following resource extraction. Long-term ecosystem sustainability within reclaimed landscapes can only be achieved with the re-establishment of biogeochemical processes between reconstructed soils and plants. In this study, we assessed key soil biogeochemical attributes (nutrient availability, organic matter composition, and microbial communities) in reconstructed, novel, anthropogenic ecosystems, covering different reclamation treatments following open-cast mining for oil extraction. We compared the attributes to those present in a range of natural soils representative of mature boreal forest ecosystems in the same area of Northern Alberta. Soil nutrient availability was determined in situ with resin probes, organic matter composition was described with 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and soil microbial community structure was characterized using phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Significant differences among natural ecosystems were apparent in nutrient availability and seemed more related to the dominant tree cover than to soil type. When analyzed together, all natural forests differed significantly from the novel ecosystems, in particular with respect to soil organic matter composition. However, there was some overlap between the reconstructed soils and some of the natural ecosystems in nutrient availability and microbial communities, but not in organic matter characteristics. Hence, our results illustrate the importance of considering the range of natural landscape variability and including several soil biogeochemical attributes when comparing novel, anthropogenic ecosystems to the mature ecosystems that constitute ecological targets.

  16. The Influence of Summer Climate on Avian Community Composition in the Eastern Boreal Forest of Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie-Louise LeBlanc

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relative influence of environmental variables, especially climate, in driving variation in species diversity is becoming increasingly important for the conservation of biodiversity. The objective of this study was to determine to what extent climate can explain the structure and diversity of forest bird communities by sampling bird abundance in homogenous mature spruce stands in the boreal forest of the Québec-Labrador peninsula using variance partitioning techniques. We also quantified the relationship among two climatic gradients, summer temperature and precipitation, and bird species richness, migratory strategy, and spring arrival phenology. For the bird community, climate factors appear to be most important in explaining species distribution and abundance because nearly 15% of the variation in the distribution of the 44 breeding birds selected for the analysis can be explained by climate. The vegetation variables we selected were responsible for a much smaller amount of the explained variation (4%. Breeding season temperature seems to be more important than precipitation in driving variation in bird species diversity at the scale of our analysis. Partial correlation analysis indicated that bird species richness distribution was determined by the temperature gradient, because the number of species increased with increasing breeding season temperature. Similar results were observed between breeding season temperature and the number of residents, short-distance and long-distance migrants, and early and late spring migrants. Our results suggest that the northern and southern range boundaries of species are not equally sensitive to the temperature gradient across the region.

  17. Restoring the Nitrogen Cycle in the Boreal Forest - a Case Study from Northern Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Jacynthe; Grayston, Sue; Prescott, Cindy; Quideau, Sylvie

    2014-05-01

    The Athabasca oil sands deposit, located in the boreal forests of Northern Alberta, is one of the largest single oil deposits in the world. This deposit rests underneath 40,200 square kilometres of land. To date, an area of about 715 square kilometres has been disturbed by oil sands mining activity (Government of Alberta, 2013). Following surface mining, companies have the legal obligation to restore soil-like profiles that can support the previous land capabilities (Powter et al., 2012). Because of its importance for site productivity, re-establishment of the nitrogen cycle between these reconstructed soils and plants is one of the most critical factors required to insure long term sustainability of reclaimed boreal landscape. High nitrogen deposition recorded in the oil sands area combined with the high level of nitrate found in reclaimed soils raised concerns about the possibility of these reclaimed soils being in early stages of N saturation (Laxton et al 2010; Hemsley, 2012), although little evidence of net nitrification in these reclaimed soils suggests the contrary (Laxton et al. 2012). To date, results on the behaviour of the nitrogen cycle in the reclaimed sites are contradictory. A systematic study of the nitrogen cycle, and especially rates of gross mineralization, nitrification and denitrification, is needed. Our research aimed at 1) measuring the gross rates of nitrogen transformations under different vegetation treatments in both reclaimed and naturally-disturbed (fire) sites and 2) characterizing the microbial communities participating in the nitrogen cycle within the same soils. A series of 20 soils, covering different vegetation treatments (plots planted with aspen (Populus tremuloides), spruce (Picea glauca) and grassland) were investigated. Gross nitrogen transformation rates were measured using 15N pool-dilution (Müller et al. 2007). Microbial communities participating in the N-cycle were characterized using qPCR and pyrosequencing. Differences

  18. The influence of boreal forest fires on the global distribution of non-methane hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Lewis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Boreal forest fires are a significant source of chemicals to the atmosphere including numerous non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs. We report airborne measurements of NMHCs, acetone and methanol from > 500 whole air samples collected over Eastern Canada, including interception of several different boreal biomass burning plumes. From these and concurrent measurements of carbon monoxide (CO we derive fire emission ratios for 29 different species relative to the emission of CO. These range from 8.9 ± 3.2 ppt ppb−1 CO for methanol to 0.007 ± 0.004 ppt ppb−1 CO for cyclopentane. The ratios are in good to excellent agreement with recent literature values. Using the GEOS-Chem global 3-D chemical transport model (CTM we show the influence of biomass burning on the global distributions of benzene, toluene, ethene and propene (species considered generally as indicative tracers of anthropogenic activity. Using our derived emission ratios and the GEOS-Chem CTM, we show that biomass burning can be the largest fractional contributor to observed benzene, toluene, ethene and propene in many global locations. The widespread biomass burning contribution to atmospheric benzene, a heavily regulated air pollutant, suggests that pragmatic approaches are needed when setting air quality targets as tailpipe and solvent emissions continue to decline. We subsequently determine the extent to which the 28 Global WMO-GAW stations worldwide are influenced by biomass burning sourced benzene, toluene, ethene and propene when compared to their exposure to anthropogenic emissions.

  19. The Role Of Disturbance In Driving Carbon Dynamics Across The North American Boreal Forest In Recent Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, D. J.; Chen, G.; Stinson, G.; Kurz, W.; McGuire, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high-latitude region may have been responsible for more than half of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is uncertain. Estimates of the current carbon sink in North America's boreal forest region vary widely depending on the measurement or scaling approach used and the budget components considered. Here, we demonstrate results from an updated approach that integrates observational data and inventory-based information on disturbances with process-level representation of ecological dynamics using a terrestrial biogeochemistry model. The integrated approach allows for continental-scale diagnosis of the carbon sink within a simulation framework for attributing the impacts of fire and insect disturbances relative to the major driving forces, including climate, atmospheric chemistry, forest management and land use. The overall results of this approach estimate an approximately 30 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal forests of Canada and Alaska over the first decade of the 21st Century, which represents a significant reduction in the strength of the CO2 sink estimated for previous decades. The recent decline in sink strength suggested by our approach is the combined result of (1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced permafrost thaw and associated increase in soil organic matter decomposition and (2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake

  20. Assessing various drought indicators in representing drought in boreal forests in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Markkanen, T.; Thum, T.; Aurela, M.; Lohila, A.; Mammarella, I.; Hagemann, S.; Aalto, T.

    2015-08-01

    Droughts can impact on forest functioning and production, and even lead to tree mortality. However, drought is an elusive phenomenon that is difficult to quantify and define universally. In this study, we assessed the performance of a set of indicators that have been used to describe drought conditions in the summer months (June, July, August) over a 30 year period (1981-2010) in Finland. Those indicators include the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), the Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), the Soil Moisture Index (SMI) and the Soil Moisture Anomaly (SMA). Herein, regional soil moisture was produced by the land surface model JSBACH. While SPI, SPEI, and SMA show a degree of anomalies from the statistical means over a period, SMI is directly connected to plant available water and closely dependent on soil properties. Moreover, the buffering effect of soil moisture and the associated soil moisture memory can impact on the onset and duration of drought as indicated by the SMI and SMA, whereas SPI and SPEI are directly controlled by meteorological conditions. In particular, we investigated whether the SMI, SMA and SPEI are able to indicate the Extreme Drought affecting Forest health (EDF) in Finland. EDF thresholds for these indicators are suggested, based on the spatially representative statistics of forest health observations in the exceptional dry year 2006. Our results showed that SMI was the best indicator in capturing the spatial extent of forest damage induced by the extreme drought in 2006. In addition, the derived thresholds were applied to those indicators to capture EDF events over the summer months of the 30 year study period. The SPEI and SMA showed more frequent EDF events over the 30 year period, and typically described a higher fraction of influenced area than SMI. In general, the suggested EDF thresholds for those indicators may be used for the indication of EDF events in Finland or other boreal forests areas in the context

  1. Assessing various drought indicators in representing drought in boreal forests in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Gao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Droughts can impact on forest functioning and production, and even lead to tree mortality. However, drought is an elusive phenomenon that is difficult to quantify and define universally. In this study, we assessed the performance of a set of indicators that have been used to describe drought conditions in the summer months (June, July, August over a 30 year period (1981–2010 in Finland. Those indicators include the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI, the Standardized Precipitation–Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI, the Soil Moisture Index (SMI and the Soil Moisture Anomaly (SMA. Herein, regional soil moisture was produced by the land surface model JSBACH. While SPI, SPEI, and SMA show a degree of anomalies from the statistical means over a period, SMI is directly connected to plant available water and closely dependent on soil properties. Moreover, the buffering effect of soil moisture and the associated soil moisture memory can impact on the onset and duration of drought as indicated by the SMI and SMA, whereas SPI and SPEI are directly controlled by meteorological conditions. In particular, we investigated whether the SMI, SMA and SPEI are able to indicate the Extreme Drought affecting Forest health (EDF in Finland. EDF thresholds for these indicators are suggested, based on the spatially representative statistics of forest health observations in the exceptional dry year 2006. Our results showed that SMI was the best indicator in capturing the spatial extent of forest damage induced by the extreme drought in 2006. In addition, the derived thresholds were applied to those indicators to capture EDF events over the summer months of the 30 year study period. The SPEI and SMA showed more frequent EDF events over the 30 year period, and typically described a higher fraction of influenced area than SMI. In general, the suggested EDF thresholds for those indicators may be used for the indication of EDF events in Finland or other boreal forests

  2. Decomposition of soil organic matter from boreal black spruce forest: Environmental and chemical controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickland, K.P.; Neff, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Black spruce forests are a dominant covertype in the boreal forest region, and they inhabit landscapes that span a wide range of hydrologic and thermal conditions. These forests often have large stores of soil organic carbon. Recent increases in temperature at northern latitudes may be stimulating decomposition rates of this soil carbon. It is unclear, however, how changes in environmental conditions influence decomposition in these systems, and if substrate controls of decomposition vary with hydrologic and thermal regime. We addressed these issues by investigating the effects of temperature, moisture, and organic matter chemical characteristics on decomposition of fibric soil horizons from three black spruce forest sites. The sites varied in drainage and permafrost, and included a "Well Drained" site where permafrost was absent, and "Moderately well Drained" and "Poorly Drained" sites where permafrost was present at about 0.5 m depth. Samples collected from each site were incubated at five different moisture contents (2, 25, 50, 75, and 100% saturation) and two different temperatures (10??C and 20??C) in a full factorial design for two months. Organic matter chemistry was analyzed using pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry prior to incubation, and after incubation on soils held at 20??C, 50% saturation. Mean cumulative mineralization, normalized to initial carbon content, ranged from 0.2% to 4.7%, and was dependent on temperature, moisture, and site. The effect of temperature on mineralization was significantly influenced by moisture content, as mineralization was greatest at 20??C and 50-75% saturation. While the relative effects of temperature and moisture were similar for all soils, mineralization rates were significantly greater for samples from the "Well Drained" site compared to the other sites. Variations in the relative abundances of polysaccharide-derivatives and compounds of undetermined source (such as toluene, phenol, 4-methyl phenol, and

  3. The Future of Eurasian Boreal Forests: Ecological Modeling Projections in the Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, D.; Shugart, H.

    2008-12-01

    Ecological modeling is one of the primary methodologies for making predictions on future changes in forested ecosystems such as those occurring in Northern Eurasia and Siberia. In particular, combining ecological modeling with global circulation model simulation outputs is a method in which scientists can forecast the impact of climate change on biodiversity (Thuiller, 2007) as well as the forested landscape. Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) have been designed for specifically this purpose, however, these vegetation models run at large spatial scales and as a result make predictions that are highly uncertain (Purves and Pacala, 2008). In previous papers, we discussed the FAREAST forest gap model and its ability to accurately predict boreal forest dynamics at smaller scales and higher resolution than DGVMs. This presentation investigates the use of the FAREAST gap model, modified for spatial expansion to cover the entire country of Russia, to predict future land cover trends under different warming scenarios. The poster provides the initial framework for the project, as well as some initial results. The collection of input variables needed by FAREAST to model the Russian continent will involve collaboration with the Russian Academy of Sciences (CEPF). Together we have developed a framework in which to amalgamate both original (temperature, precipitation, soil values) parameters as well as new parameters (fire probability, logging probability) into a GIS database that can be integrated with the FAREAST model. This framework will be capable of providing visual and graphical output for interpretation of large model runs. In order to ensure accuracy in FAREAST's ability to simulate the current environment, a run of the model under current-day conditions will be compared to recent remote sensing land cover maps. The GLC2000 land cover classification project (EU JRC) will be the primary validation method with additional validation through other biophysical

  4. Community characteristics of dark coniferous forest on north slope of Changbai Mountain%长白山北坡暗针叶林群落特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝占庆; 吴钢; 邓红兵; 李静; 曹伟

    2000-01-01

    The dark coniferous forest was distributed between 1100m and 1850m in the subalpine of Changbai Mountain,and the distribution pattern of species composition along elevation gradient in dark coniferous forest on north slope was sampled and analyzed in this research.The α and β diversity were used to measure the community diversity of the forests,and community coefficient,which was one kind of β diversity in essence,was used to analyze the similarity of species composition between the communities or plots.Based on these analyses,communities were classified according to Euclidean distance by Ward's method.The results showed that the dominant tree species Picea jezoensis and Abies nephrolepis were distributed nearly over the whole transect,and the companion trees and most of shrubs were found in certain fragments respectively.The total number of species of the plot varied slightly,but species composition among the plots varied greatly along with the elevation variation.This trend reflected the high habitat diversity of this forest zone.The dark coniferous forest could be divided into 2 or 3 types by the classification analysis,and this result was similar to that coming from calculating community coefficient between plots in the same side with different elevations.%长白山北坡的暗针叶林带分布海拔为1100~1850m,在野外调查的基础上,对暗针叶林沿海拔梯度物种组成的分布格局进行了研究.文中用α和β多样性指数来度量森林群落的多样性,用群落系数(本质上是一种β多样性指数)来度量不同群落或样地间的相似性,同时用欧氏距离和Ward法对所有样地进行了聚类分析.研究结果表明主要树种云杉和冷杉在整个暗针叶林带均有分布,而伴生树种和多数灌木出现于一定海拔范围内;沿海拔梯度物种数变化小而物种组成变化大则表明长白山暗针叶林丰富的生境多样性.聚类分析可将长白山暗针叶林分成2或3种类型,这与

  5. Altitudinal vs Latitudinal Climactic Drivers: A Comparison of a Relict Picea and Abies Forest in the Southern Appalachians versus the Hemi-Boreal Transition Zone off Southern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, A.; Lafon, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Identification of biotic and abiotic determinants of tree species range limits is critical for understanding the effects of climate change on species distributions. Upward shifts of species distributions in montane areas have been widely reported but there have been few reports of latitudinal range retractions. Previous studies have indicated that southern latitudinal limits of a species range are dictated by biotic factors such as competition while others have suggested that abiotic factors, such as temperature, dictate these limits. We investigated the potential climatic gradients at the southern latitudinal limit of the Spruce (Picea) and Fir (Abies) species that dominate the Canadian boreal forest community as well as relict boreal forests containing similar species found in the high elevation areas of the Southern Appalachians. Existing research has suggested that relict ecosystems are more sensitive to climate change and can be indicative of future changes at latitudinal range limits. Expanding on this literature, we hypothesized that we would see similar gradients in climatic variables at the southern latitudinal limit of the Canadian boreal forest and those in the relict boreal forests southern Appalachians acting as controlling factors of these species distributions. We used forty years of climate data from weather stations along the southern edge of the boreal forest in the Canadian Shield provinces, species distribution data from the Canadian National Forest Inventory, (CNFI) geospatial data from the National Park Service (NPS), and historical weather data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to perform our analysis. Our results indicate different climate variables act as controls of warm edge range limits of the Canadian boreal forest than those of the relict boreal forest of the southern Appalachians. However, we believe range retractions of the relict forest may be indicative of a more gradual response of similar species

  6. Radionuclide transport along a boreal hill slope - elevated soil water concentrations in riparian forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport of radionuclides from forest ecosystems and out into surface waters is a crucial process for understanding the long-term fate of radionuclides in the boreal landscape. Boreal forests are typically dominated by podzol soils, but the streams draining the forests are often lined by highly organic, often peat-like soils, which the radionuclides must pass through in order to reach the stream. This so-called riparian zone therefore represents a fundamentally different biogeochemical environment than ordinary forest soils, e.g. by exhibiting significantly lower pH and higher concentrations of organic colloids, which significantly can affect the mobility of many radionuclides. Since the riparian zone is the last terrestrial environment that the groundwater is in contact with before it enters the stream, previous research has demonstrated its profound impact on the stream water chemistry. Hence, the riparian soils should also be important for the transport and accumulation of radionuclides. Therefore, soil water was sampled using suction lysimeters installed at different depths along a 22 m long forested hill slope transect in northern Sweden, following the flow pathway of the groundwater from the uphill podzol to the riparian zone near the stream channel. The analyses included a wide range of hydrochemical parameters and many radiologically important elements, e.g. U, Th, Ni, C, Sr, Cs, REEs and Cl. The sampling was repeated ten times throughout a year in order to also capture the temporal variability of the soil water chemistry. The water chemistry of the investigated transect displayed a remarkable change as the groundwater approached the stream channel. Strongly increased concentrations of many elements were observed in the riparian soils. For instance, the concentrations of Th were more than 100 times higher than in the riparian zone than in the uphill forest, suggesting that the riparian zone may be a hotspot for radionuclide accumulation. The reason

  7. Radionuclide transport along a boreal hill slope - elevated soil water concentrations in riparian forest soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidman, Fredrik; Boily, Aasa; Laudon, Hjalmar [Dept. of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 901 83 Umeaa (Sweden); Koehler, Stephan J. [Dept. of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. 7050, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    The transport of radionuclides from forest ecosystems and out into surface waters is a crucial process for understanding the long-term fate of radionuclides in the boreal landscape. Boreal forests are typically dominated by podzol soils, but the streams draining the forests are often lined by highly organic, often peat-like soils, which the radionuclides must pass through in order to reach the stream. This so-called riparian zone therefore represents a fundamentally different biogeochemical environment than ordinary forest soils, e.g. by exhibiting significantly lower pH and higher concentrations of organic colloids, which significantly can affect the mobility of many radionuclides. Since the riparian zone is the last terrestrial environment that the groundwater is in contact with before it enters the stream, previous research has demonstrated its profound impact on the stream water chemistry. Hence, the riparian soils should also be important for the transport and accumulation of radionuclides. Therefore, soil water was sampled using suction lysimeters installed at different depths along a 22 m long forested hill slope transect in northern Sweden, following the flow pathway of the groundwater from the uphill podzol to the riparian zone near the stream channel. The analyses included a wide range of hydrochemical parameters and many radiologically important elements, e.g. U, Th, Ni, C, Sr, Cs, REEs and Cl. The sampling was repeated ten times throughout a year in order to also capture the temporal variability of the soil water chemistry. The water chemistry of the investigated transect displayed a remarkable change as the groundwater approached the stream channel. Strongly increased concentrations of many elements were observed in the riparian soils. For instance, the concentrations of Th were more than 100 times higher than in the riparian zone than in the uphill forest, suggesting that the riparian zone may be a hotspot for radionuclide accumulation. The reason

  8. A boreal invasion in response to climate change? Range shifts and community effects in the borderland between forest and tundra

    OpenAIRE

    Elmhagen, Bodil; Kindberg, Jonas; Hellström, Peter; Angerbjörn, Anders

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that climate warming will allow southern species to advance north and invade northern ecosystems. We review the changes in the Swedish mammal and bird community in boreal forest and alpine tundra since the nineteenth century, as well as suggested drivers of change. Observed changes include (1) range expansion and increased abundance in southern birds, ungulates, and carnivores; (2) range contraction and decline in northern birds and carnivores; and (3) abundance decli...

  9. Drying and substrate concentrations interact to inhibit decomposition of carbon substrates added to combusted Inceptisols from a boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    German, DP; Allison, SD

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Climate change is expected to alter the mechanisms controlling soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization. Under climate change, soil warming and drying could affect the enzymatic mechanisms that control SOM turnover and dependence on substrate concentration. Here, we used a greenhouse climate manipulation in a mature boreal forest soil to test two specific hypotheses: (1) Rates of decomposition decline at lower substrate concentrations, and (2) reducti...

  10. Carbon fractions and stocks in organic layers in boreal forest soils—impacts of climatic and nutritional conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Hilli, S. (Samu)

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The SOM in boreal forests contains non-living heterogeneous components resulting from microbial and chemical transformations of organic debris from plant litter. The major components in the plant biomass all decompose at different rates and therefore, contribute variably to the stable storages of soil C. The aims of the current thesis were 1) to explore how climate, soil fertility and initial litter quality affect the decomposition rate of litter, 2) to study how the different ca...

  11. Carbon input increases microbial nitrogen demand, but not microbial nitrogen mining in boreal forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Birgit; Alaei, Saeed; Bengtson, Per; Bodé, Samuel; Boeckx, Pascal; Schnecker, Jörg; Mayerhofer, Werner; Rütting, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Plant primary production at mid and high latitudes is often limited by low soil N availability. It has been hypothesized that plants can indirectly increase soil N availability via root exudation, i.e., via the release of easily degradable organic compounds such as sugars into the soil. These compounds can stimulate microbial activity and extracellular enzyme synthesis, and thus promote soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition ("priming effect"). Even more, increased C availability in the rhizosphere might specifically stimulate the synthesis of enzymes targeting N-rich polymers such as proteins that store most of the soil N, but are too large for immediate uptake ("N mining"). This effect might be particularly important in boreal forests, where plants often maintain high primary production in spite of low soil N availability. We here tested the hypothesis that increased C availability promotes protein depolymerization, and thus soil N availability. In a laboratory incubation experiment, we added 13C-labeled glucose to a range of soil samples derived from boreal forests across Sweden, and monitored the release of CO2 by C mineralization, distinguishing between CO2 from the added glucose and from the native, unlabeled soil organic C (SOC). Using a set of 15N pool dilution assays, we further measured gross rates of protein depolymerization (the breakdown of proteins into amino acids) and N mineralization (the microbial release of excess N as ammonium). Comparing unamended control samples, we found a high variability in C and N mineralization rates, even when normalized by SOC content. Both C and N mineralization were significantly correlated to SOM C/N ratios, with high C mineralization at high C/N and high N mineralization at low C/N, suggesting that microorganisms adjusted C and N mineralization rates to the C/N ratio of their substrate and released C or N that was in excess. The addition of glucose significantly stimulated the mineralization of native SOC in soils

  12. Form, quantity, and fate of nitrogen inputs along a boreal forest climate transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandenBoer, T. C.; Edwards, K.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The cycling and fate of soil organic matter, a globally significant carbon (C) reservoir, is intimately linked to the availability and form of nitrogen (N). Nitrogen inputs to remote ecosystems from the atmosphere have been accelerated by increases in agricultural fertilizer use, and fossil fuel use. Such inputs may influence the biogeochemistry of high latitude ecosystems where soil organic matter reservoirs are particularly vulnerable to climate change. The Newfoundland and Labrador Boreal Ecosystem Latitudinal Transect (NL-BELT) network has been actively monitoring C and N pools across three watershed regions spanning 47° to 53° N to understand boreal forest ecosystem responses to a warming climate. Litterfall inputs exhibited decreasing stable nitrogen isotope (d15N) values from south to north along the transect (-2, -3, and -6 ‰) and also among litter sources (deciduous > green needles > brown needles). These regional trends in d15N persist in the bryophytic biomass and throughout the soil organic horizons. Litterfall C:N increased from approximately 55 in the south to 75 in the north. In each region, C:N also exhibited consistent patterns between litterfall input types, with C:N of brown needles > deciduous > green needles. Differences between green and brown needle litterfall C:N increased along this climate gradient indicating that trees increased their N-resorption from south to north, perhaps due to increased N-limitation. Two possible phenomena could explain the trends observed: i) atmospheric N-inputs vary in quantity and composition with latitude along the transect; and/or ii) more rapid recycling of N at the most southern site reduces N-limitation relative to cooler regions. Fractionation during long-range transport of atmospheric reactive-N leads to depletion of 15N and subsequent deposition to the NL-BELT regions could explain these observations. The forms and quantities of atmospheric N-inputs are not constrained for the NL-BELT forests and

  13. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Yi, Shuhua [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, CAS; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Liang, Jingjing [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [USGS, Menlo Park, CA; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service

    2012-01-01

    Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ;0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink

  14. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in the Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F.M.; Yi, S.H.; McGuire, A.D.; Johnson, K.D.; Liang, J.; Harden, J.W.; Kasischke, E.S.; Kurz, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ∼0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink

  15. Real and Simulated Waveform Recording LIDAR Data in Boreal Juvenile Forest Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovi, A.; Korpela, I.

    2013-05-01

    Airborne small-footprint LiDAR is replacing field measurements in regional-level forest inventories, but auxiliary field work is still required for the optimal management of young stands. Waveform (WF) recording sensors can provide a more detailed description of the vegetation compared to discrete return (DR) systems. Furthermore, knowing the shape of the signal facilitates comparisons between real data and those obtained with simulation tools. We performed a quantitative validation of a Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) -based LiDAR simulator against real data and used simulations and empirical data to study the WF recording LiDAR for the classification of boreal juvenile forest vegetation. Geometric-optical models of three common species were used as input for the MCRT model. Simulated radiometric and geometric WF features were in good agreement with the real data, and interspecies differences were preserved. We used the simulator to study the effects of sensor parameters on species classification performance. An increase in footprint size improved the classification accuracy up to a certain footprint size, while the emitted pulse width and the WF sampling rate had minor effects. Analyses on empirical data showed small improvement in performance compared to existing studies, when classifying seedling stand vegetation to four operational classes. The results on simulator validation serve as a basis for the future use of simulation models e.g. in LiDAR survey planning or in the simulation of synthetic training data, while the empirical findings clarify the potential of WF LiDAR data in the inventory chain for the operational forest management planning in Finland.

  16. Soil organic matter cycling in novel and natural boreal forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, C. E.; Mercier Quideau, S.

    2013-12-01

    The uplands of the western boreal forest of Canada are characterized by a mosaic of pure and mixed stands of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss). In addition to natural ecosystems, the region is now home to novel ecosystems; i.e., ecosystems composed of reclaimed stands formed from trees planted on constructed anthropogenic soils. To understand potential differences in functioning of these novel ecosystems, we must first better understand the functioning of their natural counterparts. Here we present results on both the characterization and cycling of soil organic matter in novel and natural ecosystems found in the Athabasca oil sands region. Soil organic matter from 42 long term monitoring sites was evaluated for long chain (≥ C21) n-alkane composition. The survey showed that n-alkanes were more concentrated and had distinct signatures in natural compared to novel ecosystems. Mineral soils from reclaimed stands showed a distinct microbial community structure from natural aspen and spruce stands, as was demonstrated using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) as microbial biomarkers following addition of 13C-glucose in a laboratory incubation. Further probing by compound specific analysis of the 13C-enriched PLFAs determined that microbial incorporation of 13C-glucose was different among soils. In a field incubation using 15N labeled aspen litter added to the forest floor of reclaimed, harvested and mature natural aspen stands, the microbial community readily incorporated the tracer and nitrogen was cycled to the above-ground vegetation on all sites. In addition, the amendment of leaf litter to the forest floor also increased soil moisture and soil microbial biomass on both the reclaimed and harvested sites. Utilizing stable isotope tracers in addition to a multi-faceted experimental approach has provided insightful results on the development of soil biogeochemical cycling in novel ecosystems.

  17. Effect of Organic Layer Thickness on Black Spruce Aging Mistakes in Canadian Boreal Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Laamrani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Boreal black spruce (Picea mariana forests are prone to developing thick organic layers (paludification. Black spruce is adapted to this environment by the continuous development of adventitious roots, masking the root collar and making it difficult to age trees. Ring counts above the root collar underestimate age of trees, but the magnitude of age underestimation of trees in relation to organic layer thickness (OLT is unknown. This age underestimation is required to produce appropriate age-correction tools to be used in land resource management. The goal of this study was to assess aging errors that are done with standard ring counts of trees growing in sites with different degrees of paludification (OLT; 0–25 cm, 26–65 cm, >65 cm. Age of 81 trees sampled at three geographical locations was determined by ring counts at ground level and at 1 m height, and real age of trees was determined by cross-dating growth rings down to the root collar (root/shoot interface. Ring counts at 1 m height underestimated age of trees by a mean of 22 years (range 13–49 and 52 years (range 14–112 in null to low vs. moderately to highly paludified stands, respectively. The percentage of aging-error explained by our linear model was relatively high (R2adj = 0.71 and showed that OLT class and age at 0-m could be used to predict total aging-error while neither DBH nor geographic location could. The resulting model has important implications for forest management to accurately estimate productivity of these forests.

  18. Fractionation of U, Th, Ra and Pb from boreal forest soils by sequential extractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A five-step sequential extraction was performed to boreal forest soil samples. • Extractions gave information about mobility and sorption of natural radionuclides. • Fractionation of U, Th, Pb and Ra varied between the sample depth and grain size. • U, Pb and Fe fractionation suggested more reducing conditions in the subsoil samples. • Ra was the only radionuclide that could be regarded as mobile. - Abstract: To determine the mobility of natural radionuclides in boreal forest soil, a five-step sequential extraction procedure was carried out on soil samples taken from various depths down to 3 m on Olkiluoto Island, Finland, where there are plans to construct a spent nuclear fuel disposal repository in the bedrock. The extracted fractions studied were exchangeable, acid-soluble, reducible, oxidizable and tightly bound. It was found that the extractability of most of the radionuclides studied was dependent on the sample grain size and depth. All the elements were concentrated in the smallest grain size samples (<0.063 mm). The extraction behaviour of Th, however, did not vary with sample depth, and only about 10% of the Th was extracted by the time of the final extraction step. Stable Pb and 210Pb, as well as Ba and Ra concentrations were strongly correlated in the extractions. Radium and Ba were leached more readily than the other elements; approximately 17% of the total Ra was found in the first fraction extracted, representing exchangeable ions. Uranium was more mobile in the topsoil horizons than in the lower horizons. In the topsoil samples, an average of 51% of the extractable U was leached in the second extraction step, representing the elements soluble in weak acids, whereas only 13% of the U in the subsoil samples was extracted in this step. This is probably due to changes in soil redox conditions lower down the soil profile. The extraction behaviour of Pb and Fe also suggests the presence of more reducing conditions in the deeper soil

  19. The oxidation capacity of the boreal forest: first simulated reactivities of O3 and NO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mogensen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the 1D atmospheric chemistry–transport model SOSAA, we have investigated the atmospheric reactivity of a boreal forest ecosystem during the HUMPPA-COPEC-10 campaign (summer 2010, at SMEAR II in Southern Finland. For the very first time, we present vertically resolved model simulations of the NO3- and O3-reactivity (R together with the modelled and measured reactivity of OH. We find that OH is the most reactive oxidant (R~3 s−1 followed by NO3 (R~0.07 s−1 and O3 (R~2 × 10−5 s−1. The missing OH-reactivity was found to be large in accordance with measurements (~65% as would be expected from the chemical subset described in the model. The accounted OH radical sinks were inorganic compounds (~41%, mainly due to reaction with CO, emitted monoterpenes (~14% and oxidised biogenic volatile organic compounds (~44%. The missing reactivity is expected to be due to unknown biogenic volatile organic compounds and their photoproducts, indicating that the true main sink of OH is not expected to be inorganic compounds. The NO3 radical was found to react mainly with primary emitted monoterpenes (~60% and inorganic compounds (~37%, including NO2. NO2 is, however, only a temporary sink of NO3 under the conditions of the campaign and does not affect the NO3 concentration. We discuss the difference between instantaneous and steady state reactivity and present the first boreal forest steady state lifetime of NO3 (113 s. O3 almost exclusively reacts with inorganic compounds (~91%, mainly NO, but also NO2 during night and less with primary emitted sesquiterpenes (~6% and monoterpenes (~3%. When considering the concentration of the oxidants investigated, we find that O3 is the oxidant that is capable of removing pollutants fastest. As part of this study, we developed a simple empirical parameterisation for conversion of measured spectral irradiance into actinic flux. Further, the meteorological conditions were evaluated using radiosonde observations and

  20. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by NMR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Finessi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1 and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS were employed to measure on-line concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions.

    The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls. Such component, contributing on average 50% of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated with the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA, based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from laboratory experiments of

  1. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finessi, E.; Decesari, S.; Paglione, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Gilardoni, S.; Fuzzi, S.; Saarikoski, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Hillamo, R.; Allan, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Tiitta, P.; Laaksonen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Facchini, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA) in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1) and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS) were employed to measure on-line concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions. The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls). Such component, contributing on average 50% of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated with the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA), based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from laboratory experiments of terpenes photo-oxidation. The second NMR

  2. Tracking changes of forest carbon density following mega-fires: comparison studies in the Yellowstone National Park and Boreal Forests of Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Huang, Chengquan; Huang, Chao; He, Hong; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires and post-fire management directly change C stored in biomass and soil pools, and can have indirect impacts on long-term C balance. Two mega fires occurred in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and the boreal forests of Northeast China in 1988 and 1987, respectively, making them ideal sites to examine and compare the effects of management and disturbances on regional carbon dynamics. In this study, we quantified effects of the 1988 Yellowstone fires on YNP carbon storages and fluxes. And then we tracked and modeled post-1988 forest carbon stocks change in YNP, and compared with simulation results of carbon stock changes in post-1987 fire boreal forests of Northeast China. Preliminary results show that in YNP, the mega fires in 1988 were responsible for an immediate loss of 900 g/m2 ecosystem average C density and it would take about a decade before the YNP ecosystem recover to the pre-fire average C condition. In boreal forests of Northeast China, fire reduced aboveground and belowground carbon by 230±60 g/m2 and 460±340 g/m2, respectively.

  3. 3D simulation of boreal forests: structure and dynamics in complex terrain and in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhnik, Ksenia; Shugart, Herman H.

    2015-10-01

    To understand how the Siberian boreal forests may respond to near-future climate change, we employed a modeling approach and examined thresholds for significant and irreversible changes in forest structure and composition that are likely to be reached by mid-21st century. We applied the new spatially-explicit gap-dynamics model SIBBORK toward the understanding of how transition zones, namely treelines, which are notoriously undersampled and difficult to model, may change in the near future. We found that a 2 °C change in annual average air temperature significantly altered the structure, composition, and productivity of boreal forests stands both in the northern and the southern treeline ecotones. Treeline migration occurs at smaller temperature changes. Based on the current (1990-2014) observed warming trends, a 2 °C increase in annual average temperature compared to historical climate (1961-1990) is likely to be experienced at the northern treeline by 2040 and at the southern treeline by 2050. With regards to the forest biome, the most significant warming to date has been predicted and observed in Siberia. A 2 °C increase in annual average temperature compared to the second half of the 19th century is smaller than the predictions of even the most conservative RCP2.6 climate change scenario (IPCC 2013), and has previously been assumed to not likely result in dramatic changes to ecosystems or biome shifts. We show that at a +2 °C change, biome shifts from forest to steppe are likely to occur across a large area in southern Siberia. These changes in land cover will inevitably result in changes in the biodiversity, carbon storage, and the ecosystem services provided by the boreal forests of southern Siberia.

  4. Natural disturbance impacts on ecosystem services and biodiversity in temperate and boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Dominik; Seidl, Rupert

    2016-08-01

    In many parts of the world forest disturbance regimes have intensified recently, and future climatic changes are expected to amplify this development further in the coming decades. These changes are increasingly challenging the main objectives of forest ecosystem management, which are to provide ecosystem services sustainably to society and maintain the biological diversity of forests. Yet a comprehensive understanding of how disturbances affect these primary goals of ecosystem management is still lacking. We conducted a global literature review on the impact of three of the most important disturbance agents (fire, wind, and bark beetles) on 13 different ecosystem services and three indicators of biodiversity in forests of the boreal, cool- and warm-temperate biomes. Our objectives were to (i) synthesize the effect of natural disturbances on a wide range of possible objectives of forest management, and (ii) investigate standardized effect sizes of disturbance for selected indicators via a quantitative meta-analysis. We screened a total of 1958 disturbance studies published between 1981 and 2013, and reviewed 478 in detail. We first investigated the overall effect of disturbances on individual ecosystem services and indicators of biodiversity by means of independence tests, and subsequently examined the effect size of disturbances on indicators of carbon storage and biodiversity by means of regression analysis. Additionally, we investigated the effect of commonly used approaches of disturbance management, i.e. salvage logging and prescribed burning. We found that disturbance impacts on ecosystem services are generally negative, an effect that was supported for all categories of ecosystem services, i.e. supporting, provisioning, regulating, and cultural services (P paradox', documenting that disturbances can put ecosystem services at risk while simultaneously facilitating biodiversity. A detailed investigation of disturbance effect sizes on carbon storage and

  5. Forest Crown Cover Estimation in Northern Boreal and Temperate European Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirro, Laura; Hame, Tuomas; Ahola, Heikki; Lonnqvist, Anne

    2012-04-01

    A method for forest crown cover estimation using high resolution optical earth observation data was developed and tested at four study sites in Europe. Crown cover was estimated using the probability estimation method of VTT and Image2006 data. The accuracy of the crown cover predictions was assessed using reference data that were collected by visual interpretation of very high resolution aerial and space borne imagery. The average crown cover values in the reference data varied from 17 % to 86 % and in the predictions from 18 % to 80 %. The absolute root mean square error of the crown cover predictions varied between 14 % and 33 %. The results of the study showed that it is possible to map forest crown cover with twenty to thirty meter spatial resolution optical earth observation data using the single pixel values. However, understanding the variable results at different sites requires further investigation.

  6. Duration of fuels reduction following prescribed fire in coniferous forests of U.S. national parks in California and the Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Lalemand, Laura; Keifer, MaryBeth; Kane, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Prescribed fire is a widely used forest management tool, yet the long-term effectiveness of prescribed fire in reducing fuels and fire hazards in many vegetation types is not well documented. We assessed the magnitude and duration of reductions in surface fuels and modeled fire hazards in coniferous forests across nine U.S. national parks in California and the Colorado Plateau. We used observations from a prescribed fire effects monitoring program that feature standard forest and surface fuels inventories conducted pre-fire, immediately following an initial (first-entry) prescribed fire and at varying intervals up to >20 years post-fire. A subset of these plots was subjected to prescribed fire again (second-entry) with continued monitoring. Prescribed fire effects were highly variable among plots, but we found on average first-entry fires resulted in a significant post-fire reduction in surface fuels, with litter and duff fuels not returning to pre-fire levels over the length of our observations. Fine and coarse woody fuels often took a decade or longer to return to pre-fire levels. For second-entry fires we found continued fuels reductions, without strong evidence of fuel loads returning to levels observed immediately prior to second-entry fire. Following both first- and second-entry fire there were increases in estimated canopy base heights, along with reductions in estimated canopy bulk density and modeled flame lengths. We did not find evidence of return to pre-fire conditions during our observation intervals for these measures of fire hazard. Our results show that prescribed fire can be a valuable tool to reduce fire hazards and, depending on forest conditions and the measurement used, reductions in fire hazard can last for decades. Second-entry prescribed fire appeared to reinforce the reduction in fuels and fire hazard from first-entry fires.

  7. Use of 15N-labelled nitrogen deposition to quantify the source of nitrogen in runoff at a coniferous-forested catchment at Gardsjoen, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the source of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (N) in runoff, approx. 35 kg N enriched with the stable isotope 15N (2110 per mille δ15N) was added to a mature coniferous forested catchment for one whole year. The total N input was approx. 50 kg ha-1 year-1. The enrichment study was part of a long-term whole-catchment ammonium nitrate addition experiment at Gardsjoen, Sweden. The 15N concentrations in precipitation, throughfall, runoff and upper forest floor were measured prior to, during, and 3-9 years following the 15N addition. During the year of the 15N addition the δ15N level in runoff largely reflected the level in incoming N, indicating that the leached NO3- came predominantly from precipitation. Only 1.1% of the incoming N was lost during the year of the tracer addition. The cumulative loss of tracer N over a 10-year period was only 3.9% as DIN and 1.1% as DON. - 15N tracer addition showed that initially the main source of NO3- in runoff was N from atmospheric deposition

  8. Ectomycorrhizal-dominated boreal and tropical forests have distinct fungal communities, but analogous spatial patterns across soil horizons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista L McGuire

    Full Text Available Fungi regulate key nutrient cycling processes in many forest ecosystems, but their diversity and distribution within and across ecosystems are poorly understood. Here, we examine the spatial distribution of fungi across a boreal and tropical ecosystem, focusing on ectomycorrhizal fungi. We analyzed fungal community composition across litter (organic horizons and underlying soil horizons (0-20 cm using 454 pyrosequencing and clone library sequencing. In both forests, we found significant clustering of fungal communities by site and soil horizons with analogous patterns detected by both sequencing technologies. Free-living saprotrophic fungi dominated the recently-shed leaf litter and ectomycorrhizal fungi dominated the underlying soil horizons. This vertical pattern of fungal segregation has also been found in temperate and European boreal forests, suggesting that these results apply broadly to ectomycorrhizal-dominated systems, including tropical rain forests. Since ectomycorrhizal and free-living saprotrophic fungi have different influences on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, information on the spatial distribution of these functional groups will improve our understanding of forest nutrient cycling.

  9. Impact of Forest Harvesting on Trophic Structure of Eastern Canadian Boreal Shield Lakes: Insights from Stable Isotope Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaz, Patricia; Sirois, Pascal; Archambault, Philippe; Nozais, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Perturbations on ecosystems can have profound immediate effects and can, accordingly, greatly alter the natural community. Land-use such as forestry activities in the Canadian Boreal region have increased in the last decades, raising concerns about their potential impact on aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of forest harvesting on trophic structure in eastern Canadian Boreal Shield lakes. We measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes values for aquatic primary producers, terrestrial detritus, benthic macroinvertebrates, zooplankton and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) over a three-year period in eight eastern Boreal Shield lakes. Four lakes were studied before, one and two years after forest harvesting (perturbed lakes) and compared with four undisturbed reference lakes (unperturbed lakes) sampled at the same time. Stable isotope mixing models showed leaf-litter to be the main food source for benthic primary consumers in both perturbed and unperturbed lakes, suggesting no logging impact on allochthonous subsidies to the littoral food web. Brook trout derived their food mainly from benthic predatory macroinvertebrates in unperturbed lakes. However, in perturbed lakes one year after harvesting, zooplankton appeared to be the main contributor to brook trout diet. This change in brook trout diet was mitigated two years after harvesting. Size-related diet shift were also observed for brook trout, indicating a diet shift related to size. Our study suggests that carbon from terrestrial habitat may be a significant contribution to the food web of oligotrophic Canadian Boreal Shield lakes. Forest harvesting did not have an impact on the diet of benthic primary consumers. On the other hand, brook trout diet composition was affected by logging with greater zooplankton contribution in perturbed lakes, possibly induced by darker-colored environment in these lakes one year after logging. PMID:24763366

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Burned Area Datasets in Canadian Boreal Forest in 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Casillas, Laia; Moreno-Ruiz, José Andrés

    2013-01-01

    The turn of the new millennium was accompanied by a particularly diverse group of burned area datasets from different sensors in the Canadian boreal forests, brought together in a year of low global fire activity. This paper provides an assessment of spatial and temporal accuracy, by means of a fire-by-fire comparison of the following: two burned area datasets obtained from SPOT-VEGETATION (VGT) imagery, a MODIS Collection 5 burned area dataset, and three different datasets obtained from NOAA-AVHRR. Results showed that burned area data from MODIS provided accurate dates of burn but great omission error, partially caused by calibration problems. One of the VGT-derived datasets (L3JRC) represented the largest number of fire sites in spite of its great overall underestimation, whereas the GBA2000 dataset achieved the best burned area quantification, both showing delayed and very variable fire timing. Spatial accuracy was comparable between the 5 km and the 1 km AVHRR-derived datasets but was remarkably lower in the 8 km dataset leading, us to conclude that at higher spatial resolutions, temporal accuracy was lower. The probable methodological and contextual causes of these differences were analyzed in detail. PMID:23818817

  11. Mountain pine beetle host-range expansion threatens the boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullingham, Catherine I; Cooke, Janice E K; Dang, Sophie; Davis, Corey S; Cooke, Barry J; Coltman, David W

    2011-05-01

    The current epidemic of the mountain pine beetle (MPB), an indigenous pest of western North American pine, has resulted in significant losses of lodgepole pine. The leading edge has reached Alberta where forest composition shifts from lodgepole to jack pine through a hybrid zone. The susceptibility of jack pine to MPB is a major concern, but there has been no evidence of host-range expansion, in part due to the difficulty in distinguishing the parentals and their hybrids. We tested the utility of a panel of microsatellite loci optimized for both species to classify lodgepole pine, jack pine and their hybrids using simulated data. We were able to accurately classify simulated individuals, and hence applied these markers to identify the ancestry of attacked trees. Here we show for the first time successful MPB attack in natural jack pine stands at the leading edge of the epidemic. This once unsuitable habitat is now a novel environment for MPB to exploit, a potential risk which could be exacerbated by further climate change. The consequences of host-range expansion for the vast boreal ecosystem could be significant. PMID:21457381

  12. Direct radiative feedback due to biogenic secondary organic aerosol estimated from boreal forest site observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihavainen, H.; Asmi, E.; Aaltonen, V.; Makkonen, U.; Kerminen, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) originating from the emissions of volatile organic compounds from terrestrial vegetation constitutes an important part of the natural aerosol system. According to large-scale model simulations, the direct and indirect radiative effects of the BSOA are potentially large, yet poorly quantified. We used more than 5 years of continuous aerosol measurements to estimate the direct radiative feedback associated with the formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosol at a remote continental site at the edge of the boreal forest zone in Northern Finland. Our upper-limit estimate for this feedback during the summer period (ambient temperatures above 10 °C) was -97±66 mW m-2 K-1 (mean ± STD) when using measurements of the aerosol optical depth (fAOD) and -63±40 mW m-2 K-1 when using measurements of the "dry" aerosol scattering coefficient at the ground level (fσ). Here STD represents the variability in f caused by the observed variability in the quantities used to derive the value of f. Compared with our measurement site, the magnitude of this direct radiative feedback is expected to be larger in warmer continental regions with more abundant biogenic emissions, and even larger in regions where biogenic emissions are mixed with anthropogenic pollution.

  13. Direct radiative feedback due to biogenic secondary organic aerosol estimated from boreal forest site observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used more than five years of continuous aerosol measurements to estimate the direct radiative feedback parameter associated with the formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) at a remote continental site at the edge of the boreal forest zone in Northern Finland. Our upper-limit estimate for this feedback parameter during the summer period (ambient temperatures above 10 °C) was −97 ± 66 mW m−2 K−1 (mean ± STD) when using measurements of the aerosol optical depth (fAOD) and −63 ± 40 mW m−2 K−1 when using measurements of the ‘dry’ aerosol scattering coefficient at the ground level (fσ). Here STD represents the variability in f caused by the observed variability in the quantities used to derive the value of f. Compared with our measurement site, the magnitude of the direct radiative feedback associated with BSOA is expected to be larger in warmer continental regions with more abundant biogenic emissions, and even larger in regions where biogenic emissions are mixed with anthropogenic pollution. (letter)

  14. Responses of the circumpolar boreal forest to 20th century climate variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined relationships between tree ring-width and climate at 232 sites around the circumpolar boreal forest to explore variability in two types of response to temperature: a browning response characterized by inverse correlations between growth and temperature, and a greening response characterized by positive correlations between growth and temperature. We used moving-window correlation analysis for eight 30-year time windows, lagged by 10 years, to characterize the climate response at each site from 1902 to 2002. Inverse growth responses to temperature were widespread, occurring in all species, all time periods, and in nearly all geographic areas. The frequency of the browning response increased after 1942, while the frequency of the greening response declined. Browning was concentrated in five species (Picea abies, Picea glauca, Picea mariana, Picea obovata and Pinus banksiana), and occurred more frequently in the warmer parts of species' ranges, suggesting that direct temperature stress might be a factor. In some species, dry sites were also more likely to experience browning; moisture stress might thus be an additional explanation in some cases. As inverse responses to temperature are widespread, and occur in a broad array of species, there is unlikely to be any single explanation for their occurrence

  15. Ion production rate in a boreal forest based on ion, particle and radiation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Laakso

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the ion production rates in a boreal forest were studied based on two different methods: 1 cluster ion and particle concentration measurements, 2 external radiation and radon concentration measurements. Both methods produced reasonable estimates for ion production rates. The average ion production rate calculated from aerosol particle size distribution and air ion mobility distribution measurements was 2.6 ion pairs cm-3s-1, and based on external radiation and radon measurements, 4.5 ion pairs cm-3s-1. The first method based on ion and particle measurements gave lower values for the ion production rates especially during the day. A possible reason for this is that particle measurements started only from 3nm, so the sink of small ions during the nucleation events was underestimated. It may also be possible that the hygroscopic growth factors of aerosol particles were underestimated. Another reason for the discrepancy is the nucleation mechanism itself. If the ions are somehow present in the nucleation process, there could have been an additional ion sink during the nucleation days.

  16. Ion production rate in a boreal forest based on ion, particle and radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, L.; Petäjä, T.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.; Paatero, J.; Hõrrak, U.; Tammet, H.; Joutsensaari, J.

    2004-09-01

    In this study the ion production rates in a boreal forest were studied based on two different methods: 1) cluster ion and particle concentration measurements, 2) external radiation and radon concentration measurements. Both methods produced reasonable estimates for ion production rates. The average ion production rate calculated from aerosol particle size distribution and air ion mobility distribution measurements was 2.6 ion pairs cm-3s-1, and based on external radiation and radon measurements, 4.5 ion pairs cm-3s-1. The first method based on ion and particle measurements gave lower values for the ion production rates especially during the day. A possible reason for this is that particle measurements started only from 3nm, so the sink of small ions during the nucleation events was underestimated. It may also be possible that the hygroscopic growth factors of aerosol particles were underestimated. Another reason for the discrepancy is the nucleation mechanism itself. If the ions are somehow present in the nucleation process, there could have been an additional ion sink during the nucleation days.

  17. Ion production rate in a boreal forest based on ion, particle and radiation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Laakso

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study the ion production rates in a boreal forest are studied based on two different methods: 1 cluster ion and particle concentration measurements, 2 external radiation and radon concentration measurements. Both methods produce reasonable estimates for ion production rates. The average ion production rate calculated from aerosol particle size distribution and air ion mobility distribution measurements was 2.6 cm−3s−1 and based on external radiation and radon measurements 4.5 cm−3s−1. The first method based on ion and particle measurements gave lower values for the ion production rates especially during the day. A possible reason for this is that particle measurements started only from 3 nm, so the sink of small ions during the nucleation events was underestimated. Another reason is that the possible fogs, which caused an extra sink of small ions are not taken into account in the calculations. It may also be possible that the hygroscopic growth factors of aerosol particles were underestimated. A fourth possible reason for the discrepancy is the nucleation mechanism itself. If the ions were somehow present in the nucleation process, there could have been an additional ion sink during the nucleation days. On the other hand, not all the radiation energy is converted to ions and the possible effect of alpha recoil is also omitted.

  18. Seasonal variation of CCN concentrations and aerosol activation properties in boreal forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-L. Sihto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available As a part of EUCAARI activities, the annual cycle of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations and critical diameter for cloud droplet activation as a function of supersaturation were measured using a CCN counter and a HTDMA (hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer at SMEAR II station, Hyytiälä, Finland. The critical diameters for CCN activation were estimated from (i the measured CCN concentration and particle size distribution data, and (ii the hygroscopic growth factors by applying κ-Köhler theory, in both cases assuming an internally mixed aerosol. The critical diameters derived by these two methods were in good agreement with each other. The effect of new particle formation on the diurnal variation of CCN concentration and critical diameters was studied. New particle formation was observed to increase the CCN concentrations by 70–110%, depending on the supersaturation level. The average value for the κ-parameter determined from hygroscopicity measurements was κ = 0.18 and it predicted well the CCN activation in boreal forest conditions in Hyytiälä. The derived critical diameters and κ-parameter confirm earlier findings with other methods, that aerosol particles at CCN sizes in Hyytiälä are mostly organic, but contain also more hygrosopic, probably inorganic salts like ammonium sulphate, making the particles more CCN active than pure secondary organic aerosol.

  19. Mechanisms of Action of Indigenous Antidiabetic Plants from the Boreal Forest of Northeastern Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda M. Eid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous populations in Canada possess a wealth of native traditional knowledge. However, their rates of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, a disease that was unheard of in their midst 50 years ago, are the highest in the country. In an effort to cut the impact of T2DM epidemic on Indigenous health, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research funded the “CIHR Team in Aboriginal Antidiabetic Medicines (CIHR-TAAM.” The goal was to explore Boreal forest medicinal plants stemming from Indigenous Traditional Medicine to be included in T2DM care. Six out of nine communities of the Cree of Eeyou Istchee (CEI participated in ethnobotanical studies that resulted in the identification of 17 potential antidiabetic plant species. These species were screened for antidiabetic activities using a platform of in vitro bioassays and in vivo models of T2DM. This paper summarizes results on the 10 most promising plant species, their active constituents, and the mechanisms behind their antidiabetic activities. In addition, potential herb-drug interactions were examined at the level of drug-metabolizing enzymes, notably the cytochrome P450 family. This review serves as a canvas onto which is discussed the value of Indigenous medicinal plants, future avenues of research, and the ethical approach required in this field.

  20. Gas concentration driven fluxes of nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide in boreal forest soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes were measured in a boreal forest during two growing seasons with soil gradient and chamber methods. N2O fluxes obtained by these two techniques varied from small emission to small uptake. N2O fluxes were of the same order of magnitude, however, the fluxes measured by the soil gradient method were higher and more variable than the fluxes measured with chambers. The highest soil gradient N2O fluxes were measured in the late summer and the lowest in the autumn and spring. In the autumn, litter fall induced a peak in N2O concentration in the organic O-horizon, whereas in the spring N2O was consumed in the O-horizon. Overall, the uppermost soil layer was responsible for most of the N2O production and consumption. Soil gradient and chamber methods agreed well with CO2 fluxes. Due to the very small N2O fluxes and the sensitivity of the flux to small concentration difference between the soil and the ambient air, the flux calculations from the O-horizon to the atmosphere were considered unreliable. N2O fluxes calculated between the soil A- and O-horizons agreed relatively well with the chamber measurements

  1. A large herbivore triggers alternative successional trajectories in the boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, Bert; Tremblay, Jean-Pierre; Côté, Steeve D

    2013-12-01

    Alternative successional trajectories (AST) may result in multiple climax states within an ecosystem when disturbances affect colonization history. In the boreal forest, ungulates have been proposed to drive AST because, under herbivore pressure, preferred species may go extinct and apparent competition may benefit browsing-resistant species. Over a 15-year period following logging, we tested whether deer herbivory altered plant species composition and whether the competitive advantage of resistant species was maintained following herbivore removal. We compared exclosures built immediately after logging with delayed exclosures built eight years later on Anticosti Island, Quebec, Canada. Although the palatable tree Betula papyrifera (paper birch) and some palatable herbs recovered in delayed exclosures, we observed legacies in both tree and herb cover. Woody regeneration in delayed exclosures was dominated by Picea glauca (white spruce), and Poaceae (grasses) were abundant in the field layer. Given that only early-successional species recovered, whereas late-successional broadleaf species and Abies balsamea (balsam fir) remained rare, succession may follow an AST after a limited browsing period during early succession. PMID:24597230

  2. Size-mediated tree transpiration along soil drainage gradients in a boreal black spruce forest wildfire chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstmann, J L; Ewers, B E; Kwon, H

    2012-05-01

    Boreal forests are crucial to climate change predictions because of their large land area and ability to sequester and store carbon, which is controlled by water availability. Heterogeneity of these forests is predicted to increase with climate change through more frequent wildfires, warmer, longer growing seasons and potential drainage of forested wetlands. This study aims at quantifying controls over tree transpiration with drainage condition, stand age and species in a central Canadian black spruce boreal forest. Heat dissipation sensors were installed in 2007 and data were collected through 2008 on 118 trees (69 Picea mariana (Mill.) Britton, Sterns & Poggenb. (black spruce), 25 Populus tremuloides Michx. (trembling aspen), 19 Pinus banksiana Lamb. (jack pine), 3 Larix laricina (Du Roi) K. Koch (tamarack) and 2 Salix spp. (willow)) at four stand ages (18, 43, 77 and 157 years old) each containing a well- and poorly-drained stand. Transpiration estimates from sap flux were expressed per unit xylem area, J(S), per unit ground area, E(C) and per unit leaf area, E(L), using sapwood (A(S)) and leaf (A(L)) area calculated from stand- and species-specific allometry. Soil drainage differences in transpiration were variable; only the 43- and 157-year-old poorly-drained stands had ∼ 50% higher total stand E(C) than well-drained locations. Total stand E(C) tended to decrease with stand age after an initial increase between the 18- and 43-year-old stands. Soil drainage differences in transpiration were controlled primarily by short-term physiological drivers such as vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture whereas stand age differences were controlled by successional species shifts and changes in tree size (i.e., A(S)). Future predictions of boreal climate change must include stand age, species and soil drainage heterogeneity to avoid biased estimates of forest water loss and latent energy exchanges. PMID:22539635

  3. The Influence of Pyrogenic, Biogenic and Anthropogenic Emissions on Ozone Production Downwind from Boreal Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Douglas; Palmer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forest fires emit pollutants that can have a strong influence on downwind surface ozone concentrations, with potential implications for exceeding air quality regulations. The influence of the mixing of pyrogenic, biogenic and anthropogenic emissions on ozone is not well understood. Using the nested 0.5° latitude x 0.667° longitude GEOS-Chem chemical transport model we track biomass burning plumes in North America. We identify the changes in key chemical reactions within these plumes as well as the sensitivity of ozone to the different emission sources. We illustrate the importance of this method using a case study of a multi-day forest fire during the BORTAS aircraft campaign over eastern Canada during summer 2011. We focus on emissions from the fire on the 17th of July and follow the plume for eight days. After the initial 24 hours of pyrogenic emissions the main source of VOCs is biogenic with increasing e