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Sample records for bordetella adenylate cyclase

  1. Monospecific antibody against Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase protects from Pertussis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Faiz Kazi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Acellular pertussis vaccines has been largely accepted world-wide however, there are reports about limitedantibody response against these vaccines suggesting that multiple antigens should be included in acellular vaccinesto attain full protection. The aim of present study was to evaluate the role of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase as aprotective antigen.Materials and methods: Highly mono-specific antibody against adenylate cyclase (AC was raised in rabbits usingnitrocellulose bound adenylate cyclase and the specificity was assessed by immuoblotting. B.pertussis 18-323, wasincubated with the mono-specific serum and without serum as a control. Mice were challenged intra-nasally and pathophysiolgicalresponses were recorded.Results: The production of B.pertussis adenylate cyclase monospecific antibody that successfully recognized on immunoblotand gave protection against fatality (p< 0.01 and lung consolidation (p <0.01. Mouse weight gain showedsignificant difference (p< 0.05.Conclusion: These preliminary results highlight the role of the B.pertussis adenylate cyclase as a potential pertussisvaccine candidate. B.pertussis AC exhibited significant protection against pertussis in murine model. J Microbiol InfectDis 2012; 2(2: 36-43Key words: Pertussis; monospecific; antibody; passive-protection

  2. Third Acivity of Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase (AC) Toxin-Hemolysin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fišer, Radovan; Mašín, Jiří; Basler, Marek; Krůšek, Jan; Špuláková, V.; Konopásek, Ivo; Šebo, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 282, č. 5 (2007), s. 2808-2820 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA AV ČR IAA5020406 Grant - others:XE(XE) LSHB-CT-2003-503582; Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 146/2005/B-BIO Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : bordetella * adenylate cyclase toxin * enzymatic aktivity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.581, year: 2007

  3. Adenyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppe, D; Steer, M L

    1978-02-01

    Certain hormones regulate the activity of their target cells by stimulating adenyl cyclase, which is an enzyme located within the target cell's plasma membrane. Adenyl cyclase catalyzes the formation of cyclic AMP, which is released into the cell and modulates cell functions. In this communication the characteristics of adenyl cyclase are reviewed. The coupling between hormone receptors and this enzyme is discussed as is the ability of agents such as hormones, ATP, magnesium, calcium, guanine nucleotides and prostaglandins to alter cyclase activity. Several diseases that result from derangements of the adenyl cyclase system are known and the molecular bases for these diseases are discussed in this review.

  4. Structure-Function Relationships Underlying the Capacity of Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin to Disarm Host Phagocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Jakub; Černý, Ondřej; Osičková, Adriana; Linhartová, Irena; Mašín, Jiří; Bumba, Ladislav; Šebo, Peter; Osička, Radim

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 10 (2017), s. 1-28, č. článku 300. E-ISSN 2072-6651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05919S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28126A Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * Bordetella * cAMP Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.030, year: 2016

  5. Segments Crucial for Membrane Translocation and Pore-forming Activity of Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basler, Marek; Knapp, O.; Mašín, Jiří; Fišer, R.; Maier, E.; Benz, R.; Šebo, Peter; Osička, Radim

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 282, č. 17 (2007), s. 12419-12429 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA AV ČR IAA5020406 Grant - others:XE(XE) European Union 6th FP contract LSHB-CT-2003-503582 THERAVAC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : bordetella * adenylate cyclase toxin * ac membrane translocation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.581, year: 2007

  6. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: a swift saboteur of host defense

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtová, Jana; Kamanová, Jana; Šebo, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2006), s. 1-7 ISSN 1369-5274 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020406; GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cyaa * scanning electron microscopy * cyclase toxin Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 7.445, year: 2006

  7. Amidate Prodrugs of 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)Ethyl]Adenine as Inhibitors of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin from Bordetella pertussis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmídková, Markéta; Dvořáková, Alexandra; Tloušťová, Eva; Česnek, Michal; Janeba, Zlatko; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2014), s. 664-671 ISSN 0066-4804 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102015046 Grant - others:OPPC(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Bordetella pertussis * adenylate cyclase toxin * ACT * inhibitors * PMEA * amidate prodrugs Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.476, year: 2014

  8. Site I Inactivation Impacts Calmodulin Calcium Binding and Activation of Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Christian W; Finley, Natosha L

    2017-11-30

    Site I inactivation of calmodulin (CaM) was used to examine the importance of aspartic acid 22 at position 3 in CaM calcium binding, protein folding, and activation of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin domain (CyaA-ACD). NMR calcium titration experiments showed that site I in the CaM mutant (D22A) remained largely unperturbed, while sites II, III, and IV exhibited calcium-induced conformational changes similar to wild-type CaM (CaMWt). Circular dichroism analyses revealed that D22A had comparable α -helical content to CaMWt, and only modest differences in α -helical composition were detected between CaMWt-CyaA-ACD and D22A-CyaA-ACD complexes. However, the thermal stability of the D22A-CyaA-ACD complex was reduced, as compared to the CaMWt-CyaA-ACD complex. Moreover, CaM-dependent activity of CyaA-ACD decreased 87% in the presence of D22A. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that D22A engages CyaA-ACD, likely through C -terminal mediated binding, and that site I inactivation exerts functional effects through the modification of stabilizing interactions that occur between N -terminal CaM and CyaA-ACD.

  9. Bisamidate Prodrugs of 2-Substituted 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir) as Selective Inhibitors of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin from Bordetella pertussis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Česnek, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Šmídková, Markéta; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Dračínský, Martin; Brust, T. F.; Pávek, P.; Trejtnar, F.; Watts, V. J.; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 8 (2015), s. 1351-1364 ISSN 1860-7179 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102015046 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * bisamidates * Bordetella pertussis * nucleosides * phosphonates Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2015

  10. Quantification of potassium levels in cells treated with Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wald, Tomáš; Petry-Podgorska, Inga; Fišer, Radovan; Matoušek, Tomáš; Dědina, Jiří; Osička, Radim; Šebo, Peter; Mašín, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 450, APR 2014 (2014), s. 57-62 ISSN 0003-2697 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/0580; GA ČR GA13-14547S; GA ČR GAP302/12/0460 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:68081715 Keywords : Potassium * Adenylate cyclase toxin * RTX Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.219, year: 2014

  11. Interaction of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin with complement receptor 3 involves multivalent glycan binding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasan, Shakir; Osičková, Adriana; Bumba, Ladislav; Novák, Petr; Šebo, Peter; Osička, Radim

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 589, č. 3 (2015), s. 374-379 ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/0580; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11851S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Adenylate cyclase toxin * CD11b/CD18 * Complement receptor type 3 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.519, year: 2015

  12. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin is a unique ligand of the integrin complement receptor 3

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Osička, Radim; Osičková, Adriana; Hasan, Shakir; Bumba, Ladislav; Černý, Jiří; Šebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, DEC 9 (2015) ISSN 2050-084X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/0580; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11851S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : E. coli * adenylate cyclase toxin * biochemistry Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 8.282, year: 2015

  13. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, Tzvia I.; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh; Finley, Natosha L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates bi-lobal structure of CaM. • The structure and stability of the complex rely on intermolecular associations. • A novel mode of CaM-dependent activation of the adenylate cyclase toxin is proposed. - Abstract: Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (R h ) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken together

  14. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Tzvia I.; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh [Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Finley, Natosha L., E-mail: finleynl@miamioh.edu [Department of Microbiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Cell, Molecular, and Structural Biology Program, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates bi-lobal structure of CaM. • The structure and stability of the complex rely on intermolecular associations. • A novel mode of CaM-dependent activation of the adenylate cyclase toxin is proposed. - Abstract: Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (R{sub h}) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken

  15. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: a unique combination of a pore-forming moiety with a cell-invading adenylate cyclase enzyme

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašín, Jiří; Osička, Radim; Bumba, Ladislav; Šebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 8 (2015) ISSN 2049-632X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/12/0460; GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11851S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * membrane penetration * pore-formation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.483, year: 2015

  16. Amidate prodrugs of 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA) as inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmídková, Markéta; Dvořáková, Alexandra; Tloušťová, Eva; Česnek, Michal; Janeba, Zlatko; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 281, Suppl S1 (2014), s. 729 ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS EMBO 2014 Conference. 30.08.2014-04.09.2014, Paris] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1302; GA MV VG20102015046 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Bordetella pertussis * adenylyl cyclase toxin * inhibitors Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  17. Channel formation in model membranes by the adenylate cyclase toxin of Bordetella pertussis: Effect if Calcium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knapp, O.; Maier, E.; Polleichtner, G.; Mašín, Jiří; Šebo, Peter; Benz, R.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 42, - (2003), s. 8077-8084 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IPP1050128 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : bordetella pertussis * calcium Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.922, year: 2003

  18. Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Disrupts Functional Integrity of Bronchial Epithelial Layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasan, Shakir; Kulkarni, N.N.; Asbjarnarson, A.; Linhartová, Irena; Osička, Radim; Šebo, Peter; Gudmundsson, H.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 3 (2018), č. článku e00445-17. ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28126A; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Bordetella pertussis * airway epithelia * CyaA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.593, year: 2016

  19. Delivery of multiple epitopes by recombinant detoxified adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis induces protective antiviral immunity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fayolle, C.; Osičková, Adriana; Osička, Radim; Henry, T.; Rojas, M. J.; Saron, M. F.; Šebo, Peter; Leclers, C.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 16 (2001), s. 7330-7338 ISSN 0022-538X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/98/0432; GA MŠk ME 167; GA MŠk VS96149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : antiviral immunity * Bordetella pertusis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.622, year: 2001

  20. Exposure to Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin affects integrin-mediated adhesion and mechanics in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angely, Christelle; Nguyen, Ngoc-Minh; Andre Dias, Sofia; Planus, Emmanuelle; Pelle, Gabriel; Louis, Bruno; Filoche, Marcel; Chenal, Alexandre; Ladant, Daniel; Isabey, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin is a major virulent factor of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. CyaA toxin is able to invade eukaryotic cells where it produces high levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) affecting cellular physiology. Whether CyaA toxin can modulate cell matrix adhesion and mechanics of infected cells remains largely unknown. In this study, we use a recently proposed multiple bond force spectroscopy (MFS) with an atomic force microscope to assess the early phase of cell adhesion (maximal detachment and local rupture forces) and cell rigidity (Young's modulus) in alveolar epithelial cells (A549) for toxin exposure 95%) at CyaA concentration of 0.5 nM, but a significant effect (≈81%) at 10 nM. MFS performed on A549 for three different concentrations (0.5, 5 and 10 nM) demonstrates that CyaA toxin significantly affects both cell adhesion (detachment forces are decreased) and cell mechanics (Young's modulus is increased). CyaA toxin (at 0.5 nM) assessed at three indentation/retraction speeds (2, 5 and 10 μm/s) significantly affects global detachment forces, local rupture events and Young modulus compared with control conditions, while an enzymatically inactive variant CyaAE5 has no effect. These results reveal the loading rate dependence of the multiple bonds newly formed between the cell and integrin-specific coated probe as well as the individual bond kinetics which are only slightly affected by the patho-physiological dose of CyaA toxin. Finally, theory of multiple bond force rupture enables us to deduce the bond number N which is reduced by a factor of 2 upon CyaA exposure (N ≈ 6 versus N ≈ 12 in control conditions). MFS measurements demonstrate that adhesion and mechanical properties of A549 are deeply affected by exposure to the CyaA toxin but not to an enzymatically inactive variant. This indicates that the alteration of cell mechanics triggered by CyaA is a consequence of the increase in

  1. Pore formation by the Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin in lipid bilayer membranes: Role of voltage and pH

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knapp, O.; Maier, E.; Mašín, Jiří; Šebo, Peter; Benz, R.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1778, č. 1 (2008), s. 260-269 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5020406 Grant - others:XE(XE) QLK2-CT-1999-00556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * act * voltage Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.180, year: 2008

  2. Cyclic AMP-Elevating Capacity of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin-Hemolysin Is Sufficient for Lung Infection but Not for Full Virulence of Bordetella pertussis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škopová, Karolína; Tomalová, Barbora; Kanchev, Ivan; Rossmann, Pavel; Švédová, Martina; Adkins, Irena; Bíbová, Ilona; Tomala, Jakub; Mašín, Jiří; Guiso, N.; Osička, Radim; Sedláček, Radislav; Kovář, Marek; Šebo, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 6 (2017), s. 1-22, č. článku e00937-16. ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28126A; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-14547S; GA ČR GA13-12885S; GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/12/0460; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015040 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : Bordetella pertussis * adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin * cAMP intoxication Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; EE - Microbiology, Virology (UMG-J) OBOR OECD: Microbiology; Microbiology (UMG-J) Impact factor: 3.593, year: 2016

  3. Invasion of Dendritic Cells, Macrophages and Neutrophils by the Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin: A Subversive Move to Fool Host Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, Giorgio; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Adkins, Irena; Klimova, Nela; Sebo, Peter

    2017-09-21

    Adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) is released in the course of B. pertussis infection in the host's respiratory tract in order to suppress its early innate and subsequent adaptive immune defense. CD11b-expressing dendritic cells (DC), macrophages and neutrophils are professional phagocytes and key players of the innate immune system that provide a first line of defense against invading pathogens. Recent findings revealed the capacity of B. pertussis CyaA to intoxicate DC with high concentrations of 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which ultimately skews the host immune response towards the expansion of Th17 cells and regulatory T cells. CyaA-induced cAMP signaling swiftly incapacitates opsonophagocytosis, oxidative burst and NO-mediated killing of bacteria by neutrophils and macrophages. The subversion of host immune responses by CyaA after delivery into DC, macrophages and neutrophils is the subject of this review.

  4. Invasion of Dendritic Cells, Macrophages and Neutrophils by the Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin: A Subversive Move to Fool Host Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Fedele

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA is released in the course of B. pertussis infection in the host’s respiratory tract in order to suppress its early innate and subsequent adaptive immune defense. CD11b-expressing dendritic cells (DC, macrophages and neutrophils are professional phagocytes and key players of the innate immune system that provide a first line of defense against invading pathogens. Recent findings revealed the capacity of B. pertussis CyaA to intoxicate DC with high concentrations of 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, which ultimately skews the host immune response towards the expansion of Th17 cells and regulatory T cells. CyaA-induced cAMP signaling swiftly incapacitates opsonophagocytosis, oxidative burst and NO-mediated killing of bacteria by neutrophils and macrophages. The subversion of host immune responses by CyaA after delivery into DC, macrophages and neutrophils is the subject of this review.

  5. Pore-Forming and Enzymatic Activities of Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Synergize in Promoting Lysis of Monocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basler, Marek; Mašín, Jiří; Osička, Radim; Šebo, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 5 (2006), s. 2207-2214 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020406; GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : bordetella pertussis * cyaa * cytotoxicity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.004, year: 2006

  6. Adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin relevance for pertussis vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebo, Peter; Osička, Radim; Mašín, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 10 (2014), s. 1215-1227 ISSN 1476-0584 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-14547S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/0580; GA ČR GAP302/12/0460 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * antigen delivery * Bordetella pertussis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.210, year: 2014

  7. Regulation of brain adenylate cyclase by calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis examined the interaction between the Ca 2+ -binding protein, calmodulin (CaM), and the cAMP synthesizing enzyme, adenylate cyclase. The regulation of guanyl nucleotide-dependent adenylate cyclase by CaM was examined in a particulate fraction from bovine striatum. CaM stimulated basal adenylate cyclase activity and enhanced the stimulation of the enzyme by GTP and dopamine (DA). The potentiation of GTP- and DA-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities by CaM was more sensitive to the concentration of CaM than was the stimulation of basal activity. A photoreactive CaM derivative was developed in order to probe the interactions between CaM and the adenylate cyclase components of bovine brain. Iodo-[ 125 I]-CaM-diazopyruvamide ( 125 I-CAM-DAP) behaved like native CaM with respect to Ca 2+ -enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and Ca 2+ -dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase. 125 I-CaM-DAP cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a Ca 2+ -dependent, concentration-dependent, and CaM-specific manner. Photolysis of 125 I-CaM-DAP and forskolin-agarose purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase produced an adduct with a molecular weight of 140,000

  8. Transmembrane segments of complement receptor 3 do not participate in cytotoxic activities but determine receptor structure required for action of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wald, Tomáš; Osičková, Adriana; Mašín, Jiří; Matyska Lišková, Petra; Petry-Podgorska, Inga; Matoušek, Tomáš; Šebo, Peter; Osička, Radim

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 3 (2016), flw008 ISSN 2049-632X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/0580; GA ČR GAP302/12/0460; GA ČR GA13-14547S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:68081715 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * ICP-MS * CD11b/CD18 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation (UIACH-O) Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2016

  9. Bordetella pertussis commits human dendritic cells to promote a Th1/Th17 response through the activity of adenylate cyclase toxin and MAPK-pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Fedele

    Full Text Available The complex pathology of B. pertussis infection is due to multiple virulence factors having disparate effects on different cell types. We focused our investigation on the ability of B. pertussis to modulate host immunity, in particular on the role played by adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA, an important virulence factor of B. pertussis. As a tool, we used human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MDDC, an ex vivo model useful for the evaluation of the regulatory potential of DC on T cell immune responses. The work compared MDDC functions after encounter with wild-type B. pertussis (BpWT or a mutant lacking CyaA (BpCyaA-, or the BpCyaA- strain supplemented with either the fully functional CyaA or a derivative, CyaA*, lacking adenylate cyclase activity. As a first step, MDDC maturation, cytokine production, and modulation of T helper cell polarization were evaluated. As a second step, engagement of Toll-like receptors (TLR 2 and TLR4 by B. pertussis and the signaling events connected to this were analyzed. These approaches allowed us to demonstrate that CyaA expressed by B. pertussis strongly interferes with DC functions, by reducing the expression of phenotypic markers and immunomodulatory cytokines, and blocking IL-12p70 production. B. pertussis-treated MDDC promoted a mixed Th1/Th17 polarization, and the activity of CyaA altered the Th1/Th17 balance, enhancing Th17 and limiting Th1 expansion. We also demonstrated that Th1 effectors are induced by B. pertussis-MDDC in the absence of IL-12p70 through an ERK1/2 dependent mechanism, and that p38 MAPK is essential for MDDC-driven Th17 expansion. The data suggest that CyaA mediates an escape strategy for the bacterium, since it reduces Th1 immunity and increases Th17 responses thought to be responsible, when the response is exacerbated, for enhanced lung inflammation and injury.

  10. Ca2+ influx and tyrosine kinases trigger Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT endocytosis. Cell physiology and expression of the CD11b/CD18 integrin major determinants of the entry route.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kepa B Uribe

    Full Text Available Humans infected with Bordetella pertussis, the whooping cough bacterium, show evidences of impaired host defenses. This pathogenic bacterium produces a unique adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT which enters human phagocytes and catalyzes the unregulated formation of cAMP, hampering important bactericidal functions of these immune cells that eventually cause cell death by apoptosis and/or necrosis. Additionally, ACT permeabilizes cells through pore formation in the target cell membrane. Recently, we demonstrated that ACT is internalised into macrophages together with other membrane components, such as the integrin CD11b/CD18 (CR3, its receptor in these immune cells, and GM1. The goal of this study was to determine whether ACT uptake is restricted to receptor-bearing macrophages or on the contrary may also take place into cells devoid of receptor and gain more insights on the signalling involved. Here, we show that ACT is rapidly eliminated from the cell membrane of either CR3-positive as negative cells, though through different entry routes, which depends in part, on the target cell physiology and characteristics. ACT-induced Ca(2+ influx and activation of non-receptor Tyr kinases into the target cell appear to be common master denominators in the different endocytic strategies activated by this toxin. Very importantly, we show that, upon incubation with ACT, target cells are capable of repairing the cell membrane, which suggests the mounting of an anti-toxin cell repair-response, very likely involving the toxin elimination from the cell surface.

  11. Ca2+ Influx and Tyrosine Kinases Trigger Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin (ACT) Endocytosis. Cell Physiology and Expression of the CD11b/CD18 Integrin Major Determinants of the Entry Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxebarria, Aitor; González-Bullón, David; Gómez-Bilbao, Geraxane; Ostolaza, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Humans infected with Bordetella pertussis, the whooping cough bacterium, show evidences of impaired host defenses. This pathogenic bacterium produces a unique adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) which enters human phagocytes and catalyzes the unregulated formation of cAMP, hampering important bactericidal functions of these immune cells that eventually cause cell death by apoptosis and/or necrosis. Additionally, ACT permeabilizes cells through pore formation in the target cell membrane. Recently, we demonstrated that ACT is internalised into macrophages together with other membrane components, such as the integrin CD11b/CD18 (CR3), its receptor in these immune cells, and GM1. The goal of this study was to determine whether ACT uptake is restricted to receptor-bearing macrophages or on the contrary may also take place into cells devoid of receptor and gain more insights on the signalling involved. Here, we show that ACT is rapidly eliminated from the cell membrane of either CR3-positive as negative cells, though through different entry routes, which depends in part, on the target cell physiology and characteristics. ACT-induced Ca2+ influx and activation of non-receptor Tyr kinases into the target cell appear to be common master denominators in the different endocytic strategies activated by this toxin. Very importantly, we show that, upon incubation with ACT, target cells are capable of repairing the cell membrane, which suggests the mounting of an anti-toxin cell repair-response, very likely involving the toxin elimination from the cell surface. PMID:24058533

  12. Lymphocyte adenylate cyclase activity in immunosuppressed patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Brodde, O. E.

    1989-01-01

    In order to determine whether alterations of adenylate cyclase are involved in the immunosuppressive effect of glucocorticoid/cyclosporin treatment we measured basal, prostaglandin E1-, and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in lymphocyte membranes from kidney transplant patients undergoing

  13. The hormonal regulation of adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, D; Im, M J; Pfeuffer, T; Hekman, M; Helmreich, E J; Levitzki, A

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of adenylate cyclase by hormones and by GTP regulatory proteins was investigated in native membrane systems and in systems reconstituted from purified components. These studies can be summarized as follows. The stimulatory beta 1-adrenoceptor catalyses the activation of a complex between the GTP stimulatory protein GS and the catalytic unit C. The agonist-receptor complex can activate a few cyclase units in native membrane systems as well as in reconstituted systems. GS from turkey erythrocytes is functionally different from rabbit liver GS, the latter being more amenable to activation by guanyl nucleotides in the absence of hormone. The coupling between the beta 1-adrenoceptor GS and C is efficient when compared with the coupling obtained in native membrane systems. GTP/GDP exchange at the alpha S subunit requires the presence of the beta gamma subunits. A mechanism for the inhibition of adenylate cyclase by the inhibitory GTP regulatory protein Gi is suggested.

  14. Enhanced Ex Vivo Stimulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific T Cells in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Persons via Antigen Delivery by the Bordetella pertusis Adenylate Cyclase Vector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Connell, T. G.; Shey, M. S.; Seldon, R.; Rangaka, M. X.; van Cutsem, G.; Šimšová, Marcela; Marčeková, Zuzana; Šebo, Peter; Curtis, N.; Diwakar, L.; Meintjes, G. A.; Leclerc, C.; Wilkinson, R. J.; Wilkinson, K. A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 7 (2007), s. 847-854 ISSN 1556-6811 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06161 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : mycobacterium tuberculosis * bordetella pertusis * human immunodeficiency virus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.995, year: 2007

  15. Acylation of Lysine 860 Allows Tight Binding and Cytotoxicity of Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase on CD1 1b-Expressing Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašín, Jiří; Basler, Marek; Knapp, O.; El-Azami-El-Idrissi, M.; Maier, E.; Konopásek, I.; Benz, R.; Leclerc, C.; Šebo, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 44, - (2005), s. 12766-12759 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020406; GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : lysine 860 * bordetella Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.848, year: 2005

  16. Different strictuctural requirements for adenylate cyclase toxin interactions with erythrocyte and liposome membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašín, Jiří; Konopásek, I.; Svobodová, J.; Šebo, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 1660, - (2004), s. 144-154 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IPP1050128; GA AV ČR IAA5020907 Grant - others:GA Howard Hughes Medical Institut(US) 55000334; GA(XE) QLK2-CT-1999-00556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : bordetella pertussis * adenylate cyclase toxin * membrane interaction Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.441, year: 2004

  17. Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Subverts Phagocyte Function by RhoA Inhibition and Unproductive Ruffling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamanová, Jana; Kofroňová, Olga; Mašín, Jiří; Genth, H.; Vojtová, Jana; Linhartová, Irena; Benada, Oldřich; Just, I.; Šebo, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 181, č. 8 (2008), s. 5587-5597 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA MŠk 2B06161; GA ČR GA310/08/0447 Grant - others:XE(XE) LSHB-CT-2003-503582 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : bordetella * adenylate cyclase toxin * rhoa Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 6.000, year: 2008

  18. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide and migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zagami, Alessandro S; Edvinsson, Lars; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) is found in human trigeminocervical complex and can trigger migraine. PACAP levels were measured using a sensitive radioimmunoassay. Stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in cat elevated PACAP levels in cranial blood. Patients...... with moderate or severe migraine headache had elevated PACAP in the external jugular vein during headache (n = 15), that was reduced 1 h after treatment with sumatriptan 6 mg (n = 11), and further reduced interictally (n = 9). The data suggest PACAP, or its receptors, are a promising target for migraine...

  19. Receptors, adenylate cyclase, depression, and lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmaker, R H

    1981-04-01

    Although numerous studies have suggested that depression may be associated with a reduction in synaptic noradrenaline in the brain, direct beta-adrenergic receptor agonists have not been tested in the treatment of depression until recently. Moreover, newer theories of antidepressant action suggest that a reduction in beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity is a better correlate of antidepressant treatment than noradrenaline turnover changes. It is possible to evaluate the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase complex in the human periphery by measuring the plasma cyclic AMP rise after adrenergic agonists. A clinical trial of the beta-2 adrenergic agonist salbutamol in depression provided an opportunity to test whether adrenergic receptor subsensitivity does occur during clinical antidepressant treatment. Plasma cyclic AMP before treatment with salbutamol rose 26% in response to salbutamol 0.25 mg iv. After 1 and 3 weeks of oral salbutamol treatment, depression scores declined significantly in 11 depressed patients, while the plasma cyclic AMP response to iv salbutamol declined over 60%. The beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase remained subsensitive 4 days after cessation of salbutamol therapy. The results support the concept that receptor sensitivity changes occur during human antidepressant therapy. Data are presented that Li, too, markedly reduces activity of beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase in humans. The effect was evaluated by studying the effect of Li at therapeutic serum concentrations on the plasma cyclic AMP response to subcutaneous epinephrine. The Li effect is specific, since the plasma cyclic AMP response to glucagon is not inhibited. The plasma cyclic GMP response to subcutaneous epinephrine, suggested as a model for presynaptic alpha-noradrenergic mechanisms, is also partially inhibited by Li therapy. Since cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP may be viewed as balancing substances, their interaction may provide a mechanism for Li's dual clinical effects in mania

  20. Adenylate cyclase toxin promotes internalisation of integrins and raft components and decreases macrophage adhesion capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Martín

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the bacterium that causes whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT that must be post-translationally palmitoylated in the bacterium cytosol to be active. The toxin targets phagocytes expressing the CD11b/CD18 integrin receptor. It delivers a catalytic adenylate cyclase domain into the target cell cytosol producing a rapid increase of intracellular cAMP concentration that suppresses bactericidal functions of the phagocyte. ACT also induces calcium fluxes into target cells. Biochemical, biophysical and cell biology approaches have been applied here to show evidence that ACT and integrin molecules, along with other raft components, are rapidly internalized by the macrophages in a toxin-induced calcium rise-dependent process. The toxin-triggered internalisation events occur through two different routes of entry, chlorpromazine-sensitive receptor-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-independent internalisation, maybe acting in parallel. ACT locates into raft-like domains, and is internalised, also in cells devoid of receptor. Altogether our results suggest that adenylate cyclase toxin, and maybe other homologous pathogenic toxins from the RTX (Repeats in Toxin family to which ACT belongs, may be endowed with an intrinsic capacity to, directly and efficiently, insert into raft-like domains, promoting there its multiple activities. One direct consequence of the integrin removal from the cell surface of the macrophages is the hampering of their adhesion ability, a fundamental property in the immune response of the leukocytes that could be instrumental in the pathogenesis of Bordetella pertussis.

  1. Adenylate cyclase toxin promotes internalisation of integrins and raft components and decreases macrophage adhesion capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, César; Uribe, Kepa B; Gómez-Bilbao, Geraxane; Ostolaza, Helena

    2011-02-23

    Bordetella pertussis, the bacterium that causes whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) that must be post-translationally palmitoylated in the bacterium cytosol to be active. The toxin targets phagocytes expressing the CD11b/CD18 integrin receptor. It delivers a catalytic adenylate cyclase domain into the target cell cytosol producing a rapid increase of intracellular cAMP concentration that suppresses bactericidal functions of the phagocyte. ACT also induces calcium fluxes into target cells. Biochemical, biophysical and cell biology approaches have been applied here to show evidence that ACT and integrin molecules, along with other raft components, are rapidly internalized by the macrophages in a toxin-induced calcium rise-dependent process. The toxin-triggered internalisation events occur through two different routes of entry, chlorpromazine-sensitive receptor-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-independent internalisation, maybe acting in parallel. ACT locates into raft-like domains, and is internalised, also in cells devoid of receptor. Altogether our results suggest that adenylate cyclase toxin, and maybe other homologous pathogenic toxins from the RTX (Repeats in Toxin) family to which ACT belongs, may be endowed with an intrinsic capacity to, directly and efficiently, insert into raft-like domains, promoting there its multiple activities. One direct consequence of the integrin removal from the cell surface of the macrophages is the hampering of their adhesion ability, a fundamental property in the immune response of the leukocytes that could be instrumental in the pathogenesis of Bordetella pertussis.

  2. Adenylate cyclases involvement in pathogenicity, a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costache, Adriana; Bucurenci, Nadia; Onu, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), one of the most important secondary messengers, is produced by adenylate cyclase (AC) from adenosine triphosphate (ATP). AC is a widespread enzyme, being present both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although they have the same enzymatic activity (ATP cyclization), the structure of these proteins varies, depending on their function and the producing organism. Some pathogenic bacteria utilize these enzymes as toxins which interact with calmodulin (or another eukaryote activator), causing intense cAMP synthesis and disruption of infected cell functions. In contrast, other pathogenic bacteria benefit of augmentation of AC activity for their own function. Based on sequence analysis ofAC catalytic domain from two pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus anthracis and Bordetellapertussis) with known three-dimensional structures, a possible secondary structure for 1-255 amino acid fragment from Pseudomonas aeruginosa AC (with 80TKGFSVKGKSS90 as the ATP binding site) is proposed.

  3. Adenylate Cyclase Toxin promotes bacterial internalisation into non phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, César; Etxaniz, Asier; Uribe, Kepa B; Etxebarria, Aitor; González-Bullón, David; Arlucea, Jon; Goñi, Félix M; Aréchaga, Juan; Ostolaza, Helena

    2015-09-08

    Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough, a respiratory infectious disease that is the fifth largest cause of vaccine-preventable death in infants. Though historically considered an extracellular pathogen, this bacterium has been detected both in vitro and in vivo inside phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. However the precise mechanism used by B. pertussis for cell entry, or the putative bacterial factors involved, are not fully elucidated. Here we find that adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT), one of the important toxins of B. pertussis, is sufficient to promote bacterial internalisation into non-phagocytic cells. After characterization of the entry route we show that uptake of "toxin-coated bacteria" proceeds via a clathrin-independent, caveolae-dependent entry pathway, allowing the internalised bacteria to survive within the cells. Intracellular bacteria were found inside non-acidic endosomes with high sphingomyelin and cholesterol content, or "free" in the cytosol of the invaded cells, suggesting that the ACT-induced bacterial uptake may not proceed through formation of late endolysosomes. Activation of Tyr kinases and toxin-induced Ca(2+)-influx are essential for the entry process. We hypothesize that B. pertussis might use ACT to activate the endocytic machinery of non-phagocytic cells and gain entry into these cells, in this way evading the host immune system.

  4. Heterosubtypic protection against influenza A induced by adenylate cyclase toxoids delivering conserved HA2 subunit of hemagglutinin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staneková, Z.; Adkins, Irena; Kosová, Martina; Janulíková, J.; Šebo, Peter; Varečková, E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 1 (2013), s. 24-35 ISSN 0166-3542 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA ČR GP310/09/P582 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxoid * Influenza A infection * Cross-protection Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.434, year: 2013

  5. Adenylate Cyclase-the More Membrane Associated, the Less Radiosensitive

    OpenAIRE

    ATTILA, TAKATS; VU HOA, BINH; KATALIN, OFFENMULLER; KATALIN, BODO; LORAND, BERTOK; GYORGY J., KOTELES; Frederic Joliot-Curie National Research Institute for Radiobiology; "Frederic Joliot-Curie" National Research Institute for Radiobiology; "Frederic Joliot-Curie" National Research Institute for Radiobiology; "Frederic Joliot-Curie" National Research Institute for Radiobiology; "Frederic Joliot-Curie" National Research Institute for Radiobiology; "Frederic Joliot-Curie" National Research Institute for Radiobiology

    1993-01-01

    A dose dependent but not parallel decreases were observed both in SH content and catalytic activity of "free" catalytic subunit after irradiation (0-3200 Gy), while SR groups of membrane-associated adenylate cyclase were insensitive (under 3200 Gy). An initial "radioactivation" of membrane-associated enzyme was found under 800 Gy, then an inhibition above 1600 Gy. The SH alkylating agent, N-ethylmaleimide resulted in a complete inactivation, both of membrane associated form of adenylate cycla...

  6. High skeletal muscle adenylate cyclase in malignant hyperthermia.

    OpenAIRE

    Willner, J H; Cerri, C G; Wood, D S

    1981-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia occurs in humans with several congenital myopathies, usually in response to general anesthesia. Commonly, individuals who develop this syndrome lack symptoms of muscle disease, and their muscle lacks specific pathological changes. A biochemical marker for this myopathy has not previously been available; we found activity of adenylate cyclase and content of cyclic AMP to be abnormally high in skeletal muscle. Secondary modification of protein phosphorylation could explai...

  7. Interactions of fluoride and guanine nucleotides with thyroid adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhammer, A; Wolff, J

    1982-02-18

    The activation of bovine thyroid adenylate cyclase (ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1) by Gpp(NH)p has been studied using steady-state kinetic methods. This activation is complex and may be characterized by two Gpp(NH)p binding sites of different affinities with measured constants: Ka1 = 0.1 micro M and Ka2 = 2.9 micro M. GDP beta S does not completely inhibit the Gpp(NH)p activation: analysis of the data is consistent with a single GDP beta S inhibitory site which is competitive with the weaker Gpp(NH)p site. Guanine nucleotide effects upon F- activation of adenylate cyclase have been studied. When App(NH)p is the substrate, 10 micro M GTP along with 10 mM NaF gives higher activity than NaF alone, while GDP together with NaF inhibits the activity by 50% relative to NaF. These features are not observed when the complex is assayed with ATP in the presence of a nucleotide regenerating system or when analogs Gpp)NH)p or GDP beta S are used along with NaF. These effects were studied in three other membrane systems using App(NH)p as substrate: rat liver, rat ovary and turkey erythrocyte. No consistent pattern of guanine nucleotide effects upon fluoride activation could be observed in the different membrane preparations. Previous experiments showed that the size of soluble thyroid adenylate cyclase changed whether membranes were preincubated with Gpp(NH)p or NaF. This size change roughly corresponded to the molecular weight of the nucleotide regulatory protein. This finding, coupled with the present data, suggests that two guanine nucleotide binding sites may be involved in regulating thyroid cyclase and that these sites may be on different protein chains.

  8. Does treatment with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in vivo alter human adenylate cyclase responsiveness in vitro?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Klüppel, M.; Philipp, T.; Brodde, O. E.

    1991-01-01

    1. Treatment with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in vivo can alter adenylate cyclase responsiveness in the human heart. We have determined the effects of treatment with four different beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in vivo on the responsiveness of lymphocyte and platelet adenylate cyclase in vitro in

  9. The Escherichia coli adenylate cyclase complex. Stimulation by potassium and phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, E; Reddy, P; Gazdar, C; Peterkofsky, A

    1985-04-10

    In Escherichia coli, adenylate cyclase activity in toluene-treated cells can be inhibited by glucose while the activity in a broken cell preparation cannot. Adenylate cyclase activity in the permeabilized but not in broken cells is stimulated somewhat specifically and additively by potassium and phosphate. Kinetic studies show sigmoid substrate-velocity curves for the toluene-treated cells but hyperbolic curves for the broken cells. The stimulatory effects of potassium and phosphate on adenylate cyclase activity in tolulene-treated cells are associated with increases in the Vmax and Km for ATP. While the enzyme activity in toluene-treated cells shows a preference for magnesium over manganese, the reverse is observed in broken cells. Stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in toluene-treated cells requires the presence of the proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The PTS proteins can be phosphorylated in a P-enolpyruvate-dependent reaction. The stimulatory effects of ions will not occur if the PTS proteins are not phosphorylated. Since potassium phosphate stimulates both adenylate cyclase and PTS activities in toluene-treated cells, it is proposed that the effect of potassium phosphate on adenylate cyclase activity is mediated through an effect on the PTS. A model for dual regulation by glucose of adenylate cyclase activity is proposed. This model involves regulation of both the condition of the PTS proteins as well as the cellular concentration of phosphate.

  10. Food restriction modulates β-adrenergic-sensitive adenylate cyclase in rat liver during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase activities were studied in rat liver during postmaturational aging of male Fischer 344 rats fed ad libitum or restricted to 60% of the ad libitum intake. Catecholamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased by 200-300% between 6 and 24-27 mo of age in ad libitum-fed rats, whereas in food-restricted rats catecholamine response increased by only 58-84% between 6 and 30 mo. In ad libitum-fed rats, glucagon-stimulated enzyme activity also increased by 40% between 6 and 12 mo and in restricted rats a similar age-related increase was delayed until 18 mo. β-Adrenergic receptor density increased by 50% between 6 and 24 mo in livers from ad libitum-fed but not food-restricted rats and showed a highly significant correlation with maximal isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity over the postmaturational life span. Age-related increases in unstimulated (basal) adenylate cyclase activity and nonreceptor-mediated enzyme activation were retarded by food restriction. The results demonstrate that food restriction diminishes a marked age-related increase in β-adrenergic-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity of rat liver. Alterations of adrenergic-responsive adenylate cyclase with age and the modulatory effects of food restriction appear to be mediated by changes in both receptor and nonreceptor components of adenylate cyclase

  11. Effects of PTH and Ca2+ on renal adenyl cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, S.T.; Neuman, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion on the adenylate cyclase system was studied in isolated, renal basal-lateral plasma membranes of the rat. Bovine parathyroid hormone (bPTH) and a guanyl triphosphate analogue, Gpp(NH)p were used to stimulate cyclase activity. Under conditions of maximal stimulation, calcium ions inhibited cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation, the formation rate falling exponentially with the calcium concentration. Fifty percent inhibition of either bPTH- or Gpp(NH)p-stimulated activity was given by approximately 50 μM Ca 2+ . Also the Hill coefficient for the inhibition was close to unity in both cases. The concentration of bPTH giving half-maximal stimulation of cAMP formation (1.8 x 10 -8 M) was unchanged by the presence of calcium. These data suggest that calcium acts at some point other than the initial hormone-receptor interaction, presumably decreasing the catalytic efficiency of the enzymic moiety of the membrane complex

  12. Evidence that forskolin activates turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase through a noncatalytic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S A; Bilezikian, J P

    1983-02-01

    The diterpene forskolin has been reported to activate adenylate cyclase in a manner consistent with an interaction at the catalytic unit. However, some of its actions are more consistent with an interaction at the coupling unit that links the hormone receptor to the adenylate cyclase activity. This report adds support to the latter possibility. Under conditions that lead to stimulation of adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes by GTP, forskolin also becomes more active. Additional evidence to support an influence of forskolin upon adenylate cyclase via the GTP-coupling protein N includes the following: (i) forskolin, at submaximal concentrations, leads to enhanced sensitivity and responsiveness of isoproterenol-dependent adenylate cyclase activity in turkey erythrocyte membranes; (ii) under specified conditions, the nucleotide GDP, an inhibitor of the stimulating nucleotide GTP and its analog, guanyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p), also markedly inhibits the action of forskolin; (iii) both Gpp(NH)p and forskolin are associated with a decrease in agonist affinity for the beta-adrenergic receptor. However, actions of forskolin in the turkey erythrocyte are not identical to those of GTP: (i) forskolin is never as potent as Gpp(NH)p in activating adenylate cyclase; (ii) the magnitude of synergism between isoproterenol and forskolin is not equal to that observed with isoproterenol and Gpp(NH)p; (iii) at high concentrations, forskolin inhibits antagonist binding to the beta-receptor. Forskolin appears to have several sites of action in the turkey erythrocyte membrane, including an influence upon the adenylate cyclase regulatory protein N.

  13. Structure of the turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, T B; Lad, P M; Preston, M S; Kempner, E; Schlegel, W; Rodbell, M

    1981-02-01

    Target analysis of the turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] system showed that the molecular weight of the ground state enzyme increases from 92,000 with MnATP as substrate and no stimulatory ligands to 226,000 when activated by fluoride ion or by 5'-guanyl imidodiphosphate (p[NH]ppG) subsequent to clearance of previously bound GDP. The identical increment in size (130,000) suggests that the same regulatory unit is involved in the activation by both effectors. When assayed with isoproterenol and p[NH]ppG, the enzyme system displayed a further increment in size of 90,000 daltons. Based on binding of the antagonist 125I-labeled hydroxybenzylpindolol, the beta-adrenergic receptor is about 90,000 daltons or the same as that seen for activation of the enzyme by isoproterenol through the beta-adrenergic-receptor. Because single targets were seen for the ground state enzyme system under all conditions, it would appear that the various regulatory and catalytic components are structurally linked prior to activation by hormone, guanine nucleotides, and fluoride ion. Furthermore, based on reported subunit sizes of the nucleotide regulatory and receptor components are composed of multiple subunits, either homologous or heterologous in structure.

  14. Determination of the turn-off reaction for the hormone-activated adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, D; Eckstein, F; Lowe, M; Selinger, Z

    1979-10-10

    Previous work suggested that hormonal activation of adenylate cyclase involves the introduction of GTP to the regulatory site, and subsequent hydrolysis of the bound GTP terminates the activation. In many tissues the turn-off GTPase reaction cannot be readily measured because of a high background of nonspecific GTP hydrolysis. To circumvent this problem a general assay for the turn-off reaction has now been developed. The adenylate cyclase is first activated by hormone and GTP and the introduction of GTP is then stopped either by addition of an excess of guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) or by addition of a receptor blocking agent. The decay of adenylate cyclase activity brought on by these inhibitors is used to calculate the rate constant of the turn-off reaction. In turkey erythrocyte and rat parotid membranes the rate constant of the decay process as determined with GDP beta S is similar to that determined with the beta-adrenergic blocker propranolol. The rate constants (min-1 at 30 degrees C) for various adenylate cyclase preparations are 10 for turkey erythrocyte, 7.5 for rat parotid, and 6.2 for the rat liver enzyme. The finding of similar rate constants in the various preparations indicates that GTP hydrolysis at the regulatory site is a general mechanism for terminating the activation of adenylate cyclase.

  15. Dynamics of adenylate cyclase regulation via heterotrimeric G-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milde, Markus; Werthmann, Ruth C; von Hayn, Kathrin; Bünemann, Moritz

    2014-04-01

    A wide variety of G-protein-coupled receptors either activate or inhibit ACs (adenylate cyclases), thereby regulating cellular cAMP levels and consequently inducing proper physiological responses. Stimulatory and inhibitory G-proteins interact directly with ACs, whereas G(q)-coupled receptors exert their effects primarily via Ca2+. Using the FRET-based cAMP sensor Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1)-cAMPS (adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate), we studied cAMP levels in single living VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) or HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) with subsecond temporal resolution. Stimulation of purinergic (VSMCs) or thrombin (HUVECs) receptors rapidly decreased cAMP levels in the presence of the β-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline via a rise in Ca2+ and subsequent inhibition of AC5 and AC6. Specifically in HUVECs, we observed that, in the continuous presence of thrombin, cAMP levels climbed slowly after the initial decline with a delay of a little less than 1 min. The underlying mechanism includes phospholipase A2 activity and cyclo-oxygenase-mediated synthesis of prostaglandins. We studied further the dynamics of the inhibition of ACs via G(i)-proteins utilizing FRET imaging to resolve interactions between fluorescently labelled G(i)-proteins and AC5. FRET between Gα(i1) and AC5 developed at much lower concentration of agonist compared with the overall G(i)-protein activity. We found the dissociation of Gα(i1) subunits and AC5 to occur slower than the G(i)-protein deactivation. This led us to the conclusion that AC5, by binding active Gα(i1), interferes with G-protein deactivation and reassembly and thereby might sensitize its own regulation.

  16. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-01-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3β by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  17. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, [ 125 I]iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30 degree C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing [ 125 I]iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus

  18. Enhanced adenylate cyclase activity of turkey erythrocytes following treatment with beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, J R; Nambi, P; Sibley, D R; Lefkowitz, R J

    1984-12-15

    The turkey erythrocyte contains a beta 1-adrenergic receptor-linked adenylate cyclase system. We have examined the effects of pretreatment with receptor antagonists on adenylate cyclase activity and the individual components in the pathway of enzyme activation in this system. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is increased by 30% (P less than 0.01) over control in membranes derived from cells preincubated with the antagonist propranolol. The effect is stereospecific and dose-related with a EC50 of 100 nM for the (-) isomer. The time course of effect is rapid being complete by 90 min. Non-receptor mediated stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by manganese ion, forskolin and NaF is similarly enhanced following propranolol pretreatment. Sensitization of adenylate cyclase activity also occurs following pretreatment with a number of antagonists but is not seen after preincubation with pindolol or practolol. Quantitation of beta-adrenergic receptor (R) density using [125I]cyanopindolol indicates no difference between membranes derived from control and antagonist pretreated cells. Coupling of R with the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (N) as assessed by high affinity agonist binding is unchanged following pretreatment. The efficacy of 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate Gpp(NH)p in producing a shift of agonist binding curves associated with destabilization of high affinity H-R-N complexes, is also the same (EC50 = 0.2 microM) in membranes from control and antagonist treated cells. The isoproterenol stimulated rate of release of [3H]GDP from membranes preloaded with [3H]GTP as an index of formation of an active form of the N protein is similarly unaffected by antagonist preincubation. We conclude that the mechanism of the observed sensitization of turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase by beta-adrenergic antagonists is receptor mediated and likely involves facilitation of N interaction with the catalytic subunit of the enzyme.

  19. Calcium influx rescues adenylate cyclase-hemolysin from rapid cell membrane removal and enables phagocyte permeabilization by toxin pores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Fiser

    Full Text Available Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA penetrates the cytoplasmic membrane of phagocytes and employs two distinct conformers to exert its multiple activities. One conformer forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize phagocyte membrane for efflux of cytosolic potassium. The other conformer conducts extracellular calcium ions across cytoplasmic membrane of cells, relocates into lipid rafts, translocates the adenylate cyclase enzyme (AC domain into cells and converts cytosolic ATP to cAMP. We show that the calcium-conducting activity of CyaA controls the path and kinetics of endocytic removal of toxin pores from phagocyte membrane. The enzymatically inactive but calcium-conducting CyaA-AC⁻ toxoid was endocytosed via a clathrin-dependent pathway. In contrast, a doubly mutated (E570K+E581P toxoid, unable to conduct Ca²⁺ into cells, was rapidly internalized by membrane macropinocytosis, unless rescued by Ca²⁺ influx promoted in trans by ionomycin or intact toxoid. Moreover, a fully pore-forming CyaA-ΔAC hemolysin failed to permeabilize phagocytes, unless endocytic removal of its pores from cell membrane was decelerated through Ca²⁺ influx promoted by molecules locked in a Ca²⁺-conducting conformation by the 3D1 antibody. Inhibition of endocytosis also enabled the native B. pertussis-produced CyaA to induce lysis of J774A.1 macrophages at concentrations starting from 100 ng/ml. Hence, by mediating calcium influx into cells, the translocating conformer of CyaA controls the removal of bystander toxin pores from phagocyte membrane. This triggers a positive feedback loop of exacerbated cell permeabilization, where the efflux of cellular potassium yields further decreased toxin pore removal from cell membrane and this further enhances cell permeabilization and potassium efflux.

  20. Design and Synthesis of Fluorescent Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates as Potent Inhibitors of Bacterial Adenylate Cyclases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Břehová, Petra; Šmídková, Markéta; Skácel, Jan; Dračínský, Martin; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Velasquez, M. P. S.; Watts, V. J.; Janeba, Zlatko

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 22 (2016), s. 2534-2546 ISSN 1860-7179 R&D Projects: GA MV VG20102015046; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * anthranilic acid Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.225, year: 2016

  1. Modulation of receptors and adenylate cyclase activity during sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpace, P.J.; Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) serves as a regulator of body temperature and weight maintenance. Thermogenesis can be stimulated by catecholamine activation of adenylate cyclase through the β-adrenergic receptor. To investigate the effects of sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure on the β-adrenergic pathway, adenylate cyclase activity and β-adrenergic receptors were assessed in rat BAT after 2 wk of sucrose feeding, 2 days of food deprivation, or 2 days of cold exposure. β-Adrenergic receptors were identified in BAT using [ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol. Binding sites had the characteristics of mixed β 1 - and β 2 -type adrenergic receptors at a ratio of 60/40. After sucrose feeding or cold exposure, there was the expected increase in BAT mitochondrial mass as measured by total cytochrome-c oxidase activity but a decrease in β-adrenergic receptor density due to a loss of the β 1 -adrenergic subtype. This BAT β-adrenergic receptor downregulation was tissue specific, since myocardial β-adrenergic receptors were unchanged with either sucrose feeding or cold exposure. Forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased in BAT after sucrose feeding or cold exposure but not after food deprivation. These data suggest that in BAT, sucrose feeding or cold exposure result in downregulation of β-adrenergic receptors and that isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was limited by receptor availability

  2. Evidence for the existence of a sulfhydryl group in the adenylate cyclase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurat, A V; Yurkova, M S; Baranova, L A; Gulyaev, N N; Bulargina, T V; Severin, E S

    1985-03-01

    6-Cloro-9-beta-d-ribofuranosylpurine 5'-triphosphate (CIRTP) and 6-mercapto-9-beta-d-ribofuranosylpurine 5'-triphosphate (SRTP) irreversibly inhibit adenylate cyclase from rat brain. Adenosine 5'-[beta, gamma -imido] triphosphate protects the enzyme against inactivation by CIRTP and SRTP and acts as a competitive inhibitor with respect to ATP with the Ki value 2 X 10(-4) M. Study of the pH-dependence of the rate of the enzyme inactivation by CIRTP showed that pK for the group modified by this compound is equal to 7.45. Inactivation is first order with respect to the enzyme; the saturation effect is observed at the increased concentration of CIRTP. The k2 and KI values for irreversible inhibition of brain adenylate cyclase by CIRTP were 0.25 min-1 and 1.9 X 10(-4) M, respectively. Adenylate cyclase inhibition by SRTP is also time-dependent. Partial protection against the enzyme inactivation was observed. Dithiothreitol restores the activity of SRTP-inactivated adenylate cyclase. The results obtained indicate the presence of an -SH group in the purine amino group binding area of the enzyme active site.

  3. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide stimulates renin secretion via activation of PAC1 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hautmann, Matthias; Friis, Ulla G; Desch, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Besides of its functional role in the nervous system, the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is involved in the regulation of cardiovascular function. Therefore, PACAP is a potent vasodilator in several vascular beds, including the renal vasculature. Because...

  4. Receptor binding and adenylate cyclase activities of glucagon analogues modified in the N-terminal region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.L.; Pelton, J.T.; Trivedi, D.; Johnson, D.G.; Coy, D.H.; Sueiras-Diaz, J.; Hruby, V.J.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, we determined the ability of four N-terminally modified derivatives of glucagon, [3-Me-His1,Arg12]-, [Phe1,Arg12]-, [D-Ala4,Arg12]-, and [D-Phe4]glucagon, to compete with 125I-glucagon for binding sites specific for glucagon in hepatic plasma membranes and to activate the hepatic adenylate cyclase system, the second step involved in producing many of the physiological effects of glucagon. Relative to the native hormone, [3-Me-His1,Arg12]glucagon binds approximately twofold greater to hepatic plasma membranes but is fivefold less potent in the adenylate cyclase assay. [Phe1,Arg12]glucagon binds threefold weaker and is also approximately fivefold less potent in adenylate cyclase activity. In addition, both analogues are partial agonists with respect to adenylate cyclase. These results support the critical role of the N-terminal histidine residue in eliciting maximal transduction of the hormonal message. [D-Ala4,Arg12]glucagon and [D-Phe4]glucagon, analogues designed to examine the possible importance of a beta-bend conformation in the N-terminal region of glucagon for binding and biological activities, have binding potencies relative to glucagon of 31% and 69%, respectively. [D-Ala4,Arg12]glucagon is a partial agonist in the adenylate cyclase assay system having a fourfold reduction in potency, while the [D-Phe4] derivative is a full agonist essentially equipotent with the native hormone. These results do not necessarily support the role of an N-terminal beta-bend in glucagon receptor recognition. With respect to in vivo glycogenolysis activities, all of the analogues have previously been reported to be full agonists

  5. Vanadate stimulates adenylate cyclase via the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein by a mechanism differing from that of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawietz, W; Downs, R W; Spiegel, A M; Aurbach, G D

    1982-03-01

    Vanadate stimulates adenylate cyclase activity in turkey erythrocyte membranes. The maximal stimulation is 7-fold over basal at 3 mM vanadate; higher concentrations are inhibitory. A suboptimal concentration of fluoride (1 mM) together with vanadate (3 mM) activates adenylate cyclase in a non-additive manner; cyclase activation by optimal fluoride (10 mM) is inhibited by vanadate (3 mM). There is no stimulation by vanadate of adenylate cyclase activity (measured either with Mg2+ or Mn2+) in CYC- S49 lymphoma cell membranes. Vanadate (3 mM) shows no effect on binding of Beta-adrenergic agonists or antagonists to the [3H] (-)-dihydroalprenolol binding site in turkey erythrocyte membranes. These results suggest that the effect of vanadate on Adenylate cyclase is mediated through the nucleotide regulatory protein and may act by a mechanism similar to fluoride. However, in cholera toxic-treated membranes as well as in GDP-beta-S plus isoproterenol-treated membranes, fluoride-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is significantly reduced, but vanadate stimulation is not. Our results suggest that although the actions of vanadate and fluoride in adenylate cyclase may each involve the nucleotide regulatory unit, the exact mechanisms of activation by the two anions differ.

  6. Age-associated alterations in hepatic β-adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, S.M.; Herring, P.A.; Arinze, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of age on catecholamine regulation of hepatic glycogenolysis and on hepatic adenylate cyclase was studied in male rats up to 24 mo of age. Epinephrine and norepinephrine stimulated glycogenolysis in isolated hepatocytes at all age groups studied. Isoproterenol, however, stimulated glycogenolysis only at 24 mo. In isolated liver membranes, usual activators of adenylate cyclase increased the activity of the enzyme considerably more in membranes from 24-mo-old rats than in membranes from either 3- or 22-mo-old rats. The Mn 2+ -dependent activity of the cyclase was increased by 2.9-fold in 3-mo-old animals and ∼ 5.7-fold in 24-mo-old rats, indicating a substantial age-dependent increase in the intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit. The density of the β-adrenergic receptor, as measured by the binding of [ 125 I]-iodocyanopindolol to plasma membranes, was 5-8 fmol/mg protein in rats aged 3-12 mo but increased to 19 fmol/mg protein in 24-mo-old rats. Computer-aided analysis of isoproterenol competition of the binding indicated a small age-dependent increase in the proportion of β-receptors in the high-affinity state. These observations suggest that β-receptor-mediated hepatic glycogenolysis in the aged rat is predicated upon increases in the density of β-receptors as well as increased intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase

  7. The role of transcriptional regulation in maintaining the availability of mycobacterial adenylate cyclases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Casey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium species have a complex cAMP regulatory network indicated by the high number of adenylate cyclases annotated in their genomes. However the need for a high level of redundancy in adenylate cyclase genes remains unknown. We have used semiquantitiative RT-PCR to examine the expression of eight Mycobacterium smegmatis cyclases with orthologs in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, where cAMP has recently been shown to be important for virulence. All eight cyclases were transcribed in all environments tested, and only four demonstrated environmental-mediated changes in transcription. M. smegmatis genes MSMEG_0545 and MSMEG_4279 were upregulated during starvation conditions while MSMEG_0545 and MSMEG_4924 were downregulated in H2O2 and MSMEG_3780 was downregulated in low pH and starvation. Promoter fusion constructs containing M. tuberculosis H37Rv promoters showed consistent regulation compared to their M. smegmatis orthologs. Overall our findings indicate that while low levels of transcriptional regulation occur, regulation at the mRNA level does not play a major role in controlling cellular cyclase availability in a given environment.

  8. Functional exchange of components between light-activated photoreceptor phosphodiesterase and hormone-activated adenylate cyclase systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitensky, M.W.; Wheeler, M.A.; Rasenick, M.M.; Yamazaki, A.; Stein, P.J.; Halliday, K.R.; Wheeler, G.L.

    1982-06-01

    Previous studies have noted profound similarities between the regulation of light-activated (3',5'-cyclic-nucleotide 5'-nucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.17) in retinal rods and hormone-activated adenylate cyclase (ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1) in a variety of tissues. We report ere the functional exchange of components isolated from the photoreceptor system, which displayed predicted functional characteristics when incubated with recipient adenylate cyclase systems from rat cerebral cortical and hypothalamic synaptic membranes and frog erythrocyte ghosts. We demonstrate functional exchange of photoreceptor components at each of three loci: the hormone receptor, the GTP-binding protein (GBP), and the catalytic moiety of adenylate cyclase. Illuminated (but not unilluminated) rhodopsin was found to mimic the hormone-receptor complex, causing GTP-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. The photoreceptor GBP complexed with guanosine 5'-(..beta..,..gamma..)imidotriphosphate (p(NH)ppG) produced a marked activation of recipient adenylate cyclase systems. Much smaller activation was observed when GBP was not complexed with p(NH)ppG. A heat-stable photoreceptor phosphodiesterase inhibitor reduced both basal and Mn/sup 2 +/-activated adenylate cyclase activites and this inhibition was reversed by photoreceptor GBPp(NH)ppG. These data demonstrate a remarkable functional compatibility between subunits of both systems and furthermore imply that specialized peptide domains responsible for protein-protein interactions are highly conserved.

  9. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands 3 H-N-methylscopolamine ( 3 H-NMS), 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB), and 3 H-pirenzepine. 3 H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, 3 H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by 3 H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for 3 H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure

  10. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  11. Identification of Adenyl Cyclase Activity in a Disease Resistance Protein in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Hussein, Rana

    2012-11-01

    Cyclic nucleotide, cAMP, is an important signaling molecule in animals and plants. However, in plants the enzymes that synthesize this second messenger, adenyl cyclases (ACs), remain elusive. Given the physiological importance of cAMP in signaling, particularly in response to biotic and abiotic stresses, it is thus important to identify and characterize ACs in higher plants. Using computational approaches, a disease resistance protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, At3g04220 was found to have an AC catalytic center motif. In an attempt to prove that this candidate has adenyl cyclases activity in vitro, the coding sequence of the putative AC catalytic domain of this protein was cloned and expressed in E. coli and the recombinant protein was purified. The nucleotide cyclase activity of the recombinant protein was examined using cyclic nucleotide enzyme immunoassays. In parallel, the expression of At3g04220 was measured in leaves under three different stress conditions in order to determine under which conditions the disease resistance protein could function. Results show that the purified recombinant protein has Mn2+ dependent AC activity in vitro, and the expression analysis supports a role for At3g04220 and cAMP in plant defense.

  12. Alteration in adenylate cyclase response to aminergic stimulation following neonatal x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronister, R.B.; Palmer, G.C.; Gerbrandt, L.

    1980-01-01

    X-irradiation of the rat neonatal hippocampus produces severe alterations in the architectonic features of the mature hippocampus. The most prominent alteration is a marked depletion of the granule cells of the dentate gyrus, with a subsequent realignment of CA 4 cells. The present data also show that norepinephrine (NE), dopamine and histamine stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity is severely attenuated in the hippocampi of irradiated animals. This failure suggests that the NE fibers of irradiated subjects, although normal in content of NE, are not functional in some of their NE-effector actions

  13. Comparison of the in vivo and in vitro activities of adenylate cyclase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra(NCTC 7417)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padh, Harish; Venkitsubramanian, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    The incorporation of [ 14 C] adenine into the adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) fraction by whole cells of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was taken as a measure of the in vivo activity of adenylate cyclase. The in vivo activity of adenylate cyclase was significantly inhibited by glucose, thus suggesting that the low level of cyclic AMP in the presence of glucose is due to the inhibited synthesis of cyclic AMP. In vitro activity of adenylate cyclase had optimum pH of 8.5 and Km of 1.33 mM for ATP. Glucose and other sugars did not show significant inhibition of in vitro activity. The results suggest that the adenylate cyclase activity becomes less sensitive to glucose when the bacterial cells are disrupted, an analogy with eukaryotic adenylate cyclase which loses sensitivity to hormones when the cells are disrupted. (auth.)

  14. Effects of sevoflurane on adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterases activity in brain of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Changdong; Yang Jianping; Dai Tijun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of sevoflurane on c adenylate cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterases (PDE) activity in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem of rats, and to examine the role of cAMP in sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods: Fourty SD rats were delaminately designed and allocated randomly to 5 groups inhaling 1.5% sevoflurane i.e., no recovery (recovery group, n=8) and one hour after righting reflexrecovery (aware group, n=8). The brain tissues were rapidly dissected into cerebrocortex and hippocampus and brain stem.Then the adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterases activity were assessed. Results: So far as the activity of AC is concerned, compared with the control group, the activity of AC in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem brain stem of induction group and anesthesia group, the cerebrocortex, and hippocampus in the recovery group were significantly increased; compared with those in the anesthesia group, the activity of AC in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem of aware group were significantly decreased (P<0.05); For the activity of PDE, compared with the control group, the activity of PDE in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem in the induction group and anesthesia group was significantly decreased, compared with that in anesthesia group, the activity of PDE in the cerebrocortex, hippocampus and brain stem of recovery group and aware group was significantly increased (P<0.05). Conclusion: cAMP may play an important role in sevoflurane anesthesia. (authors)

  15. Effect of drugs on lipid methylation, receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling and cyclic AMP secretion in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Waarde, Aren; Van Haastert, P.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Intercellular communication in Dictyostelium discoldeum takes place by means of cyclic AMP-induced cyclic AMP-synthesis and secretion. Since phospholipid methylation has been suggested to play a role in receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling, we examined the effects of transmethylation inhibitors on

  16. Mechanism of adenylate cyclase activation through the beta-adrenergic receptor: catecholamine-induced displacement of bound GDP by GTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, D; Selinger, Z

    1978-09-01

    The fate of the guanyl nucleotide bound to the regulatory site of adenylate cyclase was studied on a preparation of turkey erythrocyte membranes that was incubated with [3H]GTP plus isoproterenol and subsequently washed to remove hormone and free guanyl nucleotide. Further incubation of this preparation in the presence of beta-adrenergic agonists resulted in the release from the membrane of tritiated nucleotide, identified as [3H]GDP. The catecholamine-induced release of [3H]GDP was increased 2 to 3 times in the presence of the unlabeled guanyl nucleotides GTP, guanosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imino)triphosphate [gpp(NH)p], GDP, and GMP, whereas adenine nucleotides had little effect. In the presence of Gpp(NH)p, isoproterenol induced the release of [3H]GDP and the activation of adenylate cyclase, both effects following similar time courses. The findings indicate that the inactive adenylate cyclase possesses tightly bound (GDP, produced by the hydrolysis of GTP at the regulatory site. The hormone stimulates adenylate cyclase activity by inducing an "opening" of the guanyl nucleotide site, resulting in dissociation of the bound GDP and binding of the activating guanosine triphosphate.

  17. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors: in fact, ({sup 125}I)pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level.

  18. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a β-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of β-adrenergic receptors: in fact, [ 125 I]pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level

  19. Distribution and protective function of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP in the retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya eNakamachi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, which is found in 27- or 38-amino acid forms, belongs to the VIP/glucagon/secretin family. PACAP and its three receptor subtypes are expressed in neural tissues, with PACAP known to exert a protective effect against several types of neural damage. The retina is considered to be part of the central nervous system, and retinopathy is a common cause of profound and intractable loss of vision. This review will examine the expression and morphological distribution of PACAP and its receptors in the retina, and will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the protective effect of PACAP against different kinds of retinal damage, such as that identified in association with diabetes, ultraviolet light, hypoxia, optic nerve transection, and toxins. This article will also address PACAP-mediated protective pathways involving retinal glial cells.

  20. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide promotes eccrine gland sweat secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, S; Watanabe, J; Ohtaki, H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sweat secretion is the major function of eccrine sweat glands; when this process is disturbed (paridrosis), serious skin problems can arise. To elucidate the causes of paridrosis, an improved understanding of the regulation, mechanisms and factors underlying sweat production is required...... and several exocrine glands, the effects of PACAP on the process of eccrine sweat secretion have not been examined. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of PACAP on eccrine sweat secretion. METHODS: Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining were used to determine the expression....... Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) exhibits pleiotropic functions that are mediated via its receptors [PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1R), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor type 1 (VPAC1R) and VPAC2R]. Although some studies have suggested a role for PACAP in the skin...

  1. Radiation inactivation of multimeric enzymes: application to subunit interactions of adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkman, A.S.; Skorecki, K.L.; Ausiello, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation inactivation has been applied extensively to determine the molecular weight of soluble enzyme and receptor systems from the slope of a linear ln (activity) vs. dose curve. Complex nonlinear inactivation curves are predicted for multimeric enzyme systems, composed of distinct subunits in equilibrium with multimeric complexes. For the system A1 + A2----A1A2, with an active A1A2 complex (associative model), the ln (activity) vs. dose curve is linear for high dissociation constant, K. If a monomer, A1, has all the enzyme activity (dissociative model), the ln (activity) vs. dose curve has an activation hump at low radiation dose if the inactive subunit, A2, has a higher molecular weight than A1 and has upward concavity when A2 is smaller than A1. In general, a radiation inactivation model for a multistep mechanism for enzyme activation fulfills the characteristics of an associative or dissociative model if the reaction step forming active enzyme is an associative or dissociative reaction. Target theory gives the molecular weight of the active enzyme subunit or complex from the limiting slope of the ln (activity) vs. dose curve at high radiation dose. If energy transfer occurs among subunits in the multimer, the ln (activity) vs. dose curve is linear for a single active component and is concave upward for two or more active components. The use of radiation inactivation as a method to determine enzyme size and multimeric subunit assembly is discussed with specific application to the hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase system. It is shown that the complex inactivation curves presented in the accompanying paper can be used select the best mechanism out of a series of seven proposed mechanisms for the activation of adenylate cyclase by hormone

  2. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  3. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masure, H.R.; Donovan, M.G.; Storm, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca 2+ to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca 2+ and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells

  4. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masure, H.R.; Donovan, M.G.; Storm, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells.

  5. Serotonin-Sensitive Adenylate Cyclase in Neural Tissue and Its Similarity to the Serotonin Receptor: A Possible Site of Action of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, James A.; Greengard, Paul

    1974-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) that is activated specifically by low concentrations of serotonin has been identified in homogenates of the thoracic ganglia of an insect nervous system. The activation of this enzyme by serotonin was selectively inhibited by extremely low concentrations of D-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), 2-bromo-LSD, and cyproheptadine, agents which are known to block certain serotonin receptors in vivo. The inhibition was competitive with respect to serotonin, and the calculated inhibitory constant of LSD for this serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase was 5 nM. The data are consistent with a model in which the serotonin receptor of neural tissue is intimately associated with a serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase which mediates serotonergic neurotransmission. The results are also compatible with the possibility that some of the physiological effects of LSD may be mediated through interaction with serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase. PMID:4595572

  6. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the circulation after sumatriptan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Petersen, Jesper Troensegaard

    2013-01-01

    The origin of migraine pain is still elusive, but increasingly researchers focus on the neuropeptides in the perivascular space of cranial vessels as important mediators of nociceptive input during migraine attacks. The parasympathetic neurotransmitters, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating...... peptide-38 (PACAP38) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) may be released from parasympathetic fibres and activate sensory nerve fibres during migraine attacks. Triptans are effective and well tolerated in acute migraine management but the exact mechanism of action is still debated. Triptans might...

  7. Characterization of a novel serotonin receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase in the hybrid neuroblastoma cell line NCB. 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacological characterization of the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase in membrane preparation using over 40 serotonergic and non-serotonergic compounds demonstrated that the receptor mediating the response was distinct from previously described mammalian serotonin receptors. Agonist activity was only observed with tryptamine and ergoline derivatives. Potent antagonism was observed with several ergoline derivatives and with compounds such as mianserin and methiothepine. A comparison of the rank order of potency of a variety of compounds for the NCB.20 cell receptor with well characterized mammalian and non-mammalian serotonin receptors showed a pharmacological similarity, but not identity, with the mammalian 5-HT{sub 1C} receptor, which modulates phosphatidylinositol metabolism, and with serotonin receptors in the parasitic trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni, which are coupled to adenylate cyclase. Equilibrium binding analysis utilizing ({sup 3}H)serotonin, ({sup 3}H)lysergic acid diethylamide or ({sup 3}H)dihydroergotamine demonstrated that there are no abundant high affinity serotonergic sites, which implies that the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase is mediated by receptors present in low abundance. Incubation of intact NCB.20 cells with serotinin resulted in a time and concentration dependent desensitization of the serotonin receptor.

  8. Characterization of a novel serotonin receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase in the hybrid neuroblastoma cell line NCB.20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacological characterization of the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase in membrane preparation using over 40 serotonergic and non-serotonergic compounds demonstrated that the receptor mediating the response was distinct from previously described mammalian serotonin receptors. Agonist activity was only observed with tryptamine and ergoline derivatives. Potent antagonism was observed with several ergoline derivatives and with compounds such as mianserin and methiothepine. A comparison of the rank order of potency of a variety of compounds for the NCB.20 cell receptor with well characterized mammalian and non-mammalian serotonin receptors showed a pharmacological similarity, but not identity, with the mammalian 5-HT 1C receptor, which modulates phosphatidylinositol metabolism, and with serotonin receptors in the parasitic trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni, which are coupled to adenylate cyclase. Equilibrium binding analysis utilizing [ 3 H]serotonin, [ 3 H]lysergic acid diethylamide or [ 3 H]dihydroergotamine demonstrated that there are no abundant high affinity serotonergic sites, which implies that the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase is mediated by receptors present in low abundance. Incubation of intact NCB.20 cells with serotinin resulted in a time and concentration dependent desensitization of the serotonin receptor

  9. Forskolin- and dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding sites and adenylate cyclase activity in heart of rats fed diets containing different oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, S.Q.; Ren, Y.F.; Alam, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if dietary lipids can induce changes in the adenylate cyclase system in rat heart. Three groups of male young Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 6 weeks diets containing 10% corn oil (I), 8% coconut oil + 2% corn oil (II) or 10% menhaden oil (III). Adenylate cyclase activity (basal, fluoride-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated) was higher in heart homogenates of rats in group III than in the other two groups. Concentration of the [ 3 H]-forskolin binding sites in the cardiac membranes were significantly higher in rats fed menhaden oil. The values (pmol/mg protein) were 4.8 +/- 0.2 (I), 4.5 +/- 0.7 (II) and 8.4 +/- 0.5 (III). There was no significant difference in the affinity of the forskolin binding sites among the 3 dietary groups. When measured at different concentrations of forskolin, the adenylate cyclase activity in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil was higher than in the other 2 groups. Concentrations of the [ 3 H]DHA binding sites were slightly higher but their affinity was lower in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil. The results suggest that diets containing fish oil increase the concentration of the forskolin binding sites and may also affect the characteristics of the β-adrenergic receptor in rat heart

  10. Regulation of follitropin-sensitive adenylate cyclase by stimulatory and inhibitory forms of the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in immature rat Sertoli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been designed to examine the role of guanine nucleotides in mediating FSH-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in Sertoli cell plasma membranes. Analysis of [ 3 H]GDP binding to plasma membranes suggested a single high affinity site with a K d = 0.24 uM. Competition studies indicated that GTP γ S was 7-fold more potent than GDP β S. Bound GDP could be released by FSH in the presence of GTP γ S, but not by FSH alone. Adenylate cyclase activity was enhanced 5-fold by FSH in the presence of GTP. Addition of GDP β S to the activated enzyme (FSH plus GTP) resulted in a time-dependent decay to basal activity within 20 sec. GDP β S competitively inhibited GTP γ S-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a K i = 0.18 uM. Adenylate cyclase activity was also demonstrated to be sensitive to the nucleotide bound state. In the presence of FSH, only the GTP γ S-bound form persisted even if GDP β S previously occupied all available binding sites. Two membrane proteins, M r = 43,000 and 48,000, were ADP·ribosylated using cholera toxin and labeling was enhanced 2 to 4-fold by GTP γ S but not by GDP β S. The M r = 43,000 and 48,000 proteins represented variant forms of G S . A single protein of M r = 40,000 (G i ) was ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin in vitro. GTP inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with an IC 50 = 0.1 uM. The adenosine analog, N 6 ·phenylisopropyl adenosine enhanced GTP inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by an additional 15%. GTP-dependent inhibition of forskolin-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity was abolished in membranes prepared from Sertoli cells treated in culture with pertussis toxin

  11. Adenylate Cyclase Type III Is Not a Ubiquitous Marker for All Primary Cilia during Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Antal

    Full Text Available Adenylate cyclase type III (AC3 is localized in plasma membrane of neuronal primary cilium and can be used as a marker of this cilium. AC3 has also been detected in some other primary cilia such as those of fibroblasts, synoviocytes or astrocytes. Despite the presence of a cilium in almost all cell types, we show that AC3 is not a common marker of all primary cilia of different human and mouse tissues during development. In peripheral organs, AC3 is present mainly in primary cilia in cells of the mesenchymal lineage (fibroblasts, chondroblasts, osteoblasts-osteocytes, odontoblasts, muscle cells and endothelial cells. In epithelia, the apical cilium of renal and pancreatic tubules and of ductal plate in liver is AC3-negative whereas the cilium of basal cells of stratified epithelia is AC3-positive. Using fibroblasts cell culture, we show that AC3 appears at the plasma membrane of the primary cilium as soon as this organelle develops. The functional significance of AC3 localization at the cilium membrane in some cells but not others has to be investigated in relationship with cell physiology and expression at the cilium plasma membrane of specific upstream receptors.

  12. Effects of forskolin on cerebral blood flow: implications for a role of adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysham, D.G.; Brotherton, A.F.; Heistad, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    We have studied cerebral vascular effects of forskolin, a drug which stimulates adenylate cyclase and potentiates dilator effects of adenosine in other vascular beds. Our goals were to determine whether forskolin is a cerebral vasodilator and whether it potentiates cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine. We measured cerebral blood flow with microspheres in anesthetized rabbits. Forskolin (10 micrograms/kg per min) increased blood flow (ml/min per 100 gm) from 39 +/- 5 (mean +/- S.E.) to 56 +/- 9 (p less than 0.05) in cerebrum, and increased flow to myocardium and kidney despite a decrease in mean arterial pressure. Forskolin did not alter cerebral oxygen consumption, which indicates that the increase in cerebral blood flow is a direct vasodilator effect and is not secondary to increased metabolism. We also examined effects of forskolin on the response to infusion of adenosine. Cerebral blood flow was measured during infusion of 1-5 microM/min adenosine into one internal carotid artery, under control conditions and during infusion of forskolin at 3 micrograms/kg per min i.v. Adenosine alone increased ipsilateral cerebral blood flow from 32 +/- 3 to 45 +/- 5 (p less than 0.05). Responses to adenosine were not augmented during infusion of forskolin. We conclude that forskolin is a direct cerebral vasodilator and forskolin does not potentiate cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine

  13. Adenyl cyclase activator forskolin protects against Huntington's disease-like neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Mehan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term suppression of succinate dehydrogenase by selective inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid has been used in rodents to model Huntington's disease where mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damages are primary pathological hallmarks for neuronal damage. Improvements in learning and memory abilities, recovery of energy levels, and reduction of excitotoxicity damage can be achieved through activation of Adenyl cyclase enzyme by a specific phytochemical forskolin. In this study, intraperitoneal administration of 10 mg/kg 3-nitropropionic acid for 15 days in rats notably reduced body weight, worsened motor cocordination (grip strength, beam crossing task, locomotor activity, resulted in learning and memory deficits, greatly increased acetylcholinesterase, lactate dehydrogenase, nitrite, and malondialdehyde levels, obviously decreased adenosine triphosphate, succinate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione levels in the striatum, cortex and hippocampus. Intragastric administration of forskolin at 10, 20, 30 mg/kg dose-dependently reversed these behavioral, biochemical and pathological changes caused by 3-nitropropionic acid. These results suggest that forskolin exhibits neuroprotective effects on 3-nitropropionic acid-induced Huntington's disease-like neurodegeneration.

  14. How adenylate cyclase choreographs the pas de deux of the receptors heteromerization dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, A S; Jackson, S N

    2013-05-15

    Our work suggests that heteromer formation, mainly involves linear motifs (LMs) found in disordered regions of proteins. Local disorder imparts plasticity to LMs. Most molecular recognition of proteins occurs between short linear segments, known as LMs. Interaction of short continuous epitopes is not constrained by sequence and has the advantage of resulting in interactions with micromolar affinities which suit transient, reversible complexes such as receptor heteromers. Electrostatic interactions between epitopes of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) involved, are the key step in driving heteromer formation forward. The first step in heteromerization, involves phosphorylating Ser/Thr in an epitope containing a casein kinase 1/2-consensus site. Our data suggest that dopaminergic neurotransmission, through cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) slows down heteromerization. The negative charge, acquired by the phosphorylation of a Ser/Thr in a PKA consensus site in the Arg-rich epitope, affects the activity of the receptors involved in heteromerization by causing allosteric conformational changes, due to the repulsive effect generated by the negatively charged phosphate. In addition to modulating heteromerization, it affects the stability of the heteromers' interactions and their binding affinity. So here we have an instance where phosphorylation is not just an on/off switch, instead by weakening the noncovalent bond, heteromerization acts like a rheostat that controls the stability of the heteromer through activation or inhibition of adenylate cyclase by the neurotransmitter Dopamine depending on which Dopamine receptor it docks at. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Ligand requirements for the relaxation of adenylate cyclase from activated and inhibited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, P M; Reisinger, D M; Smiley, P A

    1983-06-21

    The turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase system binds tightly the inhibitory nucleotide GDP, and a pretreatment step with isoproterenol and GMP is required to restore activation. Under identical pretreatment conditions, the release of labeled nucleotide is complete within 1 min whereas the restoration of activation by Gpp(NH)p requires 15 min. A study of the ligand requirements of the slow step shows the following: (a) The role of GMP is that of an obligatory allosteric regulator. (b) Cholera toxin modification of the system abolishes the requirement for GMP with a considerable enhancement in the reaction rate. (c) GMP is without effect on the relaxation process with the activator Gpp(NH)p as the resident nucleotide. In sharp contrast, ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (without effect in a GDP-occupied complex) markedly potentiates alterations from the Gpp(NH)p-occupied state. (d) Formation of a GDP/guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) hybrid leads to the suppression of both F- and Gpp(NH)p activation. F- activation is restored by isoproterenol alone, while GMP is still required to restore Gpp(NH)p activation. The results suggest that covalent modification or nucleotide analogue occupancy of the regulatory complex can modify the allosteric role for GMP, with consequences for the rate of the slow step.

  16. D-1 dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic stimulation of adenylate cyclase in a clone derived from the human astrocytoma cell line G-CCM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmforth, A J; Ball, S G; Freshney, R I; Graham, D I; McNamee, H B; Vaughan, P F

    1986-09-01

    Clones have been isolated from the human astrocytoma cell line G-CCM. Homogenates of clone D384 contain an adenylate cyclase that is stimulated by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine (dopamine), noradrenaline, and isoprenaline with Ka apparent values of 4, 56, and 2.7 microM, respectively. The Ka apparent value for dopamine was increased by the D-1 antagonist cis-flupenthixol, 25 and 100 nM, to 23 and 190 microM, respectively, but was unaffected by propranolol (1 microM). Noradrenaline stimulation of adenylate cyclase was only partially inhibited by either propranolol (10 microM) or cis-flupenthixol (1 microM). Propranolol (10 microM), but not cis-flupenthixol (1 microM), prevented stimulation by isoprenaline. The stimulation of adenylate cyclase by dopamine and noradrenaline remained unchanged in the presence of phentolamine (1 microM) and sulpiride (1 microM). These results suggest that clone D384 contains both D-1 dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase. Dopamine stimulates D384 adenylate cyclase through D-1 receptors, isoprenaline via beta-receptors, and noradrenaline through both receptors.

  17. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase from pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    Preincubation of the plasma membranes from pigeon erythrocytes with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to desensitization of adenylate cyclase of the erythrocytes. The adenylate cyclase activity, measured in the presence of 10 μM isoproterenol and 50 μM GTP-γ-S, is decreased by 40% in 10 min of incubation, while the activity in the presence of 50 μM GTP-γ-S is decreased by 35% in 20 min. The decrease in the adenylate cyclase activity is due to an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of a GTP analog stable to hydrolysis and a decrease in the activity in the steady-state phase of activation. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase under the action of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is coupled with a decrease in the number of β-adrenoreceptors capable of passing into a state of high affinity for antagonists in the absence of guanylic nucleotides. The influence of the catalytic subunit on adenylate cyclase entirely models the process of desensitization of the enzyme absorbed in the influence of isoproterenol or cAMP on erythrocytes

  18. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide promotes eccrine gland sweat secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S; Watanabe, J; Ohtaki, H; Matsumoto, M; Murai, N; Nakamachi, T; Hannibal, J; Fahrenkrug, J; Hashimoto, H; Watanabe, H; Sueki, H; Honda, K; Miyazaki, A; Shioda, S

    2017-02-01

    Sweat secretion is the major function of eccrine sweat glands; when this process is disturbed (paridrosis), serious skin problems can arise. To elucidate the causes of paridrosis, an improved understanding of the regulation, mechanisms and factors underlying sweat production is required. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) exhibits pleiotropic functions that are mediated via its receptors [PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1R), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor type 1 (VPAC1R) and VPAC2R]. Although some studies have suggested a role for PACAP in the skin and several exocrine glands, the effects of PACAP on the process of eccrine sweat secretion have not been examined. To investigate the effect of PACAP on eccrine sweat secretion. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining were used to determine the expression and localization of PACAP and its receptors in mouse and human eccrine sweat glands. We injected PACAP subcutaneously into the footpads of mice and used the starch-iodine test to visualize sweat-secreting glands. Immunostaining showed PACAP and PAC1R expression by secretory cells from mouse and human sweat glands. PACAP immunoreactivity was also localized in nerve fibres around eccrine sweat glands. PACAP significantly promoted sweat secretion at the injection site, and this could be blocked by the PAC1R-antagonist PACAP6-38. VIP, an agonist of VPAC1R and VPAC2R, failed to induce sweat secretion. This is the first report demonstrating that PACAP may play a crucial role in sweat secretion via its action on PAC1R located in eccrine sweat glands. The mechanisms underlying the role of PACAP in sweat secretion may provide new therapeutic options to combat sweating disorders. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Renoprotection by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide in multiple myeloma and other kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Maderdrut, Jerome L; Lertora, Juan J L; Arimura, Akira; Batuman, Vecihi

    2008-01-10

    Renal involvement in patients with multiple myeloma complicates their treatment and shortens their life-span. The main renal lesion is a tubulointerstitial transformation with fibrosis, frequently associated with cast formation in the distal nephron that results from co-precipitation of pathological immunoglobulin light chains with Tamm-Horsfall proteins. The human renal proximal tubular reabsorption of excessive light chains by endocytosis causes cellular protein overload and activates the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB). The activation of NFkappaB promotes the synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and activates signaling pathways, such as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, Jun kinase, and p38 MAPK, thus promoting interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. We tested the concept that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), a member of the secretin/vasoactive intestinal peptide family, could prevent the development of cast nephropathies. PACAP38 inhibited myeloma light chain-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression with greater potency than dexamethasone, and attenuated the resulting cell damage in the renal proximal tubule epithelial cells. The results indicated that its effects are mediated through inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and nuclear translocation of the p50 subunit of NFkappaB via both the PAC(1) and VPAC(1) receptors. PACAP was also shown to be efficacious in other common in vivo animal models for kidney hypertrophies, including streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy and gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Thus, our studies suggest that PACAP38 could be used as a cytoprotective agent that would be effective in the treatment of renal tubule injury in multiple myeloma and other chronic kidney diseases.

  20. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide modulates catecholamine storage and exocytosis in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Dong

    Full Text Available A number of efforts have been made to understand how pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP functions as a neurotrophic and neuroprotective factor in Parkinson's disease (PD. Recently its effects on neurotransmission and underlying mechanisms have generated interest. In the present study, we investigate the effects of PACAP on catecholamine storage and secretion in PC12 cells with amperometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. PACAP increases quantal release induced by high K+ without significantly regulating the frequency of vesicle fusion events. TEM data indicate that the increased volume of the vesicle is mainly the result of enlargement of the fluidic space around the dense core. Moreover, the number of docked vesicles isn't modulated by PACAP. When cells are acutely treated with L-DOPA, the vesicular volume and quantal release both increase dramatically. It is likely that the characteristics of amperometric spikes from L-DOPA treated cells are associated with increased volume of individual vesicles rather than a direct effect on the mechanics of exocytosis. Treatment with PACAP versus L-DOPA results in different profiles of the dynamics of exocytosis. Release via the fusion pore prior to full exocytosis was observed with the same frequency following treatment with PACAP and L-DOPA. However, release events have a shorter duration and higher average current after PACAP treatment compared to L-DOPA. Furthermore, PACAP reduced the proportion of spikes having rapid decay time and shortened the decay time of both fast and slow spikes. In contrast, the distributions of the amperometric spike decay for both fast and slow spikes were shifted to longer time following L-DOPA treatment. Compared to L-DOPA, PACAP may produce multiple favorable effects on dopaminergic neurons, including protecting dopaminergic neurons against neurodegeneration and potentially regulating dopamine storage and release, making it a promising

  1. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M. Hurley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger and hedonic-related (palatability drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding; surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding. In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc, through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive.

  2. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko eHattori

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP is a neuropeptide acting as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator, or neurotrophic factor. PACAP is widely expressed throughout the brain and exerts its functions through the PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1. Recent studies reveal that genetic variants of the PACAP and PAC1 genes are associated with mental disorders, and several behavioral abnormalities of PACAP knockout (KO mice are reported. However, an insufficient number of backcrosses was made using PACAP KO mice on the C57BL/6J background due to their postnatal mortality. To elucidate the effects of PACAP on neuropsychiatric function, the PACAP gene was knocked out in F1 hybrid mice (C57BL/6J x 129SvEv for appropriate control of the genetic background. The PACAP KO mice were then subjected to a behavioral test battery. PACAP deficiency had no significant effects on neurological screen. As shown previously, the mice exhibited significantly increased locomotor activity in a novel environment and abnormal anxiety-like behavior, while no obvious differences between genotypes were shown in home cage activity. In contrast to previous reports, the PACAP KO mice showed normal prepulse inhibition and slightly decreased depression-like behavior. Previous study demonstrates that the social interaction in a resident-intruder test was decreased in PACAP KO mice. On the other hand, we showed that PACAP KO mice exhibited increased social interaction in Crawley’s three-chamber social approach test, although PACAP KO had no significant impact on social interaction in a home cage. PACAP KO mice also exhibited mild performance deficit in working memory in an eight-arm radial maze and the T-maze, while they did not show any significant abnormalities in the left-right discrimination task in the T-maze. These results suggest that PACAP has an important role in the regulation of locomotor activity, social behavior, anxiety-like behavior and, potentially

  3. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in fetal cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Stephen J; King, Jeffrey C; Brees, Carol K; Moore, Joseph P

    2014-09-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is a centrally-acting peptide with highest concentration within the limbic area of the brain. PACAP is also expressed in and affects the functions of vascular and nervous tissues, endocrine glands, and the placenta. PACAP appears to be associated with the 'fight-or-flight' response to emergency partly through its effect on adrenal production of cortisol and catecholamines. We sought to explore the impact of labor as a stressor on the level of PACAP in the fetus, and hypothesized that PACAP levels would be increased when labor, abnormal fetal heart tracing, or fetal growth impairment was evident. Fetal cord venous blood samples were collected immediately after delivery from a random group of women undergoing either vaginal or Cesarean delivery. The blood was placed in chilled EDTA-aprotinin containing tubes, centrifuged, and stored at -80°C for PACAP immunoassay. Delivery data were abstracted for analysis. The level of PACAP in cord blood was similar in both males and females. There was a trend toward higher levels in the cord blood of fetuses delivered by Cesarean compared to those delivered vaginally. PACAP levels were unrelated to birth weight, Apgar scores, and the presence or absence of labor prior to delivery. While PACAP and its receptor are expressed in placenta, and PACAP protein is found in cord blood, no effect of labor stress on PACAP was found. Further research is needed to understand the role of PACAP in gestation and parturition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of cardiopulmonary bypass on beta adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase system on surfaces of peripheral lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, A; Tian, Y; Jin, S

    2000-01-01

    The experimental results showed that the level of CAMP, the ratio of cAPM to cGMP, IL-2R expression and IL-2 production in vitro in lymphocytes immediate and 2 weeks after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were significantly lower than those before anesthetics in the patients undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB. These findings suggested that CPB could cause serious damage to adrenergic beta receptor-adenylate cyclase system on circulating lymphocytes surfaces, which might be one of the mechanisms resulting in immunosuppression after open heart surgery with CPB.

  5. The Arabidopsis thalianaK+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) contains a functional cytosolic adenylate cyclase catalytic centre

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Younis, Inas

    2015-11-27

    Adenylate Cyclases (ACs) catalyze the formation of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) from adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP). Although cAMP is increasingly recognized as an important signaling molecule in higher plants, ACs have remained somewhat elusive. Here we used a search motif derived from experimentally tested guanylyl cyclases (GCs), substituted the residues essential for substrate specificity and identified the Arabidopsis thaliana K+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) as one of several candidate ACs. Firstly, we show that a recombinant N-terminal, cytosolic domain of AtKUP71-100 is able to complement the AC-deficient mutant cyaA in Escherichia coli and thus restoring the fermentation of lactose, and secondly, we demonstrate with both enzyme immunoassays and mass spectrometry that a recombinant AtKUP71-100 generates cAMP in vitro.

  6. Brain histamine H1- and H2-receptors and histamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase: effects of antipsychotics and antidepressants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupet, J.; Szuches-Myers, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    Several classes of psychoactive compounds have been investigated for their effects on histamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cell-free preparations from the guinea-pig cerebral cortex. Their inhibitory actions on this enzyme system have been compared with their abilities to displace [ 3 H]pyrilamine and [ 3 H]cimetidine from histamine H 1 - and H 2 -receptor sites, respectively. The results of these studies show that compounds which inhibited the histamine-sensitive cyclase were also displacers of either [ 3 H]pyrilamine or [ 3 H]cimetidine or both 3 H-ligands from their binding sites. In spite of the lack of a correlation between binding and cyclase antagonism it was observed that compounds that displace both ligands showed greater inhibition of the cyclase than those that have affinities for sites labeled by one or the other ligand. It was concluded that antihistamines, the antipsychotics and the antidepressants share a common property through their antagonism of H 1 -receptors and that may be responsible for their sedative side effect. (Auth.)

  7. Phosphoproteomics of cAMP signaling of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin in mouse dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Jakub; Fabrik, I.; Linhartová, Irena; Link, M.; Černý, Ondřej; Stulík, J.; Šebo, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, NOV 24 (2017), č. článku 16298. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28126A; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-14547S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : GTPASE-ACTIVATING-PROTEIN * SALT-INDUCIBLE KINASES * GENE ONTOLOGY Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  8. Acylation of lysine 983 is sufficient for toxin activity of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basar, T.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Bezoušková, Silvia; Hackett, M.; Šebo, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 276, č. 1 (2001), s. 348-354 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/98/0432; GA ČR GV310/96/K102; GA AV ČR IAA5020907; GA MŠk ME 167; GA MŠk VS96149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A53/98:Z5-020-9ii Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 7.258, year: 2001

  9. Membrane Restructuring by Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin, a Member of the RTX Toxin Family

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martín, C.; Requero, M. A.; Mašín, Jiří; Konopásek, Ivo; Goni, F. M.; Šebo, Peter; Ostolaza, H.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 186, č. 12 (2004), s. 3760-3765 ISSN 0021-9193 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020907 Grant - others:GA European Union contract(XX) QLK2-1999-0.0556 Keywords : atc * lipid Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.146, year: 2004

  10. Internation of Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase with CD11b/CD18

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    El-Azami-El-Idrisi, M.; Bauche, C.; Loucká, Jiřina; Osička, Radim; Šebo, Peter; Ladant, D.; Leclerc, C.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 278, č. 40 (2003), s. 38514-38521 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IPP1050128; GA ČR GA310/01/0934; GA AV ČR IAA5020907 Grant - others:GA by National Institutes of Health Grant(XX) 55000334; GA QLK2-CT-1999(XX) 00556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : cyaa * rtx * cd11b Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.482, year: 2003

  11. Inflammasome Activation by Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Directs Th17 Responses and Protection against Bordetella pertussis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dunne, A.; Ross, P. J.; Pospíšilová, Eva; Mašín, Jiří; Meaney, A.; Sutton, C. E.; Iwakura, Y.; Tschopp, J.; Šebo, Peter; Mills, K. H. G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 187, č. 3 (2010), s. 1711-1719 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA AV ČR IAA500200914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ADAPTIVE IMMUNE-RESPONSES * IL-17-PRODUCING T-CELLS * HOST-DEFENSE Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 5.745, year: 2010

  12. Oligomerization is involved in pore formation by Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtová, Jana; Basler, Marek; Osička, Radim; Knapp, O.; Maier, E.; Černý, J.; Benada, Oldřich; Benz, R.; Šebo, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 23, - (2009), s. 2831-2843 ISSN 0892-6638 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200914; GA MŠk 1M0506 Grant - others:-(XE) LSHB-CT-2003-503582 THERAVAC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : blue native electrophoresis * planar lipid bilayer membranes * pore-forming activity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.401, year: 2009

  13. Down-regulation of Cell Surface Cyclic AMP Receptors and Desensitization of Cyclic AMP-stimulated Adenylate Cyclase by Cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium discoideum. Kinetics and Concentration Dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1987-01-01

    cAMP binds to Dictyostelium discoideum surface receptors and induces a transient activation of adenylate cyclase, which is followed by desensitization. cAMP also induces a loss of detectable surface receptors (down-regulation). Cells were incubated with constant cAMP concentrations, washed free of

  14. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide, nitric oxide synthase, and their receptors in human and rat sphenopalatine ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csati, A; Tajti, J; Kuris, A

    2012-01-01

    for the demonstration of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), glutamine synthetase (GS), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), VIP and PACAP common receptors (VPAC1, VPAC2), and PACAP receptor (PAC1). In addition, double labeling...

  15. A novel antithrombotic effect of sulforaphane via activation of platelet adenylate cyclase: ex vivo and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Chen, Wei-Fan; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Duen-Suey; Hsiao, George; Hsu, Chung-Yi; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate, which can be found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cabbage. Sulforaphane was found to have very potent inhibitory effects on tumor growth through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of sulforaphane on platelet activation and its relative issues. Activation of platelets caused by arterial thrombosis is relevant to a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine the in vivo antithrombotic effects of sulforaphane and its possible mechanisms in platelet activation. Sulforaphane (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) was effective in reducing the mortality of ADP-induced acute pulmonary thromboembolism in mice. Other in vivo studies also revealed that sulforaphane (0.25 mg/kg) significantly prolonged platelet plug formation in mice. In addition, sulforaphane (15-75 μM) exhibited more-potent activity of inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Sulforaphane inhibited platelet activation accompanied by inhibiting relative Ca(2+) mobilization; phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt; and hydroxyl radical (OH(●)) formation. Sulforaphane markedly increased cyclic (c)AMP, but not cyclic (c)GMP levels, and stimulated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation. SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, but not ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxal in-1-one), an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, obviously reversed the sulforaphane-mediated effects on platelet aggregation; PKC activation, p38 MAPK, Akt and VASP phosphorylation; and OH(●) formation. Furthermore, a PI3-kinase inhibitor (LY294002) and a p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) both significantly diminished PKC activation and p38 MAPK and Akt phosphorylation; in contrast, a PKC inhibitor (RO318220) did not diminish p38 MAPK or Akt phosphorylation stimulated by collagen. This

  16. Adenylate cyclase toxin translocates across target cell membrane without forming a pore

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Osičková, Adriana; Mašín, Jiří; Fayolle, C.; Krůšek, Jan; Basler, Marek; Pospíšilová, Eva; Leclerc, C.; Osička, Radim; Šebo, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 6 (2010), s. 1550-1562 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200914; GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA MŠk 1M0506; GA MŠk 2B06161 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ANTIGEN PRESENTATION PATHWAY * BORDETELLA- PERTUSSIS * INVASIVE ACTIVITY Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.819, year: 2010

  17. Galanin can inhibit insulin release by a mechanism other than membrane hyperpolarization or inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, G W; Le Marchand-Brustel, Y; Yada, T; Russo, L L; Bliss, C R; Cormont, M; Monge, L; Van Obberghen, E

    1989-05-05

    -dependent Ca2+ channels. One suggested mechanism for the action of galanin is inhibition of adenylate cyclase. However, it was found that galanin inhibits insulin release even in the presence of 8-Br-cAMP, an agent which effectively bypasses adenylate cyclase. Therefore, an additional mechanism for the inhibitory effect of galanin must be present. All of the effects of galanin were sensitive to pertussis toxin. These data suggest two G-protein-dependent actions of galanin, one to hyperpolarize the plasma membrane and one at a distal point in stimulus-secretion coupling, close to the exocytotic event.

  18. Kynurenic Acid Inhibits the Electrical Stimulation Induced Elevated Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Expression in the TNC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Körtési

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMigraine is a primary headache of imprecisely known mechanism, but activation of the trigeminovascular system (TS appears to be essential during the attack. Intensive research has recently focused on pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and the kynurenine systems as potential pathogenic factors.AimWe investigated the link between these important mediators and the effects of kynurenic acid (KYNA and its synthetic analog (KYNA-a on PACAP expression in the rat trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC in a TS stimulation model related to migraine mechanisms.MethodsAdult male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with KYNA, KYNA-a, the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801, or saline (vehicle. Next, the trigeminal ganglion (TRG was electrically stimulated, the animals were transcardially perfused following 180 min, and the TNC was removed. In the TNC samples, 38 amino acid form of PACAP (PACAP1–38-like radioimmunoactivity was measured by radioimmunoassay, the relative optical density of preproPACAP was assessed by Western blot analysis, and PACAP1–38 mRNA was detected by real-time PCR.Results and conclusionElectrical TRG stimulation resulted in significant increases of PACAP1–38-LI, preproPACAP, and PACAP1–38 mRNA in the TNC. These increases were prevented by the pretreatments with KYNA, KYNA-a, and MK-801. This is the first study to provide evidence for a direct link between PACAP and the kynurenine system during TS activation.

  19. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chp Chemosensory System Regulates Intracellular cAMP Levels by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Nanette B.; Holliday, Phillip M.; Klem, Erich; Cann, Martin J.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Multiple virulence systems in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are regulated by the second messenger signaling molecule adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). Production of cAMP by the putative adenylate cyclase enzyme CyaB represents a critical control point for virulence gene regulation. To identify regulators of CyaB, we screened a transposon insertion library for mutants with reduced intracellular cAMP. The majority of insertions resulting in reduced cAMP mapped to the Chp gene cluster encoding a putative chemotaxis-like chemosensory system. Further genetic analysis of the Chp system revealed that it has both positive and negative effects on intracellular cAMP and that it regulates cAMP levels by modulating CyaB activity. The Chp system was previously implicated in the production and function of type IV pili (TFP). Given that cAMP and the cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulator Vfr control TFP biogenesis gene expression, we explored the relationship between cAMP, the Chp system and TFP regulation. We discovered that the Chp system controls TFP production through modulation of cAMP while control of TFP-dependent twitching motility is cAMP-independent. Overall, our data define a novel function for a chemotaxis-like system in controlling cAMP production and establish a regulatory link between the Chp system, TFP and other cAMP-dependent virulence systems. PMID:20345659

  20. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cockroach brain: evidence for a distinct dopamine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, G.L.; Gole, J.W.D.; Notman, H.J.; Downer, R.G.H.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine increases cyclic AMP production in crude membrane preparations of cockroach brain with plateaus in cyclic AMP production occurring between 1-10 ..mu..M and 10 mM. Maximal production of cyclic AMP is 2.25 fold greater than that of control values. Octopamine also increases cyclic AMP production with a Ka of 1.4 ..mu..M and maximal production 3.5 fold greater than that of control. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not increase cyclic AMP production. The effects of octopamine and dopamine are fully additive. The vertebrate dopamine agonists ADTN and epinine stimulate the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase (AC) with Ka values of 4.5 and 0.6 ..mu..M respectively and with maximal effectiveness 1.7 fold greater than that of control. The selective D/sub 2/-dopamine agonist LY-171555 stimulates cyclic AMP production to a similar extent with a Ka of 50 ..mu..M. Other dopamine agonists have no stimulatory effects. With the exception of mianserin, /sup 3/H-piflutixol is displaced from brain membranes by dopamine antagonists with an order of potency similar to that observed for the inhibition of dopamine-sensitive AC. The results indicate that the octopamine- and dopamine-sensitive AC in cockroach brain can be distinguished pharmacologically and the dopamine receptors coupled to AC have pharmacological characteristics distinct from vertebrate D/sup 1/- and D/sup 2/-dopamine receptors. 33 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cockroach brain: evidence for a distinct dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, G.L.; Gole, J.W.D.; Notman, H.J.; Downer, R.G.H.

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine increases cyclic AMP production in crude membrane preparations of cockroach brain with plateaus in cyclic AMP production occurring between 1-10 μM and 10 mM. Maximal production of cyclic AMP is 2.25 fold greater than that of control values. Octopamine also increases cyclic AMP production with a Ka of 1.4 μM and maximal production 3.5 fold greater than that of control. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not increase cyclic AMP production. The effects of octopamine and dopamine are fully additive. The vertebrate dopamine agonists ADTN and epinine stimulate the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase (AC) with Ka values of 4.5 and 0.6 μM respectively and with maximal effectiveness 1.7 fold greater than that of control. The selective D 2 -dopamine agonist LY-171555 stimulates cyclic AMP production to a similar extent with a Ka of 50 μM. Other dopamine agonists have no stimulatory effects. With the exception of mianserin, 3 H-piflutixol is displaced from brain membranes by dopamine antagonists with an order of potency similar to that observed for the inhibition of dopamine-sensitive AC. The results indicate that the octopamine- and dopamine-sensitive AC in cockroach brain can be distinguished pharmacologically and the dopamine receptors coupled to AC have pharmacological characteristics distinct from vertebrate D 1 - and D 2 -dopamine receptors. 33 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  2. Mechanism of control of the turkey erythrocyte beta-adrenoceptor dependent adenylate cyclase by guanyl nucleotides: a minimum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S; Tolkovsky, A M; Levitzki, A

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of native turkey erythrocyte membranes with GMP and epinephrine produces a highly active but metastable form of adenylate cyclase which decays slowly to basal native state. The decay process is greatly facilitated by GTP and GDP beta S1, and is further enhanced by 1-epinephrine. This decay process is prevented reversibly by GMP. GppNHp, like GMP, prevents the decay process first reversibly, but with time stabilizes the highly active state in a persistently active state. The expression of the catalytic activity of the enzyme in the metastable state can also be inhibited reversibly by GTP, GDP beta S and GMP at all times during the decay process. The GppNHp stabilized form is not susceptible to nucleotide inhibition. Thus, two forms of the guanyl nucleotide unit are postulated to exist: an "open" and a "closed" form. In the presence of hormone and GTP, the enzyme shuttles between these two forms continuously. GMP and GppNHp favor the complete conversion to the "open" form in the presence of beta-agonist. Evidence is also presented for the existence of two GTP dependent processes which exhibit different apparent affinities towards the nucleotide: A high affinity GTP binding process is essential for the fruitful coupling between receptor and enzyme, and a low affinity GTPase site which is responsible for the termination of the hormonal signal.

  3. Kinetics of interaction between beta-receptors, GTP protein, and the catalytic unit of turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkovsky, A M; Braun, S; Levitzki, A

    1982-01-01

    The kinetics of turkey erythrocyte membrane adenylate cyclase activation by beta-agonists and guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate is explored as a function of the concentration of the GTP regulatory protein and of the catalytic unit. It was found that the overall kinetics of activation is first order and is independent of the concentration of the GTP regulatory unit N, the catalytic unit C, and of hormone over a very wide concentration range. It was established that the rate-limiting step does not involve GDP dissociation from the inactive N unit or the association between activated N' and C. Also, it was found that guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate binding occurs in a random fashion and is not hormone dependent. These results enable us to exclude models of the sequential type in which N in its inactive form is bound to receptor R, is released in an active form N' upon hormone activation, and then binds to C, activating the latter. An acceptable model that accounts for all of the data conforms to the original formulation of "collision coupling" in which N is tightly associated to C at all times.

  4. The effects of isatin (indole-2, 3-dione on pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-induced hyperthermia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth Gábor

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that centrally administered natriuretic peptides and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP-38 have hyperthermic properties. Isatin (indole-2, 3-dione is an endogenous indole that has previously been found to inhibit hyperthermic effects of natriuretic peptides. In this study the aim was to investigate the effects of isatin on thermoregulatory actions of PACAP-38, in rats. Results One μg intracerebroventricular (icv. injection of PACAP-38 had hyperthermic effect in male, Wistar rats, with an onset of the effect at 2 h and a decline by the 6th h after administration. Intraperitoneal (ip. injection of different doses of isatin (25-50 mg/kg significantly decreased the hyperthermic effect of 1 μg PACAP-38 (icv., whereas 12.5 mg/kg isatin (ip. had no inhibiting effect. Isatin alone did not modify the body temperature of the animals. Conclusion The mechanisms that participate in the mediation of the PACAP-38-induced hyperthermia may be modified by isatin. The capability of isatin to antagonize the hyperthermia induced by all members of the natriuretic peptide family and by PACAP-38 makes it unlikely to be acting directly on receptors for natriuretic peptides or on those for PACAP in these hyperthermic processes.

  5. Comparison between dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase and 3H-SCH 23390 binding in rat striatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, P.H.; Groenvald, F.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Methods for measuring 3 H-SCH 23990 binding and dopamine (DA) stimulated adenylate cyclase (AC) were established in identical tissue preparations and under similar experimental conditions. Pharmacological characterization revealed that both assays involved interaction with the D1 receptor or closely associated sites. In order to investigate whether the binding sites for 3 H-SCH 23390 and DA in fact are identical, the antagonistic effects of a variety of pharmacologically active compounds were examined. Surprisingly, the K/sub i/-values obtained from Schild-plot analysis of the antagonism of DA-stimulated AC, were 80-240 times higher than the K/sub i/-values obtained from competition curves of 3 H-SCH 23390 binding. Since both assays were performed under identical conditions, the differences in K/sub i/-values indicate the possibility of different binding sites for DA and 3 H-SCH 23390 or, that DA and 3 -SCH 23390 label different states of the same receptor. 19 references, 7 figures, 2 tables

  6. Lack of adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1): consequences on corticospinal tract development and on locomotor recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nait Taleb Ali, H; Morel, M P; Doulazmi, M; Scotto-Lomassese, S; Gaspar, P; Dusart, I; Bennis, M

    2014-02-26

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling pathways are involved in axonal growth and regeneration. The calcium-calmodulin- stimulated adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1), a regulator of cAMP levels, is strongly expressed in the corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN) in cerebral cortex layer V during development, but its role in the development of the corticospinal tract (CST) is unknown. Here, we analyse the organization of the CST pathway using anterograde and retrograde tracers in the barrelless (brl) mouse that carries an inactivating mutation of the AC1 gene. We show that in brl mice the general organization of the CST is normal but there is an increase in the number of axons in the ipsilateral contingent in the dorsal and ventral medial funiculi of the cervical spinal cord. The density of CSMN in layer V of the motor cortex is increased in brl compared to wild-type mice. Thus, lack of AC1 likely perturbs late phases of CSMN and CST development. Next, we examine the motor recovery after a spinal cord injury (SCI). We find that brl mice show enhanced locomotor functions as assessed by the BMS (Basso mouse scale) as early as 6h and up to 6 weeks after SCI, indicating a smaller responsiveness of brl mice to SCI. It is therefore possible that developmental effects on motor systems might decrease the locomotor effects consecutive to a SCI. This point is particularly important with regards to the use of transgenic animals for testing SCI recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The circadian neuropeptide PDF signals preferentially through a specific adenylate cyclase isoform AC3 in M pacemakers of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Duvall

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF is essential for normal circadian function in Drosophila. It synchronizes the phases of M pacemakers, while in E pacemakers it decelerates their cycling and supports their amplitude. The PDF receptor (PDF-R is present in both M and subsets of E cells. Activation of PDF-R stimulates cAMP increases in vitro and in M cells in vivo. The present study asks: What is the identity of downstream signaling components that are associated with PDF receptor in specific circadian pacemaker neurons? Using live imaging of intact fly brains and transgenic RNAi, we show that adenylate cyclase AC3 underlies PDF signaling in M cells. Genetic disruptions of AC3 specifically disrupt PDF responses: they do not affect other Gs-coupled GPCR signaling in M cells, they can be rescued, and they do not represent developmental alterations. Knockdown of the Drosophila AKAP-like scaffolding protein Nervy also reduces PDF responses. Flies with AC3 alterations show behavioral syndromes consistent with known roles of M pacemakers as mediated by PDF. Surprisingly, disruption of AC3 does not alter PDF responses in E cells--the PDF-R(+ LNd. Within M pacemakers, PDF-R couples preferentially to a single AC, but PDF-R association with a different AC(s is needed to explain PDF signaling in the E pacemakers. Thus critical pathways of circadian synchronization are mediated by highly specific second messenger components. These findings support a hypothesis that PDF signaling components within target cells are sequestered into "circadian signalosomes," whose compositions differ between E and M pacemaker cell types.

  8. Effect of modulators of cytoskeletal function on desensitization and recovery of PGE2-responsive ovarian adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zor, U; Strulovici, B; Lamprecht, S A; Amsterdam, A; Oplatka, A; Lindner, H R

    1979-12-01

    Exposure of cultured Graafian follicles to PGE2 for 20 h resulted in a loss of the cyclic AMP response to fresh hormone. This desensitization was prevented by addition to the medium of D2O (25--50%) or Li+ (0.6--6 mM), agents believed to stabilize microtubules, as well as by phalloidin (1.0--10 microM), believed to stabilize the polymerized state of actin, in a dose-dependent manner. The spontaneous recovery of responsiveness to PGE2 upon incubation of refractory follicles for 6 h in hormone-free medium was prevented by addition to the medium of cytochalasin B (CB; 3 microgram/ml) or of the actin-binding myosin subfragment HMM S-1 (80 microgram/ml) or of anti-actin serum; viz. by agents likely to interfere with microfilament function. D2O (50%) caused morphological damage to the inner layer of the membrana granulosa and severe depression of protein synthesis. The other drugs used (phalloidin, LiCl and cytochalasin B) had no such effects. Resensitization of refractory follicles was also prevented by cycloheximide (10 micrograms/ml) and by actinomycin D (10 micrograms/ml). It is speculated that the recovery process may involve the insertion of a newly synthesized protein, such as PG-receptor, into the membrane by a mechanism dependent on microfilament action. These findings provide suggestive evidence for the hypothesis that cytoskeletal elements associated with the cell membrane take part in the modulation of the adenylate cyclase response to hormones.

  9. Stimulatory GTP regulatory unit Ns and the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase are tightly associated: mechanistic consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arad, H; Rosenbusch, J P; Levitzki, A

    1984-11-01

    Turkey erythrocyte membranes were solubilized in the mild detergent octylpenta(oxyethylene) [CH3(CH2)7-(OCH2CH2)5OH], which possesses a high critical micelle concentration (approximately equal to 6 mM) and forms small, dynamic micelles. Both the native enzyme Ns(GDP) X C and the p[NH]ppG-preactivated species N's X p[NH]ppG X C' were found to possess the same molecular mass of 215,000 +/- 17,000 daltons. Both enzyme species migrate as a tight complex between Ns and C on both gel permeation columns and on DEAE-Sephacel columns in detergent. The two functional units, Ns and C, remain associated even in dilute detergent solutions and throughout a 300- to 400-fold purification in octylpoly(oxyethylene). These results strongly support the view that Ns and C do not come apart during the process of enzyme activation by the beta-adrenergic receptor. Furthermore, these results strongly support our previous assertion that the beta-adrenergic receptor activation of adenylate cyclase is by a simple "collision coupling" between the receptor and NsC. These results are not compatible with shuttle mechanisms that postulate that Ns physically migrates from the receptor R to the catalytic unit C and back during the activation cycle, as suggested by Citri and Schramm [Citri, Y. & Schramm, M. (1980) Nature (London) 287, 297-300] and by De Lean et al. [De Lean, A., Stadel, J. M. & Lefkowitz, R. J. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 5108-5117].

  10. Receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of arachidonic acid release in 3T3 fibroblasts. Selective susceptibility to islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, T.; Ui, M.

    1985-01-01

    Thrombin exhibited diverse effects on mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. It (a) decreased cAMP in the cell suspension, (b) inhibited adenylate cyclase in the Lubrol-permeabilized cell suspension in a GTP-dependent manner, increased releases of (c) arachidonic acid and (d) inositol from the cell monolayer prelabeled with these labeled compounds, (e) increased 45 Ca 2+ uptake into the cell monolayer, and (f) increased 86 Rb + uptake into the cell monolayer in a ouabain-sensitive manner. Most of the effects were reproduced by bradykinin, platelet-activating factor, and angiotensin II. The receptors for these agonists are thus likely to be linked to three separate effector systems: the adenylate cyclase inhibition, the phosphoinositide breakdown leading to Ca 2+ mobilization and phospholipase A2 activation, and the Na,K-ATPase activation. Among the effects of these agonists, (a), (b), (c), and (e) were abolished, but (d) and (f) were not, by prior treatment of the cells with islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates the Mr = 41,000 protein, the alpha-subunit of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (Ni), thereby abolishing receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The effects (a), (c), (d), and (e) of thrombin, but not (b), were mimicked by A23187, a calcium ionophore. The effects of A23187, in contrast to those of receptor agonists, were not affected by the treatment of cells with IAP. Thus, the IAP substrate, the alpha-subunit of Ni, or the protein alike, may play an additional role in signal transduction arising from the Ca 2+ -mobilizing receptors, probably mediating process(es) distal to phosphoinositide breakdown and proximal to Ca 2+ gating

  11. Photo-dynamics of the lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzkofer, A.; Tanwar, M.; Veetil, S. K.; Kateriya, S.; Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P.

    2013-09-01

    The absorption and emission spectroscopic behavior of lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain consisting of a BLUF domain (BLUF = Blue Light sensor Using Flavin) and a cyclase homology domain was studied in the dark, during blue-light exposure and after blue-light exposure at a temperature of 4 °C. The BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics observed for snap-frozen NgPAC2 was lost by lyophilization (no signaling state formation with flavin absorption red-shift). Instead, blue-light photo-excitation of lyophilized NgPAC2 caused sterically restricted Tyr-Tyr cross-linking (o,o‧-ditysosine formation) and partial flavin cofactor reduction.

  12. Absorption and fluorescence characteristics of photo-activated adenylate cyclase nano-clusters from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P. [Institut fuer Biologie/Experimentelle Biophysik, Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 42, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Kateriya, S. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India)

    2012-01-02

    Graphical abstract: Protein color center emissions were observed in the wavelength range from 340 nm to 900 nm from nano-clusters of the photo-activated adenylate cyclase (nPAC) from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adenylyl cyclase nPAC in aqueous pH 7.5 buffer dissolved only to nano-clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano-cluster size was determined by light attenuation (scattering) measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size of the nano-clusters was growing by coalescing during observation period. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In nPAC nano-clusters color centers were present in emission range of 360-900 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nPAC color center emission is compared with fluorescent protein emission. - Abstract: The spectroscopic characteristics of BLUF (BLUF = sensor of blue light using flavin) domain containing soluble adenylate cyclase (nPAC = Naegleria photo-activated cyclase) samples from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain is studied at room temperature. The absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic development in the dark was investigated over two weeks. Attenuation coefficient spectra, fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence excitation distributions were measured. Thawing of frozen nPAC samples gave solutions with varying protein nano-cluster size and varying flavin, tyrosine, tryptophan, and protein color-center emission. Protein color-center emission was observed in the wavelength range of 360-900 nm with narrow emission bands of small Stokes shift and broad emission bands of large Stokes shift. The emission spectra evolved in time with protein nano-cluster aging.

  13. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins in Hashimoto's thyroiditis measured by radioreceptor assay and adenylate cyclase stimulation and their relationship to HLA-D alleles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliddal, H.; Bech, K.; Feldt-Rasmussen, U.; Thomsen, M.; Ryder, L.P.; Hansen, J.M.; Siersbaek-Nielsen, K.; Friis, T.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins, measured by both radioreceptor assay and adenylate cyclase stimulation, and the HLA alleles was studied in 41 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TSH binding-inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII) were detected in 9 (22%) patients, and human thyroid adenylate cyclase-stimulating immunoglobulins (HTACS) were found in 21 (51%) patients. Only 2 patients were positive in both assays, and an inverse relationship was observed between TBII and HTACS. In the 21 HTACS-positive patients, HLA-Dw5 was found in 1 subject, compared to 8 of the 20 HTACS-negative patients (P < 0.01), while 4 of the 9 TBII-positive patients had HLA-Dw5 compared to 5 of the 32 TBII-negative subjects (P = 0.09).No significant relations were observed between the presence of HTACS or TBII and HLA-Dw3 or HLA-B8. It is concluded that TBII and HTACS are produced independently in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and that the production of these autoantibodies seems to be related to the HLA-D region in this disease

  14. Angiotensin II potentiates prostaglandin stimulation of cyclic AMP levels in intact bovine adrenal medulla cells but not adenylate cyclase in permeabilized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarder, M R; Plevin, R; Marriott, D B

    1988-10-25

    The level of cyclic AMP in primary cultures of bovine adrenal medulla cells is elevated by prostaglandin E1. Angiotensin II is commonly reported to act on receptors linked to phosphoinositide metabolism or to inhibition of adenylate cyclase. We have investigated the effect of angiotensin II on prostaglandin E1-stimulated cyclic AMP levels in these primary cultures. Rather than reducing cyclic AMP levels, we have found that angiotensin II powerfully potentiates prostaglandin E1-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in intact cells, both in the presence and absence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors. The 50% maximal response was similar to that for stimulation of phosphoinositide breakdown by angiotensin II in these cultures. The potentiation of stimulated cyclic AMP levels was seen, although to a smaller maximum, with the protein kinase C (Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme) activating phorbol ester tetradecanoyl phorbolacetate and with the synthetic diacylglycerol 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol; pretreatment (24 h) with active phorbol ester, which would be expected to diminish protein kinase C levels, attenuated the angiotensin II potentiation of cyclic AMP. Using digitonin-permeabilized cells we showed that adenylate cyclase activity was stimulated by prostaglandin E1 with the same dose-response relationship as was cyclic AMP accumulation in intact cells, but the permeabilized cells showed no response to angiotensin II. The results are discussed with respect to the hypothesis that the angiotensin II influence on cyclic AMP levels is mediated, in part, by diacylglycerol stimulation of protein kinase C.

  15. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation of phospholipase A2 and of adenylate cyclase in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by different mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.B.; Halenda, S.P.; Bylund, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor activation on adenylate cyclase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor gene is biphasic. At lower concentrations of epinephrine forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is inhibited, but at higher concentrations the inhibition is reversed. Both of these effects are blocked by the alpha 2 antagonist yohimbine but not by the alpha 1 antagonist prazosin. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin attenuates inhibition at lower concentrations of epinephrine and greatly potentiates forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production at higher concentrations of epinephrine. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation also causes arachidonic acid mobilization, presumably via phospholipase A2. This effect is blocked by yohimbine, quinacrine, removal of extracellular Ca2+, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Quinacrine and removal of extracellular Ca2+, in contrast, have no effect on the enhanced forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. Thus, it appears that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor in these cells can simultaneously activate distinct signal transduction systems; inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase A2, both via G1, and potentiation of cyclic AMP production by a different (pertussis toxin-insensitive) mechanism

  16. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation of phospholipase A2 and of adenylate cyclase in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by different mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.B.; Halenda, S.P.; Bylund, D.B. (Univ. of Missouri-Columbia (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The effect of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor activation on adenylate cyclase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor gene is biphasic. At lower concentrations of epinephrine forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is inhibited, but at higher concentrations the inhibition is reversed. Both of these effects are blocked by the alpha 2 antagonist yohimbine but not by the alpha 1 antagonist prazosin. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin attenuates inhibition at lower concentrations of epinephrine and greatly potentiates forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production at higher concentrations of epinephrine. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation also causes arachidonic acid mobilization, presumably via phospholipase A2. This effect is blocked by yohimbine, quinacrine, removal of extracellular Ca2+, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Quinacrine and removal of extracellular Ca2+, in contrast, have no effect on the enhanced forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. Thus, it appears that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor in these cells can simultaneously activate distinct signal transduction systems; inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase A2, both via G1, and potentiation of cyclic AMP production by a different (pertussis toxin-insensitive) mechanism.

  17. Multiple pertussis toxin substrates as candidates for regulatory G proteins of adenylate cyclase coupled to the somatostatin receptor in primary rat astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebicke-Haerter, P J; Seregi, A; Wurster, S; Schobert, A; Allgaier, C; Hertting, G

    1988-10-01

    The involvement of G proteins in receptor mediated astroglial cAMP formation was studied. Isoproterenol or prostaglandin E2 stimulated adenylate cyclase of primary astroglial cells was inhibited by somatostatin. Preincubation of cells with increasing concentrations of islet activating protein (IAP) diminished somatostatin inhibition of adenylate cyclase. At an IAP concentration of 50 ng/ml somatostatin inhibition was completely abolished. Studies on IAP catalyzed 32P-ADP-ribosylation of astroglial cell particulate material revealed an incorporation of radiolabel into three polypeptides in the molecular weight range of 41,000-39,000 Dalton. Pretreatment of intact cells with IAP reduced radiolabeling of this molecular species in a concentration dependent manner. No further radiolabeling above background level was detectable after pretreatment of cultures with 10 ng IAP/ml or more. At present, the occurrence of at least three IAP substrates (G proteins) does not permit an identification of the somatostatin receptor coupled G protein. Rather, the finding reveals that astrocytes are endowed with multiple variants of GTP binding proteins likely to be coupled to different receptors.

  18. Efficient Ex Vivo Stimulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific T Cells by Genetically Detoxified Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Antigen Toxodids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wilkinson, K. A.; Šimšová, Marcela; Schölvinck, E.; Šebo, Peter; Leclerc, C.; Voredermeier, H. M.; Dickson, S. J.; Brown, J. R.; Davidson, R. N.; Pasvol, G.; Levin, M.; Wilkinson, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 5 (2005), s. 2991-2998 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5020311; GA ČR GA310/01/0934 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : mycobacterium tuberculosis * t cell * CyaA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.933, year: 2005

  19. Invasion of Dendritic Cells, Macrophages and Neutrophils by the Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin: A Subversive Move to Fool Host Immunity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fedele, G.; Schiavoni, O.; Adkins, I.; Klímová, Nela; Šebo, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 10 (2017), s. 1-15, č. článku 293. E-ISSN 2072-6651 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28126A; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-14547S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : immune response * intracellular pathways * phagocytosis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology OBOR OECD: Other biological topics Impact factor: 3.030, year: 2016

  20. The conserved tyrosine residue 940 plays a key structural role in membrane interaction of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašín, Jiří; Roderová, Jana; Osičková, Adriana; Novák, Petr; Bumba, Ladislav; Fišer, Radovan; Šebo, Peter; Osička, Radim

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, AUG 24 (2017), s. 1-14, č. článku 9330. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05919S; GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11851S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-14547S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA MŠk(CZ) LD15089; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : PERTUSSIS CYAA * BENZODIAZEPINE-RECEPTOR * ESCHERICHIA-COLI Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  1. The adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis - a novel promising vehicke fer antigen delivery to dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimšová, Marcela; Šebo, Peter; Leclerc, C.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 293, - (2004), s. 571-576 ISSN 1438-4221 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/01/0934; GA AV ČR IAA5020907 Grant - others:GA QLK2-CT-1999(XX) 00556 Keywords : cyaa * cellular immune response * antigen delivery Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.919, year: 2004

  2. Mass spectrometric analysis of recombinant adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis strain 18323/pHSP9+

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havlíček, Vladimír; Higgins, L.; Chen, W.; Halada, Petr; Šebo, Peter; Sakamoto, H.; Hackett, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 36, - (2001), s. 384-391 ISSN 1076-5174 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020907; GA MŠk ME 167; GA MŠk VS96141 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A53/98:Z5-020-9ii Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.685, year: 2001

  3. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin induces a cascade of morphological changes of sheep erythrocytes and localizes into clusters in erythrocyte membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtová, Jana; Kofroňová, Olga; Šebo, Peter; Benada, Oldřich

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 69, - (2006), s. 119-129 ISSN 1059-910X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5020406 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cyaa * scanning electron microscopy * transmission electron microscopy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.680, year: 2006

  4. Characterization of the adenosine receptor in cultured embryonic chick atrial myocytes: Coupling to modulation of contractility and adenylate cyclase activity and identification by direct radioligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, B.T.

    1989-01-01

    Adenosine receptors in a spontaneously contracting atrial myocyte culture from 14-day chick embryos were characterized by radioligand binding studies and by examining the involvement of G-protein in coupling these receptors to a high-affinity state and to the adenylate cyclase and the myocyte contractility. Binding of the antagonist radioligand [3H]-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-diproylxanthine ([3H]CPX) was rapid, reversible and saturable and was to a homogeneous population of sites with a Kd value of 2.1 +/- 0.2 nM and an apparent maximum binding of 26.2 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein (n = 10, +/- S.E.). Guanyl-5-yl-(beta, gamma-imido)diphosphate had no effect on either the Kd or the maximum binding and CPX reversed the N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and contractility, indicating that [3H] CPX is an antagonist radioligand. Competition curves for [3H] CPX binding by a series of reference adenosine agonists were consistent with labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor and were better fit by a two-site model than by a one-site model. ADP-ribosylation of the G-protein by the endogenous NAD+ in the presence of pertussis toxin shifted the competition curves from bi to monophasic with Ki values similar to those of the KL observed in the absence of prior pertussis intoxication. The adenosine agonists were capable of inhibiting both the adenylate cyclase activity and myocyte contractility in either the absence or the presence of isoproterenol. The A1 adenosine receptor-selective antagonist CPX reversed these agonist effects. The order of ability of the reference adenosine receptor agonists in causing these inhibitory effects was similar to the order of potency of the same agonists in inhibiting the specific [3H]CPX binding (N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine greater than N6-S-phenyl-2-propyladenosine or N-ethyladenosine-5'-uronic acid)

  5. Pore-formation by adenylate cyclase toxoid activates dendritic cells to prime CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švédová, Martina; Mašín, Jiří; Fišer, Radovan; Černý, Ondřej; Tomala, Jakub; Freudenberg, M.; Tučková, Ludmila; Kovář, Marek; Dadaglio, G.; Adkins, Irena; Šebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 4 (2016), s. 322-333 ISSN 0818-9641 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-14547S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/12/0460 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : N-TERMINAL KINASE * BORDETELLA- PERTUSSIS * MEMBRANE TRANSLOCATION Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.557, year: 2016

  6. Prostaglandin E2 Stimulates EP2, Adenylate Cyclase, Phospholipase C, and Intracellular Calcium Release to Mediate Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Production in Dental Pulp Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Chi; Lin, Szu-I; Lin, Li-Deh; Chan, Chiu-Po; Lee, Ming-Shu; Wang, Tong-Mei; Jeng, Po-Yuan; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2016-04-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) plays a crucial role in pulpal inflammation and repair. However, its induction of signal transduction pathways is not clear but is crucial for future control of pulpal inflammation. Primary dental pulp cells were exposed to PGE2 and 19R-OH PGE2 (EP2 agonist) or sulprostone (EP1/EP3 agonist) for 5 to 40 minutes. Cellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In some experiments, cells were pretreated with SQ22536 (adenylate cyclase inhibitor), H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), dorsomorphin (adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase inhibitor), U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor), thapsigargin (inhibitor of intracellular calcium release), W7 (calmodulin antagonist), verapamil (L-type calcium channel blocker), and EGTA (extracellular calcium chelator) for 20 minutes before the addition of PGE2. PGE2 and 19R-OH PGE2 (EP2 agonist) stimulated cAMP production, whereas sulprostone (EP1/EP3 agonist) shows little effect. PGE2-induced cAMP production was attenuated by SQ22536 and U73122 but not H89 and dorsomorphin. Intriguingly, thapsigargin and W7 prevented PGE2-induced cAMP production, but verapamil and EGTA showed little effect. These results indicate that PGE2-induced cAMP production is associated with EP2 receptor and adenylate cyclase activation. These events are mediated by phospholipase C, intracellular calcium release, and calcium-calmodulin signaling. These results are helpful for understanding the role of PGE2 in pulpal inflammation and repair and possible future drug intervention. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Photo-dynamics of the lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Tanwar, M.; Veetil, S.K.; Kateriya, S. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India); Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P. [Institut für Biologie/Experimentelle Biophysik, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 42, D-10115 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-23

    Highlights: • Lyophilizing of NgPAC2 from Naegleria gruberi caused loss of BLUF domain activity. • Photo-induced tyrosine to flavin electron transfer in lyophilized NgPAC2. • Photo-induced Tyr–Tyr cross-linking to o,o′-dityrosine in lyophilized NgPAC2. • Photo-induced partial flavin cofactor reduction in lyophilized NgPAC2. • Two NgPAC2 conformations with fast and slow photo-induced electron transfer. - Abstract: The absorption and emission spectroscopic behavior of lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain consisting of a BLUF domain (BLUF = Blue Light sensor Using Flavin) and a cyclase homology domain was studied in the dark, during blue-light exposure and after blue-light exposure at a temperature of 4 °C. The BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics observed for snap-frozen NgPAC2 was lost by lyophilization (no signaling state formation with flavin absorption red-shift). Instead, blue-light photo-excitation of lyophilized NgPAC2 caused sterically restricted Tyr–Tyr cross-linking (o,o′-ditysosine formation) and partial flavin cofactor reduction.

  8. Photo-dynamics of the lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzkofer, A.; Tanwar, M.; Veetil, S.K.; Kateriya, S.; Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Lyophilizing of NgPAC2 from Naegleria gruberi caused loss of BLUF domain activity. • Photo-induced tyrosine to flavin electron transfer in lyophilized NgPAC2. • Photo-induced Tyr–Tyr cross-linking to o,o′-dityrosine in lyophilized NgPAC2. • Photo-induced partial flavin cofactor reduction in lyophilized NgPAC2. • Two NgPAC2 conformations with fast and slow photo-induced electron transfer. - Abstract: The absorption and emission spectroscopic behavior of lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain consisting of a BLUF domain (BLUF = Blue Light sensor Using Flavin) and a cyclase homology domain was studied in the dark, during blue-light exposure and after blue-light exposure at a temperature of 4 °C. The BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics observed for snap-frozen NgPAC2 was lost by lyophilization (no signaling state formation with flavin absorption red-shift). Instead, blue-light photo-excitation of lyophilized NgPAC2 caused sterically restricted Tyr–Tyr cross-linking (o,o′-ditysosine formation) and partial flavin cofactor reduction

  9. Photo-dynamics of the BLUF domain containing soluble adenylate cyclase (nPAC) from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P. [Institut fuer Biologie/Experimentelle Biophysik, Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 42, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Kateriya, Suneel [Department of Biochemistry, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India)

    2011-08-25

    Graphical abstract: The photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (nPAC) from Naegleria gruberi was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and its photo-cycling dynamics was studied by optical absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Highlights: {yields} Photo-activated adenylyl cyclase (nPAC) from Naegleria gruberi NEG-M was expressed. {yields} Photodynamics of BLUF domain in BLUF sensor - cyclase actuator protein was studied. {yields} Photo-excitation caused BLUF photo-cycling and permanent protein re-conformation. {yields} Re-conformed protein enabled photo-induced flavin reduction by proton transfer. {yields} Fluorescence of flavin in dark- and light-adapted state of nPAC was characterized. - Abstract: The amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M comprises a BLUF (blue light sensor using flavin) regulated adenylate cyclase (nPAC). The nPAC gene was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and the photo-dynamics of the nPAC protein was studied by optical absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Blue-light exposure of nPAC caused a typical BLUF-type photo-cycle behavior (spectral absorption red-shift, fluorescence quenching, absorption and fluorescence recovery in the dark). Additionally, time-delayed reversible photo-induced one-electron reduction of fully oxidized flavin (Fl{sub ox}) to semi-reduced flavin (FlH{sup {center_dot}}) occurred. Furthermore, photo-excitation of FlH{sup {center_dot}} caused irreversible electron transfer to fully reduced anionic flavin (FlH{sup -}). A photo-induced electron transfer from Tyr or Trp to flavin (Tyr{sup {center_dot}+}-Fl{sup {center_dot}-} or Trp{sup {center_dot}+}-Fl{sup {center_dot}-} radical ion-pair formation) is thought to cause H-bond restructuring responsible for BLUF-type photo-cycling and permanent protein re-conformation enabling photo-induced flavin reduction by proton transfer. Some photo-degradation of Fl{sub ox} to lumichrome was observed. A model of the photo-dynamics of nPAC is developed.

  10. Involvement of endogenous antioxidant systems in the protective activity of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damages in cultured rat astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douiri, Salma; Bahdoudi, Seyma; Hamdi, Yosra; Cubì, Roger; Basille, Magali; Fournier, Alain; Vaudry, Hubert; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Vaudry, David; Masmoudi-Kouki, Olfa

    2016-06-01

    Astroglial cells possess an array of cellular defense mechanisms, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase antioxidant enzymes, to prevent damages caused by oxidative stress. Nevertheless, astroglial cell viability and functionality can be affected by significant oxidative stress. We have previously shown that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a potent glioprotective agent that prevents hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced apoptosis in cultured astrocytes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential protective effect of PACAP against oxidative-generated alteration of astrocytic antioxidant systems. Incubation of cells with subnanomolar concentrations of PACAP inhibited H2 O2 -evoked reactive oxygen species accumulation, mitochondrial respiratory burst, and caspase-3 mRNA level increase. PACAP also stimulated SOD and catalase activities in a concentration-dependent manner, and counteracted the inhibitory effect of H2 O2 on the activity of these two antioxidant enzymes. The protective action of PACAP against H2 O2 -evoked inhibition of antioxidant systems in astrocytes was protein kinase A, PKC, and MAP-kinase dependent. In the presence of H2 O2 , the SOD blocker NaCN and the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole, both suppressed the protective effects of PACAP on SOD and catalase activities, mitochondrial function, and cell survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the anti-apoptotic effect of PACAP on astroglial cells can account for the activation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes and reduction in respiration rate, thus preserving mitochondrial integrity and preventing caspase-3 expression provoked by oxidative stress. Considering its powerful anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative properties, the PACAPergic signaling system should thus be considered for the development of new therapeutical approaches to cure various pathologies involving oxidative neurodegeneration. We propose the following cascade for the

  11. On the role of adenylate cyclase, tyrosine kinase, and tyrosine phosphatase in the response of nerve and glial cells to photodynamic impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Bragin, D. E.; Dergacheva, Olga Y.; Vanzha, O.; Oparina, L.; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2004-08-01

    The role of different intercellular signaling pathways involving adenylate cyclase (AC), receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), tyrosine and serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PTP or PP, respectively) in the response of crayfish mechanoreceptor neuron (MRN) and surrounding glial cells to photodynamic effect of aluminum phthalocyanine Photosens have been studied. AC inhibition by MDL-12330A decreased neuron lifetime, whereas AC activation by forskolin increase it. Thus, increase in cAMP produced by activated AC protects SRN against photodynamic inactivation. Similarly, RTK inhibition by genistein decreased neuron lifetime, while inhibition of PTP or PP that remove phosphate groups from proteins, prolonged neuronal activity. AC inhibition reduced photoinduced damage of the plasma membrane, and, therefore, necrosis in neuronal and glial cells. RTK inhibition protected only neurons against PDT-induced membrane permeabilization while glial cells became lesser permeable under ortovanadate-mediated PTP inhibition. AC activation also prevented PDT-induced apoptosis in glial cells. PP inhibition enhanced apoptotic processes in photosensitized glial cells. Therefore, both intercellular signaling pathways involving AC and TRK are involved in the maintenance of neuronal activity, integrity of the neuronal and glial plasma membranes and in apoptotic processes in glia under photosensitization.

  12. Intravenous infusion of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in a patient with multiple myeloma and myeloma kidney: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Maderdrut, Jerome L; Lertora, Juan J L; Batuman, Vecihi

    2007-09-01

    We have recently shown significant renoprotective effects with the administration of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in models of myeloma kidney. PACAP markedly inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines stimulated by immunoglobulin light chains in human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells and in the kidneys of rats infused with myeloma light chains. PACAP was also shown to suppress the proliferation of human kappa and lambda light chain-secreting multiple myeloma-derived cells. In this case study, an 81-year-old male patient with active multiple myeloma and myeloma kidney was infused intravenously with synthetic human PACAP38 at a rate of 4 pmol/kg/min for 120 min. The continuous infusion increased the level of PACAP38 in blood, with a plateau at about 0.2 nM during the infusion. The level of PACAP in the blood rapidly declined after the cessation of administration with a half-life of about 5-10 min. The continuous infusion did not significantly alter the basal glucose level, blood gases or blood pressure. There was a large reduction in free lambda light chains in urine after the start of the treatment with PACAP. These studies show that PACAP can be safely used in humans and suggest that it could be used as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of multiple myeloma and myeloma kidney.

  13. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) contributes to the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in murine bone marrow via PACAP-specific receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhifang; Ohtaki, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Jun; Miyamoto, Kazuyuki; Murai, Norimitsu; Sasaki, Shun; Matsumoto, Minako; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hiraizumi, Yutaka; Numazawa, Satoshi; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-02-29

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, encoded by adcyap1) plays an important role in ectodermal development. However, the involvement of PACAP in the development of other germ layers is still unclear. This study assessed the expression of a PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1) gene and protein in mouse bone marrow (BM). Cells strongly expressing PAC1(+) were large in size, had oval nuclei, and merged with CD34(+) cells, suggesting that the former were hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Compared with wild-type mice, adcyap1(-/-) mice exhibited lower multiple potential progenitor cell populations and cell frequency in the S-phase of the cell cycle. Exogenous PACAP38 significantly increased the numbers of colony forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells (CFU-GM) with two peaks in semi-solid culture. PACAP also increased the expression of cyclinD1 and Ki67 mRNAs. These increases were completely and partially inhibited by the PACAP receptor antagonists, PACAP6-38 and VIP6-28, respectively. Little or no adcyap1 was expressed in BM and the number of CFU-GM colonies was similar in adcyap1(-/-) and wild-type mice. However, PACAP mRNA and protein were expressed in paravertebral sympathetic ganglia, which innervate tibial BM, and in the sympathetic fibers of BM cavity. These results suggested that sympathetic nerve innervation may be responsible for PACAP-regulated hematopoiesis in BM, mainly via PAC1.

  14. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP Pathway Is Induced by Mechanical Load and Reduces the Activity of Hedgehog Signaling in Chondrogenic Micromass Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Juhász

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP is a neurohormone exerting protective function during various stress conditions either in mature or developing tissues. Previously we proved the presence of PACAP signaling elements in chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Since no data can be found if PACAP signaling is playing any role during mechanical stress in any tissues, we aimed to investigate its contribution in mechanotransduction during chondrogenesis. Expressions of the mRNAs of PACAP and its major receptor, PAC1 increased, while that of other receptors, VPAC1, VPAC2 decreased upon mechanical stimulus. Mechanical load enhanced the expression of collagen type X, a marker of hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and PACAP addition attenuated this elevation. Moreover, exogenous PACAP also prevented the mechanical load evoked activation of hedgehog signaling: protein levels of Sonic and Indian Hedgehogs and Gli1 transcription factor were lowered while expressions of Gli2 and Gli3 were elevated by PACAP application during mechanical load. Our results suggest that mechanical load activates PACAP signaling and exogenous PACAP acts against the hypertrophy inducing effect of mechanical load.

  15. [Differentially expressed genes identified in the main olfactory epithelium of mice with deficiency of adenylate cyclase 3 by using suppression subtractive hybridization approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenlong, Cao; Jiangye, Hao; Yanfen, Zhou; Zhe, Zhang; Zhihua, Ni; Yuanxiang, Hu; Weili, Liu; Yongchao, Li; Daniel, R Storm; Runlin, Z Ma; Zhenshan, Wang

    2014-06-01

    Adenylate cyclase 3 (AC3) is one of the major players in the olfactory signaling within the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of mice. However, we are not ascertained whether deficiency of AC3 will lead to the differential expression of related genes in the MOE. Forward and reverse subtractive libraries were constructed by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) approach, with MOEs from AC3(-/-) and AC3(+/+) mice. These two libraries were primarily screened by Dot blot, differential expressed clones were sequenced and analyzed by bioinformatics, and differential expressed genes were verified by qRT-PCR. A total of 386 differentially expressed clones were picked out after Dot blot. The DNA sequences of 80 clones randomly selected were determined, and 62 clones were identified by blasting in GenBank. We found that 24 up-regulated clones were corresponded to genes of kcnk3, mapk7, megf11, and 38 down-regulated clones were corresponded to tmem88b, c-mip, skp1a, mlycd, etc. Their functions were annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) and found to be mainly focused on molecular binding, cell cycle, processes of biology and cells. Five genes (kcnk3, c-mip, mlycd, tmem88b and trappc5) were verified by qRT-PCR with individuals of AC3(+/+) and AC3(-/-) mice. The data indicate that kcnk3 gene is up-regulated significantly, increasing 1.27 folds compared to control mice, whereas c-mip, mlycd, tmem88b and trappc5 are down-regulated significantly, decreasing 20%, 7%, 32% and 29% compared to the AC3(+/+)mice. The functions of these genes are closely related with K(+) channels, cell differentiation, metabolism of fats, membrane transportation, and so on. It is tempting to speculate that these genes might work together with AC3 to orchestrate the olfactory transduction signaling in the MOE.

  16. Role of Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide and Tac1 gene derived tachykinins in sensory, motor and vascular functions under normal and neuropathic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botz, Bálint; Imreh, András; Sándor, Katalin; Elekes, Krisztián; Szolcsányi, János; Reglődi, Dóra; Quinn, John P; Stewart, James; Zimmer, Andreas; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2013-05-01

    Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) and Tac1 gene-encoded tachykinins (substance P: SP, neurokinin A: NKA) are expressed in capsaicin-sensitive nerves, but their role in nociception, inflammation and vasoregulation is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the function of these neuropeptides and the NK1 tachykinin receptor (from Tacr1 gene) in the partial sciatic nerve ligation-induced traumatic mononeuropathy model using gene deficient (PACAP(-/-), Tac1(-/-), and Tacr1(-/-)) mice. Mechanonociceptive threshold of the paw was measured with dynamic plantar aesthesiometry, motor coordination with Rota-Rod and cutaneous microcirculation with laser Doppler imaging. Neurogenic vasodilation was evoked by mustard oil stimulating sensory nerves. In wildtype mice 30-40% mechanical hyperalgesia developed one week after nerve ligation, which was not altered in Tac1(-/-) and Tacr1(-/-) mice, but was absent in PACAP(-/-) animals. Motor coordination of the PACAP(-/-) and Tac1(-/-) groups was significantly worse both before and after nerve ligation compared to their wildtypes, but it did not change in Tacr1(-/-) mice. Basal postoperative microcirculation on the plantar skin of PACAP(-/-) mice did not differ from the wildtypes, but was significantly lower in Tac1(-/-) and Tacr1(-/-) ones. In contrast, mustard oil-induced neurogenic vasodilation was significantly smaller in PACAP(-/-) mice, but not in Tacr1(-/-) and Tac1(-/-) animals. Both PACAP and SP/NKA, but not NK1 receptors participate in normal motor coordination. Tachykinins maintain basal cutaneous microcirculation. PACAP is a crucial mediator of neuropathic mechanical hyperalgesia and neurogenic vasodilation. Therefore identifying its target and developing selective, potent antagonists, might open promising new perspectives for the treatment of neuropathic pain and vascular complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bi-directional effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) on fear-related behavior and c-Fos expression after fear conditioning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Edward G; Venkataraman, Archana; Donahue, Rachel J; Carlezon, William A

    2016-02-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is implicated in stress regulation and learning and memory. PACAP has neuromodulatory actions on brain structures within the limbic system that could contribute to its acute and persistent effects in animal models of stress and anxiety-like behavior. Here, male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with intracerebroventricular (ICV) cannula for infusion of PACAP-38 (0.5, 1, or 1.5 μg) or vehicle followed 30 min later by fear conditioning. Freezing was measured early (1, 4, and 7 days) or following a delay (7, 10, and 13 days) after conditioning. PACAP (1.5 μg) produced a bi-phasic response in freezing behavior across test days: relative to controls, PACAP-treated rats showed a reduction in freezing when tested 1 or 7 days after fear conditioning that evolved into a significant elevation in freezing by the third test session in the early, but not delayed, group. Corticosterone (CORT) levels were significantly elevated in PACAP-treated rats following fear conditioning, but not at the time of testing (Day 1). Brain c-Fos expression revealed PACAP-dependent alterations within, as well as outside of, areas typically implicated in fear conditioning. Our findings raise the possibility that PACAP disrupts fear memory consolidation by altering synaptic plasticity within neurocircuits normally responsible for encoding fear-related cues, producing a type of dissociation or peritraumatic amnesia often seen in people early after exposure to a traumatic event. However, fear memories are retained such that repeated testing and memory reactivation (e.g., re-experiencing) causes the freezing response to emerge and persist at elevated levels. PACAP systems may represent an axis on which stress and exposure to trauma converge to promote maladaptive behavioral responses characteristic of psychiatric illnesses such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the prefrontal cortex modulates cued fear learning, but not spatial working memory, in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirry, Adam J; Herbst, Matthew R; Poirier, Sarah E; Maskeri, Michelle M; Rothwell, Amy C; Twining, Robert C; Gilmartin, Marieke R

    2018-05-01

    A genetic polymorphism within the gene encoding the pituitary adenylate cyclase- activating polypeptide (PACAP) receptor type I (PAC1R) has recently been associated with hyper-reactivity to threat-related cues in women, but not men, with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PACAP is a highly conserved peptide, whose role in mediating adaptive physiological stress responses is well established. Far less is understood about the contribution of PACAP signaling in emotional learning and memory, particularly the encoding of fear to discrete cues. Moreover, a neurobiological substrate that may account for the observed link between PAC1R and PTSD in women, but not men, has yet to be identified. Sex differences in PACAP signaling during emotional learning could provide novel targets for the treatment of PTSD. Here we investigated the contribution of PAC1R signaling within the prefrontal cortex to the acquisition of cued fear in female and male rats. We used a variant of fear conditioning called trace fear conditioning, which requires sustained attention to fear cues and depends on working-memory like neuronal activity within the prefrontal cortex. We found that cued fear learning, but not spatial working memory, was impaired by administration of a PAC1R antagonist directly into the prelimbic area of the prefrontal cortex. This effect was specific to females. We also found that levels of mRNA for the PAC1R receptor in the prelimbic cortex were greater in females compared with males, and were highest during and immediately following the proestrus stage of the estrous cycle. Together, these results demonstrate a sex-specific role of PAC1R signaling in learning about threat-related cues. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A membrane-associated adenylate cyclase modulates lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities required for bull sperm capacitation induced by hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Silvina; Córdoba, Mariana

    2017-04-01

    Hyaluronic acid, as well as heparin, is a glycosaminoglycan present in the female genital tract of cattle. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative metabolism and intracellular signals mediated by a membrane-associated adenylate cyclase (mAC), in sperm capacitation with hyaluronic acid and heparin, in cryopreserved bull sperm. The mAC inhibitor, 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, was used in the present study. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities and lactate concentration were determined spectrophotometrically in the incubation medium. Capacitation and acrosome reaction were evaluated by chlortetracycline technique, while plasma membrane and acrosome integrity were determined by trypan blue stain/differential interference contrast microscopy. Heparin capacitated samples had a significant decrease in LDH and CK activities, while in hyaluronic acid capacitated samples LDH and CK activities both increased compared to control samples, in heparin and hyaluronic acid capacitation conditions, respectively. A significant increase in lactate concentration in the incubation medium occurred in hyaluronic acid-treated sperm samples compared to heparin treatment, indicating this energetic metabolite is produced during capacitation. The LDH and CK enzyme activities and lactate concentrations in the incubation medium were decreased with 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine treatment in hyaluronic acid samples. The mAC inhibitor significantly inhibited heparin-induced capacitation of sperm cells, but did not completely inhibit hyaluronic acid capacitation. Therefore, hyaluronic acid and heparin are physiological glycosaminoglycans capable of inducing in vitro capacitation in cryopreserved bull sperm, stimulating different enzymatic pathways and intracellular signals modulated by a mAC. Hyaluronic acid induces sperm capacitation involving LDH and CK activities, thereby reducing oxidative metabolism, and this process is mediated by mAC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  20. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP has a neuroprotective function in dopamine-based neurodegeneration in rat and snail parkinsonian models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Maasz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP rescues dopaminergic neurons from neurodegeneration and improves motor changes induced by 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA in rat parkinsonian models. Recently, we investigated the molecular background of the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in dopamine (DA-based neurodegeneration using rotenone-induced snail and 6-OHDA-induced rat models of Parkinson's disease. Behavioural activity, monoamine (DA and serotonin, metabolic enzyme (S-COMT, MB-COMT and MAO-B and PARK7 protein concentrations were measured before and after PACAP treatment in both models. Locomotion and feeding activity were decreased in rotenone-treated snails, which corresponded well to findings obtained in 6-OHDA-induced rat experiments. PACAP was able to prevent the behavioural malfunctions caused by the toxins. Monoamine levels decreased in both models and the decreased DA level induced by toxins was attenuated by ∼50% in the PACAP-treated animals. In contrast, PACAP had no effect on the decreased serotonin (5HT levels. S-COMT metabolic enzyme was also reduced but a protective effect of PACAP was not observed in either of the models. Following toxin treatment, a significant increase in MB-COMT was observed in both models and was restored to normal levels by PACAP. A decrease in PARK7 was also observed in both toxin-induced models; however, PACAP had a beneficial effect only on 6-OHDA-treated animals. The neuroprotective effect of PACAP in different animal models of Parkinson's disease is thus well correlated with neurotransmitter, enzyme and protein levels. The models successfully mimic several, but not all etiological properties of the disease, allowing us to study the mechanisms of neurodegeneration as well as testing new drugs. The rotenone and 6-OHDA rat and snail in vivo parkinsonian models offer an alternative method for investigation of the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotective agents, including PACAP.

  1. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present and biochemically active in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirger, Zsolt; Laszlo, Zita; Hiripi, Laszlo; Hernadi, Laszlo; Toth, Gabor; Lubics, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Kemenes, Gyorgy; Mark, Laszlo

    2010-11-01

    PACAP is a highly conserved adenylate cyclase (AC) activating polypeptide, which, along with its receptors (PAC1-R, VPAC1, and VPAC2), is expressed in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. In vertebrates, PACAP has been shown to be involved in associative learning, but it is not known if it plays a similar role in invertebrates. To prepare the way for a detailed investigation into the possible role of PACAP and its receptors in a suitable invertebrate model of learning and memory, here, we undertook a study of their expression and biochemical role in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Lymnaea is one of the best established invertebrate model systems to study the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory, including the role of cyclic AMP-activated signaling mechanisms, which crucially depend on the learning-induced activation of AC. However, there was no information available on the expression of PACAP and its receptors in sensory structures and central ganglia of the Lymnaea nervous system known to be involved in associative learning or whether or not PACAP can actually activate AC in these ganglia. Here, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and immunohistochemistry, we established the presence of PACAP-like peptides in the cerebral ganglia and the lip region of Lymnaea. The MALDI-TOF data indicated an identity with mammalian PACAP-27 and the presence of a squid-like PACAP-38 highly homologous to vertebrate PACAP-38. We also showed that PACAP, VIP, and maxadilan stimulated the synthesis of cAMP in Lymnaea cerebral ganglion homogenates and that this effect was blocked by the appropriate general and selective PACAP receptor antagonists.

  2. cAMP Signaling of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Blocks the Oxidative Burst of Neutrophils through Epac-Mediated Inhibition of Phospholipase C Activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Ondřej; Anderson, K.E.; Stephens, L.R.; Hawkins, P.T.; Šebo, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 198, č. 3 (2017), s. 1285-1296 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-14547S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : BORDETELLA-PERTUSSIS * NADPH OXIDASE * CYCLIC-AMP Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.856, year: 2016

  3. cAMP signalling of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin through the SHP-1 phosphatase activates the BimEL-Bax pro-apoptotic cascade in phagocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ahmad, Jawid Nazir; Černý, Ondřej; Linhartová, Irena; Mašín, Jiří; Osička, Radim; Šebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2016), s. 384-398 ISSN 1462-5814 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-14547S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/0580; GA ČR GAP302/12/0460 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : FORKHEAD TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR * HUMAN T-CELLS * DENDRITIC CELLS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.554, year: 2016

  4. Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Mobilizes Its beta(2) Integrin Receptor into Lipid Rafts to Accomplish Translocation across Target Cell Membrane in Two Steps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bumba, Ladislav; Mašín, Jiří; Fišer, R.; Šebo, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2010), s. 1-15 ISSN 1553-7366 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP310/07/P115; GA MŠk 1M0506; GA AV ČR IAA500200914; GA MŠk 2B06161; GA ČR GA310/08/0447 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : SHEEP ERYTHROCYTES * BACILLUS-ANTHRACIS * ESCHERICHIA-COLI Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.079, year: 2010

  5. Prime/boost immunotherapy of HPV16-induced tumors with E7 protein delivered by Bordetella adenylate cyclase and modified vaccinia virus Ankara

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, J.; Stasíková, J.; Kutinová, L.; Mašín, Jiří; Hainz, P.; Šimšová, Marcela; Gabriel, P.; Šebo, Peter; Němečková, P.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, - (2006), s. 39-46 ISSN 0340-7004 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5020311; GA ČR GA310/04/0004; GA MZd NR8004 Grant - others:GA MZd NC6570 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : vaccine * hpv -e7 * vaccinia virus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.313, year: 2006

  6. The cell invasive Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin: a model of protein penetration across cell membranes and a new tool for the immunologist

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Osička, Radim; Osičková, Adriana; Basar, T.; Bezoušková, Silvia; Havlíček, Vladimír; Halada, Petr; Loucká, Jiřina; Vojtová, Jana; Kalhous, Miloš; Forman, Stanislav

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 8 (2000), s. 599-600 ISSN 0009-2770. [Biochemický sjezd /17./. 07.09.2000-10.09.2000, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/98/0432; GA AV ČR IAA5020907; GA MŠk VS96149; GA MŠk ME 167 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  7. Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Differentially Modulates Toll-Like Receptor-Stimulated Activation, Migration and T Cell Stimulatory Capacity of Dendritic Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adkins, Irena; Kamanová, Jana; Kocourková, A.; Švédová, Martina; Tomala, Jakub; Janová, H.; Mašín, Jiří; Chládková, Barbara; Bumba, Ladislav; Kovář, Marek; Ross, P. J.; Tučková, Ludmila; Spíšek, R.; Mills, K. H. G.; Šebo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 8 (2014) E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA ČR GP310/09/P582; GA ČR GAP301/11/0325; GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : RESPIRATORY-INFECTION * INTERLEUKIN-10 PRODUCTION * PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  8. In vivo induction of CTL responses by recombinant adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis carrying multiple copies of a viral CD8+ T-cell epitope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebo, Peter; Moukrim, Z.; Kalhous, M.; Schaft, N.; Dadaglio, G.; Sheshko, V.; Fayolle, C.; Leclerc, C.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 26, - (1999), s. 167-173 ISSN 0928-8244 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/98/0432; GA MŠk VS96149; GA MŠk ME 167 Grant - others:Barrande(FR) 97054 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A53/98:Z5-020-9ii Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology , Virology Impact factor: 1.329, year: 1999

  9. Induction of a polarized Th1 response by insertion of multiple copies of a viral T-cell epitope into adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dadaglio, G.; Moukrim, Z.; Lo-Man, R.; Sheshko, V.; Šebo, Peter; Leclerc, C.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 7 (2000), s. 3867-3872 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/98/0432; GA MŠk VS96149; GA MŠk ME 167 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A53/98:Z5-020-9ii Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.204, year: 2000

  10. Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Blocks Induction of Bactericidal Nitric Oxide in Macrophages through cAMP-Dependent Activation of the SHP-1 Phosphatase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Ondřej; Kamanová, Jana; Mašín, Jiří; Bíbová, Ilona; Škopová, Karolína; Šebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 194, č. 10 (2015), s. 4901-4913 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/12/0460; GA ČR GA13-14547S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : CYCLIC-AMP * MURINE MACROPHAGES * IFN-GAMMA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.985, year: 2015

  11. Complete protection against P. berghei malaria upon heterologous prime/boost immunization against circumsporozoite protein employing Salmonella type III secretion system and Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxoid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tartz, S.; Rüssmann, H.; Kamanová, Jana; Šebo, Peter; Sturm, A.; Heussler, V.; Fleischer, B.; Jacobs, T.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 47 (2008), s. 5935-5943 ISSN 0264-410X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06161 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : circumsporozoite protein * vaccine * salmonella Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.298, year: 2008

  12. A FRET-Based Method for Probing the Conformational Behavior of an Intrinsically Disordered Repeat Domain from Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-22

    inMaterials andMethods. (C)Rapid kinetics ofC-BR(L)-Y folding (9) andunfolding (b) at the indicated CaCl2 concentrations was measured using FRET as...described inMaterials andMethods. Error bars represent standard errors (Ng 3). Representative fluorescence time course traces are shown inFigure S1 of...aContour length (lc) between the chromophores of the FPs, calculated as described inMaterials andMethods. bAverage end-to-end distance of a theoretical

  13. Ex vivo and in vivo studies of CME-1, a novel polysaccharide purified from the mycelia of Cordyceps sinensis that inhibits human platelet activation by activating adenylate cyclase/cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wan-Jung; Chang, Nen-Chung; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Liao, Jiun-Cheng; Lin, Mei-Jiun; Wang, Shwu-Huey; Chou, Duen-Suey; Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-12-01

    CME-1, a novel water-soluble polysaccharide, was purified from the mycelia of Cordyceps sinensis, and its chemical structure was characterized to contain mannose and galactose in a ratio of 4:6 (27.6 kDa). CME-1 was originally observed to exert a potent inhibitory effect on tumor migration and a cytoprotective effect against oxidative stress. Activation of platelets caused by arterial thrombosis is relevant to various cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, no data are available concerning the effects of CME-1 on platelet activation. Hence, the purpose of this study was to examine the ex vivo and in vivo antithrombotic effects of CME-1 and its possible mechanisms in platelet activation. The aggregometry, immunoblotting, flow cytometric analysis and platelet functional analysis were used in this study. CME-1 (2.3-7.6 μM) exhibited highly potent activity in inhibiting human platelet aggregation when stimulated by collagen, thrombin, and arachidonic acid but not by U46619. CME-1 inhibited platelet activation accompanied by inhibiting Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), thromboxane B2 (TxB2) and hydroxyl radical (OH(●)) formation. However, CME-1 interrupted neither FITC-triflavin nor FITC-collagen binding to platelets. CME-1 markedly increased cyclic AMP levels, but not cyclic GMP levels, and stimulated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation. SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, but not ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, obviously reversed the CME-1-mediated effects on platelet aggregation and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), Akt, p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and TxB2 formation. CME-1 substantially prolonged the closure time of whole blood and the occlusion time of platelet plug formation. This study demonstrates for the first time that CME-1 exhibits highly potent antiplatelet activity that may initially activate adenylate cyclase/cyclic AMP and, subsequently, inhibit intracellular signals (such as Akt and

  14. Negatively charged residues of the segment linking the enzyme and cytolysin moieties restrict the membrane-permeabilizing capacity of adenylate cyclase toxin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašín, Jiří; Osičková, Adriana; Suková, Anna; Fišer, Radovan; Halada, Petr; Bumba, Ladislav; Linhartová, Irena; Osička, Radim; Šebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Septemeber 1 (2016), s. 29137 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05919S; GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11851S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-14547S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : BORDETELLA-PERTUSSIS CYAA * SECONDARY STRUCTURE PREDICTION * ANTIGEN-PRESENTING CELLS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  15. A Role for Calcium-Activated Adenylate Cyclase and Protein Kinase A in the Lens Src Family Kinase and Na,K-ATPase Response to Hyposmotic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidullah, Mohammad; Mandal, Amritlal; Delamere, Nicholas A

    2017-09-01

    Na,K-ATPase activity in lens epithelium is subject to control by Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs). Previously we showed hyposmotic solution causes an SFK-dependent increase in Na,K-ATPase activity in the epithelium. Here we explored the role of cAMP in the signaling mechanism responsible for the SFK and Na,K-ATPase response. Intact porcine lenses were exposed to hyposmotic Krebs solution (200 mOsm) then the epithelium was assayed for cAMP, SFK phosphorylation (activation) or Na,K-ATPase activity. An increase of cAMP was observed in the epithelium of lenses exposed to hyposmotic solution. In lenses exposed to hyposmotic solution SFK phosphorylation in the epithelium approximately doubled as did Na,K-ATPase activity and both responses were prevented by H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. The magnitude of the SFK response to hyposmotic solution was reduced by a TRPV4 antagonist HC067047 added to prevent TRPV4-mediated calcium entry, and by a cytoplasmic Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. The Na,K-ATPase activity response in the epithelium of lenses exposed to hyposmotic solution was abolished by BAPTA-AM. As a direct test of cAMP-dependent SFK activation, intact lenses were exposed to 8-pCPT-cAMP, a cell-permeable cAMP analog. 8-pCPT-cAMP caused robust SFK activation. Using Western blot, two calcium-activated adenylyl cyclases, ADCY3 and ADCY8, were detected in lens epithelium. Calcium-activated adenylyl cyclases are expressed in the lens epithelium and SFK activation is linked to a rise of cAMP that occurs upon hyposmotic challenge. The findings point to cAMP as a link between TRPV4 channel-mediated calcium entry, SFK activation, and a subsequent increase of Na,K-ATPase activity.

  16. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of 45Ca2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel

  17. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. (Albany Medical College, NY (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel.

  18. Immunization with a Circumsporozoite Epitope Fused to Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase in Conjunction with Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte-Associated Antigen 4 Blockade Confers Protection against Plasmodium berghei Liver-Stage Malaria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tartz, S.; Kamanová, Jana; Šimšová, Marcela; Šebo, Peter; Bolte, S.; Heussler, V.; Fleischer, B.; Jacobs, T.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 4 (2006), s. 2277-2285 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5020311 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : plasmodium berghei * immunity * malaria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.004, year: 2006

  19. Delivery of a MalE CD4+-T-Cell Epitope into the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation Pathway by Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase ral NPKSupply

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Loucká, Jiřina; Schlecht, G.; Vojtová, Jana; Leclerc, C.; Šebo, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 2 (2002), s. 1002-1005 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/01/0934; GA AV ČR IAA5020907; GA MŠk ME 167 Grant - others:QLK2-CT(US) 00556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : delivery * epitope * complex Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.039, year: 2002

  20. Delivery of CD8+ T-cell epitopes into major histocompatibility complex class I antigen presentation pathway by Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase:delineation of cell invasive structures and permissive insertion sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Osička, Radim; Osičková, Adriana; Basar, T.; Guermonprez, P.; Rojas, M.; Leclerc, C.; Šebo, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 1 (2000), s. 247-256 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/98/0432; GA AV ČR IAA5020907; GA MŠk VS96149; GA MŠk ME 167 Institutional research plan: CEZ:A53/98:Z5-020-9ii Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.204, year: 2000

  1. Substantial gaps in knowledge of Bordetella pertussis antibody and T cell epitopes relevant for natural immunity and vaccine efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Seymour, Emily; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The recent increase in whooping cough in vaccinated populations has been attributed to waning immunity associated with the acellular vaccine. The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a repository of immune epitope data from the published literature and includes T cell and antibody epitopes for human pathogens. The IEDB conducted a review of the epitope literature, which revealed 300 Bordetella pertussis-related epitopes from 39 references. Epitope data are currently available for six virulence factors of B. pertussis: pertussis toxin, pertactin, fimbrial 2, fimbrial 3, adenylate cyclase and filamentous hemagglutinin. The majority of epitopes were defined for antibody reactivity; fewer T cell determinants were reported. Analysis of available protective correlates data revealed a number of candidate epitopes; however few are defined in humans and few have been shown to be protective. Moreover, there are a limited number of studies defining epitopes from natural infection versus whole cell or acellular/subunit vaccines. The relationship between epitope location and structural features, as well as antigenic drift (SNP analysis) was also investigated. We conclude that the cumulative data is yet insufficient to address many fundamental questions related to vaccine failure and this underscores the need for further investigation of B. pertussis immunity at the molecular level. PMID:24530743

  2. Bordetella pertussis transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica are Gram negative bacterial respiratory pathogens. B. pertussis is the causative agent of whooping cough and is considered a human-adapted variant of B. bronchiseptica. B. pertussis and B. bronchiseptica share mechanisms of pathogenesis and are gene...

  3. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), stress, and sex hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S Bradley; Toufexis, Donna J; Hammack, Sayamwong E

    2017-09-01

    Stressor exposure is associated with the onset and severity of many psychopathologies that are more common in women than men. Moreover, the maladaptive expression and function of stress-related hormones have been implicated in these disorders. Evidence suggests that PACAP has a critical role in the stress circuits mediating stress-responding, and PACAP may interact with sex hormones to contribute to sex differences in stress-related disease. In this review, we describe the role of the PACAP/PAC1 system in stress biology, focusing on the role of stress-induced alterations in PACAP expression and signaling in the development of stress-induced behavioral change. Additionally, we present more recent data suggesting potential interactions between stress, PACAP, and circulating estradiol in pathological states, including PTSD. These studies suggest that the level of stress and circulating gonadal hormones may differentially regulate the PACAPergic system in males and females to influence anxiety-like behavior and may be one mechanism underlying the discrepancies in human psychiatric disorders.

  4. Evaluation of the Specificity of BP3385 for Bordetella pertussis

    Science.gov (United States)

    BP3385 has been proposed as a diagnostic PCR target for discriminating between Bordetella pertussis and other Bordetella species that also infect humans. Our results demonstrate this gene is also present in some strains of Bordetella hinzii and Bordetella bronchiseptica....

  5. The RNA Chaperone Hfq Is Required for Virulence of Bordetella pertussis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bíbová, Ilona; Škopová, Karolína; Mašín, Jiří; Černý, Ondřej; Hot, D.; Šebo, Peter; Večerek, Branislav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 11 (2013), s. 4081-4090 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1940; GA ČR GAP302/12/0460 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : ADENYLATE-CYCLASE TOXIN * ISLET-ACTIVATING PROTEIN * ESCHERICHIA-COLI HFQ Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.156, year: 2013

  6. The importance of conserved amino acids in heme-based globin-coupled diguanylate cyclases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehua Wan

    Full Text Available Globin-coupled diguanylate cyclases contain globin, middle, and diguanylate cyclase domains that sense O2 to synthesize c-di-GMP and regulate bacterial motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. However, relatively few studies have extensively examined the roles of individual residues and domains of globin-coupled diguanylate cyclases, which can shed light on their signaling mechanisms and provide drug targets. Here, we report the critical residues of two globin-coupled diguanylate cyclases, EcGReg from Escherichia coli and BpeGReg from Bordetella pertussis, and show that their diguanylate cyclase activity requires an intact globin domain. In the distal heme pocket of the globin domain, residues Phe42, Tyr43, Ala68 (EcGReg/Ser68 (BpeGReg, and Met69 are required to maintain full diguanylate cyclase activity. The highly conserved amino acids His223/His225 and Lys224/Lys226 in the middle domain of EcGReg/BpeGReg are essential to diguanylate cyclase activity. We also identified sixteen important residues (Leu300, Arg306, Asp333, Phe337, Lys338, Asn341, Asp342, Asp350, Leu353, Asp368, Arg372, Gly374, Gly375, Asp376, Glu377, and Phe378 in the active site and inhibitory site of the diguanylate cyclase domain of EcGReg. Moreover, BpeGReg266 (residues 1-266 and BpeGReg296 (residues 1-296, which only contain the globin and middle domains, can inhibit bacterial motility. Our findings suggest that the distal residues of the globin domain affect diguanylate cyclase activity and that BpeGReg may interact with other c-di-GMP-metabolizing proteins to form mixed signaling teams.

  7. In Vitro Assessment of Guanylyl Cyclase Activity of Plant Receptor Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Raji, Misjudeen

    2017-05-31

    Cyclic nucleotides such as 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) are increasingly recognized as key signaling molecules in plants, and a growing number of plant mononucleotide cyclases, both adenylate cyclases (ACs) and guanylate cyclases (GCs), have been reported. Catalytically active cytosolic GC domains have been shown to be part of many plant receptor kinases and hence directly linked to plant signaling and downstream cellular responses. Here we detail, firstly, methods to identify and express essential functional GC domains of receptor kinases, and secondly, we describe mass spectrometric methods to quantify cGMP generated by recombinant GCs from receptor kinases in vitro.

  8. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2017-10-04

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  9. Structure of Bordetella pertussis peptidoglycan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folkening, W.J.; Nogami, W.; Martin, S.A.; Rosenthal, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis Tohama phases I and III were grown to the late-exponential phase in liquid medium containing [ 3 H]diaminopimelic acid and treated by a hot (96 0 C) sodium dodecyl sulfate extraction procedure. Washed sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble residue from phases I and III consisted of complexes containing protein (ca. 40%) and peptidoglycan (60 6 ). Subsequent treatment with proteinase K yielded purified peptidoglycan which contained N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylmuramic acid, alanine, glutamic acid, and diaminopimelic acid in molar ratios of 1:1:2:1:1 and 3 H added in diaminopimelic acid was present in peptidoglycan-protein complexes and purified peptidoglycan as diaminopimelic acid exclusively and that pertussis peptidoglycan was not O acetylated, consistent with it being degraded completely by hen egg white lysozyme. Muramidase-derived disaccharide peptide monomers and peptide-cross-linked dimers and higher oligomers were isolated by molecular-sieve chromatography; from the distribution of these peptidoglycan fragments, the extent of peptide cross-linking of both phase I and III peptidoglycan was calculated to be ca. 48%. Unambiguous determination of the structure of muramidase-derived pepidoglycan fragments by fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry indicated that the pertussis peptidoglycan monomer fraction was surprisingly homogeneous, consisting of >95% N-acetylglucosaminyl-N-acetylmuramyl-alanyl-glutamyl-diaminopimelyl-alanine

  10. Whooping cough in Pakistan: Bordetella pertussis vs Bordetella parapertussis in 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, Habib; Said, Fahad; Syed, Muhammad A; Mughal, Amjad; Kazi, Yasmeen F; Heuvelman, Kees; Mooi, Frits R

    2011-10-01

    Pertussis, or whooping cough, is an acute respiratory disease mainly affecting infants and children and is caused by Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis. The aim of this study was to investigate the share of Bordetella species from potential whooping cough cases during 2005-2009. Eight hundred and two samples from suspected pertussis cases were collected, mainly from 2 provinces of Pakistan. Bacterial culture, identification, DNA extraction and routinely used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods using IS1001, IS1002 and IS481 were used to identify the Bordetella species. The results were unexpected, because all of the isolates collected from the different cities were identified as B. parapertussis (7.4%); B. pertussis was not isolated from any sample. However, PCR results indicated the presence of a small percentage (0.6%) of B. pertussis among the total cases studied. This study suggests that vaccines to protect against both B. pertussis and B. parapertussis should be considered.

  11. Genetic Variation of Bordetella pertussis in Austria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, B.; Melzer, H.; Freymuller, G.; Stumvoll, S.; Rendi-Wagner, P.; Paulke-Korinek, M.; Repa, A.; Mooi, F.R.; Kollaritsch, H.; Mittermayer, H.; Kessler, H.H.; Stanek, G.; Steinborn, R.; Duchene, M.; Wiedermann, U.

    2015-01-01

    In Austria, vaccination coverage against Bordetella pertussis infections during infancy is estimated at around 90%. Within the last years, however, the number of pertussis cases has increased steadily, not only in children but also in adolescents and adults, indicating both insufficient herd

  12. Bordetella pertussis diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebaek, N H; Heron, I; Skjødt, K

    1994-01-01

    The object of this work was to test the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for demonstration of Bordetella pertussis (BP) in nasopharyngeal secretions. The method was applied to patients with recently diagnosed pertussis, as verified by BP culture. In order to test the sensitivity and specificity...

  13. Calcium-dependent disorder-to-order transitions are central to the secretion and folding of the CyaA toxin of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Darragh P; Perez, Ana Cristina Sotomayor; Karst, Johanna; Cannella, Sara E; Enguéné, Véronique Yvette Ntsogo; Hessel, Audrey; Raoux-Barbot, Dorothée; Voegele, Alexis; Subrini, Orso; Davi, Marilyne; Guijarro, J Inaki; Raynal, Bertrand; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Hernandez, Belen; Ghomi, Mahmoud; Hourdel, Véronique; Malosse, Christian; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Brier, Sébastien; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2018-01-12

    The adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) plays an essential role in the early stages of respiratory tract colonization by Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. Once secreted, CyaA invades eukaryotic cells, leading to cell death. The cell intoxication process involves a unique mechanism of translocation of the CyaA catalytic domain directly across the plasma membrane of the target cell. Herein, we review our recent results describing how calcium is involved in several steps of this intoxication process. In conditions mimicking the low calcium environment of the crowded bacterial cytosol, we show that the C-terminal, calcium-binding Repeat-in-ToXin (RTX) domain of CyaA, RD, is an extended, intrinsically disordered polypeptide chain with a significant level of local, secondary structure elements, appropriately sized for transport through the narrow channel of the secretion system. Upon secretion, the high calcium concentration in the extracellular milieu induces the refolding of RD, which likely acts as a scaffold to favor the refolding of the upstream domains of the full-length protein. Due to the presence of hydrophobic regions, CyaA is prone to aggregate into multimeric forms in vitro, in the absence of a chaotropic agent. We have recently defined the experimental conditions required for CyaA folding, comprising both calcium binding and molecular confinement. These parameters are critical for CyaA folding into a stable, monomeric and functional form. The monomeric, calcium-loaded (holo) toxin exhibits efficient liposome permeabilization and hemolytic activities in vitro, even in a fully calcium-free environment. By contrast, the toxin requires sub-millimolar calcium concentrations in solution to translocate its catalytic domain across the plasma membrane, indicating that free calcium in solution is actively involved in the CyaA toxin translocation process. Overall, this data demonstrates the remarkable adaptation of bacterial RTX toxins to the

  14. Diagnosis of whooping cough in Switzerland: differentiating Bordetella pertussis from Bordetella holmesii by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittet, Laure F; Emonet, Stéphane; François, Patrice; Bonetti, Eve-Julie; Schrenzel, Jacques; Hug, Melanie; Altwegg, Martin; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii, an emerging pathogen, can be misidentified as Bordetella pertussis by routine polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In some reports, up to 29% of the patients diagnosed with pertussis have in fact B. holmesii infection and invasive, non-respiratory B. holmesii infections have been reported worldwide. This misdiagnosis undermines the knowledge of pertussis' epidemiology, and may lead to misconceptions on pertussis vaccine's efficacy. Recently, the number of whooping cough cases has increased significantly in several countries. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether B. holmesii was contributing to the increase in laboratory-confirmed cases of B. pertussis in Switzerland. A multiplex species-specific quantitative PCR assay was performed on 196 nasopharyngeal samples from Swiss patients with PCR-confirmed Bordetella infection (median age: 6 years-old, minimum 21 days-old, maximum 86 years-old), formerly diagnosed as Bordetella pertussis (IS481+). No B. holmesii (IS481+, IS1001-, hIS1001+) was identified. We discuss whether laboratories should implement specific PCR to recognize different Bordetella species. We conclude that in Switzerland B. holmesii seems to be circulating less than in neighboring countries and that specific diagnostic procedures are not necessary routinely. However, as the epidemiological situation may change rapidly, periodic reevaluation is suggested.

  15. [Features of Bordetella pertussis, Bordetella spp. infection and whopping cough in Córdoba province, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giayetto, Víctor O; Blanco, Sebastián; Mangeaud, Arnaldo; Barbás, María G; Cudolá, Analía; Gallego, Sandra V

    2017-04-01

    Whooping cough is a re-emerging infection in the world and Latin America. It was considered relevant to investigate the clinical and epidemiological profile of Bordetella spp. and Bordetella pertussis infection in Córdoba province, Argentina; evaluating, at the same time, the co-infection with virus producing respiratory infections that may be confused with whooping cough. All whooping cough suspected cases were studied by Polimerase Chain Reaction, amplifying the repeated insertion sequence (IS) 481 and the promoter gene encoding pertussis toxin, between 2011 and 2013. The data were obtained from the clinical and epidemiological records. From 2,588 whooping cough suspected cases, 11.59% was infected by Bordetella spp. and 9.16% was confirmed as Bordetella pertussis infection. The rate of infection was 7.22 and 1.84 per 100,000 for 2011 and 2012, respectively. The infection presented a seasonal tendency and it was mainly found on the group of children between 13 and 24 months old. The co-infection with virus producing respiratory infections, were uncommon. Paroxysmal cough, cyanosis and/or vomiting were predictors of the infection for Bordetella pertussis. To deal with the re-emergence of whooping cough is important the knowledge of the regional epidemiological situation. This paper shows the situation of these infections in the regional clinical and epidemiological context, and makes the information available for health decision-making.

  16. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide stimulates neurite growth in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, A; Kimball, B; Romanchuk, G; Mulholland, M W

    1995-01-01

    The ability of PACAP-38 to stimulate morphological development was studied using rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. PACAP-38 produced concentration-dependent increases in percentage of cells exhibiting neurite extension. Similar increases were produced by forskolin (28 +/- 2% at 96 h) and 8-bromo cAMP (30 +/- 2%). Vasoactive intestinal peptide and alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide were without effect. PACAP-38 produced significant increases in PC12 cell cAMP content and inositol phosphate turnover. Intracellular [Ca2+] increased from 169 +/- 14 nM to 560 +/- 58 nM in response to 1 microM PACAP-38. PACAP-stimulated neurite outgrowth was abolished by RpcAMPS, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent kinases but was unaffected by the protein kinase C antagonist H7.

  17. Accelerated evolution of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide precursor gene during human origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yin-Qiu; Qian, Ya-Ping; Yang, Su

    2005-01-01

    is at least seven times faster than that in other mammal species resulting from strong Darwinian positive selection. Eleven human-specific amino acid changes were identified in the PACAP precursors, which are conserved from murine to African apes. Protein structural analysis suggested that a putative novel...

  18. A Gateway((R)) -compatible bacterial adenylate cyclase-based two-hybrid system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ouellette, S. P.; Gauliard, E.; Antošová, Zuzana; Ladant, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2014), s. 259-267 ISSN 1758-2229 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : bacterial two-hybrid system * protein–protein interactions * cell division * Gateway((R))(GW) cloning system Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.293, year: 2014

  19. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide plays a role in olfactory memory formation in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józsa, Rita; Hollósy, Tibor; Tamás, Andrea; Tóth, Gábor; Lengvári, István; Reglodi, Dóra

    2005-11-01

    PACAP plays an important role during development of the nervous system and is also involved in memory processing. The aim of the present study was to investigate the function of PACAP in chicken embryonic olfactory memory formation by blocking PACAP at a sensitive period in ovo. Chicken were exposed daily to strawberry scent in ovo from embryonic day 15. Control eggs were treated only with saline, while other eggs received a single injection of the PACAP antagonist PACAP6-38 at day 15. The consumption of scented and unscented water was measured daily after hatching. Animals exposed to strawberry scent in ovo showed no preference. However, chickens exposed to PACAP6-38, showed a clear preference for plain water, similarly to unexposed chicken. Our present study points to PACAP's possible importance in embryonic olfactory memory formation.

  20. Gustatory Habituation in "Drosophila" Relies on "Rutabaga" (Adenylate Cyclase)-Dependent Plasticity of GABAergic Inhibitory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Pushkar; Rodrigues, Veronica; VijayRaghavan, K.; Ramaswami, Mani

    2012-01-01

    In some situations, animals seem to ignore stimuli which in other contexts elicit a robust response. This attenuation in behavior, which enables animals to ignore a familiar, unreinforced stimulus, is called habituation. Despite the ubiquity of this phenomenon, it is generally poorly understood in terms of the underlying neural circuitry. Hungry…

  1. The Bordetella pertussis Type III Secretion System Tip Complex Protein Bsp22 Is Not a Protective Antigen and Fails To Elicit Serum Antibody Responses during Infection of Humans and Mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romero, Rodrigo, Villarino; Bíbová, Ilona; Černý, Ondřej; Večerek, Branislav; Wald, Tomáš; Benada, Oldřich; Zavadilová, J.; Osička, Radim; Šebo, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 8 (2013), s. 2761-2767 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/0580; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1940 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : ADENYLATE CYCLASE-HEMOLYSIN * T-CELL EPITOPES * IMMUNE-RESPONSES Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.156, year: 2013

  2. 21 CFR 866.3065 - Bordetella spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bordetella spp. serological reagents. 866.3065 Section 866.3065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... identification aids in the diagnosis of diseases caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Bordetella and...

  3. Bordetella bronchiseptica and fatal pneumonia of dogs and cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordetella bronchiseptica frequently causes nonfatal tracheobronchitis, but its role in fatal pneumonia is less well-studied. The objectives of this study were to identify the frequency of Bordetella bronchiseptica infection in fatal cases of bronchopneumonia in dogs and cats and to compare the diag...

  4. [Detection of bordetella within the framework of the Eupert-labnet Bordetella PCR EQA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeczkowska, Magdalena; Piekarska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was evaluation of molecular identification results of samples including genomic DNA of Bordetella by using PCR method, obtained by laboratory of Department of Bacteriology NIZP-PZH and their comparison with the results obtained by other reference laboratories in EU. The study was conducted within the framework of the first external quality assessment (Eupert-labnet Bordetella PCR EQA). The panel of ten coded samples of purified genomic DNA was investigated. The panel was designed to include dilution of genomic DNA from B. pertussis at the three concentrations 2 pg/microl (high), 0,2 pg/microl (medium) and 0,02 pg/microl (low). The panel included as well DNA of other Bordetella species (B. parapertussis, B. holmesii, B. bronchiseptica) and H. influenzae at concentrations 2 pg/microl. There was also two ,,blank" samples containing only Tris Buffet (10mM, pH 8,0). Presence or absence of B. pertussis DNA in the tested samples was determined by using four PCR assays: conventional in-house PCR (detection of IS481 B. pertussis and IS1001 B. parapertussis), commercial multiplex PCR (detection of DNA B. pertussis), conventional in-hause real-time PCR (detection of IS481 B. pertussis) and commercial real-time PCR (detection of IS1001 B. parapertussis). All but one samples were correctly identified in our laboratory. Laboratory of Department of Bacteriology NIZP-PZH correctly detected DNA ofB. pertussis at both the ,,high" and ,,medium" dilution. In addition, the distinction between B. pertussis and other Bordetella species was correctly obtained by our laboratory. The negative samples, the two blank samples and one containing H. influenzae were correctly detected. Results of the first international external quality assessment have confirmed competences of laboratory of Department of Bacteriology NIZP-PZH in molecular identification of Bordetella pertussis.

  5. The extent of the temperature-induced membrane remodeling in two closely related Bordetella species reflects their adaptation to diverse environmental niches

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seydlová, G.; Beranová, I.; Bíbová, Ilona; Dienstbier, Ana; Držmíšek, Jakub; Mašín, Jiří; Fišer, R.; Konopásek, I.; Večerek, Branislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 19 (2017), s. 8048-8058 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GF16-34825L; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05919S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-30782A; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : PERTUSSIS ADENYLATE-CYCLASE * ESCHERICHIA-COLI * FATTY-ACIDS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2016

  6. Genomic island excisions in Bordetella petrii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levillain Erwan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the members of the genus Bordetella B. petrii is unique, since it is the only species isolated from the environment, while the pathogenic Bordetellae are obligately associated with host organisms. Another feature distinguishing B. petrii from the other sequenced Bordetellae is the presence of a large number of mobile genetic elements including several large genomic regions with typical characteristics of genomic islands collectively known as integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs. These elements mainly encode accessory metabolic factors enabling this bacterium to grow on a large repertoire of aromatic compounds. Results During in vitro culture of Bordetella petrii colony variants appear frequently. We show that this variability can be attributed to the presence of a large number of metastable mobile genetic elements on its chromosome. In fact, the genome sequence of B. petrii revealed the presence of at least seven large genomic islands mostly encoding accessory metabolic functions involved in the degradation of aromatic compounds and detoxification of heavy metals. Four of these islands (termed GI1 to GI3 and GI6 are highly related to ICEclc of Pseudomonas knackmussii sp. strain B13. Here we present first data about the molecular characterization of these islands. We defined the exact borders of each island and we show that during standard culture of the bacteria these islands get excised from the chromosome. For all but one of these islands (GI5 we could detect circular intermediates. For the clc-like elements GI1 to GI3 of B. petrii we provide evidence that tandem insertion of these islands which all encode highly related integrases and attachment sites may also lead to incorporation of genomic DNA which originally was not part of the island and to the formation of huge composite islands. By integration of a tetracycline resistance cassette into GI3 we found this island to be rather unstable and to be lost from

  7. Bordetella pertussis pathogenesis: current and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Jeffrey A.; Scheller, Erich V.; Miller, Jeff F.; Cotter, Peggy A.

    2014-01-01

    Pertussis, or whooping cough, has recently reemerged as a major public health threat despite high levels of vaccination against the etiological agent, Bordetella pertussis. In this Review, we describe the pathogenesis of this disease, with a focus on recent mechanistic insights into virulence factor function. We also discuss the changing epidemiology of pertussis and the challenges of vaccine development. Despite decades of research, many aspects of B. pertussis physiology and pathogenesis remain poorly understood. We highlight knowledge gaps that must be addressed to develop improved vaccines and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24608338

  8. Adenylic dinucleotides produced by CD38 are negative endogenous modulators of platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Mirko; Basile, Giovanna; Bruzzese, Debora; Guida, Lucrezia; Signorello, Maria Grazia; Chothi, Madhu Parakkottil; Bruzzone, Santina; Millo, Enrico; Qi, Ai-Dong; Nicholas, Robert A; Kassack, Matthias U; Leoncini, Giuliana; Zocchi, Elena

    2008-09-05

    Diadenosine 5',5'''-P1,P2-diphosphate (Ap2A) is one of the adenylic dinucleotides stored in platelet granules. Along with proaggregant ADP, it is released upon platelet activation and is known to stimulate myocyte proliferation. We have previously demonstrated synthesis of Ap2A and of two isomers thereof, called P18 and P24, from their high pressure liquid chromatography retention time, by the ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 in mammalian cells. Here we show that Ap2A and its isomers are present in resting human platelets and are released during thrombin-induced platelet activation. The three adenylic dinucleotides were identified by high pressure liquid chromatography through a comparison with the retention times and the absorption spectra of purified standards. Ap2A, P18, and P24 had no direct effect on platelet aggregation, but they inhibited platelet aggregation induced by physiological agonists (thrombin, ADP, and collagen), with mean IC50 values ranging between 5 and 15 microm. Moreover, the three dinucleotides did not modify the intracellular calcium concentration in resting platelets, whereas they significantly reduced the thrombin-induced intracellular calcium increase. Through binding to the purinergic receptor P2Y11, exogenously applied Ap2A, P18, and P24 increased the intracellular cAMP concentration and stimulated platelet production of nitric oxide, the most important endogenous antiaggregant. The presence of Ap2A, P18, and P24 in resting platelets and their release during thrombin-induced platelet activation at concentrations equal to or higher than the respective IC50 value on platelet aggregation suggest a role of these dinucleotides as endogenous negative modulators of aggregation.

  9. Prevalence of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis in Samples Submitted for RSV Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsh, Paul

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The clinical presentation of Bordetella pertussis can overlap with that of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; however, management differs.HYPOTHESIS: First, the prevalence of B. pertussis is less than 2% among patients screened for RSV, and second the prevalence of B. parapertussis is also less than 2% among these patients.METHODS: Nasal washings submitted to a clinical laboratory for RSV screening were tested for B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, using species-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays. These were optimized to target conserved regions within a complement gene and the CarB gene, respectively. A Bordetella spp. genus-specific real-time PCR assay was designed to detect the Bhur gene of B. pertussis, B. parapertussis, and B. bronchiseptica. RSV A and B subtypes were tested by reverse transcription-PCR.RESULTS: Four hundred and eighty-nine clinical samples were tested. There was insufficient material to complete testing for one B. pertussis, 10 RSV subtype A, and four RSV subtype B assays. Bordetella pertussis was detected in 3/488 (0.6% (95% CI 0.1% to 1.8%, while B. parapertussis was detected in 5/489 (1.0% (95% CI 0.3% to 2.4%. Dual infection of B. pertussis with RSV and of B. parapertussis with RSV occurred in two and in three cases respectively. RSV was detected by PCR in 127 (26.5%.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of B. pertussis in nasal washings submitted for RSV screening was less than 2%. The prevalence of parapertussis may be higher than 2%. RSV with B. pertussis and RSV with B. parapertussis coinfection do occur.

  10. Characterization of two unusual guanylyl cyclases from Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Jeroen; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    2002-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclase A (GCA) and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) encode GCs in Dictyostelium and have a topology similar to 12-transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclase, respectively. We demonstrate that all detectable GC activity is lost in a cell line in which both genes have been inactivated. Cell

  11. Soluble adenylyl cyclase in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Andreas; Meili, Dimirela; Salathe, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP is integral for many physiological processes. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) was recently identified as a widely expressed intracellular source of cAMP in mammalian cells. sAC is evolutionary, structurally, and biochemically distinct from the G-protein-responsive transmembranous adenylyl cyclases (tmAC). The structure of the catalytic unit of sAC is similar to tmAC, but sAC does not contain transmembranous domains, allowing localizations independent of the membranous...

  12. Mouse lung adhesion assay for Bordetella pertussis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, K.A.; Freer, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The ability of Bordetella pertussis to adhere to cell surfaces has been demonstrated by adhesion to tissue culture cells and adhesion to chicken, hamster or rabbit trachea in organ culture. In this report a mouse lung assay for adhesion is described and the results obtained using two virulent strains of B. pertussis and their avirulent counterparts. These were a C modulation of one of the original virulent strains and a phase IV variant of the other virulent strain. Organisms were radiolabelled by adding 1 μCi (37 K Bq) of [ 14 C]glutamic acid per 10 ml of culture medium before inoculation and incubation for 5 days. The lungs were washed by perfusion in situ with at least two volumes (1 ml) of sterile 1% (w/v) casamino acids. The percentage of the inoculated organisms retained in the lungs was determined, after removal of the lungs, by one of the following two methods: viable count or radioactive count. Results for both methods were expressed as the percentage of the inoculum retained in the lungs plus or minus one standard deviation. (Auth.)

  13. Septic arthritis and osteomyelitis due to Bordetella petrii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogi, Masayuki; Bankowski, Matthew J; Pien, Francis D

    2015-03-01

    A case of Bordetella petrii septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in an elbow resulted from a dirt bike accident in Hawaii. Two months of intravenous antibiotics and repeated surgeries were required to cure this infection. Our case, and literature review, suggests that extended-spectrum penicillins, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are good treatment options. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Septic Arthritis and Osteomyelitis Due to Bordetella petrii

    OpenAIRE

    Nogi, Masayuki; Bankowski, Matthew J.; Pien, Francis D.

    2014-01-01

    A case of Bordetella petrii septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in an elbow resulted from a dirt bike accident in Hawaii. Two months of intravenous antibiotics and repeated surgeries were required to cure this infection. Our case, and literature review, suggests that extended-spectrum penicillins, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are good treatment options.

  15. Crucial role of antibodies to pertactin in Bordetella pertussis immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellwig, SMM; Rodriguez, ME; Berbers, GAM; de Winkel, JGJV; Mooi, FR

    2003-01-01

    Pertussis, a serious infectious disease of the respiratory tract caused by Bordetella pertussis, is reemerging in vaccinated populations. Efforts to curtail this disease are hampered by limited insight into the basis of protective immunity. Opsonophagocytosis was recently found to play a central

  16. Induction and maintenance of Bordetella pertussis specific immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenger, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Pertussis, also referred to as whooping cough, is a serious respiratory disease mainly caused by the gram-negative bacterium Bordetella pertussis. The disease is most severe in neonates and children under the age of 1. Before childhood vaccination was introduced in the 1950s, pertussis was an

  17. Proteome analysis of Bordetella pertussis isolated from human macrophages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lamberti, Y.; Cafiero, J.H.; Surmann, K.; Valdez, H.; Holubová, Jana; Večerek, Branislav; Šebo, Peter; Schmidt, F.; Völker, U.; Rodriguez, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 136, MAY16 (2016), s. 55-67 ISSN 1874-3919 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14AR028 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Bordetella pertussis * Intracellular survival * Proteomics Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2016

  18. Two Distinct Episodes Of Whooping Cough Caused By Consecutive Bordetella Pertussis And Bordetella Parapertussis Infections In A Fully Immunized Healthy Boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heininger, Ulrich; Schlassa, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    We describe a 5-year-old, fully immunized boy with polymerase chain reaction-proven consecutive Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis infections causing typical whooping cough at the age of 2 and 5 years, respectively. Neither pertussis immunization nor disease provides reliable immunity against further episodes of whooping cough.

  19. Properties of adenyl cyclase and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate receptor protein-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.

    1976-01-01

    Several spontaneous cya and crp mutants of Escherichia coli have been selected as clones simultaneously resistant to phage lambda and nalidixic acid and characterized. Both cya and crp mutants have been found to grow as cocci with increased doubling times. They have increased resistance to some mutagens (methylmethanesulfonate, ultraviolet light, gamma rays), antibiotics (nalidixic acid, ampicillin), phages (lambda, T6), sublethal heat and hypotonic shock, and decreased resistance to neutral detergents (sodium dodecyl sulfate, sodium deoxycholate), a protein synthesis inhibitor (streptomycin), and a respiratory inhibitor (sodium azide). The nature of changes in cell parameters indicate fundamental alterations in the envelope structure of the cya and crp mutant cells. The new cya and crp mutants have been found to be multiply carbohydrate negative and nonmotile in conformity with similar previously isolated mutants. Studies of revertants and phi 80 cya + and phi 80 cya transductants indicated that the pleiotropic phenotype is related to a single mutational event at the cya or the crp locus in the mutants

  20. Investigation of the pathophysiological mechanisms of migraine attacks induced by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Hougaard, Anders; Schytz, Henrik W

    2014-01-01

    samples (plasma PACAP38 and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and serum tryptase), and vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory frequency, and end-tidal pressure of CO2) was recorded before and up to 5 h after infusion. Twenty-two patients [mean age 24 years (range 19-36)] completed the study...... on both days. Sixteen patients (73%) reported migraine-like attacks after PACAP38 and four after vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (18%) infusion (P = 0.002). Three of four patients, who reported migraine-like attacks after vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, also reported attacks after PACAP38. Both...... the start of PACAP38 infusion only in those patients who later reported migraine attacks. Blood levels of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and tryptase were unchanged after PACAP38 infusion. In conclusion, PACAP38-induced migraine was associated with sustained dilatation of extracranial arteries...

  1. Alternative Splicing of the Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Receptor PAC1: Mechanisms of Fine Tuning of Brain Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna eBlechman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of the precursor mRNA encoding for the neuropeptide receptor PAC1/ADCYAP1R1 generates multiple protein products that exhibit pleiotropic activities. Recent studies in mammals and zebrafish have implicated some of these splice isoforms in control of both cellular and body homeostasis. Here, we review the regulation of PAC1 splice variants and their underlying signal transduction and physiological processes in the nervous system.

  2. Y1 receptors for neuropeptide Y are coupled to mobilization of intracellular calcium and inhibition of adenylate cyclase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakerlund, L; Gether, U; Fuhlendorff, J

    1990-01-01

    Two types of binding sites have previously been described for neuropeptide Y (NPY), called Y1 and Y2 receptors. The intracellular events following Y1 receptor activation was studied in the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-MC. Both NPY and the specific Y1 receptor ligand, [Leu31,Pro34]-NPY, caused...

  3. Innervation of the rat pineal gland by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)-immunoreactive nerve fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, J.

    1999-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, neuropeptide Y, colocalization, trigeminal ganglion, rat (Wistar)......Calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, neuropeptide Y, colocalization, trigeminal ganglion, rat (Wistar)...

  4. The central regulation of plant physiology by adenylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geigenberger, Peter; Riewe, David; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2010-02-01

    There have been many recent developments concerning the metabolic, transport and signalling functions of adenylates in plants, suggesting new roles for these compounds as central regulators of plant physiology. For example, altering the expression levels of enzymes involved in the equilibration, salvaging, synthesis and transport of adenylates leads to perturbations in storage, growth and stress responses, implying a role for adenylates as important signals. Furthermore, sensing of the internal energy status involves SNF1-related kinases, which control the expression and phosphorylation of key metabolic enzymes. ATP also acts as an apoplastic signalling molecule to control cell growth and pathogen responses. These new results could shed light on the emerging question of whether energy homeostasis in plant cells differs from mechanisms found in microbes and mammals. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Epidemiology of whooping cough & typing of Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegerle, Nicolas; Guiso, Nicole

    2013-11-01

    Bordetella pertussis is a Gram-negative human-restricted bacterium that evolved from the broad-range mammalian pathogen, Bordetella bronchiseptica. It causes whooping cough or pertussis in humans, which is the most prevalent vaccine-preventable disease worldwide. The introduction of the pertussis whole-cell vaccination for young children, followed by the introduction of the pertussis acellular vaccination (along with booster vaccination) for older age groups, has affected the bacterial population and epidemiology of the disease. B. pertussis is relatively monomorphic worldwide, but nevertheless, different countries are facing different epidemiological evolutions of the disease. Although it is tempting to link vaccine-driven phenotypic and genotypic evolution of the bacterium to epidemiology, many other factors should be considered and surveillance needs to continue, in addition to studies investigating the impact of current clinical isolates on vaccine efficacy.

  6. Septic Arthritis and Osteomyelitis Due to Bordetella petrii

    OpenAIRE

    Nogi, Masayuki; Bankowski, Matthew J; Pien, Francis D

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Bordetella petrii elbow septic arthritis and osteomyelitis that resulted from a dirt bike accident in Hawai‘i. Initial incision and drainage followed by one month of oral doxycycline were given. Because of persistent infection of the elbow, additional 10 weeks of intravenous piperacillin/tazobactam and repeated surgeries were required to cure this infection. B. petrii was isolated from the synovial fluid and identification was obtained using 16S rRNA sequencing showing the...

  7. Cilia-associated bacteria in fatal Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia of dogs and cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordetella bronchiseptica frequently causes nonfatal tracheobronchitis, but its role in fatal pneumonia is less well-studied. The objectives of this study were to identify the frequency of Bordetella bronchiseptica infection in fatal cases of bronchopneumonia in dogs and cats and to compare the diag...

  8. Comparative analysis of plant lycopene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Ibrahim; Filiz, Ertugrul; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-10-01

    Carotenoids are essential isoprenoid pigments produced by plants, algae, fungi and bacteria. Lycopene cyclase (LYC) commonly cyclize carotenoids, which is an important branching step in the carotenogenesis, at one or both end of the backbone. Plants have two types of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). In this study, plant LYCs were analyzed. Based on domain analysis, all LYCs accommodate lycopene cyclase domain (Pf05834). Furthermore, motif analysis indicated that motifs were conserved among the plants. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs were classified in β and ϵ groups. Monocot and dicot plants separated from each other in the phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, Oryza sativa Japonica Group and Zea mays of LYCs as monocot plants and Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum of LYCs as dicot plants were analyzed. According to nucleotide diversity analysis of β-LCY and ϵ-LCY genes, nucleotide diversities were found to be π: 0.30 and π: 0.25, respectively. The result highlighted β-LCY genes showed higher nucleotide diversity than ϵ-LCY genes. LYCs interacting genes and their co-expression partners were also predicted using String server. The obtained data suggested the importance of LYCs in carotenoid metabolism. 3D modeling revealed that depicted structures were similar in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs. Likewise, the predicted binding sites were highly similar between O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera LCYs. Most importantly, analysis elucidated the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif for both type of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). This motif related to Rossmann fold domain and probably provides a flat platform for binding of FAD in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs with conserved structure. In addition to lycopene cyclase domain, the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif can be used for exploring LYCs proteins and to annotate the function of unknown proteins containing lycopene cyclase

  9. Adenylyl cyclases in the digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatini, Maria Eugenia; Gorelick, Fred; Glaser, Shannon

    2014-06-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are a group of widely distributed enzymes whose functions are very diverse. There are nine known transmembrane AC isoforms activated by Gαs. Each has its own pattern of expression in the digestive system and differential regulation of function by Ca(2+) and other intracellular signals. In addition to the transmembrane isoforms, one AC is soluble and exhibits distinct regulation. In this review, the basic structure, regulation and physiological roles of ACs in the digestive system are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Overexpression of functional human oxidosqualene cyclase in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kürten, Charlotte; Uhlén, Mathias; Syrén, Per-Olof

    2015-01-01

    The generation of multicyclic scaffolds from linear oxidosqualene by enzymatic polycyclization catalysis constitutes a cornerstone in biology for the generation of bioactive compounds. Human oxidosqualene cyclase (hOSC) is a membrane-bound triterpene cyclase that catalyzes the formation of the te...

  11. Improving specificity of Bordetella pertussis detection using a four target real-time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detemmerman, Liselot; Soetens, Oriane; Yusuf, Erlangga; Piérard, Denis

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of whooping cough, a contagious respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussis, is on the rise despite existing vaccination programmes. Similar, though usually milder, respiratory symptoms may be caused by other members of the Bordetella genus: B. parapertussis, B. holmesii, and B. bronchiseptica. Pertussis diagnosis is mostly done using PCR, but the use of multiple targets is necessary in order to differentiate the different Bordetella spp. with sufficient sensitivity and specificity. In this study we evaluate a multiplex PCR assay for the differentiation of B. pertussis from other Bordetella spp., using the targets IS481, IS1001, IS1002, and recA. Moreover, we retrospectively explore the epidemiology of Bordetella spp. infections in Belgium, using the aforementioned assay over a three-year period, from 2013 until 2015. PMID:28403204

  12. The missing link: Bordetella petrii is endowed with both the metabolic versatility of environmental bacteria and virulence traits of pathogenic Bordetellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneiker-Bekel Susanne

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bordetella petrii is the only environmental species hitherto found among the otherwise host-restricted and pathogenic members of the genus Bordetella. Phylogenetically, it connects the pathogenic Bordetellae and environmental bacteria of the genera Achromobacter and Alcaligenes, which are opportunistic pathogens. B. petrii strains have been isolated from very different environmental niches, including river sediment, polluted soil, marine sponges and a grass root. Recently, clinical isolates associated with bone degenerative disease or cystic fibrosis have also been described. Results In this manuscript we present the results of the analysis of the completely annotated genome sequence of the B. petrii strain DSMZ12804. B. petrii has a mosaic genome of 5,287,950 bp harboring numerous mobile genetic elements, including seven large genomic islands. Four of them are highly related to the clc element of Pseudomonas knackmussii B13, which encodes genes involved in the degradation of aromatics. Though being an environmental isolate, the sequenced B. petrii strain also encodes proteins related to virulence factors of the pathogenic Bordetellae, including the filamentous hemagglutinin, which is a major colonization factor of B. pertussis, and the master virulence regulator BvgAS. However, it lacks all known toxins of the pathogenic Bordetellae. Conclusion The genomic analysis suggests that B. petrii represents an evolutionary link between free-living environmental bacteria and the host-restricted obligate pathogenic Bordetellae. Its remarkable metabolic versatility may enable B. petrii to thrive in very different ecological niches.

  13. Soluble variants of human recombinant glutaminyl cyclase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Castaldo

    Full Text Available Recombinant human Glutaminyl Cyclase expressed in E. coli is produced as inclusion bodies. Lack of glycosylation is the main origin of its accumulation in insoluble aggregates. Mutation of single isolated hydrophobic amino acids into negative amino acids was not able to circumvent inclusion bodies formation. On the contrary, substitution with carboxyl-terminal residues of two or three aromatic residues belonging to extended hydrophobic patches on the protein surface provided soluble but still active forms of the protein. These mutants could be expressed in isotopically enriched forms for NMR studies and the maximal attainable concentration was sufficient for the acquisition of (1H-(15N HSQC spectra that represent the starting point for future drug development projects targeting Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Bordetella pertussis, B. parapertussis, vaccines and cycles of whooping cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchez, Valérie; Guiso, Nicole

    2015-10-01

    Whooping cough is a vaccine-preventable disease due to Bordetella pertussis and B. parapertussis. This highly contagious respiratory disease occurs through epidemic cycles every 3-5 years and vaccination did not change this frequency. Models suggest that the cyclic increase of susceptibles is linked to demographic differences and different vaccine coverage. However, differences in surveillance of the disease as well as adaptation of the agents of the disease to their human hosts and to vaccine pressure might also play an important role. These parameters are discussed in this review. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The effect of adenyl compounds on the rat heart.

    OpenAIRE

    Burnstock, G.; Meghji, P.

    1983-01-01

    1 The effects of adenyl compounds were examined on the rat atrium and ventricle. 2 Adenosine, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and beta, gamma-methylene ATP (APPCP) produced negative inotropic effects on the rat atrium. These inhibitory effects were antagonized by 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), a P1-purinoceptor antagonist, and potentiated by erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA), an adenosine deaminase inhibitor, but were not affected...

  16. Substrate specificity determinants of class III nucleotidyl cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharambe, Nikhil G; Barathy, Deivanayaga V; Syed, Wajeed; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Colaςo, Melwin; Misquith, Sandra; Suguna, Kaza

    2016-10-01

    The two second messengers in signalling, cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, are produced by adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases respectively. Recognition and discrimination of the substrates ATP and GTP by the nucleotidyl cyclases are vital in these reactions. Various apo-, substrate- or inhibitor-bound forms of adenylyl cyclase (AC) structures from transmembrane and soluble ACs have revealed the catalytic mechanism of ATP cyclization reaction. Previously reported structures of guanylyl cyclases represent ligand-free forms and inactive open states of the enzymes and thus do not provide information regarding the exact mode of substrate binding. The structures we present here of the cyclase homology domain of a class III AC from Mycobacterium avium (Ma1120) and its mutant in complex with ATP and GTP in the presence of calcium ion, provide the structural basis for substrate selection by the nucleotidyl cyclases at the atomic level. Precise nature of the enzyme-substrate interactions, novel modes of substrate binding and the ability of the binding pocket to accommodate diverse conformations of the substrates have been revealed by the present crystallographic analysis. This is the first report to provide structures of both the nucleotide substrates bound to a nucleotidyl cyclase. Coordinates and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank with accession numbers: 5D15 (Ma1120 CHD +ATP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0E (Ma1120 CHD +GTP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0H (Ma1120 CHD (KDA→EGY)+ATP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0G (Ma1120 CHD (KDA→EGY)+GTP.Ca 2+ ). Adenylyl cyclase (EC number: 4.6.1.1). © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Toll-like receptor 4 limits transmission of Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Rolin

    Full Text Available Transmission of pathogens has been notoriously difficult to study under laboratory conditions leaving knowledge gaps regarding how bacterial factors and host immune components affect the spread of infections between hosts. We describe the development of a mouse model of transmission of a natural pathogen, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and its use to assess the impact of host immune functions. Although B. bronchiseptica transmits poorly between wild-type mice and mice lacking other immune components, it transmits efficiently between mice deficient in Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4. TLR4-mutant mice were more susceptible to initial colonization, and poorly controlled pathogen growth and shedding. Heavy neutrophil infiltration distinguished TLR4-deficient responses, and neutrophil depletion did not affect respiratory CFU load, but decreased bacterial shedding. The effect of TLR4 response on transmission may explain the extensive variation in TLR4 agonist potency observed among closely related subspecies of Bordetella. This transmission model will enable mechanistic studies of how pathogens spread from one host to another, the defining feature of infectious disease.

  18. Polymorphisms influencing expression of dermonecrotic toxin in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Okada

    Full Text Available Bordetella bronchiseptica is a pathogenic bacterium causing respiratory infections in a broad range of mammals. Recently, we determined the whole genome sequence of B. bronchiseptica S798 strain isolated from a pig infected with atrophic rhinitis and found four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at positions -129, -72, +22, and +38 in the region upstream of dnt encoding dermonecrotic toxin (DNT, when compared with a rabbit isolate, RB50. DNT is known to be involved in turbinate atrophy observed in atrophic rhinitis. Immunoblotting, quantitative real-time PCR, and β-galactosidase reporter assay revealed that these SNPs resulted in the increased promoter activity of dnt and conferred the increased ability to produce DNT on the bacteria. Similar or identical SNPs were also found in other pig isolates kept in our laboratory, all of which produce a larger amount of DNT than RB50. Our analysis revealed that substitution of at least two of the four bases, at positions -72 and +22, influenced the promoter activity for dnt. These results imply that these SNPs are involved in the pathogenicity of bordetellae specific to pig diseases.

  19. Of mice and men: asymmetric interactions between Bordetella pathogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restif, O; Wolfe, D N; Goebel, E M; Bjornstad, O N; Harvill, E T

    2008-11-01

    In a recent experiment, we found that mice previously infected with Bordetella pertussis were not protected against a later infection with Bordetella parapertussis, while primary infection with B. parapertussis conferred cross-protection. This challenges the common assumption made in most mathematical models for pathogenic strain dynamics that cross-immunity between strains is symmetric. Here we investigate the potential consequences of this pattern on the circulation of the two pathogens in human populations. To match the empirical dominance of B. pertussis, we made the additional assumption that B. parapertussis pays a cost in terms of reduced fitness. We begin by exploring the range of parameter values that allow the coexistence of the two pathogens, with or without vaccination. We then track the dynamics of the system following the introduction of anti-pertussis vaccination. Our results suggest that (1) in order for B. pertussis to be more prevalent than B. parapertussis, the former must have a strong competitive advantage, possibly in the form of higher infectivity, and (2) because of asymmetric cross-immunity, the introduction of anti-pertussis vaccination should have little effect on the absolute prevalence of B. parapertussis. We discuss the evidence supporting these predictions, and the potential relevance of this model for other pathogens.

  20. Novel environmental species isolated from the plaster wall surface of mural paintings in the Takamatsuzuka tumulus: Bordetella muralis sp. nov., Bordetella tumulicola sp. nov. and Bordetella tumbae sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazato, Nozomi; Handa, Yutaka; Nishijima, Miyuki; Kigawa, Rika; Sano, Chie; Sugiyama, Junta

    2015-12-01

    Ten strains of Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile coccobacilli were isolated from the plaster wall surface of 1300-year-old mural paintings inside the stone chamber of the Takamatsuzuka tumulus in Asuka village (Asuka-mura), Nara Prefecture, Japan. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of the isolates, they belonged to the proteobacterial genus Bordetella (class Betaproteobacteria) and could be separated into three groups representing novel lineages within the genus Bordetella. Three isolates were selected, one from each group, and identified carefully using a polyphasic approach. The isolates were characterized by the presence of Q-8 as their major ubiquinone system and C16 : 0 (30.0-41.8 %), summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c; 10.1-27.0 %) and C17 : 0 cyclo (10.8-23.8 %) as the predominant fatty acids. The major hydroxy fatty acids were C12 : 0 2-OH and C14 : 0 2-OH. The DNA G+C content was 59.6-60.0 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization tests confirmed that the isolates represented three separate novel species, for which the names Bordetella muralis sp. nov. (type strain T6220-3-2bT = JCM 30931T = NCIMB 15006T), Bordetella tumulicola sp. nov. (type strain T6517-1-4bT = JCM 30935T = NCIMB 15007T) and Bordetella tumbae sp. nov. (type strain T6713-1-3bT = JCM 30934T = NCIMB 15008T) are proposed. These results support previous evidence that members of the genus Bordetella exist in the environment and may be ubiquitous in soil and/or water.

  1. Kwantitatief onderzoek naar de gevoeligheid van Bordetella bronchiseptica en Pasteurella multocida voor sulfonamiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klingeren; B.van; Dessens-Kroon; M.; Verheuvel; M.

    1985-01-01

    Teneinde kwantitatieve informatie te verkrijgen over de gevoeligheid en het resistentieniveau van Bordetella bronchiseptica en Pasteurella multocida voor sulfonamiden werd voor resp. 119 en 151 bij biggen/varkens geisoleerde stammen van deze species uit een vijftal veterinair bacteriologische

  2. Canine distemper virus infection with secondary Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Headley,Selwyn Arlington; Graça,Dominguita Lühers; Costa,Mateus Matiuzzi da; Vargas,Agueda Castagna de

    1999-01-01

    Canine distemper virus infection and secondary Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia are described in mongrel dogs. Canine distemper was characterised by nonsuppurative demyelinating encephalitis with typical inclusion bodies in astrocytes. B. bronchiseptica was isolated from areas of purulent bronchopneumonia.

  3. Probing the genome-scale metabolic landscape of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dos Santos, Filipe Branco; Olivier, Brett G.; Boele, Joost; Krumpochova, Petra; Klau, Gunnar W.; Giera, Martin; Teusink, Bas

    2017-01-01

    Whooping cough is a highly contagious respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite widespread vaccination, its incidence has been rising alarmingly, and yet, the physiology of B. pertussis remains poorly understood. We combined genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, a novel

  4. Bacteriemia recurrente por Bordetella bronchiseptica en un paciente con trasplante de medula ósea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Echeverri-Toro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Se reporta un caso de bacteriemia recurrente por Bordetella bronchiseptica en un paciente inmunocomprometido con antecedentes de trasplante alogénico de medula ósea por síndrome mielodisplásico, quien ingresó al hospital por síndrome febril. Bordetella bronchiseptica es un agente patógeno veterinario poco común en humanos que afecta principalmente a pacientes inmunocomprometidos y es causa poco frecuente de bacteriemia.

  5. Pituitary Adenlylate Cyclase Activating Peptide Protects Adult Neural Stem Cells from a Hypoglycaemic milieu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Mansouri

    Full Text Available Hypoglycaemia is a common side-effect of glucose-lowering therapies for type-2 diabetic patients, which may cause cognitive/neurological impairment. Although the effects of hypoglycaemia in the brain have been extensively studied in neurons, how hypoglycaemia impacts the viability of adult neural stem cells (NSCs has been poorly investigated. In addition, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of how hypoglycaemia regulates NSCs survival have not been characterized. Recent work others and us have shown that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R agonist Exendin-4 stimulate NSCs survival against glucolipoapoptosis. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro system where to study the effects of hypoglycaemia on NSC survival. Furthermore, we determine the potential role of PACAP and Exendin-4 in counteracting the effect of hypoglycaemia. A hypoglycaemic in vitro milieu was mimicked by exposing subventricular zone-derived NSC to low levels of glucose. Moreover, we studied the potential involvement of apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress by quantifying protein levels of Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3 and mRNA levels of CHOP. We show that PACAP via PAC-1 receptor and PKA activation counteracts impaired NSC viability induced by hypoglycaemia. The protective effect induced by PACAP correlated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, Exendin-4 was ineffective. The results show that hypoglycaemia decreases NSC viability and that this effect can be substantially counteracted by PACAP via PAC-1 receptor activation. The data supports a potential therapeutic role of PAC-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of neurological complications, based on neurogenesis impairment by hypoglycaemia.

  6. Bordetella pertussis evolution in the (functional) genomics era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Thomas; Preston, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of whooping cough caused by Bordetella pertussis in many developed countries has risen dramatically in recent years. This has been linked to the use of an acellular pertussis vaccine. In addition, it is thought that B. pertussis is adapting under acellular vaccine mediated immune selection pressure, towards vaccine escape. Genomics-based approaches have revolutionized the ability to resolve the fine structure of the global B. pertussis population and its evolution during the era of vaccination. Here, we discuss the current picture of B. pertussis evolution and diversity in the light of the current resurgence, highlight import questions raised by recent studies in this area and discuss the role that functional genomics can play in addressing current knowledge gaps. PMID:26297914

  7. Computational identification of candidate nucleotide cyclases in higher plants

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-09-03

    In higher plants guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs) cannot be identified using BLAST homology searches based on annotated cyclic nucleotide cyclases (CNCs) of prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, or animals. The reason is that CNCs are often part of complex multifunctional proteins with different domain organizations and biological functions that are not conserved in higher plants. For this reason, we have developed CNC search strategies based on functionally conserved amino acids in the catalytic center of annotated and/or experimentally confirmed CNCs. Here we detail this method which has led to the identification of >25 novel candidate CNCs in Arabidopsis thaliana, several of which have been experimentally confirmed in vitro and in vivo. We foresee that the application of this method can be used to identify many more members of the growing family of CNCs in higher plants. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  8. Activation of Adenylyl Cyclase Causes Stimulation of Adenosine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pleli

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Signaling of Gs protein-coupled receptors (GsPCRs is accomplished by stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, causing an increase of the intracellular cAMP concentration, activation of the intracellular cAMP effectors protein kinase A (PKA and Epac, and an efflux of cAMP, the function of which is still unclear. Methods: Activation of adenylyl cyclase by GsPCR agonists or cholera toxin was monitored by measurement of the intracellular cAMP concentration by ELISA, anti-phospho-PKA substrate motif phosphorylation by immunoblotting, and an Epac-FRET assay in the presence and absence of adenosine receptor antagonists or ecto-nucleotide phosphodiesterase/pyrophosphatase2 (eNPP2 inhibitors. The production of AMP from cAMP by recombinant eNPP2 was measured by HPLC. Extracellular adenosine was determined by LC-MS/MS, extracellular ATP by luciferase and LC-MS/MS. The expression of eNPP isoenzymes 1-3 was examined by RT-PCR. The expression of multidrug resistance protein 4 was suppressed by siRNA. Results: Here we show that the activation of GsPCRs and the GsPCRs-independent activation of Gs proteins and adenylyl cyclase by cholera toxin induce stimulation of cell surface adenosine receptors (A2A or A2B adenosine receptors. In PC12 cells stimulation of adenylyl cyclase by GsPCR or cholera toxin caused activation of A2A adenosine receptors by an autocrine signaling pathway involving cAMP efflux through multidrug resistance protein 4 and hydrolysis of released cAMP to AMP by eNPP2. In contrast, in PC3 cells cholera toxin- and GsPCR-induced stimulation of adenylyl cyclase resulted in the activation of A2B adenosine receptors. Conclusion: Our findings show that stimulation of adenylyl cyclase causes a remarkable activation of cell surface adenosine receptors.

  9. Soluble guanylate cyclase : a potential therapeutic target for heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Marti, Catherine N.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Roessig, Lothar; Greene, Stephen J.; Boehm, Michael; Burnett, John C.; Campia, Umberto; Cleland, John G. F.; Collins, Sean P.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Levy, Phillip D.; Metra, Marco; Pitt, Bertram; Ponikowski, Piotr; Sato, Naoki; Voors, Adriaan A.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Butler, Javed

    The number of annual hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) and the mortality rates among patients hospitalized for HF remains unacceptably high. The search continues for safe and effective agents that improve outcomes when added to standard therapy. The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase

  10. Inhibitors of glutaminyl cyclases against Alzheimer´s disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolenko, Petr; Koch, B.; Schilling, S.; Rahfeld, J.-U.; Demuth, H.-U.; Stubbs, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2013), s. 16 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology /11./. 14.03.2013-16.03.2013, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : glutaminyl cyclases * Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  11. Real-time PCR-based detection of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis in an Irish paediatric population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grogan, Juanita A

    2011-06-01

    Novel real-time PCR assays targeting the Bordetella pertussis insertion sequence IS481, the toxin promoter region and Bordetella parapertussis insertion sequence IS1001 were designed. PCR assays were capable of detecting ≤10 copies of target DNA per reaction, with an amplification efficiency of ≥90 %. From September 2003 to December 2009, per-nasal swabs and nasopharyngeal aspirates submitted for B. pertussis culture from patients ≤1 month to >15 years of age were examined by real-time PCR. Among 1324 patients, 76 (5.7 %) were B. pertussis culture positive and 145 (10.95 %) were B. pertussis PCR positive. Of the B. pertussis PCR-positive patients, 117 (81 %) were aged 6 months or less. A total of 1548 samples were examined, of which 87 (5.6 %) were culture positive for B. pertussis and 169 (10.92 %) were B. pertussis PCR positive. All culture-positive samples were PCR positive. Seven specimens (0.5 %) were B. parapertussis culture positive and 10 (0.8 %) were B. parapertussis PCR positive, with all culture-positive samples yielding PCR-positive results. A review of patient laboratory records showed that of the 1324 patients tested for pertussis 555 (42 %) had samples referred for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) testing and 165 (30 %) were positive, as compared to 19.4 % of the total 5719 patients tested for RSV in this period. Analysis of the age distribution of RSV-positive patients identified that 129 (78 %) were aged 6 months or less, similar to the incidence observed for pertussis in that patient age group. In conclusion, the introduction of the real-time PCR assays for the routine detection of B. pertussis resulted in a 91 % increase in the detection of the organism as compared to microbiological culture. The incidence of infection with B. parapertussis is low while the incidence of RSV infection in infants suspected of having pertussis is high, with a similar age distribution to B. pertussis infection.

  12. Evidence for an intact polysaccharide capsule in Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, YiLin; Li, Rui; Howe, Josephine; Hoo, Regina; Pant, Aakanksha; Ho, SiYing; Alonso, Sylvie

    2010-03-01

    Polysaccharide capsules contribute to the pathogenesis of many bacteria species by providing resistance against various defense mechanisms. The production of a capsule in Bordetella pertussis, the etiologic agent of whooping cough, has remained controversial; earlier studies reported this pathogen as a capsulated microorganism whereas the recent B. pertussis genome analysis revealed the presence of a truncated capsule locus. In this work, using transmission electron microscopy and immunostaining approaches, we provide a formal evidence for the presence of an intact microcapsule produced at the surface of both laboratory strain and clinical isolates of B. pertussis. In agreement with previous studies, we found that the capsule is optimally produced in avirulent phase. Unexpectedly, the presence of the capsule was also detected at the surface of virulent B. pertussis bacteria. Consistently, a substantial transcriptional activity of the capsule operon was detected in virulent phase, suggesting that the capsular polysaccharide may play a role during pertussis pathogenesis. In vitro assays indicated that the presence of the capsule does not affect B. pertussis adherence to mammalian cells and does not further protect the bacterium from phagocytosis, complement-mediated killing or antimicrobial peptide attack. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  13. The multifaceted RisA regulon of Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutte, Loïc; Huot, Ludovic; Antoine, Rudy; Slupek, Stephanie; Merkel, Tod J; Chen, Qing; Stibitz, Scott; Hot, David; Locht, Camille

    2016-09-13

    The whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis regulates the production of its virulence factors by the BvgA/S system. Phosphorylated BvgA activates the virulence-activated genes (vags) and represses the expression of the virulence-repressed genes (vrgs) via the activation of the bvgR gene. In modulating conditions, with MgSO4, the BvgA/S system is inactive, and the vrgs are expressed. Here, we show that the expression of almost all vrgs depends on RisA, another transcriptional regulator. We also show that some vags are surprisingly no longer modulated by MgSO4 in the risA(-) background. RisA also regulates the expression of other genes, including chemotaxis and flagellar operons, iron-regulated genes, and genes of unknown function, which may or may not be controlled by BvgA/S. We identified RisK as the likely cognate RisA kinase and found that it is important for expression of most, but not all RisA-regulated genes. This was confirmed using the phosphoablative RisAD(60)N and the phosphomimetic RisAD(60)E analogues. Thus the RisA regulon adds a new layer of complexity to B. pertussis virulence gene regulation.

  14. Complement evasion by Bordetella pertussis: implications for improving current vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongerius, Ilse; Schuijt, Tim J; Mooi, Frits R; Pinelli, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough or pertussis, a highly contagious disease of the respiratory tract. Despite high vaccination coverage, reported cases of pertussis are rising worldwide and it has become clear that the current vaccines must be improved. In addition to the well-known protective role of antibodies and T cells during B. pertussis infection, innate immune responses such as the complement system play an essential role in B. pertussis killing. In order to evade this complement activation and colonize the human host, B. pertussis expresses several molecules that inhibit complement activation. Interestingly, one of the known complement evasion proteins, autotransporter Vag8, is highly expressed in the recently emerged B. pertussis isolates. Here, we describe the current knowledge on how B. pertussis evades complement-mediated killing. In addition, we compare this to complement evasion strategies used by other bacterial species. Finally, we discuss the consequences of complement evasion by B. pertussis on adaptive immunity and how identification of the bacterial molecules and the mechanisms involved in complement evasion might help improve pertussis vaccines.

  15. Clinical, laboratorial and radiographic predictors of Bordetella pertussis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Vieira Bellettini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify clinical, laboratorial and radiographic predictors for Bordetella pertussis infection.METHODS: This was a retrospective study, which analyzed medical records of all patients submitted to a molecular dignosis (qPCR for B. pertussis from September 2011 to January 2013. Clinical and laboratorial data were reviewed, including information about age, sex, signs/symptoms, length of hospitalization, blood cell counts, imaging findings, coinfection with other respiratory pathogens and clinical outcome.RESULTS: 222 cases were revised. Of these, 72.5% had proven pertussis, and 60.9% were under 1 year old. In patients aging up to six months, independent predictors for B. pertussisinfection were (OR 8.0, CI 95% 1.8-36.3; p=0.007 and lymphocyte count >104/µL (OR 10.0, CI 95% 1.8-54.5; p=0.008. No independent predictors of B. pertussisinfection could be determined for patients older than six months. Co-infection was found in 21.4% of patients, of which 72.7% were up to six months of age. Adenovirus was the most common agent (40.9%. In these patients, we were not able to identify any clinical features to detect patients presenting with a respiratory co-infection, even though longer hospital stay was observed in patients with co-infections (12 vs. 6 days; p=0.009.CONCLUSIONS: Cyanosis and lymphocytosis are independent predictors for pertussis in children up to 6 months old.

  16. New Data on Vaccine Antigen Deficient Bordetella pertussis Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Bouchez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of Bordetella pertussis is driven by natural and vaccine pressures. Isolates circulating in regions with high vaccination coverage present multiple allelic and antigenic variations as compared to isolates collected before introduction of vaccination. Furthermore, during the last epidemics reported in regions using pertussis acellular vaccines, isolates deficient for vaccine antigens, such as pertactin (PRN, were reported to reach high proportions of circulating isolates. More sporadic filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA or pertussis toxin (PT deficient isolates were also collected. The whole genome of some recent French isolates, deficient or non-deficient in vaccine antigens, were analyzed. Transcription profiles of the expression of the main virulence factors were also compared. The invasive phenotype in an in vitro human tracheal epithelial (HTE cell model of infection was evaluated. Our genomic analysis focused on SNPs related to virulence genes known to be more likely to present allelic polymorphism. Transcriptomic data indicated that isolates circulating since the introduction of pertussis vaccines present lower transcription levels of the main virulence genes than the isolates of the pre-vaccine era. Furthermore, isolates not producing FHA present significantly higher expression levels of the entire set of genes tested. Finally, we observed that recent isolates are more invasive in HTE cells when compared to the reference strain, but no multiplication occurs within cells.

  17. Biodegradation of naphthalene by Bordetella avium isolated from petroleum refinery wastewater in Egypt and its pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.M. Abo-State

    2018-01-01

    The results revealed that isolate MAM-P22 was the best Naphthalene degrader. It degraded 95% of the highest concentration 7 mM. The best Naphthalene degrader bacterial Isolate MAM-22 was identified by 16S-rRNA showed a similarity of 98% to Bordetella avium strain with accession No. 041769.1. The results of GC/MS analysis revealed that Bordetella avium MAM-P22 degraded Naphthalene to give six intermediate compounds, These compounds were 1,2-Benzene dicarboxylic acid, Butyl-2,4-dimethyl-2-nitro-4-pentenoate, 1-Nonen-3-ol, Eicosane, Nonacosane.

  18. Aprataxin resolves adenylated RNA–DNA junctions to maintain genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumbale, Percy [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Lab. of Structural Biology; Williams, Jessica S. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Lab. of Structural Biology; Schellenberg, Matthew J. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Lab. of Structural Biology; Kunkel, Thomas A. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Lab. of Structural Biology and Lab. of Molecular Genetics; Williams, R. Scott [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Lab. of Structural Biology and Lab. Molecular Genetics

    2013-12-22

    Faithful maintenance and propagation of eukaryotic genomes is ensured by three-step DNA ligation reactions used by ATP-dependent DNA ligases. Paradoxically, when DNA ligases encounter nicked DNA structures with abnormal DNA termini, DNA ligase catalytic activity can generate and/or exacerbate DNA damage through abortive ligation that produces chemically adducted, toxic 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA lesions. Aprataxin (APTX) reverses DNA adenylation but the context for deadenylation repair is unclear. Here we examine the importance of APTX to RNase-H2-dependent excision repair (RER) of a lesion that is very frequently introduced into DNA, a ribonucleotide. We show that ligases generate adenylated 5' ends containing a ribose characteristic of RNase H2 incision. APTX efficiently repairs adenylated RNA–DNA, and acting in an RNA–DNA damage response (RDDR), promotes cellular survival and prevents S-phase checkpoint activation in budding yeast undergoing RER. Structure–function studies of human APTX–RNA–DNA–AMP–Zn complexes define a mechanism for detecting and reversing adenylation at RNA–DNA junctions. This involves A-form RNA binding, proper protein folding and conformational changes, all of which are affected by heritable APTX mutations in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1. Together, these results indicate that accumulation of adenylated RNA–DNA may contribute to neurological disease.

  19. Optimization of ATP synthase function in mitochondria and chloroplasts via the adenylate kinase equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir U Igamberdiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The bulk of ATP synthesis in plants is performed by ATP synthase, the main bioenergetics engine of cells, operating both in mitochondria and in chloroplasts. The reaction mechanism of ATP synthase has been studied in detail for over half a century; however, its optimal performance depends also on the steady delivery of ATP synthase substrates and the removal of its products. For mitochondrial ATP synthase, we analyze here the provision of stable conditions for (i the supply of ADP and Mg2+, supported by adenylate kinase (AK equilibrium in the intermembrane space, (ii the supply of phosphate via membrane transporter in symport with H+, and (iii the conditions of outflow of ATP by adenylate transporter carrying out the exchange of free adenylates. We also show that, in chloroplasts, AK equilibrates adenylates and governs Mg2+ contents in the stroma, optimizing ATP synthase and Calvin cycle operation, and affecting the import of inorganic phosphate in exchange with triose phosphates. It is argued that chemiosmosis is not the sole component of ATP synthase performance, which also depends on AK-mediated equilibrium of adenylates and Mg2+, adenylate transport and phosphate release and supply.

  20. Aprataxin resolves adenylated RNA-DNA junctions to maintain genome integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumbale, Percy; Williams, Jessica S.; Schellenberg, Matthew J.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Williams, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Faithful maintenance and propagation of eukaryotic genomes is ensured by three-step DNA ligation reactions employed by ATP-dependent DNA ligases1,2. Paradoxically, when DNA ligases encounter nicked DNA structures with abnormal DNA termini, DNA ligase catalytic activity can generate and/or exacerbate DNA damage through abortive ligation that produces chemically adducted, toxic 5′-adenylated (5′-AMP) DNA lesions3–6 (Fig. 1a). Aprataxin (Aptx) reverses DNA-adenylation but the context for deadenylation repair is unclear. Here we examine the importance of Aptx to RNaseH2-dependent excision repair (RER) of a lesion that is very frequently introduced into DNA, a ribonucleotide. We show that ligases generate adenylated 5′-ends containing a ribose characteristic of RNaseH2 incision. Aptx efficiently repairs adenylated RNA-DNA, and acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR), promotes cellular survival and prevents S-phase checkpoint activation in budding yeast undergoing RER. Structure-function studies of human Aptx/RNA-DNA/AMP/Zn complexes define a mechanism for detecting and reversing adenylation at RNA-DNA junctions. This involves A-form RNA-binding, proper protein folding and conformational changes, all of which are impacted by heritable APTX mutations in Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia 1 (AOA1). Together, these results suggest that accumulation of adenylated RNA-DNA may contribute to neurological disease. PMID:24362567

  1. Detection of Bordetella avium by TaqMan real-time PCR in tracheal swabs from wildlife birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, T; Pestka, D; Tykałowski, B; Śmiałek, M; Koncicki, A; Bancerz-Kisiel, A

    2017-03-28

    Bordetella avium, the causing agent of bordetellosis, a highly contagious infection of the respiratory tract in young poultry, causes significant losses in poultry farming throughout the world. Wildlife birds can be a reservoir of various pathogens that infect farm animals. For this reason the studies were conducted to estimate the prevalence of Bordetella avium in wildlife birds in Poland. Tracheal swab samples were collected from 650 birds representing 27 species. The bacterial DNA was isolated directly from the swabs and screened for Bordetella avium by TaqMan real-time PCR. The assay specificity was evaluated by testing DNA isolated from 8 other bacteria that can be present in avian respiratory tract, and there was no amplification from non-Bordetella avium agents. Test sensitivity was determined by preparing standard tenfold serial dilutions of DNA isolated from positive control. The assay revealed to be sensitive, with detection limit of approximately 4.07x10^2 copies of Bordetella avium DNA. The genetic material of Bordetella avium was found in 54.54% of common pheasants, in 9.09% of Eurasian coots, in 3.22% of black-headed gulls and in 2.77% of mallard ducks. The results of this study point to low prevalence of Bordetella avium infections in wildlife birds. The results also show that described molecular assay proved to be suitable for the rapid diagnosis of bordetellosis in the routine diagnostic laboratory.

  2. Differential regulation of type III secretion and virulence genes in Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica by a secreted anti-σ factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Umesh; Shokeen, Bhumika; Cheng, Ning; Cho, Yeonjoo; Blum, Charles; Coppola, Giovanni; Miller, Jeff F

    2016-03-01

    The BvgAS phosphorelay regulates ∼10% of the annotated genomes of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica and controls their infectious cycles. The hierarchical organization of the regulatory network allows the integration of contextual signals to control all or specific subsets of BvgAS-regulated genes. Here, we characterize a regulatory node involving a type III secretion system (T3SS)-exported protein, BtrA, and demonstrate its role in determining fundamental differences in T3SS phenotypes among Bordetella species. We show that BtrA binds and antagonizes BtrS, a BvgAS-regulated extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor, to couple the secretory activity of the T3SS apparatus to gene expression. In B. bronchiseptica, a remarkable spectrum of expression states can be resolved by manipulating btrA, encompassing over 80 BtrA-activated loci that include genes encoding toxins, adhesins, and other cell surface proteins, and over 200 BtrA-repressed genes that encode T3SS apparatus components, secretion substrates, the BteA effector, and numerous additional factors. In B. pertussis, BtrA retains activity as a BtrS antagonist and exerts tight negative control over T3SS genes. Most importantly, deletion of btrA in B. pertussis revealed T3SS-mediated, BteA-dependent cytotoxicity, which had previously eluded detection. This effect was observed in laboratory strains and in clinical isolates from a recent California pertussis epidemic. We propose that the BtrA-BtrS regulatory node determines subspecies-specific differences in T3SS expression among Bordetella species and that B. pertussis is capable of expressing a full range of T3SS-dependent phenotypes in the presence of appropriate contextual cues.

  3. [Infection by Bordetella pertussis and bordetella parapertussis in cases of suspected whooping cough (2011-2015) in Mar del Plata, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavayén, Silvina; Zotta, Claudia; Cepeda, Marcela; Lara, Claudia; Rearte, Analia; Regueira, Mabel

    2017-01-01

    . To classify the study population in the Argentinian National Health Surveillance System framework, determine the proportion of infection by Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis, and identify factors associated with the cases of suspected whooping cough attended to in the city of Mar del Plata and its outskirts during the period 2011- 2015. An observational and descriptive study was carried out. Clinical cases with suspicion of whooping cough were diagnosed by laboratory. The laboratory studies consisted of culture, PCR, and serology using the ELISA technique. A total of 572 cases were evaluated. The female sex was the most frequent (51.9%). The most frequent age range was 2 to 17 moths (51.1%; 290/568), which was also the group with the most confirmed cases. Only 47.8% (155/324) of the population studied had complete vaccination for their age. Whooping cough due to B. pertussis was confirmed in 15.5% (89/572) of cases and one case with B. parapertussis. Those cases that had contact with a coughing relative were significantly associated with the confirmation of Bordetella spp. by the laboratory (odds ratio: 3.3; 95% confidence interval: 1.9-5.4). The results show the need to suspect whooping cough and diagnose it early in children, adolescents, and adults in order to better control the disease. Likewise, continuing prevention and containment measures are fundamental in decreasing the circulation of the causal agent.

  4. Cholesterol-rich domains are involved in Bordetella pertussis phagocytosis and intracellular survival in neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberti, Yanina; Perez Vidakovics, Maria Laura; Van der Pol, Ludo-W.; Eugenia Rodriguez, Maria

    Bordetella pertussis-specific antibodies protect against whooping cough by facilitating host defense mechanisms such as phagocytosis However. the mechanism involved in the phagocytosis of the bacteria under non-opsonic conditions is still poorly characterized. We report here that B. pertussis

  5. Bordetella bronchiseptica in a paediatric cystic fibrosis patient: possible transmission from a household cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordetella bronchiseptica was isolated from the sputum of a cystic fibrosis patient recently exposed to a kitten with an acute respiratory disease. Genetic characterization of the isolate and comparison with other isolates of human or feline origin strongly implicate the kitten as the source of infe...

  6. Probing the genome-scale metabolic landscape of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.B. dos Santos (Filipe Branco); B.G. Olivier (Brett); J. Boele (Joost); V. Smessaert (Vincent); P. De Rop (Philippe); P. Krumpochova (Petra); G.W. Klau (Gunnar); M. Giera (Martin); P. Dehottay (Philippe); B. Teusink (Bas); P. Goffin (Philippe)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWhooping cough is a highly contagious respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite widespread vaccination, its incidence has been rising alarmingly, and yet, the physiology of B. pertussis remains poorly understood. We combined genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, a

  7. Global population structure and evolution of Bordetella pertussis and their relationship with vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart, M.J.; Harris, S.R.; Advani, A.; Arakawa, Y.; Bottero, D.; Bouchez, V.; Cassiday, P.K.; Chiang, C.S.; Dalby, T.; Fry, N.K.; Gaillard, M.E.; Gent, M. van; Guiso, N.; Hallander, H.O.; Harvill, E.T.; He, Q.; Heide, H.G. van der; Heuvelman, K.; Hozbor, D.F.; Kamachi, K.; Karataev, G.I.; Lan, R.; Lutylska, A.; Maharjan, R.P.; Mertsola, J.; Miyamura, T.; Octavia, S.; Preston, A.; Quail, M.A.; Sintchenko, V.; Stefanelli, P.; Tondella, M.L.; Tsang, R.S.; Xu, Y.; Yao, S.M.; Zhang, S.; Parkhill, J.; Mooi, F.R.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis causes pertussis, a respiratory disease that is most severe for infants. Vaccination was introduced in the 1950s, and in recent years, a resurgence of disease was observed worldwide, with significant mortality in infants. Possible causes for this include the switch from

  8. Vaccine-driven evolution of Bordetella pertussis: changes in population structure and strain fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, Inge Hubertus Maria van

    2002-01-01

    Whooping cough or pertussis is a highly contagious disease of the respiratory tract, caused by Bordetella pertussis. In The Netherlands mass vaccination against B. pertussis was introduced in 1953 and was very effective in reducing the pertussis incidence and mortality. Although vaccination was

  9. Identification of Bordetella bronchseptica in fatal pneumonia of dogs and cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection with Bordetella bronchiseptica is a common cause of tracheobronchitis and upper respiratory disease in dogs and cats, but it can also lead to fatal pneumonia. Identification of this pathogen is important due the risk of transmission to other animals, availability of vaccines and potential...

  10. Bordetella pertussis pertactin knock-out strains reveal immunomodulatory properties of this virulence factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovingh, Elise Sofie; Mariman, Rob; Solans, Luis; Hijdra, Daniëlle; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; Jongerius, Ilse; van Gent, Marjolein; Mooi, Frits; Locht, Camille; Pinelli, Elena

    2018-01-01

    Whooping cough, caused by Bordetella pertussis, has resurged and presents a global health burden worldwide. B. pertussis strains unable to produce the acellular pertussis vaccine component pertactin (Prn), have been emerging and in some countries represent up to 95% of recent clinical isolates.

  11. Bordetella Pertussis virulence factors in the continuing evolution of whooping cough vaccines for improved performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorji, Dorji; Mooi, Frits; Yantorno, Osvaldo; Deora, Rajendar; Graham, Ross M; Mukkur, Trilochan K

    Despite high vaccine coverage, whooping cough caused by Bordetella pertussis remains one of the most common vaccine-preventable diseases worldwide. Introduction of whole-cell pertussis (wP) vaccines in the 1940s and acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines in 1990s reduced the mortality due to pertussis.

  12. Evidence for an intracellular niche for Bordetella pertussis in broncho-alveolar lavage cells of mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellwig, SMM; Hazenbos, WLW; van de Winkel, JGJ; Mooi, FR

    1999-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis can attach, invade and survive intracellularly in human macrophages in vitro. To study the significance of this bacterial feature in vivo, we analyzed the presence of viable bacteria in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cells of mice infected with B, pertussis. We found B. pertussis

  13. Filamentous hemagglutinin of Bordetella pertussis: a key adhesin with immunomodulatory properties?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romero, Rodrigo, Villarino; Osička, Radim; Šebo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 12 (2014), s. 1339-1360 ISSN 1746-0913 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) P302/11/0580; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-14547S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Bordetella * adhesion * integrins * filamentous hemagglutinin Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.275, year: 2014

  14. Bordetella holmesii meningitis in a 12-year-old anorectic girl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Balen, T.; Nieman, A.E.; Hermans, M.H.; Schneeberger, P.M.; Vries, E. De

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 12-year-old anorectic girl with Bordetella holmesii meningitis, the techniques used for its identification, and minimum inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics for 7 B. Holmesii strains collected in the Netherlands during the past 12 years. B. holmesii meningitis has not been

  15. First Report of Infectious Pericarditis Due to Bordetella holmesii in an Adult Patient with Malignant Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Hideya; Sonobe, Kazunari; Dan, Kazuo; Saito, Ryoichi

    2012-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii is a fastidious Gram-negative rod first identified in 1995. Though rare, it is isolated mainly in immunocompromised and asplenic hosts and is associated with bacteremia, pertussis-like respiratory tract infection, and endocarditis. Herein, we describe a unique B. holmesii infectious pericarditis patient with malignant lymphoma. PMID:22378902

  16. Comparison of an infective avirulent and canine virulent Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnow, R A; Causey, S C; Geary, S J; Wren, W S

    1983-02-01

    Two Bordetella bronchiseptica isolates, S-55 and D-2, were evaluated in dogs for inducement of (i) infection, (ii) clinical bordetellosis, and (iii) histopathologic changes on tracheal and bronchiole tissues. Further, each isolate was characterized for variance in (i) toxicity for mice and (ii) intracellular proteins. Both S-55 and D-2 were detectable in test dog groups during the 26-day test period, although 545 times more D-2 was recovered than was S-55. In dogs inoculated with D-2, clinical infectious tracheobronchitis appeared in 4 days and continued for 22 days. Bordetellosis was not observed in dogs given S-55 or in noninoculated dogs. Tracheal and bronchiole tissues from dogs inoculated with the S-55 and D-2 isolates were microscopically examined for lesions. Dogs inoculated with S-55 did not have tracheal or bronchiole lesions. Lesions were not observed in noninoculated dogs. Dogs inoculated with D-2 had marked lesions in the tracheal and bronchiole tissues. The D-2 whole cells were an average 4.8 times as lethal as S-55 whole cells in mice (given intraperitoneal inoculation), whereas cell-free culture supernatants from S-55 and D-2 isolates were nontoxic. Cell-free sonicated extracts of S-55 and D-2 proved toxic to mice (intraperitoneal inoculation), but after the extracts were heated at 56 C for 30 minutes, both were nontoxic. Intracellular proteins of approximately 116,000 and 44,000 daltons were found in higher concentration in D-2 cells than in S-55 cells.

  17. Seroprevalence of Bordetella pertussis antibody in pregnant women in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyed Hamid; Zamani, Mehrangiz; Mamani, Mojgan; Javedanpoor, Robabeh; Rahighi, Amir Hossein; Nadi, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    The increasing incidence of pertussis among adolescents and adults in recent years is an alarming factor in transmission of the infection to non-immune infants and children. Vaccination of pregnant women, immediately after delivery and before being discharged from the hospital may help to protect mothers and their newborns against the disease. Decision making process, regarding maternal immunization, requires credible information and knowledge about seroepidemiology of the infection in pregnant women. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of Bordetella pertussis antibody among admitted pregnant women in Hamadan, western Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 288 pregnant women admitted to the Fatemiyeh Hospital, Hamadan, western Iran, were enrolled into the study. After obtaining consent from every patient, serum samples were taken from patients and were kept frozen until testing. Serum level of B. pertussis antibody was measured using ELISA. Level of antibody higher than 24 U/ml was considered positive. The obtained data were analyzed using the statistical software SPSS. From 288 pregnant women, 126 (43.8%) were in their second trimester. Serological results in 103 patients (35.8%) were positive. The mean age of mothers with positive serology was 27.5±6 years old. Thirty-five percent of patients had a valid immunization record, and 1.57% of those with no vaccination record had a positive serology. The level of immunity against B. pertussis in pregnant women was low. Immunization before or during pregnancy can stimulate newborn's immune response and gives them required protection against pertussis infection.

  18. Clinical Diagnosis of Bordetella Pertussis Infection: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebell, Mark H; Marchello, Christian; Callahan, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis (BP) is a common cause of prolonged cough. Our objective was to perform an updated systematic review of the clinical diagnosis of BP without restriction by patient age. We identified prospective cohort studies of patients with cough or suspected pertussis and assessed study quality using QUADAS-2. We performed bivariate meta-analysis to calculate summary estimates of accuracy and created summary receiver operating characteristic curves to explore heterogeneity by vaccination status and age. Of 381 studies initially identified, 22 met our inclusion criteria, of which 14 had a low risk of bias. The overall clinical impression was the most accurate predictor of BP (positive likelihood ratio [LR+], 3.3; negative likelihood ratio [LR-], 0.63). The presence of whooping cough (LR+, 2.1) and posttussive vomiting (LR+, 1.7) somewhat increased the likelihood of BP, whereas the absence of paroxysmal cough (LR-, 0.58) and the absence of sputum (LR-, 0.63) decreased it. Whooping cough and posttussive vomiting have lower sensitivity in adults. Clinical criteria defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were sensitive (0.90) but nonspecific. Typical signs and symptoms of BP may be more sensitive but less specific in vaccinated patients. The clinician's overall impression was the most accurate way to determine the likelihood of BP infection when a patient initially presented. Clinical decision rules that combine signs, symptoms, and point-of-care tests have not yet been developed or validated. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  19. Dephosphorylation of sperm guanylate cyclase during sea urchin fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    When intact Arbacia punctulata spermatozoa are exposed to solubilized egg jelly, the electrophoretic mobility of an abundant sperm flagellar membrane protein changes from an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa to 150 kDa. A. punctulata spermatozoa can be labeled in vivo with /sup 32/P-labeled cells it was demonstrated that the mobility shift of the 160-kDa protein is due to dephosphorylation. The peptide resact (Cys-Val-Thr-Gly-Ala-Pro-Gly-Cys-Val-Gly-Gly-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH/sub 2/) is the component of egg jelly which is responsible for inducing the dephosphorylation. The 160/150-kdal sperm membrane protein has been purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-agarose, and identified as sperm guanylate cyclase. The enzymatic activity of the guanylate cyclase is tightly coupled to its phosphorylation state. Resact has been shown to act as a potent chemoattractant for A. punctulata spermatozoa. The chemotactic response is concentration-dependent, is abolished by pretreatment of the spermatozoa with resact, and shows an absolute requirement for external calcium. This work represents the first demonstration of animal sperm chemotaxis in response to a precisely-defined molecule of egg origin. The results established a new, biologically meaningful function for resact, and may implicate sperm guanylate cyclase and cGMP in flagellar function and the chemotactic response.

  20. Adenylate kinase locus 1 polymorphism and feto-placental development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulvia, Gloria-Bottini; Antonio, Pietroiusti; Anna, Neri; Patrizia, Saccucci; Ada, Amante; Egidio, Bottini; Andrea, Magrini

    2011-12-01

    Recently our group has found that the correlation between birth weight and placental weight - an index of a balanced feto-placental unit development - is influenced by genetic factors. Since adenylate kinase locus 1 (AK₁) is a polymorphic enzyme that plays an important role in the synthesis of nucleotides required for many metabolic functions, we have investigated the possible role of its genetic variability in the correlation between birth weight and placental weight. 342 consecutive healthy newborn infants from the population of Rome (Italy) and 286 puerperae from another population from Central Italy were studied. The correlation coefficient between birth weight and placental weight is much higher in infants with low activity AK₁2-1 phenotype than in those with high activity AK₁1 phenotype. The difference between AK₁ and AK₁2-1 is well marked only in newborns with a gestational age greater than 38 weeks and it is not influenced by sex, maternal age and maternal smoking. A similar pattern is observed with maternal AK₁ phenotype. These results suggest that the difference in enzymatic activity between AK₁ phenotypes influencing the equilibrium among ATP, ADP, AMP and adenosine could have an important role in a balanced development of feto-placental unit. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Delivery of Large Heterologous Polypeptides across the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Antigen-Presenting Cells by the Bordetella RTX Hemolysin Moiety Lacking the Adenylyl Cyclase Domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Jana; Kamanová, Jana; Jelínek, J.; Tomala, Jakub; Mašín, Jiří; Kosová, Martina; Staněk, Ondřej; Bumba, Ladislav; Michálek, J.; Kovář, Marek; Šebo, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 3 (2012), s. 1181-1192 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200914; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0717; GA ČR GAP301/11/0325; GA MŠk 1M0506; GA MŠk 2B06161 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : MHC CLASS -I * ESCHERICHIA-COLI * PRESENTATION PATHWAY Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.074, year: 2012

  2. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and PAC1 receptor in the testis of cartilaginous fish Torpedo marmorata: A molecular and phylogenetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnese, Marisa; Valiante, Salvatore; Rosati, Luigi; Andreuccetti, Piero; Prisco, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The role of PACAP in spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis has been largely investigated in last years in mammals; conversely, a few studies have been performed in non mammalian vertebrates. In this paper we investigated the sequence, expression and localization of PACAP and its PAC1 receptor in the testis of the benthic elasmobranch Torpedo marmorata, the marbled electric ray. Cloning a partial PACAP cDNA, we demonstrated for the first time in elasmobranches that PACAP shows a highly conserved sequence, compared with the PACAP of other chordates (tunicates and vertebrates). Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis revealed that PACAP has been well preserved during evolution and that a negative selection acts on PACAP sequence, leading to the conservation of the coding sites. The phylogenetic consensus tree showed also that Torpedo PACAP is more related with the amphibian PACAP than with the teleost one. Finally, we demonstrated that in T. marmorata PACAP and its PAC1 receptor are synthesized directly in the testis, where they show a wider localization than mammals, suggesting that this neuropeptide is involved in the control of Torpedo spermatogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Bordetella Bps polysaccharide is required for biofilm formation and persistence in the lower respiratory tract of swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is pervasive in swine populations and plays multiple roles in respiratory disease. Additionally, B. bronchiseptica is capable of establishing long-term or chronic infections in swine. Bacterial biofilms are increasingly recognized as important contributors to chronic bacter...

  4. Identifying long-term memory B-cells in vaccinated children despite waning antibody levels specific for Bordetella pertussis proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikx, Lotte H.; Ozturk, Kemal; de Rond, Lia G. H.; Veenhoven, Reinier H.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Berbers, Guy A. M.; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Whooping cough is a respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. Since the 1950s in developed countries pertussis vaccinations are included in the national immunization program. However, antibody levels rapidly wane after both whole cell and acellular pertussis vaccination. Therefore

  5. A Multiplex PCR for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Bordetella pertussis in Clinical Specimens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDonough, E. A; Barrozo, C. P; Russell, K. L; Metzgar, D

    2005-01-01

    ..., and Bordetella pertussis in uncultured patient specimens. These organisms cause similar symptomologies and are often not diagnosed because they are difficult to identify with classical methods such as culture and serology...

  6. Adenylate Kinase and AMP Signaling Networks: Metabolic Monitoring, Signal Communication and Body Energy Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Terzic

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Adenylate kinase and downstream AMP signaling is an integrated metabolic monitoring system which reads the cellular energy state in order to tune and report signals to metabolic sensors. A network of adenylate kinase isoforms (AK1-AK7 are distributed throughout intracellular compartments, interstitial space and body fluids to regulate energetic and metabolic signaling circuits, securing efficient cell energy economy, signal communication and stress response. The dynamics of adenylate kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer regulates multiple intracellular and extracellular energy-dependent and nucleotide signaling processes, including excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, cell and ciliary motility, nuclear transport, energetics of cell cycle, DNA synthesis and repair, and developmental programming. Metabolomic analyses indicate that cellular, interstitial and blood AMP levels are potential metabolic signals associated with vital functions including body energy sensing, sleep, hibernation and food intake. Either low or excess AMP signaling has been linked to human disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recent studies indicate that derangements in adenylate kinase-mediated energetic signaling due to mutations in AK1, AK2 or AK7 isoforms are associated with hemolytic anemia, reticular dysgenesis and ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, hormonal, food and antidiabetic drug actions are frequently coupled to alterations of cellular AMP levels and associated signaling. Thus, by monitoring energy state and generating and distributing AMP metabolic signals adenylate kinase represents a unique hub within the cellular homeostatic network.

  7. The BvgAS Regulon of Bordetella pertussis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Moon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nearly all virulence factors in Bordetella pertussis are activated by a master two-component system, BvgAS, composed of the sensor kinase BvgS and the response regulator BvgA. When BvgS is active, BvgA is phosphorylated (BvgA~P, and virulence-activated genes (vags are expressed [Bvg(+ mode]. When BvgS is inactive and BvgA is not phosphorylated, virulence-repressed genes (vrgs are induced [Bvg(− mode]. Here, we have used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR to define the BvgAS-dependent regulon of B. pertussis Tohama I. Our analyses reveal more than 550 BvgA-regulated genes, of which 353 are newly identified. BvgA-activated genes include those encoding two-component systems (such as kdpED, multiple other transcriptional regulators, and the extracytoplasmic function (ECF sigma factor brpL, which is needed for type 3 secretion system (T3SS expression, further establishing the importance of BvgA~P as an apex regulator of transcriptional networks promoting virulence. Using in vitro transcription, we demonstrate that the promoter for brpL is directly activated by BvgA~P. BvgA-FeBABE cleavage reactions identify BvgA~P binding sites centered at positions −41.5 and −63.5 in bprL. Most importantly, we show for the first time that genes for multiple and varied metabolic pathways are significantly upregulated in the B. pertussis Bvg(− mode. These include genes for fatty acid and lipid metabolism, sugar and amino acid transporters, pyruvate dehydrogenase, phenylacetic acid degradation, and the glycolate/glyoxylate utilization pathway. Our results suggest that metabolic changes in the Bvg(− mode may be participating in bacterial survival, transmission, and/or persistence and identify over 200 new vrgs that can be tested for function.

  8. Bordetella pertussis en estudiantes adolescentes de la Ciudad de México Bordetella pertussis em estudantes adolescentes da Cidade do México Bordetella pertussis in adolescents students in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Tomé Sandoval

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar la seroprevalencia a Bordetella pertussis en escolares y sus contactos escolares y familiares. MÉTODOS: Un total de 12.273 estudiantes de 12 a 15 años de edad, de 14 escuelas secundarias públicas de la Ciudad de México fueron estudiados durante los meses de Septiembre 2002 a Marzo 2003. Se tomó muestra de exudado nasofaríngeo en adolescentes con tos de más de 14 días de evolución. La infección fue confirmada por la técnica de reacción en cadena de polimerasa. Se realizó estudio de contactos escolares y familiares. RESULTADOS: La incidencia de tos fue de 5 para 1.000 estudiantes. De los 61 estudiantes con tos incluidos en la muestra, 20 (32,8% fueron positivos para Bordetella. De los 152 contactos escolares, 16 (10,6% resultaron positivos, y ocho tenían tos. Uno de esos contactos fue el director de una de las escuelas responsable de más del 60% de los casos positivos (12/20, quien también dio lecciones a diez de los estudiantes infectados. De los 29 familiares, ocho (27,6% fueron positivos, pertenecientes a tres familias. CONCLUSIONES: Los resultados muestran que la frecuencia de la enfermedad fue similar al comunicado en la población adolescente de otros países. Sin embargo, este trastorno no tiene necesariamente signos clínicos de la tos persistente y está sujeto a la existencia de infectados asintomáticos con Bordetella.OBJETIVO: Estimar a soroprevalência a Bordetella pertussis em escolares e seus contatos. MÉTODOS: Foram examinados 12.273 alunos entre 12 e 15 anos de idade, de 14 escolas secundárias públicas da Cidade do México, de setembro de 2002 a março de 2003. Amostras de exudado nasofaríngeo foram coletadas de adolescentes com tosse por mais de 14 dias. A infecção foi confirmada por reação em cadeia da polimerase. Todos os alunos e funcionários dos colégios dos casos confirmados por reação em cadeia da polimerase e seus familiares foram testados. RESULTADOS: A incidência de tosse

  9. The polymerization of amino acid adenylates on sodium-montmorillonite with preadsorbed polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paecht-Horowitz, Mella; Eirich, Frederick R.

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous polymerization of amino acid adenylates on Na-montmorillonite in dilute, neutral suspension, after polypeptides were adsorbed on the clay, is studied. It is found that the degrees of polymerization of the oligopeptides and polypeptides obtained is dependent on the amounts of polypeptides that were preadsorbed. It is concluded that a catalytic activity may derive from c-spacings that offer adsorption sites for the reagent amino acid adenylate within the peripheral recesses of irregularly stacked clay platelets by bringing the anhydride bonds and neutral amino groups into favorable reaction distances.

  10. Neuronal Expression of Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase in the Mammalian Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jonathan; Martinez, Jennifer; Milner, Teresa A.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic 3’, 5’-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a critical and ubiquitous second messenger involved in a multitude of signaling pathways. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a novel source of cAMP subject to unique localization and regulation. It was originally discovered in mammalian testis and found to be activated by bicarbonate and calcium. sAC has been implicated in diverse processes, including astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling and axonal outgrowth of neurons. However, despite these func...

  11. Piracy of adhesins: attachment of superinfecting pathogens to respiratory cilia by secreted adhesins of Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomanen, E

    1986-12-01

    Two proteins secreted by Bordetella pertussis are known to mediate adherence of these bacteria to mammalian respiratory cilia. When either ciliated cells or other pathogenic bacteria were pretreated with these adhesins, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus acquired the ability to adhere to cilia in vitro and in vivo. Such piracy of adhesins may contribute to superinfection in mucosal diseases such as whooping cough.

  12. Tracheitis associated with Bordetella bronchiseptica in a polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Claude; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2006-06-01

    A male polar bear (Ursus maritimus) was diagnosed with tracheitis associated with Bordetella bronchiseptica that was cultured from an endotracheal sample of thick mucopurulent exudate. The condition responded to oral amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and clinical signs of inappetence, depression, dysphagia, and tussis were resolved. One week after this presentation, a female conspecific presented with similar clinical signs, suggesting a transmissible nature of the disease or the same source of infection. The source of infection remains unknown.

  13. Genetic Profile Variation in Vaccine Strains and Clinical Isolates of Bordetella pertussis Recovered from Iranian Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Haghighi, Faezeh; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Abbasi, Ebrahim; Eshraghi, Seyed Saeed; Zeraati, Hojjat; Mousavi, Seyed Ali Javad; Asgarian-Omran, Hossein; Douraghi, Masoumeh; Shokri, Fazel

    2014-01-01

    Background Re-emergence of pertussis has been reported in Iran despite a high rate of vaccination coverage. Low efficacy of the vaccine might be due to the genetic divergence between clinical versus vaccine strains. In the current study, the genetic profiles of clinical isolates and vaccine strains of Bordetella pertussis (B. pertussis) were assessed by using Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Methods Following phenotypic and molecular identification of isolates, XbaI-digested genomic D...

  14. Airborne Induced Experimental Bordetella bronchiseptica Pneumonia in Strain 13 Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    infectious atrophic rhinitis in swine (1,2,3), infectious tracheobronchitis in canines 4 (1,2,4), and epizootic pneumonia in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus...RA. Canine infectious tracheobronchitis : Effects of an intranasal live canine parainfluenza - Bordetella bronchiseptica vaccine on viral shedding and...John W. Ezzell and William C. Mitchell United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD 21701

  15. Antibodies to Bordetella pertussis antigens in maternal and cord blood pairs: a Thai cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Nasamon Wanlapakorn; Thanunrat Thongmee; Preeyaporn Vichaiwattana; Elke Leuridan; Sompong Vongpunsawad; Yong Poovorawan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Background. Pertussis is a vaccine-preventable disease, yet an increasing incidence of pertussis occurs in many countries. Thailand has a long-standing pertussis vaccination policy, therefore most expectant mothers today had received vaccines as children. The resurgence of pertussis among Thai infants in recent years led us to examine the preexisting antibodies to Bordetella pertussis antigens in a cohort of 90 pregnant women. Methods. We evaluated the IgG to the Pertussis toxin (PT...

  16. Uptake of [14C]nicotinic acid and [14C]nicotinamide by Bordetella pertussis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPheat, W.L.; Wardlaw, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis has an absolute requirement for either nicotinic acid (NA) or nicotinamide (ND), both being equally effective in supporting growth. The results of an investigation to compare the rates of uptake of NA and ND, to determine the influence of factors such as energy source and temperature on uptake, and to measure the Ksub(m) and Vsub(max) values are reported. (Auth.)

  17. Detection of IgG antibodies against Bordetella pertussis with 125I-protein A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirsing von Koenig, C.H.; Finger, H.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the detection of IgG antibodies against Bordetella pertussis is described, based on the principle of 'sandwich' radioimmunoassay. 125 I protein A is used as radioactive tracer. The influence of amounts of antigen, antibody, radioactive tracer, incubation time and temperature were tested and the optimal conditions for the assay are described. The procedure offers a simple, quick, and sensitive method for detecting antibodies against B. pertussis. Application and limitation of the test are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Crystallization of the class IV adenylyl cyclase from Yersinia pestis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Natasha; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Reddy, Prasad T.; Gallagher, D. Travis

    2006-01-01

    The class IV adenylyl cyclase from Y. pestis has been crystallized in an orthorhombic form suitable for structure determination. The class IV adenylyl cyclase from Yersinia pestis has been cloned and crystallized in both a triclinic and an orthorhombic form. An amino-terminal His-tagged construct, from which the tag was removed by thrombin, crystallized in a triclinic form diffracting to 1.9 Å, with one dimer per asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 33.5, b = 35.5, c = 71.8 Å, α = 88.7, β = 82.5, γ = 65.5°. Several mutants of this construct crystallized but diffracted poorly. A non-His-tagged native construct (179 amino acids, MW = 20.5 kDa) was purified by conventional chromatography and crystallized in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 . These crystals have unit-cell parameters a = 56.8, b = 118.6, c = 144.5 Å, diffract to 3 Å and probably have two dimers per asymmetric unit and V M = 3.0 Å 3 Da −1 . Both crystal forms appear to require pH below 5, complicating attempts to incorporate nucleotide ligands into the structure. The native construct has been produced as a selenomethionine derivative and crystallized for phasing and structure determination

  19. Adenylate kinase I does not affect cellular growth characteristics under normal and metabolic stress conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, W.C.C. de; Oerlemans, F.T.J.J.; Wieringa, B.

    2004-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AK)-catalyzed phosphotransfer is essential in the maintenance of cellular energetic economy in cells of fully differentiated tissues with highly variable energy demand, such as muscle and brain. To investigate if AK isoenzymes have a comparable function in the energy-demand

  20. Extracellular DNA is essential for maintaining Bordetella biofilm integrity on abiotic surfaces and in the upper respiratory tract of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt S Conover

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria form complex and highly elaborate surface adherent communities known as biofilms which are held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. We have previously shown that by adopting a biofilm mode of existence in vivo, the gram negative bacterial pathogens Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis are able to efficiently colonize and persist in the mammalian respiratory tract. In general, the bacterial biofilm matrix includes polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA (eDNA. In this report, we investigated the function of DNA in Bordetella biofilm development. We show that DNA is a significant component of Bordetella biofilm matrix. Addition of DNase I at the initiation of biofilm growth inhibited biofilm formation. Treatment of pre-established mature biofilms formed under both static and flow conditions with DNase I led to a disruption of the biofilm biomass. We next investigated whether eDNA played a role in biofilms formed in the mouse respiratory tract. DNase I treatment of nasal biofilms caused considerable dissolution of the biofilm biomass. In conclusion, these results suggest that eDNA is a crucial structural matrix component of both in vitro and in vivo formed Bordetella biofilms. This is the first evidence for the ability of DNase I to disrupt bacterial biofilms formed on host organs.

  1. Inferring biological functions of guanylyl cyclases with computational methods

    KAUST Repository

    Alquraishi, May Majed

    2013-09-03

    A number of studies have shown that functionally related genes are often co-expressed and that computational based co-expression analysis can be used to accurately identify functional relationships between genes and by inference, their encoded proteins. Here we describe how a computational based co-expression analysis can be used to link the function of a specific gene of interest to a defined cellular response. Using a worked example we demonstrate how this methodology is used to link the function of the Arabidopsis Wall-Associated Kinase-Like 10 gene, which encodes a functional guanylyl cyclase, to host responses to pathogens. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  2. The arsonomethyl analogue of adenosine 5'-phosphate. An uncoupler of adenylate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, S R; Sparkes, M J; Dixon, H B

    1984-01-01

    Adenosine was converted into the arsonomethyl analogue of AMP. The reactions used provide a general route for converting an alcohol, R-CH2-OH, into the arsonomethyl analogue, R-CH2-CH2-AsO3H2, of its phosphate, R-CH2-O-PO3H2. The analogue of AMP proves to be a substrate for rabbit adenylate kinase, which shows a limiting velocity with it of 1/17 that with AMP, a Michaelis constant raised 70-fold to about 10 mM, and hence a specificity constant lowered about 1200-fold. The product of transfer of a phospho group from ATP to the analogue is, like all anhydrides of arsonic acids, unstable to hydrolysis, and so breaks down to yield orthophosphate and regenerate the analogue. Hence adenylate kinase is converted into an ATPase by the presence of the analogue. PMID:6089748

  3. In Vitro Activity of Solithromycin against Bordetella pertussis, an Emerging Respiratory Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Dwight J; Vicino, David; Fernandes, Prabhavathi

    2016-12-01

    There has been an increase in the number of pertussis cases reported since the introduction of the acellular pertussis vaccine. While children that present with pertussis have a characteristic whooping cough, adults can simply have a persistent, nonspecific cough and remain undiagnosed. Macrolide antibiotics, such as azithromycin, are the currently recommended treatment for pertussis. Solithromycin is a new macrolide and the first fluoroketolide with broad activity against a wide spectrum of bacterial pathogens and has completed clinical development for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. This study reports the potent in vitro activity of solithromycin against a collection of recent isolates of Bordetella pertussis. Copyright © 2016 Hardy et al.

  4. Evidence of Bordetella pertussis infection in vaccinated 1-year-old Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Pontoppidan, Peter Lotko; von König, Carl-Heinz Wirsing

    2010-01-01

    We measured IgA and IgG antibodies to pertussis toxin (PT) and filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) in sera from 203 1-year-old children who had received one to three doses of a monocomponent PT toxoid vaccine. Ten children (5%) had IgA antibody to PT indicating recent infection; seven of these children......%. The apparent high Bordetella pertussis infection rate in Danish infants suggests that the monocomponent PT toxoid vaccine used in Denmark has limited efficacy against B. pertussis infection. A prospective immunization study comparing a multi-component vaccine with the present monocomponent PT toxoid vaccine...

  5. Evidence for positive selection acting on microcystin synthetase adenylation domains in three cyanobacterial genera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhiainen Leo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria produce a wealth of secondary metabolites, including the group of small cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins that constitutes the microcystin family. The enzyme complex that directs the biosynthesis of microcystin is encoded in a single large gene cluster (mcy. mcy genes have a widespread distribution among cyanobacteria and are likely to have an ancient origin. The notable diversity within some of the Mcy modules is generated through various recombination events including horizontal gene transfer. Results A comparative analysis of the adenylation domains from the first module of McyB (McyB1 and McyC in the microcystin synthetase complex was performed on a large number of microcystin-producing strains from the Anabaena, Microcystis and Planktothrix genera. We found no decisive evidence for recombination between strains from different genera. However, we detected frequent recombination events in the mcyB and mcyC genes between strains within the same genus. Frequent interdomain recombination events were also observed between mcyB and mcyC sequences in Anabaena and Microcystis. Recombination and mutation rate ratios suggest that the diversification of mcyB and mcyC genes is driven by recombination events as well as point mutations in all three genera. Sequence analysis suggests that generally the adenylation domains of the first domain of McyB and McyC are under purifying selection. However, we found clear evidence for positive selection acting on a number of amino acid residues within these adenylation domains. These include residues important for active site selectivity of the adenylation domain, strongly suggesting selection for novel microcystin variants. Conclusion We provide the first clear evidence for positive selection acting on amino acid residues involved directly in the recognition and activation of amino acids incorporated into microcystin, indicating that the microcystin complement of a given strain may

  6. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Soluble Rat Lung Guanylate Cyclase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandwein, Harvey; Lewicki, John; Murad, Ferid

    1981-07-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies to rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase [GTP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing) EC 4.6.1.2] have been produced by fusing spleen cells from immunized BALB/c mice with SP-2/0 myeloma cells. The antibodies were detected by their ability to bind immobilized guanylate cyclase and by immunoprecipitation of purified enzyme in the presence of second (rabbit anti-mouse) antibody. After subcloning by limiting dilution, hybridomas were injected intraperitoneally into mice to produce ascitic fluid containing 2-5 mg of antibody per ml. The four antibodies obtained had titers of between 1:1580 and 1:3160 but were detectable at dilutions greater than 1:20,000. Soluble guanylate cyclase from several rat tissues were crossreactive with the four monoclonal antibodies, suggesting that the soluble enzyme from different rat tissues is antigenically similar. The antibodies also recognized soluble lung enzyme from rat, beef, and pig, while enzyme from rabbit was not crossreactive and mouse enzyme was recognized by only one of the antibodies. Particulate guanylate cyclase from a number of tissues had only minimal crossreactivity with the antibodies. Immunoprecipitated guanylate cyclase retained catalytic activity, could be activated with sodium nitroprusside, and was inhibited by cystamine. None of the antibodies were inhibitory under the conditions examined. These antibodies will be useful probes for the study of guanylate cyclase regulation and function under a variety of physiological conditions.

  7. Molecular and Functional Characterization of a Trypanosoma cruzi Nuclear Adenylate Kinase Isoform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cámara, María de los Milagros; Bouvier, León A.; Canepa, Gaspar E.; Miranda, Mariana R.; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, is an early divergent eukaryote in which control of gene expression relies mainly in post-transcriptional mechanisms. Transcription levels are globally up and down regulated during the transition between proliferating and non-proliferating life-cycle stages. In this work we characterized a nuclear adenylate kinase isoform (TcADKn) that is involved in ribosome biogenesis. Nuclear adenylate kinases have been recently described in a few organisms, being all related to RNA metabolism. Depending on active transcription and translation, TcADKn localizes in the nucleolus or the cytoplasm. A non-canonical nuclear localization signal was mapped towards the N-terminal of the protein, being the phosphate-binding loop essential for its localization. In addition, TcADKn nuclear exportation depends on the nuclear exportation adapter CRM1. TcADKn nuclear shuttling is governed by nutrient availability, oxidative stress and by the equivalent in T. cruzi of the mammalian TOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway. One of the biological functions of TcADKn is ribosomal 18S RNA processing by direct interaction with ribosomal protein TcRps14. Finally, TcADKn expression is regulated by its 3′ UTR mRNA. Depending on extracellular conditions, cells modulate protein translation rates regulating ribosome biogenesis and nuclear adenylate kinases are probably key components in these processes. PMID:23409202

  8. A comprehensive survey of 3′ animal miRNA modification events and a possible role for 3′ adenylation in modulating miRNA targeting effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Ando, Yoshinari; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Tomaru, Yasuhiro; Nishibu, Takahiro; Ukekawa, Ryo; Funakoshi, Taku; Kurokawa, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Daub, Carsten O.

    2010-01-01

    Animal microRNA sequences are subject to 3′ nucleotide addition. Through detailed analysis of deep-sequenced short RNA data sets, we show adenylation and uridylation of miRNA is globally present and conserved across Drosophila and vertebrates. To better understand 3′ adenylation function, we deep-sequenced RNA after knockdown of nucleotidyltransferase enzymes. The PAPD4 nucleotidyltransferase adenylates a wide range of miRNA loci, but adenylation does not appear to affect miRNA stability on a...

  9. Evaluation of Amplification Targets for the Specific Detection of Bordetella pertussis Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rubayet Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bordetella pertussis infections continue to be a major public health challenge in Canada. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays to detect B pertussis are typically based on the multicopy insertion sequence IS481, which offers high sensitivity but lacks species specificity.

  10. Isolation and characterization of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene mineralizing Bordetella sp. and its bioremediation potential in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Grundmann, Sabine; Schmid, Michael; Dörfler, Ulrike; Roherer, Stefanie; Charles Munch, Jean; Hartmann, Anton; Jiang, Xin; Schroll, Reiner

    2007-03-01

    A soil which has been polluted with chlorinated benzenes for more than 25 years was used for isolation of adapted microorganisms able to mineralize 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB). A microbial community was enriched from this soil and acclimated in liquid culture under aerobic conditions using 1,2,4-TCB as a sole available carbon source. From this community, two strains were isolated and identified by comparative sequence analysis of their 16S-rRNA coding genes as members of the genus Bordetella with Bordetella sp. QJ2-5 as the highest homological strain and with Bordetella petrii as the closest related described species. The 16S-rDNA of the two isolated strains showed a similarity of 100%. These strains were able to mineralize 1,2,4-TCB within two weeks to approximately 50% in liquid culture experiments. One of these strains was reinoculated to an agricultural soil with low native 1,2,4-TCB degradation capacity to investigate its bioremediation potential. The reinoculated strain kept its biodegradation capability: (14)C-labeled 1,2,4-TCB applied to this inoculated soil was mineralized to about 40% within one month of incubation. This indicates a possible application of the isolated Bordetella sp. for bioremediation of 1,2,4-TCB contaminated sites.

  11. Seroprevalence of pertussis in the Gambia : evidence for continued circulation of bordetella pertussis despite high vaccination rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scott, Susana; van der Sande, Marianne; Faye-Joof, Tisbeh; Mendy, Maimuna; Sanneh, Bakary; Barry Jallow, Fatou; de Melker, Hester; van der Klis, Fiona; van Gageldonk, Pieter; Mooi, Frits; Kampmann, Beate

    BACKGROUND: Bordetella pertussis can cause severe respiratory disease and death in children. In recent years, large outbreaks have occurred in high-income countries; however, little is known about pertussis incidence in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: We evaluated antibody responses to pertussis toxin

  12. Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin itself does not trigger anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 production by human dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romero, Rodrigo, Villarino; Hasan, Shakir; Faé, K.; Holubová, Jana; Geurtsen, J.; Schwarzer, Martin; Wiertsema, S.; Osička, Radim; Poolman, J.; Šebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 306, č. 1 (2016), s. 38-47 ISSN 1438-4221 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA ČR GA13-14547S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Bordetella pertussis * Cytokine * Dendritic cell Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.391, year: 2016

  13. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme. © 2014 Desai et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  14. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Steve J; Stout, Jake M; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-07-31

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2-C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity.

  15. Cloning and Functional Characterization of a Lycopene β-Cyclase from Macrophytic Red Alga Bangia fuscopurpurea

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    Tian-Jun Cao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Lycopene cyclases cyclize the open ends of acyclic lycopene (ψ,ψ-carotene into β- or ε-ionone rings in the crucial bifurcation step of carotenoid biosynthesis. Among all carotenoid constituents, β-carotene (β,β-carotene is found in all photosynthetic organisms, except for purple bacteria and heliobacteria, suggesting a ubiquitous distribution of lycopene β-cyclase activity in these organisms. In this work, we isolated a gene (BfLCYB encoding a lycopene β-cyclase from Bangia fuscopurpurea, a red alga that is considered to be one of the primitive multicellular eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms and accumulates carotenoid constituents with both β- and ε-rings, including β-carotene, zeaxanthin, α-carotene (β,ε-carotene and lutein. Functional complementation in Escherichia coli demonstrated that BfLCYB is able to catalyze cyclization of lycopene into monocyclic γ-carotene (β,ψ-carotene and bicyclic β-carotene, and cyclization of the open end of monocyclic δ-carotene (ε,ψ-carotene to produce α-carotene. No ε-cyclization activity was identified for BfLCYB. Sequence comparison showed that BfLCYB shares conserved domains with other functionally characterized lycopene cyclases from different organisms and belongs to a group of ancient lycopene cyclases. Although B. fuscopurpurea also synthesizes α-carotene and lutein, its enzyme-catalyzing ε-cyclization is still unknown.

  16. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumenacker, J. S.; Hyder, S. M.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17beta-estradiol (E2) regulates the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC alpha(1) 10% and sGC beta(1) 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression.

  17. Cloning and Characterization of Oxidosqualene Cyclases from Kalanchoe daigremontiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhonghua; Yeats, Trevor; Han, Hong; Jetter, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The first committed step in triterpenoid biosynthesis is the cyclization of oxidosqualene to polycyclic alcohols or ketones C30H50O. It is catalyzed by single oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) enzymes that can carry out varying numbers of carbocation rearrangements and, thus, generate triterpenoids with diverse carbon skeletons. OSCs from diverse plant species have been cloned and characterized, the large majority of them catalyzing relatively few rearrangement steps. It was recently predicted that special OSCs must exist that can form friedelin, the pentacyclic triterpenoid whose formation involves the maximum possible number of rearrangement steps. The goal of the present study, therefore, was to clone a friedelin synthase from Kalanchoe daigremontiana, a plant species known to accumulate this triterpenoid in its leaf surface waxes. Five OSC cDNAs were isolated, encoding proteins with 761–779 amino acids and sharing between 57.4 and 94.3% nucleotide sequence identity. Heterologous expression in yeast and GC-MS analyses showed that one of the OSCs generated the steroid cycloartenol together with minor side products, whereas the other four enzymes produced mixtures of pentacyclic triterpenoids dominated by lupeol (93%), taraxerol (60%), glutinol (66%), and friedelin (71%), respectively. The cycloartenol synthase was found expressed in all leaf tissues, whereas the lupeol, taraxerol, glutinol, and friedelin synthases were expressed only in the epidermis layers lining the upper and lower surfaces of the leaf blade. It is concluded that the function of these enzymes is to form respective triterpenoid aglycones destined to coat the leaf exterior, probably as defense compounds against pathogens or herbivores. PMID:20610397

  18. Evolution-guided adaptation of an adenylation domain substrate specificity to an unusual amino acid.

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    Simon Vobruba

    Full Text Available Adenylation domains CcbC and LmbC control the specific incorporation of amino acid precursors in the biosynthesis of lincosamide antibiotics celesticetin and lincomycin. Both proteins originate from a common L-proline-specific ancestor, but LmbC was evolutionary adapted to use an unusual substrate, (2S,4R-4-propyl-proline (PPL. Using site-directed mutagenesis of the LmbC substrate binding pocket and an ATP-[32P]PPi exchange assay, three residues, G308, A207 and L246, were identified as crucial for the PPL activation, presumably forming together a channel of a proper size, shape and hydrophobicity to accommodate the propyl side chain of PPL. Subsequently, we experimentally simulated the molecular evolution leading from L-proline-specific substrate binding pocket to the PPL-specific LmbC. The mere change of three amino acid residues in originally strictly L-proline-specific CcbC switched its substrate specificity to prefer PPL and even synthetic alkyl-L-proline derivatives with prolonged side chain. This is the first time that such a comparative study provided an evidence of the evolutionary relevant adaptation of the adenylation domain substrate binding pocket to a new sterically different substrate by a few point mutations. The herein experimentally simulated rearrangement of the substrate binding pocket seems to be the general principle of the de novo genesis of adenylation domains' unusual substrate specificities. However, to keep the overall natural catalytic efficiency of the enzyme, a more comprehensive rearrangement of the whole protein would probably be employed within natural evolution process.

  19. Role of MbtH-like Proteins in the Adenylation of Tyrosine during Aminocoumarin and Vancomycin Biosynthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Björn; Taubitz, Tatjana; Heide, Lutz

    2011-01-01

    MbtH-like proteins consist of ∼70 amino acids and are encoded in the biosynthetic gene clusters of non-ribosomally formed peptides and other secondary metabolites derived from amino acids. Recently, several MbtH-like proteins have been shown to be required for the adenylation of amino acid in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis. We now investigated the role of MbtH-like proteins in the biosynthesis of the aminocoumarin antibiotics novobiocin, clorobiocin, and simocyclinone D8 and of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin. The tyrosine-adenylating enzymes CloH, SimH, and Pcza361.18, involved in the biosynthesis of clorobiocin, simocyclinone D8, and vancomycin, respectively, required the presence of MbtH-like proteins in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming heterotetrameric complexes. In contrast, NovH, involved in novobiocin biosynthesis, showed activity in the absence of MbtH-like proteins. Comparison of the active centers of CloH and NovH showed only one amino acid to be different, i.e. Leu-383 versus Met-383. Mutation of this amino acid in CloH (L383M) indeed led to MbtH-independent adenylating activity. All investigated tyrosine-adenylating enzymes exhibited remarkable promiscuity for MbtH-like proteins from different pathways and organisms. YbdZ, the MbtH-like protein from the expression host Escherichia coli, was found to bind to adenylating enzymes during expression and to influence their biochemical properties markedly. Therefore, the use of ybdZ-deficient expression hosts is important in biochemical studies of adenylating enzymes. PMID:21890635

  20. Bordetella Bronchiseptica in the Immunosuppressed Population – A Case Series and Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Tareq Yacoub

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Organisms that are not known to cause serious infection in the immunocompetent population can in fact cause devastating illness in immunosupressed neutropenic populations especially those who are undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, and solid organ transplantation or a history of malignancy.  One organism of interest isolated from immunosupressed patients at our institution was Bordetella bronchiseptica. B. bronchiseptica is a Gram-negative, rod shaped bacterium, primary respiratory tract organism known to cause respiratory tract disease in the animal population which include dogs, cats, and rabbits. This organism rarely causes serious infection in the immunocompetent population. However; in immunosupressed patients, it can cause serious pulmonary disease. We present three cases of B. bronchiseptica isolated from patients with a history of malignancy a serious pulmonary infection.

  1. Clinical outbreak of Bordetella avium infection in two turkey breeder flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, B J; Ghazikhanian, G Y; Mayeda, B

    1986-01-01

    An acute upper respiratory disease was observed in two broad-breasted white (BBW) turkey primary breeder flocks. Associated clinical signs included sneezing, depression, and a deep dry cough originating from large conducting airways. Morbidity reached approximately 15-20% of the hens in an affected house. None of the turkeys died, and total feed consumption was not affected. A minimal effect upon egg production was noticed. Sera from an acutely affected flock exhibited a marked rise in titer to Bordetella avium compared with preinfection sera samples. In Case 1, B. avium was isolated in pure culture from affected birds. In Case 2, B. avium was diagnosed by serological results and clinical signs; bacteriological examination was not attempted. The findings presented here are consistent with an acute clinical outbreak of B. avium-induced turkey rhinotracheitis (turkey coryza) in BBW turkey breeder hens.

  2. Evidence of Bordetella pertussis infection in vaccinated 1-year-old Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Pontoppidan, Peter Lotko; von König, Carl-Heinz Wirsing

    2010-01-01

    We measured IgA and IgG antibodies to pertussis toxin (PT) and filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) in sera from 203 1-year-old children who had received one to three doses of a monocomponent PT toxoid vaccine. Ten children (5%) had IgA antibody to PT indicating recent infection; seven of these children...... had received three doses of vaccine. PT IgA responders did not have significantly longer coughing episodes than PT IgA non-responders. Since an IgA antibody response occurs in only approximately 50% of infected children, the actual infection rate in our cohort is estimated to approximately 10......%. The apparent high Bordetella pertussis infection rate in Danish infants suggests that the monocomponent PT toxoid vaccine used in Denmark has limited efficacy against B. pertussis infection. A prospective immunization study comparing a multi-component vaccine with the present monocomponent PT toxoid vaccine...

  3. Bordetella bronchiseptica Pneumonia in an Extremely-Low-Birth-Weight Neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuk Joseph Ting

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bordetella bronchiseptica, a gram-negative coccobacillus, is a common veterinary pathogen. In both domestic and wild animals, this bacterium causes respiratory infections including infectious tracheobronchitis in dogs and atrophic rhinitis in swine. Human infections are rare and have been documented in immunocompromised hosts. Here, we describe an extremely-low-birth-weight infant with B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. This is the first report that describes the microorganism's responsibility in causing nosocomial infection in a preterm neonate. He recovered uneventfully after a course of meropenem. It is possible that the bacteria colonize the respiratory tracts of our health care workers or parents who may have had contact with pets and then transmitted the bacterium to our patient. Follow-up until 21 months of age showed normal growth and development. He did not suffer from any significant residual respiratory disease.

  4. Crystallographic characterization of the passenger domain of the Bordetella autotransporter BrkA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Li; Nguyen, Nham T.; Fernandez, Rachel C.; Murphy, Michael E. P.

    2009-01-01

    A secreted bacterial protein from a human pathogen that mediates serum resistance and adherence was overexpressed, purified, refolded and crystallized. Preliminary X-ray diffraction data are presented. Autotransporters (ATs) are proteins that deliver effectors (the passenger domain) to the surface of Gram-negative bacteria by the type V secretion pathway. The passenger domain of BrkA, a Bordetella pertussis autotransporter mediating serum resistance and adherence, was cloned in a pET expression system and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The gene product was correctly refolded, purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. The space group was assumed to be P4 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 108.19, c = 115.35 Å

  5. Complete genome sequence of a clinical Bordetella pertussis isolate from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Gabriel N Andrade

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There has been a resurgence in the number of pertussis cases in Brazil and around the world. Here, the genome of a clinical Bordetella pertussis strain (Bz181 that was recently isolated in Brazil is reported. Analysis of the virulence-associated genes defining the pre- and post-vaccination lineages revealed the presence of the prn2-ptxS1A-fim3B-ptxP3 allelic profile in Bz181, which is characteristic of the current pandemic lineage. A putative metallo-β-lactamase gene presenting all of the conserved zinc-binding motifs that characterise the catalytic site was identified, in addition to a multidrug efflux pump of the RND family that could confer resistance to erythromycin, which is the antibiotic of choice for treating pertussis disease.

  6. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  7. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonatesensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals

    OpenAIRE

    Tresguerres, M; Barott, KL; Barron, ME; Roa, JN

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO 3 - , and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO 3 - sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition...

  8. Inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase toxin, edema factor, from Bacillus anthracis by a series of 18 mono- and bis-(M)ANT-substituted nucleoside 5'-triphosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Hesham; Dove, Stefan; Geduhn, Jens; König, Burkhard; Shen, Yuequan; Tang, Wei-Jen; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis causes anthrax disease and exerts its deleterious effects by the release of three exotoxins, i.e. lethal factor, protective antigen and edema factor (EF), a highly active calmodulin-dependent adenylyl cyclase (AC). Conventional antibiotic treatment is ineffective against either toxaemia or antibiotic-resistant strains. Thus, more effective drugs for anthrax treatment are needed. Our previous studies showed that EF is differentially inhibited by various purine and pyrimidine nucleotides modified with N-methylanthraniloyl (MANT)- or anthraniloyl (ANT) groups at the 2'(3')-O-ribosyl position, with the unique preference for the base cytosine (Taha et al., Mol Pharmacol 75:693 (2009)). MANT-CTP was the most potent EF inhibitor (K (i), 100 nM) among 16 compounds studied. Here, we examined the interaction of EF with a series of 18 2',3'-O-mono- and bis-(M)ANT-substituted nucleotides, recently shown to be very potent inhibitors of the AC toxin from Bordetella pertussis, CyaA (Geduhn et al., J Pharmacol Exp Ther 336:104 (2011)). We analysed purified EF and EF mutants in radiometric AC assays and in fluorescence spectroscopy studies and conducted molecular modelling studies. Bis-MANT nucleotides inhibited EF competitively. Propyl-ANT-ATP was the most potent EF inhibitor (K (i), 80 nM). In contrast to the observations made for CyaA, introduction of a second (M)ANT-group decreased rather than increased inhibitor potency at EF. Activation of EF by calmodulin resulted in effective fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from tryptophan and tyrosine residues located in the vicinity of the catalytic site to bis-MANT-ATP, but FRET to bis-MANT-CTP was only small. Mutations N583Q, K353A and K353R differentially altered the inhibitory potencies of bis-MANT-ATP and bis-MANT-CTP. The nucleotide binding site of EF accommodates bulky bis-(M)ANT-substituted purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, but the fit is suboptimal compared to CyaA. These data provide a basis

  9. Pertussis diagnosis in Belgium: results of the National Reference Centre for Bordetella anno 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, H; Rodeghiero, C; VAN DEN Poel, C; Vincent, M; Pierard, D; Huygen, K

    2017-08-01

    In 2015, the Belgian National Reference Centre for Bordetella analyzed 4110 respiratory samples by qPCR and 4877 serum samples by serology. Whereas about 50% of respiratory samples were from infants and children below the age of five, serum samples were distributed among all age categories. A total of 394 (9·6%) cases was diagnosed as positive for Bordetella pertussis by qPCR and 844 (17·3%) cases were diagnosed as acute infection by serology (anti-pertussis toxin (PT) IgG > 125 IU/ml). Another 1042 (21·4%) sera had anti-PT IgG between 55 and 125 IU/ml reflecting a vaccination or pertussis infection during the last 1-2 years. Seventy per cent of the pertussis cases diagnosed by qPRC were in infants and children younger than 14 years old, whereas the highest number of sera with anti-PT levels >125 IU/ml was in the age group of 10-14 years old. Based on the limited data of the last vaccination (reported for only 15% of the samples), recent booster vaccination in the teenager group may have contributed only minimally to these elevated anti-PT levels. The highest number of sera with anti-PT titers between 55 and 125 IU/ml was found in the age category 50-59 years old. It is clear that pertussis continues to be a problem in Belgium and that other vaccination strategies (maternal vaccination, cocoon vaccination) and ultimately better vaccines will be needed to control this highly infectious respiratory disease.

  10. Immunization status of Iranian military recruits against Bordetella pertussis infection (whooping cough).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Morteza; Afsharpaiman, Shahla; Jonaidi Jafari, Nematollah; Ranjbar, Reza; Gooya, Mohammad Mahdi; Robat Sarpooshi, Javad; Esfahani, Ali Akbar; Soheylipoor, Hamid

    2011-03-21

    Military recruits are susceptible to respiratory pathogens because of increased antibiotic resistance and the lack of an effective vaccine. The goal of the current study was to determine the immunological status of the Bordetella pertussis among conscripts in Iranian military garrisons. The study population consisted of 424 conscripts aged 18 to 21 years who enrolled for military service. They were selected using cluster stratified sampling from all military garrisons in Tehra, Iran. To determine the seroprevalence of infection, blood specimens from all recruits were collected and stored at - 20 °C until assayed. All serum samples were screened for immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against Bordetella pertussis toxin (PT) and by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The overall prevalence of B. pertussis seropositivity in military recruits was 60.6. Only 55.0% of the recruits had low awareness about the record of vaccination against B. pertussis during childhood. Among 424 studied individuals, 48 recruits (11.3%) had a positive history of whooping cough; prevalence of seropositivity in these recruits was 70.0%. Among these subjects, 61.7% were referred to a physician for treatment and only 39.6% of them were administered anti-pertussis therapy. Our study showed that military conscripts in Tehran garrisons were not serologically immune to pertussis and also confirmed the low awareness about vaccination and medical history related to pertussis infection in this high-risk subgroup of the Iranian population. Routine acellular booster vaccination, particularly before 18 years of age, is recommended.

  11. Multiple lineage specific expansions within the guanylyl cyclase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Halloran Damien M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guanylyl cyclases (GCs are responsible for the production of the secondary messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate, which plays important roles in a variety of physiological responses such as vision, olfaction, muscle contraction, homeostatic regulation, cardiovascular and nervous function. There are two types of GCs in animals, soluble (sGCs which are found ubiquitously in cell cytoplasm, and receptor (rGC forms which span cell membranes. The complete genomes of several vertebrate and invertebrate species are now available. These data provide a platform to investigate the evolution of GCs across a diverse range of animal phyla. Results In this analysis we located GC genes from a broad spectrum of vertebrate and invertebrate animals and reconstructed molecular phylogenies for both sGC and rGC proteins. The most notable features of the resulting phylogenies are the number of lineage specific rGC and sGC expansions that have occurred during metazoan evolution. Among these expansions is a large nematode specific rGC clade comprising 21 genes in C. elegans alone; a vertebrate specific expansion in the natriuretic receptors GC-A and GC-B; a vertebrate specific expansion in the guanylyl GC-C receptors, an echinoderm specific expansion in the sperm rGC genes and a nematode specific sGC clade. Our phylogenetic reconstruction also shows the existence of a basal group of nitric oxide (NO insensitive insect and nematode sGCs which are regulated by O2. This suggests that the primordial eukaryotes probably utilized sGC as an O2 sensor, with the ligand specificity of sGC later switching to NO which provides a very effective local cell-to-cell signalling system. Phylogenetic analysis of the sGC and bacterial heme nitric oxide/oxygen binding protein domain supports the hypothesis that this domain originated from a cyanobacterial source. Conclusion The most salient feature of our phylogenies is the number of lineage specific expansions

  12. Mechanism of adenylate kinase: Site-directed mutagenesis versus x-ray and NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Mingdaw; Yan, Honggao

    1991-01-01

    Controversy is an integral part of scientific research and is often a precursor to the truth. However, this lesson has been learned in a very hard way in the case of the structure-function relationship of adenylate kinase (AK), which catalyzes the interconversion between MgATP+AMP and MgADP+ADP. While this small kinase has been considered a model kinase and the enzyme-substrate interaction of AK was among the first investigated by X-ray crystallography and NMR the substrate binding sites deduced from the early studies by these two powerful techniques (termed the X-ray model and the NMR model, respectively) were dramatically different. Ironically, both models have had substantial impact on researchers in related fields. The problems have finally been dealt with since 1987 by the interplay between site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray, and NMR. The purpose of this review is not only to summarize the current knowledge in the structure-function relationship of adenylate kinase but also to accurately document and critically analyze historical developments in the hope that history will not be repeated

  13. The pimeloyl-CoA synthetase BioW defines a new fold for adenylate-forming enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, Paola; Manandhar, Miglena; Dong, Shi-Hui; Deveryshetty, Jaigeeth; Agarwal, Vinayak; Cronan, John E.; Nair, Satish K.

    2017-04-17

    Reactions that activate carboxylates through acyl-adenylate intermediates are found throughout biology and include acyl- and aryl-CoA synthetases and tRNA synthetases. Here we describe the characterization of Aquifex aeolicus BioW, which represents a new protein fold within the superfamily of adenylating enzymes. Substrate-bound structures identified the enzyme active site and elucidated the mechanistic strategy for conjugating CoA to the seven-carbon α,ω-dicarboxylate pimelate, a biotin precursor. Proper position of reactive groups for the two half-reactions is achieved solely through movements of active site residues, as confirmed by site-directed mutational analysis. The ability of BioW to hydrolyze adenylates of noncognate substrates is reminiscent of pre-transfer proofreading observed in some tRNA synthetases, and we show that this activity can be abolished by mutation of a single residue. These studies illustrate how BioW can carry out three different biologically prevalent chemical reactions (adenylation, thioesterification, and proofreading) in the context of a new protein fold.

  14. Adenylyl Cyclase Signaling in the Developing Chick Heart: The Deranging Effect of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejnová, L.; Hahnová, K.; Kočková, Radka; Svatůňková, Jarmila; Sedmera, David; Novotný, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, č. 2014 (2014), s. 463123 ISSN 2314-6133 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1308 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : embryonic heart * embryotoxicity * adenylyl cyclase * G protein * beta-blocking agents Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.579, year: 2014

  15. Agonist-induced desensitization of adenylyl cyclase in Y1 adrenocortical tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, M.F.; Tsao, J.; Pon, D.J.; Schimmer, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    Y1 adrenocortical tumor cells (Y1DS) and Y1 mutants resistant to ACTH-induced desensitization of adenylyl cyclase (Y1DR) were transfected with a gene encoding the mouse beta 2-adrenergic receptor (beta 2-AR). Transfectants expressed beta 2-ARs that were able to stimulate adenylyl cyclase activity and steroid biosynthesis. These transfectants were used to explore the basis for the DR mutation in Y1 cells. The authors demonstrate that beta-adrenergic agonists desensitize the adenylyl cyclase system in transfected Y1DS cells whereas transfected Y1DR cells are resistant to desensitization by beta-adrenergic agonists. The fate of the beta 2-ARs during desensitization was evaluated by photoaffinity labelling with [125I]iodocyanopindolol diazerine. Desensitization of Y1DS transfectants was accompanied by a modest loss in receptor density that was insufficient to account for the complete loss of responsiveness to beta-adrenergic agonists. The extent of receptor loss induced by beta-adrenergic agonists in Y1DR transfectants exceeded that in the Y1DS transfectants indicating that the mutation which protects Y1DR cells from agonist-induced desensitization is prior to receptor down-regulation in the desensitization pathway. From these results we infer that ACTH and isoproterenol desensitize adenylyl cyclase by a common pathway and that receptor loss is not a major component of the desensitization process in these cells

  16. Soluble guanylyl cyclase is involved in PDT-induced injury of crayfish glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for selective destruction of malignant brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. NO have been already shown to participate in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells. As soluble guanylyl cyclase is the only known receptor for NO, we have studied the possible role of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Using inhibitory analysis we have shown that during PDT soluble guanylyl cyclase, probably, has proapoptotic and antinecrotic effect on the glial cells of the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. Proapoptotic effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase could be mediated by protein kinase G (PKG). Thus, the involvement of NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells was indirectly demonstrated.

  17. Activity Regulation by Heteromerization of Arabidopsis Allene Oxide Cyclase Family Members

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Otto, M.; Naumann, Ch.; Brandt, W.; Wasternack, Claus; Hause, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2016), č. článku 3. ISSN 2223-7747 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Activity regulation * Arabidopsis allene oxide cyclase isoforms * Heteromerization Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  18. Platelet adenylyl cyclase activity as a biochemical trait marker for predisposition to alcoholism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratsma, J.E.; Gunning, W.B.; Leurs, R.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.M.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated a reduced G(s)-protein stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in the brain and blood cells of alcoholics. We investigated this phenomenon in platelets of children of alcoholics (COA), i.e., of children at high risk for the acquisition of alcoholism and (as yet) not

  19. Structure of glutaminyl cyclase from Drosophila melanogaster in space group I4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolenko, Petr; Koch, B.; Rahfeld, J.-U.; Schilling, S.; Demuth, H.-U.; Stubbs, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 4 (2013), s. 358-361 ISSN 1744-3091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : glutaminyl cyclases * Drosophila melanogaster * soaking Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2013

  20. Cryptic indole hydroxylation by a non-canonical terpenoid cyclase parallels bacterial xenobiotic detoxification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugel, Susann; Baunach, Martin; Baer, Philipp; Ishida-Ito, Mie; Sundaram, Srividhya; Xu, Zhongli; Groll, Michael; Hertweck, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Terpenoid natural products comprise a wide range of molecular architectures that typically result from C-C bond formations catalysed by classical type I/II terpene cyclases. However, the molecular diversity of biologically active terpenoids is substantially increased by fully unrelated, non-canonical terpenoid cyclases. Their evolutionary origin has remained enigmatic. Here we report the in vitro reconstitution of an unusual flavin-dependent bacterial indoloterpenoid cyclase, XiaF, together with a designated flavoenzyme-reductase (XiaP) that mediates a key step in xiamycin biosynthesis. The crystal structure of XiaF with bound FADH2 (at 2.4 Å resolution) and phylogenetic analyses reveal that XiaF is, surprisingly, most closely related to xenobiotic-degrading enzymes. Biotransformation assays show that XiaF is a designated indole hydroxylase that can be used for the production of indigo and indirubin. We unveil a cryptic hydroxylation step that sets the basis for terpenoid cyclization and suggest that the cyclase has evolved from xenobiotics detoxification enzymes.

  1. A real-time PCR assay with improved specificity for detection and discrimination of all clinically relevant Bordetella species by the presence and distribution of three Insertion Sequence elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossewaarde Jacobus M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Dutch laboratories molecular detection of B. pertussis and B. parapertussis is commonly based on insertion sequences IS481 and IS1001, respectively. Both IS elements are more widely spread among Bordetella species. Both Bordetella holmesii, and B. bronchiseptica can harbour IS481. Also, IS1001 is found among B. bronchiseptica. IS481, and IS1001 based PCR thus lacks specificity when used for detection of specific Bordetella spp. Findings We designed a PCR based on IS1002, another IS element that is present among Bordetella species, and exploited it as a template in combination with PCR for IS481, and IS1001. In combining the PCRs for IS481, IS1001, and IS1002, and including an inhibition control, we were able to detect and discriminate all clinically relevant Bordetella species. Conclusions We developed an improved PCR method for specific detection of B. pertussis, B. parapertussis, B. holmesii, and B. bronchiseptica.

  2. Energetics and Structural Characterization of the large-scale Functional Motion of Adenylate Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formoso, Elena; Limongelli, Vittorio; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-02-01

    Adenylate Kinase (AK) is a signal transducing protein that regulates cellular energy homeostasis balancing between different conformations. An alteration of its activity can lead to severe pathologies such as heart failure, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. A comprehensive elucidation of the large-scale conformational motions that rule the functional mechanism of this enzyme is of great value to guide rationally the development of new medications. Here using a metadynamics-based computational protocol we elucidate the thermodynamics and structural properties underlying the AK functional transitions. The free energy estimation of the conformational motions of the enzyme allows characterizing the sequence of events that regulate its action. We reveal the atomistic details of the most relevant enzyme states, identifying residues such as Arg119 and Lys13, which play a key role during the conformational transitions and represent druggable spots to design enzyme inhibitors. Our study offers tools that open new areas of investigation on large-scale motion in proteins.

  3. The Bpel locus encodes type III secretion machinery in Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, J R; Rigg, G P; Matthews, R C; Burnie, J P

    1999-12-01

    Type III secretory genes(Bscl, J, K, L, N and O) have recently been identified in Bordetella bronchiseptica and shown to be under the control of the BvgAS locus. We examined a 35 616 byte DNA sequence amplified from Bordetella pertussis Tohama I for homology with known type III secretory genes in Yersinia spp. and Pseudomonas sppand a total of 20 homologous open reading frames were detected. Putative type III secretion proteins in B. pertussis were designated according to their homology with type III secretion proteins in B. bronchiseptica, Yersinia and Pseudomonas. These ORFs were arranged in two putative operons, which together we have designated as the BpeI locus. The first spans nucleotides 23385-7888 and encodes the putative proteins LcrH1, BopD, BopB, LcfH2, BscI, BscJ, BscK, BscL, BscN, BscO, BscQ, BscR, BscS, BscT, BscU, and BscC, in this order. The second spans nucleotides 23580-29863 and encodes the putative proteins LcrE, LcrD, BscD and BscF, in this order. The homology of these proteins to type III secretory proteins was B. bronchiseptica (73-99%), Yersinia spp. (17-65%), Pseudomonas spp. (18-64%). The B. pertussis proteins were similar to their homologues in B. bronchiseptica, Yersinia and Pseudomonas in terms of length, molecular weight and isoelectric point. Coiled-coil domains were detected in putative translocation proteins, BopB and BopD. BopB and BopD were similar to each other, to the RTX toxin family and to cyaA, cyaB, cyaD and cyaE. The percentage G+C content of the sequence analysed was 66.16%, which is similar to the published percentage G+C (67-70%) for the B. pertussis chromosome. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Global population structure and evolution of Bordetella pertussis and their relationship with vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Marieke J; Harris, Simon R; Advani, Abdolreza; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Bottero, Daniela; Bouchez, Valérie; Cassiday, Pamela K; Chiang, Chuen-Sheue; Dalby, Tine; Fry, Norman K; Gaillard, María Emilia; van Gent, Marjolein; Guiso, Nicole; Hallander, Hans O; Harvill, Eric T; He, Qiushui; van der Heide, Han G J; Heuvelman, Kees; Hozbor, Daniela F; Kamachi, Kazunari; Karataev, Gennady I; Lan, Ruiting; Lutyńska, Anna; Maharjan, Ram P; Mertsola, Jussi; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Octavia, Sophie; Preston, Andrew; Quail, Michael A; Sintchenko, Vitali; Stefanelli, Paola; Tondella, M Lucia; Tsang, Raymond S W; Xu, Yinghua; Yao, Shu-Man; Zhang, Shumin; Parkhill, Julian; Mooi, Frits R

    2014-04-22

    Bordetella pertussis causes pertussis, a respiratory disease that is most severe for infants. Vaccination was introduced in the 1950s, and in recent years, a resurgence of disease was observed worldwide, with significant mortality in infants. Possible causes for this include the switch from whole-cell vaccines (WCVs) to less effective acellular vaccines (ACVs), waning immunity, and pathogen adaptation. Pathogen adaptation is suggested by antigenic divergence between vaccine strains and circulating strains and by the emergence of strains with increased pertussis toxin production. We applied comparative genomics to a worldwide collection of 343 B. pertussis strains isolated between 1920 and 2010. The global phylogeny showed two deep branches; the largest of these contained 98% of all strains, and its expansion correlated temporally with the first descriptions of pertussis outbreaks in Europe in the 16th century. We found little evidence of recent geographical clustering of the strains within this lineage, suggesting rapid strain flow between countries. We observed that changes in genes encoding proteins implicated in protective immunity that are included in ACVs occurred after the introduction of WCVs but before the switch to ACVs. Furthermore, our analyses consistently suggested that virulence-associated genes and genes coding for surface-exposed proteins were involved in adaptation. However, many of the putative adaptive loci identified have a physiological role, and further studies of these loci may reveal less obvious ways in which B. pertussis and the host interact. This work provides insight into ways in which pathogens may adapt to vaccination and suggests ways to improve pertussis vaccines. IMPORTANCE Whooping cough is mainly caused by Bordetella pertussis, and current vaccines are targeted against this organism. Recently, there have been increasing outbreaks of whooping cough, even where vaccine coverage is high. Analysis of the genomes of 343 B. pertussis

  5. Probing the genome-scale metabolic landscape of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco Dos Santos, Filipe; Olivier, Brett G; Boele, Joost; Smessaert, Vincent; De Rop, Philippe; Krumpochova, Petra; Klau, Gunnar W; Giera, Martin; Dehottay, Philippe; Teusink, Bas; Goffin, Philippe

    2017-08-25

    Whooping cough is a highly-contagious respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussi s. Despite vaccination, its incidence has been rising alarmingly, and yet, the physiology of B. pertussis remains poorly understood. We combined genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, a novel optimization algorithm and experimental data to probe the full metabolic potential of this pathogen, using strain Tohama I as a reference. Experimental validation showed that B. pertussis secretes a significant proportion of nitrogen as arginine and purine nucleosides, which may contribute to modulation of the host response. We also found that B. pertussis can be unexpectedly versatile, being able to metabolize many compounds while displaying minimal nutrient requirements. It can grow without cysteine - using inorganic sulfur sources such as thiosulfate - and it can grow on organic acids such as citrate or lactate as sole carbon sources, providing in vivo demonstration that its TCA cycle is functional. Although the metabolic reconstruction of eight additional strains indicates that the structural genes underlying this metabolic flexibility are widespread, experimental validation suggests a role of strain-specific regulatory mechanisms in shaping metabolic capabilities. Among five alternative strains tested, three were shown to grow on substrate combinations requiring a functional TCA cycle, but only one could use thiosulfate. Finally, the metabolic model was used to rationally design growth media with over two-fold improvements in pertussis toxin production. This study thus provides novel insights into B. pertussis physiology, and highlights the potential, but also limitations of models solely based on metabolic gene content. IMPORTANCE The metabolic capabilities of Bordetella pertussis - the causative agent of whooping cough - were investigated from a systems-level perspective. We constructed a comprehensive genome-scale metabolic model for B. pertussis , and challenged its predictions

  6. Selective splitting of 3'-adenylated dinucleoside polyphosphates by specific enzymes degrading dinucleoside polyphosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guranowski, Andrzej; Sillero, Antonio; Günther Sillero, María Antonia

    2003-01-01

    Several 3'-[(32)P]adenylated dinucleoside polyphosphates (Np(n)N'p*As) were synthesized by the use of poly(A) polymerase (Sillero MAG et al., 2001, Eur J Biochem.; 268: 3605-11) and three of them, ApppA[(32)P]A or ApppAp*A, AppppAp*A and GppppGp*A, were tested as potential substrates of different dinucleoside polyphosphate degrading enzymes. Human (asymmetrical) dinucleoside tetraphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.17) acted almost randomly on both AppppAp*A, yielding approximately equal amounts of pppA + pAp*A and pA + pppAp*A, and GppppGp*, yielding pppG + pGp*A and pG + pppGp*A. Narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) tetraphosphatase acted preferentially on the dinucleotide unmodified end of both AppppAp*A (yielding 90% of pppA + pAp*A and 10 % of pA + pppAp*A) and GppppGp*A (yielding 89% pppG + pGp*A and 11% of pG + pppGp*A). (Symmetrical) dinucleoside tetraphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.41) from Escherichia coli hydrolyzed AppppAp*A and GppppGp*A producing equal amounts of ppA + ppAp*A and ppG + ppGp*A, respectively, and, to a lesser extent, ApppAp*A producing pA + ppAp*A. Two dinucleoside triphosphatases (EC 3.6.1.29) (the human Fhit protein and the enzyme from yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus)) and dinucleoside tetraphosphate phosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.53) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not degrade the three 3'-adenylated dinucleoside polyphosphates tested.

  7. Regulation of hormone-receptor coupling to adenylyl cyclase. Effects of GTP and GDP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, R; Abramowitz, J; Bordelon-Riser, M; Blume, A J; Birnbaumer, L

    1980-11-10

    GDP and GTP regulation of receptor-mediated stimulation of adenylyl cyclases in membranes of S49 murine lymphoma cells (S49), NS-20 murine neuroblastoma cells (NS-20), rabbit corpora lutea (CL), and turkey erythrocytes were studied under assay conditions which minimized conversion of added GTP to GDP and of added GDP to GTP. Hormonal stimulation in all systems required guanine nucleotide addition. In the presence of GTP, adenylyl cyclase activity in S49, NS-20, and CL was stimulated respectively by isoproterenol and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), by PGE1 and the adenosine analog, phenylisopropyladenosine, and by PGE1 and isoproterenol, with the first of the listed stimulants eliciting higher activities than the second. Activity in turkey erythrocyte membranes was stimulated by isoproterenol. GDP was partially effective in promoting hormonal stimulation, being able to sustain stimulation by isoproterenol and PGE1 in S49 cell membranes and by PGE1 in CL membranes. In NS-20 membranes, both GDP and guanosine-5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) were inhibitory on basal activity, yet promoted limited but significant stimulation by PGE1. In turkey erythrocytes, stimulation by isoproterenol could not be elicited with GDP or GDP beta S. Thus, although less effective than GTP in promoting hormonal stimulation of several adenylyl cyclase systems, GDP was clearly not inactive. Concentration effect curves for active hormone in the presence of GDP had higher apparent Ka values than in the presence of GTP. In spite of differences between the effects of GTP and GDP on hormonal stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activities, GTP and GDP affected equally well isoproterenol binding, regardless of whether or not its receptor could be shown to stimulate adenylyl cyclase in the presence of GDP. Determination of transphosphorylation of GDP to GTP showed that at saturating concentrations, the proportion of GDP converted to GTP is negligible and unaffected by hormonal stimulation. Concentrations

  8. Identification of the chlE gene encoding oxygen-independent Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Kaori; Minamizaki, Kei; Fujita, Yuichi

    2015-08-07

    The fifth ring (E-ring) of chlorophyll (Chl) a is produced by Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester (MPE) cyclase. There are two evolutionarily unrelated MPE cyclases: oxygen-independent (BchE) and oxygen-dependent (ChlA/AcsF) MPE cyclases. Although ChlA is the sole MPE cyclase in Synechocystis PCC 6803, it is yet unclear whether BchE exists in cyanobacteria. A BLAST search suggests that only few cyanobacteria possess bchE. Here, we report that two bchE candidate genes from Cyanothece strains PCC 7425 and PCC 7822 restore the photosynthetic growth and bacteriochlorophyll production in a bchE-lacking mutant of Rhodobacter capsulatus. We termed these cyanobacterial bchE orthologs "chlE." Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Bordetella bronchiseptica strains isolated from pigs in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepniewska, K; Urbaniak, K; Markowska-Daniel, I

    2014-01-01

    A total of 209 Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bbr) strains isolated from pigs were examined. Phenotypic study included: biochemical characterization (motility, catalase, oxidase, urease activity, nitrate reduction and growth on MacConkey agar) and antimicrobial susceptibility (disc diffusion method). Genotypic studies based on detection of three genes encoded virulence factors, such as: flagella (fla), dermonecrotoxin (dnt), and exogenous ferric siderophore receptor (bfrZ), using PCR. Most of the Bbr strains tested had a homogeneous biochemical profile. 97.6% of them provided suitable results in biochemical tests. All Bbr isolates tested showed high resistance to penicillin (100%), linco-spectin (100%) and ceftiofur (97.9%). Over 57% and 43% of Bbr strains were resistant to ampicillin and amoxicillin, respectively. All Bbr isolates showed high sensitivity to most chemotherapeutics used such as enrofloxacin (97.9%), tetracycline (97.9%), oxytetracycline (97.9%), amoxicillin with clavulonic acid (95.8%), florfenicol (90.4%), and gentamicine (77.6%). Over of 94% of Bbr strains were moderately susceptible to norfloxacine. Molecular analysis confirmed that almost all evaluated Bbr strains (94.7%) possessed the fla gene. A lower percentage of isolates had the dnt gene (72.7%) and the lowest percentage of strains (51.7%), had the bfrZ gene.

  10. Interaction of Bordetella bronchiseptica and Its Lipopolysaccharide with In Vitro Culture of Respiratory Nasal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Gallego

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nasal septa of fetal rabbits at 26 days of gestation were harvested by cesarean section of the does while under anesthesia and then exposed to Bordetella bronchiseptica or its lipopolysaccharide (LPS for periods of 2 and 4 hours. A total of 240 explants were used. The tissues were examined using the Hematoxylin & Eosin technique. Then, semithin sections (0.5 m were stained with toluidine blue and examined with indirect immunoperoxidase (IPI and lectin histochemistry. The most frequent and statistically significant findings were as follows: (1 cell death and increased goblet cell activity when exposed to bacteria and (2 cell death, cytoplasmic vacuolation and infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes when exposed to LPS. The lesions induced by the bacterium were more severe than with LPS alone, except for the cytoplasmic vacuolation in epithelial cells. IPI stained the ciliated border of the epithelium with the bacterium more intensely, while LPS lectin histochemistry preferentially labeled the cytoplasm of goblet cell. These data indicate that B. bronchiseptica and its LPS may have an affinity for specific glycoproteins that would act as adhesion receptors in both locations.

  11. Activation of the vrg6 promoter of Bordetella pertussis by RisA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cróinín, Tadhg O; Grippe, Vanessa K; Merkel, Tod J

    2005-03-01

    The BvgAS two-component system positively regulates the expression of the virulence genes of Bordetella pertussis and negatively regulates a second set of genes whose function is unknown. The BvgAS-mediated regulation of the bvg-repressed genes is accomplished through the activation of expression of the negative regulator, BvgR. A second two-component regulatory system, RisAS, is required for expression of the bvg-repressed surface antigens VraA and VraB. We examined the roles of BvgR and RisA in the regulation of four bvg-repressed genes in B. pertussis. Our analyses demonstrated that all four genes are repressed by the product of the bvgR locus and are activated by the product of the risA locus. Deletion analysis of the vrg6 promoter identified the upstream and downstream boundaries of the promoter and, in contrast to previously published results, demonstrated that sequences downstream of the start of transcription are not required for the regulation of expression of vrg6. Gel mobility-shift experiments demonstrated sequence-specific binding of RisA to the vrg6 and vrg18 promoters, and led to the identification of two putative RisA binding sites. Finally, transcriptional analysis and Western blot analysis demonstrated that BvgR regulates neither the expression nor the stability of RisA.

  12. Pneumonia caused by Bordetella bronchiseptica in two HIV-positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Filipini Rampelotto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Bordetella bronchiseptica (BB is a Gram-negative coccobacillus responsible for respiratory diseases in dogs, cats and rabbits. Reports on its development in humans are rare. However, in immunosuppressed patients, especially in those with the immunodeficiency virus (HIV, BB can cause severe pulmonary infections. We report on two cases of pneumonia caused by BB in HIV-positive male patients in a university hospital. CASE REPORT: The first case comprised a 43-year-old patient who was admitted presenting chronic leg pain and coughing, with suspected pneumonia. BB was isolated from sputum culture and was successfully treated with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole in association with levofloxacin. The second case comprised a 49-year-old patient who was admitted presenting fever, nausea, sweating and a dry cough, also with suspected pneumonia. BB was isolated from sputum culture, tracheal secretions and bronchoalveolar lavage. The disease was treated with ciprofloxacin but the patient died. CONCLUSION: BB should be included in the etiology of pneumonia in immunodeficient HIV patients. As far as we know, these two were the first cases of pneumonia due to BB to occur in this university hospital.

  13. Induction of Bordetella pertussis-specific immune memory by DTPa vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Sandra; Denoël, Philippe; Godfroid, Fabrice; Cortvrindt, Caroline; Vanderheyde, Nathalie; Poolman, Jan

    2011-04-18

    Several vaccines are available against pertussis, differing by the number of Bordetella pertussis antigens that they contain as well as their formulation. The GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals (GSK Bio) tricomponent DTPa vaccine (DTPa3, Infanrix™), and the Sanofi-Pasteur (SP) five-component formulation (DTPa5, Pediacel™) were shown to have comparable short-term efficacy in clinical trials. However, potential differences in long-term protection were recently suggested, which might reflect the elicitation of different specific immune memory by the two vaccines. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate in mice the immune responses against B. pertussis, and particularly the establishment of specific B cell memory after immunization with DTPa3 and DTPa5 vaccines. Whereas intranasal challenge experiments showed similar protection with both vaccines, DTPa3 induced higher antibody levels to FHA and PRN than DTPa5. Further, the frequency of memory B cells was investigated by B cell ELISPOT. Higher frequencies of PT- and PRN-specific memory B cells were evidenced after vaccination with DTPa3, compared with DTPa5. Although the origin of such difference is unclear, the use of two different adjuvants (aluminum phosphate versus hydroxide) is proposed as a possible explanation. In conclusion, this study proposes that the induction of higher levels of B. pertussis antigen-specific memory B cells with DTPa3 participate to the suggested longer persistence of protection observed with this vaccine, as compared with DTPa5. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Membrane-Pore Forming Characteristics of the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattip Kurehong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Previously, the 126-kDa Bordetella pertussis CyaA pore-forming/hemolysin (CyaA-Hly domain was shown to retain its hemolytic activity causing lysis of susceptible erythrocytes. Here, we have succeeded in producing, at large quantity and high purity, the His-tagged CyaA-Hly domain over-expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble hemolytically-active form. Quantitative assays of hemolysis against sheep erythrocytes revealed that the purified CyaA-Hly domain could function cooperatively by forming an oligomeric pore in the target cell membrane with a Hill coefficient of ~3. When the CyaA-Hly toxin was incorporated into planar lipid bilayers (PLBs under symmetrical conditions at 1.0 M KCl, 10 mM HEPES buffer (pH 7.4, it produced a clearly resolved single channel with a maximum conductance of ~35 pS. PLB results also revealed that the CyaA-Hly induced channel was unidirectional and opened more frequently at higher negative membrane potentials. Altogether, our results first provide more insights into pore-forming characteristics of the CyaA-Hly domain as being the major pore-forming determinant of which the ability to induce such ion channels in receptor-free membranes could account for its cooperative hemolytic action on the target erythrocytes.

  15. Seroprevalence of Bordetella pertussis in the Mexican population: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Glez, C; Lazcano-Ponce, E; Rojas, R; DeAntonio, R; Romano-Mazzotti, L; Cervantes, Y; Ortega-Barría, E

    2014-04-01

    SUMMARY Serum samples collected during the National Health and Nutrition survey (ENSANUT 2006) were obtained from subjects aged 1-95 years (January-October 2010) and analysed to assess the seroprevalence of Bordetella pertussis (BP) in Mexico. Subjects' gender, age, geographical region and socioeconomic status were extracted from the survey and compiled into a subset database. A total of 3344 subjects (median age 29 years, range 1-95 years) were included in the analysis. Overall, BP seroprevalence was 47.4%. BP seroprevalence was significantly higher in males (53.4%, P = 0.0007) and highest in children (59.3%) decreasing with advancing age (P = 0.0008). BP seroprevalence was not significantly different between regions (P = 0.1918) and between subjects of socioeconomic status (P = 0.0808). Women, adolescents and young adults were identified as potential sources of infection to infants. Booster vaccination for adolescents and primary contacts (including mothers) for newborns and infants may provide an important public health intervention to reduce the disease burden.

  16. Role of canine parainfluenza virus and Bordetella bronchiseptica in kennel cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, J S; Sobonya, R; Minnich, L; Taussig, L M

    1984-09-01

    The effect of Bordetella bronchiseptica upper airway colonization on the clinical, radiographic, serologic, pathologic, and pulmonary function changes caused by canine parainfluenza-2 virus (CPIV-2) infection was studied in 24 purebred Beagle pups (10.5 +/- 1.4 weeks old). Eight control dogs (group I) were not colonized or inoculated with CPIV-2. Of the 12 noncolonized dogs inoculated with CPIV-2 (group II), 9 developed antibody titers to CPIV-2 and 10 had clinical signs of infectious canine tracheobronchitis (kennel cough). Group I and group II dogs did not differ in radiographic findings or pulmonary function. Four group II dogs necropsied 1 to 5 days after clinical signs developed had laryngotracheobronchitis and bronchiolar inflammation not present at necropsy on 2 group I dogs. Four dogs had B bronchiseptica upper airway colonization and were inoculated with CPIV-2 (group III). All 4 group III dogs developed positive antibody titers, had clinical signs of kennel cough, and had radiographic changes. Pulmonary dynamic compliance was lower in group III than in group I or group II animals. Respiratory rate and tidal volume did not differ among the 3 groups. The 1 group III dog that was necropsied had changes similar to group II dogs with the addition of lobar bronchopneumonia. The present study indicates that asymptomatic B bronchiseptica colonization may effect the clinical, radiographic, and pulmonary function changes produced by CPIV-2 respiratory tract infections.

  17. The First Siphoviridae Family Bacteriophages Infecting Bordetella bronchiseptica Isolated from Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Aleksandra; Kostanjsek, Rok; Rakhely, Gabor; Knezevic, Petar

    2017-02-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a well-known etiological agent of kennel cough in dogs and cats and one of the two causative agents of atrophic rhinitis, a serious swine disease. The aim of the study was to isolate B. bronchiseptica bacteriophages from environmental samples for the first time. A total of 29 phages from 65 water samples were isolated using the strain ATCC 10580 as a host. The lytic spectra of the phages were examined at 25 and 37 °C, using 12 strains of B. bronchiseptica. All phages were able to plaque on 25.0 % to 41.7 % of the strains. The selected phages showed similar morphology (Siphoviridae, morphotype B2), but variation of RFLP patterns and efficacy of plating on various strains. The partial genome sequence of phage vB_BbrS_CN1 showed its similarity to phages from genus Yuavirus. Using PCR, it was confirmed that the phages do not originate from the host strain, and environmental origin was additionally confirmed by the analysis of host genome sequence in silico and plating heated and unheated samples in parallel. Accordingly, this is the first isolation of B. bronchiseptica phages from environment and the first isolation and characterization of phages of B. bronchiseptica belonging to family Siphoviridae.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of Bordetella pertussis in Cambodia determined by direct genotyping of clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriuchi, Takumi; Vichit, Ork; Vutthikol, Yong; Hossain, Md Shafiqul; Samnang, Chham; Toda, Kohei; Grabovac, Varja; Hiramatsu, Yukihiro; Otsuka, Nao; Shibayama, Keigo; Kamachi, Kazunari

    2017-09-01

    This study sought to determine the genotypes of circulating Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of pertussis, in Cambodia by direct molecular typing of clinical specimens. DNA extracts from nasopharyngeal swabs obtained from 82 pertussis patients in 2008-2016 were analyzed by multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). B. pertussis virulence-associated allelic genes (ptxA, prn, and fim3) and the pertussis toxin promoter ptxP were also investigated by DNA sequence-based typing. Forty-four DNA extracts (54%) yielded a complete MLVA profile, and these were sorted into 8 MLVA types (MT18, MT26, MT27, MT29, MT43, MT72, MT95, and MT200). MT27 and MT29, which are common in developed countries, were the predominant strain types (total 73%). The predominant profile of virulence-associated allelic genes was the combination of ptxP3/ptxA1/prn2/fim3A (48%). MT27 strains were detected during the entire study period, whereas MT29 strains were only found in 2014-2016. The B. pertussis population in Cambodia, where a whole-cell pertussis vaccine (WCV) has been continuously used, resembled those observed previously in developed countries where acellular pertussis vaccines are used. Circulating B. pertussis strains in Cambodia were distinct from those in other countries using WCVs. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Development and characterization of attenuated metabolic mutants of Bordetella bronchiseptica for applications in vaccinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yevsa, Tetyana; Ebensen, Thomas; Fuchs, Barbara; Zygmunt, Beata; Libanova, Rimma; Gross, Roy; Schulze, Kai; Guzmán, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is an important pathogen causing a number of veterinary respiratory syndromes in agriculturally important and food-producing confinement-reared animals, resulting in great economic losses annually amounting to billions of euros worldwide. Currently available live vaccines are incompletely satisfactory in terms of efficacy and safety. An efficient vaccine for livestock animals would allow reducing the application of antibiotics, thereby preventing the massive release of pharmaceuticals into the environment. Here, we describe two new potential vaccine strains based on the BB7865 strain. Two independent attenuating mutations were incorporated by homologous recombination in order to make negligible the risk of recombination and subsequent reversion to the virulent phenotype. The mutations are critical for bacterial metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, intracellular survival and in vivo persistence. The resulting double mutants BB7865 risA aroA and BB7865 risA dapE were characterized as promising vaccine candidates, which are able to confer protection against colonization of the lower respiratory tract after sublethal challenge with the wild-type strain. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Activity Enhancement Based on the Chemical Equilibrium of Multiple-Subunit Nitrile Hydratase from Bordetella petrii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Ping; Lin, Lu; Zhao, Yueqin; Zhong, Wenjuan; Wu, Lunjie; Zhou, Zhemin; Sun, Weifeng

    2016-09-01

    The maturation mechanism of nitrile hydratase (NHase) of Pseudomonas putida NRRL-18668 was discovered and named as "self-subunit swapping." Since the NHase of Bordetella petrii DSM 12804 is similar to that of P. putida, the NHase maturation of B. petrii is proposed to be the same as that of P. putida. However, there is no further information on the application of NHase according to these findings. We successfully rapidly purified NHase and its activator through affinity his tag, and found that the cell extracts of NHase possessed multiple types of protein ingredients including α, β, α2β2, and α(P14K)2 who were in a state of chemical equilibrium. Furthermore, the activity was significantly enhanced through adding extra α(P14K)2 to the cell extracts of NHase according to the chemical equilibrium. Our findings are useful for the activity enhancement of multiple-subunit enzyme and for the first time significantly increased the NHase activity according to the chemical equilibrium.

  1. Bordetella bronchiseptica antigen enhances the production of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigen-specific immunoglobulin G in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Seol-Hwa; Hahn, Tae-Wook; Joo, Hong-Gu

    2017-09-30

    We previously demonstrated that Bordetella ( B .) bronchiseptica antigen (Ag) showed high immunostimulatory effects on mouse bone marrow cells (BMs) while Mycoplasma ( M .) hyopneumoniae Ag showed low effects. The focus of this study was to determine if B. bronchiseptica Ag can enhance the M. hyopneumoniae Ag-specific immune response and whether the host's immune system can recognize both Ags. MTT assay results revealed that each or both Ags did not significantly change BM metabolic activity. Flow cytometry analysis using carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester showed that B. bronchiseptica Ag can promote the division of BMs. In cytokine and nitric oxide (NO) assays, B. bronchiseptica Ag boosted production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in M. hyopneumoniae Ag-treated BMs, and combined treatment with both Ags elevated the level of NO in BMs compared to that from treatment of M. hyopneumoniae Ag alone. Immunoglobulin (Ig)G enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the sera of Ag-injected mice clearly indicated that B. bronchiseptica Ag can increase the production of M. hyopneumoniae Ag-specific IgG. This study provided information valuable in the development of M. hyopneumoniae vaccines and showed that B. bronchiseptica Ag can be used both as a vaccine adjuvant and as a vaccine Ag.

  2. Live Attenuated Pertussis Vaccine BPZE1 Protects Baboons Against Bordetella pertussis Disease and Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papin, James F.; Lecher, Sophie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Thalen, Marcel; Solovay, Ken; Rubin, Keith; Mielcarek, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Evidence suggests that the resurgence of pertussis in many industrialized countries may result from the failure of current vaccines to prevent nasopharyngeal colonization by Bordetella pertussis, the principal causative agent of whooping cough. Here, we used a baboon model to test the protective potential of the novel, live attenuated pertussis vaccine candidate BPZE1. A single intranasal/intratracheal inoculation of juvenile baboons with BPZE1 resulted in transient nasopharyngeal colonization and induction of immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A to all antigens tested, while causing no adverse symptoms or leukocytosis. When BPZE1-vaccinated baboons were challenged with a high dose of a highly virulent B. pertussis isolate, they were fully protected against disease, whereas naive baboons developed illness (with 1 death) and leukocytosis. Total postchallenge nasopharyngeal virulent bacterial burden of vaccinated animals was substantially reduced (0.002%) compared to naive controls, providing promising evidence in nonhuman primates that BPZE1 protects against both pertussis disease and B. pertussis infection. PMID:28535276

  3. Modulation of the NF-kappaB pathway by Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzvia Abramson

    Full Text Available Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA is a cell-associated and secreted adhesin produced by Bordetella pertussis with pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory activity in host cells. Given the importance of the NF-kappaB transcription factor family in these host cell responses, we examined the effect of FHA on NF-kappaB activation in macrophages and bronchial epithelial cells, both of which are relevant cell types during natural infection.Exposure to FHA of primary human monocytes and transformed U-937 macrophages, but not BEAS-2B epithelial cells, resulted in early activation of the NF-kappaB pathway, as manifested by the degradation of cytosolic IkappaB alpha, by NF-kappaB DNA binding, and by the subsequent secretion of NF-kappaB-regulated inflammatory cytokines. However, exposure of macrophages and human monocytes to FHA for two hours or more resulted in the accumulation of cytosolic IkappaB alpha, and the failure of TNF-alpha to activate NF-kappaB. Proteasome activity was attenuated following exposure of cells to FHA for 2 hours, as was the nuclear translocation of RelA in BEAS-2B cells.These results reveal a complex temporal dynamic, and suggest that despite short term effects to the contrary, longer exposures of host cells to this secreted adhesin may block NF-kappaB activation, and perhaps lead to a compromised immune response to this bacterial pathogen.

  4. [Production of pertussis toxin by Bordetella pertussis strains isolated from patients with whooping cough].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaĭtsev, E M; Mertsalova, N U; Shinkarev, A S; Mazurova, I K; Zakharova, N S

    2011-01-01

    To assess level of pertussin toxin (PT) production by vaccine strains of Bordetella pertussis and strains isolated from patients with whooping cough. Concentration of PT in supernatants of microbial cultures of 3 vaccine strains and 25 strains of B. pertussis isolated from patients with pertussis in 2001 - 2005 was measured with enzyme immunoassay using gamma-globulin fractions of rabbit antiserum to PT as immunosorbent or included in peroxidase conjugates. Level of PT production by strains isolated from infected persons varied from 3 +/- 0.5 to 64.8 +/- 12.2 ng/MFU/ml: in 9 strains--from 3 +/- 0.5 to 9.4 +/- 2.1 ng/MFU/ml, in 7--10.5 +/- 1.8 to 18.4 +/- 2.6 ng/MFU/ml, and in 9--23.6 +/- 4.5 to 64.8 +/- 12.2 ng/MFU/ml. B. pertussis strains isolated from patients were heterogeneous on level of PT production. Difference in expression of PT between strains were as high as 20-fold. Conditionally low, moderate and high levels of PT production had 9 (36%), 7 (28%), and 9 (36%) of 25 studied strains. Three vaccine strains had levels of toxin production similar to recently isolated strains with moderate level of its production.

  5. The relationship between mucosal immunity, nasopharyngeal carriage, asymptomatic transmission and the resurgence of Bordetella pertussis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Christopher; Rohani, Pejman; Thea, Donald M

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of whooping cough in the US has been rising slowly since the 1970s, but the pace of this has accelerated sharply since acellular pertussis vaccines replaced the earlier whole cell vaccines in the late 1990s. A similar trend occurred in many other countries, including the UK, Canada, Australia, Ireland, and Spain, following the switch to acellular vaccines. The key question is why. Two leading theories (short duration of protective immunologic persistence and evolutionary shifts in the pathogen to evade the vaccine) explain some but not all of these shifts, suggesting that other factors may also be important. In this synthesis, we argue that sterilizing mucosal immunity that blocks or abbreviates the duration of nasopharyngeal carriage of Bordetella pertussis and impedes person-to-person transmission (including between asymptomatically infected individuals) is a critical factor in this dynamic. Moreover, we argue that the ability to induce such mucosal immunity is fundamentally what distinguishes whole cell and acellular pertussis vaccines and may be pivotal to understanding much of the resurgence of this disease in many countries that adopted acellular vaccines. Additionally, we offer the hypothesis that observed herd effects generated by acellular vaccines may reflect a modification of disease presentation leading to reduced potential for transmission by those already infected, as opposed to inducing resistance to infection among those who have been exposed. PMID:28928960

  6. Antibodies to Bordetella pertussis antigens in maternal and cord blood pairs: a Thai cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasamon Wanlapakorn

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Pertussis is a vaccine-preventable disease, yet an increasing incidence of pertussis occurs in many countries. Thailand has a long-standing pertussis vaccination policy, therefore most expectant mothers today had received vaccines as children. The resurgence of pertussis among Thai infants in recent years led us to examine the pre-existing antibodies to Bordetella pertussis antigens in a cohort of 90 pregnant women. Methods We evaluated the IgG to the Pertussis toxin (PT, filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA and pertactin (PRN in maternal and cord blood sera using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Results When values of >10 IU/ml were accepted as potential protective concentrations, we found that the percentages of unprotected infants were 73.3%, 43.3% and 75.5% for anti-PT, anti-FHA and anti-PRN IgG, respectively. Discussion These results may explain the susceptibility for pertussis among newborn infants in Thailand and support the requirement for a pertussis booster vaccine during pregnancy, which may contribute to the passive seroprotection among newborns during the first months of life.

  7. Rapid and sensitive detection of Bordetella bronchiseptica by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bordetella bronchiseptica causes acute and chronic respiratory infections in diverse animal species and occasionally in humans. In this study, we described the establishment of a simple, sensitive and cost-efficient loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay for the detection of B. bronchiseptica. A set of primers towards a 235 bp region within the flagellum gene of B. bronchiseptica was designed with online software.. The specificity of the LAMP assay was examined by using 6 porcine pathogens and 100 nasal swabs collected from healthy pigs and suspect infected pigs. The results indicated that positive reactions were confirmed for all B. bronchiseptica and no cross-reactivity was observed from other non-B. bronchiseptica. In sensitivity evaluations, the technique successfully detected a serial dilutions of extracted B. bronchiseptica DNA with a detection limit of 9 copies, which was 10 times more sensitive than that of PCR. Compared with conventional PCR, the higher sensitivity of LAMP method and no need for the complex instrumentation make this LAMP assay a promising alternative for the diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica in rural areas and developing countries where there lacks of complex laboratory services.

  8. A cost-effective method for Illumina small RNA-Seq library preparation using T4 RNA ligase 1 adenylated adapters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yun-Ru

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sequencing is a powerful tool for novel small RNA discovery. Illumina small RNA sequencing library preparation requires a pre-adenylated 3’ end adapter containing a 5’,5’-adenyl pyrophosphoryl moiety. In the absence of ATP, this adapter can be ligated to the 3’ hydroxyl group of small RNA, while RNA self-ligation and concatenation are repressed. Pre-adenylated adapters are one of the most essential and costly components required for library preparation, and few are commercially available. Results We demonstrate that DNA oligo with 5’ phosphate and 3’ amine groups can be enzymatically adenylated by T4 RNA ligase 1 to generate customized pre-adenylated adapters. We have constructed and sequenced a small RNA library for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum using the T4 RNA ligase 1 adenylated adapter. Conclusion We provide an efficient and low-cost method for small RNA sequencing library preparation, which takes two days to complete and costs around $20 per library. This protocol has been tested in several plant species for small RNA sequencing including sweet potato, pepper, watermelon, and cowpea, and could be readily applied to any RNA samples.

  9. Avaliação imunológica da vacina contra pertussis com menor teor de LPS (Plow) na infecção com Bordetella pertussis e Bordetella parapertussis, em camundongos.

    OpenAIRE

    Priscila Silva Cunegundes

    2016-01-01

    A coqueluche é uma doença contagiosa, causada por Bordetella pertussis e B. parapertussis e as vacinas de células inteiras (WCPs) contra pertussis, embora eficazes, foram associadas a efeitos indesejáveis. Já as vacinas pertussis acelulares são menos reatogênicas, mas caras, o que as torna inviáveis para países em desenvolvimento. Nesse estudo, avaliamos a resposta imune induzida por uma vacina pertussis celular com menor teor de LOS (Plow), desenvolvida pelo Instituto Butantan. Para isso, ca...

  10. Structure of glutaminyl cyclase from Drosophila melanogaster in space group I4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolenko, Petr; Koch, Birgit; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Stubbs, Milton T.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of ligand-free glutaminyl cyclase from D. melanogaster has been determined in a novel crystal form belonging to space group I4. The structure of ligand-free glutaminyl cyclase (QC) from Drosophila melanogaster (DmQC) has been determined in a novel crystal form. The protein crystallized in space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.3, c = 72.7 Å. The crystal diffracted to a resolution of 2 Å at the home source. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and was refined to an R factor of 0.169. DmQC exhibits a typical α/β-hydrolase fold. The electron density of three monosaccharides could be localized. The accessibility of the active site will facilitate structural studies of novel inhibitor-binding modes

  11. Spatial resolution of cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldieri, Giusi

    2016-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptor signaling starts at the plasma membrane and continues at endosomal stations. In this issue, Inda et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201512075) show that different forms of adenylyl cyclase are activated at the plasma membrane versus endosomes, providing a rationale for the spatial encoding of cAMP signaling. PMID:27402955

  12. Characterization of the Human ?1?1 Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Marro, Mart?n L.; Peir?, Concepci?n; Panayiotou, Catherine M.; Baliga, Reshma S.; Meurer, Sabine; Schmidt, Harald H. H. W.; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2008-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the principal receptor for NO and plays a ubiquitous role in regulating cellular function. This is exemplified in the cardiovascular system where sGC governs smooth muscle tone and growth, vascular permeability, leukocyte flux, and platelet aggregation. As a consequence, aberrant NO-sGC signaling has been linked to diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, and stroke. Despite these key (patho)physiological roles, little is known about the expressional...

  13. Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase defines a nuclear cAMP microdomain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippin, Jonathan H.; Farrell, Jeanne; Huron, David; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Hess, Kenneth C.; Fischman, Donald A.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase resides, in part, inside the mammalian cell nucleus where it stimulates the activity of nuclear protein kinase A to phosphorylate the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). The existence of this complete and functional, nuclear-localized cAMP pathway establishes that cAMP signals in intracellular microdomains and identifies an alternate pathway leading to CREB activation. PMID:14769862

  14. Antiarrhythmic effect of prolonged morphine exposure is accompanied by altered myocardial adenylyl cyclase signaling in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škrabalová, J.; Neckář, Jan; Hejnová, L.; Bartoňová, I.; Kolář, František; Novotný, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2012), s. 351-359 ISSN 1734-1140 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA501110901 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 429511 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : rat myocardium * morphine * adenylyl cyclase * G-proteins * arrhythmias Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.965, year: 2012

  15. Chemical shift assignments of polyketide cyclase_like protein CGL2373 from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chunjie; Hu, Rui; Ramelot, Theresa A; Kennedy, Michael A; Li, Xuegang; Yang, Yunhuang; Zhu, Jiang; Liu, Maili

    2017-10-01

    Protein CGL2373 from Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is 155 amino acids long and 17.7 kDa, is a member of the polyketide_cyc2 family. As a potential polyketide cyclase, it may play an important role in the biosynthesis of aromatic polyketides that are the source of many bioactive molecules. Here we report the complete 1 H, 13 C and 15 N chemical shift assignments of CGL2373, which lays a foundation for further structural and functional research.

  16. Transgenic rescue of defective Cd36 enhances myocardial adenylyl cyclase signaling in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klevstig, M.; Manakov, D.; Kašparová, D.; Brabcová, I.; Papoušek, František; Žurmanová, J.; Zídek, Václav; Šilhavý, Jan; Neckář, Jan; Pravenec, Michal; Kolář, František; Nováková, O.; Novotný, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 465, č. 10 (2013), s. 1477-1486 ISSN 0031-6768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX01110901; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0505 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : SHR rats * Cd36 * heart * beta-Adrenergic receptors * Adenylyl cyclase * Protein kinase A Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.073, year: 2013

  17. A newly discovered Bordetella species carries a transcriptionally active CRISPR-Cas with a small Cas9 endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yury V; Shariat, Nikki; Register, Karen B; Linz, Bodo; Rivera, Israel; Hu, Kai; Dudley, Edward G; Harvill, Eric T

    2015-10-26

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas) are widely distributed among bacteria. These systems provide adaptive immunity against mobile genetic elements specified by the spacer sequences stored within the CRISPR. The CRISPR-Cas system has been identified using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) against other sequenced and annotated genomes and confirmed via CRISPRfinder program. Using Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR) and Sanger DNA sequencing, we discovered CRISPRs in additional bacterial isolates of the same species of Bordetella. Transcriptional activity and processing of the CRISPR have been assessed via RT-PCR. Here we describe a novel Type II-C CRISPR and its associated genes-cas1, cas2, and cas9-in several isolates of a newly discovered Bordetella species. The CRISPR-cas locus, which is absent in all other Bordetella species, has a significantly lower GC-content than the genome-wide average, suggesting acquisition of this locus via horizontal gene transfer from a currently unknown source. The CRISPR array is transcribed and processed into mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNA), some of which have homology to prophages found in closely related species B. hinzii. Expression of the CRISPR-Cas system and processing of crRNAs with perfect homology to prophages present in closely related species, but absent in that containing this CRISPR-Cas system, suggest it provides protection against phage predation. The 3,117-bp cas9 endonuclease gene from this novel CRISPR-Cas system is 990 bp smaller than that of Streptococcus pyogenes, the 4,017-bp allele currently used for genome editing, and which may make it a useful tool in various CRISPR-Cas technologies.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the glutaminyl cyclase from Carica papaya latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarkan, Mohamed [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale I, Faculté de Médecine-ULB CP609, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Clantin, Bernard; Bompard, Coralie [CNRS-UMR 8525, Institut de Biologie de Lille, BP 477, 1 Rue du Professeur Calmette, F-59021 Lille (France); Belrhali, Hassan [EMBL Grenoble Outstation, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 181, F-38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Baeyens-Volant, Danielle [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale I, Faculté de Médecine-ULB CP609, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Looze, Yvan [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale, Institut de Pharmacie-ULB CP206/04, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Villeret, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.villeret@ibl.fr [CNRS-UMR 8525, Institut de Biologie de Lille, BP 477, 1 Rue du Professeur Calmette, F-59021 Lille (France); Wintjens, René, E-mail: vincent.villeret@ibl.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale, Institut de Pharmacie-ULB CP206/04, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratoire de Chimie Générale I, Faculté de Médecine-ULB CP609, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-01-01

    The glutaminyl cyclase isolated from C. papaya latex has been crystallized using the hanging-drop method. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to 1.7 Å resolution. In living systems, the intramolecular cyclization of N-terminal glutamine residues is accomplished by glutaminyl cyclase enzymes (EC 2.3.2.5). While in mammals these enzymes are involved in the synthesis of hormonal and neurotransmitter peptides, the physiological role played by the corresponding plant enzymes still remains to be unravelled. Papaya glutaminyl cyclase (PQC), a 33 kDa enzyme found in the latex of the tropical tree Carica papaya, displays an exceptional resistance to chemical and thermal denaturation as well as to proteolysis. In order to elucidate its enzymatic mechanism and to gain insights into the structural determinants underlying its remarkable stability, PQC was isolated from papaya latex, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.82, b = 81.23, c = 108.17 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to a resolution of 1.7 Å.

  19. Identification of photoactivated adenylyl cyclases in Naegleria australiensis and BLUF-containing protein in Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Sato, Aya; Kita, Ayaka; Kodaira, Ken-Ichi; Iseki, Mineo; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Shibusawa, Mami; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Yagita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of Naegleria gruberi has revealed that the organism encodes polypeptides similar to photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs). Screening in the N. australiensis genome showed that the organism also encodes polypeptides similar to PACs. Each of the Naegleria proteins consists of a "sensors of blue-light using FAD" domain (BLUF domain) and an adenylyl cyclase domain (AC domain). PAC activity of the Naegleria proteins was assayed by comparing sensitivities of Escherichia coli cells heterologously expressing the proteins to antibiotics in a dark condition and a blue light-irradiated condition. Antibiotics used in the assays were fosfomycin and fosmidomycin. E. coli cells expressing the Naegleria proteins showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light, indicating that the proteins functioned as PACs in the bacterial cells. Analysis of the N. fowleri genome revealed that the organism encodes a protein bearing an amino acid sequence similar to that of BLUF. A plasmid expressing a chimeric protein consisting of the BLUF-like sequence found in N. fowleri and the adenylyl cyclase domain of N. gruberi PAC was constructed to determine whether the BLUF-like sequence functioned as a sensor of blue light. E. coli cells expressing a chimeric protein showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light. These experimental results indicated that the sequence similar to the BLUF domain found in N. fowleri functioned as a sensor of blue light.

  20. sigE facilitates the adaptation of Bordetella bronchiseptica to stress conditions and lethal infection in immunocompromised mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barchinger Sarah E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell envelope of a bacterial pathogen can be damaged by harsh conditions in the environment outside a host and by immune factors during infection. Cell envelope stress responses preserve the integrity of this essential compartment and are often required for virulence. Bordetella species are important respiratory pathogens that possess a large number of putative transcription factors. However, no cell envelope stress responses have been described in these species. Among the putative Bordetella transcription factors are a number of genes belonging to the extracytoplasmic function (ECF group of alternative sigma factors, some of which are known to mediate cell envelope stress responses in other bacteria. Here we investigate the role of one such gene, sigE, in stress survival and pathogenesis of Bordetella bronchiseptica. Results We demonstrate that sigE encodes a functional sigma factor that mediates a cell envelope stress response. Mutants of B. bronchiseptica strain RB50 lacking sigE are more sensitive to high temperature, ethanol, and perturbation of the envelope by SDS-EDTA and certain β-lactam antibiotics. Using a series of immunocompromised mice deficient in different components of the innate and adaptive immune responses, we show that SigE plays an important role in evading the innate immune response during lethal infections of mice lacking B cells and T cells. SigE is not required, however, for colonization of the respiratory tract of immunocompetent mice. The sigE mutant is more efficiently phagocytosed and killed by peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs than RB50, and exhibits decreased cytotoxicity toward macrophages. These altered interactions with phagocytes could contribute to the defects observed during lethal infection. Conclusions Much of the work on transcriptional regulation during infection in B. bronchiseptica has focused on the BvgAS two-component system. This study reveals that the Sig

  1. Tye7 regulates yeast Ty1 retrotransposon sense and antisense transcription in response to adenylic nucleotides stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Géraldine; Pinson, Benoit; Tchalikian-Cosson, Aurélie; Coulpier, Fanny; Lemoine, Sophie; Pennetier, Carole; Bridier-Nahmias, Antoine; Todeschini, Anne Laure; Fayol, Hélène; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Lesage, Pascale

    2012-07-01

    Transposable elements play a fundamental role in genome evolution. It is proposed that their mobility, activated under stress, induces mutations that could confer advantages to the host organism. Transcription of the Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated in response to a severe deficiency in adenylic nucleotides. Here, we show that Ty2 and Ty3 are also stimulated under these stress conditions, revealing the simultaneous activation of three active Ty retrotransposon families. We demonstrate that Ty1 activation in response to adenylic nucleotide depletion requires the DNA-binding transcription factor Tye7. Ty1 is transcribed in both sense and antisense directions. We identify three Tye7 potential binding sites in the region of Ty1 DNA sequence where antisense transcription starts. We show that Tye7 binds to Ty1 DNA and regulates Ty1 antisense transcription. Altogether, our data suggest that, in response to adenylic nucleotide reduction, TYE7 is induced and activates Ty1 mRNA transcription, possibly by controlling Ty1 antisense transcription. We also provide the first evidence that Ty1 antisense transcription can be regulated by environmental stress conditions, pointing to a new level of control of Ty1 activity by stress, as Ty1 antisense RNAs play an important role in regulating Ty1 mobility at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages.

  2. Expression of bvg-repressed genes in Bordetella pertussis is controlled by RisA through a novel c-di-GMP signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    The BvgAS two component system of Bordetella pertussis controls virulence factor expression. In addition, BvgAS controls expression of the bvg-repressed genes through the action of the repressor, BvgR. The transcription factor RisA is inhibited by BvgR, and when BvgR is not expressed RisA induces th...

  3. Cyclic di-GMP regulation of the bvg-repressed genes and the orphan response regulator RisA in Bordetella pertussis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expression of Bordetella pertussis virulence factors is activated by the BvgAS two-component system. Under modulating growth conditions BvgAS indirectly represses another set of genes through the action of BvgR, a bvg-activated protein. BvgR blocks activation of the response regulator RisA which is ...

  4. Carotenoid analysis of sweetpotato Ipomoea batatas and functional identification of its lycopene β- and ε-cyclase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Takemura, Miho; Maoka, Takashi; Otani, Motoyasu; Misawa, Norihiko

    2016-09-01

    Sweetpotato Ipomoea batatas is known as a hexaploid species. Here, we analyzed carotenoids contained in the leaves and tubers of sweetpotato cultivars 'White Star' (WS) and W71. These cultivars were found to contain several carotenoids unique to sweetpotato tubers such as β-carotene-5,6,5',8'-diepoxide and β-carotene-5,8-epoxide. Next, we isolated two kinds of carotene cyclase genes that encode lycopene β- and ε-cyclases from the WS and W71 leaves, by RT-PCR and subsequent RACE. Two and three lycopene β-cyclase gene sequences were, respectively, isolated from WS, named IbLCYb1, 2, and from W71, IbLCYb3, 4, 5. Meanwhile, only a single lycopene ε-cyclase gene sequence, designated IbLCYe, was isolated from both WS and W71. These genes were separately introduced into a lycopene-synthesizing Escherichia coli transformed with the Pantoea ananatis crtE, crtB and crtI genes, followed by HPLC analysis. β-Carotene was detected in E. coli cells that carried IbLCYb1-4, indicating that the IbLCYb1-4 genes encode lycopene β-cyclase. Meanwhile, the introduction of IbLCYe into the lycopene-synthesizing E. coli led to efficient production of δ-carotene with a monocyclic ε-ring, providing evidence that the IbLCYe gene codes for lycopene ε-(mono)cyclase. Expression of the β- and ε-cyclase genes was analyzed as well.

  5. Cilia-associated bacteria in fatal Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia of dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha-Abdelaziz, Khaled; Bassel, Laura L; Harness, Melanie L; Clark, Mary Ellen; Register, Karen B; Caswell, Jeff L

    2016-07-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica frequently causes nonfatal tracheobronchitis, but its role in fatal pneumonia is less recognized. Our study evaluated histologic identification of cilia-associated bacteria as a method for diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. Cases of fatal bronchopneumonia were studied retrospectively, excluding neonates and cases of aspiration pneumonia, minor lung lesions, or autolysis. The study population comprised 36 canine and 31 feline cases of bronchopneumonia. B. bronchiseptica was identified in 8 of 36 canine and 14 of 31 feline cases based on immunohistochemistry (IHC) using serum from a rabbit hyperimmunized with pertactin, PCR testing (Fla2/Fla12), and/or bacterial culture data when available. Of these, IHC was positive in 4 canine and 7 feline cases, PCR was positive in 8 canine and 14 feline cases, and B. bronchiseptica was isolated in 2 of 5 canine and 3 of 9 feline cases tested. Examination of histologic sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin revealed bronchial cilia-associated bacteria in 4 of 36 canine and 5 of 31 feline cases; these were all positive by IHC and PCR. The presence of cilia-associated bacteria had been noted in the pathology report for only 2 of these 9 cases. Thus, the presence of cilia-associated bacteria seems frequently overlooked by pathologists, but is a diagnostically significant feature of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. A specific diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia is important because it suggests primary or opportunistic bacterial pneumonia rather than aspiration pneumonia, and because of the risk of animal-to-animal transmission of B. bronchiseptica, the availability of vaccines for disease prevention, and the potential zoonotic risk to immunocompromised pet owners. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bordetella bronchiseptica Isolates from Swine and Companion Animals and Detection of Resistance Genes.

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    Sandra Prüller

    Full Text Available Bordetella bronchiseptica causes infections of the respiratory tract in swine and other mammals and is a precursor for secondary infections with Pasteurella multocida. Treatment of B. bronchiseptica infections is conducted primarily with antimicrobial agents. Therefore it is essential to get an overview of the susceptibility status of these bacteria. The aim of this study was to comparatively analyse broth microdilution susceptibility testing according to CLSI recommendations with an incubation time of 16 to 20 hours and a longer incubation time of 24 hours, as recently proposed to obtain more homogenous MICs. Susceptibility testing against a panel of 22 antimicrobial agents and two fixed combinations was performed with 107 porcine isolates from different farms and regions in Germany and 43 isolates obtained from companion animals in Germany and other European countries. Isolates with increased MICs were investigated by PCR assays for the presence of resistance genes. For ampicillin, all 107 porcine isolates were classified as resistant, whereas only a single isolate was resistant to florfenicol. All isolates obtained from companion animals showed elevated MICs for β-lactam antibiotics and demonstrated an overall low susceptibility to cephalosporines. Extension of the incubation time resulted in 1-2 dilution steps higher MIC50 values of porcine isolates for seven antimicrobial agents tested, while isolates from companion animals exhibited twofold higher MIC50/90 values only for tetracycline and cefotaxime. For three antimicrobial agents, lower MIC50 and MIC90 values were detected for both, porcine and companion animal isolates. Among the 150 isolates tested, the resistance genes blaBOR-1 (n = 147, blaOXA-2, (n = 4, strA and strB (n = 17, sul1 (n = 10, sul2 (n = 73, dfrA7 (n = 3 and tet(A (n = 8 were detected and a plasmid localisation was identified for several of the resistance genes.

  7. Variation of Housekeeping Genes in Clinical Isolates and Vaccine Strains of Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Masoumeh; Haghighi, Faezeh; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Abbasi, Ebrahim; Eshraghi, Seyed Saeed; Ghourchian, Sedighe; Zeraati, Hojjat; Yaseri, Mehdi; Douraghi, Masoumeh; Shokri, Fazel

    2017-04-01

    Bordetella pertussis causes serious contagious infections, primarily in childhood. A whole-cell vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus-whole cell pertussis (DTwP), has been used to protect against pertussis in children in Iran, but the pertussis cases have been increasing during recent years. We determined the allelic variation level of housekeeping genes in isolates recovered from pertussis patients and vaccine strains used in national vaccination program. Five clinical isolates, 2 vaccine strains and a Tohama I strain were studied through multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of housekeeping genes. The relatedness between STs, the founder, single- and double-locus variants (SLVs, DLVs) was determined using eBURST algorithm. The concordance between the type assignments by MLST and PFGE was determined. In the 5 clinical isolates, 2 STs were identified, ST2 and ST79. The vaccine strains displayed two distinct allelic profiles assigned to ST1 and ST2. ST2 was predicted as founder and the remaining STs were SLVs of ST2. MLST and PFGE type assignments were 86.6% concordant. The clinical isolates of B. pertussis were different from vaccine strains used in the national vaccination program. This study confirms the low level of variation in housekeeping genes of B. pertussis. MLST of virulent antigenic genes needs to be applied as a complementary method for the characterization of new ST-harboring isolates that may predominate periodically. The combination of these data allows rapid and efficient surveillance of currently circulating isolates. These data might elucidate the future trends and considerations for vaccine formulation and design.

  8. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bordetella bronchiseptica Isolates from Swine and Companion Animals and Detection of Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüller, Sandra; Rensch, Ulrike; Meemken, Diana; Kaspar, Heike; Kopp, Peter A.; Klein, Günter; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica causes infections of the respiratory tract in swine and other mammals and is a precursor for secondary infections with Pasteurella multocida. Treatment of B. bronchiseptica infections is conducted primarily with antimicrobial agents. Therefore it is essential to get an overview of the susceptibility status of these bacteria. The aim of this study was to comparatively analyse broth microdilution susceptibility testing according to CLSI recommendations with an incubation time of 16 to 20 hours and a longer incubation time of 24 hours, as recently proposed to obtain more homogenous MICs. Susceptibility testing against a panel of 22 antimicrobial agents and two fixed combinations was performed with 107 porcine isolates from different farms and regions in Germany and 43 isolates obtained from companion animals in Germany and other European countries. Isolates with increased MICs were investigated by PCR assays for the presence of resistance genes. For ampicillin, all 107 porcine isolates were classified as resistant, whereas only a single isolate was resistant to florfenicol. All isolates obtained from companion animals showed elevated MICs for β-lactam antibiotics and demonstrated an overall low susceptibility to cephalosporines. Extension of the incubation time resulted in 1–2 dilution steps higher MIC50 values of porcine isolates for seven antimicrobial agents tested, while isolates from companion animals exhibited twofold higher MIC50/90 values only for tetracycline and cefotaxime. For three antimicrobial agents, lower MIC50 and MIC90 values were detected for both, porcine and companion animal isolates. Among the 150 isolates tested, the resistance genes blaBOR-1 (n = 147), blaOXA-2, (n = 4), strA and strB (n = 17), sul1 (n = 10), sul2 (n = 73), dfrA7 (n = 3) and tet(A) (n = 8) were detected and a plasmid localisation was identified for several of the resistance genes. PMID:26275219

  9. Identifying the age cohort responsible for transmission in a natural outbreak of Bordetella bronchiseptica.

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    Gráinne H Long

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the major routes of disease transmission and reservoirs of infection are needed to increase our understanding of disease dynamics and improve disease control. Despite this, transmission events are rarely observed directly. Here we had the unique opportunity to study natural transmission of Bordetella bronchiseptica--a directly transmitted respiratory pathogen with a wide mammalian host range, including sporadic infection of humans--within a commercial rabbitry to evaluate the relative effects of sex and age on the transmission dynamics therein. We did this by developing an a priori set of hypotheses outlining how natural B. bronchiseptica infections may be transmitted between rabbits. We discriminated between these hypotheses by using force-of-infection estimates coupled with random effects binomial regression analysis of B. bronchiseptica age-prevalence data from within our rabbit population. Force-of-infection analysis allowed us to quantify the apparent prevalence of B. bronchiseptica while correcting for age structure. To determine whether transmission is largely within social groups (in this case litter, or from an external group, we used random-effect binomial regression to evaluate the importance of social mixing in disease spread. Between these two approaches our results support young weanlings--as opposed to, for example, breeder or maternal cohorts--as the age cohort primarily responsible for B. bronchiseptica transmission. Thus age-prevalence data, which is relatively easy to gather in clinical or agricultural settings, can be used to evaluate contact patterns and infer the likely age-cohort responsible for transmission of directly transmitted infections. These insights shed light on the dynamics of disease spread and allow an assessment to be made of the best methods for effective long-term disease control.

  10. Detection of respiratory viruses and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B S; Kurz, S; Weber, K; Balzer, H-J; Hartmann, K

    2014-09-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) is an acute, highly contagious disease complex caused by a variety of infectious agents. At present, the role of viral and bacterial components as primary or secondary pathogens in CIRD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine influenza virus (CIV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine herpes virus-1 (CHV-1), canine distemper virus (CDV) and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with CIRD and to compare the data with findings in healthy dogs. Sixty-one dogs with CIRD and 90 clinically healthy dogs from Southern Germany were prospectively enrolled in this study. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from all dogs and were analysed for CPIV, CAV-2, CIV, CRCoV, CHV-1, CDV, and B. bronchiseptica by real-time PCR. In dogs with acute respiratory signs, 37.7% tested positive for CPIV, 9.8% for CRCoV and 78.7% for B. bronchiseptica. Co-infections with more than one agent were detected in 47.9% of B. bronchiseptica-positive, 82.6% of CPIV-positive, and 100% of CRCoV-positive dogs. In clinically healthy dogs, 1.1% tested positive for CAV-2, 7.8% for CPIV and 45.6% for B. bronchiseptica. CPIV and B. bronchiseptica were detected significantly more often in dogs with CIRD than in clinically healthy dogs (P infectious agents in dogs with CIRD in Southern Germany. Mixed infections with several pathogens were common. In conclusion, clinically healthy dogs can carry respiratory pathogens and could act as sources of infection for susceptible dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Protective Role of Passively Transferred Maternal Cytokines against Bordetella pertussis Infection in Newborn Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Shokrollah; Thompson, David R; Van Kessel, Jill; Babiuk, Lorne A; Gerdts, Volker

    2017-04-01

    Maternal vaccination represents a potential strategy to protect both the mother and the offspring against life-threatening infections. This protective role has mainly been associated with antibodies, but the role of cell-mediated immunity, in particular passively transferred cytokines, is not well understood. Here, using a pertussis model, we have demonstrated that immunization of pregnant sows with heat-inactivated bacteria leads to induction of a wide range of cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], gamma interferon [IFN-γ], interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-8, and IL-12/IL-23p40) in addition to pertussis-specific antibodies. These cytokines can be detected in the sera and colostrum/milk of vaccinated sows and subsequently were detected at significant levels in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of piglets born to vaccinated sows together with pertussis-specific antibodies. In contrast, active vaccination of newborn piglets with heat-inactivated bacteria induced high levels of specific IgG and IgA but no cytokines. Although the levels of antibodies in vaccinated piglets were comparable to those of passively transferred antibodies, no protection against Bordetella pertussis infection was observed. Thus, our results demonstrate that a combination of passively transferred cytokines and antibodies is crucial for disease protection. The presence of passively transferred cytokines/antibodies influences the cytokine secretion ability of splenocytes in the neonate, which provides novel evidence that maternal immunization can influence the newborn's cytokine milieu and may impact immune cell differentiation (e.g., Th1/Th2 phenotype). Therefore, these maternally derived cytokines may play an essential role both as mediators of early defense against infections and possibly as modulators of the immune repertoire of the offspring. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Molecular epidemiology of Bordetella pertussis in the Philippines in 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galit, Salvacion Rosario L; Otsuka, Nao; Furuse, Yuki; Almonia, Daryl Joy V; Sombrero, Lydia T; Capeding, Rosario Z; Lupisan, Socorro P; Saito, Mariko; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Hiramatsu, Yukihiro; Shibayama, Keigo; Kamachi, Kazunari

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to determine the genotypes of circulating Bordetella pertussis in the Philippines by direct molecular typing of clinical specimens. Nasopharyngeal swabs (NPSs) were collected from 50 children hospitalized with pertussis in three hospitals during 2012-2014. Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was performed on the DNA extracts from NPSs. B. pertussis virulence-associated allelic genes (ptxA, prn, and fim3) and the pertussis toxin promoter, ptxP, were also investigated by DNA sequence-based typing. Twenty-six DNA extracts yielded a complete MLVA profile, which were sorted into 10 MLVA types. MLVA type 34 (MT34), which is rare in Australia, Europe, Japan, and the USA, was the predominant strain (50%). Seven MTs (MT29, MT32, MT33, and MT283-286, total 42%) were single-locus variants of MT34, while two (MT141 and MT287, total 8%) were double-locus variants of MT34. All MTs had the combination of virulence-associated allelic genes, ptxP1-ptxA1-prn1-fim3A. The B. pertussis population in the Philippines comprises genetically related strains. These strains are markedly different from those found in patients from other countries where acellular pertussis vaccines are used. The differences in vaccine types between these other countries and the Philippines, where the whole-cell vaccine is still used, may select for distinct populations of B. pertussis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of PCR, Culture, and Direct Fluorescent-Antibody Testing for Detection of Bordetella pertussis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffelholz, Mike J.; Thompson, Curt J.; Long, Karla S.; Gilchrist, Mary J. R.

    1999-01-01

    We prospectively compared the performance of culture, direct fluorescent-antibody testing (DFA), and an in-house-developed PCR test targeting the repeated insertion sequence IS481 for the detection of Bordetella pertussis in nasopharyngeal swab specimens. We tested 319 consecutive paired specimens on which all three tests were performed. A total of 59 specimens were positive by one or more tests. Of these, 5 were positive by all three tests, 2 were positive by culture and PCR, 16 were positive by PCR and DFA, 28 were positive by PCR only, and 8 were positive by DFA only. Any specimen positive by culture was considered to be a true positive, as were specimens positive by both PCR and DFA. Specimens positive only by PCR or DFA were considered discrepant, and their status was resolved by review of patient histories. Patients with symptoms meeting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clinical case definition for pertussis and who had a specimen positive by PCR or DFA were considered to have true B. pertussis infections. Of the 28 patients positive by PCR only, 20 met the clinical case definition for pertussis, while 3 of the 8 patients positive by DFA only met the clinical case definition. After resolution of the status of discrepant specimens, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 15.2, 100, 100, and 87.5%, respectively, for culture; 93.5, 97.1, 84.3, and 98.9%, respectively, for PCR; and 52.2, 98.2, 82.8, and 92.4%, respectively, for DFA. The actual positive predictive value of PCR was probably greater, as several PCR-positive patients who did not meet the clinical case definition had symptoms consistent with typical or atypical pertussis. PCR is a sensitive and specific method for the detection of B. pertussis. PMID:10449467

  14. Prevalence and genetic characterization of pertactin-deficient Bordetella pertussis in Japan.

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    Nao Otsuka

    Full Text Available The adhesin pertactin (Prn is one of the major virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of whooping cough. However, a significant prevalence of Prn-deficient (Prn(- B. pertussis was observed in Japan. The Prn(- isolate was first discovered in 1997, and 33 (27% Prn(- isolates were identified among 121 B. pertussis isolates collected from 1990 to 2009. Sequence analysis revealed that all the Prn(- isolates harbor exclusively the vaccine-type prn1 allele and that loss of Prn expression is caused by 2 different mutations: an 84-bp deletion of the prn signal sequence (prn1ΔSS, n = 24 and an IS481 insertion in prn1 (prn1::IS481, n = 9. The frequency of Prn(- isolates, notably those harboring prn1ΔSS, significantly increased since the early 2000s, and Prn(- isolates were subsequently found nationwide. Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA revealed that 24 (73% of 33 Prn(- isolates belong to MLVA-186, and 6 and 3 Prn(- isolates belong to MLVA-194 and MLVA-226, respectively. The 3 MLVA types are phylogenetically closely related, suggesting that the 2 Prn(- clinical strains (harboring prn1ΔSS and prn1::IS481 have clonally expanded in Japan. Growth competition assays in vitro also demonstrated that Prn(- isolates have a higher growth potential than the Prn(+ back-mutants from which they were derived. Our observations suggested that human host factors (genetic factors and immune status that select for Prn(- strains have arisen and that Prn expression is not essential for fitness under these conditions.

  15. Direct molecular typing of Bordetella pertussis from nasopharyngeal specimens in China in 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Q; Wang, X; Liu, Y; Luan, Y; Zhang, J; Li, Y; Liu, X; Ma, C; Li, H; Wang, Z; He, Q

    2016-07-01

    Data on the molecular epidemiology of Bordetella pertussis are limited in developing countries where whole-cell pertussis vaccines (WCVs) have been used. The aim of this study was to determine the genotypes of circulating B. pertussis in China by direct molecular typing of clinical specimens. DNA extracts of 122 nasopharyngeal swabs (NPs) positive for B. pertussis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (targeting IS481 and ptx-Pr) from 2012 to 2013 were used for typing using the multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and also by PCR-based multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of B. pertussis virulence genes (ptxP, prn, and fim3). One hundred and eight DNA extracts (89 %) generated a complete MLVA type (MT). Among the 18 MTs obtained, MT55 (52 %) and MT104 (13 %) were the most common. MT27, which is linked to the ptxP3 allele and is prevalent in many developed countries using acellular pertussis vaccines (ACVs), was only found in 7 (6 %) DNA extracts. Eighty-seven DNA extracts (71 %) produced a complete multiantigen sequence typing (MAST) type. Of them, 77 (89 %) had the ptxP1/prn1/fim3-1 allele profile. Four DNA extracts (5 %) had the ptxP3/prn2/fim3-2 profile and 3 (4 %) had the ptxP3/prn1/fim3-2 allele profile. These seven DNA extracts also harbored MT27. Our result shows that B. pertussis circulating in China was different from those found in countries where ACVs have been in use, supporting the notion that selection pressure induced by WCVs and ACVs on the bacterial population differs.

  16. Multiplex PCR-based assay for detection of Bordetella pertussis in nasopharyngeal swab specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadowsky, R M; Michaels, R H; Libert, T; Kingsley, L A; Ehrlich, G D

    1996-11-01

    A multiplex PCR-based assay was developed for the detection of Bordetella pertussis in nasopharyngeal swab specimens. The assay simultaneously amplified two separate DNA targets (153 and 203 bp) within a B. pertussis repetitive element and a 438-bp target within the beta-actin gene of human DNA (PCR amplification control). PCR products were detected by a sensitive and specific liquid hybridization gel retardation assay. A total of 496 paired nasopharyngeal swab specimens were tested by both the PCR-based assay and culture. Although 30 (6%) of the specimens inhibited the amplification of the beta-actin target, in all 29 specimens studied, the inhibition disappeared on repeat testing or was easily overcome with a 1:8 dilution or less of specimen digest. Of the 495 specimen pairs yielding a final evaluable result by the PCR-based assay, 19.0% were positive by the PCR-based assay, whereas 13.9% were positive by culture (P < 0.0001). After resolving the PCR-positive, culture-negative results by testing an additional aliquot from these specimens by the multiplex PCR-based assay, the PCR-based assay had a sensitivity and specificity of 98.9 and 99.7%, respectively, compared with values of 73.4 and 100%, respectively, for culture. In comparison with patients with culture-confirmed pertussis, those with PCR-positive, culture-negative results were older and more likely to have had prolonged cough, immunization with pertussis vaccine, or treatment with erythromycin. This multiplex PCR-based assay is substantially more sensitive than culture and identifies specimens that contain inhibitors of PCR.

  17. Bordetella Pertussis virulence factors in the continuing evolution of whooping cough vaccines for improved performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorji, Dorji; Mooi, Frits; Yantorno, Osvaldo; Deora, Rajendar; Graham, Ross M; Mukkur, Trilochan K

    2018-02-01

    Despite high vaccine coverage, whooping cough caused by Bordetella pertussis remains one of the most common vaccine-preventable diseases worldwide. Introduction of whole-cell pertussis (wP) vaccines in the 1940s and acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines in 1990s reduced the mortality due to pertussis. Despite induction of both antibody and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses by aP and wP vaccines, there has been resurgence of pertussis in many countries in recent years. Possible reasons hypothesised for resurgence have ranged from incompliance with the recommended vaccination programmes with the currently used aP vaccine to infection with a resurged clinical isolates characterised by mutations in the virulence factors, resulting in antigenic divergence with vaccine strain, and increased production of pertussis toxin, resulting in dampening of immune responses. While use of these vaccines provide varying degrees of protection against whooping cough, protection against infection and transmission appears to be less effective, warranting continuation of efforts in the development of an improved pertussis vaccine formulations capable of achieving this objective. Major approaches currently under evaluation for the development of an improved pertussis vaccine include identification of novel biofilm-associated antigens for incorporation in current aP vaccine formulations, development of live attenuated vaccines and discovery of novel non-toxic adjuvants capable of inducing both antibody and CMI. In this review, the potential roles of different accredited virulence factors, including novel biofilm-associated antigens, of B. pertussis in the evolution, formulation and delivery of improved pertussis vaccines, with potential to block the transmission of whooping cough in the community, are discussed.

  18. Global Population Structure and Evolution of Bordetella pertussis and Their Relationship with Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Marieke J.; Harris, Simon R.; Advani, Abdolreza; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Bottero, Daniela; Bouchez, Valérie; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Chiang, Chuen-Sheue; Dalby, Tine; Fry, Norman K.; Gaillard, María Emilia; van Gent, Marjolein; Guiso, Nicole; Hallander, Hans O.; Harvill, Eric T.; He, Qiushui; van der Heide, Han G. J.; Heuvelman, Kees; Hozbor, Daniela F.; Kamachi, Kazunari; Karataev, Gennady I.; Lan, Ruiting; Lutyńska, Anna; Maharjan, Ram P.; Mertsola, Jussi; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Octavia, Sophie; Preston, Andrew; Quail, Michael A.; Sintchenko, Vitali; Stefanelli, Paola; Tondella, M. Lucia; Tsang, Raymond S. W.; Xu, Yinghua; Yao, Shu-Man; Zhang, Shumin; Mooi, Frits R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bordetella pertussis causes pertussis, a respiratory disease that is most severe for infants. Vaccination was introduced in the 1950s, and in recent years, a resurgence of disease was observed worldwide, with significant mortality in infants. Possible causes for this include the switch from whole-cell vaccines (WCVs) to less effective acellular vaccines (ACVs), waning immunity, and pathogen adaptation. Pathogen adaptation is suggested by antigenic divergence between vaccine strains and circulating strains and by the emergence of strains with increased pertussis toxin production. We applied comparative genomics to a worldwide collection of 343 B. pertussis strains isolated between 1920 and 2010. The global phylogeny showed two deep branches; the largest of these contained 98% of all strains, and its expansion correlated temporally with the first descriptions of pertussis outbreaks in Europe in the 16th century. We found little evidence of recent geographical clustering of the strains within this lineage, suggesting rapid strain flow between countries. We observed that changes in genes encoding proteins implicated in protective immunity that are included in ACVs occurred after the introduction of WCVs but before the switch to ACVs. Furthermore, our analyses consistently suggested that virulence-associated genes and genes coding for surface-exposed proteins were involved in adaptation. However, many of the putative adaptive loci identified have a physiological role, and further studies of these loci may reveal less obvious ways in which B. pertussis and the host interact. This work provides insight into ways in which pathogens may adapt to vaccination and suggests ways to improve pertussis vaccines. PMID:24757216

  19. SNP-based typing: a useful tool to study Bordetella pertussis populations.

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    Marjolein van Gent

    Full Text Available To monitor changes in Bordetella pertussis populations, mainly two typing methods are used; Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE and Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA. In this study, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP typing method, based on 87 SNPs, was developed and compared with PFGE and MLVA. The discriminatory indices of SNP typing, PFGE and MLVA were found to be 0.85, 0.95 and 0.83, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis, using SNP typing as Gold Standard, revealed false homoplasies in the PFGE and MLVA trees. Further, in contrast to the SNP-based tree, the PFGE- and MLVA-based trees did not reveal a positive correlation between root-to-tip distance and the isolation year of strains. Thus PFGE and MLVA do not allow an estimation of the relative age of the selected strains. In conclusion, SNP typing was found to be phylogenetically more informative than PFGE and more discriminative than MLVA. Further, in contrast to PFGE, it is readily standardized allowing interlaboratory comparisons. We applied SNP typing to study strains with a novel allele for the pertussis toxin promoter, ptxP3, which have a worldwide distribution and which have replaced the resident ptxP1 strains in the last 20 years. Previously, we showed that ptxP3 strains showed increased pertussis toxin expression and that their emergence was associated with increased notification in The Netherlands. SNP typing showed that the ptxP3 strains isolated in the Americas, Asia, Australia and Europe formed a monophyletic branch which recently diverged from ptxP1 strains. Two predominant ptxP3 SNP types were identified which spread worldwide. The widespread use of SNP typing will enhance our understanding of the evolution and global epidemiology of B. pertussis.

  20. Genomic content of Bordetella pertussis clinical isolates circulating in areas of intensive children vaccination.

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    Valérie Bouchez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of the study was to analyse the evolution of Bordetella pertussis population and the influence of herd immunity in different areas of the world where newborns and infants are highly vaccinated. METHODOLOGY: The analysis was performed using DNA microarray on 15 isolates, PCR on 111 isolates as well as GS-FLX sequencing technology on 3 isolates and the B. pertussis reference strain, Tohama I. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our analyses demonstrate that the current circulating isolates are continuing to lose genetic material as compared to isolates circulating during the pre-vaccine era whatever the area of the world considered. The lost genetic material does not seem to be important for virulence. Our study confirms that the use of whole cell vaccines has led to the control of isolates that were similar to vaccine strains. GS-FLX sequencing technology shows that current isolates did not acquire any additional material when compared with vaccine strains or with isolates of the pre-vaccine era and that the sequenced strain Tohama I is not representative of the isolates. Furthermore, this technology allowed us to observe that the number of Insertion Sequence elements contained in the genome of the isolates is temporally increasing or varying between isolates. CONCLUSIONS: B. pertussis adaptation to humans is still in progress by losing genetic material via Insertion Sequence elements. Furthermore, recent isolates did not acquire any additional material when compared with vaccine strains or with isolates of the pre-vaccine era. Herd immunity, following intensive vaccination of infants and children with whole cell vaccines, has controlled isolates similar to the vaccine strains without modifying significantly the virulence of the isolates. With the replacement of whole cell vaccines by subunit vaccines, containing only few bacterial antigens targeting the virulence of the bacterium, one could hypothesize the circulation of isolates

  1. Combinatorial effects of genistein and sex-steroids on the level of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), adenylate cyclase (AC) and cAMP in the cervix of ovariectomised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Naguib; Ismail, Nurain; Muniandy, Sekaran; Korla, Praveen Kumar; Giribabu, Nelli

    2015-12-01

    The combinatorial effects of genistein and estrogen (E) or estrogen plus progesterone (E+P) on CFTR, AC and cAMP levels in cervix were investigated. Ovariectomised adult female rats received 50 or 100mg/kg/day genistein with E or E followed by E+P [E+(E+P)] for seven consecutive days. Cervixes were harvested and analyzed for CFTR mRNA levels by Real-time PCR. Distribution of AC and CFTR proteins in endocervix were observed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of cAMP were measured by enzyme-immunoassay. Molecular docking predicted interaction between genistein and AC. Our results indicate that levels of CFTR, AC and cAMP in cervix of rats receiving genistein plus E were higher than E-only treatment (pcervix of E and E+(E+P)-treated rats by genistein could affect the cervical secretory function which could influence the female reproductive processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell envelope of Bordetella pertussis: immunological and biochemical analyses and characterization of a major outer membrane porin protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    Surface molecules of Bordetella pertussis which may be important in metabolism, pathogenesis, and immunity to whooping cough were examined using cell fractionation and 125 I cell surface labeling. Antigenic envelope proteins were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting procedures using monoclonal antibodies and convalescent sera. A surface protein with a high M/sub r/, missing in a mutant lacking the filamentous hemagglutinin, was identified in virulent Bordetella pertussis but was absent in virulent B. pertussis strains. At least three envelope proteins were found only in virulent B. pertussis strains and were absent or diminished in avirulent and most phenotypically modulated strains. Transposon-induced mutants unable to produce hemolysin, dermonecrotic toxin, pertussis toxin, and filamentous hemagglutinin also lacked these three envelope proteins, confirming that virulence-associated envelope proteins were genetically regulated with other virulence-associated traits. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed at least five heat modifiable proteins which migrated as higher or lower M/sub r/ moieties if solubilized at 25 0 C instead of 100 0 C

  3. Recombinant adenylate kinase 3 from liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis for histochemical analysis and serodiagnosis of clonorchiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soon Bin; Kim, Paul; Woo, Hae Sun; Kim, Tae Yun; Kim, Ju Yeong; Lee, Hye Min; Jang, Yun Soo; Kim, Eun-Min; Yong, Tai-Soon; Seong, Baik Lin

    2018-03-27

    Due to the lack of an effective prophylactic intervention and diagnosis, human liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis continues to afflict a large human population, causing a chronic inflammatory bile duct disease. With an aim to identify target antigens for sensitive serodiagnosis, adenylate kinase 3 of C. sinensis (CsAK3) was successfully expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli by fusion to an RNA-interacting domain derived from human Lys-tRNA synthetase and purified by Ni2+-affinity chromatography. Anti-CsAK3 serum was raised by immunization of mice, and Western blotting confirmed that CsAK3 was expressed in adult-stage C. sinensis. Histochemical analysis showed that CsAK3 was localized to the subtegumental tissue of C. sinensis and was excreted into the bile duct of the host. When tested against sera from various parasite-infected patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the recombinant CsAK3 elicited a specific response to C. sinensis-infected sera. The results suggest that CsAK3, either alone or in combination with other antigens, could be used for improving the clinical diagnosis of clonorchiasis.

  4. Adenylate kinase I does not affect cellular growth characteristics under normal and metabolic stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Wieke; Oerlemans, Frank; Wieringa, Bé

    2004-07-01

    Adenylate kinase (AK)-catalyzed phosphotransfer is essential in the maintenance of cellular energetic economy in cells of fully differentiated tissues with highly variable energy demand, such as muscle and brain. To investigate if AK isoenzymes have a comparable function in the energy-demand management of proliferating cells, AK1 and AK1beta were expressed in mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells and in human colon carcinoma SW480 cells. Glucose deprivation, galactose feeding, and metabolic inhibitor tests revealed a differential energy dependency for these two cell lines. N2a cells showed a faster proliferation rate and strongest coupling to mitochondrial activity, SW480 proliferation was more dependent on glycolysis. Despite these differences, ectopic expression of AK1 or AK1beta did not affect their growth characteristics under normal conditions. Also, no differential effects were seen under metabolic stress upon treatment with mitochondrial and glycolytic inhibitors in in vitro culture or in solid tumors grown in vivo. Although many intimate connections have been revealed between cell death and metabolism, our results suggest that AK1- or AK1beta-mediated high-energy phosphoryl transfer is not a modulating factor in the survival of tumor cells during episodes of metabolic crisis.

  5. [Effect of Qishen Yiqi droplet on adenylate contents in myocardium of cor pulmonale rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shi-Han; Shan, Qiu-Yue; Xu, Meng-Xi; Zhang, Yi-Dan; Song, Li-Li; Hou, Ning; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Mi-Xia; Zhuang, Peng-Wei; Zhang, Yan-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Cor pulmonale rat models were induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline(MCT), and the sham group received a single intraperitioneal injection of normal saline. After the model rats received intragastric administration of Qishen Yiqi droplet(QS) for 6 weeks, the contents of adenylate(ATP, ADP and AMP) in right myocardial tissues were measured by HPLC, and then the metabolism changes in myocardium of cor pulmonale rats with QS were investigated. The results showed that ATP, ADP, and AMP were well separated, with a good linearity within a certain range of concentration; and the recovery rates were within the range of 90%-108%. As compared with model group, the level of ATP was significantly elevated in high-dose treatment group; ADP contents showed an increasing trend and AMP contents showed a decreasing trend, indicating that QS could significantly improve energy metabolism system in myocardium. By using the HPLC, a qualitative and quantitative analysis method was given for the determination of ATP, ADP and AMP contents in myocardium, providing a method for energy metabolism measurement in biological samples. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  6. Deciphering hierarchical features in the energy landscape of adenylate kinase folding/unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. Nicholas; Pirchi, Menahem; Haran, Gilad; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2018-03-01

    Hierarchical features of the energy landscape of the folding/unfolding behavior of adenylate kinase, including its dependence on denaturant concentration, are elucidated in terms of single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurements in which the proteins are encapsulated in a lipid vesicle. The core in constructing the energy landscape from single-molecule time-series across different denaturant concentrations is the application of rate-distortion theory (RDT), which naturally considers the effects of measurement noise and sampling error, in combination with change-point detection and the quantification of the FRET efficiency-dependent photobleaching behavior. Energy landscapes are constructed as a function of observation time scale, revealing multiple partially folded conformations at small time scales that are situated in a superbasin. As the time scale increases, these denatured states merge into a single basin, demonstrating the coarse-graining of the energy landscape as observation time increases. Because the photobleaching time scale is dependent on the conformational state of the protein, possible nonequilibrium features are discussed, and a statistical test for violation of the detailed balance condition is developed based on the state sequences arising from the RDT framework.

  7. A comprehensive survey of 3' animal miRNA modification events and a possible role for 3' adenylation in modulating miRNA targeting effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, A Maxwell; Ando, Yoshinari; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Tomaru, Yasuhiro; Nishibu, Takahiro; Ukekawa, Ryo; Funakoshi, Taku; Kurokawa, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Daub, Carsten O

    2010-10-01

    Animal microRNA sequences are subject to 3' nucleotide addition. Through detailed analysis of deep-sequenced short RNA data sets, we show adenylation and uridylation of miRNA is globally present and conserved across Drosophila and vertebrates. To better understand 3' adenylation function, we deep-sequenced RNA after knockdown of nucleotidyltransferase enzymes. The PAPD4 nucleotidyltransferase adenylates a wide range of miRNA loci, but adenylation does not appear to affect miRNA stability on a genome-wide scale. Adenine addition appears to reduce effectiveness of miRNA targeting of mRNA transcripts while deep-sequencing of RNA bound to immunoprecipitated Argonaute (AGO) subfamily proteins EIF2C1-EIF2C3 revealed substantial reduction of adenine addition in miRNA associated with EIF2C2 and EIF2C3. Our findings show 3' addition events are widespread and conserved across animals, PAPD4 is a primary miRNA adenylating enzyme, and suggest a role for 3' adenine addition in modulating miRNA effectiveness, possibly through interfering with incorporation into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), a regulatory role that would complement the role of miRNA uridylation in blocking DICER1 uptake.

  8. A comprehensive survey of 3′ animal miRNA modification events and a possible role for 3′ adenylation in modulating miRNA targeting effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Ando, Yoshinari; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Tomaru, Yasuhiro; Nishibu, Takahiro; Ukekawa, Ryo; Funakoshi, Taku; Kurokawa, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Daub, Carsten O.

    2010-01-01

    Animal microRNA sequences are subject to 3′ nucleotide addition. Through detailed analysis of deep-sequenced short RNA data sets, we show adenylation and uridylation of miRNA is globally present and conserved across Drosophila and vertebrates. To better understand 3′ adenylation function, we deep-sequenced RNA after knockdown of nucleotidyltransferase enzymes. The PAPD4 nucleotidyltransferase adenylates a wide range of miRNA loci, but adenylation does not appear to affect miRNA stability on a genome-wide scale. Adenine addition appears to reduce effectiveness of miRNA targeting of mRNA transcripts while deep-sequencing of RNA bound to immunoprecipitated Argonaute (AGO) subfamily proteins EIF2C1–EIF2C3 revealed substantial reduction of adenine addition in miRNA associated with EIF2C2 and EIF2C3. Our findings show 3′ addition events are widespread and conserved across animals, PAPD4 is a primary miRNA adenylating enzyme, and suggest a role for 3′ adenine addition in modulating miRNA effectiveness, possibly through interfering with incorporation into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), a regulatory role that would complement the role of miRNA uridylation in blocking DICER1 uptake. PMID:20719920

  9. cAMP Signaling Compartmentation: Adenylyl Cyclases as Anchors of Dynamic Signaling Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Timothy B; Agarwal, Shailesh R; Harvey, Robert D; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2018-04-01

    It is widely accepted that cAMP signaling is compartmentalized within cells. However, our knowledge of how receptors, cAMP signaling enzymes, effectors, and other key proteins form specific signaling complexes to regulate specific cell responses is limited. The multicomponent nature of these systems and the spatiotemporal dynamics involved as proteins interact and move within a cell make cAMP responses highly complex. Adenylyl cyclases, the enzymatic source of cAMP production, are key starting points for understanding cAMP compartments and defining the functional signaling complexes. Three basic elements are required to form a signaling compartment. First, a localized signal is generated by a G protein-coupled receptor paired to one or more of the nine different transmembrane adenylyl cyclase isoforms that generate the cAMP signal in the cytosol. The diffusion of cAMP is subsequently limited by several factors, including expression of any number of phosphodiesterases (of which there are 24 genes plus spice variants). Finally, signal response elements are differentially localized to respond to cAMP produced within each locale. A-kinase-anchoring proteins, of which there are 43 different isoforms, facilitate this by targeting protein kinase A to specific substrates. Thousands of potential combinations of these three elements are possible in any given cell type, making the characterization of cAMP signaling compartments daunting. This review will focus on what is known about how cells organize cAMP signaling components as well as identify the unknowns. We make an argument for adenylyl cyclases being central to the formation and maintenance of these signaling complexes. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S. (Biosciences Division); (Univ. of Nevada); (Alliance Protein Labs.)

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  11. [Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of pertactin recombinants against Bordetella bronchiseptica challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhanqin; Wang, Chen; Xue, Yun; Ding, Ke; Zhang, Chunjie; Cheng, Xiangchao; Li, Yinju; Liu, Yichen; Wu, Tingcai

    2010-09-01

    In this study we showed the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of five pertactin recombinants against Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb) challenge. The complete coding sequence (2040 bp) of the prn gene (PRN) and its fragments,5'-terminal 1173 bp fragment (PN),3'-terminal 867 bp fragment (PC), two copies of region I (654 bp; PR I) in PN, and 2 copies of region II (678 bp; PR II) in PC, were separately cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-KG, and expressed in the Eschierichia coli BL21 (DE3) using induction by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside. The recombinant proteins were named GST-PRN, GST-PN, GST-PC, GST-2PR I and GST-2PR II. All five recombinant proteins showed immunological reactivity in the Western-blot analysis. Mice, immunized subcutaneously with two doses of the purified proteins mixed with an equal volume of Freund's adjuvant,produced robust PRN-specific IgG antibody levels. When challenged, 6 of 9 mice in GST-2PR I group and all 9 mice in the other groups survived intranasal challenge with three times the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of virulent Bb HH0809. After challenge with 10 LD50 7/9,3/9,6/9,1/10 and 6/10 of the mice survived. Furthermore, complete protection against intraperitoneal (i.p.) challenge with 10 LD50 of HH0809 was observed in mice that were injected i.p. with 0.5 ml rabbit anti-GST-PRN, GST-PN,GST-PC or GST-2PR II serum. Only 1 of 10 mice survived in the group of mice that received anti-GST-2PR I, and no survivors were noted in the group of mice that received PRN-absorbed rabbit antiserum (0/5). In this study,we showed that all of five pertactin recombinants had differential immunogenicity and protective efficacy against Bb challenge. Mice immunized with GST-PC had better survival against fatal Bb challenge than did those immunized with GST-PN. In addition, GST-2PR II and GST-2PR I provided the similar results These data may have implications for the development of safe and efficacious subunit vaccines for the prevention of

  12. Comparative gene expression profiling in two congenic mouse strains following Bordetella pertussis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demant Peter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Susceptibility to Bordetella pertussis infection varies widely. These differences can partly be explained by genetic host factors. HcB-28 mice are more resistant to B. pertussis infection than C3H mice, which could partially be ascribed to the B. pertussis susceptibility locus-1 (Bps1 on chromosome 12. The presence of C57BL/10 genome on this locus instead of C3H genome resulted in a decreased number of bacteria in the lung. To further elucidate the role of host genetic factors, in particular in the Bps1 locus, in B. pertussis infection, and to identify candidate genes within in this region, we compared expression profiles in the lungs of the C3H and HcB-28 mouse strains following B. pertussis inoculation. Twelve and a half percent of the genomes of these mice are from a different genetic background. Results Upon B. pertussis inoculation 2,353 genes were differentially expressed in the lungs of both mouse strains. Two hundred and six genes were differentially expressed between the two mouse strains, but, remarkably, none of these were up- or down-regulated upon B. pertussis infection. Of these 206 genes, 17 were located in the Bps1 region. Eight of these genes, which showed a strong difference in gene expression between the two mouse strains, map to the immunoglobulin heavy chain complex (Igh. Conclusion Gene expression changes upon B. pertussis infection are highly identical between the two mouse strains despite the differences in the course of B. pertussis infection. Because the genes that were differentially regulated between the mouse strains only showed differences in expression before infection, it appears likely that such intrinsic differences in gene regulation are involved in determining differences in susceptibility to B. pertussis infection. Alternatively, such genetic differences in susceptibility may be explained by genes that are not differentially regulated between these two mouse strains. Genes in the Igh

  13. Analysis of Bordetella pertussis pertactin and pertussis toxin types from Queensland, Australia, 1999–2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slack Andrew T

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Australia two acellular Bordetella pertussis vaccines have replaced the use of a whole cell vaccine. Both of the licensed acellular vaccines contain the following three components; pertussis toxoid, pertussis filamentous haemagglutinin and the 69 kDa pertactin adhesin. One vaccine also contains pertussis fimbriae 2 and 3. Various researchers have postulated that herd immunity due to high levels of pertussis vaccination might be influencing the makeup of endemic B. pertussis populations by selective pressure for strains possessing variants of these genes, in particular the pertactin gene type. Some publications have suggested that B. pertussis variants may be contributing to a reduced efficacy of the existing vaccines and a concomitant re-emergence of pertussis within vaccinated populations. This study was conducted to survey the pertactin and pertussis toxin subunit 1 types from B. pertussis isolates in Queensland, Australia following the introduction of acellular vaccines. Methods Forty-six B. pertussis isolates recovered from Queensland patients between 1999 and 2003 were examined by both DNA sequencing and LightCycler™ real time PCR to determine their pertactin and pertussis toxin subunit 1 genotypes. Results Pertactin typing showed that 38 isolates possessed the prn1 allele, 3 possessed the prn2 allele and 5 possessed the prn3 allele. All forty-six isolates possessed the pertussis toxin ptxS1A genotype. Amongst the circulating B. pertussis population in Queensland, 82.5% of the recovered clinical isolates therefore possessed the prn1/ptxS1A genotype. Conclusion The results of this study compared to historical research on Queensland isolates suggest that B. pertussis pertactin and pertussis toxin variants are not becoming more prevalent in Queensland since the introduction of the acellular vaccines. Current prevalences of pertactin variants are significantly different to that described in a number of other countries

  14. 31P NMR Spectroscopy Revealed Adenylate kinase-like Activity and Phosphotransferase-like Activity from F1-ATPase of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Won

    2011-01-01

    Adenylate kinase-like activity and phosphotransferase-like activity from F 1 -ATPase of Escherichia coli was revealed by 31 P NMR spectroscopy. Incubation of F 1 -ATPase with ADP in the presence of Mg 2+ shows the appearance of 31 P resonances from AMP and Pi, suggesting generation of AMP and ATP by adenylate kinase-like activity and the subsequent hydrolysis to Pi. Incubation of F1-ATPase with ADP in the presence of methanol shows additional peak from methyl phosphate, suggesting phosphotransferase-like activity of F 1 -ATPase. Both adenylate kinase-like activity and phosphotransferase-like activity has not been reported from F 1 -ATPase of Escherichia coli. 31 P NMR could be a valuable tool for the investigation of phosphorous related enzyme

  15. Phosphorolytic activity of Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase towards its cognate aminoacyl adenylate detected by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Led, Jens Jørgen; Switon, Werner K.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1983-01-01

    , and Mg2+ ions, catalyzes the synthesis of ADP from three different substrates which all lead to enzyme-bound glycyl adenylate, that is, ATP, adenosine 5'-[ß,¿-methylene]triphosphate and Ap4A. It was furthermore demonstrated that the only pathway by which a synthetase-catalyzed degradation of Ap4A can...... of adenosine(5')tetraphospho(5')adenosine (Ap4A) and adenosine(5')triphospho(5')adenosine (Ap3A), also catalyzes the formation of ADP from inorganic phosphate and the enzyme-bound glycyl adenylate. Accordingly it was shown that E. coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase, in the presence of inorganic phosphate, glycine...... of the applied enzyme, the study also showed that the preparation catalyzes a glycine-independent transfer of the ¿-phosphate group from ATP to nucleoside 5'-diphosphates. The importance of the observed reaction between inorganic phosphate and enzyme-bound aminoacyl adenylate in relation to the remaining...

  16. Balance between Coiled-Coil Stability and Dynamics Regulates Activity of BvgS Sensor Kinase in Bordetella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesne, E; Krammer, E-M; Dupre, E; Locht, C; Lensink, M F; Antoine, R; Jacob-Dubuisson, F

    2016-03-01

    The two-component system BvgAS controls the expression of the virulence regulon of Bordetella pertussis. BvgS is a prototype of bacterial sensor kinases with extracytoplasmic Venus flytrap perception domains. Following its transmembrane segment, BvgS harbors a cytoplasmic Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain and then a predicted 2-helix coiled coil that precede the dimerization-histidine-phosphotransfer domain of the kinase. BvgS homologs have a similar domain organization, or they harbor only a predicted coiled coil between the transmembrane and the dimerization-histidine-phosphotransfer domains. Here, we show that the 2-helix coiled coil of BvgS regulates the enzymatic activity in a mechanical manner. Its marginally stable hydrophobic interface enables a switch between a state of great rotational dynamics in the kinase mode and a more rigid conformation in the phosphatase mode in response to signal perception by the periplasmic domains. We further show that the activity of BvgS is controlled in the same manner if its PAS domain is replaced with the natural α-helical sequences of PAS-less homologs. Clamshell motions of the Venus flytrap domains trigger the shift of the coiled coil's dynamics. Thus, we have uncovered a general mechanism of regulation for the BvgS family of Venus flytrap-containing two-component sensor kinases. The two-component system BvgAS of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis regulates the virulence factors necessary for infection in a coordinated manner. BvgS is the prototype of a family of sensor kinase proteins found in major bacterial pathogens. When BvgS functions as a kinase, B. pertussis is virulent, and the bacterium shifts to an avirulent phase after BvgS senses chemicals that make it switch to phosphatase. Our goal is to decipher the signaling mechanisms of BvgS in order to understand virulence regulation in Bordetella, which may lead to new antimicrobial treatments targeting those two-component systems. We discovered that the

  17. Kinetic and structural characterization of bacterial glutaminyl cyclases from Zymomonas mobilis and Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, David Ruiz; Parthier, Christoph; Jänckel, Nadine; Grandke, Julia; Stelter, Marco; Schilling, Stephan; Boehme, Mathias; Neumann, Piotr; Wolf, Raik; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Stubbs, Milton T; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich

    2010-12-01

    Although enzymes responsible for the cyclization of amino-terminal glutamine residues are present in both plant and mammal species, none have yet been characterized in bacteria. Based on low sequence homologies to plant glutaminyl cyclases (QCs), we cloned the coding sequences of putative microbial QCs from Zymomonas mobilis (ZmQC) and Myxococcus xanthus (MxQC). The two recombinant enzymes exhibited distinct QC activity, with specificity constants k(cat)/K(m) of 1.47±0.33 mm⁻¹ s⁻¹ (ZmQC) and 142±32.7 mm⁻¹ s⁻¹ (MxQC) towards the fluorescent substrate glutamine-7-amino-4-methyl-coumarine. The measured pH-rate profile of the second order rate constant displayed an interesting deviation towards the acidic limb of the pH chart in the case of ZmQC, whereas MxQC showed maximum activity in the mild alkaline pH range. Analysis of the enzyme variants ZmQCGlu⁴⁶Gln and MxQCGln⁴⁶Glu show that the exchanged residues play a significant role in the pH behaviour of the respective enzymes. In addition, we determined the three dimensional crystal structures of both enzymes. The tertiary structure is defined by a five-bladed β-propeller anchored by a core cation. The structures corroborate the putative location of the active site and confirm the proposed relation between bacterial and plant glutaminyl cyclases.

  18. Detection of Bordetella pertussis from Clinical Samples by Culture and End-Point PCR in Malaysian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Tan Xue; Hashim, Rohaidah; Ahmad, Norazah; Abdullah, Khairul Hafizi

    2013-01-01

    Pertussis or whooping cough is a highly infectious respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. In vaccinating countries, infants, adolescents, and adults are relevant patients groups. A total of 707 clinical specimens were received from major hospitals in Malaysia in year 2011. These specimens were cultured on Regan-Lowe charcoal agar and subjected to end-point PCR, which amplified the repetitive insertion sequence IS481 and pertussis toxin promoter gene. Out of these specimens, 275 were positive: 4 by culture only, 6 by both end-point PCR and culture, and 265 by end-point PCR only. The majority of the positive cases were from ≤3 months old patients (77.1%) (P 0.05). Our study showed that the end-point PCR technique was able to pick up more positive cases compared to culture method.

  19. Biodegradation of alpha and beta endosulfan in broth medium and soil microcosm by bacterial strain Bordetella sp. B9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Supriya; Singh, Dileep K

    2009-04-01

    Bacterial strains were isolated from endosulfan treated soil to study the microbial degradation of this pesticide in broth medium and soil microcosm. The isolates were grown in minimal medium and screened for endosulfan degradation. The strain, which utilized endosulfan and showed maximum growth, was selected for detail studies. Maximum degrading capability in shake flask culture was shown by Bordetella sp. B9 which degraded 80% of alpha endosulfan and 86% of beta endosulfan in 18 days. Soil microcosm study was also carried out using this strain in six different treatments. Endosulfan ether and endosulfan lactone were the main metabolites in broth culture, while in soil microcosm endosulfan sulfate was also found along with endosulfan ether and endosulfan lactone. This bacterial strain has a potential to be used for bioremediation of the contaminated sites.

  20. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Izac

    Full Text Available It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium's growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports.

  1. Immunization with the Recombinant Cholera Toxin B Fused to Fimbria 2 Protein Protects against Bordetella pertussis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Olivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the immunogenic properties of the fusion protein fimbria 2 of Bordetella pertussis (Fim2—cholera toxin B subunit (CTB in the intranasal murine model of infection. To this end B. pertussis Fim2 coding sequence was cloned downstream of the cholera toxin B subunit coding sequence. The expression and assembly of the fusion protein into pentameric structures (CTB-Fim2 were evaluated by SDS-PAGE and monosialotetrahexosylgaglioside (GM1-ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. To evaluate the protective capacity of CTB-Fim2, an intraperitoneal or intranasal mouse immunization schedule was performed with 50 μg of CTB-Fim2. Recombinant (rFim2 or purified (BpFim2 Fim2, CTB, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS were used as controls. The results showed that mice immunized with BpFim2 or CTB-Fim2 intraperitoneally or intranasally presented a significant reduction in bacterial lung counts compared to control groups (P<0.01 or P<0.001, resp.. Moreover, intranasal immunization with CTB-Fim2 induced significant levels of Fim2-specific IgG in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and Fim2-specific IgA in BAL. Analysis of IgG isotypes and cytokines mRNA levels showed that CTB-Fim2 results in a mixed Th1/Th2 (T-helper response. The data presented here provide support for CTB-Fim2 as a promising recombinant antigen against Bordetella pertussis infection.

  2. Bordetella pertussis diagnosis in children under five years of age in the Regional Hospital of Cajamarca, Northern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Casabona-Oré, Veronica; Petrozzi-Helasvuo, Veronica; Cornejo-Tapia, Angela; Weilg, Pablo; Pons, Maria J; Cieza-Mora, Erico; Bazán-Mayra, Jorge; Cornejo-Pacherres, Hernan; Ruiz, Joaquin

    2015-11-30

    Bordetella pertussis is an important human pathogen that causes whooping cough (pertussis), an endemic illness responsible of significant morbidity and mortality, especially in infants and children. Worldwide, there are an estimated of 16 million cases of pertussis, resulting in about 195,000 child deaths per year. In Peru, pertussis is a major health problem that has been on the increase despite immunization efforts. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of B. pertussis among children under five years of age suspected to have whopping cough in Cajamarca, Peru. Children diagnosed with whooping cough admitted to the Hospital Regional de Cajamarca from August 2010 to July 2013 were included. Nasopharyngeal samples were obtained for B. pertussis culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection. In 133 children, the pertussis toxin and IS481 gene were detected in 38.35% (51/133) of the cases by PCR, while only 9.02% (12/133) of the Bordetella cultures were positive. The most frequent symptoms in patients with positive B. pertussis were paroxysm of coughing 68.63% (35/51), cyanosis 56.86% (29/51), respiratory distress 43.14% (22/51), and fever 39.22% (20/51). Pneumonia and acute bronchial obstructive syndrome were present in 17.65% (9/51) and 13.72% (7/51) of the cases, respectively. B. pertussis is responsible for an important proportion of whooping cough in hospitalized children in Cajamarca. Epidemiologic surveillance programs for B. pertussis are essential in Peru, especially in children who could most benefit from the vaccine.

  3. Characterisation of the ArmA adenylation domain implies a more diverse secondary metabolism in the genus Armillaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiek, Mathias; Braesel, Jana; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    The armA-gene, encoding a tridomain enzyme reminiscent of nonribosomal peptide synthetases, was identified in the genome of the basidiomycete Armillaria mellea. Heterologously expressed enzyme and the ATP-pyrophosphate exchange assay were used for the in vitro biochemical characterisation of the ArmA adenylation domain. l-leucine was the preferred substrate, while l-threonine, l-valine, l-alanine, and l-isoleucine were turned over at lower rates (83 %, 62 %, 56 %, and 44 %, respectively). Other proteinogenic amino acids, 2-oxo acids, and benzoic acid derivatives were not accepted. As the substrate range of ArmA is incompatible with the secondary metabolites known from the genus Armillaria, our results imply greater natural product diversity in this genus. This is the first biochemical characterisation of a basidiomycete amino acid-adenylating domain, and our results may help refine computer algorithms to predict substrate specificities for basidiomycete nonribosomal peptide synthetases whose genes are discovered through genome sequencing. Copyright © 2011 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dependence of electrical activity and calcium influx-controlled prolactin release on adenylyl cyclase signaling pathway in pituitary lactotrophs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gonzalez-Iglesias, A. E.; Jiang, Y.; Tomič, M.; Kretschmannová, K.; Andric, S. A.; Zemková, Hana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 9 (2006), s. 2231-2246 ISSN 0888-8809 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : adenylyl cyclase * intracellular calcium concentration * lactotrophs Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.967, year: 2006

  5. Role of the bicarbonate-responsive soluble adenylyl cyclase in pH sensing and metabolic regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Jung-Chin; Oude-Elferink, Ronald P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, adcy10) was recently identified as a unique source of cAMP in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Its activity is regulated by bicarbonate and fine tuned by calcium. As such, and in conjunction with carbonic an hydrase ( CA), sAC constitutes an

  6. [Serological evaluation of Bordetella pertussis infection in adults with prolonged cough].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Cemile; Çöplü, Nilay; Gözalan, Ayşegül; Yılmaz, Ülkü; Bilekli, Selen; Demirci, Nilgün Yılmaz; Biber, Çiğdem; Erdoğan, Yurdanur; Esen, Berrin; Çöplü, Lütfi

    2016-07-01

    Pertussis is a vaccine-preventable disease that is transmitted from infected to susceptible individuals by respiratory route. Bordetella pertussis infection may occur at any age as neither vaccine nor natural infection induced immunity lasts life-long. This study was planned to demonstrate the serological evidence of infection among adults, to raise awareness among clinicians and to provide data for the development of strategies to protect vulnerable infants. A total of 538 patients (345 female, 193 male) ages between 18-87 years who had a complain of prolonged cough for more than two weeks were included in the study. Anti-pertussis toxin (PT) IgG and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin (FH) IgG levels from single serum samples were measured by an in-house ELISA test which was standardized and shown to be efficient previously. Anti-PT IgG antibody levels of ≥ 100 EU/ml were considered as acute/recent infection with B.pertussis. In our study, 9.7% (52/538) of the patients had high levels of anti-PT IgG (≥ 100 EU/ml) and among those patients 43 (43/52; 82.7%) also had high (≥ 100 EU/ml) anti-FHA IgG levels. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of age, gender, education level, DPT (diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus) vaccination history, smoking history or average daily cigarette consumption (p> 0.05) between the cases with high antibody levels (n= 52). When the symptoms and the presence of cases with high antibody levels were evaluated, it was detected that no one parameter was significantly different from others, except that 24.1% of the cases with inspiratory whooping had high anti-PT levels. There was also no statistically significant difference between high anti-PT levels ≥ 100 EU/ml and the patients with risk factors [smoking (21/200; 10.5%), presence of disease that cause chronic cough and/or drug usage (19/171; %11.1), and whole factors which cause chronic cough (32/306; %10.5)] and without risk factors (p= 0.581; p= 0.357; p= 0

  7. Comparative analysis of oligonucleotide primers for high-throughput screening of genes encoding adenylation domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in actinomycetes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bakal, Tomáš; Goo, K.-S.; Najmanová, Lucie; Plháčková, Kamila; Kadlčík, Stanislav; Ulanová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 5 (2015), s. 1267-1274 ISSN 0003-6072 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Nonribosomal peptide synthetase * Adenylation domain * Actinomycetes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.944, year: 2015

  8. Crystal structures at 2.5 Angstrom resolution of seryl-tRNA synthetase complexed with two analogs of seryl adenylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belrhali, H.; Yaremchuk, A.; Tukalo, M.

    1994-01-01

    in the crystal from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and serine hydroxamate, and the second is with a synthetic analog of seryl adenylate (5'-O-[N-(L-seryl)-sulfamoyl]adenosine), which is a strong inhibitor of the enzyme. Both molecules are bound in a similar fashion by a network of hydrogen bond interactions...

  9. Adenylyl Cyclase Signaling in the Developing Chick Heart: The Deranging Effect of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Hejnova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adenylyl cyclase (AC signaling system plays a crucial role in the regulation of cardiac contractility. Here we analyzed the key components of myocardial AC signaling in the developing chick embryo and assessed the impact of selected β-blocking agents on this system. Application of metoprolol and carvedilol, two commonly used β-blockers, at embryonic day (ED 8 significantly downregulated (by about 40% expression levels of AC5, the dominant cardiac AC isoform, and the amount of Gsα protein at ED9. Activity of AC stimulated by forskolin was also significantly reduced under these conditions. Interestingly, when administered at ED4, these drugs did not produce such profound changes in the myocardial AC signaling system, except for markedly increased expression of Giα protein. These data indicate that β-blocking agents can strongly derange AC signaling during the first half of embryonic heart development.

  10. Moonlighting kinases with guanylate cyclase activity can tune regulatory signal networks

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2012-02-01

    Guanylate cyclase (GC) catalyzes the formation of cGMP and it is only recently that such enzymes have been characterized in plants. One family of plant GCs contains the GC catalytic center encapsulated within the intracellular kinase domain of leucine rich repeat receptor like kinases such as the phytosulfokine and brassinosteroid receptors. In vitro studies show that both the kinase and GC domain have catalytic activity indicating that these kinase-GCs are examples of moonlighting proteins with dual catalytic function. The natural ligands for both receptors increase intracellular cGMP levels in isolated mesophyll protoplast assays suggesting that the GC activity is functionally relevant. cGMP production may have an autoregulatory role on receptor kinase activity and/or contribute to downstream cell expansion responses. We postulate that the receptors are members of a novel class of receptor kinases that contain functional moonlighting GC domains essential for complex signaling roles.

  11. Endothelial CD99 signals through soluble adenylyl cyclase and PKA to regulate leukocyte transendothelial migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Richard L.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.; Winger, Ryan C.; Wang, Jing; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    CD99 is a critical regulator of leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM). How CD99 signals during this process remains unknown. We show that during TEM, endothelial cell (EC) CD99 activates protein kinase A (PKA) via a signaling complex formed with the lysine-rich juxtamembrane cytoplasmic tail of CD99, the A-kinase anchoring protein ezrin, and soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). PKA then stimulates membrane trafficking from the lateral border recycling compartment to sites of TEM, facilitating the passage of leukocytes across the endothelium. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of EC sAC or PKA, like CD99 blockade, arrests neutrophils and monocytes partway through EC junctions, in vitro and in vivo, without affecting leukocyte adhesion or the expression of relevant cellular adhesion molecules. This is the first description of the CD99 signaling pathway in TEM as well as the first demonstration of a role for sAC in leukocyte TEM. PMID:26101266

  12. Multiple diguanylate cyclase-coordinated regulation of pyoverdine synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yicai; Yuan, Mingjun; Mohanty, Anee

    2015-01-01

    intrinsic feature of c-di-GMP signalling is the abundance of DGCs and PDEs encoded by many bacterial species. It is unclear whether the different DGCs or PDEs coordinately establish the c-di-GMP regulation or function independently of each other. Here, we provide evidence that multiple DGCs are involved......The nucleotide signalling molecule bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays an essential role in regulating microbial virulence and biofilm formation. C-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes and degraded by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes. One...... in regulation of c-di-GMP on synthesis of the major iron siderophore pyoverdine in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Constitutive expression of the WspG or YedQ DGC in P.aeruginosa is able to induce its pyoverdine synthesis. Induction of pyoverdine synthesis by high intracellular c-di-GMP depends on the synthesis...

  13. pH sensing via bicarbonate-regulated ‘soluble’ adenylyl cyclase (sAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawreen eRahman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC is a source of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP. sAC is directly regulated by bicarbonate (HCO3- ions. In living cells, HCO3- ions are in nearly instantaneous equilibrium with carbon dioxide (CO2 and pH due to the ubiquitous presence of carbonic anhydrases. Numerous biological processes are regulated by CO2, HCO3-, and/or pH, and in a number of these, sAC has been shown to function as a physiological CO2/HCO3/pH sensor. In this review, we detail the known pH sensing functions of sAC, and we discuss two highly-studied, pH-dependent pathways in which sAC might play a role.

  14. Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Complexes Shape the Photoresponses of Retinal Rods and Cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong eWen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate rods and cones, photon capture by rhodopsin leads to the destruction of cyclic GMP (cGMP and the subsequent closure of cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG ion channels in the outer segment plasma membrane. Replenishment of cGMP and reopening of the channels limit the growth of the photon response and are requisite for its recovery. In different vertebrate retinas, there may be as many as four types of membrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs for cGMP synthesis. Ten neuronal Ca2+ sensor proteins could potentially modulate their activities. The mouse is proving to be an effective model for characterizing the roles of individual components because its relative simplicity can be reduced further by genetic engineering. There are two types of guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs and two types of GCs in mouse rods, whereas cones express one type of GCAP and one type of GC. Mutant mouse rods and cones bereft of both GCAPs have large, long lasting photon responses. Thus, GCAPs normally mediate negative feedback tied to the light-induced decline in intracellular Ca2+ that accelerates GC activity to curtail the growth and duration of the photon response. Rods from other mutant mice that express a single GCAP type reveal how the two GCAPs normally work together as a team. Because of its lower Ca2+ affinity, GCAP1 is the first responder that senses the initial decrease in Ca2+ following photon absorption and acts to limit response amplitude. GCAP2, with a higher Ca2+ affinity, is recruited later during the course of the photon response as Ca2+ levels continue to decline further. The main role of GCAP2 is to provide for a timely response recovery and it is particularly important after exposure to very bright light. The multiplicity of GC isozymes and GCAP homologs in the retinas of other vertebrates confers greater flexibility in shaping the photon responses in order to tune visual sensitivity, dynamic range and frequency response.

  15. Synergism between soluble guanylate cyclase signaling and neuropeptides extends lifespan in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abergel, Rachel; Livshits, Leonid; Shaked, Maayan; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Gross, Einav

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen (O 2 ) homeostasis is important for all aerobic animals. However, the manner by which O 2 sensing and homeostasis contribute to lifespan regulation is poorly understood. Here, we use the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to address this question. We demonstrate that a loss-of-function mutation in the neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1 and a deletion mutation in the atypical soluble guanylate cyclase gcy-35 O 2 sensor interact synergistically to extend worm lifespan. The function of npr-1 and gcy-35 in the O 2 -sensing neurons AQR, PQR, and URX shortens the lifespan of the worm. By contrast, the activity of the atypical soluble guanylate cyclase O 2 sensor gcy-33 in these neurons is crucial for lifespan extension. In addition to AQR, PQR, and URX, we show that the O 2 -sensing neuron BAG and the interneuron RIA are also important for the lifespan lengthening. Neuropeptide processing by the proprotein convertase EGL-3 is essential for lifespan extension, suggesting that the synergistic effect of joint loss of function of gcy-35 and npr-1 is mediated through neuropeptide signal transduction. The extended lifespan is regulated by hypoxia and insulin signaling pathways, mediated by the transcription factors HIF-1 and DAF-16. Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to play an important function in lifespan lengthening. As HIF-1 and DAF-16 activities are modulated by ROS, we speculate that joint loss of function of gcy-35 and npr-1 extends lifespan through ROS signaling. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. G protein-coupled receptors form stable complexes with inwardly rectifying potassium channels and adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Natalie; Ethier, Nathalie; Oak, James N; Pei, Lin; Liu, Fang; Trieu, Phan; Rebois, R Victor; Bouvier, Michel; Hebert, Terence E; Van Tol, Hubert H M

    2002-11-29

    A large number of studies have demonstrated co-purification or co-immunoprecipitation of receptors with G proteins. We have begun to look for the presence of effector molecules in these receptor complexes. Co-expression of different channel and receptor permutations in COS-7 and HEK 293 cells in combination with co-immunoprecipitation experiments established that the dopamine D(2) and D(4), and beta(2)-adrenergic receptors (beta(2)-AR) form stable complexes with Kir3 channels. The D(4)/Kir3 and D(2) receptor/Kir3 interaction does not occur when the channel and receptor are expressed separately and mixed prior to immunoprecipitation, indicating that the interaction is not an artifact of the experimental protocol and reflects a biosynthetic event. The observed complexes are stable in that they are not disrupted by receptor activation or modulation of G protein alpha subunit function. However, using a peptide that binds Gbetagamma (betaARKct), we show that Gbetagamma is critical for dopamine receptor-Kir3 complex formation, but not for maintenance of the complex. We also provide evidence that Kir3 channels and another effector, adenylyl cyclase, are stably associated with the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor and can be co-immunoprecipitated by anti-receptor antibodies. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, we have shown that in living cells under physiological conditions, beta(2)AR interacts directly with Kir3.1/3.4 and Kir3.1/3.2c heterotetramers as well as with adenylyl cyclase. All of these interactions are stable in the presence of receptor agonists, suggesting that these signaling complexes persist during signal transduction. In addition, we provide evidence that the receptor-effector complexes are also found in vivo. The observation that several G protein-coupled receptors form stable complexes with their effectors suggests that this arrangement might be a general feature of G protein-coupled signal transduction.

  17. A HCO(3)(-)-dependent mechanism involving soluble adenylyl cyclase for the activation of Ca²⁺ currents in locus coeruleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber, Ann N; Santin, Joseph M; Graham, Cathy D; Putnam, Robert W

    2014-12-01

    Hypercapnic acidosis activates Ca²⁺ channels and increases intracellular Ca²⁺ levels in neurons of the locus coeruleus, a known chemosensitive region involved in respiratory control. We have also shown that large conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels, in conjunction with this pathway, limits the hypercapnic-induced increase in firing rate in locus coeruleus neurons. Here, we present evidence that the Ca²⁺ current is activated by a HCO(3)(-)-sensitive pathway. The increase in HCO(3)(-) associated with hypercapnia activates HCO(3)(-)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (soluble adenylyl cyclase). This results in an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels and activation of Ca²⁺ channels via cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase A. We also show the presence of soluble adenylyl cyclase in the cytoplasm of locus coeruleus neurons, and that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate analogue db-cyclic adenosine monophosphate increases Ca²⁺i. Disrupting this pathway by decreasing HCO(3)(-) levels during acidification or inhibiting either soluble adenylyl cyclase or protein kinase A, but not transmembrane adenylyl cyclase, can increase the magnitude of the firing rate response to hypercapnia in locus coeruleus neurons from older neonates to the same extent as inhibition of K⁺ channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The role of soluble adenylyl cyclase in health and disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Israel, Lars [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Noegel, Angelika A. [University of Cologne, Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Schleicher, Michael [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Holak, Tad A. [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany)

    2004-05-15

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an {alpha}-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by {beta}-strands.

  19. Calcium-Driven Folding of RTX Domain beta-Rolls Ratchets Translocation of RTX Proteins through Type I Secretion Ducts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bumba, Ladislav; Mašín, Jiří; Macek, Pavel; Wald, Tomáš; Motlová, Lucia; Bíbová, Ilona; Klímová, Nela; Bednárová, Lucie; Veverka, Václav; Kachala, M.; Svergun, D. I.; Bařinka, Cyril; Šebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 1 (2016), s. 47-62 ISSN 1097-2765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11205; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11851S; GA ČR GA13-14547S; GA ČR GAP302/12/0460; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0717; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:61388963 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : ADENYLATE-CYCLASE TOXIN * GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA * BORDETELLA-PERTUSSIS Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (BTO-N); CE - Biochemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 14.714, year: 2016

  20. Constitutive inhibitory action of muscarinic receptors on adenylyl cyclase in cardiac membranes and its stereospecific suppression by hyoscyamine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říčný, Jan; Gualtieri, F.; Tuček, Stanislav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2002), s. 131-137 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011910; GA ČR GA309/99/0214 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * adenylyl cyclase * constitutive activity of receptors Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 0.984, year: 2002

  1. Cyclic nucleotide binding and structural changes in the isolated GAF domain of Anabaena adenylyl cyclase, CyaB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Hassan Biswas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GAF domains are a large family of regulatory domains, and a subset are found associated with enzymes involved in cyclic nucleotide (cNMP metabolism such as adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. CyaB2, an adenylyl cyclase from Anabaena, contains two GAF domains in tandem at the N-terminus and an adenylyl cyclase domain at the C-terminus. Cyclic AMP, but not cGMP, binding to the GAF domains of CyaB2 increases the activity of the cyclase domain leading to enhanced synthesis of cAMP. Here we show that the isolated GAFb domain of CyaB2 can bind both cAMP and cGMP, and enhanced specificity for cAMP is observed only when both the GAFa and the GAFb domains are present in tandem (GAFab domain. In silico docking and mutational analysis identified distinct residues important for interaction with either cAMP or cGMP in the GAFb domain. Structural changes associated with ligand binding to the GAF domains could not be detected by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET experiments. However, amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS experiments provided insights into the structural basis for cAMP-induced allosteric regulation of the GAF domains, and differences in the changes induced by cAMP and cGMP binding to the GAF domain. Thus, our findings could allow the development of molecules that modulate the allosteric regulation by GAF domains present in pharmacologically relevant proteins.

  2. Glycosylated Triterpenoid Saponin : a Specific Inhibitor of Diguanylate Cyclase from Acetobacter xylinum.Biological Activity and Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia, Ohana; Deborah P., Delmer; Gail, Volman; Moshe, Benziman; Department of Biological Chemistry, Institute of Life Scineces, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Section of Plant Biology, University of California Davis; Department of Biological Chemistry, Institute of Life Scineces, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Department of Biological Chemistry, Institute of Life Scineces, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    1998-01-01

    In a recent paper (Ohana et al.1998), we described the purification and structural charactrization of a novel glycosidic triterpenoid saponin (GTS), a specific inhibitor of diguanylate cyclase (dgc), the key regulatory enzyme of the cellulose synthesizing apparatus of the bacterium Acetobacter xylinum. This compound and an identical or very similar one were isolated from pea (Pisum sativum), and A.xylinum respectively. We now present the effects of GTS on the kinetic properties of dgc. The ob...

  3. Modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by baclofen in the developing rat brain: difference between cortex, thalamus and hippocampus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejnová, Lucie; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Novotný, Jiří; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel; Svoboda, Petr

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 330, č. 1 (2002), s. 9-12 ISSN 0304-3940 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0207; GA ČR GA309/01/0255 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : GABA(B) receptors * baclofen * adenylyl cyclase Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.100, year: 2002

  4. The Receptor Guanylyl Cyclase Type D (GC-D) Ligand Uroguanylin Promotes the Acquisition of Food Preferences in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Kelliher, Kevin R.; Zufall, Frank; Munger, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Rodents rely on olfactory stimuli to communicate information between conspecifics that is critical for health and survival. For example, rodents that detect a food odor simultaneously with the social odor carbon disulfide (CS2) will acquire a preference for that food. Disruption of the chemosensory transduction cascade in CS2-sensitive olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that express the receptor guanylyl cyclase type D (GC-D; GC-D+ OSNs) will prevent mice from acquiring these preferences. GC-D+...

  5. Successful treatment of Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia by minocycline in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuji; Uemura, Keiichi

    2016-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a bacterial pathogen usually isolated from animals and rarely causes human infections. There are, however, some reports that B. bronchiseptica causes human respiratory infections in immunocompromised patients or those with underlying respiratory diseases, although there is a lack of treatment guidelines. An 80-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital to treat anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis. On the 16th day after admission, she complained of a productive cough with right pleuritic pain and had low-grade fever. After chest CT scans, we diagnosed pneumonia. Gram stain of her sputum revealed moderate levels of gram-negative coccobacilli, which was later identified as B. bronchiseptica by mass spectrometry. According to the result of minimum inhibitory concentration, we successfully treated the pneumonia with minocycline. This case suggests that B. bronchiseptica pneumonia can be treated by minocycline if the minimum inhibitory concentration is less than 0.25 μg/mL. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bordetella pertussis risA, but not risS, is required for maximal expression of Bvg-repressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, Trevor H; Allen, Andrew G; Al-Meer, Jehan A; Maskell, Duncan; Peppler, Mark S

    2005-09-01

    Expression of virulence determinants by Bordetella pertussis, the primary etiological agent of whooping cough, is regulated by the BvgAS two-component regulatory system. The role of a second two-component regulatory system, encoded by risAS, in this process is not defined. Here, we show that mutation of B. pertussis risA does not affect Bvg-activated genes or proteins. However, mutation of risA resulted in greatly diminished expression of Bvg-repressed antigens and decreased transcription of Bvg-repressed genes. In contrast, mutation of risS had no effect on the expression of Bvg-regulated molecules. Mutation of risA also resulted in decreased bacterial invasion in a HeLa cell model. However, decreased invasion could not be attributed to the decreased expression of Bvg-repressed products, suggesting that mutation of risA may affect the expression of a variety of genes. Unlike the risAS operons in B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica, B. pertussis risS is a pseudogene that encodes a truncated RisS sensor. Deletion of the intact part of the B. pertussis risS gene does not affect the expression of risA-dependent, Bvg-repressed genes. These observations suggest that RisA activation occurs through cross-regulation by a heterologous system.

  7. Protection of dogs for 13 months against Bordetella bronchiseptica and canine parainfluenza virus with a modified live vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, A A C; Theelen, R P H; Jaspers, R; Horspool, L J I; Sutton, D; Bergman, J G H E; Paul, G

    2005-07-02

    Twelve specific pathogen-free (spf) puppies were vaccinated intranasally with a bivalent, modified live vaccine against infectious tracheobronchitis (group 1) and six puppies of the same age and from the same source served as unvaccinated controls (group 2). Both groups were challenged with wild-type Bordetella bronchiseptica and canine parainfluenza virus by the aerosol route 56 weeks after group 1 had been vaccinated, and at the same time six 10-week-old spf puppies from the same source (group 3) were also challenged. Oronasal swabs were taken regularly before and after the challenge, for the isolation of bacteria and viruses, and the dogs were observed for clinical signs for three weeks after the challenge. The control dogs became culture-positive for B bronchiseptica and canine parainfluenza virus, but the isolation yields from the vaccinated group were significantly lower (P<0.05). The mean clinical scores of the vaccinated group were 61 per cent lower than the scores of group 2 (P=0.009), and 90 per cent lower than the scores of group 3 (P=0.001).

  8. Adenovirus 2, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and Parainfluenza Molecular Diagnostic Assay Results in Puppies After vaccination with Modified Live Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch-Gallie, R; Moroff, S; Lappin, M R

    2016-01-01

    Canine adenovirus 2, parainfluenza, and Bordetella bronchiseptica cause respiratory disease in dogs, and each has a modified live intranasal vaccine available. Molecular diagnostic assays to amplify specific nucleic acids are available for each of these agents. If positive molecular diagnostic assay results are common after vaccination, the positive predictive value of the diagnostic assays for disease would be decreased. To determine the impact of administration of commercially available modified live topical adenovirus 2, B. bronchiseptica, and parainfluenza vaccine has on the results of a commercially available PCR panel. Eight puppies from a research breeding facility negative for these pathogens. Blinded prospective pilot study. Puppies were vaccinated with a single dose of modified live topical adenovirus 2, B. bronchiseptica, and parainfluenza and parenteral dose of adenovirus 2, canine distemper virus, and parvovirus. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected on multiple days and submitted for PCR assay. Nucleic acids of all 3 organisms contained in the topical vaccine were detected from both samples multiple times through 28 days after vaccination with higher numbers of positive samples detected between days 3 and 10 after vaccination. Vaccine status should be considered when interpreting respiratory agent PCR results if modified live vaccines have been used. Development of quantitative PCR and wild-type sequencing are necessary to improve positive predictive value of these assays by distinguishing vaccinate from natural infection. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. The relationship between mucosal immunity, nasopharyngeal carriage, asymptomatic transmission and the resurgence of Bordetella pertussis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Christopher Gill

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of whooping cough in the US has been rising slowly since the 1970s, but the pace of this has accelerated sharply since acellular pertussis vaccines replaced the earlier whole cell vaccines in the late 1990s. A similar trend occurred in many other countries, including the UK, Canada, Australia, Ireland, and Spain, following the switch to acellular vaccines. The key question is why. Two leading theories (short duration of protective immunologic persistence and evolutionary shifts in the pathogen to evade the vaccine explain some but not all of these shifts, suggesting that other factors may also be important. In this synthesis, we argue that sterilizing mucosal immunity that blocks or abbreviates the duration of nasopharyngeal carriage of Bordetella pertussis and impedes person-to-person transmission (including between asymptomatically infected individuals is a critical factor in this dynamic. Moreover, we argue that the ability to induce such mucosal immunity is fundamentally what distinguishes whole cell and acellular pertussis vaccines and may be pivotal to understanding much of the resurgence of this disease in many countries that adopted acellular vaccines. Additionally, we offer the hypothesis that observed herd effects generated by acellular vaccines may reflect a modification of disease presentation leading to reduced potential for transmission by those already infected, as opposed to inducing resistance to infection among those who have been exposed.

  10. [PCR testing for Bordetella pertussis in household contacts as a diagnostic tool for atypical whooping cough in unvaccinated young infants].

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    Cosnes-Lambe, Cecile; Raymond, Josette; Vallet, Christelle; Armengaud, Jean-Baptiste; Bosdure, Emmanuelle; Catalano-Pons, Charlotte; Chalumeau, Martin; El Hajje, Marie-Joelle; Moulin, Florence; de Suremain, Nathalie; Reglier-Poupet, Hélène; Poyart, Claire; Gendrel, Dominique

    2008-10-01

    False-negative findings of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for genuine pertussis as well as the numerous atypical forms of whooping cough make it difficult to diagnose this disease in young babies. For two years, real-time PCR was performed to test for Bordetella pertussis in 86 infants younger than 6 months hospitalized for apnea or paroxysmal and/or vomiting cough and in 205 of their household contacts, whether or not they coughed. Group 1 included 30 infants for whom PCR detected B. pertussis (25 of whom were also RSV+). PCR was also positive for at least one household contact in 25/30 families. This group included 16 babies with apnea and 12 who developed a whooping cough during follow-up. Group 2 comprised 12 infants whose PCR was negative while at least one household contact had positive results. Five of these infants had severe apnea and 6 developed a whooping cough. Group 3 included 44 infants (28 RSV +) for whom PCR was negative in the index case and in the household contacts: none developed a whooping cough during follow-up. Only 3 of the 54 positive household contacts had a paroxysmal cough or a typical whooping cough and 12 had no cough at all. Positive PCR in a household contact, symptomatic or not, is helpful for the diagnosis of atypical whooping cough in young infants.

  11. [Accumulation of the bvg- Bordetella pertussis a virulent mutants in the process of experimental whooping cough in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medkova, A Iu; Siniashina, L N; Rumiantseva, Iu P; Voronina, O L; Kunda, M S; Karataev, G I

    2013-01-01

    The duration of the persistence and dynamics of accumulation of insertion bvg- Bordetella pertussis mutants were studied in lungs of laboratory mice after intranasal and intravenous challenge by virulent bacteria of the causative agent of whooping cough. The capability of the virulent B. pertussis bacteria to long-term persistence in the body of mice was tested. Using the real-time PCR approximately hundred genome equivalents of the B. pertussis DNA were detected in lungs of mice in two months after infection regardless of the way of challenge. Using the bacterial test bacteria were identified during only four weeks after challenge. Bvg- B. pertussis avirulent mutants were accumulated for the infection time. The percentage of the avirulent bacteria in the B. pertussis population reached 50% in 7-9 weeks after challenge. The obtained results show that the laboratory mice can be used for study of the B. pertussis insertion mutant formation dynamics in vivo and confirm the hypothesis about insertional bvg- B. pertussis virulent mutants accumulation during development of pertussis infection in human.

  12. Serodiagnosis of whooping cough in Belgium: results of the National Reference Centre for Bordetella pertussis anno 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duterme, Sophie; Vanhoof, Raymond; Vanderpas, Jean; Pierard, Denis; Huygen, Kris

    2016-04-01

    Report on the pitfalls of serodiagnosis of pertussis in Belgium for 2013 by the NRC Bordetella. Determine cases of acute infection using an anti-pertussis toxin (PT) IgG antibody ELISA. A total of 2471 serum samples were received. Clinical information on the duration of cough (at moment of blood sampling) is essential for a reliable interpretation of the results. In order to avoid false negative results, 213 samples for which this information was lacking were not tested. For a total of 2179 patients tested, 520 (23.9%) had antibody levels indicative of an acute infection, 261 (12%) samples were diagnosed as positive (indicative of a pertussis infection or vaccination during the last year), 143 (6.7%) samples were classified as doubtful and 752 (34,5%) (35.5%) were diagnosed as negative. The serodiagnosis of pertussis has limited value for the early diagnosis of the disease and PCR analysis on nasopharyngeal swabs is the method of choice during the first 2 weeks and always for young children pertussis, serum samples should preferentially be collected 3 weeks after onset of symptoms.

  13. Influence of vaccination with Bordetella pertussis cells on haemopoiesis in sublethally irradiated mice and their radiation lethality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiek, S.; Bitny-Szlachto, S.

    1978-01-01

    Post-irradiation lethality of CFW mice has turned out to be enhanced by vaccination with Bordetella pertussis cells 10 min., 48 hrs. prior or 48 hrs. after the exposure to X-rays. The sensitization factor was found to be 1.23, as it revealed by decrease of radiation LD 50 . Granulopoiesis and erythropoiesis proved to be stimulated by vaccination, in mice irradiated with 200 or 400 R but not in those after 600 R. Direct radiosensitivity of CFU was not altered by vaccination, but the subsequent loss of bone marrow stem cells was enhanced in vaccinated mice. On the other hand, endocolonization of spleens with bone marrow stem cells has turned out to be highly enhanced by the vaccine, resulting in confluent growth of colonies. This effect of the vaccine was not abolished by hydroxyurea given 15 min. or 1 hr. after vaccination. Enhanced post-irradiation lethality is considered to result from fall of the bone marrow stem cell pool below the level indispensable to ensure the post-irradiation recovery of the haemopoietic system. (author)

  14. [Clinical and epidemiological differences between Bordetella pertussis and respiratory syncytial virus infections in infants: a matched case control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Sánchez, Francisco; Cobos-Carrascosa, Elena; Sánchez-Forte, Miguel; López-Sánchez, María Ángeles; González-Jiménez, Yolanda; Azor-Martínez, Ernestina

    2014-01-01

    An increase in cases of pertussis, mainly in young infants, has been reported in the last few years. The clinical presentation of this disease is very similar to that produced by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which makes the diagnosis difficult. To compare the clinical and epidemiological characteristics between Bordetella pertussis and RSV infections in infants admitted to hospital. An analytical matched case-control study was conducted during the period 2008-2011. Cases were defined as infants admitted with pertussis confirmed by PCR in nasopharyngeal aspirate. Each case was matched by age, sex and date of admission to two controls defined as patients with RSV infection detected by immunochromatography in nasal aspirate. Demographic, clinical, laboratory data were compared. Seventy eight patients (26 cases of pertussis and 52 controls RSV+) were included. Sociodemographic characteristics were similar in both groups. Cases had more days of symptoms prior to admission, longer hospital stays, and increased frequency of epidemic family environment. Apnoea and cyanosis were more frequent. Cases of pertussis were more likely to have apnoea, cyanosis, and lymphocytosis while RSV infections had more frequent fever, vomiting and respiratory distress. The clinical presentations of pertussis and RSV infection are similar, but there are some characteristics that can help to distinguish between them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. The importance of Bordetella pertussis strains which do not produce virulence factors in the epidemiology of pertussis

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    Maciej Polak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis strains, which have lost the ability to produce antigens, such as pertactin - Prn, pertussis toxin - Ptx, filamentous haemagglutinin - FHA, fimbriae type 2 and 3 - Fim 2 and 3, tracheal colonization factor - TcfA, have recently been isolated in countries with a high vaccination coverage. The emergence of such isolates might have resulted from B. pertussis natural evolution course or adaptive mechanisms, allowing increased circulation of the pathogen in vaccinated populations. So far, the majority of described mutants were deficient in the Prn production. Prn deficient isolates were found in countries which use acellular pertussis vaccines (aP in routine immunization programmes. The increase of frequency of Prn¯ strains isolation was correlated with the period of routine vaccination with aP vaccines. In most countries, the spread of these isolates has resulted from independent mutations rather than from the expansion of a single clone. Prn¯ isolates were collected from patients showing typical clinical symptoms of pertussis found for Prn+ strains. Results of in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that Prn¯, Ptx¯ and FHA¯ isolates retain cytotoxic properties, and besides Ptx¯ isolates, were lethal in intranasally infected mice. Further explanation of the impact of antigen deficiencies on virulence and transmission of B. pertussis in the context of the continuous increase of pertussis incidence is necessary to develop a new, optimized strategy of pertussis prevention.

  16. Cloning, expression, and characterization of epi-cedrol synthase, a sesquiterpene cyclase from Artemisia annua L.

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    Mercke, P; Crock, J; Croteau, R; Brodelius, P E

    1999-09-15

    Sesquiterpene cyclases (synthases) catalyze the conversion of the isoprenoid intermediate farnesyl diphosphate to various sesquiterpene structural types. In plants, many sesquiterpenes are produced as defensive chemicals (phytoalexins) or mediators of chemical communication (i.e., pollinator attractants). A number of sesquiterpene synthases are present in Artemisia annua L. (annual wormwood). We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding one of these, epi-cedrol synthase. This clone contains a 1641-bp open reading frame coding for 547 amino acids (63.5 kDa), a 38-bp 5'-untranslated end, and a 272-bp 3'-untranslated sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence was 32 to 43% identical with the sequences of other known sesquiterpene cyclases from angiosperms. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant enzyme catalyzed the formation of both olefinic (3%) and oxygenated (97%) sesquiterpenes from farnesyl diphosphate. GC-MS analysis identified the olefins as alpha-cedrene (57% of the olefins), beta-cedrene (13%), (E)-beta-farnesene (5%), alpha-acoradiene (1%), (E)-alpha-bisabolene (8%), and three unknown olefins (16%) and the oxygenated sesquiterpenes (97% of total sesquiterpene generated, exclusive of farnesol and nerolidol) as cedrol (4%) and epi-cedrol (96%). epi-Cedrol synthase was not active with geranylgeranyl diphosphate as substrate, whereas geranyl diphosphate was converted to monoterpenes by the recombinant enzyme at a rate of about 15% of that observed with farnesyl diphosphate as substrate. The monoterpene olefin products are limonene (45%), terpinolene (42%), gamma-terpinene (8%), myrcene (5%), and alpha-terpinene (2%); a small amount of the monoterpene alcohol terpinen-4-ol is also produced. The pH optimum for the recombinant enzyme is 8.5-9.0 (with farnesyl diphosphate as substrate) and the K(m) values for farnesyl diphosphate are 0.4 and 1.3 microM at pH 7. 0 and 9.0, respectively. The K(m) for Mg(2+) is 80 microM at pH 7.0 and 9.0.

  17. Membrane Guanylate Cyclase catalytic Subdomain: Structure and Linkage with Calcium Sensors and Bicarbonate

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    Sarangan Ravichandran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC is a ubiquitous multi-switching cyclic GMP generating signaling machine linked with countless physiological processes. In mammals it is encoded by seven distinct homologous genes. It is a single transmembrane spanning multi-modular protein; composed of integrated blocks and existing in homo-dimeric form. Its core catalytic domain (CCD module is a common transduction center where all incoming signals are translated into the production of cyclic GMP, a cellular signal second messenger. Crystal structure of the MGC’s CCD does not exist and its precise identity is ill-defined. Here, we define it at a sub-molecular level for the phototransduction-linked MGC, the rod outer segment guanylate cyclase type 1, ROS-GC1. (1 The CCD is a conserved 145-residue structural unit, represented by the segment V820-P964. (2 It exists as a homo-dimer and contains seven conserved catalytic elements (CEs wedged into seven conserved motifs. (3 It also contains a conserved 21-residue neurocalcin δ-modulated structural domain, V836-L857. (4 Site-directed mutagenesis documents that each of the seven CEs governs the cyclase’s catalytic activity. (5 In contrast to the soluble and the bacterium MGC which use Mn2+-GTP substrate for catalysis, MGC CCD uses the natural Mg2+-GTP substrate. (6 Strikingly, the MGC CCD requires anchoring by the Transmembrane Domain (TMD to exhibit its major (∼92% catalytic activity; in isolated form the activity is only marginal. This feature is not linked with any unique sequence of the TMD; there is minimal conservation in TMD. Finally, (7 the seven CEs control each of four phototransduction pathways- -two Ca2+-sensor GCAPs-, one Ca2+-sensor, S100B-, and one bicarbonate-modulated. The findings disclose that the CCD of ROS-GC1 has built-in regulatory elements that control its signal translational activity. Due to conservation of these regulatory elements, it is proposed that these elements also control the

  18. Glutaminyl Cyclases as Novel Targets for the Treatment of Septic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellvard, Annelie; Maresz, Katarzyna; Schilling, Stephan; Graubner, Sigrid; Heiser, Ulrich; Jonsson, Roland; Cynis, Holger; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Potempa, Jan; Mydel, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Background. Septic arthritis is a severe and rapidly debilitating disease mainly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we assess the antiarthritic efficiency of glutaminyl cyclase (QC) inhibitors. Methods. Mice were inoculated with an arthritogenic amount of S. aureus intravenously or by local administration into the knee joint. Animals were treated with QC inhibitors (PBD155 and PQ529) via chow during the experiment. QC and isoQC knockout mice were also analyzed for arthritis symptoms after local administration of bacteria. Results. Both QC inhibitors significantly delayed the onset of clinical signs of arthritis, and inhibitors significantly decreased weight loss in treated animals. Following intraarticular injection of S. aureus, PBD155-treated mice had lower levels of synovitis and bone erosion, as well as less myeloperoxidase in synovial tissue. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis revealed that PBD155 treatment affected the expression pattern of adhesion molecules, preventing the upregulation of cells expressing CD11b/CD18. Conclusion. The compounds investigated here represent a novel class of small molecular antiarthritic inhibitors. In our studies, they exerted strong antiinflammatory actions, and therefore they might be suited for disease-modifying treatment of infectious arthritis. PMID:23204180

  19. Elevated Adenylyl Cyclase 9 Expression Is a Potential Prognostic Biomarker for Patients with Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hua; Wang, Kun; Jin, Jun-Feng; Jin, He; Yang, Lihua; Zou, Yidan; Du, Biaoyan; Liu, Xiaodong

    2018-01-02

    BACKGROUND Adenylyl cyclase 9 (ADCY9) is an enzyme that modulates signal transduction by producing the second messenger, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of ADCY9 expression with clinicopathological features and disease-free survival of colon cancer patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Immunohistochemistry staining with ADCY9 antibody was performed on a tissue microarray. Immunoreactivity scores (IRS) were recorded and applied for association analysis. ADCY9 mRNA expression and clinicopathogical information were also extracted from TCGA colon cancer dataset and analyzed using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models.  RESULTS ADCY9 IRS was significantly higher (P=0.002) in tumor tissues (6.40±1.26, n=200) than in adjacent normal samples (4.13±0.83, n=8). The IRS and mRNA expression of ADCY9 were correlated to colon cancer TNM staging. Longer disease-free survival was observed in patients with lower ADCY9 expression (P=0.001). In the multivariate models, ADCY9 expression level (hazard ratio [HR] 5.495, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.753-17.227, P=0.003), and distant metastasis (HR 4.329, 95% CI 1.374-13.636, P=0.012) were still associated with disease-free survival. CONCLUSIONS High ADCY9 expression is a poor prognostic factor for disease-free survival in colon cancer.

  20. Mapping Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Protein Disulfide Isomerase Regions of Interaction.

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    Erin J Heckler

    Full Text Available Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC is a heterodimeric nitric oxide (NO receptor that produces cyclic GMP. This signaling mechanism is a key component in the cardiovascular system. NO binds to heme in the β subunit and stimulates the catalytic conversion of GTP to cGMP several hundred fold. Several endogenous factors have been identified that modulate sGC function in vitro and in vivo. In previous work, we determined that protein disulfide isomerase (PDI interacts with sGC in a redox-dependent manner in vitro and that PDI inhibited NO-stimulated activity in cells. To our knowledge, this was the first report of a physical interaction between sGC and a thiol-redox protein. To characterize this interaction between sGC and PDI, we first identified peptide linkages between sGC and PDI, using a lysine cross-linking reagent and recently developed mass spectrometry analysis. Together with Flag-immunoprecipitation using sGC domain deletions, wild-type (WT and mutated PDI, regions of sGC involved in this interaction were identified. The observed data were further explored with computational modeling to gain insight into the interaction mechanism between sGC and oxidized PDI. Our results indicate that PDI interacts preferentially with the catalytic domain of sGC, thus providing a mechanism for PDI inhibition of sGC. A model in which PDI interacts with either the α or the β catalytic domain is proposed.

  1. Photomanipulation of antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm formation of Escherichia coli heterologously expressing photoactivated adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Konno, Noriko; Haneda, Yukari; Yamamori, Baku; Iseki, Mineo; Shibusawa, Mami; Ono, Yasushi; Kodaira, Ken-ichi; Funada, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2012-01-01

    A cyaA-deficient Escherichia coli strain was transformed by a plasmid carrying the gene for BsPAC, a photoactivated adenylyl cyclase identified from a Beggiatoa sp., and was subjected to an antibiotic susceptibility assay and biofilm formation assay under a light or dark condition. Cells expressing BsPAC that were incubated under blue light (470 nm) were more susceptible to fosfomycin, nalidixic acid and streptomycin than were cells incubated in the dark. Cells expressing BsPAC formed more biofilms when incubated under the light than did cells cultured in the dark. We concluded from these observations that it is possible to determine the importance of cAMP in antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm formation of E. coli by photomanipulating the cellular cAMP level by the use of BsPAC. A site-directed mutant of BsPAC in which Tyr7 was replaced by Phe functioned even in the dark, indicating that Tyr7 plays an important role in photoactivation of BsPAC. Results of mutational analysis of BsPAC should contribute to an understanding of the molecular basis for photoactivation of the protein.

  2. Functional analysis of the sporulation-specific diadenylate cyclase CdaS in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cao; Ma, Yang; Wang, Xun; Xie, Yuqun; Ali, Maria K.; He, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is a recently discovered bacterial secondary messenger molecule, which is associated with various physiological functions. In the genus Bacillus, the intracellular level and turnover of c-di-AMP are mainly regulated by three diadenylate cyclases (DACs), including DisA, CdaA and CdaS, and two c-di-AMP-specific phosphodiesterases (GdpP and PgpH). In this study, we demonstrated that CdaS protein from B. thuringiensis is a hexameric DAC protein that can convert ATP or ADP to c-di-AMP in vitro and the N-terminal YojJ domain is essential for the DAC activity. Based on the markerless gene knock-out method, we demonstrated that the transcription of cdaS was initiated by the sporulation-specific sigma factor σH and the deletion of cdaS significantly delayed sporulation and parasporal crystal formation. These findings contrast with similar experiments conducted using B. subtilis, wherein transcription of its cdaS was initiated by the sigma factor σG. Deletion of all the three DAC genes from a single strain was unsuccessful, suggesting that c-di-AMP is an indispensable molecule in B. thuringiensis. Phylogenetic analysis indicated increased diversity of CdaS in the B. cereus and B. subtilis Bacillus subgroups. In summary, this study identifies important aspects in the regulation of c-di-AMP in the genus Bacillus. PMID:26441857

  3. Guanylate cyclase-C/cGMP: an emerging pathway in the regulation of visceral pain

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    Gerhard eHannig

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C expressed predominantly on intestinal epithelial cells by guanylin, uroguanylin or the closely related GC-C agonist peptide, linaclotide, stimulates generation and release of cyclic guanosine-3’,5’-monophosphate (cGMP. Evidence that the visceral analgesic effects of linaclotide are mediated by a novel, GC-C-dependent peripheral sensory mechanism was first demonstrated in animal models of visceral pain. Subsequent studies with uroguanylin or linaclotide have confirmed the activation of a GC-C/cGMP pathway leading to increased submucosal cGMP mediated by cGMP efflux pumps, which modulates intestinal nociceptor function resulting in peripheral analgesia. These effects can be reproduced by the addition of exogenous cGMP and support a role for GC-C/cGMP signaling in the regulation of visceral sensation, a physiological function that has not previously been linked to the GC-C/cGMP pathway. Notably, targeting the GC-C/cGMP pathway for treatment of gastrointestinal pain and abdominal sensory symptoms has now been validated in the clinic. In 2012, linaclotide was approved in the United States and European Union for the treatment of adult patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation.

  4. Biased activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase: the Janus face of thymoquinone

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    Charlotte Detremmerie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The natural compound thymoquinone, extracted from Nigella sativa (black cumin, is widely used in humans for its anti-oxidative properties. Thymoquinone is known for its acute endothelium-independent vasodilator effects in isolated rat aortae and pulmonary arteries, depending in part on activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels and inhibition of voltage-dependent calcium channels. The compound also improves endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric arteries of ageing rodents and in aortae of rabbits treated with pyrogallol, by inhibiting oxidative stress. Serendipitously, thymoquinone was found to augment contractions in isolated arteries with endothelium of both rats and pigs. The endothelium-dependent augmentation it causes counterintuitively depends on biased activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC producing inosine 3ʹ,5ʹ-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic IMP rather than guanosine 3ʹ,5ʹ-cyclic monophosphate. This phenomenon shows a striking mechanistic similarity to the hypoxic augmentation previously observed in porcine coronary arteries. The cyclic IMP preferentially produced under thymoquinone exposure causes an increased contractility of arterial smooth muscle by interfering with calcium homeostasis. This brief review summarizes the vascular pharmacology of thymoquinone, focussing in particular on how the compound causes endothelium-dependent contractions by biasing the activity of sGC.

  5. Consistent expression of guanylyl cyclase-C in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal cancers.

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    Hadi Danaee

    Full Text Available The transmembrane receptor guanylate cyclase-C (GCC has been found to be expressed in colorectal cancers. However, limited data are available on GCC protein expression in non-colorectal gastrointestinal tumors and few studies have reported whether GCC protein expression was consistently preserved in synchronous primary and metastatic cancer tissues.GCC protein status was assessed by immunohistochemistry in tumor specimens from individuals (n = 627 with gastrointestinal tumors, including esophageal (n = 130, gastric (n = 276, pancreatic (n = 136, and colorectal (n = 85 primary and metastatic tumors. Tissue specimens consisted of tissue microarrays containing esophageal, gastric, pancreatic tumors, and whole-slide tissue sections from colorectal cancer patients with matching primary and metastatic tumors.Among the evaluated esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic tumors, the frequency of GCC positivity at the protein level ranged from 59% to 68%. GCC was consistently expressed in primary and matched/synchronous metastatic lesions of colorectal cancer tissues derived from the same patients.This observational study demonstrated the protein expression of GCC across various gastrointestinal malignancies. In all cancer histotypes, GCC protein localization was observed predominantly in the cytoplasm compared to the membrane region of tumor cells. Consistent immunohistochemistry detection of GCC protein expression in primary colorectal cancers and in their matched liver metastases suggests that the expression of GCC is maintained throughout the process of tumor progression and formation of metastatic disease.

  6. Guanylyl cyclase C in colorectal cancer: susceptibility gene and potential therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jieru E; Li, Peng; Pitari, Giovanni M; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott A

    2009-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. While mechanisms underlying this disease have been elucidated over the past two decades, these molecular insights have failed to translate into efficacious therapy. The oncogenomic view of cancer suggests that terminal transformation reflects the sequential corruption of signal transduction circuits regulating key homeostatic mechanisms, whose multiplicity underlies the therapeutic resistance of most tumors to interventions targeting individual pathways. Conversely, the paucity of mechanistic insights into proximal pathophysiological processes that initiate and amplify oncogenic circuits preceding accumulation of mutations and transformation impedes development of effective prevention and therapy. In that context, guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), the intestinal receptor for the paracrine hormones guanylin and uroguanylin, whose early loss characterizes colorectal transformation, has emerged as a component of lineage-specific homeostatic programs organizing spatiotemporal patterning along the crypt-surface axis. Dysregulation of GCC signaling, reflecting hormone loss, promotes tumorigenesis through reprogramming of replicative and bioenergetic circuits and genomic instability. Compensatory upregulation of GCC in response to hormone loss provides a unique translational opportunity for prevention and treatment of colorectal tumors by hormone-replacement therapy.

  7. Adenylyl cyclase plays a regulatory role in development, stress resistance and secondary metabolism in Fusarium fujikuroi.

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    Jorge García-Martínez

    Full Text Available The ascomycete fungus Fusarium fujikuroi (Gibberella fujikuroi MP-C produces secondary metabolites of biotechnological interest, such as gibberellins, bikaverin, and carotenoids. Production of these metabolites is regulated by nitrogen availability and, in a specific manner, by other environmental signals, such as light in the case of the carotenoid pathway. A complex regulatory network controlling these processes is recently emerging from the alterations of metabolite production found through the mutation of different regulatory genes. Here we show the effect of the targeted mutation of the acyA gene of F. fujikuroi, coding for adenylyl cyclase. Mutants lacking the catalytic domain of the AcyA protein showed different phenotypic alterations, including reduced growth, enhanced production of unidentified red pigments, reduced production of gibberellins and partially derepressed carotenoid biosynthesis in the dark. The phenotype differs in some aspects from that of similar mutants of the close relatives F. proliferatum and F. verticillioides: contrary to what was observed in these species, ΔacyA mutants of F. fujikuroi showed enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress (H(2O(2, but no change in heavy metal resistance or in the ability to colonize tomato tissue, indicating a high versatility in the regulatory roles played by cAMP in this fungal group.

  8. Regulation of intraocular pressure by soluble and membrane guanylate cyclases and their role in glaucoma.

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    Emmanuel S Buys

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy characterized by visual field defects that ultimately lead to irreversible blindness (1, 2. By the year 2020, an estimated 80 million people will have glaucoma, 11 million of which will be bilaterally blind. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG is the most common type of glaucoma. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is currently the only risk factor amenable to treatment. How IOP is regulated and can be modulated remains a topic of active investigation. Available therapies, mostly geared towards lowering IOP, offer incomplete protection, and POAG often goes undetected until irreparable damage has been done, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic approaches, drug targets, and biomarkers (3, 4. In this review, the role of soluble (nitric oxide (NO-activated and membrane-bound, natriuretic peptide (NP-activated guanylate cyclases that generate the secondary signaling molecule cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP in the regulation of IOP and in the pathophysiology of POAG will be discussed.

  9. Bioinformatics analysis of the oxidosqualene cyclase gene and the amino acid sequence in mangrove plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Wati, R.

    2017-01-01

    This study described the bioinformatics methods to analyze seven oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) genes from mangrove plants on DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, similarity, subcellular localization and phylogenetic. The physical and chemical properties of seven mangrove OSC showed variation among the genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of seven mangrove OSC genes followed the order of a helix > random coil > extended chain structure. The values of chloroplast or signal peptide were too low, indicated that no chloroplast transit peptide or signal peptide of secretion pathway in mangrove OSC genes. The target peptide value of mitochondria varied from 0.163 to 0.430, indicated it was possible to exist. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity and functional of properties of the different amino acids in mangrove OSC genes. To clarify the relationship among the mangrove OSC gene, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. The phylogenetic tree shows that there are three clusters, Kandelia KcMS join with Bruguiera BgLUS, Rhizophora RsM1 was close to Bruguiera BgbAS, and Rhizophora RcCAS join with Kandelia KcCAS. The present study, therefore, supported the previous results that plant OSC genes form distinct clusters in the tree.

  10. Pressure stabilization is not a general property of thermophilic enzymes: the adenylate kinases of Methanococcus voltae, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, and Methanococcus jannaschii.

    OpenAIRE

    Konisky, J; Michels, P C; Clark, D S

    1995-01-01

    The application of 50-MPa pressure did not increase the thermostabilities of adenylate kinases purified from four related mesophilic and thermophilic marine methanogens. Thus, while it has been reported that some thermophilic enzymes are stabilized by pressure (D. J. Hei and D. S. Clark, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 60:932-939, 1994), hyperbaric stabilization is not an intrinsic property of all enzymes from deep-sea thermophiles.

  11. A beta-lysine adenylating enzyme and a beta-lysine binding protein involved in poly beta-lysine chain assembly in nourseothricin synthesis in Streptomyces noursei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Nicolas; Pankevych, Kvitka; Demydchuk, Julia; Lambrecht, Klaus; Saluz, Hans-Peter; Krügel, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Nourseothricins (syn. Streptothricins), a group of nucleoside peptides produced by several streptomycete strains, contain a poly beta-lysine chain of variable length attached in amide linkage to the amino sugar moiety gulosamine of the nucleoside portion. We show that the nourseothricin-producing Streptomyces noursei contains an enzyme (NpsA) of an apparent M(r) 56,000 that specifically activates beta-lysine by adenylation but does not bind to it as a thioester. Cloning and sequencing of npsA from S. noursei including its flanking DNA regions revealed that it is closely linked to the nourseothricin resistance gene nat1 and some other genes on the chromosome possibly involved in nourseothricin biosynthesis. The deduced amino-acid sequence revealed that NpsA is a stand-alone adenylation domain with similarity to the adenylation domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). Further analysis revealed that S. noursei contains a beta-lysine binding enzyme (NpsB) of about M(r) 64,100 which can be loaded by NpsA with beta-lysine as a thioester. Analysis of the deduced amino-acid sequence from the gene (npsB) of NpsB showed that it consists of two domains. The N-terminal domain of approximately 100 amino-acid residues has high similarity to PCP domains of NRPSs whereas the 450-amino-acid C-terminal domain has a high similarity to epimerization (E)-domains of NRPSs. Remarkably, in this E-domain the conserved H-H-motif is changed to H-Q, which suggests that either the domain is nonfunctional or has a specialized function. The presence of one single adenylating beta-lysine activating enzyme in nourseothricin-producing streptomycete and a separate binding protein suggests an iteratively operating NRPS-module catalyses synthesis of the poly beta-lysine chain.

  12. Characterization of a Bordetella pertussis Diaminopimelate (DAP) Biosynthesis Locus Identifies dapC, a Novel Gene Coding for an N-Succinyl-l,l-DAP Aminotransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, Thilo M.; Schneider, Boris; Krumbach, Karin; Eggeling, Lothar; Gross, Roy

    2000-01-01

    The functional complementation of two Escherichia coli strains defective in the succinylase pathway of meso-diaminopimelate (meso-DAP) biosynthesis with a Bordetella pertussis gene library resulted in the isolation of a putative dap operon containing three open reading frames (ORFs). In line with the successful complementation of the E. coli dapD and dapE mutants, the deduced amino acid sequences of two ORFs revealed significant sequence similarities with the DapD and DapE proteins of E. coli...

  13. Characterization of a Bordetella pertussis diaminopimelate (DAP) biosynthesis locus identifies dapC, a novel gene coding for an N-succinyl-L, L-DAP aminotransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, T. M.; Schneider, B.; Krumbach, K.; Eggeling, L.; Gross, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    The functional complementation of two Escherichia coli strains defective in the succinylase pathway of meso-diaminopimelate (meso DAP) biosynthesis with a Bordetella pertussis gene library resulted in the isolation of a putative dap operon containing three open reading frames (ORFs), In line with the successful complementation of the E, coli dapD and dapE mutants, the deduced amino acid sequences of two ORFs revealed significant sequence similarities with the DapD and DapE proteins of E, coli...

  14. Bordetella pertussis infection in household contacts of cases of pertussis in the southeast zone of the city of Cali, Colombia, 2006-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Miryam Astudillo; Victoria Eugenia Estrada; Mónica Fernández de Soto; Luz Ángela Moreno

    2011-01-01

    Introducción: Bordetella pertussis causa tos ferina o tos convulsiva, enfermedad contagiosa e inmunoprevenible, una de las primeras 10 causas de muerte entre niños menores de 1 año, al no estar completamente inmunizados. Se considera reemergente en varios países, con altas tasas de complicaciones y hospitalizaciones. Objetivo: conocer la proporción de infección por B. pertussis, entre casos sospechosos de tosferina y sus contactos domiciliarios entre niños del suroriente de Cali, área geográf...

  15. Inhibition of PCR-based assay for Bordetella pertussis by using calcium alginate fiber and aluminum shaft components of a nasopharyngeal swab.

    OpenAIRE

    Wadowsky, R M; Laus, S; Libert, T; States, S J; Ehrlich, G D

    1994-01-01

    A PCR-based assay for Bordetella pertussis was inhibited by using a calcium alginate fiber-tipped swab with an aluminum shaft but not by using a Dacron fiber-tipped swab with a plastic shaft. The calcium alginate fiber component inhibited the assay following storage for less than 1 min in a suspension of 10(3) CFU of B. pertussis per ml, whereas the aluminum shaft component required storage for at least 48 h in order to cause inhibition. We recommend the Dacron swab over the calcium alginate ...

  16. Inhibition of PCR-based assay for Bordetella pertussis by using calcium alginate fiber and aluminum shaft components of a nasopharyngeal swab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadowsky, R M; Laus, S; Libert, T; States, S J; Ehrlich, G D

    1994-04-01

    A PCR-based assay for Bordetella pertussis was inhibited by using a calcium alginate fiber-tipped swab with an aluminum shaft but not by using a Dacron fiber-tipped swab with a plastic shaft. The calcium alginate fiber component inhibited the assay following storage for less than 1 min in a suspension of 10(3) CFU of B. pertussis per ml, whereas the aluminum shaft component required storage for at least 48 h in order to cause inhibition. We recommend the Dacron swab over the calcium alginate swab for collecting specimens for testing in PCR-based assays.

  17. A New Type of Metal-Binding Site in Cobalt- And Zinc-Containing Adenylate Kinases Isolated From Sulfate-Reducers D. Gigas And D. Desulfuricans ATCC 27774

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavel, O.Y.; Bursakov, S.A.; Rocco, G.Di; Trincao, J.; Pickering, I.J.; George, G.N.; Calvete, J.J.; Brondino, C.; Pereira, A.S.; Lampreia, J.; Tavares, P.; Moura, J.J.G.; Moura, I.

    2009-05-18

    Adenylate kinase (AK) mediates the reversible transfer of phosphate groups between the adenylate nucleotides and contributes to the maintenance of their constant cellular level, necessary for energy metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis. The AK were purified from crude extracts of two sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), Desulfovibrio (D.) gigas NCIB 9332 and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774, and biochemically and spectroscopically characterized in the native and fully cobalt- or zinc-substituted forms. These are the first reported adenylate kinases that bind either zinc or cobalt and are related to the subgroup of metal-containing AK found, in most cases, in Gram-positive bacteria. The electronic absorption spectrum is consistent with tetrahedral coordinated cobalt, predominantly via sulfur ligands, and is supported by EPR. The involvement of three cysteines in cobalt or zinc coordination was confirmed by chemical methods. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicate that cobalt or zinc are bound by three cysteine residues and one histidine in the metal-binding site of the 'LID' domain. The sequence {sup 129}Cys-X{sub 5}-His-X{sub 15}-Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys of the AK from D. gigas is involved in metal coordination and represents a new type of binding motif that differs from other known zinc-binding sites of AK. Cobalt and zinc play a structural role in stabilizing the LID domain.

  18. A new type of metal-binding site in cobalt- and zinc-containing adenylate kinases isolated from sulfate-reducers Desulfovibrio gigas and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavel, Olga Yu; Bursakov, Sergey A; Di Rocco, Giulia; Trincão, José; Pickering, Ingrid J; George, Graham N; Calvete, Juan J; Shnyrov, Valery L; Brondino, Carlos D; Pereira, Alice S; Lampreia, Jorge; Tavares, Pedro; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AK) mediates the reversible transfer of phosphate groups between the adenylate nucleotides and contributes to the maintenance of their constant cellular level, necessary for energy metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis. The AK were purified from crude extracts of two sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), Desulfovibrio (D.) gigas NCIB 9332 and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774, and biochemically and spectroscopically characterised in the native and fully cobalt- or zinc-substituted forms. These are the first reported adenylate kinases that bind either zinc or cobalt and are related to the subgroup of metal-containing AK found, in most cases, in Gram-positive bacteria. The electronic absorption spectrum is consistent with tetrahedral coordinated cobalt, predominantly via sulfur ligands, and is supported by EPR. The involvement of three cysteines in cobalt or zinc coordination was confirmed by chemical methods. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicate that cobalt or zinc are bound by three cysteine residues and one histidine in the metal-binding site of the "LID" domain. The sequence 129Cys-X5-His-X15-Cys-X2-Cys of the AK from D. gigas is involved in metal coordination and represents a new type of binding motif that differs from other known zinc-binding sites of AK. Cobalt and zinc play a structural role in stabilizing the LID domain.

  19. The role of the C8 proton of ATP in the catalysis of shikimate kinase and adenylate kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Colin P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been demonstrated that the adenyl moiety of ATP plays a direct role in the regulation of ATP binding and/or phosphoryl transfer within a range of kinase and synthetase enzymes. The role of the C8-H of ATP in the binding and/or phosphoryl transfer on the enzyme activity of a number of kinase and synthetase enzymes has been elucidated. The intrinsic catalysis rate mediated by each kinase enzyme is complex, yielding apparent KM values ranging from less than 0.4 μM to more than 1 mM for ATP in the various kinases. Using a combination of ATP deuterated at the C8 position (C8D-ATP as a molecular probe with site directed mutagenesis (SDM of conserved amino acid residues in shikimate kinase and adenylate kinase active sites, we have elucidated a mechanism by which the ATP C8-H is induced to be labile in the broader kinase family. We have demonstrated the direct role of the C8-H in the rate of ATP consumption, and the direct role played by conserved Thr residues interacting with the C8-H. The mechanism by which the vast range in KM might be achieved is also suggested by these findings. Results We have demonstrated the mechanism by which the enzyme activities of Group 2 kinases, shikimate kinase (SK and adenylate kinase 1 (AK1, are controlled by the C8-H of ATP. Mutations of the conserved threonine residues associated with the labile C8-H cause the enzymes to lose their saturation kinetics over the concentration range tested. The relationship between the role C8-H of ATP in the reaction mechanism and the ATP concentration as they influence the saturation kinetics of the enzyme activity is also shown. The SDM clearly identified the amino acid residues involved in both the catalysis and regulation of phosphoryl transfer in SK and AK1 as mediated by C8H-ATP. Conclusions The data outlined serves to demonstrate the “push” mechanism associated with the control of the saturation kinetics of Group 2 kinases mediated by ATP C8-H. It

  20. A rapid ELISA-based method for screening Bordetella pertussis strain production of antigens included in current acellular pertussis vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkoff, Alex-Mikael; Guiso, Nicole; Guillot, Sophie; Xing, Dorothy; Markey, Kevin; Berbers, Guy; Mertsola, Jussi; He, Qiushui

    2014-06-01

    Despite extensive vaccinations, there have been pertussis epidemics in many countries including the Netherlands, the UK, Australia and the USA. During these epidemics Bordetella pertussis strains not producing the vaccine antigen pertactin (Prn) are emerging and increasing in numbers. However, methods for confirming PRN production of B. pertussis isolates are combined PCR or PCR-based sequencing tests and western blotting. Furthermore, data about production of pertussis toxin (PT) and filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) of these isolates are scarce. Fimbriae (Fim) production is usually determined by agglutination and reported as serotype. In this study we developed an easy, accurate and rapid method for screening PT and FHA production. Methods for Prn and Fim production have been published earlier. We analyzed altogether 109 B. pertussis strains, including 103 Finnish B. pertussis strains collected during 2006-2013, international strain Tohama I, French strains FR3496 (PT-negative), FR3693 (Prn-negative) and FR4624 (FHA-negative) and Fim-serotype reference strains S1 (producing only Fim2) and S3 (producing only Fim3). An indirect ELISA with whole bacterial cells as coating antigen was developed and used for rapid screening of the B. pertussis strains. Production of different antigens (PT, FHA, Prn, Fim2 and Fim3) was detected with specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). From the 103 Finnish B. pertussis strains tested, all were positive for PT, FHA and Fim. Four were found negative for Prn, and they were isolated during 2011-2013. The newly developed method proved to be useful and simple for rapid screening of different antigen production of B. pertussis isolates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identifying long-term memory B-cells in vaccinated children despite waning antibody levels specific for Bordetella pertussis proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikx, Lotte H; Oztürk, Kemal; de Rond, Lia G H; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2011-02-04

    Whooping cough is a respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. Since the 1950s in developed countries pertussis vaccinations are included in the national immunization program. However, antibody levels rapidly wane after both whole cell and acellular pertussis vaccination. Therefore protection against pertussis may depend largely on long-term B- and T-cell immunities. We investigated long-term pertussis-specific memory B-cell responses in children who were primed at infant age with the Dutch wP-vaccine (ISRCTN65428640). Purified B-cells were characterized by FACS-analysis and after polyclonal stimulation memory B-cells were detected by ELISPOT-assays specific for pertussis toxin, filamentous haemagglutinin, pertactin and tetanus. In addition, plasma IgG levels directed to the same antigens were measured by a fluorescent bead-based multiplex immunoassay. Two and 3 years after wP priming as well as 2 and 5 years after the aP booster at the age of 4, low plasma IgG levels to the pertussis proteins were found. At the same time, however pertussis protein-specific memory B-cells could be detected and their number increased with age. The number of tetanus-specific memory B-cells was similar in all age groups, whereas IgG-tetanus levels were high 2 years after tetanus booster compared to pre- and 5 years post-booster levels. This study shows the presence of long-term pertussis protein-specific memory B-cells in children despite waning antibody levels after vaccination, which suggests that memory B-cells in addition to antibodies may contribute to protection against pertussis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Immune-enhancing effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides on DNA vaccine expressing Bordetella avium ompA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujie eZhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bordetella avium is the causative agent of bordetellosis, which remains to be the cause of severe losses in the turkey industry. Given the lack of vaccines that can provide good protection, developing a novel vaccine against B. avium infection is crucial. In this study, we constructed a eukaryotic expression plasmid, which expressed the outer membrane protein A (ompA of B. avium, to prepare a B. avium recombinant ompA-DNA vaccine. Three concentrations (low, middle, and high of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides (TPPPS, a known immunomodulator, were used as adjuvants, and their immune conditioning effects on the developed DNA vaccine were examined. The pure ompA-DNA vaccine, Freund's incomplete adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine, and the empty plasmid served as the controls. The chickens in each group were separately inoculated with these vaccines three times at 1, 7 and 14 days old. Dynamic changes in antibody production, cytokine secretion, and lymphocyte count were then determined from 7 days to 49 days after the first inoculation. Protective rates of the vaccines were also determined after the third inoculation. Results showed that the pure DNA vaccine obviously induced the production of antibodies, the secretion of cytokines, and the increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts in peripheral blood, as well as provided a protective rate of 50% to the B. avium-challenged chickens. The chickens inoculated with the TPPPS adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine and Freund’s adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine demonstrated higher levels of immune responses than those inoculated with pure ompA-DNA vaccine, whereas only the ompA-DNA vaccine with 200 mg/mL TPPPS completely protected the chickens against B. avium infection. These findings indicate that the B. avium ompA-DNA vaccine combined with TPPPS is a potentially effective B. avium vaccine.

  3. [Clinical-epidemiological study of Bordetella pertussis infection in the Gran Canaria island in the period, 2008-2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Laura; Casabella Pernas, Antonio; Hernández Febles, Melisa; Colino Gil, Elena; Eisman Maraver, Alicia; Pena López, María José

    2017-12-06

    Describe the epidemiological and clinical pattern of Bordetella pertussis infection (whooping cough) among hospitalised infants less than one year-old in a paediatric hospital in Gran Canaria. A retrospective review of the patient hospital records was performed, and recording only those with a microbiological diagnosis of pertussis infection detected using polymerase chain reaction, from January 2008 to December 2016. A total of 110 patients were identified, of which 105 (95.4%) were less than 6 months-old, and 59.1% were males. The annual incidence of hospital admissions was estimated between 13.7 to 425.0 cases per 100,000 infants <12 months old, with 2peaks in 2011 and 2015. Household members were the main potential sources of infection. Main clinical features were pertussis cough associated with signs of catarrh, cyanosis, and lymphocytosis. Complications occurred in 15.4% of the patients (mainly pneumonia), but the outcome was favourable in all the cases. A lower age and non-vaccination were associated with an increased risk of developing complications (P<.05). Viral co-infection occurred in 31.6% of infants diagnosed with pertussis. The incidence of pertussis has increased in the last years in Gran Canaria, with a lower development of complications and mortality rates compared with the previous period. Lower age and non-vaccination status are considered risk factors for developing complications. Vaccination in pregnant women will probably lead to a decline in the incidence in the future, especially in infants younger than 6 months. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  4. Direct molecular typing of Bordetella pertussis from clinical specimens submitted for diagnostic quantitative (real-time) PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, David J; Jauneikaite, Elita; Tchipeva, Draga; Harrison, Timothy G; Fry, Norman K

    2012-12-01

    Molecular typing of Bordetella pertussis is routinely performed on bacterial isolates, but not on DNA extracted from nasopharyngeal aspirates or pernasal swabs submitted for diagnostic real-time PCR (qPCR). We investigated whether these DNA extracts were suitable for multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and DNA sequence-based typing. We analysed all the available qPCR-positive samples received by our laboratory from patients typing of the pertactin, pertussis toxin S1 subunit and pertussis promoter regions (prn, ptxA and ptxP) was attempted on 89 of the DNA extracts that had generated a full MLVA profile. Eighty-three (93 %) of these produced complete sequences for all three targets. Comparison of molecular typing data from the 89 extracts with those from 111 contemporary bacterial isolates showed that the two sources yielded the same picture of the B. pertussis population [dominated by the MLVA-27 prn(2) ptxA(1) ptxP(3) clonal type]. There was no significant difference in MLVA type distribution or diversity between the two sample sets. This suggests that clinical extracts can be used in place of, or to complement, bacterial cultures for typing purposes (at least, in this age group). With small modifications to methodology, generating MLVA and sequence-based typing data from qPCR-positive clinical DNA extracts is likely to generate a complete dataset in the majority of samples from the molecular epidemiological studies of the B. pertussis population or as a tool in outbreak investigations.

  5. Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Housekeeping Genes and Antigenic Determinant Genes in Bordetella pertussis Strains Isolated in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang-Oun; Moon, Yu Mi; Kim, So-Hyeon; Sung, Hwa Young; Kwon, Seung-Jik; Kang, Yeon Ho; Yu, Jae Yon

    2011-09-01

    To confirm genotype diversities of clinical isolates of Bordetella pertussis and to evaluate the risk of pertussis outbreak in Korea. Seven housekeeping genes and 10 antigenic determinant genes from clinical B. pertussis isolates were analyzed by Multilocus sequence typing (MLST). More variant pattern was observed in antigenic determinant genes. Especially, PtxS1 gene was the most variant gene; five genotypes were observed from eight global genotypes. In the bacterial type, the number of observed sequence types in the isolates was seven and the most frequent form was type 1 (79.6%). This major sequence type also showed a time-dependent transition pattern. Older isolates (1968 and 1975) showed type 1 and 6 in housekeeping genes and antigenic determinant genes, respectively. However, these were changed to type 2 and 1 in isolates 1999-2008. This transition was mainly attributed to genotype change of PtxS1 and Fim3 gene; the tendency of genotype change was to avoid vaccine-derived genotype. In addition, there was second transition in 2009. In this period, only the sequence type of antigenic determinant genes was changed to type 2. Based Upon Related Sequence Types (BURST) analysis confirmed that there were two clonal complexes (ACCI and ACCII) in the Korean isolates. Moreover, the recently increased sequence type was revealed as AST2 derived from AST 3 in ACCI. Genotype changes in Korean distributing strains are still progressing and there was a specific driving force in antigenic determinant genes. Therefore continuous surveillance of genotype change of the distributing strains should be performed to confirm interrelationship of genotype change with vaccine immunity.

  6. Differences in Bordetella pertussis DNA load according to clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with whooping cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotons, Pedro; de Paz, Hector D; Toledo, Diana; Villanova, Marta; Plans, Pedro; Jordan, Iolanda; Dominguez, Angela; Jane, Mireia; Godoy, Pere; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    To identify associations between nasopharyngeal Bordetella pertussis DNA load and clinical and epidemiological characteristics and evaluate DNA load prognostic value in pertussis severity. Prospective observational multi-centre study including nasopharyngeal samples positive to pertussis DNA by real-time PCR collected from children and adult patients in more than 200 health centres of Catalonia (Spain) during 2012-2013. B. pertussis load was inversely correlated with age (rho = -0.32, p < 0.001), time to diagnosis (rho = -0.33, p < 0.001) and number of symptoms (rho = 0.13, p = 0.002). Median bacterial load was significantly higher in inpatients versus outpatients (4.91 vs. 2.55 log10 CFU/mL, p < 0.001), patients with complications versus those without (6.05 vs. 2.82 log10 CFU/mL, p < 0.001), disease incidence in summer and autumn versus spring and winter (3.50 vs. 2.21 log10 CFU/mL, p = 0.002), and unvaccinated-partially vaccinated patients versus vaccinated (4.20 vs. 2.76 log10 CFU/mL, p = 0.004). A logistic regression model including bacterial load and other candidate prognostic factors showed good prediction for hospital care (AUC = 0.94) although only age and unvaccinated status were found to be prognostic factors. We observed strong positive associations of nasopharyngeal bacterial load with severity outcomes of hospitalisation and occurrence of complications. Bacterial load and other independent variables contributed to an accurate prognostic model for hospitalisation. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bordetella pertussis Isolates from Argentinean Whooping Cough Patients Display Enhanced Biofilm Formation Capacity Compared to Tohama I Reference Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Laura; Grunert, Tom; Cattelan, Natalia; de Gouw, Daan; Villalba, María I; Serra, Diego O; Mooi, Frits R; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Yantorno, Osvaldo M

    2015-01-01

    Pertussis is a highly contagious disease mainly caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite the massive use of vaccines, since the 1950s the disease has become re-emergent in 2000 with a shift in incidence from infants to adolescents and adults. Clearly, the efficacy of current cellular or acellular vaccines, formulated from bacteria grown in stirred bioreactors is limited, presenting a challenge for future vaccine development. For gaining insights into the role of B. pertussis biofilm development for host colonization and persistence within the host, we examined the biofilm forming capacity of eight argentinean clinical isolates recovered from 2001 to 2007. All clinical isolates showed an enhanced potential for biofilm formation compared to the reference strain Tohama I. We further selected the clinical isolate B. pertussis 2723, exhibiting the highest biofilm biomass production, for quantitative proteomic profiling by means of two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with mass spectrometry, which was accompanied by targeted transcriptional analysis. Results revealed an elevated expression of several virulence factors, including adhesins involved in biofilm development. In addition, we observed a higher expression of energy metabolism enzymes in the clinical isolate compared to the Tohama I strain. Furthermore, all clinical isolates carried a polymorphism in the bvgS gene. This mutation was associated to an increased sensitivity to modulation and a faster rate of adhesion to abiotic surfaces. Thus, the phenotypic biofilm characteristics shown by the clinical isolates might represent an important, hitherto underestimated, adaptive strategy for host colonization and long time persistence within the host.

  8. Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Analysis of Bordetella pertussis Isolates Circulating in Europe from 1998 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, Abdolreza; Hallander, Hans O.; Dalby, Tine; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki; Guiso, Nicole; Njamkepo, Elisabeth; von Könnig, Carl Heinz Wirsing; Riffelmann, Marion; Mooi, Frits R.; Sandven, Per; Lutyńska, Anna; Fry, Norman K.; Mertsola, Jussi

    2013-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2009, Bordetella pertussis clinical isolates were collected during three periods, i.e., 1998 to 2001 (n = 102), 2004 to 2005 (n = 154), and 2007 to 2009 (n = 140), from nine countries with distinct vaccination programs, i.e., Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis was performed according to standardized recommendations for epidemiological typing of B. pertussis. There were 81 different PFGE profiles, five of which (BpSR3, BpSR5, BpSR10, BpSR11, and BpSR12) were observed in 61% of the 396 isolates and shown to be predominant in almost all countries. The major profile, BpSR11, showed a decreasing trend from 25% to 30% in 1998 to 2005 to 13% in 2007 to 2009, and there were increases in BpSR3 and BpSR10 from 0% and 8% to 21% and 22%, respectively. One difference between these profiles is that BpSR11 contains isolates harboring the fim3-2 allele and BpSR3 and BpSR10 contain isolates harboring the fim3-1 allele. The total proportion of the five predominant profiles increased from 44% in 1998 to 2001 to 63% in 2004 to 2005 to 70% in 2007 to 2009. In conclusion, common PFGE profiles were identified in B. pertussis populations circulating in European countries with different vaccination programs and different vaccine coverages. These prevalent isolates contain the novel pertussis toxin promoter ptxP3 allele. However, there is evidence for diversifying selection between ptxP3 strains characterized by distinct PFGE profiles. This work shows that, even within a relatively short time span of 10 years, successful isolates which spread through Europe and cause large shifts in B. pertussis populations may emerge. PMID:23175253

  9. Bordetella pertussis isolates from Argentinean whooping cough patients display enhanced biofilm formation capacity compared to Tohama I reference strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eArnal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pertussis is a highly contagious disease mainly caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite the massive use of vaccines since the 1950´s the disease has become re-emergent in 2000 with a shift in incidence from infants to adolescents and adults. Clearly, the efficacy of current cellular or acellular vaccines, formulated from bacteria grown in stirred bioreactors is limited, presenting a challenge for future vaccine development. For gaining insights into the role of B. pertussis biofilm development for host colonization and persistence within the host, we examined the biofilm forming capacity of eight argentinean clinical isolates recovered from 2001 to 2007. All clinical isolates showed an enhanced potential for biofilm formation compared to the reference strain Tohama I. We further selected the clinical isolate B. pertussis 2723, exhibiting the highest biofilm biomass production, for quantitative proteomic profiling by means of two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE coupled with mass spectrometry (MS, which was accompanied by targeted transcriptional analysis. Results revealed an elevated expression of several virulence factors, including adhesins involved in biofilm development. In addition, we observed a higher expression of energy metabolism enzymes in the clinical isolate compared to the Tohama I strain. Furthermore, all clinical isolates carried a polymorphism in the bvgS gene. This mutation was associated to an increased sensitivity to modulation and a faster rate of adhesion to abiotic surfaces. Thus, the phenotypic biofilm characteristics shown by the clinical isolates might represent an important, hitherto underestimated, adaptive strategy for host colonization and long time persistence within the host.

  10. Membrane guanylate cyclase, a multimodal transduction machine: history, present, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rameshwar K; Duda, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    A sequel to these authors' earlier comprehensive reviews which covered the field of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC) from its origin to the year 2010, this article contains 13 sections. The first is historical and covers MGC from the year 1963-1987, summarizing its colorful developmental stages from its passionate pursuit to its consolidation. The second deals with the establishment of its biochemical identity. MGC becomes the transducer of a hormonal signal and founder of the peptide hormone receptor family, and creates the notion that hormone signal transduction is its sole physiological function. The third defines its expansion. The discovery of ROS-GC subfamily is made and it links ROS-GC with the physiology of phototransduction. Sections ROS-GC, a Ca(2+)-Modulated Two Component Transduction System to Migration Patterns and Translations of the GCAP Signals Into Production of Cyclic GMP are Different cover its biochemistry and physiology. The noteworthy events are that augmented by GCAPs, ROS-GC proves to be a transducer of the free Ca(2+) signals generated within neurons; ROS-GC becomes a two-component transduction system and establishes itself as a source of cyclic GMP, the second messenger of phototransduction. Section ROS-GC1 Gene Linked Retinal Dystrophies demonstrates how this knowledge begins to be translated into the diagnosis and providing the molecular definition of retinal dystrophies. Section Controlled By Low and High Levels of [Ca(2+)]i, ROS-GC1 is a Bimodal Transduction Switch discusses a striking property of ROS-GC where it becomes a "[Ca(2+)]i bimodal switch" and transcends its signaling role in other neural processes. In this course, discovery of the first CD-GCAP (Ca(2+)-dependent guanylate cyclase activator), the S100B protein, is made. It extends the role of the ROS-GC transduction system beyond the phototransduction to the signaling processes in the synapse region between photoreceptor and cone ON-bipolar cells; in section Ca(2

  11. ε-Caprolactam Utilization by Proteus sp. and Bordetella sp. Isolated From Solid Waste Dumpsites in Lagos State, Nigeria, First Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanuth, Hassan Adeyemi; Yadav, Amit; Fagade, Obasola Ezekiel; Shouche, Yogesh

    2013-06-01

    The ε-caprolactam is the monomer of the synthetic non-degradable nylon-6 and often found as nonreactive component of nylon-6 manufacturing waste effluent. Environmental consequences of its toxicity to natural habitats and humans pose a global public concern. Soil samples were collected from three designated solid waste dumpsites, namely, Abule-Egba, Olusosun and Isheri-Igando in Lagos State, Nigeria. Sixteen bacteria isolated from these samples were found to utilize the ε-caprolactam as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen at concentration of ≤20 g l(-1). The isolates were characterized using their 16S rRNA gene sequence and showed similarity with Pseudomonas sp., Proteus sp., Providencia sp., Corynebacterium sp., Lysinibacillus sp., Leucobacter sp., Alcaligenes sp. and Bordetella sp. Their optimal growth conditions were found to be at temperature range of 30 to 35 °C and pH range of 7.0-7.5. High Performance liquid chromatography analysis of the ε-caprolactam from supernatant of growth medium revealed that these isolates have potential to remove 31.6-95.7 % of ε-caprolactam. To the best of our knowledge, this study is first to report the ability of Proteus sp. and Bordetella sp. for ε-caprolactam utilization.

  12. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction-Based Detection of Bordetella pertussis in Mexican Infants and Their Contacts: A 3-Year Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino-Andrade, Alejandra; Martínez-Leyva, Gabriel; Mérida-Vieyra, Jocelin; Saltigeral, Patricia; Lara, Antonino; Domínguez, Wendy; García de la Puente, Silvestre; De Colsa, Agustín

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as a diagnostic method for the detection of Bordetella pertussis in hospitalized patients aged pertussis detection and symptoms in household contacts of patients diagnosed with pertussis were studied. A total of 286 patients were included; of these, 67.1% had B pertussis and 4.5% had Bordetella spp. Complications occurred in 20% of patients, and the mortality rate was 6.7%. Of 434 contacts studied, 111 were mothers of study infants, representing the most frequently B pertussis-infected group and the main symptomatic contact. The use of RT-PCR permits improved detection and diagnosis of pertussis and a better understanding of the epidemiology of sources of infection. The complications and mortality rate of pertussis continue to be high. Household contacts are confirmed as a frequent source of infection of B pertussis in young children. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular cloning, subcellular localization and characterization of two adenylate kinases from cassava, Manihot esculenta Crantz cv. KU50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonrueng, Channarong; Tangpranomkorn, Surachat; Yazhisai, Uthaman; Sirikantaramas, Supaart

    2016-10-01

    Adenylate kinase (ADK) is a phosphotransferase that plays an important role in cellular energy homeostasis. Many isozymes located in different subcellular compartments have been reported. In this study, we focus on the characterization of cassava (Manihot esculenta) ADKs. We found 15 ADKs that are publicly available in the African cassava genome database. We cloned two ADKs, namely MeADK1 and MeADK2, which are phylogenetically grouped together with the plastidial ADK in potato. Both MeADK1 and MeADK2 showed 66% identity in the amino acid sequences with plastidial ADK in potato. However, we demonstrated that they are localized to mitochondria using GFP fusions of MeADK1 and MeADK2. The Escherichia coli-produced recombinant MeADK1 and MeADK2 preferred forward reactions that produce ATP. They exhibited similar specific activities. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that MeADK1 and MeADK2 in 2-month-old leaves have similar expression patterns under a diurnal light-dark cycle. However, MeADK2 transcripts were expressed at much higher levels than MeADK1 in 5-month-old leaves and roots. Thus, we conclude that MeADK2 might play a vital role in energy homeostasis in cassava mitochondria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. A minor conformation of a lanthanide tag on adenylate kinase characterized by paramagnetic relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hass, Mathias A. S.; Liu, Wei-Min; Agafonov, Roman V.; Otten, Renee; Phung, Lien A.; Schilder, Jesika T.; Kern, Dorothee; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2015-01-01

    NMR relaxation dispersion techniques provide a powerful method to study protein dynamics by characterizing lowly populated conformations that are in dynamic exchange with the major state. Paramagnetic NMR is a versatile tool for investigating the structures and dynamics of proteins. These two techniques were combined here to measure accurate and precise pseudocontact shifts of a lowly populated conformation. This method delivers valuable long-range structural restraints for higher energy conformations of macromolecules in solution. Another advantage of combining pseudocontact shifts with relaxation dispersion is the increase in the amplitude of dispersion profiles. Lowly populated states are often involved in functional processes, such as enzyme catalysis, signaling, and protein/protein interactions. The presented results also unveil a critical problem with the lanthanide tag used to generate paramagnetic relaxation dispersion effects in proteins, namely that the motions of the tag can interfere severely with the observation of protein dynamics. The two-point attached CLaNP-5 lanthanide tag was linked to adenylate kinase. From the paramagnetic relaxation dispersion only motion of the tag is observed. The data can be described accurately by a two-state model in which the protein-attached tag undergoes a 23° tilting motion on a timescale of milliseconds. The work demonstrates the large potential of paramagnetic relaxation dispersion and the challenge to improve current tags to minimize relaxation dispersion from tag movements

  15. Role of water in the enzymatic catalysis: study of ATP + AMP → 2ADP conversion by adenylate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Bharat V; Jana, Biman; Bagchi, Biman

    2011-04-28

    The catalytic conversion ATP + AMP → 2ADP by the enzyme adenylate kinase (ADK) involves the binding of one ATP molecule to the LID domain and one AMP molecule to the NMP domain. The latter is followed by a phosphate transfer and then the release of two ADP molecules. We have computed a novel two-dimensional configurational free energy surface (2DCFES), with one reaction coordinate each for the LID and the NMP domain motions, while considering explicit water interactions. Our computed 2DCFES clearly reveals the existence of a stable half-open half-closed (HOHC) intermediate state of the enzyme. Cycling of the enzyme through the HOHC state reduces the conformational free energy barrier for the reaction by about 20 kJ/mol. We find that the stability of the HOHC state (missed in all earlier studies with implicit solvent model) is largely because of the increase of specific interactions of the polar amino acid side chains with water, particularly with the arginine and the histidine residues. Free energy surface of the LID domain is rather rugged, which can conveniently slow down LID's conformational motion, thus facilitating a new substrate capture after the product release in the catalytic cycle.

  16. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Dose adenosine 5'-triphosphate bind to the adenosine 5'-monophosphate site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shyy, Y.J.; Tian, G.; Tsai, M.D.

    1987-10-06

    Although the subtrate binding properties of adenylate kinase (AK) have been studied extensively by various biochemical and biophysical techniques, it remains controversial whether uncomplexed adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) binds to the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) site of AK. The authors present two sets of experiments which argue against binding of ATP to the AMP site. (a) /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance titration of ATP with AK indicated a 1:1 stoichiometry on the basis of changes in coupling constants and line widths. This ruled out binding of ATP to both sites. (b) ATP and MgATP were found to behave similarly by protecting AK from spontaneous inactivation while AMP showed only a small degree of protection. Such inactivation could also be protected or reversed by dithioerythritol and is most likely due to oxidation of sulfhydryl groups, one of which (cysteine-25) is located near the MgATP site. The results support binding of ATP to the MgATP site predominantly, instead of the AMP site, in the absence of Mg/sup 2 +/.

  17. Allene oxide synthase, allene oxide cyclase and jasmonic acid levels in Lotus japonicus nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zdyb

    Full Text Available Jasmonic acid (JA, its derivatives and its precursor cis-12-oxo phytodienoic acid (OPDA form a group of phytohormones, the jasmonates, representing signal molecules involved in plant stress responses, in the defense against pathogens as well as in development. Elevated levels of JA have been shown to play a role in arbuscular mycorrhiza and in the induction of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In this study, the gene families of two committed enzymes of the JA biosynthetic pathway, allene oxide synthase (AOS and allene oxide cyclase (AOC, were characterized in the determinate nodule-forming model legume Lotus japonicus JA levels were to be analysed in the course of nodulation. Since in all L. japonicus organs examined, JA levels increased upon mechanical disturbance and wounding, an aeroponic culture system was established to allow for a quick harvest, followed by the analysis of JA levels in whole root and shoot systems. Nodulated plants were compared with non-nodulated plants grown on nitrate or ammonium as N source, respectively, over a five week-period. JA levels turned out to be more or less stable independently of the growth conditions. However, L. japonicus nodules formed on aeroponically grown plants often showed patches of cells with reduced bacteroid density, presumably a stress symptom. Immunolocalization using a heterologous antibody showed that the vascular systems of these nodules also seemed to contain less AOC protein than those of nodules of plants grown in perlite/vermiculite. Hence, aeroponically grown L. japonicus plants are likely to be habituated to stress which could have affected JA levels.

  18. Stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase prevents cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary hypertension and emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissmann, Norbert; Lobo, Borja; Pichl, Alexandra; Parajuli, Nirmal; Seimetz, Michael; Puig-Pey, Raquel; Ferrer, Elisabet; Peinado, Víctor I; Domínguez-Fandos, David; Fysikopoulos, Athanasios; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Frey, Reiner; Schermuly, Ralph T; García-Lucio, Jéssica; Blanco, Isabel; Bednorz, Mariola; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Tadele, Elsa; Brandes, Ralf P; Grimminger, Jan; Klepetko, Walter; Jaksch, Peter; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich; Barberà, Joan A

    2014-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of death worldwide. No therapy stopping progress of the disease is available. To investigate the role of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)-cGMP axis in development of lung emphysema and pulmonary hypertension (PH) and to test whether the sGC-cGMP axis is a treatment target for these conditions. Investigations were performed in human lung tissue from patients with COPD, healthy donors, mice, and guinea pigs. Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 6 hours per day, 5 days per week for up to 6 months and treated with BAY 63-2521. Guinea pigs were exposed to CS from six cigarettes per day for 3 months, 5 days per week and treated with BAY 41-2272. Both BAY compounds are sGC stimulators. Gene and protein expression analysis were performed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Lung compliance, hemodynamics, right ventricular heart mass alterations, and alveolar and vascular morphometry were performed, as well as inflammatory cell infiltrate assessment. In vitro assays of cell adhesion, proliferation, and apoptosis have been done. The functionally essential sGC β1-subunit was down-regulated in patients with COPD and in CS-exposed mice. sGC stimulators prevented the development of PH and emphysema in the two different CS-exposed animal models. sGC stimulation prevented peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis of alveolar and endothelial cells, reduced CS-induced inflammatory cell infiltrate in lung parenchyma, and inhibited adhesion of CS-stimulated neutrophils. The sGC-cGMP axis is perturbed by chronic exposure to CS. Treatment of COPD animal models with sGC stimulators can prevent CS-induced PH and emphysema.

  19. Corruption of homeostatic mechanisms in the guanylyl cyclase C signaling pathway underlying colorectal tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Scott A

    2010-01-01

    Colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, originates from the malignant transformation of intestinal epithelial cells. The intestinal epithelium undergoes a highly organized process of rapid regeneration along the crypt-villus axis, characterized by proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis, whose coordination is essential to maintaining the mucosal barrier. Disruption of these homeostatic processes predisposes cells to mutations in tumor suppressors or oncogenes, whose dysfunction provides transformed cells an evolutionary growth advantage. While sequences of genetic mutations at different stages along the neoplastic continuum have been established, little is known of the events initiating tumorigenesis prior to adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations. Here, we examine a role for the corruption of homeostasis induced by silencing novel tumor suppressors, including the intestine-specific transcription factor CDX2 and its gene target guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), as early events predisposing cells to mutations in APC and other sequential genes that initiate colorectal cancer. CDX2 and GCC maintain homeostatic regeneration in the intestine by restricting cell proliferation, promoting cell maturation and adhesion, regulating cell migration and defending the intestinal barrier and genomic integrity. Elimination of CDX2 or GCC promotes intestinal tumor initiation and growth in aged mice, mice carrying APC mutations or mice exposed to carcinogens. The roles of CDX2 and GCC in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis, universal disruption in their signaling through silencing of hormones driving GCC, and the uniform overexpression of GCC by tumors underscore the potential value of oral replacement with GCC ligands as targeted prevention and therapy for colorectal cancer. PMID:20592492

  20. Isolated dorsal root ganglion neurones inhibit receptor-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity in associated glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, KY; Yeung, BHS; Wong, YH; Wise, H

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyper-nociceptive PGE2 EP4 receptors and prostacyclin (IP) receptors are present in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones and glial cells in culture. The present study has investigated the cell-specific expression of two other Gs-protein coupled hyper-nociceptive receptor systems: β-adrenoceptors and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors in isolated DRG cells and has examined the influence of neurone–glial cell interactions in regulating adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Experimental Approach Agonist-stimulated AC activity was determined in mixed DRG cell cultures from adult rats and compared with activity in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures and pure DRG glial cell cultures. Key Results Pharmacological analysis showed the presence of Gs-coupled β2-adrenoceptors and CGRP receptors, but not β1-adrenoceptors, in all three DRG cell preparations. Agonist-stimulated AC activity was weakest in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures. DRG neurones inhibited IP receptor-stimulated glial cell AC activity by a process dependent on both cell–cell contact and neurone-derived soluble factors, but this is unlikely to involve purine or glutamine receptor activation. Conclusions and Implications Gs-coupled hyper-nociceptive receptors are readily expressed on DRG glial cells in isolated cell cultures and the activity of CGRP, EP4 and IP receptors, but not β2-adrenoceptors, in glial cells is inhibited by DRG neurones. Studies using isolated DRG cells should be aware that hyper-nociceptive ligands may stimulate receptors on glial cells in addition to neurones, and that variable numbers of neurones and glial cells will influence absolute measures of AC activity and affect downstream functional responses. PMID:22924655