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Sample records for boosting antibody responses

  1. Boosting of HIV-1 neutralizing antibody responses by a distally related retroviral envelope protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Schiffner, Torben; Bowles, Emma;

    2014-01-01

    Our knowledge of the binding sites for neutralizing Abs (NAb) that recognize a broad range of HIV-1 strains (bNAb) has substantially increased in recent years. However, gaps remain in our understanding of how to focus B cell responses to vulnerable conserved sites within the HIV-1 envelope glycop...... results provide a proof of concept that a distally related retroviral SIV Env protein boost can increase pre-existing NAb responses against HIV-1....

  2. Per-oral immunization with antigen-conjugated nanoparticles followed by sub-cutaneous boosting immunization induces long-lasting mucosal and systemic antibody responses in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah E Howe

    Full Text Available Food or water-borne enteric pathogens invade their hosts via intestinal mucosal surfaces, thus developing effective oral vaccines would greatly reduce the burden of infectious diseases. The nature of the antigen, as well as the mode of its internalization in the intestinal mucosa affects the ensuing immune response. We show that model protein antigen ovalbumin (Ova given per-orally (p.o. induces oral tolerance (OT, characterized by systemic IgG1-dominated antibody response, which cannot be boosted by sub-cutaneous (s.c. immunization with Ova in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA. Intestinal IgA generated in response to Ova feeding diminished over time and was abrogated by s.c. immunization with Ova+CFA. Humoral response to Ova was altered by administering Ova conjugated to 20 nm nanoparticles (NP-Ova. P.o. administration of NP-Ova induced systemic IgG1/IgG2c, and primed the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA. These responses were boosted by secondary s.c. immunization with Ova+CFA or p.o. immunization with NP-Ova. However, only in s.c.-boosted mice serum and mucosal antibody titers remained elevated for 6 months after priming. In contrast, s.c. priming with NP-Ova induced IgG1-dominated serum antibodies, but did not prime the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA, even after secondary p.o. immunization with NP-Ova. These results indicate that Ova conjugated to NPs reaches the internal milieu in an immunogenic form and that mucosal immunization with NP-Ova is necessary for induction of a polarized Th1/Th2 immune response, as well as intestinal IgA response. In addition, mucosal priming with NP-Ova, followed by s.c. boosting induces superior systemic and mucosal memory responses. These findings are important for the development of efficacious mucosal vaccines.

  3. Infection with Plasmodium berghei Boosts Antibody Responses Primed by a DNA Vaccine Encoding Gametocyte Antigen Pbs48/45

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, Diana; Maciel, Jorge; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2006-01-01

    An important consideration in the development of a malaria vaccine for individuals living in areas of endemicity is whether vaccine-elicited immune responses can be boosted by natural infection. To investigate this question, we used Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood-stage parasites for the infection of mice that were previously immunized with a DNA vaccine encoding the P. berghei sexual-stage antigen Pbs48/45. Intramuscular immunization in mice with one or two doses of DNA-Pbs48/45 or of empty DN...

  4. Mutual boosting effects of sensitization with timothy grass pollen and latex glove extract on IgE antibody responses in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, V; Diepgen, T L; Kubeta, O; Leakakos, T; Truscott, W; Schuler, G; Kraft, D; Valenta, R

    2000-05-01

    Type I allergy to natural rubber latex can be an important health problem for latex-exposed individuals (e.g., health care workers, spina bifida children). Also beyond these risk groups, a high sensitization rate of varying and partly unknown clinical relevance has been reported. Atopy represents a risk factor for latex allergy and recent studies indicate that patients suffering from pollen allergies may have pollen allergen-specific IgE antibodies which cross-react with latex allergens. In order to investigate whether sensitization to pollen allergens can have priming effects on the production of IgE antibodies against latex in vivo, a mouse model was established. Groups of 10 BALB/C mice were immunized with Al(OH)3-adsorbed pollen extracts from timothy grass, ragweed, mugwort, or birch. For control purposes, one additional group received adjuvant only and another group was not immunized. Half of the mice of each group were subsequently immunized with Al(OH)3-adsorbed latex glove extract, the other half with adjuvant only. Pollen and latex-specific IgE- and IgG1-antibody responses were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and statistically evaluated by analysis of variance. Antibody responses to cross-reactive antigens were investigated by immunoblotting. We found significantly increased IgE reactivities to latex after pollen sensitization and vice versa. Moreover, mice immunized with timothy grass pollen extract alone - without subsequent latex immunization - displayed IgE reactivity to latex. Cross-reactive antibodies were directed against pollen antigens of approximately 60 kDa molecular weight. Our results thus demonstrate a mutual boosting effect of pollen and latex sensitization in vivo which may be also operative in polysensitized plant allergic patients. PMID:10771489

  5. Potent Functional Antibody Responses Elicited by HIV-I DNA Priming and Boosting with Heterologous HIV-1 Recombinant MVA in Healthy Tanzanian Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Agricola Joachim; Charlotta Nilsson; Said Aboud; Muhammad Bakari; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Merlin L Robb; Marovich, Mary A.; Patricia Earl; Bernard Moss; Christina Ochsenbauer; Britta Wahren; Fred Mhalu; Eric Sandström; Gunnel Biberfeld; Guido Ferrari

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA) virus boosting (HIVIS03). The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtyp...

  6. DNA vaccine delivered by a needle-free injection device improves potency of priming for antibody and CD8+ T-cell responses after rAd5 boost in a randomized clinical trial.

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    Barney S Graham

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA vaccine immunogenicity has been limited by inefficient delivery. Needle-free delivery of DNA using a CO2-powered Biojector® device was compared to delivery by needle and syringe and evaluated for safety and immunogenicity. METHODS: Forty adults, 18-50 years, were randomly assigned to intramuscular (IM vaccinations with DNA vaccine, VRC-HIVDNA016-00-VP, (weeks 0, 4, 8 by Biojector® 2000™ or needle and syringe (N/S and boosted IM at week 24 with VRC-HIVADV014-00-VP (rAd5 with N/S at 10(10 or 10(11 particle units (PU. Equal numbers per assigned schedule had low (≤500 or high (>500 reciprocal titers of preexisting Ad5 neutralizing antibody. RESULTS: 120 DNA and 39 rAd5 injections were given; 36 subjects completed follow-up research sample collections. IFN-γ ELISpot response rates were 17/19 (89% for Biojector® and 13/17 (76% for N/S delivery at Week 28 (4 weeks post rAd5 boost. The magnitude of ELISpot response was about 3-fold higher in Biojector® compared to N/S groups. Similar effects on response rates and magnitude were observed for CD8+, but not CD4+ T-cell responses by ICS. Env-specific antibody responses were about 10-fold higher in Biojector-primed subjects. CONCLUSIONS: DNA vaccination by Biojector® was well-tolerated and compared to needle injection, primed for greater IFN-γ ELISpot, CD8+ T-cell, and antibody responses after rAd5 boosting. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00109629.

  7. Rabies vaccination: comparison of neutralizing antibody responses after priming and boosting with different combinations of DNA, inactivated virus, or recombinant vaccinia virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodmell, D L; Ewalt, L C

    2000-05-01

    Long-term levels of neutralizing antibody were evaluated in mice after a single immunization with experimental DNA or recombinant vaccinia virus (RVV) vaccines encoding the rabies virus glycoprotein (G), or the commercially available inactivated virus human diploid cell vaccine (HDCV). Anamnestic antibody titers were also evaluated after two booster immunizations with vaccines that were identical to or different from the priming vaccine. Five hundred and forty days (1.5 year) after a single immunization with any of the three vaccines, neutralizing antibody titers remained greater than the minimal acceptable human level of antibody titer (0.5 International Units (IU)/ml). In addition, either an HDCV or DNA booster elicited early and elevated anamnestic antibody responses in mice that had been primed with any of the three vaccines. In contrast, RVV boosters failed to elevate titers in mice that had been previously primed with RVV, and elicited slowly rising titers in mice that had been primed with either DNA or HDCV. Thus, a single vaccination with any of the three different vaccines elicited long-term levels of neutralizing antibody that exceeded 0.5 IU/ml. In contrast, different prime-booster vaccine combinations elicited anamnestic neutralizing antibody responses that increased quickly, increased slowly or failed to increase. PMID:10738096

  8. New vaccine strategies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: II: Enhanced systemic and secreted antibody responses against the CFA/I fimbriae by priming with DNA and boosting with a live recombinant Salmonella vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Lásaro

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The induction of systemic (IgG and mucosal (IgA antibody responses against the colonization factor I antigen (CFA/I of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC was evaluated in mice primed with an intramuscularly delivered CFA/I-encoding DNA vaccine followed by two oral immunizations with a live recombinant Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain expressing the ETEC antigen. The booster effect induced by the oral immunization was detected two weeks and one year after the administration of the DNA vaccine. The DNA-primed/Salmonella-boosted vaccination regime showed a synergistic effect on the induced CFA/I-specific systemic and secreted antibody levels which could not be attained by either immunization strategy alone. These results suggest that the combined use of DNA vaccines and recombinant Salmonella vaccine strains can be a useful immunization strategy against enteric pathogens.

  9. Masking of antigenic epitopes by antibodies shapes the humoral immune response to influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnitsyna, Veronika I; Ellebedy, Ali H; Davis, Carl; Jacob, Joshy; Ahmed, Rafi; Antia, Rustom

    2015-09-01

    The immune responses to influenza, a virus that exhibits strain variation, show complex dynamics where prior immunity shapes the response to the subsequent infecting strains. Original antigenic sin (OAS) describes the observation that antibodies to the first encountered influenza strain, specifically antibodies to the epitopes on the head of influenza's main surface glycoprotein, haemagglutinin (HA), dominate following infection with new drifted strains. OAS suggests that responses to the original strain are preferentially boosted. Recent studies also show limited boosting of the antibodies to conserved epitopes on the stem of HA, which are attractive targets for a 'universal vaccine'. We develop multi-epitope models to explore how pre-existing immunity modulates the immune response to new strains following immunization. Our models suggest that the masking of antigenic epitopes by antibodies may play an important role in describing the complex dynamics of OAS and limited boosting of antibodies to the stem of HA. Analysis of recently published data confirms model predictions for how pre-existing antibodies to an epitope on HA decrease the magnitude of boosting of the antibody response to this epitope following immunization. We explore strategies for boosting of antibodies to conserved epitopes and generating broadly protective immunity to multiple strains. PMID:26194761

  10. Fulfill Social Responsibility, Boost Western Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Wei

    2010-01-01

    @@ 2010 CNPC(China National Petroleum Corporation)Conference of Leading Cadres was held in Dushanzi,Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region on July 16.The major tasks of the Conference are to thoroughly implement the scientific concept of development,to summarize and review the achievements in promoting transformation of development mode,to analyze the situation and tasks facing the company,to effectively enhance the initiative,the sense of urgency and responsibility,to accelerate transformation of development mode,thus to promote the construction of an integrated international energy corporation and realize comprehensive,coordinated and sustainable development.

  11. Potent T cell Responses Induced by Single DNA Vaccine Boosted with Recombinant Vaccinia Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianxing Liu; Chao Qiu; Yang Huang; Jianqing Xu; Yiming Shao

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid DNA,an effective vaccine vector,can induce both cellular and humoral immune responses.However,plasmid DNA raises issues concerning potential genomic integration after injection.This issue should be considered in preclinical studies.Tiantan vaccinia virus (TV) has been most widely utilized in eradicating smallpox in China.This virus has also been considered as a successful vaccine vector against a few infectious diseases.Potent T cell responses through T-cell receptor (TCR) could be induced by three injections of the DNA prime vaccine followed by a single injection of recombinant vaccinia vaccine.To develop a safer immunization strategy,a single DNA prime followed by a single recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTV) AIDS vaccine was used to immunize mice.Our data demonstrated that one DNA prime/rTV boost regimen induced mature TCR activation with high functional avidity,preferential T cell Vβ receptor usage and high sensitivity to anti-CD3 antibody stimulation.No differences in T cell responses were observed among one,two or three DNA prime/rTV boost regimens.This study shows that one DNA prime/rTV boost regimen is sufficient to induce potent T cell responses against HIV.

  12. HIV-1 Env DNA vaccine plus protein boost delivered by EP expands B- and T-cell responses and neutralizing phenotype in vivo.

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    Kar Muthumani

    Full Text Available An effective HIV vaccine will most likely require the induction of strong T-cell responses, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, and the elicitation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Previously, we demonstrated the induction of strong HIV/SIV cellular immune responses in macaques and humans using synthetic consensus DNA immunogens delivered via adaptive electroporation (EP. However, the ability of this improved DNA approach to prime for relevant antibody responses has not been previously studied. Here, we investigate the immunogenicity of consensus DNA constructs encoding gp140 sequences from HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C and D in a DNA prime-protein boost vaccine regimen. Mice and guinea pigs were primed with single- and multi-clade DNA via EP and boosted with recombinant gp120 protein. Sera were analyzed for gp120 binding and induction of neutralizing antibody activity. Immunization with recombinant Env protein alone induced low-titer binding antibodies with limited neutralization breath. In contrast, the synthetic DNA prime-protein boost protocol induced significantly higher antibody binding titers. Furthermore, sera from DNA prime-protein boost groups were able to neutralize a broader range of viruses in a panel of tier 1 clade B viruses as well as multiple tier 1 clade A and clade C viruses. Further investigation of synthetic DNA prime plus adaptive EP plus protein boost appears warranted.

  13. Antibody Response to Pneumocystis jirovecii

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Kieran R.; Huang, Laurence; Morris, Alison; Koch, Judy; Crothers, Kristina; Levin, Linda; Eiser, Shary; Satwah, Supriya; Zucchi, Patrizia; Walzer, Peter D.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a prospective pilot study of the serologic responses to overlapping recombinant fragments of the Pneumocystis jirovecii major surface glycoprotein (Msg) in HIV-infected patients with pneumonia due to P. jirovecii and other causes. Similar baseline geometric mean antibody levels to the fragments measured by an ELISA were found in both groups. Serum antibodies to MsgC in P. jirovecii patients rose to a peak level 3–4 weeks (p50 cells/μL and first episode of pneumocystosis were the ...

  14. Epigenetics of the antibody response

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone posttranslational modifications and microRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and microRNAs modulate t...

  15. Class specific antibody response to gonococcal infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Miettinen, A; Hakkarainen, K; Grönroos, P; Heinonen, P.; Teisala, K; Aine, R; Sillantaka, I; Saarenmaa, K; Lehtinen, M; Punnonen, R

    1989-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay was used to determine IgM, IgG, and IgA antibodies to gonococcal pili in 68 patients with uncomplicated gonorrhoea, 35 women with pelvic inflammatory disease, and in 115 normal controls. A clear difference in response rate in all three antibody classes between patients with gonorrhoea and healthy controls was evident. Among women with gonorrhoea, the magnitude of antibody response was higher than among men with gonorrhoea, especially in the IgM class. No major difference...

  16. The Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime-Rv0577 DNA boost vaccination induces a durable Th1 immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dongqing; Chen, Wei; Mi, Youjun; Gong, Xueli; Luo, Tao; Bao, Lang

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global health problem and effective vaccines are urgently needed. In this study, we used the combined DNA- and protein-based vaccines of immunodominant antigen Rv0577 to boost BCG and evaluated their immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. Our data suggest that the booster vaccine may substantially enhance the immunogenicity of BCG and strengthen both CD4+ T cell-mediated Th1 and CD8+ T cell-mediated cytolytic responses. Compared with the protein-based vaccine, the DNA-based vaccine can induce more durable Th1 immune response, characterized by high levels of antibody response, proliferation response, percentages of CD4+/CD8+ and cytokine secretion in antigen-stimulated splenocyte cultures. In conclusion, we for the first time, developed a protein- and plasmid DNA-based booster vaccine based on Rv0577. Our findings suggest that antigen Rv0577-based DNA vaccine is immunogenic and can efficiently boost BCG, which could be helpful in the design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB. PMID:26922320

  17. Adaptive responses to antibody based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodems, Tamara S; Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Pearson, Hannah E; Orbuch, Rachel A; Flanigan, Bailey G; Wheeler, Deric L

    2016-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) represent a large class of protein kinases that span the cellular membrane. There are 58 human RTKs identified which are grouped into 20 distinct families based upon their ligand binding, sequence homology and structure. They are controlled by ligand binding which activates intrinsic tyrosine-kinase activity. This activity leads to the phosphorylation of distinct tyrosines on the cytoplasmic tail, leading to the activation of cell signaling cascades. These signaling cascades ultimately regulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, migration, survival and homeostasis of the cell. The vast majority of RTKs have been directly tied to the etiology and progression of cancer. Thus, using antibodies to target RTKs as a cancer therapeutic strategy has been intensely pursued. Although antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have shown promise in the clinical arena, the development of both intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibody-based therapies is now well appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the RTK family, the biology of EGFR and HER2, as well as an in-depth review of the adaptive responses undertaken by cells in response to antibody based therapies directed against these receptors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms and their relevance in human models will lead to molecular insights in overcoming and circumventing resistance to antibody based therapy. PMID:26808665

  18. Cellular cooperation during in vivo anti-hapten antibody responses. I. The effect of cell number on the response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular interactions in adoptive secondary anti-hapten antibody responses to the hapten 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) have been studied. It was shown that DNP-specific B cells must interact with carrier specific helper T cells to give optimal responses. Independent titration of B cell and helper cell activity in adoptive anti-DNP antibody responses gave the following results: Doubling the number of transferred B cells approximately doubled the subsequent antibody response. Doubling the number of helper cells leads to nearly 4 times as much anti-DNP antibody, measured 7 days after boosting (''premium effect''). This marked effect of helper cell number on the antibody response is thought to be due primarily to the interaction of two populations of carrier-specific cells in the helper effect, or to the interaction of two activities of a single population of helper cells, namely clone activation and clone expansion. Only a very small proportion of the premium effect given by helper cells could be attributed to increases in antibody affinity. (U.S.)

  19. Decay of Sabin inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV-boosted poliovirus antibodies

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    Sonia Resik

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The decay of poliovirus antibodies over a 21–22-month period was similar regardless of the type of booster vaccine used, suggesting the scientific data of Salk IPV long-term persistence and decay may be broadly applicable to Sabin IPV.

  20. Multi-epitope Models Explain How Pre-existing Antibodies Affect the Generation of Broadly Protective Responses to Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Lavine, Jennie; Ellebedy, Ali; Ahmed, Rafi; Antia, Rustom

    2016-01-01

    The development of next-generation influenza vaccines that elicit strain-transcendent immunity against both seasonal and pandemic viruses is a key public health goal. Targeting the evolutionarily conserved epitopes on the stem of influenza’s major surface molecule, hemagglutinin, is an appealing prospect, and novel vaccine formulations show promising results in animal model systems. However, studies in humans indicate that natural infection and vaccination result in limited boosting of antibodies to the stem of HA, and the level of stem-specific antibody elicited is insufficient to provide broad strain-transcendent immunity. Here, we use mathematical models of the humoral immune response to explore how pre-existing immunity affects the ability of vaccines to boost antibodies to the head and stem of HA in humans, and, in particular, how it leads to the apparent lack of boosting of broadly cross-reactive antibodies to the stem epitopes. We consider hypotheses where binding of antibody to an epitope: (i) results in more rapid clearance of the antigen; (ii) leads to the formation of antigen-antibody complexes which inhibit B cell activation through Fcγ receptor-mediated mechanism; and (iii) masks the epitope and prevents the stimulation and proliferation of specific B cells. We find that only epitope masking but not the former two mechanisms to be key in recapitulating patterns in data. We discuss the ramifications of our findings for the development of vaccines against both seasonal and pandemic influenza. PMID:27336297

  1. Oral priming with replicating adenovirus serotype 4 followed by subunit H5N1 vaccine boost promotes antibody affinity maturation and expands H5N1 cross-clade neutralization.

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    Khurana, Surender; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa R; Ishioka, Glenn; Alexander, Jeff; Smith, Jon; Gurwith, Marc; Golding, Hana

    2015-01-01

    A Phase I trial conducted in 2009-2010 demonstrated that oral vaccination with a replication competent Ad4-H5 (A/Vietnam) vector with dosages ranging from 107-1011 viral particles was well tolerated. HA-specific T-cell responses were efficiently induced, but very limited hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) humoral responses were measured. However, a single boost of Ad4-H5-Vtn vaccinated individuals with a unadjuvanted licensed H5N1 (A/Vietnam) subunit vaccine resulted in superior HI titers compared with unprimed subjects. In the current study, the impact of Ad4-H5 priming on the quality of the polyclonal humoral immune response was evaluated using a real-time kinetics assay by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Total binding of serum polyclonal antibodies from the Ad4-H5-Vtn primed groups against both homologous H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1) and heterologous A/Indonesia-5/2005 (clade 2.1) HA1 head domain was significantly higher compared with sera from individuals that received subunit H5N1 vaccination alone. SPR measurements also demonstrated that the antigen-antibody complex dissociation rates (a surrogate for antibody affinity) of serum antibodies against the HA1 of H5N1-A/Vietnam were significantly higher in the Ad4-H5 primed groups compared with those from the unprimed group. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between the antibody affinities for HA1 (but not HA2) and the virus neutralization titers against the homologous strain and a panel of heterologous clade 2 H5N1 strains. These findings support the concept of oral prime-boost vaccine approaches against pandemic influenza to elicit long-term memory B cells with high affinity capable of rapid response to variant pandemic viruses likely to emerge and adapt to human transmissions. PMID:25629161

  2. Augmentation of the antibody response of Atlantic salmon by oral administration of alginate-encapsulated IPNV antigens.

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    Lihan Chen

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of alginate-encapsulated infectious pancreatic necrosis virus antigens in inducing the immune response of Atlantic salmon as booster vaccines. One year after intraperitoneal injection with an oil-adjuvanted vaccine, post-smolts were orally boosted either by 1 alginate-encapsulated IPNV antigens (ENCAP; 2 soluble antigens (UNENCAP or 3 untreated feed (control. This was done twice, seven weeks apart. Sampling was done twice, firstly at 7 weeks post 1st oral boost and the 2nd, at 4 weeks after the 2nd oral boost. Samples included serum, head kidney, spleen and hindgut. Serum antibodies were analyzed by ELISA while tissues were used to assess the expression of IgM, IgT, CD4, GATA3, FOXP3, TGF-β and IL-10 genes by quantitative PCR. Compared to controls, fish fed with ENCAP had a significant increase (p<0.04 in serum antibodies following the 1st boost but not after the 2nd boost. This coincided with significant up-regulation of CD4 and GATA3 genes. In contrast, serum antibodies in the UNENCAP group decreased both after the 1st and 2nd oral boosts. This was associated with significant up-regulation of FOXP3, TGF-β and IL-10 genes. The expression of IgT was not induced in the hindgut after the 1st oral boost but was significantly up-regulated following the 2nd one. CD4 and GATA3 mRNA expressions exhibited a similar pattern to IgT in the hindgut. IgM mRNA expression on the other hand was not differentially regulated at any of the times examined. Our findings suggest that 1 Parenteral prime with oil-adjuvanted vaccines followed by oral boost with ENCAP results in augmentation of the systemic immune response; 2 Symmetrical prime and boost (mucosal with ENCAP results in augmentation of mucosal immune response and 3 Symmetrical priming and boosting (mucosal with soluble antigens results in the induction of systemic immune tolerance.

  3. Mucosal priming of newborn mice with S. Typhi Ty21a expressing anthrax protective antigen (PA) followed by parenteral PA-boost induces B and T cell-mediated immunity that protects against infection bypassing maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Karina; Ditamo, Yanina; Galen, James E; Baillie, Les W J; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2010-08-23

    The currently licensed anthrax vaccine has several limitations and its efficacy has been proven only in adults. Effective immunization of newborns and infants requires adequate stimulation of their immune system, which is competent but not fully activated. We explored the use of the licensed live attenuated S. Typhi vaccine strain Ty21a expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen [Ty21a(PA)] followed PA-alum as a strategy for immunizing the pediatric population. Newborn mice primed with a single dose of Ty21a(PA) exhibited high frequencies of mucosal IgA-secreting B cells and IFN-gamma-secreting T cells during the neonatal period, none of which was detected in newborns immunized with a single dose of PA-alum. Priming with Ty21a(PA) followed by PA-boost resulted in high levels of PA-specific IgG, toxin neutralizing and opsonophagocytic antibodies and increased frequency of bone marrow IgG plasma cells and memory B cells compared with repeated immunization with PA-alum alone. Robust B and T cell responses developed even in the presence of maternal antibodies. The prime-boost protected against systemic and respiratory infection. Mucosal priming with a safe and effective S. Typhi-based anthrax vaccine followed by PA-boost could serve as a practical and effective prophylactic approach to prevent anthrax early in life. PMID:20619377

  4. Using Intradermal Rabies Vaccine to Boost Immunity in People with Low Rabies Antibody Levels

    OpenAIRE

    David Brown; Fooks, Anthony R.; Martin Schweiger

    2011-01-01

    Intradermal rabies vaccine is recommended by the World Health Organisation, but not all countries, including England, follow this recommendation. A group of 12 adults in England previously given pre-exposure intradermal rabies vaccine were considered to be non-immune to rabies because their rabies antibody titres were known to be less than 0.5 IU/mL. A cohort study examined the immunizing effect of increasing the participants' cumulative dose of intradermal rabies to 2.0 IU. All patients subs...

  5. Potent and Broadly Reactive HIV-2 Neutralizing Antibodies Elicited by a Vaccinia Virus Vector Prime-C2V3C3 Polypeptide Boost Immunization Strategy▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, José Maria; Borrego, Pedro; Rocha, Cheila; Barroso, Helena; Quintas, Alexandre; Novo, Carlos; Taveira, Nuno

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infection affects about 1 to 2 million individuals, the majority living in West Africa, Europe, and India. As for HIV-1, new strategies for the prevention of HIV-2 infection are needed. Our aim was to produce new vaccine immunogens that elicit the production of broadly reactive HIV-2 neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). Native and truncated envelope proteins from the reference HIV-2ALI isolate were expressed in vaccinia virus or in bacteria. This source isolate was used due to its unique phenotype combining CD4 independence and CCR5 usage. NAbs were not elicited in BALB/c mice by single immunization with a truncated and fully glycosylated envelope gp125 (gp125t) or a recombinant polypeptide comprising the C2, V3, and C3 envelope regions (rpC2-C3). A strong and broad NAb response was, however, elicited in mice primed with gp125t expressed in vaccinia virus and boosted with rpC2-C3. Serum from these animals potently neutralized (median 50% neutralizing titer, 3,200) six of six highly divergent primary HIV-2 isolates. Coreceptor usage and the V3 sequence of NAb-sensitive isolates were similar to that of the vaccinating immunogen (HIV-2ALI). In contrast, NAbs were not reactive on three X4 isolates that displayed major changes in V3 loop sequence and structure. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that broadly reactive HIV-2 NAbs can be elicited by using a vaccinia virus vector-prime/rpC2-C3-boost immunization strategy and suggest a potential relationship between escape to neutralization and cell tropism. PMID:20844029

  6. Serum Antibody Response to Clostridium botulinum Toxin in Infant Botulism

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, Lorry G.; Dezfulian, Manuchehr; Yolken, Robert H.

    1982-01-01

    A serum antibody response has not been previously demonstrated after infection with Clostridium botulinum. We developed an enzyme immunoassay for measuring serum antibody to C. botulinum toxins A, B, and E. This assay system detected a specific immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M antibody response to C. botulinum toxin in two patients with infant botulism.

  7. Radiosensitivity of antibody responses and radioresistant secondary tetanus antitoxin responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary tetanus antitoxin responses were increasingly repressed in mice when gamma radiation doses of 100 to 400 rads were delivered by whole-body exposure prior to immunization with fluid tetanus toxoid (FTT). Nearly normal secondary antitoxin responses were obtained in mice exposed to 600 rads of gamma radiation 4 days after secondary antigenic stimulation with FTT. A rapid transition from radiosensitivity of the antibody-forming system on days 1 to 3 was followed by relative radioresistance on day 4 after the booster injection of toxoid. Studies on lymphoid cellular kinetics in popliteal lymph nodes after injection of 3H--thymidine (3H--TdR) and incorporation of 3H--L-histidine into circulating antitoxin were carried out. Analysis of tritium radioactivity in antigen--antibody precipitates of serums 2 hr after injection of the labeled amino acid revealed maximum incorporation into antibody around day 7 after the booster in nonirradiated controls and about day 12, i.e., 8 days after irradiation, in experimental mice. The shift from radiosensitivity to relative radioresistance was attributed to a marked peak of plasma-cell proliferation in the medulla of lymph nodes on day 3. Many medullary plasma cells survived and continued to proliferate after exposure to radiation. Germinal centers were destroyed by radiation within 1 day. Since antibody formation continued after exposure to radiation and after the loss of germinal centers, this supports the view that germinal-center cells were involved more in the generation of memory cells than in antibody synthesis

  8. Blocking junctional adhesion molecule C enhances dendritic cell migration and boosts the immune responses against Leishmania major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Ballet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment of dendritic cells to sites of infections and their migration to lymph nodes is fundamental for antigen processing and presentation to T cells. In the present study, we showed that antibody blockade of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C on endothelial cells removed JAM-C away from junctions and increased vascular permeability after L. major infection. This has multiple consequences on the output of the immune response. In resistant C57BL/6 and susceptible BALB/c mice, we found higher numbers of innate immune cells migrating from blood to the site of infection. The subsequent migration of dendritic cells (DCs from the skin to the draining lymph node was also improved, thereby boosting the induction of the adaptive immune response. In C57BL/6 mice, JAM-C blockade after L. major injection led to an enhanced IFN-γ dominated T helper 1 (Th1 response with reduced skin lesions and parasite burden. Conversely, anti JAM-C treatment increased the IL-4-driven T helper 2 (Th2 response in BALB/c mice with disease exacerbation. Overall, our results show that JAM-C blockade can finely-tune the innate cell migration and accelerate the consequent immune response to L. major without changing the type of the T helper cell response.

  9. SUMO boosts the DNA damage response barrier against cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2010), s. 9-11. ISSN 1535-6108 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/0353 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : DNA damage response * ubiquitylation * sumoylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 26.925, year: 2010

  10. Demonstration of brachytherapy boost dose-response relationships in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate brachytherapy dose-response relationships in adults with glioblastoma undergoing temporary 125I implant boost after external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Since June 1987, orthogonal radiographs using a fiducial marker box have been used to verify brain implant source positions and generate dose-volume histograms at the University of California, San Francisco. For adults who underwent brachytherapy boost for glioblastoma from June 1987 through December 1992, tumor volumes were reoutlined to ensure consistency and dose-volume histograms were recalculated. Univariate and multivariate analyses of various patient and treatment parameters were performed evaluating for influence of dose on freedom from local failure (FFLF) and actuarial survival. Results: Of 102 implant boosts, 5 were excluded because computer plans were unavailable. For the remaining 97 patients, analyses with adjustment for known prognostic factors (age, KPS, extent of initial surgical resection) and prognostic factors identified on univariate testing (adjuvant chemotherapy) showed that higher minimum brachytherapy tumor dose was strongly associated with improved FFLF (p = 0.001). A quadratic relationship was found between total biological effective dose and survival, with a trend toward optimal survival probability at 47 Gy minimum brachytherapy tumor dose (corresponding to about 65 Gy to 95% of the tumor volume); survival decreased with lower or higher doses. Two patients expired and one requires hospice care because of brain necrosis after brachytherapy doses > 63 Gy to 95% of the tumor volume with 60 Gy to > 18 cm3 of normal brain. Conclusion: Although higher minimum brachytherapy tumor dose was strongly associated with better local control, a brachytherapy boost dose > 50-60 Gy may result in life-threatening necrosis. We recommend careful conformation of the prescription isodose line to the contrast enhancing tumor volume, delivery of a minimum brachytherapy boost

  11. Antibody Response and Disease Severity in Healthcare Worker MERS Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshukairi, Abeer N; Khalid, Imran; Ahmed, Waleed A; Dada, Ashraf M; Bayumi, Daniyah T; Malic, Laut S; Althawadi, Sahar; Ignacio, Kim; Alsalmi, Hanadi S; Al-Abdely, Hail M; Wali, Ghassan Y; Qushmaq, Ismael A; Alraddadi, Basem M; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-06-01

    We studied antibody response in 9 healthcare workers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, who survived Middle East respiratory syndrome, by using serial ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence assay testing. Among patients who had experienced severe pneumonia, antibody was detected for >18 months after infection. Antibody longevity was more variable in patients who had experienced milder disease. PMID:27192543

  12. Antibody Response and Disease Severity in Healthcare Worker MERS Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Imran; Ahmed, Waleed A.; Dada, Ashraf M.; Bayumi, Daniyah T.; Malic, Laut S.; Althawadi, Sahar; Ignacio, Kim; Alsalmi, Hanadi S.; Al-Abdely, Hail M.; Wali, Ghassan Y.; Qushmaq, Ismael A.; Alraddadi, Basem M.; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    We studied antibody response in 9 healthcare workers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, who survived Middle East respiratory syndrome, by using serial ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence assay testing. Among patients who had experienced severe pneumonia, antibody was detected for >18 months after infection. Antibody longevity was more variable in patients who had experienced milder disease. PMID:27192543

  13. Antibody responses in allogeneic radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of long-lived allogeneic radiation chimeras, free of graft-versus-host disease, has been achieved using serologic elimination of Thy 1+ cells from donor bone marrow. Humoral immune function was not restored in these animals as evidenced by lack of primary antibody responses to a T cell-dependent antigen, namely, sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) both in vivo and in vitro. No evidence for a suppressor cell-mediated mechanism was found. Using separated chimera spleen cell populations and specific helper cell soluble mediators, the functional capabilities of chimera B cells, T cells, and macrophages were assessed. These findings suggested that the failure of chimeras to produce antibody is not the result of impaired B cell, T cell, or macrophage function, but rather, that it is due to ineffective cellular interactions. Physiologic cellular interactions depend upon the sharing of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) determinants between interacting cells. However, the self-recognition repertoire of developing T cells may be influenced by the environment which these cells differentiate such that they learn to recognize host MHC determinants as self. These findings support the interpretation that the immunologic hyporeactivity of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras reflects the role of the host environment in restricting the interactive capabilities of donor-derived cells

  14. Induction of Broad and Potent Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immune Responses in Rhesus Macaques by Priming with a DNA Vaccine and Boosting with Protein-Adsorbed Polylactide Coglycolide Microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Otten, Gillis; Schaefer, Mary; Greer, Catherine; Calderon-Cacia, Maria; Coit, Doris; Kazzaz, Jina; Medina-Selby, Angelica; Selby, Mark; Singh, Manmohan; Ugozzoli, Mildred; zur Megede, Jan; Barnett, Susan W.; O'Hagan, Derek; Donnelly, John; Ulmer, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Several vaccine technologies were evaluated for their abilities to induce anti-human immunodeficiency virus Gag immune responses in rhesus macaques. While no vaccine alone was able to induce broad and strong immune responses, these were achieved by priming with Gag DNA and boosting with Gag protein adsorbed to polylactide coglycolide microparticles. This regimen elicited strong antibodies, helper T cells, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes and thus holds promise as an effective vaccination scheme.

  15. Heterologous prime-boost regimens with a recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral vector and adjuvanted F4 protein elicit polyfunctional HIV-1-specific T-Cell responses in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin, Clarisse; Vanloubbeeck, Yannick; Baudart, Sébastien; Ska, Michaël; Bayat, Babak; Brauers, Geoffroy; Clarinval, Géraldine; Donner, Marie-Noëlle; Marchand, Martine; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Mettens, Pascal; Cohen, Joe; Voss, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are important for HIV-1 replication control. F4/AS01 consists of F4 recombinant fusion protein (containing clade B Gag/p24, Pol/RT, Nef and Gag/p17) formulated in AS01 Adjuvant System, and was shown to induce F4-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses in humans. While replication-incompetent recombinant HIV-1/SIV antigen-expressing human adenoviral vectors can elicit high-frequency antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, their use is hampered by widespread pre-existing immunity to human serotypes. Non-human adenovirus serotypes associated with lower prevalence may offer an alternative strategy. We evaluated the immunogenicity of AdC7-GRN ('A'), a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 7 vector expressing clade B Gag, RT and Nef, and F4/AS01 ('P'), when delivered intramuscularly in homologous (PP or AA) and heterologous (AAPP or PPAA) prime-boost regimens, in macaques and mice. Vaccine-induced HIV-1-antigen-specific T cells in peripheral blood (macaques), liver, spleen, and intestinal and genital mucosa (mice) were characterized by intracellular cytokine staining. Vaccine-specific IgG antibodies (macaques) were detected using ELISA. In macaques, only the heterologous prime-boost regimens induced polyfunctional, persistent and balanced CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses specific to each HIV-1 vaccine antigen. AdC7-GRN priming increased the polyfunctionality of F4/AS01-induced CD4+ T cells. Approximately 50% of AdC7-GRN-induced memory CD8+ T cells exhibited an effector-memory phenotype. HIV-1-specific antibodies were detected with each regimen. In mice, antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in the mucosal and systemic anatomical compartments assessed. When administered in heterologous prime-boost regimens, AdC7-GRN and F4/AS01 candidate vaccines acted complementarily in inducing potent and persistent peripheral blood HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses and antibodies in macaques. Besides

  16. A Bivalent, Chimeric Rabies Virus Expressing Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Induces Multifunctional Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, Amber; Shen, Shixue; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David; McGettigan, James P

    2015-11-01

    We previously showed that a matrix (M) gene-deleted rabies virus (RABV)-based vaccine (RABV-ΔM) is highly immunogenic and induces potent B cell responses in the context of RABV infection. We speculated that RABV-ΔM expressing HIV proteins would also induce potent B cell responses against HIV antigens. As a prerequisite to future studies in nonhuman primates, we completed immunogenicity studies in mice to confirm the ability of RABV-ΔM to induce polyfunctional B cell responses in the context of HIV. To that end, the envelope protein from the mac239 strain of SIV (SIVmac239Env) was cloned into RABV-ΔM, resulting in RABV-ΔM-Env. Infectious virus was recovered following standard methods and propagated on baby hamster kidney cells stably expressing RABV M [>10(7) focus forming units (ffu)/ml]. Western blot analysis of cell lysates or of purified virions confirmed Env expression on the surface of infected cells and within virus particles, respectively. Positive neutralization activity against a neutralization-sensitive SIV strain and to a lesser extent against a neutralization-resistant SIV strain was detected in mice after a single intramuscular inoculation with RABV-ΔM-Env. The quality, but not quantity, of the antibody response was enhanced via boosting with recombinant gp130 or RABV-ΔM-Env as measured by an increase in antibody avidity and a skewing toward a Th1-type antibody response. We also show that an intradermal inoculation induces higher antibodies than an intramuscular or intranasal inoculation. An intradermal inoculation of RABV-ΔM-Env followed by a boost inoculation with recombinant gp130 produced anti-SIV antibodies with neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibody (nNAb) effector functions. Together, RABV-ΔM-Env induces B cells to secrete antibodies against SIV with the potential to clear both "free" and cell-associated virus. Strategies capable of eliciting both NAbs as well as nNAbs might help to improve the efficacy of HIV-1 vaccines. PMID

  17. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure Suppresses T-independent Antibody Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to  3.75mg/kg of perfluoroocatnoic acid (PFOA) for 15d suppresses T-dependent antibody responses (TDAR), suggesting that T helper cells and/or B cells/plasma cells may be impacted. This study evaluated effects of PFOA exposure on the T cell-independent antibody response...

  18. Antibodies Produced in Response to Cryptococcus neoformans Pulmonary Infection in Mice Have Characteristics of Nonprotective Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Casadevall, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    Murine cryptocococcal pulmonary infection elicited serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG to the capsular polysaccharide, but only IgG stained yeast cells in alveoli. Both isotypes produced punctuate immunofluorescence patterns on yeast cells like those of nonprotective antibodies. The difficulties involved in associating humoral immunity with protection in murine cryptocococcal infection could reflect nonprotective antibody responses.

  19. Immunity to rhabdoviruses in rainbow trout: the antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lapatra, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    detail so far. Analysis of the specificity of anti-virus trout antibodies has been complicated by a generally insufficient ability of the antibodies to bind the viral proteins in assays such as immunoblotting. However, other assays, specifically designed for detection of fish anti IHNV/VHSV antibodies...... occasional detrimental effect on rainbow trout farming. Research efforts have been focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in protective immunity. Several specific and nonspecific cellular and humoral parameters are believed to be involved, but only the antibody response has been characterised in......, have demonstrated that rainbow trout can produce specific and highly functional antibodies that are able to neutralise virus pathogenicity in vitro as well as in vivo. The apparently more restricted antibody response to IHNV and VHSV antigens in fish compared to mammals could possibly be explained by...

  20. Enhancing antibody: a novel component of the immune response.

    OpenAIRE

    Nemazee, D A; Sato, V L

    1982-01-01

    Current descriptions of the immune response identify two classes of antigenic stimuli that result in the production of specific antibody: (i) exogenous antigens and (ii) endogenous variable-region determinants of the immune system. We expand this scheme to include a third class of antigenic stimulus--new determinants created by the binding of antibody to antigen. This paper describes a set of monoclonal antibodies which arose after repeated immunization with antigen alone but which bound anti...

  1. Boosting BCG-primed responses with a subunit Apa vaccine during the waning phase improves immunity and imparts protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Kannanganat, Sunil; Dobos, Karen M; Lucas, Megan; Spencer, John S; Amara, Rama Rao; Plikaytis, Bonnie B; Posey, James E; Sable, Suraj B

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous prime-boosting has emerged as a powerful vaccination approach against tuberculosis. However, optimal timing to boost BCG-immunity using subunit vaccines remains unclear in clinical trials. Here, we followed the adhesin Apa-specific T-cell responses in BCG-primed mice and investigated its BCG-booster potential. The Apa-specific T-cell response peaked 32-52 weeks after parenteral or mucosal BCG-priming but waned significantly by 78 weeks. A subunit-Apa-boost during the contraction-phase of BCG-response had a greater effect on the magnitude and functional quality of specific cellular and humoral responses compared to a boost at the peak of BCG-response. The cellular response increased following mucosal BCG-prime-Apa-subunit-boost strategy compared to Apa-subunit-prime-BCG-boost approach. However, parenteral BCG-prime-Apa-subunit-boost by a homologous route was the most effective strategy in-terms of enhancing specific T-cell responses during waning in the lung and spleen. Two Apa-boosters markedly improved waning BCG-immunity and significantly reduced Mycobacterium tuberculosis burdens post-challenge. Our results highlight the challenges of optimization of prime-boost regimens in mice where BCG drives persistent immune-activation and suggest that boosting with a heterologous vaccine may be ideal once the specific persisting effector responses are contracted. Our results have important implications for design of prime-boost regimens against tuberculosis in humans. PMID:27173443

  2. Inadequate Antibody Response to Rabies Vaccine in Immunocompromised Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Kopel, Eran; Oren, Gal; Sidi, Yechezkel; David, Dan

    2012-01-01

    We describe an inadequate antibody response to rabies vaccine in an immunocompromised patient. A literature search revealed 15 additional immunocompromised patients, of whom 7 did not exhibit the minimum acceptable level of antibodies after a complete postexposure prophylaxis regimen. An international rabies registry is needed to provide a basis for determining appropriate vaccination protocols.

  3. Feedback Enhancement of Antibody Responses via Complement and Fc Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström, Jörgen

    2001-01-01

    IgG, IgM and IgE in complex with antigen have the capacity to regulate specific immune responses. In this investigation, the role of Fc receptors for IgG (FcγRI, FcγRII and FcγRIII) and complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) for antibody-mediated enhancement of antibody responses are investigated. IgM is known to efficiently activate complement and thereby enhance specific antibody responses but it is not known if this involves binding to CR1/2. Using CR1/2 deficient mice, immunized with sheep ...

  4. Prime-boost strategies in mucosal immunization affect local IgA production and the type of Th response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eFiorino

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Combinations of different delivery routes for priming and boosting represent vaccination strategies that can modulate magnitude, quality, and localization of the immune response. A murine model was used to study T cell clonal expansion following nasal or subcutaneous priming, and secondary immune responses after boosting by either homologous or heterologous routes. T cell primary activation was studied by using the adoptive transfer model of ovalbumin-specific transgenic CD4+ T cells. Both nasal and subcutaneous immunization efficiently elicited, in the respective draining lymph nodes, primary clonal expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that disseminated towards distal lymph nodes (mesenteric and iliac and the spleen. After boosting, a very high serum IgG response was induced in all groups independent of the combination of immunization routes used, while significant levels of local IgA were detected only in mice boosted by the nasal route. Mucosal priming drove a stronger Th1 polarization than the systemic route, as shown by serum IgG subclass analysis. IFN-gamma production was observed in splenocytes of all groups, while prime-boost vaccine combinations that included the mucosal route, yielded higher levels of IL-17. Memory lymphocytes were identified in both spleen and draining lymph nodes in all immunized mice, with the highest number of IL-2 producing cells detected in mice primed and boosted by the nasal route. This work shows the critical role of immunization routes in modulating quality and localization of immune responses, in prime-boost vaccine strategies.

  5. Antibody response in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) immunized with a model antigen associated with different adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, T R; Di Domenico, J; Kirsten, K S; Nied, C O; Frandoloso, R; Kreutz, L C

    2016-07-25

    Adjuvants are essential to boost the immune response to inoculated antigen and play a central role in vaccine development. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of several adjuvants in the production of anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies in silver catfish. Two hundred and seventy juvenile silver catfish (60-80 g) of both sexes were intraperitoneally vaccinated with BSA (200 µg/fish) alone or mixed to the following adjuvants: Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), aluminum hydroxide (AlOH), Montanide, four types of cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) and three concentrations of β-glucan, and the immune enhancing property was evaluated by measuring anti-BSA antibodies in blood samples at biweekly intervals. Our results demonstrated that CpGs ODNs and β-glucan were as effective as classical adjuvants (FCA, FIA, AlOH and Montanide) in promoting anti-BSA antibodies and that the kinetics of antibody production induced by all adjuvants used in our study had a similar trend to that observed in other fish species, with a peak at 28 days post-vaccination. These results may be useful for the selection of adjuvants for vaccine formulation intended for silver catfish and for the development of vaccine and vaccination strategies to other fish species. PMID:27464022

  6. Antibody responses in patients with invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsson, G; Colque-Navarro, P.; Gustafsson, E.; Andersson, R.; Möllby, R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Correlation between antibody response and clinical outcome in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia has yielded conflicting results. Immunization schedules have failed in clinical trials. Is the humoral response toward S. aureus of protective nature? A prospective study was performed in patients with invasive S. aureus (ISA) infections during the period 2003?2005. The antibody levels were determined at the beginning and at the end of treatment and one month later (n?=?96, n?=?7...

  7. Immunity to rhabdoviruses in rainbow trout: the antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lapatra, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    occasional detrimental effect on rainbow trout farming. Research efforts have been focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in protective immunity. Several specific and nonspecific cellular and humoral parameters are believed to be involved, but only the antibody response has been characterised in......, have demonstrated that rainbow trout can produce specific and highly functional antibodies that are able to neutralise virus pathogenicity in vitro as well as in vivo. The apparently more restricted antibody response to IHNV and VHSV antigens in fish compared to mammals could possibly be explained by...

  8. Subtype C gp140 Vaccine Boosts Immune Responses Primed by the South African AIDS Vaccine Initiative DNA-C2 and MVA-C HIV Vaccines after More than a 2-Year Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Glenda E; Mayer, Kenneth H; Elizaga, Marnie L; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Allen, Mary; Morris, Lynn; Montefiori, David; De Rosa, Stephen C; Sato, Alicia; Gu, Niya; Tomaras, Georgia D; Tucker, Timothy; Barnett, Susan W; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N; Shen, Xiaoying; Downing, Katrina; Williamson, Carolyn; Pensiero, Michael; Corey, Lawrence; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2016-06-01

    A phase I safety and immunogenicity study investigated South African AIDS Vaccine Initiative (SAAVI) HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) DNA vaccine encoding Gag-RT-Tat-Nef and gp150, boosted with modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing matched antigens. Following the finding of partial protective efficacy in the RV144 HIV vaccine efficacy trial, a protein boost with HIV-1 subtype C V2-deleted gp140 with MF59 was added to the regimen. A total of 48 participants (12 U.S. participants and 36 Republic of South Africa [RSA] participants) were randomized to receive 3 intramuscular (i.m.) doses of SAAVI DNA-C2 of 4 mg (months 0, 1, and 2) and 2 i.m. doses of SAAVI MVA-C of 1.45 × 10(9) PFU (months 4 and 5) (n = 40) or of a placebo (n = 8). Approximately 2 years after vaccination, 27 participants were rerandomized to receive gp140/MF59 at 100 μg or placebo, as 2 i.m. injections, 3 months apart. The vaccine regimen was safe and well tolerated. After the DNA-MVA regimen, CD4(+) T-cell and CD8(+) T-cell responses occurred in 74% and 32% of the participants, respectively. The protein boost increased CD4(+) T-cell responses to 87% of the subjects. All participants developed tier 1 HIV-1C neutralizing antibody responses as well as durable Env binding antibodies that recognized linear V3 and C5 peptides. The HIV-1 subtype C DNA-MVA vaccine regimen showed promising cellular immunogenicity. Boosting with gp140/MF59 enhanced levels of binding and neutralizing antibodies as well as CD4(+) T-cell responses to HIV-1 envelope. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00574600 and NCT01423825.). PMID:27098021

  9. Boost Effects in the (e,e') Transverse Response of 3He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomusiak, Edward; Efros, Victor; Leidemann, Winfried; Orlandini, Giuseppina; Yuan, Luping

    2015-10-01

    In an earlier paper Efros et al. investigated frame dependence in calculations of the transverse (e,e') response function of 3He. These calculations were non-relativistic but did incorporate relativistic corrections in the electromagnetic operators. Those corrections, taken from the work of Ritz et al. are of order M-3 and represent kinematical effects. It was found that in the region of the quasi-elastic peak, with one proviso, frame dependence held to a good approximation up to q = 700 MeV/c. The one proviso was that we not include one of the corrections - the so-called ω-dependent term. Although this term vanishes in one of the frames (the ANB frame) the question arises as to whether or not another correction exists which might nearly restore frame independence. This work investigates the possibility that Boost effects may provide an explanation. We report on our progress in this regard.

  10. Development of enhanced antibody response toward dual delivery of nano-adjuvant adsorbed human Enterovirus-71 vaccine encapsulated carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohamed I; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Hussein, Mohd Z; Elkhidir, Isam M; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a new approach for enhancing immunity toward mucosal vaccines. HEV71 killed vaccine that is formulated with nanosize calcium phosphate adjuvant and encapsulated onto chitosan and alginate delivery carriers was examined for eliciting antibody responses in serum and saliva collected at weeks 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 for viral-specific IgA & IgG levels and viral neutralizing antibody titers. The antibody responses induced in rabbits by the different formulations delivered by a single (buccal) route were compared to those of dual immunization (intradermal / mucosal) and un-immunized control. Chitosan-loaded vaccine adjuvant induced elevated IgA antibody, while Alginate-adjuvant irreversible bonding sequestered the vaccine and markedly reduced immunogenicity. The induced mucosal and parenteral antibody profiles appeared in an inverse manner of enhanced mucosal IgA antibody accompanied by lower systemic IgG following a single oral immunization route. The combined intradermal and oral dual-immunized group developed an elevated salivary IgA, systemic IgG, and virus neutralizing response. A reduced salivary neutralizing antibody titer was observed and attributed to the continual secretion exchanges in saliva. Designing a successful mucosal delivery formulation needs to take into account the vaccine delivery site, dosage, adjuvant and carrier particle size, charge, and the reversibility of component interactions. The dual immunization seems superior and is a important approach for modulating the antibody response and boosting mucosal protection against HEV71 and similar pathogens based on their transmission mode, tissue tropism and shedding sites. Finally, the study has highlighted the significant role of dual immunization for simultaneous inducing and modulating the systemic and mucosal immune responses to EV71. PMID:26186664

  11. Antibody and B cell responses to Plasmodium sporozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna N Dups

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are capable of blocking infection of the liver by Plasmodium sporozoites. Accordingly the induction of anti-sporozoite antibodies is a major aim of various vaccine approaches to malaria. In recent years our knowledge of the specificity and quantities of antibodies required for protection has been greatly expanded by clinical trials of various whole sporozoite and subunit vaccines. Moreover, the development of humanized mouse models and transgenic parasites have also aided our ability to assess the specificity of antibodies and their ability to block infection. Nonetheless, considerable gaps remain in our knowledge - in particular in understanding what antigens are recognized by infection blocking antibodies and in knowing how we can induce robust, long-lived antibody responses. Maintaining high levels of circulating antibodies is likely to be of primary importance, as antibodies must block infection in the short time it takes for sporozoites to reach the liver from the skin. It is clear that a better understanding of the development of protective B cell-mediated immunity will aid the development and refinement of malaria vaccines.

  12. Boosting BCG with inert spores improves immunogenicity and induces specific IL-17 responses in a murine model of bovine tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Kaveh, Daryan A; Sibly, Laura; Webb, Paul R; Bull, Naomi C; Cutting, Simon M; Hogarth, Philip J

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global pandemic, in both animals and man, and novel vaccines are urgently required. Heterologous prime-boost of BCG represents a promising strategy for improved TB vaccines, with respiratory delivery the most efficacious to date. Such an approach may be an ideal vaccination strategy against bovine TB (bTB), but respiratory vaccination presents a technical challenge in cattle. Inert bacterial spores represent an attractive vaccine vehicle. Therefore we evaluated whether parenterally administered spores are efficacious when used as a BCG boost in a murine model of immunity against Mycobacterium bovis. Here we report the use of heat-killed, TB10.4 adsorbed, Bacillus subtilis spores delivered via subcutaneous injection to boost immunity primed by BCG. We demonstrate that this approach improves the immunogenicity of BCG. Interestingly, this associated with substantial boosting of IL-17 responses; considered to be important in protective immunity against TB. These data demonstrate that parenteral delivery of spores represents a promising vaccine vehicle for boosting BCG, and identifies potential for optimisation for use as a vaccine for bovine TB. PMID:27156624

  13. Heterologous prime-boost immunization regimens using adenovirus vector and virus-like particles induce broadly neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Chang; Liu, Wen-Chun; Lin, Yu-Fen; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2013-11-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses continue to trigger severe diseases in poultry and humans, prompting efforts to develop an effective vaccine. Toward that goal, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus vector encoding influenza hemagglutin (rAd-HA) and a flagellin-containing virus-like particle (FliC-VLP). Using a murine model, we investigated a heterologous prime-boost vaccination regimen combining these two vectors. Our results indicate that priming with the rAd-HA vector followed by a FliC-VLP booster induced the highest HA-specific total IgG, IgG1and IgG2a. Maximum neutralizing antibody titers against homologous and heterologous clades of H5N1 virus strains and hemagglutination inhibition resulted from the heterologous vaccination strategy. Our results are likely to contribute to the development of more effective H5N1 vaccines. PMID:23813782

  14. Antibody and T-cell responses associated with experimental human malaria infection or vaccination show limited relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen M; Okitsu, Shinji; Porter, David W; Duncan, Christopher; Amacker, Mario; Pluschke, Gerd; Cavanagh, David R; Hill, Adrian V S; Todryk, Stephen M

    2015-05-01

    This study examined specific antibody and T-cell responses associated with experimental malaria infection or malaria vaccination, in malaria-naive human volunteers within phase I/IIa vaccine trials, with a view to investigating inter-relationships between these types of response. Malaria infection was via five bites of Plasmodium falciparum-infected mosquitoes, with individuals reaching patent infection by 11-12 days, having harboured four or five blood-stage cycles before drug clearance. Infection elicited a robust antibody response against merozoite surface protein-119 , correlating with parasite load. Classical class switching was seen from an early IgM to an IgG1-dominant response of increasing affinity. Malaria-specific T-cell responses were detected in the form of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 (IL-4) ELIspot, but their magnitude did not correlate with the magnitude of antibody or its avidity, or with parasite load. Different individuals who were immunized with a virosome vaccine comprising influenza antigens combined with P. falciparum antigens, demonstrated pre-existing interferon-γ, IL-2 and IL-5 ELIspot responses against the influenza antigens, and showed boosting of anti-influenza T-cell responses only for IL-5. The large IgG1-dominated anti-parasite responses showed limited correlation with T-cell responses for magnitude or avidity, both parameters being only negatively correlated for IL-5 secretion versus anti-apical membrane antigen-1 antibody titres. Overall, these findings suggest that cognate T-cell responses across a range of magnitudes contribute towards driving potentially effective antibody responses in infection-induced and vaccine-induced immunity against malaria, and their existence during immunization is beneficial, but magnitudes are mostly not inter-related. PMID:25471322

  15. Focusing antibody responses against distraction and loss in diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenshen; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    Pathogens are complex and evolving fast. They have developed full ranges of disguises to divert immune responses and often manage to escape recognition and thereby outpace natural immunity. A prominent example is the scarce and staggered development of broadly neutralizing antibodies against highly mutable viruses. It remains unclear under what evolutionary conditions these exceptional antibodies could emerge and dominate the response. To address this challenge, we construct an individual-based stochastic model of the Darwinian evolution of antibody-producing immune cells. We consider complexity of viral epitopes, vary seeding diversity of the immune cell population, and allow a time varying population size and extinction - new aspects essential for designing a realistic vaccine. We show that various temporal statistics of antigenic environments would select distinct evolutionary paths that lead to predominantly non-neutralizing, strain-specific or broadly neutralizing antibody responses. We suggest strategies to focus antibody responses on the targeted vulnerability of the virus and confer selective advantage to cross-reactive lineages. This implies a new step toward an effective vaccine against rapidly mutating complex pathogens. This work is supported by NIH.

  16. Anti-survivin antibody responses in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikas, Vaios; Khalil, Sanaa; Kerenidi, Theodora; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Germenis, Anastasios E

    2009-09-18

    Existing evidence regarding spontaneous anti-survivin humoral responses in lung cancer is inconclusive. Moreover, despite that cancer cell death elicited by radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents seems to be immunogenic, information about the possible effect of treatment on these responses, is lacking. Serum samples from 33 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and 117 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients upon diagnosis, and from 100 controls, were tested by ELISA for anti-survivin antibodies. Cutoff was set to the mean+2SD of controls. 7.7% of NSCLC, none of the SCLC patients and 2% of the controls appeared with elevated antibody levels (OR 3.6, 95% CI 0.7-17.3 for NSCLC, OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.03-12.6 for SCLC). Measurement of antibodies in 76 NSCLC patients post therapies and during their follow-up, revealed that in 12 NSCLC patients the antibody levels increased up to 2-38 times, and in seven others, they decreased by 2-8 times. No significant correlation was uncovered between either the antibody levels upon diagnosis or their changes post therapies and during follow-up, and any clinicopathological parameter, their response to therapy and survival. Survivin does not induce considerable humoral responses in lung cancer. Potentially, however, strong anti-survivin antibody responses can be elicited during the post therapy and follow-up of the patients, whose clinical significance remains to be elucidated. These findings, together with our previous data concerning survivin expression and the related cytolytic T cell responses in lung cancer, signify a high tolerogenic potential of this tumor-associated antigen. PMID:19380192

  17. Cross-clade neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 induced in rabbits by focusing the immune response on a neutralizing epitope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were performed to induce cross-clade neutralizing antibodies (Abs) by testing various combinations of prime and boost constructs that focus the immune response on structurally-conserved epitopes in the V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120. Rabbits were immunized with gp120 DNA containing a V3 loop characterized by the GPGR motif at its tip, and/or with gp120 DNA with a V3 loop carrying the GPGQ motif. Priming was followed by boosts with V3-fusion proteins (V3-FPs) carrying the V3 sequence from a subtype B virus (GPGR motif), and/or with V3 sequences from subtypes A and C (GPGQ motif). The broadest and most consistent neutralizing responses were generated when using a clade C gp120 DNA prime and with the V3B-FP boost. Immune sera displayed neutralizing activity in three assays against pseudoviruses and primary isolates from subtypes A, AG, B, C, and D. Polyclonal Abs in the immune rabbit sera neutralized viruses that were not neutralized by pools of human anti-V3 monoclonal Abs. Greater than 80% of the neutralizing Abs were specific for V3, showing that the immune response could be focused on a neutralizing epitope and that vaccine-induced anti-V3 Abs have cross-clade neutralizing activity.

  18. Ranitidine improves postoperative suppression of antibody response to preoperative vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F;

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the histamine-2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (100 mg intravenously every 12 hours for 72 hours) on postoperative serum antibody responses to preoperative immunization with six limit of flocculation tetanus toxoid and six limit of flocculation diphtheria toxoid was assessed in a...... and antidiphtheria toxoid were drawn before skin incision and on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28. Ranitidine significantly increased the postoperative antibody response to tetanus toxoid, (p less than 0.01) and insignificantly increased that to diphtheria toxoid vaccination (p less...

  19. Antibody responses to recombinant and plasma derived hepatitis B vaccines.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, S E; Stanley, C.; Howard, C. R.; Zuckerman, A J; Steward, M W

    1986-01-01

    The antibody response to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) induced in 25 recipients of a recombinant hepatitis B vaccine derived from yeast was compared with that induced in 25 recipients of a vaccine prepared from hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) derived from plasma. Anti-HBs affinity and specificity were compared using assays of antibody affinity with two different antigens, a complex of the major polypeptide of HBsAg (p25; molecular weight 25 000 daltons) covalently linked to its g...

  20. Ability of herpes simplex virus vectors to boost immune responses to DNA vectors and to protect against challenge by simian immunodeficiency virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immunogenicity and protective capacity of replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector-based vaccines were examined in rhesus macaques. Three macaques were inoculated with recombinant HSV vectors expressing Gag, Env, and a Tat-Rev-Nef fusion protein of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Three other macaques were primed with recombinant DNA vectors expressing Gag, Env, and a Pol-Tat-Nef-Vif fusion protein prior to boosting with the HSV vectors. Robust anti-Gag and anti-Env cellular responses were detected in all six macaques. Following intravenous challenge with wild-type, cloned SIV239, peak and 12-week plasma viremia levels were significantly lower in vaccinated compared to control macaques. Plasma SIV RNA in vaccinated macaques was inversely correlated with anti-Rev ELISPOT responses on the day of challenge (P value < 0.05), anti-Tat ELISPOT responses at 2 weeks post challenge (P value < 0.05) and peak neutralizing antibody titers pre-challenge (P value 0.06). These findings support continued study of recombinant herpesviruses as a vaccine approach for AIDS

  1. Intratypic heterologous vaccination of calves can induce an antibody response in presence of maternal antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, A.; Eble, P.L.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Chenard, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background - Maternal antibodies can interfere with foot-and-mouth disease vaccination. In this study we determined whether intratypic heterologous vaccination could help to improve herd immunity. Results - In unvaccinated calves, a half-life of maternal antibodies of 21 days was determined. At two weeks of age, calves without maternal antibodies showed a good antibody response against both vaccines used in the trial, while in calves with maternal antibodies no antibody response to homologous...

  2. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  3. Effect of praziquantel treatment of Schistosoma mansoni during pregnancy on intensity of infection and antibody responses to schistosome antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tweyongyere, Robert; Mawa, Patrice A.; Emojong, Nicholas O.;

    2009-01-01

    with those first treated after delivery (undetected (88.5%), light (10.6%), moderate (0.9%) and heavy (0%), p = 0.16). Parasite specific antibody levels were lower during pregnancy than after delivery. Praziquantel treatment during pregnancy boosted anti-worm IgG isotypes and to a lesser extent Ig......E, but these boosts were less pronounced than in women whose treatment was delayed until after delivery. Praziquantel had limited effects on antibodies against egg antigens. Conclusion S mansoni antigen-specific antibody levels and praziquantel-induced boosts in antibody levels were broadly suppressed...

  4. Co-administration of non-carrier nanoparticles boosts antigen immune response without requiring protein conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Nani; Chuan, Yap P; Seth, Arjun; Cordoba, Yoann; Lua, Linda H L; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2014-06-17

    Nanotechnology promises a revolution in medicine including through new vaccine approaches. The use of nanoparticles in vaccination has, to date, focused on attaching antigen directly to or within nanoparticle structures to enhance antigen uptake by immune cells. Here we question whether antigen incorporation with the nanoparticle is actually necessary to boost vaccine effectiveness. We show that the immunogenicity of a sub-unit protein antigen was significantly boosted by formulation with silica nanoparticles even without specific conjugation of antigen to the nanoparticle. We further show that this effect was observed only for virus-sized nanoparticles (50 nm) but not for larger (1,000 nm) particles, demonstrating a pronounced effect of nanoparticle size. This non-attachment approach has potential to radically simplify the development and application of nanoparticle-based formulations, leading to safer and simpler nanoparticle applications in vaccine development. PMID:24793947

  5. Antibody response and antibody affinity maturation in cats with experimental proliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, S A; Bailey, M; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R

    1992-07-01

    An experimental model of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) in the cat, which closely resembles human proliferative forms of GN, has been used to study the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the development of immune complex-mediated renal disease. The serum IgG and IgM antibody response to antigen, average antibody affinity (avidity) and affinity heterogeneity of the IgG and IgM populations was assessed at varying times after commencement of chronic immunization with the antigen, human serum albumin (HSA), by enzyme immunoassay. Cats could be classified according to whether they were "low", "intermediate" or "high" IgG responders, by quantification of serum IgG values. Cats with the lowest serum IgG values failed to develop glomerulonephritis. However, there was no relationship between actual IgG values and the severity of the induced disease. In contrast to IgG, there was no division of cats into low or high IgM anti-HSA responders. Again, cats with the lowest IgM values failed to develop GN, but, more interestingly, a late, marked increase in serum IgM anti-HSA occurred only in cats that developed clinical signs of GN (anterior uveitis and nephrotic syndrome). Maturation of average, functional IgG affinity (avidity) for HSA following chronic immunization was clearly demonstrated for all cats. At the end of the experiment, all cats had IgG of high affinity for HSA and the average affinity heterogeneity of the IgG populations was less than in measurements taken earlier. Values of IgG affinity at the end of the experiment were very similar both in cats which developed GN and in those which remained clinically, biochemically and pathologically normal. In contrast to IgG antibody, some cats developed IgM of increased affinity, whilst others produced antibody of reduced affinity, following chronic immunization. There was no correlation between the development of disease and the production of either low or high affinity IgM antibody. Data indicated that an

  6. Induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses against the HIV coreceptor CCR5 upon intramuscular immunization and aerosol delivery of a Virus-like Particle based vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Z; Smyth, HD; Durfee, P; Chackerian, B

    2009-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) can be exploited as platforms to increase the immunogenicity of poorly immunogenic antigens, including self-proteins. We have developed VLP-based vaccines that target two domains of the HIV coreceptor CCR5 that are involved in HIV binding. These vaccines induce anti-CCR5 antibodies that bind to native CCR5 and inhibit SIV infection in vitro. Given the role of mucosal surfaces in HIV transmission and replication, we also asked whether an aerosolized, VLP-based pulmonary vaccine targeting CCR5 could induce a robust mucosal response in addition to a systemic response. In rats, both intramuscular and pulmonary immunization induced high titer IgG and IgA against the vaccine in the serum, but only aerosol vaccination induced IgA antibodies at local mucosal sites. An intramuscular prime followed by an aerosol boost resulted in strong serum and mucosal antibody responses. These results show that VLP-based vaccines targeting CCR5 induce high-titer systemic antibodies, and can elicit both local and systemic mucosal response when administered via an aerosol. Vaccination against a self-molecule that is critically involved during HIV transmission and pathogenesis is an alternative to targeting the virus itself. More generally, our results provide a general method for inducing broad systemic and mucosal antibody responses using VLP-based immunogens. PMID:19849995

  7. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Alam, Jahangir; Afsar, Nure Alam; Huda, Nazmul; Kabir, Yearul; Qadri, Firdausi; Raqib, Rubhana; Stephensen, Charles B

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy. Infants received tetanus and pertussis vaccines at 6, 10 and 14 wk of age. TT and PT anti-IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes was measured at 15 wk. Plasma antibodies were measured at 6 wk (pre-vaccination), 15 wk and 1 y of age. Prior to vaccination, TT and PT antibody were detected in 94.6% and 15.2% of infants. At 15 wk anti-TT-IgG and anti-PT-IgG in plasma was increased by 7-9 fold over pre-vaccination levels, while at 1 y plasma anti-TT-IgG was decreased by approximately 5-fold from the peak and had returned to near the pre-vaccination level. At 1 y plasma anti-PT-IgG was decreased by 2-fold 1 yfrom the 15 wk level. However, 89.5% and 82.3% of infants at 1 y had protective levels of anti-TT and anti-PT IgG, respectively. Pre-vaccination plasma IgG levels were associated with lower vaccine-specific IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes at 15 wk (p < 0.10). This apparent inhibition was seen for anti-TT-IgG at both 15 wk (p < 0.05) and t 1 y (p < 0.10) of age. In summary, we report an apparent inhibitory effect of passively derived maternal antibody on an infants' own antibody response to the same vaccine. However, since the cut-off values for protective titers are low, infants had protective antibody levels throughout infancy. PMID:27176823

  8. Antibody Response against Parvovirus in Patients with Inflammatory Rheumatological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Raeisi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some viral infections have been suggested to trigger or cause autoimmune diseases. One of these viruses is parvovirus B19 which can have various rheumatologic manifestations. In this study we investigated the association between parvovirus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosis(SLE, systemic sclerosis(SSc and undifferentiated arthritis at the Rheumatological Clinic, Imam Khomeini hospital. Methods: In this sectional case-control study, IgM and IgG antibodies against parvovirus B19 were measured with ELISA in 41 patients with RA, 28 patients with SLE, 13 patients with SSc, 8 patients with undifferentiated arthritis as well as 90 healthy controls. The ELISA kit (DRG, Germany was semi-quantitative and qualititative. Results: Parvovirus B19 IgM was detected in one patient with RA, one with SSc and four in the control group. IgG anti- B19-specific antibody was detected in 58.5% of RA patients, 67.9% of SLE patients, 69. 2% of SSc patients, 87.5% of undifferentiated arthritis patients as compared to 53.3% of controls. The results were compared between the patient and control groups(p>0.05. Conclusion: According to the results, there was no significant correlation for the antibody titer against parvovirus B19 in the patient and control group. The highly positive response of IgG against parvovirus in undifferentiated arthritis implies the need for more research.

  9. Duration of serum antibody response to rabies vaccination in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Alison M; Watson, Johanna L; Brault, Stephanie A; Edman, Judy M; Moore, Susan M; Kass, Philip H; Wilson, W David

    2016-08-15

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the impact of age and inferred prior vaccination history on the persistence of vaccine-induced antibody against rabies in horses. DESIGN Serologic response evaluation. ANIMALS 48 horses with an undocumented vaccination history. PROCEDURES Horses were vaccinated against rabies once. Blood samples were collected prior to vaccination, 3 to 7 weeks after vaccination, and at 6-month intervals for 2 to 3 years. Serum rabies virus-neutralizing antibody (RVNA) values were measured. An RVNA value of ≥ 0.5 U/mL was used to define a predicted protective immune response on the basis of World Health Organization recommendations for humans. Values were compared between horses vaccinated and those inferred to be immunologically naïve. RESULTS A protective RVNA value (≥ 0.5 U/mL) was maintained for 2 to 3 years in horses inferred to have been previously vaccinated on the basis of prevaccination RVNA values. No significant difference was evident in response to rabies vaccination or duration of protective RVNA values between horses vaccination. Significant differences were identified between horses inferred to have been previously vaccinated and horses inferred to be naïve prior to the study. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A rabies vaccination interval > 1 year may be appropriate for previously vaccinated horses but not for horses vaccinated only once. Additional research is required to confirm this finding and characterize the optimal primary dose series for rabies vaccination. PMID:27479286

  10. Evaluation of Vaccine-induced Antibody Responses: Impact of New Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Zaccaro, Daniel J.; Wagener, Diane K.; Whisnant, Carol C; Staats, Herman F.

    2013-01-01

    Host response to vaccination has historically been evaluated based on a change in antibody titer that compares the post-vaccination titer to the pre-vaccination titer. A four-fold or greater increase in antigen-specific antibody has been interpreted to indicate an increase in antibody production in response to vaccination. New technologies, such as the bead-based assays, provide investigators and clinicians with precise antibody levels (reported as concentration per mL) in ranges below and ab...

  11. Chinese border disease virus strain JSLS12-01 infects piglets and down-regulates the antibody responses of classical swine fever virus C strain vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Li; Li, Wenliang; Liu, Xia; Hao, Fei; Yang, Leilei; Deng, Jiawu; Zhang, Wenwen; Wei, Jianzhong; Jiang, Jieyuan

    2015-07-31

    During 2012 and 2013, several border disease virus (BDV) strains were identified from Chinese goat and sheep herds. At the same time, pigs from the same areas were found to be seropositive to BDV by ELISA, without showing clinical signs (unpublished data). To examine the susceptibility of pigs to the Chinese BDV strains, BDV isolate JSLS12-01, isolated from naturally infected sheep, was used to infect pigs. Antibody responses, viremia, clinical signs and pathological changes of the infected animals were examined. It confirmed that the current BDV strain could infect the domestic pigs, the animals showed viremia during 4 to 14 days post infection (dpi) and sero-conversion from 14dpi; no clinical and pathological changes were observed. In addition, CSFV maternal antibody did not influence BDV infection. Subsequently, pigs were infected with the BDV isolate and vaccinated with Hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV) 21 days later to determine the effect of BDV infection on antibody induction of CSFV vaccination. The specific CSFV antibody and neutralizing antibody titers of the BDV infected group remained negative after the primary vaccination. Even after the boost vaccination, they were still significantly lower than those of the uninfected groups (p<0.05). These results indicated that BDV infection could down-regulate the antibody responses of CSFV C-strain vaccination. It should be paid attention that BDV prevalence in pig herds and in live vaccines might hamper the vaccination of CSF. PMID:26117151

  12. Immunization with Immune Complexes Modulates the Fine Specificity of Antibody Responses to a Flavivirus Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Tsouchnikas, Georgios; Zlatkovic, Juergen; Jarmer, Johanna; Strauß, Judith; Vratskikh, Oksana; Kundi, Michael; Stiasny, Karin; Heinz, Franz X.

    2015-01-01

    The antibody response to proteins may be modulated by the presence of preexisting antigen-specific antibodies and the formation of immune complexes (ICs). Effects such as a general increase or decrease of the response as well as epitope-specific phenomena have been described. In this study, we investigated influences of IC immunization on the fine specificity of antibody responses in a structurally well-defined system, using the envelope (E) protein of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus as a...

  13. Decreased Serum Antibody Responses to Recombinant Pneumocystis Antigens in HIV-Infected and Uninfected Current Smokers▿

    OpenAIRE

    Crothers, Kristina; Daly, Kieran R.; Rimland, David; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Butt, Adeel A.; Justice, Amy C.; Djawe, Kpandja; Levin, Linda; Walzer, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Serologic studies can provide important insights into the epidemiology and transmission of Pneumocystis jirovecii. Exposure to P. jirovecii can be assessed by serum antibody responses to recombinant antigens from the major surface glycoprotein (MsgC), although factors that influence the magnitude of the antibody response are incompletely understood. We determined the magnitudes of antibody responses to P. jirovecii in comparison to adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in HIV-infec...

  14. The Cellular Bases of Antibody Responses during Dengue Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Aguilar-Medina, Elsa Maribel; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab) responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG) memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell-dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic, or memory) B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections. This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events such as the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation, and germinal centers (GCs) formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs), till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated. PMID:27375618

  15. The cellular bases of antibody responses during dengue virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Yam-Puc

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic or memory B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections.This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events like the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation and germinal centers (GCs formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs, till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated.

  16. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B.; Specht, L.; Henrichsen, J.;

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in...... antibody response was compared to the findings in 12 healthy volunteers with the aim of establishing the optimal time for vaccination. Serum antibodies against 6 of the pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens (types 1, 4, 7F, 14, 18C and 23F) contained in the vaccine were determined by an ELISA. Antibody...... response to pneumococcal type antigens was similar in healthy adults and in patients with early stage HD before therapy. After treatment, postvaccination antibody response became negligible. Even up to 7 years after cessation of therapy patients were not able to raise a significant antibody response...

  17. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B; Specht, L; Henrichsen, J;

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in...... antibody response was compared to the findings in 12 healthy volunteers with the aim of establishing the optimal time for vaccination. Serum antibodies against 6 of the pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens (types 1, 4, 7F, 14, 18C and 23F) contained in the vaccine were determined by an ELISA. Antibody...... response to pneumococcal type antigens was similar in healthy adults and in patients with early stage HD before therapy. After treatment, postvaccination antibody response became negligible. Even up to 7 years after cessation of therapy patients were not able to raise a significant antibody response....

  18. Antibody Response to Actinomyces Antigen and Dental Caries Experience: Implications for Caries Susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Martin; Owen, Willis L; Avery, Kevin T

    2005-01-01

    Fluoridated dentifrices reduce dental caries in subjects who perform effective oral hygiene. Actinomyces naeslundii increases in teeth-adherent microbial biofilms (plaques) in these subjects, and a well-characterized serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response (Actinomyces antibody [A-Ab]) is also increased. Other studies suggest that a serum IgG antibody response to streptococcal d-alanyl poly(glycerophosphate) (S-Ab) may indicate caries experience associated strongly with gingival health...

  19. Morning vaccination enhances antibody response over afternoon vaccination: A cluster-randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Joanna E.; Drayson, Mark T; Taylor, Angela E.; Toellner, Kai M.; Lord, Janet M.; Phillips, Anna C

    2016-01-01

    Highlights • Early small studies provide mixed evidence for effects of time of vaccination on antibody response. • This is the first large scale randomised trial of different times of vaccination. • Morning vaccination enhances the antibody response to the influenza vaccine. • This simple manipulation is cost neutral and may improve protection from influenza in older adults.

  20. Characterization of isotypes of antibody response against leishmania parasite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELIZA) was developed to detect IgG,IgM and IgA response in visceral leishmaniasis patients (VL) against L.donovain and L. major antigens compared to control groups; cutaneous leishmaniasis patients (CL), mucosal leishmaniasis patients (ML), patients with other tropical diseases and healthy controls.Highly specific IgG were found in VL patients with test specificity (93.7%) and sensitivity(93.4%). A moderate IgG were found in VL patients but non-specific while no IgA were detected in all studied groups. Also VL patients showed high specificity and sensitivity (95.2 and 96.6% respectively) against L.major antigen.The distribution of IgG subclasses (IgG1,IgG2,IgG3 and IgG4) antibodies in VL patients were assayed.IgG3 showed the highest specificity and sensitivity and titers followed by IgG1.Also the diagnostic value of ELIZA test for different leishmaniasis forms were discussed. (Author)

  1. Impact of Fighting on Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Virus Vaccine in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sheng; Li, Xin; Wan, Min; Hua, Li; Xiao, Yue; Dong, Boqi; Liu, Jialin; Diao, Wenzhen; Yu, Yongli; Wang, Liying

    2015-11-01

    Antibody responses to vaccines can be influenced by various behavioral and psychosocial factors. Few reports exist on the impact of fighting on antibody response to vaccines. This study unexpectedly found that fighting could significantly enhance antibody production in male mice immunized with hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccines. To confirm the finding, a mouse-fighting model was established in which it was observed that only intense fighting, not mild fighting, enhanced the antibody response to HBV surface antigen in male mice, and that the frequency of fighting and active attacks during fighting showed no obvious relationship with the antibody levels in the male mice that experienced fighting. In addition, fighting can cause significant upregulation of CD80 in CD11c(+) cells in the spleen of male mice. These data suggest that fighting could influence the humoral immune response in individuals immunized with vaccines or infected with microbes. PMID:26417964

  2. Longitudinal study of interferon-gamma, serum antibody and milk antibody responses in cattle infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, A.; Jungersen, Gregers; Lind, Peter

    During a 2-year study period, 252 animals from dairy herds infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and 119 animals from non-infected herds were subjected to repeated blood and faecal sampling. Animals were retrospectively grouped by infection status as infected, exposed (culture......-blood lymphocytes (IFN-gamma test), and measurement of antibody responses against M. paratuberculosis in serum and milk by an in-house absorbed ELISA. The IFN-gamma test diagnosed higher proportions of infected and exposed animals than the antibody ELISAs. The highest sensitivity of IFN-gamma test was in infected...... compared with repeated samplings showed better performance of the IFN-gamma test by repeated samplings, and the milk antibody ELISA in animals of 3+ years of age performed significantly better with repeated sampling compared with single sampling. In conclusion, the IFN-gamma test may be applied for...

  3. Human antibody response to herpes simplex virus-specific polypeptides after primary and recurrent infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Kahlon, J; Lakeman, F. D.; Ackermann, M; Whitley, R J

    1986-01-01

    Human antibody responses to specific polypeptides of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively) were assessed in serial serum specimens from 18 infected patients by immunoblot technology. Nine patients had HSV-1 infections (six genital and three oral) and nine had HSV-2 genital infections. Antibodies to homologous and heterologous HSV antigens were studied and correlated with total microneutralization and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibodies as well as correlat...

  4. Impaired Antigen-Specific Immune Response to Vaccines in Children with Antibody Production Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Szczawinska-Poplonyk, Aleksandra; Breborowicz, Anna; Samara, Husam; Ossowska, Lidia; Dworacki, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    The impaired synthesis of antigen-specific antibodies, which is indispensable for an adaptive immune response to infections, is a fundamental pathomechanism that leads to clinical manifestations in children with antibody production defects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the synthesis of antigen-specific antibodies following immunization in relation to peripheral blood B cell subsets in young children with hypogammaglobulinemia. Twenty-two children, aged from 8 to 61 months, with a def...

  5. Antibody responses of horses to equine influenza viruses during a postepizootic period in Japan.

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, H; Shimizu, K; Taya, Y; Noda, H; Tokunaga, T

    1982-01-01

    The antibody responses to equine influenza viruses were investigated during a postepizootic period of the disease. Serum samples were collected from a total of 128 horses on three occasions during the years 1967-77. No significant increase of hemagglutination-inhibition antibody titers to subtypes 1 and 2 of equine influenza virus were detected in any of the sera tested. The maternal hemagglutination-inhibition antibody titers of foals decreased over a four month interval. A marked increase o...

  6. Acute infection by hepatitis E virus with a slight immunoglobulin M antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Yuki; Oshiro, Yukio; Imanishi, Mamiko; Ishige, Kazunori; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    The anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody response is generally regarded as a useful marker for diagnosing primary infection. However, in some cases, this antibody is not detected during the acute phase of infection. An 81-year-old man with stable membranous nephropathy who presented with asymptomatic acute liver dysfunction came to our hospital. HEV RNA of genotype 3 was detected in his serum, and he was diagnosed with acute hepatitis E. According to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, high-level positivity for anti-HEV IgG and IgA antibodies was observed, but the assay was negative for IgM antibody throughout the clinical course of infection. The patient was not immunosuppressed. We further investigated the presence of IgM antibody using two other polyclonal antibodies against human IgM as secondary antibodies and another recombinant ORF2 protein of genotype 3 as an immobilized antigen. IgM was weakly detected in the serum during the acute phase only by the test with the antigen of genotype 3. Multi-genotype antigens can detect a slight IgM antibody response; however, anti-HEV IgA is more useful in diagnosing primary HEV infection, particularly in cases with a low IgM antibody response. PMID:26215116

  7. Optimizing selection of large animals for antibody production by screening immune response to standard vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mary K; Fridy, Peter C; Keegan, Sarah; Chait, Brian T; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies made in large animals are integral to many biomedical research endeavors. Domesticated herd animals like goats, sheep, donkeys, horses and camelids all offer distinct advantages in antibody production. However, their cost of use is often prohibitive, especially where poor antigen response is commonplace; choosing a non-responsive animal can set a research program back or even prevent experiments from moving forward entirely. Over the course of production of antibodies from llamas, we found that some animals consistently produced a higher humoral antibody response than others, even to highly divergent antigens, as well as to their standard vaccines. Based on our initial data, we propose that these "high level responders" could be pre-selected by checking antibody titers against common vaccines given to domestic farm animals. Thus, time and money can be saved by reducing the chances of getting poor responding animals and minimizing the use of superfluous animals. PMID:26775851

  8. Corporate Social Responsibility Boosts Value Creation at the Base of the Pyramid

    OpenAIRE

    André, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multinational enterprises (MNEs) have embraced the possibility to find growth or strategic opportunities by targeting the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) segment, while contributing to alleviate poverty. Taking stock of the notorious early BoP initiatives shows that the bet made upon this responsible commitment is not yet won. Indeed, some were relegated to philanthropic programmes or simply dismantled, highlighting a tension to combine both societal and financial sustainability. The paper question...

  9. Induction of Boosted Immune Response in Mice by Leptospiral Surface Proteins Expressed in Fusion with DnaK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Atzingen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is an important global disease of human and veterinary concern. Caused by pathogenic Leptospira, the illness was recently classified as an emerging infectious disease. Currently available veterinarian vaccines do not induce long-term protection against infection and do not provide cross-protective immunity. Several studies have suggested the use of DnaK as an antigen in vaccine formulation, due to an exceptional degree of immunogenicity. We focused on four surface proteins: rLIC10368 (Lsa21, rLIC10494, rLIC12690 (Lp95, and rLIC12730, previously shown to be involved in host-pathogen interactions. Our goal was to evaluate the immunogenicity of the proteins genetically fused with DnaK in animal model. The chosen genes were amplified by PCR methodology and cloned into pAE, an E. coli vector. The recombinant proteins were expressed alone or in fusion with DnaK at the N-terminus. Our results demonstrate that leptospiral proteins fused with DnaK have elicited an enhanced immune response in mice when compared to the effect promoted by the individual proteins. The boosted immune effect was demonstrated by the production of total IgG, lymphocyte proliferation, and significant amounts of IL-10 in supernatant of splenocyte cell cultures. We believe that this approach could be employed in vaccines to enhance presentation of antigens of Leptospira to professional immune cells.

  10. Porcine humoral immune responses to multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Kamstrup, Søren; Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Eriksen, L.

    cognate antigen in the pigs were used. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to quantitate the circulating m-mAbs, as well as the induced pig anti-mouse antibodies (PAMA), in serum samples from m-mAb-treated pigs. As expected, we generally saw vigorous PAMA responses within 10 days aft er......In humans and cattle, multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies (m-mAbs) induce anti-mouse antibody responses. The objectives of the present. study were to investigate whether a similar response could be seen when pigs were subjected to m-mAb therapy, and to study the kinetics of such a...

  11. Immune history shapes specificity of pandemic H1N1 influenza antibody responses

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yang; Myers, Jaclyn L.; Bostick, David L; Sullivan, Colleen B.; Madara, Jonathan; Linderman, Susanne L.; Liu, Qin; Carter, Donald M.; Wrammert, Jens; Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Ross, Ted M.; Ahmed, Rafi; Wilson, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Human antibody responses against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus are predominantly directed against conserved epitopes in the stalk and receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. This is in stark contrast to pH1N1 antibody responses generated in ferrets, which are focused on the variable Sa antigenic site of HA. Here, we show that most humans born between 1983 and 1996 elicited pH1N1 antibody responses that are directed against an epitope near the HA receptor–binding doma...

  12. Rapid antibody responses by low-dose, single-step, dendritic cell-targeted immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hui; Griffiths, Michelle N.; Burton, Dennis R; Ghazal, Peter

    2000-01-01

    We have compared the kinetics of antibody responses in conventional and dendritic cell-targeted immunization by using a model antigen in mice. Targeting was achieved by linking the reporter antigen (polyclonal goat anti-hamster antibody) to N418, a hamster mAb that binds to the CD11c molecule on the surface of murine dendritic cells. Intradermal injection of submicrogram quantities of goat anti-hamster antibody complexed to mAb N418 elicited goat antibody-specific serum IgG in mice. Antigen-s...

  13. Antibody Responses After Analytic Treatment Interruption in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1-Infected Individuals on Early Initiated Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Bricault, Christine A.; Shields, Jennifer; Bayne, Madeleine; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Seaman, Michael S.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    The examination of antibody responses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected individuals in the setting of antiretroviral treatment (ART) interruption can provide insight into the evolution of antibody responses during viral rebound. In this study, we assessed antibody responses in 20 subjects in AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5187, wherein subjects were treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection, underwent analytic treatment interruption, and subsequently demonstrated viral rebound. Our data suggest that early initiation of ART arrests the maturation of HIV-1-specific antibody responses, preventing epitope diversification of antibody binding and the development of functional neutralizing capacity. Antibody responses do not appear permanently blunted, however, because viral rebound triggered the resumption of antibody maturation in our study. We also found that antibody responses measured by these assays did not predict imminent viral rebound. These data have important implications for the HIV-1 vaccine and eradication fields.

  14. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades. PMID:15640788

  15. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L. [Calfornia Univ., Sacramento (United States). Davis Medical Center

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ({sup 9}0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ({sup 1}31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  16. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM (90yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM (131I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades

  17. Antibody response and clinical reactions in children given measles vaccine with immunoglobulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Lingam, S.; Miller, C L; Clarke, M; Pateman, J

    1986-01-01

    Antibody responses and clinical reactions to three measles vaccines (Attenuvax, Mevilin, and Rimevax) injected into the opposite arm to immunoglobulin were assessed in 45 children with brain disorders making them susceptible to fits if given measles vaccine alone. In this small study no unacceptable reactions occurred and in only three cases was the antibody response minimal or absent. More children in this special category should be considered for vaccination against measles in this way.

  18. Effect of nonprotective vaccination on antibody response to subsequent human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Pincus, S H; Messer, K G; Hu, S L

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the systemic anti-HIV antibody response in chimpanzees who were immunized with live vaccinia containing either the HIV envelope glycoprotein (gp160IIIB) or a control antigen (herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D) and then challenged with either a high dose (300,000 TCID50) or low dose (100 TCID50) of HIVIIIB. HIV was subsequently isolated from all animals, indicating failure of the vaccination to protect against HIV infection. Serum antibody responses were evaluated before...

  19. DNA prime-adenovirus boost immunization induces a vigorous and multifunctional T-cell response against hepadnaviral proteins in the mouse and woodchuck model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinska, Anna D; Johrden, Lena; Zhang, Ejuan; Fiedler, Melanie; Mayer, Anja; Wildner, Oliver; Lu, Mengji; Roggendorf, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Induction of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific cytotoxic T cells by therapeutic immunization may be a strategy to treat chronic hepatitis B. In the HBV animal model, woodchucks, the application of DNA vaccine expressing woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) core antigen (WHcAg) in combination with antivirals led to the prolonged control of viral replication. However, it became clear that the use of more potent vaccines is required to overcome WHV persistence. Therefore, we asked whether stronger and more functional T-cell responses could be achieved using the modified vaccines and an optimized prime-boost vaccination regimen. We developed a new DNA plasmid (pCGWHc) and recombinant adenoviruses (AdVs) showing high expression levels of WHcAg. Mice vaccinated with the improved plasmid pCGWHc elicited a stronger WHcAg-specific CD8(+) T-cell response than with the previously used vaccines. Using multicolor flow cytometry and an in vivo cytotoxicity assay, we showed that immunization in a DNA prime-AdV boost regimen resulted in an even more vigorous and functional T-cell response than immunization with the new plasmid alone. Immunization of naïve woodchucks with pCGWHc plasmid or AdVs induced a significant WHcAg-specific degranulation response prior to the challenge, this response had not been previously detected. Consistently, this response led to a rapid control of infection after the challenge. Our results demonstrate that high antigen expression levels and the DNA prime-AdV boost immunization improved the T-cell response in mice and induced significant T-cell responses in woodchucks. Therefore, this new vaccination strategy may be a candidate for a therapeutic vaccine against chronic HBV infection. PMID:22718818

  20. An adenovirus prime/plasmid boost strategy for induction of equipotent immune responses to two dengue virus serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaminathan Sathyamangalam

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue is a public health problem of global significance for which there is neither an effective antiviral therapy nor a preventive vaccine. It is a mosquito-borne viral disease, caused by dengue (DEN viruses, which are members of the Flaviviridae family. There are four closely related serotypes, DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3 and DEN-4, each of which is capable of causing disease. As immunity to any one serotype can potentially sensitize an individual to severe disease during exposure to a heterologous serotype, the general consensus is that an effective vaccine should be tetravalent, that is, it must be capable of affording protection against all four serotypes. The current strategy of creating tetravalent vaccine formulations by mixing together four monovalent live attenuated vaccine viruses has revealed the phenomenon of viral interference leading to the manifestation of immune responses biased towards a single serotype. Results This work stems from the emergence of (i the DEN virus envelope (E domain III (EDIII as the most important region of the molecule from a vaccine perspective and (ii the adenovirus (Ad as a promising vaccine vector platform. We describe the construction of a recombinant, replication-defective Ad (rAd vector encoding a chimeric antigen made of in-frame linked EDIIIs of DEN virus serotypes 2 and 4. Using this rAd vector, in conjunction with a plasmid vector encoding the same chimeric bivalent antigen, in a prime-boost strategy, we show that it is possible to elicit equipotent neutralizing and T cell responses specific to both DEN serotypes 2 and 4. Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that a DEN vaccine targeting more than one serotype may be based on a single DNA-based vector to circumvent viral interference. This work lays the foundation for developing a single Ad vector encoding EDIIIs of all four DEN serotypes to evoke a balanced immune response against each one of them. Thus, this work has

  1. Antibody response to hidden epitope of influenza a hemagglutinin elicited by anti-idiotypic antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibody (MoAb) IIF4 defines an epitope on the HA2 part of influenza hemagglutinin (HA)It was also found this epitope becomes fully accessible after pH 5 treatment of the antigen and is shared by strains of H3 subtype. In this study we found binding of MoAb IIF4 also to some strains belonging to H2, H4, H7, and H10 subtypes. We prepared rabbit polyclonal anti-IIF4 anti-idiotype (anti-Id) antibody. In competitive assays, the inhibition potential of anti-Id was considerably higher than that of native HA. Anti-Id was used for the preparation of mouse Ab3 (anti-anti-IIF4) serum. Reactivity pattern of Ab3 with influenza virus strains differed from Ab1 in in (i) appearance of binding to some strains of H2 and H7 subtype and (ii) decreased dependency of Ab3 binding on the pH forms of antigen. The reactivity of Ab1 and Ab3 with two amantadine-resistant virus mutants indicates that IIF4 epitope (and its related region recognized by Ab3) becomes accessible in consequence of destabilization of trimeric arrangement of HA and it it also correlates with expulsion of N-terminus of HA2. (author)

  2. Discordant antibody and cellular responses to Pneumocystis major surface glycoprotein variants in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishop Lisa R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major surface glycoprotein (Msg of Pneumocystis is encoded by approximately 50 to 80 unique but related genes. Msg diversity may represent a mechanism for immune escape from host T cell responses. We examined splenic T cell proliferative and cytokine as well as serum antibody responses to recombinant and native Pneumocystis antigens in immunized or Pneumocystis-infected mice. In addition, immune responses were examined in 5 healthy humans. Results Proliferative responses to each of two recombinant Msg variant proteins were seen in mice immunized with either recombinant protein, but no proliferation to these antigens was seen in mice immunized with crude Pneumocystis antigens or in mice that had cleared infection, although the latter animals demonstrated proliferative responses to crude Pneumocystis antigens and native Msg. IL-17 and MCP-3 were produced in previously infected animals in response to the same antigens, but not to recombinant antigens. Antibody responses to the recombinant P. murina Msg variant proteins were seen in all groups of animals, demonstrating that all groups were exposed to and mounted immune responses to Msg. No human PBMC samples proliferated following stimulation with P. jirovecii Msg, while antibody responses were detected in sera from 4 of 5 samples. Conclusions Cross-reactive antibody responses to Msg variants are common, while cross-reactive T cell responses are uncommon; these results support the hypothesis that Pneumocystis utilizes switching of Msg variant expression to avoid host T cell responses.

  3. Impaired Antigen-Specific Immune Response to Vaccines in Children with Antibody Production Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczawinska-Poplonyk, Aleksandra; Breborowicz, Anna; Samara, Husam; Ossowska, Lidia; Dworacki, Grzegorz

    2015-08-01

    The impaired synthesis of antigen-specific antibodies, which is indispensable for an adaptive immune response to infections, is a fundamental pathomechanism that leads to clinical manifestations in children with antibody production defects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the synthesis of antigen-specific antibodies following immunization in relation to peripheral blood B cell subsets in young children with hypogammaglobulinemia. Twenty-two children, aged from 8 to 61 months, with a deficiency in one or more major immunoglobulin classes participated in the study. Postvaccination antibodies against tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, the surface antigen of the hepatitis B virus, and the capsular Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide antigen were assessed along with an immunophenotypic evaluation of peripheral blood B lymph cell maturation. A deficiency of antibodies against the tetanus toxoid was assessed in 73% of cases and that against the diphtheria toxoid was assessed in 68% of cases, whereas a deficiency of antibodies against the surface antigen of the hepatitis B virus was revealed in 59% of the children included in the study. A defective response to immunization with a conjugate vaccine with the Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide antigen was demonstrated in 55% of hypogammaglobulinemic patients. Increased proportions of transitional B lymph cells and an accumulation of plasmablasts accompanied antibody deficiencies. The defective response to vaccine protein and polysaccharide antigens is a predominating disorder of humoral immunity in children with hypogammaglobulinemia and may result from a dysfunctional state of the cellular elements of the immune system. PMID:26018535

  4. Antibody Response against Parvovirus in Patients with Inflammatory Rheumatological Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    SH Raeisi; S Jafari; F Khajali; Abdollahi, A.; SR Najafizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Some viral infections have been suggested to trigger or cause autoimmune diseases. One of these viruses is parvovirus B19 which can have various rheumatologic manifestations. In this study we investigated the association between parvovirus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosis(SLE), systemic sclerosis(SSc) and undifferentiated arthritis at the Rheumatological Clinic, Imam Khomeini hospital. Methods: In this sectional case-control study, IgM and IgG antibodi...

  5. Heterologous prime-boost-boost immunisation of Chinese cynomolgus macaques using DNA and recombinant poxvirus vectors expressing HIV-1 virus-like particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anson Donald S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is renewed interest in the development of poxvirus vector-based HIV vaccines due to the protective effect observed with repeated recombinant canarypox priming with gp120 boosting in the recent Thai placebo-controlled trial. This study sought to investigate whether a heterologous prime-boost-boost vaccine regimen in Chinese cynomolgus macaques with a DNA vaccine and recombinant poxviral vectors expressing HIV virus-like particles bearing envelopes derived from the most prevalent clades circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, focused the antibody response to shared neutralising epitopes. Methods Three Chinese cynomolgus macaques were immunised via intramuscular injections using a regimen composed of a prime with two DNA vaccines expressing clade A Env/clade B Gag followed by boosting with recombinant fowlpox virus expressing HIV-1 clade D Gag, Env and cholera toxin B subunit followed by the final boost with recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing HIV-1 clade C Env, Gag and human complement protein C3d. We measured the macaque serum antibody responses by ELISA, enumerated T cell responses by IFN-γ ELISpot and assessed seroneutralisation of HIV-1 using the TZM-bl β-galactosidase assay with primary isolates of HIV-1. Results This study shows that large and complex synthetic DNA sequences can be successfully cloned in a single step into two poxvirus vectors: MVA and FPV and the recombinant poxviruses could be grown to high titres. The vaccine candidates showed appropriate expression of recombinant proteins with the formation of authentic HIV virus-like particles seen on transmission electron microscopy. In addition the b12 epitope was shown to be held in common by the vaccine candidates using confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. The vaccine candidates were safely administered to Chinese cynomolgus macaques which elicited modest T cell responses at the end of the study but only one out of the three macaques

  6. Effects of Route of Inoculation and Viral Genetic Variation on Antibody Responses to Polyomavirus SV40 in Syrian Golden Hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Swain, Jody L.; Sroller, Vojtech; Wong, Connie; Zhang, Shaojie; Halvorson, Steven J.; Herron, Alan J.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Butel, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants of polyomavirus SV40 are powerful agents with which to define viral effects on cells and carcinogenesis pathways. We hypothesized that differences in biologic variation among viral strains affect the process of viral infection and are reflected in antibody responses to the viral nonstructural large T-antigen (TAg) protein but not in neutralizing antibody responses against the inoculated viral particles. We analyzed the production of TAg antibody and neutralizing antibody in S...

  7. The ability of four genotypic interpretation systems to predict virological response to ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Zoe V; Geretti, Anna Maria; Kjaer, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    : Limited information exists on the prognostic value of genotypic interpretation systems (GISs) for ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PI/rs). We compared PI/r resistance levels ascribed by four GIS and examined their abilities to predict HIV-RNA reductions after starting a PI/r-based regimen...

  8. Neutralizing Antibody Response and Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in HIV-1-Infected Individuals from Guinea-Bissau and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borggren, Marie; Jensen, Sanne Skov; Heyndrickx, Leo; Palm, Angelica A; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Jespersen, Sanne; da Silva, Zacarias José; Karlsson, Ingrid; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2016-05-01

    The development of therapeutic and prophylactic HIV vaccines for African countries is urgently needed, but the question of what immunogens to use needs to be answered. One approach is to include HIV envelope immunogens derived from HIV-positive individuals from a geographically concentrated epidemic with more limited viral genetic diversity for a region-based vaccine. To address if there is a basis for a regional selected antibody vaccine, we have screened two regionally separate cohorts from Guinea-Bissau and Denmark for neutralizing antibody activity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against local and nonlocal circulating HIV-1 strains. The neutralizing activity did not demonstrate higher potential against local circulating strains according to geography and subtype determination, but the plasma from Danish individuals demonstrated significantly higher inhibitory activity than that from Guinea-Bissau individuals against both local and nonlocal virus strains. Interestingly, an opposite pattern was observed with ADCC activity, where Guinea-Bissau individual plasma demonstrated higher activity than Danish plasma and was specifically against the local circulating subtype. Thus, on basis of samples from these two cohorts, no local-specific neutralizing activity was detected, but a local ADCC response was identified in the Guinea-Bissau samples, suggesting potential use of regional immunogens for an ADCC-inducing vaccine. PMID:26621287

  9. Epitope specificity of human immunodeficiency virus-1 antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollara, Justin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M Anthony; Pazgier, Marzena; Haynes, Barton F; Ferrari, Guido

    2013-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] has been suggested to play an important role in control of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 [HIV-1] viral load and protection from infection. ADCC antibody responses have been mapped to multiple linear and conformational epitopes within the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Many epitopes targeted by antibodies that mediate ADCC overlap with those recognized by antibodies capable of virus neutralization. In addition, recent studies conducted with human monoclonal antibodies derived from HIV-1 infected individuals and HIV-1 vaccine-candidate vaccinees have identified a number of antibodies that lack the ability to capture primary HIV-1 isolates or mediate neutralizing activity, but are able to bind to the surface of infected CD4+ T cells and mediate ADCC. Of note, the conformational changes in the gp120 that may not exclusively relate to binding of the CD4 molecule are important in exposing epitopes recognized by ADCC responses. Here we discuss the HIV-1 envelope epitopes targeted by ADCC antibodies in the context of the potential protective capacities of ADCC. PMID:24191939

  10. Induction of cross-protection against influenza A virus by DNA prime-intranasal protein boost strategy based on nucleoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Jian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly conserved nucleoprotein (NP is an internal protein of influenza virus and is capable of inducing cross-protective immunity against different influenza A viruses, making it a main target of universal influenza vaccine. In current study, we characterized the immune response induced by DNA prime-intranasal protein boost strategy based on NP (A/PR/8/34, H1N1 in mouse model, and evaluated its protection ability against a lethal dose challenge of influenza virus. Results The intranasal boost with recombinant NP (rNP protein could effectively enhance the pre-immune response induced by the NP DNA vaccine in mice. Compared to the vaccination with NP DNA or rNP protein alone, the prime-boost strategy increased the level of NP specific serum antibody, enhanced the T cell immune response, and relatively induced more mucosal IgA antibody. The overall immune response induced by this heterologous prime-boost regimen was Th-1-biased. Furthermore, the immune response in mice induced by this strategy provided not only protection against the homologous virus but also cross-protection against a heterosubtypic H9N2 strain. Conclusions The NP DNA prime-intranasal protein boost strategy may provide an effective strategy for universal influenza vaccine development.

  11. HIV-1 therapy with monoclonal antibody 3BNC117 elicits host immune responses against HIV-1

    OpenAIRE

    Schoofs, Till; Klein, Florian; Braunschweig, Malte; Kreider, Edward F.; Feldmann, Anna; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago; Lorenzi, Julio C. C.; Parrish, Erica H.; Learn, Gerald H.; West, Anthony P.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Schlesinger, Sarah J.; Seaman, Michael S.; Czartoski, Julie

    2016-01-01

    3BNC117 is a broad and potent neutralizing antibody to HIV-1 that targets the CD4 binding site on the viral envelope spike. When administered passively, this antibody can prevent infection in animal models and suppress viremia in HIV-1–infected individuals. Here we report that HIV-1 immunotherapy with a single injection of 3BNC117 affects host antibody responses in viremic individuals. In comparison to untreated controls that showed little change in their neutralizing activity over a 6-month ...

  12. The respiratory syncytial virus G protein conserved domain induces a persistent and protective antibody response in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien N Nguyen

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is an important cause of severe upper and lower respiratory disease in infants and in the elderly. There are 2 main RSV subtypes A and B. A recombinant vaccine was designed based on the central domain of the RSV-A attachment G protein which we had previously named G2Na (aa130-230. Here we evaluated immunogenicity, persistence of antibody (Ab response and protective efficacy induced in rodents by: (i G2Na fused to DT (Diphtheria toxin fragments in cotton rats. DT fusion did not potentiate neutralizing Ab responses against RSV-A or cross-reactivity to RSV-B. (ii G2Nb (aa130-230 of the RSV-B G protein either fused to, or admixed with G2Na. G2Nb did not induce RSV-B-reactive Ab responses. (iii G2Na at low doses. Two injections of 3 µg G2Na in Alum were sufficient to induce protective immune responses in mouse lungs, preventing RSV-A and greatly reducing RSV-B infections. In cotton rats, G2Na-induced RSV-reactive Ab and protective immunity against RSV-A challenge that persisted for at least 24 weeks. (iv injecting RSV primed mice with a single dose of G2Na/Alum or G2Na/PLGA [poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide]. Despite the presence of pre-existing RSV-specific Abs, these formulations effectively boosted anti-RSV Ab titres and increased Ab titres persisted for at least 21 weeks. Affinity maturation of these Abs increased from day 28 to day 148. These data indicate that G2Na has potential as a component of an RSV vaccine formulation.

  13. Targeting HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers to B Cells by Using APRIL Improves Antibody Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Melchers M; Bontjer I; Tong T; Chung NP; Klasse PJ; Eggink D; Montefiori DC; Gentile M; Cerutti A; Olson WC; Berkhout B; Binley JM; Moore JP; Sanders RW

    2012-01-01

    An HIV-1 vaccine remains elusive, in part because various factors limit the quantity and quality of the antibodies raised against the viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). We hypothesized that targeting Env vaccines directly to B cells, by fusing them to molecules that bind and activate these cells, would improve Env-specific antibody responses. Therefore, we fused trimeric Env gp140 to A PRoliferation-Inducing Ligand (APRIL), B-cell Activating Factor (BAFF), and CD40 Ligand (CD40L). The...

  14. Western blot analysis of the human antibody response to Campylobacter jejuni cellular antigens during gastrointestinal infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Nachamkin, I; Hart, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Western blot analysis was used to identify antigenic components of Campylobacter jejuni whole cells and outer membranes that elicit antibody responses in patients with campylobacter enteritis. Acute- and convalescent-phase sera from eight patients were analyzed for antibody activity against their homologous infecting strains and heterologous clinical isolates. Whole-cell and Sarkosyl-insoluble membrane components were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and ...

  15. Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines Overcome Splenic Dependency of Antibody Response to Pneumococcal Polysaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Breukels, Mijke A.; Zandvoort, Andre; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P. J. M.; van den Muijsenberg, Adrie; Lodewijk, Monique E.; Beurret, Michel; Pieter A Klok; Timens, Wim; Rijkers, Ger T.

    2001-01-01

    Protection against infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae depends on the presence of antibodies against capsular polysaccharides that facilitate phagocytosis. Asplenic patients are at increased risk for pneumococcal infections, since both phagocytosis and the initiation of the antibody response to polysaccharides take place in the spleen. Therefore, vaccination with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines is recommended prior to splenectomy, which, as in the case of trauma, is not always feasi...

  16. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    RODRIGUES da SILVA Andréa de Cássia; Caporale, Graciane Maria Medeiros; GONÇALVES Celso Alberto; TARGUETA Mosar Couteiro; Fabiano COMIN; Carlos Roberto ZANETTI; Kotait, Ivanete

    2000-01-01

    Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac) and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac) vaccine. The antibody ti...

  17. Prime-Boost Vaccination Using Chemokine-Fused gp120 DNA and HIV Envelope Peptides Activates Both Immediate and Long-Term Memory Cellular Responses in Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV vaccine candidates with improved immunogenicity and induction of mucosal T-cell immunity are needed. A prime-boost strategy using a novel HIV glycoprotein 120 DNA vaccine was employed to immunize rhesus macaques. The DNA vaccine encoded a chimeric gp120 protein in fusion with monocyte chemoattractant protein-3, which was hypothesized to improve the ability of antigen-presenting cells to capture viral antigen through chemokine receptor-mediated endocytosis. DNA vaccination induced virus-reactive T cells in peripheral blood, detectable by T cell proliferation, INFγ ELISPOT and sustained IL-6 production, without humoral responses. With a peptide-cocktail vaccine containing a set of conserved polypeptides of HIV-1 envelope protein, given by nasogastric administration, primed T-cell immunity was significantly boosted. Surprisingly, long-term and peptide-specific mucosal memory T-cell immunity was detected in both vaccinated macaques after one year. Therefore, data from this investigation offer proof-of-principle for potential effectiveness of the prime-boost strategy with a chemokine-fused gp120 DNA and warrant further testing in the nonhuman primate models for developing as a potential HIV vaccine candidate in humans.

  18. The Role of Interleukin-6 in Mucosal IgA Antibody Responses in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Alistair J.; Husband, Alan J.; Ramshaw, Ian A.; Bao, Shisan; Matthaei, Klaus I.; Koehler, Georges; Kopf, Manfred

    1994-04-01

    In mice with targeted disruption of the gene that encodes interleukin-6 (IL-6), greatly reduced numbers of immunoglobulin A (IgA)-producing cells were observed at mucosae and grossly deficient local antibody responses were recorded after mucosal challenge with either ovalbumin or vaccinia virus. The IgA response in the lungs was completely restored after intranasal infection with recombinant vaccinia viruses engineered to express IL-6. These findings demonstrate a critical role for IL-6 in vivo in the development of local IgA antibody responses and illustrate the effectiveness of vector-directed cytokine gene therapy.

  19. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor DNA prime-protein boost strategy to enhance efficacy of a recombinant pertussis DNA vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-tian LI; Yong-zhang ZHU; Jia-you CHU; Ke DONG; Ping HE; Chun-yan FENG; Bao-yu HU; Shu-min ZHANG; Xiao-kui GUO

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate a new strategy to enhance the efficacy of a recombinant pertussis DNA vaccine. The strategy is co-injection with cytokine plasmids as prime, and boosted with purified homologous proteins. Method: A recombinant pertussis DNA vaccine containing the pertussis toxin subunit 1 (PTS1), fragments of the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) gene and pertactin (PRN) gene encoding filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin were constructed. Balb/c mice were immunized with several DNA vaccines and antigen-specific antibodies anti-PTSl, anti-PRN, anti-FHA, cytokines interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4, IFN-γ, TNF-oc, and spleno-cyte-proliferation assay were used to describe immune responses. Results: The recombinant DNA vaccine could elicit similar immune responses in mice as that of separate plasmids encoding the 3 fragments, respectively. Mice immunized with DNA and boosted with the corresponding protein elicited more antibodies than those that received DNA as boost. In particular, when the mice were co-immunized with murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor plasmids and boosted with proteins, all 4 cytokines and the 3 antigen-specific antibodies were significantly increased compared to the pVAXl group. Anti-PTSl, anti-FHA, IL-4 and TNF-α elicited in the colony stimulating factor (CSF) prime-protein boost group showed significant increase compared to all the other groups. Conclusion: This prime and boost strategy has proven to be very useful in improving the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines against pertussis.

  20. Clinical Response of Pelvic and Para-aortic Lymphadenopathy to a Radiation Boost in the Definitive Management of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rash, Dominique L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Lee, Yongsook C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, Kansas (United States); Kashefi, Amir [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Durbin-Johnson, Blythe [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Mathai, Mathew; Valicenti, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Mayadev, Jyoti S., E-mail: jyoti.mayadev@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Optimal treatment with radiation for metastatic lymphadenopathy in locally advanced cervical cancer remains controversial. We investigated the clinical dose response threshold for pelvic and para-aortic lymph node boost using radiographic imaging and clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 68 patients were treated for locally advanced cervical cancer; 40 patients had clinically involved pelvic and/or para-aortic lymph nodes. Computed tomography (CT) or 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scans obtained pre- and postchemoradiation for 18 patients were reviewed to assess therapeutic radiographic response of individual lymph nodes. External beam boost doses to involved nodes were compared to treatment response, assessed by change in size of lymph nodes by short axis and change in standard uptake value (SUV). Patterns of failure, time to recurrence, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were determined. Results: Sixty-four lymph nodes suspicious for metastatic involvement were identified. Radiation boost doses ranged from 0 to 15 Gy, with a mean total dose of 52.3 Gy. Pelvic lymph nodes were treated with a slightly higher dose than para-aortic lymph nodes: mean 55.3 Gy versus 51.7 Gy, respectively. There was no correlation between dose delivered and change in size of lymph nodes along the short axis. All lymph nodes underwent a decrease in SUV with a complete resolution of abnormal uptake observed in 68%. Decrease in SUV was significantly greater for lymph nodes treated with ≥54 Gy compared to those treated with <54 Gy (P=.006). Median follow-up was 18.7 months. At 2 years, OS and DFS for the entire cohort were 78% and 50%, respectively. Locoregional control at 2 years was 84%. Conclusions: A biologic response, as measured by the change in SUV for metastatic lymph nodes, was observed at a dose threshold of 54 Gy. We recommend that involved lymph nodes be treated to this minimum dose.

  1. Delivering HIV Gagp24 to DCIR Induces Strong Antibody Responses In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Flamar

    Full Text Available Targeting dendritic cell-specific endocytic receptors using monoclonal antibodies fused to desired antigens is an approach widely used in vaccine development to enhance the poor immunogenicity of protein-based vaccines and to induce immune responses. Here, we engineered an anti-human DCIR recombinant antibody, which cross-reacts with the homologous cynomolgous macaque receptor and was fused via the heavy chain C-terminus to HIV Gagp24 protein (αDCIR.Gagp24. In vitro, αDCIR.Gagp24 expanded multifunctional antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells recognizing multiple Gagp24 peptides from HIV-infected patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In non human primates, priming with αDCIR.Gagp24 without adjuvant elicited a strong anti-Gagp24 antibody response after the second immunization, while in the non-targeted HIV Gagp24 protein control groups the titers were weak. The presence of the double-stranded RNA poly(I:C adjuvant significantly enhanced the anti-Gagp24 antibody response in all the groups and reduced the discrimination between the different vaccine groups. The avidity of the anti-Gagp24 antibody responses was similar with either αDCIR.Gagp24 or Gagp24 immunization, but increased from medium to high avidity in both groups when poly(I:C was co-administered. This data provides a comparative analysis of DC-targeted and non-targeted proteins for their capacity to induce antigen-specific antibody responses in vivo. This study supports the further development of DCIR-based DC-targeting vaccines for protective durable antibody induction, especially in the absence of adjuvant.

  2. To boost or not boost in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper it to analyse and discuss standard definition of the 'boost' procedure in relation to clinical results and new forms of the boost designed on physical and radiobiological bases. Seventeen sets of clinical data including over 5000 cases cancer with different tumour stages and locations and treated with various forms of 'boost' method have been subtracted from literature. Effectiveness of boost is analyzed regarding its place in combined treatment, timing and subvolume involved. Radiobiological parameter of D10 and normalization method for biologically equivalent doses and dose intensity are used to simulated cold and not subvolumes (hills and dales) and its influence of effectiveness on the boost delivery. Sequential and concomitant boost using external irradiation, although commonly used, offers LTC benefit lower than expected. Brachytherapy, intraoperative irradiation and concurrent chemotherapy boost methods appear more effective. Conformal radiotherapy, with or without dose-intensity modulation, allows heterogeneous increase in dose intensity within the target volume and can be used to integrate the 'boost dose' into baseline treatment (Simultaneous Integrated Boost and SIB). Analysis of interrelationships between boost-dose; boost volume and its timing shows that a TCP benefit from boosting can be expected when a relatively large part of the target volume is involved. Increase in boost dose above 1.2-1.3 of baseline dose using 'standard' methods does not substantially further increase the achieved TCP benefit unless hypoxic cells are a problem. Any small uncertainties in treatment planning can ruin all potential beneficial effect of the boost. For example, a 50% dose deficit in a very small (e.g. 1%) volume of target can decrease TCP to zero. Therefore boost benefits should be carefully weighed against any risk of cold spots in the target volume. Pros and cons in discussion of the role of boost in radiotherapy lead to the important

  3. Effects of deceleration on the humoral antibody response in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, R. P.; Caren, L. D.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of hypergravity, simulated by chronic centrifugation, followed by a return to normal G (deceleration) on the immune system of rats were investigated. Two groups of male rats (28 days at 2.1 G, and 3.1 G) were compared to the control group (1.0 G). The animals were immunized by i.p. injections of sheep red blood cells on days 29, 42, and 57, and bled on days 36, 47, and 62. While the centrifuged rats ate and gainedsignificantly less than the control rats, the antibody titers and the organ/body mass ratios for the adrenal glands, kidneys, lungs, heart, and thymus were unaffected by gravity exposures, as were the values of the hematocrit and the white blood cell counts. It is concluded that deceleration does not adversely affect these particular aspects of the immune system.

  4. Control Strategy for Discontinuous Conduction Mode Boost Rectifier with Low Total Harmonic Distortion and Improved Dynamic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Athab

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its simplicity, the discontinuous conduction mode boost rectifier is potentially the least expensive active line-harmonics reducing circuit. Problem statement: The line current however, shows considerable distortion when the peak input voltage is close to the output voltage, As a result, the input power factor is poor. This study proposes a simple, low-cost method to reduce the line harmonics. Approach: A periodic voltage signal was injected in the control circuit to vary the duty cycle of the boost switch within a line cycle so that the third-order harmonic of the input current is reduced and the THD is improved. The proposed technique eliminates the additional harmonic generator, phase detecting and phase-locking circuits, which was proposed in the literature. Instead we can utilize the bridge rectifier's output voltage of the boost converter to modulate the duty cycle of the boost switch. As a result, the injected signal is naturally synchronized with line current. In addition, to obtain nearly constant harmonic content over a wide range of load variation, a modulation index m is used to update the injected signal with a fraction of duty cycle which reflects the load changes. Results: The results proved that third-order harmonic, which was the Lowest Order Harmonic (LOH, can be attenuated by adjusting the modulation index of the injected signal. Moreover, the rectifier shows a good transient performance where the converter's output voltage overshoots during load and input voltage transients is reduced. Conclusions/Recommendations: The proposed circuit can be used as a front-end converter for DC/DC or DC/AC converters in order to improve the power factor of the input current. Also the proposed control circuit could be integrated in a single chip in order to reduce the cost of the industrial implementation.

  5. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate. PMID:26111521

  6. Vaccinia virus strain NYVAC induces substantially lower and qualitatively different human antibody responses compared with strains Lister and Dryvax

    OpenAIRE

    Midgley, Claire M.; Putz, Mike M.; Weber, Jonathan N.; Smith, Geoffrey L.

    2008-01-01

    The antibody responses elicited by immunization of humans with vaccinia virus (VACV) strains Lister, Dryvax and NYVAC have been determined and compared. Neutralizing antibodies against intracellular mature virus (IMV) and extracellular enveloped virus (EEV), and binding antibody titres (ELISA) against the EEV protein B5, the IMV proteins A27 and H3, and VACV-infected cell lysate were measured. Lister and Dryvax induced broadly similar antibody titres, consistent with the fact that these vacci...

  7. Effect of previous vaccination with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaballie, H; Wuyts, G; Dillaerts, D; Frans, G; Moens, L; Proesmans, M; Vermeulen, F; De Boeck, K; Meyts, I; Bossuyt, X

    2016-08-01

    During the past 10 years, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) has become part of the standard childhood vaccination programme. This may impact upon the diagnosis of polysaccharide antibody deficiency by measurement of anti-polysaccharide immunoglobulin (Ig)G after immunization with unconjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV). Indeed, contrary to PPV, PCV induces a T-dependent, more pronounced memory response. The antibody response to PPV was studied retrospectively in patients referred for suspected humoral immunodeficiency. The study population was divided into four subgroups based on age (2-5 years versus ≥ 10 years) and time tested (1998-2005 versus 2010-12). Only 2-5-year-old children tested in 2010-12 had been vaccinated with PCV prior to PPV. The PCV primed group showed higher antibody responses for PCV-PPV shared serotypes 4 and 18C than the unprimed groups. To a lesser extent, this was also found for non-PCV serotype 9N, but not for non-PCV serotypes 19A and 8. Furthermore, PCV-priming elicited a higher IgG2 response. In conclusion, previous PCV vaccination affects antibody response to PPV for shared serotypes, but can also influence antibody response to some non-PCV serotypes (9N). With increasing number of serotypes included in PCV, the diagnostic assessment for polysaccharide antibody deficiency requires careful selection of serotypes that are not influenced by prior PCV (e.g. serotype 8). Further research is needed to identify more serotypes that are not influenced. PMID:26939935

  8. Antibody responses of swine following infection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, M. hyorhinis, M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, João Carlos; Strait, Erin L; Raymond, Matthew; Ramirez, Alejandro; Minion, F Chris

    2014-11-01

    Several mycoplasma species possessing a range of virulence have been described in swine. The most commonly described are Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, and Mycoplasma flocculare. They are ubiquitious in many pig producing areas of the world, and except for M. hyopneumoniae, commercial antibody-based assays are lacking for most of these. Antibody cross-reactivity among these four mycoplasma species is not well characterized. Recently, the use of pen-based oral fluids for herd surveillance is of increasing interest. Thus, this study sought to measure pig antibody responses and the level of cross-reactivity in serum and pen-based oral fluids after challenge with four species of swine mycoplasmas. Four groups of four mycoplasma-free growing pigs were separately inoculated with the different mycoplasma species. Pen-based oral fluids and serum samples were collected weekly until necropsy. Species-specific Tween 20 ELISAs were used to measure antibody responses along with four other commercial M. hyopneumoniae ELISAs. Animals from all groups seroconverted to the challenge species of mycoplasma and no evidence of cross-contamination was observed. A delayed antibody response was seen with all but M. hyorhinis-infected pigs. Cross-reactive IgG responses were detected in M. hyopneumoniae- and M. flocculare-infected animals by the M. hyorhinis Tween 20 ELISA, while sera from M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare-infected pigs were positive in one commercial assay. In pen-based oral fluids, specific anti-M. hyopneumoniae IgA responses were detected earlier after infection than serum IgG responses. In summary, while some antibody-based assays may have the potential for false positives, evidence of this was observed in the current study. PMID:25240775

  9. Analysis of Antibody Responses to Protective Antigen-Based Anthrax Vaccines through Use of Competitive Assays▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rebecca A Brady; Verma, Anita; Meade, Bruce D.; Burns, Drusilla L.

    2010-01-01

    The licensed anthrax vaccine and many of the new anthrax vaccines being developed are based on protective antigen (PA), a nontoxic component of anthrax toxin. For this reason, an understanding of the immune response to PA vaccination is important. In this study, we examined the antibody response elicited by PA-based vaccines and identified the domains of PA that contribute to that response in humans as well as nonhuman primates (NHPs) and rabbits, animal species that will be used to generate ...

  10. Class specific antibody responses to newborn larva antigens during Trichinella spiralis human infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendez-Loredo B.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A follow-up study of the class antibody responses to newborn larva (NBL antigens in individuals involved in an outbreak of human trichinellosis was carried out by ELISA assays. The data showed that similar kinetics of antibody responses of different magnitude developed in trichinellosis patients; it was low by week 3, a peak raised by week 5 and decreased from week 7 up to the end of the study. The IgA-ELISA assay was the most sensitive and specific while the IgM was the least sensitive and specific. IgA antibodies to NBL antigens were detected in 80 % of patients while IgE, IgG and IgM responses were observed in 44, 31 and 19 % of the patients by week 3, respectively. From weeks 5 to 7, IgA antibodies were found in 89 to 100 % of the patients while lower percentages (0-82 % were found for the other isotypes. Reactivity of IgA, IgE, IgG and IgM to NBL antigens decreased from week 37 to 57 after infection (0-38 %. These results suggest that detection of IgA antibodies may be useful for early diagnosis and epidemiological studies in human trichinellosis.

  11. HIV-1 subtype C superinfected individuals mount low autologous neutralizing antibody responses prior to intrasubtype superinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basu Debby

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential role of antibodies in protection against intra-subtype HIV-1 superinfection remains to be understood. We compared the early neutralizing antibody (NAb responses in three individuals, who were superinfected within one year of primary infection, to ten matched non-superinfected controls from a Zambian cohort of subtype C transmission cases. Sequence analysis of single genome amplified full-length envs from a previous study showed limited diversification in the individuals who became superinfected with the same HIV-1 subtype within year one post-seroconversion. We hypothesized that this reflected a blunted NAb response, which may have made these individuals more susceptible to superinfection. Results Neutralization assays showed that autologous plasma NAb responses to the earliest, and in some cases transmitted/founder, virus were delayed and had low to undetectable titers in all three superinfected individuals prior to superinfection. In contrast, NAbs with a median IC50 titer of 1896 were detected as early as three months post-seroconversion in non-superinfected controls. Early plasma NAbs in all subjects showed limited but variable levels of heterologous neutralization breadth. Superinfected individuals also exhibited a trend toward lower levels of gp120- and V1V2-specific IgG binding antibodies but higher gp120-specific plasma IgA binding antibodies. Conclusions These data suggest that the lack of development of IgG antibodies, as reflected in autologous NAbs as well as gp120 and V1V2 binding antibodies to the primary infection virus, combined with potentially competing, non-protective IgA antibodies, may increase susceptibility to superinfection in the context of settings where a single HIV-1 subtype predominates.

  12. Immunological Cross-Reactivity between Malaria Vaccine Target Antigen P48/45 in Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum and Cross–Boosting of Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Bansal, Geetha P.; Merino, Kristen; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2016-01-01

    In general, malaria immunity has been suggested to be species specific with very little, if any, known cross-reactivity between Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum, both of which are responsible for >90% of human malaria, and co-endemic in many countries. It is therefore believed that species-specific immunity may be needed to target different species of Plasmodium. Pfs48/45 and Pvs48/45 are well established targets in the sexual stages of the malaria parasites, and are being pursued for the development of transmission blocking vaccines. Comparison of their sequences reveals 61% and 55% identity at the DNA and protein level, respectively raising the possibility that these two target antigens might share cross-reacting epitopes. Having succeeded in expressing recombinant Pfs48/45 and Pvs48/45 proteins, we hypothesized that these proteins will not only exhibit immunological cross–reactivity but also cross-boost immune responses. Mice were immunized with purified recombinant proteins using CFA, Montanide ISA-51 and alum as adjuvants, and the sera were analyzed by ELISA, Western blotting and indirect fixed and live IFA to address the hypothesis. Our studies revealed that Pvs48/45-immune sera showed strong cross-reactivity to full length Pfs48/45 protein, and the majority of this cross reactivity was in the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal sub-fragments of Pfs48/45. In cross-boosting experiments Pfs48/45 and Pvs48/45 antigens were able to cross-boost each other in mouse immunization studies. Additionally we also noticed an effect of adjuvants in the overall magnitude of observed cross-reactivity. These studies may have significant implications for immunity targeting transmission of both the species of malaria parasites. PMID:27438603

  13. The Complexity of a Dengue Vaccine: A Review of the Human Antibody Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky Flipse

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Yet, there are no vaccines or specific antivirals available to prevent or treat the disease. Several dengue vaccines are currently in clinical or preclinical stages. The most advanced vaccine is the chimeric tetravalent CYD-TDV vaccine of Sanofi Pasteur. This vaccine has recently cleared Phase III, and efficacy results have been published. Excellent tetravalent seroconversion was seen, yet the protective efficacy against infection was surprisingly low. Here, we will describe the complicating factors involved in the generation of a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine. Furthermore, we will discuss the human antibody responses during infection, including the epitopes targeted in humans. Also, we will discuss the current understanding of the assays used to evaluate antibody response. We hope this review will aid future dengue vaccine development as well as fundamental research related to the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

  14. ELISA to study antibody responses to anthrax vaccine in cattle, sheep and goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ELISA based on tri-partite toxin partially purified from Bacillus anthracis was used to determine the antibody responses of groups of cattle, sheep and goats after anthrax vaccination. All species produced detectable increases in antibody titres after vaccination with the order being cattle>sheep>goats. A second vaccination induced variable anamnestic responses depending on the species or time (6 or 22 weeks) after the primary dose. Large differences were observed between individual animals with respect to the antibody induced by the 2 vaccine doses. This observation, together with differences in vaccine quality and apparent immunogenicity may affect efficient control of anthrax outbreaks. ELISA provided a convenient method of determining the relative contribution of these factors to the protection afforded by anthrax vaccination programs. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Polyanhydride Nanovaccines Induce Germinal Center B Cell Formation and Sustained Serum Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, Julia E; Tygrett, Lorraine T; Hao, Jihua; Habte, Habtom H; Cho, Michael W; Greenspan, Neil S; Waldschmidt, Thomas J; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticle-based subunit vaccines have shown promising characteristics by enhancing antigen presentation and inducing protective immune responses when compared with soluble protein. Specifically, polyanhydride nanoparticle-based vaccines (i.e., nanovaccines) have been shown to successfully encapsulate and release antigens, activate B and T cells, and induce both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity towards a variety of immunogens. One of the characteristics of strong thymus-dependent antibody responses is the formation of germinal centers (GC) and the generation of GC B cells, which is part of the T helper cell driven cellular response. In order to further understand the role of nanovaccines in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses, their ability to induce germinal center B cell formation and isotype switching and the effects thereof on serum antibody responses were investigated in these studies. Polyanhydride nanovaccines based on 1,6-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)hexane and 1,8-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)-3,6-dioxaoctane were used to subcutaneously administer a viral antigen. GC B cell formation and serum antibody responses induced by the nanovaccines were compared to that induced by alum-based vaccine formulations. It was demonstrated that a single dose of polyanhydride nanovaccines resulted in the formation of robust GCs and serum antibody in comparison to that induced by the alum-based formulation. This was attributed to the sustained release of antigen provided by the nanovaccines. When administered in a multiple dose regimen, the highest post-immunization titer and GC B cell number was enhanced, and the immune response induced by the nanovaccines was further sustained. These studies provide foundational information on the mechanism of action of polyanhydride nanovaccines. PMID:27319223

  16. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Hanne R; Brix, Susanne; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2004-05-01

    While allergic reactions to soya are increasingly investigated, the normal immune response to ingested soya is scarcely described. In the present study, we wanted to characterise the soya-specific immune response in healthy mice ingesting soya protein. Mice fed a soya-containing diet (F0) and mice of the first (F1) and second (F2) offspring generation bred on a soya protein-free diet were used either directly or were transferred between the soya-containing and soya protein-free diet during pregnancy or neonatal life. The mice were compared as to levels of naturally occurring specific antibodies analysed by ELISA, and to the presence of oral tolerance detected as a suppressed antibody and cell-proliferation response upon immunisation with soya protein. F0 mice generated soya-specific antibodies, while oral tolerance to the same soya proteins was also clearly induced. When F0 dams were transferred to soya protein-free feed before mating, the F1 and F2 offspring generations showed no significantly different response, indicating that soya-specific immune components were not maternally transmitted. However, the ingestion of dietary soya protein by F1 mice during late pregnancy and lactation caused a lasting antibody response in the offspring, but in this case in the absence of oral tolerance. This indicates that, under certain conditions, factors involved in spontaneous antibody production can be transmitted from mother to offspring. Understanding the immune response to soya protein ingested under healthy conditions is important in the assessment of adverse effects of soya protein and in the use of animal allergy models. The present results add to this understanding. PMID:15137924

  17. Antibody response to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide conjugated to tetanus toxoid in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Gyhrs, A; Lausen, B;

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the antibody response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccine (HibCP-TT) in preterm infants. SUBJECTS: Thirty-five healthy preterm infants with gestational ages (GA) from 27 to 36 weeks and birth weights from ...

  18. Immunoglobulin M and G antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Rowe, P; Bennett, S;

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to describe the age-related immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG response to part of a 220-kDa glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) from Plasmodium falciparum and to determine possible correlations of possession of these antibodies with malaria morbidity. IgM and IgG levels...

  19. INADEQUATE ANTIBODY-RESPONSE AGAINST RESPIRATORY VIRAL-INFECTION IN LONG-SURVIVING RAT LUNG ALLOGRAFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINTER, JB; GROEN, M; VANDERLOGT, K; WILDEVUUR, CRH; PROP, J

    1995-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients suffer from a high number of viral infections. It has been suggested that the defense against viral infections is impaired in lung transplants, Therefore, we investigated in rat lung transplants whether antibody responses against an intrapulmonary viral infection were impa

  20. Association of selenocysteine transfer RNA fragments with serum antibody response to Mycoplasma spp. in beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective was to identify transfer RNA fragments (tRFs) associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma spp. in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: in summer after calves were born, in fall at weaning, and in the following spring. All sera collected...

  1. Anti-α-galactosidase A antibody response to agalsidase beta treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcox, William R; Linthorst, Gabor E; Germain, Dominique P; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Waldek, Stephen; Richards, Susan M; Beitner-Johnson, Dana; Cizmarik, Marta; Cole, J Alexander; Kingma, Wytske; Warnock, David G

    2012-01-01

    Agalsidase beta, a form of recombinant human α-galactosidase A (αGAL), is approved for use as enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Fabry disease. An immunogenic response against a therapeutic protein could potentially impact its efficacy or safety. The development of anti-αGAL IgG antibodies was ...

  2. Lack of association between mannose binding lectin and antibody responses after acellular pertussis vaccinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Gröndahl-Yli-Hannuksela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mannose-binding lectin (MBL is one of the key molecules in innate immunity and its role in human vaccine responses is poorly known. This study aimed to investigate the possible association of MBL polymorphisms with antibody production after primary and booster vaccinations with acellular pertussis vaccines in infants and adolescents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Five hundred and sixty eight subjects were included in this study. In the adolescent cohort 355 subjects received a dose of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (dTpa vaccine ten years previously. Follow-up was performed at 3, 5 and 10 years. Infant cohort consisted of 213 subjects, who had received three primary doses of DTaP vaccine at 3, 5, and 12 months of age according to Finnish immunization program. Blood samples were collected before the vaccinations at 2,5 months of age and after the vaccinations at 13 months and 2 years of age. Concentrations of IgG antibodies to pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin, and pertactin and antibodies to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids were measured by standardized enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of MBL2 gene exon1 (codons 52, 54, 57 were examined. MBL serum concentration was also measured from the adolescent cohort. No association was found with MBL2 exon 1 polymorphisms and antibody responses against vaccine antigens, after primary and booster dTpa vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that MBL polymorphisms do not affect the production and persistence of antibodies after acellular pertussis vaccination. Our finding also suggests that MBL might not be involved in modulating antibody responses to the vaccines made of purified bacterial proteins.

  3. Antibody response of five bird species after vaccination with a killed West Nile virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, Danelle M; Llizo, Shirley Yeo; Miller, Christine L; Glaser, Amy L

    2007-06-01

    West Nile virus has been associated with numerous bird mortalities in the United States since 1999. Five avian species at three zoological parks were selected to assess the antibody response to vaccination for West Nile virus: black-footed penguins (Spheniscus demersus), little blue penguins (Eudyptula minor), American flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber), Chilean flamingos (Phoenicopterus chilensis), and Attwater's prairie chickens (Tympanuchus cupido attwateri). All birds were vaccinated intramuscularly at least twice with a commercially available inactivated whole virus vaccine (Innovator). Significant differences in antibody titer over time were detected for black-footed penguins and both flamingo species. PMID:17679507

  4. Antibody responses after vaccination against equine influenza in the Republic of Korea in 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Ju; KIM, Bo-Hye; YANG, Sunjoo; Choi, Eun-jin; SHIN, Ye-Jin; SONG, Jae-Young; Shin, Yeun-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    In this study, antibody responses after equine influenza vaccination were investigated among 1,098 horses in Korea using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. The equine influenza viruses, A/equine/South Africa/4/03 (H3N8) and A/equine/Wildeshausen/1/08 (H3N8), were used as antigens in the HI assay. The mean seropositive rates were 91.7% (geometric mean antibody levels (GMT), 56.8) and 93.6% (GMT, 105.2) for A/equine/South Africa/4/03 and A/equine/Wildeshausen/1/08, respectively. Yearli...

  5. Immune senescence in old and very old rhesus monkeys: reduced antibody response to influenza vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Coe, Christopher L.; Lubach, Gabriele R.; Kinnard, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    The health of old monkeys usually begins to deteriorate by 20 years of age, coinciding with the onset of a slowly progressing immune senescence. Changes in lymphocyte subsets and responses to several antigens have been characterized in geriatric primates, but systematic research has not been conducted on vaccination against influenza virus, a topic of considerable clinical concern for elderly humans. Antibody responses were significantly reduced to primary immunizations in old monkeys, but by...

  6. Stability of a viral infection model with state-dependent delay, CTL and antibody immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Rezounenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A virus dynamics model with intracellular state-dependent delay and nonlinear infection rate of Beddington-DeAngelis functional response is studied. The technique of Lyapunov functionals is used to analyze stability of an interior infection equilibrium which describes the case of both CTL and antibody immune responses activated. We consider first a particular biologically motivated class of discrete state-dependent delays. Next, the general case is investigated.

  7. Canine antibody response to Phlebotomus perniciosus bites negatively correlates with the risk of Leishmania infantum transmission.

    OpenAIRE

    Michaela Vlkova; Iva Rohousova; Jan Drahota; Dorothee Stanneck; Eva Maria Kruedewagen; Norbert Mencke; Domenico Otranto; Petr Volf

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phlebotomine sand flies are blood-sucking insects that can transmit Leishmania parasites. Hosts bitten by sand flies develop an immune response against sand fly salivary antigens. Specific anti-saliva IgG indicate the exposure to the vector and may also help to estimate the risk of Leishmania spp. transmission. In this study, we examined the canine antibody response against the saliva of Phlebotomus perniciosus, the main vector of Leishmania infantum in the Mediterranean Basin, an...

  8. Immunization of Macaca fascicularis (Macaca irus) monkeys with Streptococcus mutans: specificity of antibody responses in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmings, F G; Evans, R T; Genco, R J

    1976-04-01

    M fascicularis monkeys were immunized subcutaneously in the vicinity of the major salivary glands and by retrograde infusion into the parotid duct, with a vaccine containing Formalin-killed S mutans strain 6715 cells and culture-fluid antigens. Indirect immunofluorescent staining was used to titrate and classify antibodies. Subcutaneous immunization induced only a serum response, whereas intraductal infusion stimulated both an IgA antibody response in the parotid fluid and a serum response. Immunized and nonimmunized control groups were orally infected with S mutans strain 6715. The establishment in dental plaque was quantitated by recovery of the infecting organism on selective media and by immunofluorescent staining of plaque smears taken from individual tooth surfaces. The establishment of S mutans strain 6715 was noticeably inhibited in immune monkeys. Immunofluorescent assays for antibody also showed that serum and parotid fluid containing serum IgA antibodies cross reacted with other d serotype and a serotype strains but not representative b and c strains. Immune and control groups were then orally infected with S mutans strain GS-5, a c serotype strain, and no inhibition in establishment was detected of the non-cross-reacting type c organism in the immune group. A latter series of booster immunizations via the intraductal route resulted in a significant decrease in parotid fluid flow. Histological investigations showed inflammatory cell infiltration and replacement of epithelium by connective tissue in the glands from immunized monkeys. A separate group of monkeys, younger than the first, was immunized with the same vaccine via the duct only. In this group, immunizations were given at shorter intervals, but the immunization response was similar to that observed in the first group. The investigations reviewed here and new experiments reported show that immunization of monkeys with S mutan strain 6715 via the parotid duct elicited a reproducible IgA antibody

  9. DNA prime-protein boost based vaccination with a conserved region of leptospiral immunoglobulin-like A and B proteins enhances protection against leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Karine M; Hartwig, Daiane D; Oliveira, Thaís L; Bacelo, Kátia L; Schuch, Rodrigo; Amaral, Marta G; Dellagostin, Odir A

    2015-12-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the Leptospira genus. Vaccination with bacterins has severe limitations. Here, we evaluated the N-terminal region of the leptospiral immunoglobulin-like B protein (LigBrep) as a vaccine candidate against leptospirosis using immunisation strategies based on DNA prime-protein boost, DNA vaccine, and subunit vaccine. Upon challenge with a virulent strain ofLeptospira interrogans, the prime-boost and DNA vaccine approaches induced significant protection in hamsters, as well as a specific IgG antibody response and sterilising immunity. Although vaccination with recombinant fragment of LigBrep also produced a strong antibody response, it was not immunoprotective. These results highlight the potential of LigBrep as a candidate antigen for an effective vaccine against leptospirosis and emphasise the use of the DNA prime-protein boost as an important strategy for vaccine development. PMID:26676320

  10. Antibody response in cattle, sheep and rats to infection with. gamma. -irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, D.L.; Doy, T.G. (Agricultural Research Council, Compton (UK). Inst. for Research on Animal Diseases); Hanna, R.E.B. (Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (UK))

    1982-05-01

    Cattle, sheep and rats were infected orally with ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica, or with normal metacercariae. The antibody response was monitored in each host to metacercarial tegument (T0), juvenile tegument (T1), adult tegument (T2) and gut antigens. The response was examined at weekly intervals for cattle and sheep throughout 15 weeks of infection and four weeks after infection in rats, using an indirect fluorescent antibody labelling technique. It was found that the irradiated metacercariae engendered a normal humoral response to T0, T1 and gut antigens in all three hosts although the antibody levels were somewhat reduced due to early death or stunting of the flukes. T0 and T1 appeared to be antigenically similar. Antibodies against T2 appeared late in the animals infected with ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae and the titres attained were considerably lower than in the controls. The T2 antigen stimulus in the animals given ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae was probably provided by flukes which 'broke through' the developmental barrier imposed by irradiation and which were found alive at autopsy.

  11. Immune response of mallard ducks treated with immunosuppressive agents: antibody response to erythrocytes and in vivo response to phytohemagglutinin-P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrank, C.S.; Cook, M.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of two in vivo tests to assay immune competence of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) treated with various immunomodulatory agents was examined. Skin responses to phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) injected intradermally and serum antibody levels produced in response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) were measured. As measured by the skin response to PHA-P, ducks injected intramuscularly with cyclophosphamide or cyclosporine did not respond differently from control-injected ducks. Dexamethasone injected intramuscularly significantly suppressed the skin response to PHA-P. As measured by antibody levels in response to SRBC, ducks injected intramuscularly with cyclophosphamide responded with antibody titers similar to controls. Cyclosporine injected intramuscularly reduced the level of immunoglobulin (Ig) G significantly in one of two experiments. Dexamethasone injected intramuscularly reduced peak total and IgG titers. These experiments provide information on the viability of these two in vivo tests to reflect immune competence of mallard ducks.

  12. Antibody Response is More Likely to Pneumococcal Proteins Than to Polysaccharide After HIV-associated Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Green, Nicola; Goldblatt, David;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). In order to assess the immunogenicity of pneumococcal proteins and polysaccharide, we investigated protein and serotype-specific antibody responses after HIV......-associated IPD. METHODS: Specific antipneumococcal immunoglobulin G to 27 pneumococcal protein antigens and 30 serotype polysaccharides was measured in plasma before and after IPD in HIV-infected individuals and compared to HIV-infected individuals without IPD. RESULTS: Over time, 81% of IPD cases responded to...... HIV-infected individuals with IPD had a serotype-specific antibody response. Younger age at the time of IPD was the only predictor of a serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody response, whereas we did not identify predictors of a protein-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: Antibody responses...

  13. Boosting foundations and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Schapire, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Boosting is an approach to machine learning based on the idea of creating a highly accurate predictor by combining many weak and inaccurate "rules of thumb." A remarkably rich theory has evolved around boosting, with connections to a range of topics, including statistics, game theory, convex optimization, and information geometry. Boosting algorithms have also enjoyed practical success in such fields as biology, vision, and speech processing. At various times in its history, boosting has been perceived as mysterious, controversial, even paradoxical.

  14. Analysis of V2 antibody responses induced in vaccinees in the ALVAC/AIDSVAX HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolla-Pazner, Susan; deCamp, Allan C; Cardozo, Timothy; Karasavvas, Nicos; Gottardo, Raphael; Williams, Constance; Morris, Daryl E; Tomaras, Georgia; Rao, Mangala; Billings, Erik; Berman, Phillip; Shen, Xiaoying; Andrews, Charla; O'Connell, Robert J; Ngauy, Viseth; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; de Souza, Mark; Korber, Bette; Koup, Richard; Bailer, Robert T; Mascola, John R; Pinter, Abraham; Montefiori, David; Haynes, Barton F; Robb, Merlin L; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Michael, Nelson L; Gilbert, Peter B; Kim, Jerome H

    2013-01-01

    The RV144 clinical trial of a prime/boost immunizing regimen using recombinant canary pox (ALVAC-HIV) and two gp120 proteins (AIDSVAX B and E) was previously shown to have a 31.2% efficacy rate. Plasma specimens from vaccine and placebo recipients were used in an extensive set of assays to identify correlates of HIV-1 infection risk. Of six primary variables that were studied, only one displayed a significant inverse correlation with risk of infection: the antibody (Ab) response to a fusion protein containing the V1 and V2 regions of gp120 (gp70-V1V2). This finding prompted a thorough examination of the results generated with the complete panel of 13 assays measuring various V2 Abs in the stored plasma used in the initial pilot studies and those used in the subsequent case-control study. The studies revealed that the ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX vaccine induced V2-specific Abs that cross-react with multiple HIV-1 subgroups and recognize both conformational and linear epitopes. The conformational epitope was present on gp70-V1V2, while the predominant linear V2 epitope mapped to residues 165-178, immediately N-terminal to the putative α4β7 binding motif in the mid-loop region of V2. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to compare the risk of infection with data from 12 V2 assays, and in 11 of these, the ORs were ≤1, reaching statistical significance for two of the variables: Ab responses to gp70-V1V2 and to overlapping V2 linear peptides. It remains to be determined whether anti-V2 Ab responses were directly responsible for the reduced infection rate in RV144 and whether anti-V2 Abs will prove to be important with other candidate HIV vaccines that show efficacy, however, the results support continued dissection of Ab responses to the V2 region which may illuminate mechanisms of protection from HIV-1 infection and may facilitate the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:23349725

  15. Analysis of V2 antibody responses induced in vaccinees in the ALVAC/AIDSVAX HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Zolla-Pazner

    Full Text Available The RV144 clinical trial of a prime/boost immunizing regimen using recombinant canary pox (ALVAC-HIV and two gp120 proteins (AIDSVAX B and E was previously shown to have a 31.2% efficacy rate. Plasma specimens from vaccine and placebo recipients were used in an extensive set of assays to identify correlates of HIV-1 infection risk. Of six primary variables that were studied, only one displayed a significant inverse correlation with risk of infection: the antibody (Ab response to a fusion protein containing the V1 and V2 regions of gp120 (gp70-V1V2. This finding prompted a thorough examination of the results generated with the complete panel of 13 assays measuring various V2 Abs in the stored plasma used in the initial pilot studies and those used in the subsequent case-control study. The studies revealed that the ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX vaccine induced V2-specific Abs that cross-react with multiple HIV-1 subgroups and recognize both conformational and linear epitopes. The conformational epitope was present on gp70-V1V2, while the predominant linear V2 epitope mapped to residues 165-178, immediately N-terminal to the putative α4β7 binding motif in the mid-loop region of V2. Odds ratios (ORs were calculated to compare the risk of infection with data from 12 V2 assays, and in 11 of these, the ORs were ≤1, reaching statistical significance for two of the variables: Ab responses to gp70-V1V2 and to overlapping V2 linear peptides. It remains to be determined whether anti-V2 Ab responses were directly responsible for the reduced infection rate in RV144 and whether anti-V2 Abs will prove to be important with other candidate HIV vaccines that show efficacy, however, the results support continued dissection of Ab responses to the V2 region which may illuminate mechanisms of protection from HIV-1 infection and may facilitate the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine.

  16. Impact of a Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 vaccine on antibody responses in adult Malians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alassane Dicko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites is a leading blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate. Protection of Aotus monkeys after vaccination with AMA1 correlates with antibody responses. STUDY DESIGN/RESULTS: A randomized, controlled, double-blind phase 1 clinical trial was conducted in 54 healthy Malian adults living in an area of intense seasonal malaria transmission to assess the safety and immunogenicity of the AMA1-C1 malaria vaccine. AMA1-C1 contains an equal mixture of yeast-expressed recombinant proteins based on sequences from the FVO and 3D7 clones of P. falciparum, adsorbed on Alhydrogel. The control vaccine was the hepatitis B vaccine (Recombivax. Participants were enrolled into 1 of 3 dose cohorts (n = 18 per cohort and randomized 2:1 to receive either AMA1-C1 or Recombivax. Participants in the first, second, and third cohorts randomized to receive AMA1-C1 were vaccinated with 5, 20 and 80 microg of AMA1-C1, respectively. Vaccinations were administered on days 0, 28, and 360, and participants were followed until 6 months after the final vaccination. AMA1-C1 was well tolerated; no vaccine-related severe or serious adverse events were observed. AMA1 antibody responses to the 80 microg dose increased rapidly from baseline levels by days 14 and 28 after the first vaccination and continued to increase after the second vaccination. After a peak 14 days following the second vaccination, antibody levels decreased to baseline levels one year later at the time of the third vaccination that induced little or no increase in antibody levels. CONCLUSIONS: Although the AMA1-C1 vaccine candidate was well-tolerated and induced antibody responses to both vaccine and non-vaccine alleles, the antibody response after a third dose given at one year was lower than the response to the initial vaccinations. Additionally, post-vaccination increases in anti-AMA1 antibody levels were not associated with significant changes

  17. Flagellin induces antibody responses through a TLR5- and inflammasome-independent pathway1

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Yglesias, Américo Harry; Zhao, Xiaodan; Quarles, Ellen K.; Lai, Marvin A.; VandenBos, Tim; Strong, Roland K.; Smith, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellin is a potent immunogen that activates the innate immune system via TLR5 and Naip5/6, and generates strong T and B cell responses. The adaptor protein MyD88 is critical for signaling by TLR5, as well as IL-1 and IL-18 receptors, major downstream mediators of the Naip5/6 Nlrc4-inflammasome. Herein we define roles of known flagellin receptors and MyD88 in antibody responses generated towards flagellin. We used mice genetically deficient in flagellin recognition pathways to characterize innate immune components that regulate isotype specific antibody responses. Using purified flagellin from Salmonella, we dissected the contribution of innate flagellin recognition pathways to promote antibody responses towards flagellin and co-administered ovalbumin in C57BL/6 mice. We demonstrate IgG2c responses towards flagellin were TLR5- and inflammasome-dependent; IgG1 was the dominant isotype and partially TLR5- and inflammasome-dependent. Our data indicates a substantial flagellin-specific IgG1 response was induced through a TLR5-, inflammasome-, and MyD88-independent pathway. IgA anti-FliC responses were TLR5- & MyD88-dependent and caspase-1-independent. Unlike C57BL/6 mice, flagellin immunized A/J mice induced co-dominant IgG1 and IgG2a responses. Furthermore, MyD88-independent flagellin-induced antibody responses were even more pronounced in A/J MyD88−/− mice, and IgA anti-FliC responses were suppressed by MyD88. Flagellin also worked as an adjuvant toward co-administered ovalbumin, but it only promoted IgG1 anti-OVA responses. Our results demonstrate that a novel pathway for flagellin recognition contributes to antibody production. Characterization of this pathway will be useful for understanding immunity to flagellin and the rationale design of flagellin-based vaccines. PMID:24442437

  18. Genomic copy number variants: evidence for association with antibody response to anthrax vaccine adsorbed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Falola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anthrax and its etiologic agent remain a biological threat. Anthrax vaccine is highly effective, but vaccine-induced IgG antibody responses vary widely following required doses of vaccinations. Such variation can be related to genetic factors, especially genomic copy number variants (CNVs that are known to be enriched among genes with immunologic function. We have tested this hypothesis in two study populations from a clinical trial of anthrax vaccination. METHODS: We performed CNV-based genome-wide association analyses separately on 794 European Americans and 200 African-Americans. Antibodies to protective antigen were measured at week 8 (early response and week 30 (peak response using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We used DNA microarray data (Affymetrix 6.0 and two CNV detection algorithms, hidden markov model (PennCNV and circular binary segmentation (GeneSpring to determine CNVs in all individuals. Multivariable regression analyses were used to identify CNV-specific associations after adjusting for relevant non-genetic covariates. RESULTS: Within the 22 autosomal chromosomes, 2,943 non-overlapping CNV regions were detected by both algorithms. Genomic insertions containing HLA-DRB5, DRB1 and DQA1/DRA genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC region (chromosome 6p21.3 were moderately associated with elevated early antibody response (β = 0.14, p = 1.78×10(-3 among European Americans, and the strongest association was observed between peak antibody response and a segmental insertion on chromosome 1, containing NBPF4, NBPF5, STXMP3, CLCC1, and GPSM2 genes (β = 1.66, p = 6.06×10(-5. For African-Americans, segmental deletions spanning PRR20, PCDH17 and PCH68 genes on chromosome 13 were associated with elevated early antibody production (β = 0.18, p = 4.47×10(-5. Population-specific findings aside, one genomic insertion on chromosome 17 (containing NSF, ARL17 and LRRC37A genes was associated

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigens Influence the Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Abdollah; Bagheri-Jamebozorgi, Masoome; Nemati, Maryam; Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Shokri, Fazel

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and its sequelae such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma has remained a serious public health problem throughout the world. The WHO strategy for effective control of HBV infection and its complications is mass vaccination of neonates and children within the framework of Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Vaccination with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) induces protective antibody response (anti-HBs ≥ 10 IU/L) in 90-99% of vaccinees. The lack of response to HBsAg has been attributed to a variety of immunological mechanisms, including defect in antigen presentation, defect in HBsAg-specific T and/or B cell repertoires, T-cell suppression, increase in the regulatory T cell count, lack of necessary help of T-cells for production of anti-HBs by B cells, defect in Th1 and/or Th2 cytokine production and selective killing of HBsAg-specific B-cells by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The HLA complex plays an important role in many of these immunological processes. A variety of HLA class I, II, and III alleles and antigens have been reported to be associated with antibody response to HBsAg vaccination in different ethnic populations. Moreover, some HLA haplotypes were also associated with responsiveness to HBsAg. In this review the association of the HLA specificities with antibody response to hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is discussed. PMID:26546891

  20. Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sulggi A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Chomont, Nicolas; Fromentin, Remi; Lewin, Sharon R.; O’Doherty, Una; Palmer, Sarah; Richman, Douglas D.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Yukl, Steven A.; Deeks, Steven G.; Burbelo, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A major challenge to HIV eradication strategies is the lack of an accurate measurement of the total burden of replication-competent HIV (the “reservoir”). We assessed the association of anti-HIV antibody responses and the estimated size of the reservoir during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods We evaluated anti-HIV antibody profiles using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) assay in relation to several blood-based HIV reservoir measures: total and 2-LTR DNA (rtPCR or droplet digital PCR); integrated DNA (Alu PCR); unspliced RNA (rtPCR), multiply-spliced RNA (TILDA), residual plasma HIV RNA (single copy PCR), and replication-competent virus (outgrowth assay). We also assessed total HIV DNA and RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (rtPCR). Spearman correlations and linear regressions were performed using log-transformed blood- or tissue-based reservoir measurements as predictors and log-transformed antibody levels as outcome variables. Results Among 51 chronically HIV-infected ART-suppressed participants (median age = 57, nadir CD4+ count = 196 cells/mm3, ART duration = 9 years), the most statistically significant associations were between antibody responses to integrase and HIV RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (1.17 fold-increase per two-fold RNA increase, P = 0.004) and between antibody responses to matrix and integrated HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells (0.35 fold-decrease per two-fold DNA increase, P = 0.003). However, these associations were not statistically significant after a stringent Bonferroni-adjustment of P<0.00045. Multivariate models including age and duration of ART did not markedly alter results. Conclusions Our findings suggest that anti-HIV antibody responses may reflect the size of the HIV reservoir during chronic treated HIV disease, possibly via antigen recognition in reservoir sites. Larger, prospective studies are needed to validate the utility of antibody levels as a measure of the total body burden of HIV

  1. Comparative evaluation of booster efficacies of BCG, Ag85B, and Ag85B peptides based vaccines to boost BCG induced immunity in BALB/c mice: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Husain, Aliabbas A.; Warke, Shubhangi R.; Kalorey, Dewanand R.; Daginawala, Hatim F.; Taori, Girdhar M.; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In the present study booster efficacies of Ag85 B, Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), and Ag85B peptides were evaluated using prime boost regimes in BALB/c mice. Materials and Methods Mice were primed with BCG vaccine and subsequently boosted with Ag85B, BCG and cocktail of Ag85B peptides. Results Based on analysis of immune response it was observed mice boosted with Ag85B peptides showed significant (p < 0.001) cytokines levels (interferon γ, interleukin 12) and BCG specific antibodies ...

  2. Measles virus antibody responses in children randomly assigned to receive standard-titer edmonston-zagreb measles vaccine at 4.5 and 9 months of age, 9 months of age, or 9 and 18 months of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Cesario; Garly, May-Lill; Bale, Carlitos;

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization recommends administration of measles vaccine (MV) at age 9 months in low-income countries. We tested the measles virus antibody response at 4.5, 9, 18, and 24 months of age for children randomly assigned to receive standard-titer Edmonston-Zagreb MV at 4.5 and 9 months...... levels at 24 months of age. In addition, the response at both 9 and 24 months of age was inversely correlated with the antibody level at receipt of the first dose of MV, and the second dose of MV, received at 9 months of age, provided a significant boost in antibody level to children who had low antibody...... levels. In the group of 318 children who received MV at 9 months of age, with or without a second dose at 18 months of age, 99% (314) had protective levels at 24 months of age. The geometric mean titer at 24 months of age was significantly lower in the group that received MV at 4.5 and 9 months of age...

  3. Characterization of the antigen-specific CD4+ T cell response induced by prime-boost strategies with CAF01 and CpG adjuvants administered by the intranasal and subcutaneous routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa eCiabattini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The design of heterologous prime-boost vaccine combinations that optimally shape the immune response is of critical importance for the development of next generation vaccines. Here we tested different prime-boost combinations using the tuberculosis vaccine antigen H56 with CAF01 or CpG ODN 1821 adjuvants, administered by the parenteral and nasal routes. By using peptide-MHC class II tetramers, antigen-specific CD4+ T cells were tracked following primary and booster immunizations. Both parenteral priming with H56 plus CAF01 and nasal priming with H56 plus CpG elicited significant expansion of CD4+ tetramer-positive T cells in the spleen, however only parenterally primed cells responded to booster immunization. Subcutaneous priming with H56 and CAF01 followed by nasal boosting with H56 and CpG showed the greater expansion of CD4+ tetramer-positive T cells in the spleen and lungs compared to all the other homologous and heterologous prime-boost combinations. Nasal boosting exerted a recruitment of primed CD4+ T cells into lungs that was stronger in subcutaneously than nasally primed mice, in accordance with different chemokine receptor expression induced by primary immunization. These data demonstrate that subcutaneous priming is fundamental for eliciting CD4+ T cells that can be efficiently boosted by the nasal route and results in the recruitment of antigen-experienced cells into the lungs. Combination of different vaccine formulations and routes of delivery for priming and boosting is a strategic approach for improving and directing vaccine-induced immune responses.

  4. Requirement for Fc Effector Mechanisms in the APOBEC3/Rfv3-Dependent Neutralizing Antibody Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halemano, Kalani; Barrett, Bradley S.; Heilman, Karl J.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses are often evaluated in the absence of Fc-dependent immune effectors. In murine Friend retrovirus infection, Apobec3/Rfv3 promotes a potent polyclonal NAb response. Here, we show that the Apobec3/Rfv3-dependent NAb response correlated with virus-specific IgG2 titers and that the in vivo neutralization potency of Apobec3/Rfv3-resistant antisera was dependent on activating Fcγ receptors but not complement. The data strengthen retroviral vaccine strategies aimed at eliciting NAbs that activate specific Fcγ receptors. PMID:25589647

  5. Mucosal immunization with PLGA-microencapsulated DNA primes a SIV-specific CTL response revealed by boosting with cognate recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systemically administered DNA encoding a recombinant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) derived immunogen effectively primes a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in macaques. In this further pilot study we have evaluated mucosal delivery of DNA as an alternative priming strategy. Plasmid DNA, pTH.HW, encoding a multi-CTL epitope gene, was incorporated into poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles of less than 10 μm in diameter. Five intrarectal immunizations failed to stimulate a circulating vaccine-specific CTL response in 2 Mamu-A*01+ rhesus macaques. However, 1 week after intradermal immunization with a cognate modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine MVA.HW, CTL responses were detected in both animals that persisted until analysis postmortem, 12 weeks after the final boost. In contrast, a weaker and less durable response was seen in an animal vaccinated with the MVA construct alone. Analysis of lymphoid tissues revealed a disseminated CTL response in peripheral and regional lymph nodes but not the spleen of both mucosally primed animals

  6. Relationship between exposure to vector bites and antibody responses to mosquito salivary gland extracts.

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    Albin Fontaine

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne diseases are major health problems worldwide. Serological responses to mosquito saliva proteins may be useful in estimating individual exposure to bites from mosquitoes transmitting these diseases. However, the relationships between the levels of these IgG responses and mosquito density as well as IgG response specificity at the genus and/or species level need to be clarified prior to develop new immunological markers to assess human/vector contact. To this end, a kinetic study of antibody levels against several mosquito salivary gland extracts from southeastern French individuals living in three areas with distinct ecological environments and, by implication, distinct Aedes caspius mosquito densities were compared using ELISA. A positive association was observed between the average levels of IgG responses against Ae. caspius salivary gland extracts and spatial Ae. caspius densities. Additionally, the average level of IgG responses increased significantly during the peak exposure to Ae. caspius at each site and returned to baseline four months later, suggesting short-lived IgG responses. The species-specificity of IgG antibody responses was determined by testing antibody responses to salivary gland extracts from Cx. pipiens, a mosquito that is present at these three sites at different density levels, and from two other Aedes species not present in the study area (Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. The IgG responses observed against these mosquito salivary gland extracts contrasted with those observed against Ae. caspius salivary gland extracts, supporting the existence of species-specific serological responses. By considering different populations and densities of mosquitoes linked to environmental factors, this study shows, for the first time, that specific IgG antibody responses against Ae. caspius salivary gland extracts may be related to the seasonal and geographical variations in Ae. caspius density. Characterisation of such

  7. Prebiotic and probiotic agents enhance antibody-based immune responses to Salmonella Typhimurium infection in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Naqid, Ibrahim A.; Jonathan P. Owen; Maddison, Ben C; Gardner, David S.; Foster, Neil; Tchorzewska, Monika; La Ragione, Roberto M; Gough, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonellosis causes significant economic losses to the pig industry and contaminated pork products are an important source of Salmonella for humans. The EU ban on the use of antibiotic growth promoters in pig production, and the emergence of antibiotic resistance has meant there is a pressing need for alternative control strategies for pathogenic bacteria such as S. Typhimurium in pigs. Here, we determined the effects of prebiotic, probiotic and synbiotic diet regimes on antibody responses t...

  8. Antibody Response Rates To Hepatitis B Vaccination in Children With Chronic Renal Failure: An Observational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ece, İbrahim; Kibar, Ayse Esin; Oflaz, Burhan; Cakar, Nilgun; Balli, Sevket; Akkok, Nermin; Kara, Nazli

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the most important factors increasing the mortality and the mobility in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). There are a limited number of studies of pediatric patients with CRF regarding the response to double doses and protection rates. In this study, our aim was to compare the antibody levels and the respond rates to recombinant hepatitis B vaccine in children with chronic renal failure (CRF). Materials and Methods: In this pr...

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigens Influence the Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollah Jafarzadeh; Masoome Bagheri-Jamebozorgi; Maryam Nemati; Forough Golsaz-Shirazi; Fazel Shokri

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and its sequelae such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma has remained a serious public health problem throughout the world. The WHO strategy for effective control of HBV infection and its complications is mass vaccination of neonates and children within the framework of Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Vaccination with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) induces protective antibody response (anti-HBs ≥ 10 IU/L) in 90-99% of vaccinees.The lack ...

  10. Canine antibody response to Phlebotomus perniciosus bites negatively correlates with the risk of Leishmania infantum transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Vlkova

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phlebotomine sand flies are blood-sucking insects that can transmit Leishmania parasites. Hosts bitten by sand flies develop an immune response against sand fly salivary antigens. Specific anti-saliva IgG indicate the exposure to the vector and may also help to estimate the risk of Leishmania spp. transmission. In this study, we examined the canine antibody response against the saliva of Phlebotomus perniciosus, the main vector of Leishmania infantum in the Mediterranean Basin, and characterized salivary antigens of this sand fly species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sera of dogs bitten by P. perniciosus under experimental conditions and dogs naturally exposed to sand flies in a L. infantum focus were tested by ELISA for the presence of anti-P. perniciosus antibodies. Antibody levels positively correlated with the number of blood-fed P. perniciosus females. In naturally exposed dogs the increase of specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 was observed during sand fly season. Importantly, Leishmania-positive dogs revealed significantly lower anti-P. perniciosus IgG2 compared to Leishmania-negative ones. Major P. perniciosus antigens were identified by western blot and mass spectrometry as yellow proteins, apyrases and antigen 5-related proteins. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that monitoring canine antibody response to sand fly saliva in endemic foci could estimate the risk of L. infantum transmission. It may also help to control canine leishmaniasis by evaluating the effectiveness of anti-vector campaigns. Data from the field study where dogs from the Italian focus of L. infantum were naturally exposed to P. perniciosus bites indicates that the levels of anti-P. perniciosus saliva IgG2 negatively correlate with the risk of Leishmania transmission. Thus, specific IgG2 response is suggested as a risk marker of L. infantum transmission for dogs.

  11. Formation of antibodies against infliximab and adalimumab strongly correlates with functional drug levels and clinical responses in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radstake, T R D J; Svenson, M; Eijsbouts, A M;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) neutralising antibody constructs are increasingly being used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: To determine potential differences in clinical responses, soluble drug levels and antibody formation between patients with RA receiving...... 16 (47%), 8 (24%) and 10 (29%). Clinical responses correlated with the levels of S-infliximab/adalimumab and the formation of anti-infliximab/anti-adalimumab antibodies. CONCLUSION: The clinical response to two anti-TNFalpha biological agents closely follows the trough drug levels and the presence of...... antibodies directed against the drugs. Further studies that focus on the underlying pathways leading to antibody formation are warranted to predict immunogenicity of these expensive biological agents and treatment outcomes....

  12. Neutralizing antibody response in the patients with hand, foot and mouth disease to enterovirus 71 and its clinical implications

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    Zhu Liye

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has emerged as a significant pathogen causing large outbreaks in China for the past 3 years. Developing an EV71 vaccine is urgently needed to stop the spread of the disease; however, the adaptive immune response of humans to EV71 infection remains unclear. We examined the neutralizing antibody titers in HFMD patients and compared them to those of asymptomatic healthy children and young adults. We found that 80% of HFMD patients became positive for neutralizing antibodies against EV71 (GMT = 24.3 one day after the onset of illness. The antibody titers in the patients peaked two days (GMT = 79.5 after the illness appeared and were comparable to the level of adults (GMT = 45.2. Noticeably, the antibody response was not correlated with disease severity, suggesting that cellular immune response, besides neutralizing antibodies, could play critical role in controlling the outcome of EV71 infection in humans.

  13. Maternal HIV-1 envelope–specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permar, Sallie R.; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E.; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L.; Overman, R. Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan; Chen, Haiyan; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Von Holle, Tarra; Martinez, David R.; Cai, Fangping; Kumar, Amit; Xia, Shi-Mao; Lu, Xiaozhi; Louzao, Raul; Wilkes, Samantha; Datta, Saheli; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S. Munir; Montefiori, David C.; Denny, Thomas N.; Moody, M. Anthony; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1–transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score–matched nontransmitting mothers were selected from the Women and Infants Transmission Study (WITS) of US nonbreastfeeding, HIV-1–infected mothers. In a multivariable logistic regression model, the magnitude of the maternal IgG responses specific for the third variable loop (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope was predictive of a reduced risk of MTCT. Neutralizing Ab responses against easy-to-neutralize (tier 1) HIV-1 strains also predicted a reduced risk of peripartum transmission in secondary analyses. Moreover, recombinant maternal V3–specific IgG mAbs mediated neutralization of autologous HIV-1 isolates. Thus, common V3-specific Ab responses in maternal plasma predicted a reduced risk of MTCT and mediated autologous virus neutralization, suggesting that boosting these maternal Ab responses may further reduce HIV-1 MTCT. PMID:26053661

  14. Antibody and inflammatory responses in laying hens with experimental primary infections of Ascaridia galli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Atxutegi, C; Gandolfi, B; Arangüena, T; Sepúlveda, R; Arévalo, M; Simón, F

    2009-04-01

    Ascaridia galli, an intestinal nematode that affects hens and other domestic and wild birds, causes economic losses in avian exploitations. The present work shows that A. galli stimulates a strong antibody response as well as an intense inflammatory reaction, in the intestinal mucous of experimentally infected Lohmann Brown laying hens. IgG antibodies against soluble extracts of A. galli embrionated eggs and adult worms, were detected in both blood and yolks eggs from infected hens during a period of 105 days after the infection. This indicates that hens transfer to their offspring a part of the IgG antibodies produced when they become infected. The antigens responsible for the stimulation of specific IgG were molecules of 30-34, 44-54 and 58-90 kDa, while in the yolk eggs of infected hens a reactivity directed against antigens of molecular weight (M(w)) lower than 50 kDa was detected. Histology revealed traumatic lesions with leukocyte infiltration, and inflammation of the intestinal wall of the infected hens after 105 days of initial infection. The possible influence of the immune and inflammatory response on the population dynamics of the parasite is discussed. PMID:19167166

  15. The clonal antibody response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa heat shock protein is highly diverse in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulanova, M; Petersen, T D; Ciofu, O;

    1997-01-01

    The GroEL protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to the bacterial 60-65 kDa heat shock protein family. A strong antibody response to GroEL has been found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic pulmonary infection caused by P. aeruginosa. Clonotypes of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies against Gro...

  16. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGUES da SILVA Andréa de Cássia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac vaccine. The antibody titers were appraised by cell-culture neutralization test and ELISA, and the percentage of seropositivity was ascertained for a period of 180 days. IPVvac elicited complete seropositivity rates from day 30 to day 150, and even on day 180, 87% of the sera showed virus-neutralizing antibody titers (VNA higher than 0.5IU/ml. There were no significant differences between the VNA titers and seropositivity rates obtained with IPVvac in the two methods tested. AEvac, however, elicited significantly lower titers than those observed in the group receiving inactivated vaccine. In addition, the profiles of antirabies IgG antibodies, evaluated by ELISA, and VNA, appraised by cell-culture neutralization test, were slightly different, when both vaccines were compared.

  17. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues da Silva, A C; Caporale, G M; Gonçalves, C A; Targueta, M C; Comin, F; Zanetti, C R; Kotait, I

    2000-01-01

    Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac) and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac) vaccine. The antibody titers were appraised by cell-culture neutralization test and ELISA, and the percentage of seropositivity was ascertained for a period of 180 days. IPVvac elicited complete seropositivity rates from day 30 to day 150, and even on day 180, 87% of the sera showed virus-neutralizing antibody titers (VNA) higher than 0.5IU/ml. There were no significant differences between the VNA titers and seropositivity rates obtained with IPVvac in the two methods tested. AEvac, however, elicited significantly lower titers than those observed in the group receiving inactivated vaccine. In addition, the profiles of antirabies IgG antibodies, evaluated by ELISA, and VNA, appraised by cell-culture neutralization test, were slightly different, when both vaccines were compared. PMID:10810324

  18. Optimisation of prime-boost immunization in mice using novel protein-based and recombinant vaccinia (Tiantan-based HBV vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A therapeutic vaccine for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection that enhances virus-specific cellular immune responses is urgently needed. The "prime-boost" regimen is a widely used vaccine strategy against many persistence infections. However, few reports have addressed this strategy applying for HBV therapeutic vaccine development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To develop an effective HBV therapeutic vaccine, we constructed a recombinant vaccinia virus (Tiantan containing the S+PreS1 fusion antigen (RVJSS1 combined with the HBV particle-like subunit vaccine HBVSS1 to explore the most effective prime-boost regimen against HBV. The immune responses to different prime-boost regimens were assessed in C57BL/C mice by ELISA, ELISpot assay and Intracellular cytokine staining analysis. Among the combinations tested, an HBV protein particle vaccine priming and recombinant vaccinia virus boosting strategy accelerated specific seroconversion and produced high antibody (anti-PreS1, anti-S antibody titres as well as the strongest multi-antigen (PreS1, and S-specific cellular immune response. HBSS1 protein prime/RVJSS1 boost immunization was also generated more significant level of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for Th1 cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ. CONCLUSIONS: The HBSS1 protein-vaccine prime plus RVJSS1 vector boost elicits specific antibody as well as CD4 and CD8 cells secreting Th1-like cytokines, and these immune responses may be important parameters for the future HBV therapeutic vaccines.

  19. Antibody response to respiratory syncytial virus infection in children <18 months old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Scarselli, Elisa; Lelii, Mara; Scala, Alessia; Vitelli, Alessandra; Capone, Stefania; Fornili, Marco; Biganzoli, Elia; Orenti, Annalisa; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Principi, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    The development of a safe and effective respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine might be facilitated by knowledge of the natural immune response to this virus. The aims of this study were to evaluate the neutralizing antibody response of a cohort of healthy children <18 months old to RSV infection. During the RSV season, 89 healthy children <18 months old were enrolled and followed up weekly for 12 weeks. At each visit, a nasopharyngeal swab was obtained for RSV detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). During the study period, 2 blood samples were drawn and they were used to determine RSV geometric mean neutralizing antibody titres (GMT) against RSV. A total of 35 (39.3%) children had RSV detected during the study period. Among RSV-positive patients, children ≥7 months showed a significantly higher increase in antibody response (p<0.001). A significantly higher number of patients with a ≥4 -fold increase in GMT were ≥7 months old (p = 0.02) and presented lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) during the study period (p = 0.01). Viral shedding was longer among children aged ≥7 months (p = 0.06), those with viral load ≥10(6) copies/mL (p = 0.03), and those with LRTIs during the study period (p = 0.03), but it was not associated with the immune response (p = 0.41). In conclusion, natural RSV infection seems to evoke a low immune response in younger children. To be effective in this infant population, which is at highest risk of developing severe LRTIs, vaccines must be able to induce in the first months of life a stronger immune response than that produced by the natural infection. PMID:26901128

  20. The allergy adjuvant effect of particles – genetic factors influence antibody and cytokine responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Løvik Martinus

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing epidemiological and experimental evidence for an aggravating effect of particulate air pollution on asthma and allergic symptoms and, to a lesser extent, on allergic sensitization. Genetic factors appear to influence not only the magnitude, but also the quality of the adjuvant effect of particles with respect to allergen-specific IgE (Th2-associated and IgG2a (Th1-associated responses. In the present study, we aimed to investigate how the genetic background influences the responses to the allergen and particles alone and in combination. We examined how polystyrene particles (PSP affected the IgE and IgG2a responses against the model allergen ovalbumin (OVA, after subcutaneous injection into the footpad of BALB/cA, BALB/cJ, NIH and C3H/HeN mice, Further, ex vivo IL-4, IFN-γ and IL-10 cytokine secretion by Con A-stimulated cells from the draining popliteal lymph node (PLN five days after injection of OVA and PSP separately or in combination was determined. Results PSP injected with OVA increased the levels of OVA-specific IgE antibodies in all strains examined. In contrast, the IgG2a levels were significantly increased only in NIH and C3H/HeN mice. PSP in the presence of OVA increased cell numbers and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ levels in BALB/cA, NIH and C3H/HeN mice, with the exception of IFN-γ in NIH mice. However, each mouse strain had their unique pattern of response to OVA+PSP, OVA and PSP, and also their unique background cytokine response (i.e. the cytokine response in cells from mice injected with buffer only. Conclusion Genetic factors (i.e. the strain of mice influenced the susceptibility to the adjuvant effect of PSP on both secondary antibody responses and primary cellular responses in the lymph node, as well as the cellular responses to both OVA and PSP given separately. Interestingly, PSP alone induced cytokine responses in the lymph node in some of the mouse strains. Furthermore, we found that

  1. Early and enhanced antitoxin responses elicited with complexes of tetanus toxoid and specific mouse and human antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary tetanus antitoxin responses were early and enhanced in mice when tetanus toxoid was administered in complex with specific isologous antitoxin or specific mouse γ-globulin. Antitoxin responses were enhanced when fluid tetanus toxoid was complexed in vitro in antigen-to-antibody ratios of equivalence or antigen excess; responses to complexed toxoid in antibody excess were comparatively repressed. Primary responses were greatly inhibited in mice immunized with the same amount of toxoid complexed at equivalence or in antibody excess with specific human γ-globulin. Although primary responses were totally repressed, a primed state developed; a second injection of fluid toxoid within a few days produced excellent antitoxin responses. Separate injections of antigen and antibody at different sites produced an excellent in vivo primed state for early and high responses. Antibody production after stimulation with complexed toxoid was also enhanced in mice irradiated with 400 rads, a dose that ordinarily completely suppresses primary responses with fluid toxoid alone. These data provide evidence for the efficacy of antigen-antibody complexes in early and active immunization. (U.S.)

  2. Flagellin induces antibody responses through a TLR5- and inflammasome-independent pathway1

    OpenAIRE

    López-Yglesias, Américo Harry; Zhao, Xiaodan; Ellen K Quarles; Lai, Marvin A.; VandenBos, Tim; Strong, Roland K.; Smith, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellin is a potent immunogen that activates the innate immune system via TLR5 and Naip5/6, and generates strong T and B cell responses. The adaptor protein MyD88 is critical for signaling by TLR5, as well as IL-1 and IL-18 receptors, major downstream mediators of the Naip5/6 Nlrc4-inflammasome. Herein we define roles of known flagellin receptors and MyD88 in antibody responses generated towards flagellin. We used mice genetically deficient in flagellin recognition pathways to characterize ...

  3. Antibody response following Hepatitis B vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients: does normalized urea clearance matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Erkan Dervisoglu; Melih Simsek; Ahmet Yilmaz

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Data on the factors that contribute to the antibody response to hepatitis B virus vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients are scarce. The current study was conducted on a group of peritoneal dialysis patients to learn how the response to hepatitis B virus vaccination varies according to the patient's clearance of urea normalized to total body water (Kt/V). METHODS: A convenience sample of 33 peritoneal dialysis patients (13 women and 20 men, with a mean age of 49¡12 years) was...

  4. Specific serum antibody responses in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) provide limited protection against Streptococcus ictaluri challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasnik, David J; Evans, Joyce J; Klesius, Phillip H

    2011-11-15

    Passive immunization studies were conducted to determine the role of specific antibodies in immunity to Streptococcus ictaluri. Adult channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were injected i.p. with tryptic soy broth as control or with 1.5 × 10(7)colony-forming units (cfu) S. ictaluri/fish at 0, 30, and 60 d, and serum was collected 90 d after the original challenge. Fish were passively immunized by i.p. injection with serum from the tryptic soy broth (TSB) control group, anti-S. ictaluri serum from fish immunized three times and sampled at 90 d (SSI), or heat-inactivated anti-S. ictaluri serum from fish immunized three times and sampled at 90 d (HISSI). These passively immunized fish were then challenged 72 h later with 1.5 × 10(8)cfu S. ictaluri/fish. Over 21 d, the mean cumulative percent survival was 43.3 (TSB), 63.3 (SSI), and 50.0 (HISSI). A significant difference in cumulative percent survival was noted between the TSB and the HISSI groups, and significant differences were noted between these groups and the SSI group. Serum obtained from immunized fish 72 h after passive immunization exhibited increased anti-S. ictaluri antibody levels. Twenty-one days after the challenge, the HISSI and SSI group antibody levels significantly increased above their corresponding pre-challenge levels. No significant (r(2)=0.0806; P<0.5985) correlation between increased pre-challenge specific serum antibody levels and survival after challenge was demonstrated when analyzing the control and passive immunization groups. The results indicate that both specific anti-S. ictaluri antibodies and non-specific immune responses are important for protection against S. ictaluri. PMID:21962634

  5. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology. PMID:26928739

  6. Immunization of N terminus of enterovirus 71 VP4 elicits cross-protective antibody responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is major cause of hand, foot and mouth disease. Large epidemics of EV71 infection have been recently reported in the Asian-Pacific region. Currently, no vaccine is available to prevent EV71 infection. Results The peptide (VP4N20) consisting of the first 20 amino acids at the N-terminal of VP4 of EV71 genotype C4 were fused to hepatitis B core (HBcAg) protein. Expression of fusion proteins in E. coli resulted in the formation of chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs). Mice immunized with the chimeric VLPs elicited anti-VP4N20 antibody response. In vitro microneutralization experiments showed that anti-chimeric VLPs sera were able to neutralize not only EV71 of genotype C4 but also EV71 of genotype A. Neonatal mice model confirmed the neutralizing ability of anti-chimeric VLPs sera. Eiptope mapping led to the identification of a “core sequence” responsible for antibody recognition within the peptide. Conclusions Immunization of chimeric VLPs is able to elicit antibodies displaying a broad neutralizing activity against different genotypes of EV71 in vitro. The “core sequence” of EV71-VP4 is highly conserved across EV71 genotypes. The chimeric VLPs have a great potential to be a novel vaccine candidate with a broad cross-protection against different EV71 genotypes. PMID:24320792

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigens Influence the Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Jafarzadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection and its sequelae such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma has remained a serious public health problem throughout the world. The WHO strategy for effective control of HBV infection and its complications is mass vaccination of neonates and children within the framework of Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI. Vaccination with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg induces protective antibody response (anti-HBs ≥ 10 IU/L in 90-99% of vaccinees.The lack of  response to  HBsAg has  been attributed  to a variety of  immunological mechanisms, including defect in antigen presentation, defect in HBsAg-specific T and/or B cell repertoires, T-cell suppression, increase in the regulatory T cell count, lack of necessary help of T-cells for production of anti-HBs by B cells, defect in Th1 and/or Th2 cytokine production  and  selective  killing  of  HBsAg-specific  B-cells  by  human  leukocyte  antigen (HLA-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The HLA complex plays an important role in many of these immunological processes.A variety of HLA class I, II, and III alleles and antigens have been reported to beassociated with antibody response to HBsAg vaccination in different ethnic populations. Moreover, some HLA haplotypes were also associated with responsiveness to HBsAg.In this review the association of the HLA specificities with antibody response to hepatitis B (HB vaccine is discussed.

  8. Metastatic brain cancer: prediction of response to whole-brain helical tomotherapy with simultaneous intralesional boost for metastatic disease using quantitative MR imaging features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Harish; Bauman, Glenn; Rodrigues, George; Bartha, Robert; Ward, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    The sequential application of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and more targeted stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is frequently used to treat metastatic brain tumors. However, SRS has side effects related to necrosis and edema, and requires separate and relatively invasive localization procedures. Helical tomotherapy (HT) allows for a SRS-type simultaneous infield boost (SIB) of multiple brain metastases, synchronously with WBRT and without separate stereotactic procedures. However, some patients' tumors may not respond to HT+SIB, and would be more appropriately treated with radiosurgery or conventional surgery despite the additional risks and side effects. As a first step toward a broader objective of developing a means for response prediction to HT+SIB, the goal of this study was to investigate whether quantitative measurements of tumor size and appearance (including first- and second-order texture features) on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan acquired prior to treatment could be used to differentiate responder and nonresponder patient groups after HT+SIB treatment of metastatic disease of the brain. Our results demonstrated that smaller lesions may respond better to this form of therapy; measures of appearance provided limited added value over measures of size for response prediction. With further validation on a larger data set, this approach may lead to a means for prediction of individual patient response based on pre-treatment MRI, supporting appropriate therapy selection for patients with metastatic brain cancer.

  9. MOUSE ANTIBODY RESPONSE FOLLOWING REPETITIVE INJECTIONS OF GAMMA-IRRADIATED HUMAN PLACENTA COLLAGENA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秉慈; MelvinSpira; 许增禄

    1994-01-01

    Injectable bovine collagen has been used clinically for years.But both the necessity of repeated injections to maintain corrections and the question of adverse allergic reactions developing from the use of a xenogenic collagen have been an area of serious concern.To overoome these adyerse effects,we have developed injectable collagen preparations from human placenta.Gamma irradiation was used for sterilization and crosslinking of the collagen.We observed the mouse immune respose to gamma-irradiated human placenta soluble and insoluble collagen follow-ing multiple injections.After six injections of these materials,no total IgG level increase was found,nor was anti-body specifically directed against human collagen found.Mouse antibody levels were also observed following Zyderm Ⅱ and Zyplast repetitive injections and follow-ing repetitive implantations of coated vicryl and chromic gut.No humoral immune response was found in this het-erologous type system.

  10. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibody profoundly suppresses the immune response to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Christina; Kauffmann, Susanne Ørding; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2007-01-01

    Previous work has shown that agonistic Abs to CD40 (anti-CD40) can boost weak CD8 T cell responses as well as substitute for CD4 T cell function during chronic gammaherpes virus infection. Agonistic anti-CD40 treatment has, therefore, been suggested as a potential therapeutic strategy in immunoco......Previous work has shown that agonistic Abs to CD40 (anti-CD40) can boost weak CD8 T cell responses as well as substitute for CD4 T cell function during chronic gammaherpes virus infection. Agonistic anti-CD40 treatment has, therefore, been suggested as a potential therapeutic strategy in...... also collapsed prematurely, and virus clearance was delayed. Additional analysis revealed that, following anti-CD40 treatment, the virus-specific CD8 T cells initially proliferated normally, but an increased cell loss compared with that in untreated mice was observed. The anti-CD40-induced abortion of...

  11. Prime-boost vaccination with Bacillus Calmette Guerin and a recombinant adenovirus co-expressing CFP10, ESAT6, Ag85A and Ag85B of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces robust antigen-specific immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu; Li, Min; Deng, Guangcun; Zhao, Liping; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2015-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains to be a prevalent health issue worldwide. At present, Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) is the singular anti-TB vaccine available for the prevention of disease in humans; however, this vaccine only provides limited protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Therefore, the development of alternative vaccines and strategies for increasing the efficacy of vaccination against TB are urgently required. The present study aimed to evaluate the ability of a recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad5-CEAB) co-expressing 10-kDa culture filtrate protein, 6-kDa early-secreted antigenic target, antigen 85 (Ag85)A and Ag85B of Mtb to boost immune responses following primary vaccination with BCG in mice. The mice were first subcutaneously primed with BCG and boosted with two doses of Ad5-CEAB via an intranasal route. The immunological effects of Ad5-CEAB boosted mice primed with BCG were then evaluated using a series of immunological indexes. The results demonstrated that the prime-boost strategy induced a potent antigen-specific immune response, which was primarily characterized by an enhanced T cell response and increased production of cytokines, including interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-2, in mice. In addition, this vaccination strategy was demonstrated to have an elevated humoral response with increased concentrations of antigen-specific bronchoalveolar lavage secretory immunoglobulin (Ig)A and serum IgG in mice compared with those primed with BCG alone. These data suggested that the regimen of subcutaneous BCG prime and mucosal Ad5-CEAB boost was a novel strategy for inducing a broad range of antigen-specific immune responses to Mtb antigens in vivo, which may provide a promising strategy for further development of adenoviral-based vaccine against Mtb infection. PMID:25962477

  12. Dynamics of virus shedding and antibody responses in influenza A virus-infected feral swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hailiang; Cunningham, Fred L; Harris, Jillian; Xu, Yifei; Long, Li-Ping; Hanson-Dorr, Katie; Baroch, John A; Fioranelli, Paul; Lutman, Mark W; Li, Tao; Pedersen, Kerri; Schmit, Brandon S; Cooley, Jim; Lin, Xiaoxu; Jarman, Richard G; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Given their free-ranging habits, feral swine could serve as reservoirs or spatially dynamic 'mixing vessels' for influenza A virus (IAV). To better understand virus shedding patterns and antibody response dynamics in the context of IAV surveillance amongst feral swine, we used IAV of feral swine origin to perform infection experiments. The virus was highly infectious and transmissible in feral swine, and virus shedding patterns and antibody response dynamics were similar to those in domestic swine. In the virus-inoculated and sentinel groups, virus shedding lasted ≤ 6 and ≤ 9 days, respectively. Antibody titres in inoculated swine peaked at 1 : 840 on day 11 post-inoculation (p.i.), remained there until 21 days p.i. and dropped to nucleoprotein position 473. Using data from cell culture as a benchmark, sensitivity and specificity of a matrix gene-based quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method using nasal swab samples for detection of IAV in feral swine were 78.9 and 78.1 %, respectively. Using data from haemagglutination inhibition assays as a benchmark, sensitivity and specificity of an ELISA for detection of IAV-specific antibody were 95.4 and 95.0 %, respectively. Serological surveillance from 2009 to 2014 showed that ∼7.58 % of feral swine in the USA were positive for IAV. Our findings confirm the susceptibility of IAV infection and the high transmission ability of IAV amongst feral swine, and also suggest the need for continued surveillance of IAVs in feral swine populations. PMID:26297148

  13. Antibody response in naïve and sensitised goats infested by Sarcoptes scabiei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to characterize the IgG and IgE antibody responses in goats infested repeatedly with Sarcoptes scabiei. Ten goats purchased from scabies-free farms were infested with 2000 live mites on the auricles. Fifty days after the initial infestation, the goats were treated with ivermectin. After being completely recovered, the goats were reinfested then treated again at 50 days post infestation. Blood samples were collected at the time of the first infestation, then every 10 days afterwards for 270 days. Seroconversion for IgG took place after 30 days following the first infestation, whereas the maximum level of the specific IgG antibodies occurred after 50 days. Immunoblot analysis identified a number of antigens (Mr 180, 135, 43 and 38 KDa that recognised by the IgG at 10 days and continuously recognised throughout the course of the multiple infestations. Being consistently recognised, those antigens should be essential in the development immunological diagnostic tests for scabies. The levels of scabies-specific IgE antibodies increased slowly during the first infestation and rapidly dropped following treatment of the animals with ivermectin. In the second and third infestations, however, the reaginic antibodies rose rapidly and with a grater level. On immunoblot analysis, at least 10 antigens (Mr 130, 72, 64, 58, 48, 44, 41, 39, 27 and 25 KDa were observed to be recognised by the IgE present in the sera from scabies-infested animals. Since IgE response is considered to play a major role in the immune protection, those allergens, therefore, could be used as the main component of an anti-scabies vaccine.

  14. Systemic antibody response to nano-size calcium phospate biocompatible adjuvant adsorbed HEV-71 killed vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Since 1980s, human enterovirus-71 virus (HEV-71) is one of the common infectious disease in Asian Pacific region since late 1970s without effective commercial antiviral or protective vaccine is unavailable yet. The work examines the role of vaccine adjuvant particle size and the route of administration on postvaccination antibody response towards HEV-71 vaccine adsorbed to calcium phosphate (CaP) adjuvant. Materials and Methods First, CaP nano-particles were compared to a commercial micro-size and vaccine alone. Secondly, intradermal reduced dosage was compared to the conventional intramuscular immunization. Killed HEV-71 vaccines adsorbed to CaP nano-size (73 nm) and commercial one of micro-size (1.7 µm) were administered through intradermal, intramuscular, rabbits received vaccine alone and unvaccinated animals. Results CaP nano-particles adsorbed HEV-71 vaccine displayed higher antibody than the micro-size or unadsorbed vaccine alone, through both parenteral immunization routes. Moreover, the intradermal route (0.5 µg/mL) of 0.1-mL volume per vaccine dose induced equal IgG antibody level to 1.0-mL intramuscular route (0.5 µg/mL). Conclusion The intradermal vaccine adsorbed CaP nano-adjuvant showed safer and significant antibody response after one-tenth reduced dose quantity (0.5 µg/mL) of only 0.1-mL volume as the most suitable protective, cost effective and affordable formulation not only for HEV-71; but also for developing further effective vaccines toward other human pathogens. PMID:25649429

  15. The Effect of Prophylactic Antipyretic Administration on Post-Vaccination Adverse Reactions and Antibody Response in Children: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Rashmi Ranjan Das; Inusha Panigrahi; Sushree Samiksha Naik

    2014-01-01

    Background Prophylactic antipyretic administration decreases the post-vaccination adverse reactions. Recent study finds that they may also decrease the antibody responses to several vaccine antigens. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence for a relationship between prophylactic antipyretic administration, post-vaccination adverse events, and antibody response in children. Methods A systematic search of major databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE was carried out till March 2014. ...

  16. CD4 and CD8 T cell responses to the M. tuberculosis Ag85B-TB10.4 promoted by adjuvanted subunit, adenovector or heterologous prime boost vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvang, Tara; Christensen, Jan P; Billeskov, Rolf;

    2009-01-01

    recruited to the site of infection, at the onset of infection. However, compared to CD8 T cells, CD4 T cells showed more extensive recruitment and were the main T cell subset proliferating at the site of infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Heterologous prime boost based on H4, produced an additive effect...... CD8 T cells. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To compare CD4 and CD8 responses against Ag85B-TB10.4 (H4), H4 was delivered as a subunit vaccine in cationic liposomes (CAF01), expressed in Ad5 (Ad-H4) or as a heterologous prime boost vaccination. H4/CAF01 induced primarily CD4 T cells and Ad-H4 gave...... predominantly a CD8 T cell response. In contrast, the heterologous prime boost combination resulted in augmentation of both the CD4 and CD8 response. The majority (>40%) of the CD4 T cells induced by the heterologous prime boost protocol were polyfunctional, and expressed IFN-gamma(+), IL-2(+), and TNF...

  17. Reduction of IL-17A Might Suppress the Th1 Response and Promote the Th2 Response by Boosting the Function of Treg Cells during Silica-Induced Inflammatory Response In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silica inhalation can induce chronic lung inflammation and fibrosis. Upon silica stimulation, activated macrophages trigger the T-lymphocyte which can differentiate into many different types of Th cells, including the recently discovered Th17 cells. IL-17A, the typical Th17 cytokine, is reported in some inflammatory diseases. However, the role of IL-17A in silica-induced inflammatory response is still not clear. The regulatory mechanism of silica-induced Th17 response also needs to be investigated. So we established a mice primary cell coculture system (macrophage and lymphocyte to investigate the role of IL-17A in silica-induced inflammatory response in vitro, by using anti-IL-17A mAb and IL-1Ra. Both anti-IL-17A mAb and IL-1Ra decreased the level of IL-17A and increased the function of Treg cells. The Th1 response was suppressed and the Th2 response was promoted by the addition of anti-IL-17A mAb or IL-1Ra. IL-1Ra treatment decreased the level of IL-6, whereas the levels of IL-23 and ROR-γt were increased. Our study demonstrated that IL-17A reduction altered the pattern of silica-induced Th responses by boosting the function of Treg cells in vitro. Blocking the function of IL-1 signal pathway could suppress the level of IL-17A, which played the major role in modulating silica-induced Th responses in vitro.

  18. Mutations in Antibody Fragments Modulate Allosteric Response Via Hydrogen-Bond Network Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amit; Tracka, Malgorzata B; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Livesay, Dennis R; Jacobs, Donald J

    2016-05-10

    A mechanical perturbation method that locally restricts conformational entropy along the protein backbone is used to identify putative allosteric sites in a series of antibody fragments. The method is based on a distance constraint model that integrates mechanical and thermodynamic viewpoints of protein structure wherein mechanical clamps that mimic substrate or cosolute binding are introduced. Across a set of six single chain-Fv fragments of the anti-lymphotoxin-β receptor antibody, statistically significant responses are obtained by averaging over 10 representative structures sampled from a molecular dynamics simulation. As expected, the introduced clamps locally rigidify the protein, but long-ranged increases in both rigidity and flexibility are also frequently observed. Expanding our analysis to every molecular dynamics frame demonstrates that the allosteric responses are modulated by fluctuations within the hydrogen-bond network where the native ensemble is comprised of conformations that both are, and are not, affected by the perturbation in question. Population shifts induced by the mutations alter the allosteric response by adjusting which hydrogen-bond networks are the most probable. These effects are compared using response maps that track changes across each single chain-Fv fragment, thus providing valuable insight into how sensitive allosteric mechanisms are to mutations. PMID:27166802

  19. Haemolytic complement activity, C3 and FactorB consumption in serum from chickens divergently selected for antibody responses to sheep red blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parmentier, H.K.; Baelmans, R.; Nieuwland, M.G.B.; Dorny, P.; Demey, F.

    2002-01-01

    Antibody responses, serum complement haemolytic activity, and complement component C3 and Factor B consumption were studied in chickens divergently selected for high and low antibody responses to sheep red blood cells, and in a randombred control line. Significantly higher total and IgG antibody res

  20. Learning Boost C++ libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    If you are a C++ programmer who has never used Boost libraries before, this book will get you up-to-speed with using them. Whether you are developing new C++ software or maintaining existing code written using Boost libraries, this hands-on introduction will help you decide on the right library and techniques to solve your practical programming problems.

  1. Enhanced antibody affinity in sublethally irradiated mice and bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublethally irradiated mice primed with dinitrophenyl (Dnp)-keyhole limpet hemocyanin immediately after irradiation or 30 days later and subsequently boosted with a second injection of antigen displayed a secondary response to Dnp characterized by antibody affinity greater than that in unirradiated controls. Also, in radiation chimeras primed with Dnp-keyhole limpet hemocyanin 120 days after syngeneic or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation the antibodies against Dnp produced after boosting were of higher affinity than the antibodies raised in normal mice. These findings are tentatively attributed to lack of suppressor thymus-derived lymphocytes (T cells) in sublethally irradiated mice and bone marrow chimeras, in which the enhanced ability to produce antibodies of high affinity may compensate for quantitative defects of the immune system

  2. Boosting immune response with the invariant chain segments via association with non-peptide binding region of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Fangfang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on binding of invariant chain (Ii to major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecules to form complexes, Ii-segment hybrids, Ii-key structure linking an epitope, or Ii class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP replaced with an epitope were used to increase immune response. It is currently unknown whether the Ii-segment cytosolic and transmembrane domains bind to the MHC non-peptide binding region (PBR and consequently influence immune response. To investigate the potential role of Ii-segments in the immune response via MHC II/peptide complexes, a few hybrids containing Ii-segments and a multiepitope (F306 from Newcastle disease virus fusion protein (F were constructed, and their binding effects on MHC II molecules and specific antibody production were compared using confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, western blotting and animal experiments. Results One of the Ii-segment/F306 hybrids, containing ND (Asn–Asp outside the F306 in the Ii-key structure (Ii-key/F306/ND, neither co-localized with MHC II molecules on plasma membrane nor bound to MHC II molecules to form complexes. However, stimulation of mice with the structure produced 4-fold higher antibody titers compared with F306 alone. The two other Ii-segment/F306 hybrids, in which the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of Ii were linked to this structure (Cyt/TM/Ii-key/F306/ND, partially co-localized on plasma membrane with MHC class II molecules and weakly bound MHC II molecules to form complexes. They induced mice to produce approximately 9-fold higher antibody titers compared with F306 alone. Furthermore, an Ii/F306 hybrid (F306 substituting CLIP co-localized well with MHC II molecules on the membrane to form complexes, although it increased antibody titer about 3-fold relative to F306 alone. Conclusions These results suggest that Ii-segments improve specific immune response by binding to the non-PBR on MHC class II molecules and enabling

  3. Epstein-Barr virus but not cytomegalovirus is associated with reduced vaccine antibody responses in Gambian infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Holder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and cytomegalovirus (CMV are persistent herpesviruses that have various immunomodulatory effects on their hosts. Both viruses are usually acquired in infancy in Sub-Saharan Africa, a region where childhood vaccines are less effective than in high income settings. To establish whether there is an association between these two observations, we tested the hypothesis that infection with one or both viruses modulate antibody responses to the T-cell independent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine and the T-cell dependent measles vaccines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Infection with EBV and CMV was diagnosed by the presence of virus-specific IgM in the peripheral blood or by the presence of IgG at higher levels than that found in umbilical cord blood. Anti-meningococcus IgG and IgM were quantified by ELISA. Anti-measles antibody responses were quantified by haemagglutinin antibody inhibition assay. Infants infected with EBV had reduced IgG and IgM antibody responses to meningococcal polysaccharides and to measles vaccine. Infection with CMV alone predicted no changes in the response to meningococcal polysaccharide. While CMV alone had no discernable effect on the antibody response to measles, the response of infants infected with both CMV and EBV was similar to that of infants infected with neither, suggesting that the effects of CMV infection countered the effects of EBV on measles antibody responses. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this exploratory study indicate that infection with EBV is associated with reduced antibody responses to polysaccharides and to measles vaccine, but suggest that the response to T-cell dependent antigens such as measles haemagglutinin may be restored by infection with CMV.

  4. A more robust boosting algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Freund, Yoav

    2009-01-01

    We present a new boosting algorithm, motivated by the large margins theory for boosting. We give experimental evidence that the new algorithm is significantly more robust against label noise than existing boosting algorithm.

  5. Effect of Early Antibiotic Treatment on the Antibody Response to Cytoplasmic Proteins of Brucella melitensis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Raul A.; Racaro, Graciela C.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    1999-01-01

    To test whether antibiotic therapy hampers the antibody response to Brucella antigens, 30 BALB/c mice were infected with Brucella melitensis H38 and randomized for treatment with doxycycline administered intraperitoneally for 42 days starting at 7 or 28 days postinfection (p.i.) (groups DOX7 and DOX28, respectively) or for no treatment (control group). Antibodies to smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reached peak levels (mean optical density [OD] = 2.618) between days 56 and 70 p.i. in the control group, and similar peak levels (mean OD = 2.486) were observed in the DOX28 group, but significantly lower peak levels (mean OD = 0.821) were observed at 28 days p.i. in the DOX7 group. The antibody response against cytoplasmic proteins depleted of LPS (CPs) reached maximal levels (mean OD = 2.402) between days 56 and 70 p.i. in the control group, but no response was detected in the DOX7 group. Anti-CP antibodies were detected in only three animals from the DOX28 group, at levels significantly lower than those in the control group (mean maximal OD = 0.791). The pattern of antibody response to an 18-kDa cytoplasmic protein of Brucella spp. was similar to that against the CP antigen. This study shows that early antibiotic treatment affects the antibody response of mice to cytoplasmic proteins of Brucella and, to a lesser extent, to LPS. PMID:10225853

  6. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Makarova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV. RESULTS: Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  7. Correlated effects of selection for immunity in White Leghorn chicken lines on natural antibodies and specific antibody responses to KLH and M. butyricum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourichon David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of selection for three general immune response traits on primary antibody responses (Ab to Mycobacterium butyricum or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH was studied in four experimental lines of White Leghorn chicken. Birds underwent 12 generations of selection for one of three different general immune criteria; high antibody response to Newcastle disease virus 3 weeks after vaccination (ND3, high cell-mediated immune response, using the wing web response to phytohemglutinin (PHA and high phagocytic activity, measured as carbone clearance (CC. Line ND3-L was selected on ND3, line PHA-L was selected on PHA, and line CC-L on CC, but all lines were measured for all three traits. The fourth line was a contemporary random bred control maintained throughout the selection experiment. Principal component analysis was used to distinguish clusters based on the overall set of immune measures. Results In the KLH immunised group, no differences were present between lines for natural antibodies binding to KLH and LPS, and, lines ND3-L and PHA-L had higher titers to LTA and anti-Gal titers measured before the immunisation protocol. The measure of ND3 was correlated positively with LPS titers measured post KLH immunisation and with the difference between LPS titers measured at day 0 and 7 post immunisation. In the M. butyricum immunised group, Line ND3-L showed significantly higher specific antibody response to M. butyricum, and this result agrees well with the hypothesis that the Th-1 pathway was expected to be selected for in this line. Conclusion This study has shown that the two different antigens KLH and M. butyricum gave rise to different responses in the set of selected lines, and that the response was only enhanced for the antigen associated with the same response mechanism as that for the trait (ND3, PHA or CC for which the line was selected. Interactions between innate and acquired immunity have been observed mainly for the

  8. rBCSP31 Antibody Response in Patients with Brucellosis: A Candidate for Brucella Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoramabadi , N. (PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: One of the proteins shared in all strains of Brucella is 31 kDa surface protein (BCPS31 that could be an appropriate target for immunization and serological diagnosis. Material and Methods: In the present study, BCSP31 produced as a recombinant protein in pET28a (+ expression system was utilized, using ELISA, to detect trace specific antibody (IgG in brucellosis patients' serum that was confirmed by culture. We also evaluated cytokine response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to this protein in the cell culture. Results: The results indicated a significant amount of surface protein antibodies (IgG in the serum of patients with brucellosis. Evaluation of lymphocyte responses to rBCSP31 also showed a significant IL-12 and IFN-γ production in patients’ lymphocyte cultures. Conclusion: These results suggest that BCSP31 can elicit specific humoral and cellular responses during host infection and it can be used in designing immunization and serologic diagnosis systems

  9. Influence of routes and administration parameters on antibody response of pigs following DNA vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Annette Malene; Kirstensen, Birte; Dannemann-Jensen, Tove;

    2004-01-01

    Using the nucleoprotein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus as model antigen, we optimised parameters for gene gun vaccination of pigs, including firing pressure and vaccination site. As criteria for optimisation, we characterised particle penetration and local tissue damage by...... histology. For selected combinations, vaccination efficiency in terms of antibody response was studied. Gene gun vaccination on ear alone was as efficient as a multi-site (ear, thorax, inguinal area, tongue mucosa) gene gun approach, and more efficient than combined intramuscular (i.m.)/intradermal (i.......d.) injection of plasmid DNA. This indicates, that the ear is an attractive site for gene gun vaccination of pigs....

  10. The antibody response to well-defined malaria antigens after acute malaria in individuals living under continuous malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E; Høgh, B; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Borre, M; Björkman, A; Marbiah, N T; Dolopaye, E; Hanson, A P; Jepsen, S

    1992-01-01

    The IgG and IgM antibody responses to the C-terminal 783 amino acids of the P. falciparum glutamate-rich protein, GLURP489-1271, expressed as an E. coli fusion protein, the IgG response to a 18-mer synthetic peptide EDKNEKGQHEIVEVEEIL (GLURP899-916) representing the C-terminal repeats of GLURP, and...... a synthetic peptide (EENV)6 representing the C-terminal repeats from Pf155/RESA, were investigated longitudinally in 13 children and 7 adults living under conditions of continuous, intense malaria transmission. Some subjects did not recognize the antigens after malaria infection, and in subjects...... recognizing the antigens, the responses were often short-lived. In adults, the antibody responses to the GLURP489-1271 fusion protein and the (EENV)6 peptide peaked after 2 weeks, and not all individuals responded to all antigens. The antibody response, even against large fragments of conserved antigens, is...

  11. Induction of ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+ TH Cells Correlates with Antibody Responses to Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Lopez, Santiago; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Schmitt, Nathalie; Mueller, Cynthia; Harrod, Carson; Flano, Emilio; Mejias, Asuncion; Albrecht, Randy A.; Blankenship, Derek; Xu, Hui; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Garcia-Sastre, Adolfo; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Ramilo, Octavio; Ueno, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal influenza vaccine protects 60 to 90% of healthy young adults from influenza infection. The immunological events that lead to the induction of protective antibody responses remain poorly understood in humans. We identified the type of CD4+ T cells associated with protective antibody responses after seasonal influenza vaccinations. The administration of trivalent split-virus influenza vaccines induced a temporary increase of CD4+ T cells expressing ICOS, which peaked at day 7, as did plasmablasts. The induction of ICOS was largely restricted to CD4+ T cells co-expressing the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR5, a subpopulation of circulating memory T follicular helper cells. Up to 60% of these ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells were specific for influenza antigens and expressed interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-10, IL-21, and interferon-γ upon antigen stimulation. The increase of ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells in blood correlated with the increase of preexisting antibody titers, but not with the induction of primary antibody responses. Consistently, purified ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells efficiently induced memory B cells, but not naïve B cells, to differentiate into plasma cells that produce influenza-specific antibodies ex vivo. Thus, the emergence of blood ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells correlates with the development of protective antibody responses generated by memory B cells upon seasonal influenza vaccination. PMID:23486778

  12. Heritability of antibody isotype and subclass responses to Plasmodium falciparum antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy O Duah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is important to understand the extent to which genetic factors regulate acquired immunity to common infections. A classical twin study design is useful to estimate the heritable component of variation in measurable immune parameters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study assessed the relative heritability of different plasma antibody isotypes and subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgM, IgA and IgE naturally acquired to P. falciparum blood stage antigens AMA1, MSP1-19, MSP2 (two allelic types and MSP3 (two allelic types. Separate analyses were performed on plasma from 213 pairs of Gambian adult twins, 199 child twin pairs sampled in a dry season when there was little malaria transmission, and another set of 107 child twin pairs sampled at the end of the annual wet season when malaria was common. There were significantly positive heritability (h(2 estimates for 48% (20/42 of the specific antibody assays (for the seven isotypes and subclasses to the six antigens tested among the adults, 48% (20/42 among the children in the dry season and 31% (13/42 among the children in the wet season. In children, there were significant heritability estimates for IgG4 reactivity against each of the antigens, and this subclass had higher heritability than the other subclasses and isotypes. In adults, 75% (15/20 of the significantly heritable antigen-specific isotype responses were attributable to non-HLA class II genetic variation, whereas none showed a significant HLA contribution. SIGNIFICANCE: Genome-wide approaches are now warranted to map the major genetic determinants of variable antibody isotype and subclass responses to malaria, alongside evaluation of their impact on infection and disease. Although plasma levels of IgG4 to malaria antigens are generally low, the exceptionally high heritability of levels of this subclass in children deserves particular investigation.

  13. Dietary germanium biotite supplementation enhances the induction of antibody responses to foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Yoo, Han Sang; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential ability of germanium biotite (GB) to stimulate the production of antibodies specific for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). To this aim, we measured the total FMDV-specific antibody responses and IgM production after vaccination against FMD both experimentally and in the field. GB supplementation with FMDV vaccination stimulated the production of anti-FMDV antibodies, and effectively increased IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. These results suggest that GB may be a novel al...

  14. Rare and transient anti-D antibody response in D(-) liver transplant recipients transfused with D(+) red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burin des Roziers, N; Ibanez, C; Samuel, D; Francoz, C; Idri, S; François, A; Mortelecque, R; Bierling, P; Pirenne, F

    2016-07-01

    A retrospective analysis was conducted on 20 D(-) liver transplant (LT) recipients transfused with D(+) RBCs perioperatively and screened for RBC antibodies between 2 and 6 months later. None developed anti-D detectable by the indirect antiglobulin test. Two patients produced weak anti-D that reacted only with papain-treated RBCs at 10 and 11 days without any sign of immune haemolysis. Antibodies became quickly undetectable. These data suggest an unusual pattern of alloimmunization in LT recipients with rapid, weak and transient antibody response and support the safety of transfusing D(+) RBCs in most of D(-) patients during LT surgery. PMID:26918570

  15. Antibody response of healthy children to pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito Susanna; Daleno Cristina; Tagliabue Claudia; Scala Alessia; Picciolli Irene; Taroni Francesca; Galeone Carlotta; Baldanti Fausto; Principi Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about the proportion of pediatric pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza cases who showed seroconversion, the magnitude of this seroconversion, or the factors that can affect the antibody level evoked by the pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza. Aims of this study were to analyse antibody responses and the factors associated with high antibody titres in a cohort of children with naturally acquired A/H1N1/2009 influenza infection confirmed by reverse-transcriptase polymer...

  16. Wildtype p53-specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses in Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune;

    2011-01-01

    Mutation in the p53 gene based on single amino acid substitutions is a frequent event in human cancer. Accumulated mutant p53 protein is released to antigen presenting cells of the immune system and anti-p53 immune responses even against wt p53 is induced and observed in a number of human cancer...... patients. Detection of antibodies against wt p53 protein has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker and discovery of new T-cell epitopes has enabled design of cancer vaccination protocols with promising results. Here, we identified wt p53-specific antibodies in various cancer patients and...... identified a broad range of responses against wt p53 protein and 15-mer peptides using a novel print array technology. Likewise, using bioinformatic tools in silico, we identified CD8 T-cell specificity or reactivity against HLA-A*02:01 binding peptides wt p53(65-73), wt p53(187-197), and wt p53(264-272) in...

  17. Antibody and T cell responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola in health and chronic periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Shin

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the T cell response to the members of oral flora are poorly understood. We characterized the antibody and T cell responses to FadA and Td92, adhesins from Fusobacterium nucleatum, an oral commensal, and Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen, respectively. Peripheral blood and saliva were obtained from healthy individuals and patients with untreated chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 11 paris and after successful treatment of the disease (n = 9. The levels of antigen-specific antibody were measured by ELISA. In plasma, IgG1 was the most abundant isotype of Ab for both Ags, followed by IgA and then IgG4. The levels of FadA-specific salivary IgA (sIgA were higher than Td92-specific sIgA and the FadA-specific IgA levels observed in plasma. However, the periodontal health status of the individuals did not affect the levels of FadA- or Td92-specific antibody. Even healthy individuals contained FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells, as determined by the detection of intracytoplasmic CD154 after short-term in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs with the antigens. Patients with CP tended to possess increased numbers of FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells but reduced numbers of Td92-specific Foxp3(+CD4(+ Tregs than the healthy subjects. Both FadA and Td92 induced the production of IFNγ and IL-10 but inhibited the secretion of IL-4 by PBMCs. In conclusion, F. nucleatum induced Th3 (sIgA- and Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant immune responses, whereas T. denticola induced a Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant response. This IFNγ-dominant cytokine response was impaired in CP patients, and the Td92-induced IFNγ levels were negatively associated with periodontal destruction in patients. These findings may provide new insights into the homeostatic interaction between the immune system and oral bacteria and the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  18. Frequency and Domain Specificity of Toxin-Neutralizing Paratopes in the Human Antibody Response to Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed▿

    OpenAIRE

    Reason, Donald; Liberato, Justine; Sun, Jinying; Keitel, Wendy; Zhou, Jianhui

    2009-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA) is the cell surface recognition unit of the binary anthrax toxin system and the primary immunogenic component in both the current and proposed “next-generation” anthrax vaccines. Several studies utilizing animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies, acquired by either active or passive immunization, are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. To investigate the human antibody response to anthrax immunization, we have established a ...

  19. Effect of Early Antibiotic Treatment on the Antibody Response to Cytoplasmic Proteins of Brucella melitensis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bowden, Raul A.; Racaro, Graciela C.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    1999-01-01

    To test whether antibiotic therapy hampers the antibody response to Brucella antigens, 30 BALB/c mice were infected with Brucella melitensis H38 and randomized for treatment with doxycycline administered intraperitoneally for 42 days starting at 7 or 28 days postinfection (p.i.) (groups DOX7 and DOX28, respectively) or for no treatment (control group). Antibodies to smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reached peak levels (mean optical density [OD] = 2.618) between days...

  20. Comprehensive Mapping of Common Immunodominant Epitopes in the West Nile Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Recognized by Avian Antibody Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, EnCheng; Jing ZHAO; Liu, Nihong; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Qin, Yongli; Bu, Zhigao; Yang, Yinhui; Lunt, Ross A.; Wang, Linfa; Wu, Donglai

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for se...

  1. Psychosocial factors are associated with the antibody response to both thymus-dependent and thymus-independent vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Stephen; Phillips, Anna C.; Ferraro, Alastair J; Drayson, Mark T; Carroll, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the association between psychological stress, social support and antibody response to both thymus-dependent and thymus-independent vaccinations. Stressful life events in the previous year and customary social support were measured by standard questionnaires at baseline in 75 (41 females) healthy students. Antibody status was assessed at baseline, 4 and 18 weeks following vaccination with formaldehyde inactivated hepatitis A virus and pneumococcal polysaccharides, wh...

  2. Antibody Responses Elicited against the Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins Differ during Infection with Different Isolates of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum

    OpenAIRE

    Leader, Brandon T.; Hevner, Karin; Molini, Barbara J.; Barrett, Lynn K.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2003-01-01

    Variation in the expression of the different Tpr proteins in the syphilis spirochete, Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, may have important implications in its ability to evade host immune detection and cause persistent infection. In the present study we examined the pattern of antibody responsiveness to different Tpr members during infection with three isolates of T. pallidum. There was variability in the specificities and temporal patterns of reactivity of the antibodies elicited against t...

  3. The assessment of antibody response following immunization with polysaccharide vaccine in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghamohammadi A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: An increased risk for invasive infections with encapsulated bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae has been described in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD or in those on dialysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibody response to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine in CKD patients. "n"nMethods : Sixty-six patients with CKD and 40 healthy individuals were vaccinated with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. The serum antibody response (IgG and IgG2 to the Pneumovax antigens was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA prior to and four weeks after vaccination."n"nResults : Out of 66 vaccinated patients with CKD, 14 were found to be hyporesponsive to the vaccine (Group 1. Patients with normal specific antibody response were regarded as respondents and were assigned to Group 2 (n=52. The mean post-vaccination IgG titer to the pneumococcal antigens in Group 1 was significantly lower than those in Group 2 (P=0.012 for IgG and P=0.02 for IgG2. The increased anti-pneumococcal IgG titer was significantly lower in patients in Group 1 versus Group 2 (P=0.001 or the healthy control group (P=0.005. During the follow-up period of patients, patients in Group 1 developed

  4. Immunosuppressive drugs impairs antibody response of the polysaccharide and conjugated pneumococcal vaccines in patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Halkjær, Sofie Ingdam; Thomsen, Ole Østergaard;

    2015-01-01

    with and without immunosuppressive treatment four weeks post vaccination. METHODS: In a randomized trial of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV13), a group of CD patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs (IS) alone or in...... between treatment groups showed that immunosuppressive treatment impaired the antibody response to both vaccines and that TNF-a treatment further conveyed additional impairment of the response. CONCLUSION: PCV13 induces higher antibody response for some serotypes compared to PPV23. In addition, CD...... patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs alone or in combination with TNF-α antagonists had an impaired antibody response to both PPV23 and PCV13 compared to patients not receiving any of these treatments. The study has been registered in the European Clinical Trials Database (EudraCT, record no 2012...

  5. Antibody response following Hepatitis B vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients: does normalized urea clearance matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Dervisoglu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Data on the factors that contribute to the antibody response to hepatitis B virus vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients are scarce. The current study was conducted on a group of peritoneal dialysis patients to learn how the response to hepatitis B virus vaccination varies according to the patient's clearance of urea normalized to total body water (Kt/V. METHODS: A convenience sample of 33 peritoneal dialysis patients (13 women and 20 men, with a mean age of 49¡12 years was administered double doses (20 μg IM in each deltoid muscle of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine at 0, 1, 2, and 6 months. Response to immunization was measured at one to three months after the final dose of vaccine. The subjects were divided into groups according to the level of antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs, including non-responders ( 100 IU/L. RESULTS: Among non-responders, weak responders, and good responders, significant differences were found in age (54 ± 12 vs. 56 ± 9 vs. 45¡12 years, respectively; p = 0.049 and recombinant human erythropoietin use (20 vs. 29 vs. 76%, respectively; p = 0.016. No significant differences in weekly total Kt/V (p = 0.704, weekly peritoneal Kt/V (p = 0.064 and residual glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.355 were found across the three groups. CONCLUSIONS: Delivered clearance measured by weekly peritoneal Kt/V and total clearance measured by weekly total Kt/V did not predict the response to hepatitis B virus vaccination in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

  6. Online Gradient Boosting

    OpenAIRE

    Beygelzimer, Alina; Hazan, Elad; Kale, Satyen; Luo, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    We extend the theory of boosting for regression problems to the online learning setting. Generalizing from the batch setting for boosting, the notion of a weak learning algorithm is modeled as an online learning algorithm with linear loss functions that competes with a base class of regression functions, while a strong learning algorithm is an online learning algorithm with convex loss functions that competes with a larger class of regression functions. Our main result is an online gradient b...

  7. In vivo effects of monoclonal anti-L3T4 antibody on immune responsiveness of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Reduction of irradiated cercariae-induced resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, E.A.; Colley, D.G.

    1988-04-15

    Mice can be partially protected against challenge infections of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae by either single or multiple exposure to irradiated cercariae (x-cerc). The participation of L3T4+ lymphocytes on this resistance phenomenon was evaluated by selectively depleting this cell population through in vivo administration of mAb anti-L3T4 at three different times in relationship to the challenge infections. Treatment with anti-L3T4 before challenge such that depletion was effective during the time of cercarial skin penetration and dermal/s.c. residence significantly reduced the level of resistance induced by x-cerc sensitization. When treatment was delayed until after challenge, depletion of L3T4+ cells coincided with either the lung or post-lung/liver phases of schistosomular migration, and normal levels of x-cerc-induced resistance were induced. In contrast to once-immunized mice, mice hyperimmunized by five exposures to x-cerc and then depleted of L3T4+ cells at the time of challenge still expressed resistance to the challenge. These data suggest that when mice are sensitized only once with x-cerc the challenge infection provides a necessary immunologic boost which requires L3T4+ cells for effective expression of resistance. The requirement for this anamnestic effect by the challenge infection can be circumvented by hyperimmunization. Evaluation of the immune response of one-time sensitized or hyperimmunized mice demonstrated that cellular Ag-specific proliferative responses and mitogen-induced lymphokine production were abrogated after any of the various in vivo regimens of anti-L3T4 antibody. In contrast, immunoblot analysis of humoral responsiveness revealed a correlation between the expression of resistance and the ability of sera from immunized and anti-L3T4 treated mice to recognize a 75-kDa parasite antigenic component.

  8. In vivo effects of monoclonal anti-L3T4 antibody on immune responsiveness of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Reduction of irradiated cercariae-induced resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice can be partially protected against challenge infections of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae by either single or multiple exposure to irradiated cercariae (x-cerc). The participation of L3T4+ lymphocytes on this resistance phenomenon was evaluated by selectively depleting this cell population through in vivo administration of mAb anti-L3T4 at three different times in relationship to the challenge infections. Treatment with anti-L3T4 before challenge such that depletion was effective during the time of cercarial skin penetration and dermal/s.c. residence significantly reduced the level of resistance induced by x-cerc sensitization. When treatment was delayed until after challenge, depletion of L3T4+ cells coincided with either the lung or post-lung/liver phases of schistosomular migration, and normal levels of x-cerc-induced resistance were induced. In contrast to once-immunized mice, mice hyperimmunized by five exposures to x-cerc and then depleted of L3T4+ cells at the time of challenge still expressed resistance to the challenge. These data suggest that when mice are sensitized only once with x-cerc the challenge infection provides a necessary immunologic boost which requires L3T4+ cells for effective expression of resistance. The requirement for this anamnestic effect by the challenge infection can be circumvented by hyperimmunization. Evaluation of the immune response of one-time sensitized or hyperimmunized mice demonstrated that cellular Ag-specific proliferative responses and mitogen-induced lymphokine production were abrogated after any of the various in vivo regimens of anti-L3T4 antibody. In contrast, immunoblot analysis of humoral responsiveness revealed a correlation between the expression of resistance and the ability of sera from immunized and anti-L3T4 treated mice to recognize a 75-kDa parasite antigenic component

  9. Influence of protein expression system on elicitation of IgE antibody responses: experience with lactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Rachael J; Flanagan, Brian F; Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2012-11-15

    With increased interest in genetically modified (GM) crop plants there is an important need to understand the properties that contribute to the ability of such novel proteins to provoke immune and/or allergic responses. One characteristic that may be relevant is glycosylation, particularly as novel expression systems (e.g. bacterial to plant) will impact on the protein glycoprofile. The allergenicity (IgE inducing) and immunogenicity (IgG inducing) properties of wild type native human lactoferrin (NLF) from human milk (hm) and neutrophil granules (n) and a recombinant molecule produced in rice (RLF) have been assessed. These forms of lactoferrin have identical amino acid sequences, but different glycosylation patterns: hmNLF and nNLF have complex glycoprofiles including Lewis (Le)(x) structures, with particularly high levels of Le(x) expressed by nNLF, whereas RLF is simpler and rich in mannose residues. Antibody responses induced in BALB/c strain mice by intraperitoneal exposure to the different forms of lactoferrin were characterised. Immunisation with both forms of NLF stimulated substantial IgG and IgE antibody responses. In contrast, the recombinant molecule was considerably less immunogenic and failed to stimulate detectable IgE, irrespective of endotoxin and iron content. The glycans did not contribute to epitope formation, with equivalent IgE and IgG binding recorded for high titre anti-NLF antisera regardless of whether the immunising NLF or the recombinant molecule were used substrates in the analyses. These data demonstrate that differential glycosylation profiles can have a profound impact on protein allergenicity and immunogenicity, with mannose and Le(x) exhibiting opposing effects. These results have clear relevance for characterising the allergenic hazards of novel proteins in GM crops. PMID:22813905

  10. The Antibody Response to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Aşık

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We aimed to investigate the presence of antibodies (Anti-BIP against binding immunoglobulin protein (BIP, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperone with immune modulator and anti-apoptotic effects in Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT patients. Material and Method: We included sixty-two autoimmune thyroiditis patients, 20 with euthyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, 27 with subclinical hypothyroidism and 15 with hypothyroid, and a control group of 37 healthy subjects. Results: No statistically significant difference was determined in anti-BIP levels among the HT subgroups or in comparison with the control group (p=0.889.Discussion: Although BIP activation has been shown in vitro in thyroid cells, no difference was determined in our study in anti-BIP levels between the HT patient subgroups and the control group. This suggests that antibodies developing against BIP through apoptosis and/or T cell response are either not related to HT or at levels that cannot be determined by measuring serum. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 53-6

  11. Neutralising antibody response in domestic cats immunised with a commercial feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M; Harris, Matthew; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Beatty, Julia A; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2015-02-18

    Across human and veterinary medicine, vaccines against only two retroviral infections have been brought to market successfully, the vaccines against feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). FeLV vaccines have been a global success story, reducing virus prevalence in countries where uptake is high. In contrast, the more recent FIV vaccine was introduced in 2002 and the degree of protection afforded in the field remains to be established. However, given the similarities between FIV and HIV, field studies of FIV vaccine efficacy are likely to advise and inform the development of future approaches to HIV vaccination. Here we assessed the neutralising antibody response induced by FIV vaccination against a panel of FIV isolates, by testing blood samples collected from client-owned vaccinated Australian cats. We examined the molecular and phenotypic properties of 24 envs isolated from one vaccinated cat that we speculated might have become infected following natural exposure to FIV. Cats vaccinated against FIV did not display broadly neutralising antibodies, suggesting that protection may not extend to some virulent recombinant strains of FIV circulating in Australia. PMID:25613718

  12. Antibody responses after vaccination against equine influenza in the Republic of Korea in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ju; Kim, Bo-Hye; Yang, Sunjoo; Choi, Eun-Jin; Shin, Ye-Jin; Song, Jae-Young; Shin, Yeun-Kyung

    2015-11-01

    In this study, antibody responses after equine influenza vaccination were investigated among 1,098 horses in Korea using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. The equine influenza viruses, A/equine/South Africa/4/03 (H3N8) and A/equine/Wildeshausen/1/08 (H3N8), were used as antigens in the HI assay. The mean seropositive rates were 91.7% (geometric mean antibody levels (GMT), 56.8) and 93.6% (GMT, 105.2) for A/equine/South Africa/4/03 and A/equine/Wildeshausen/1/08, respectively. Yearlings and two-year-olds in training exhibited lower positive rates (68.1% (GMT, 14) and 61.7% (GMT, 11.9), respectively, with different antigens) than average. Horses two years old or younger may require more attention in vaccination against equine influenza according to the vaccination regime, because they could be a target of the equine influenza virus. PMID:26062436

  13. Antibody response to rabies vaccination in captive and freeranging wolves (Canis lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federoff, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen captive and five free-ranging Minnesota gray wolves (Canis lupus) were tested for the presence of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) after vaccination with an inactivated canine rabies vaccine. Blood was collected from all wolves prior to vaccination and at 1 mo postvaccination (PV) and from all captive and three wild wolves at 3 mo PV. In addition, one free-ranging wolf was sampled at 4 mo PV, and two free-ranging wolves were sampled at 6 mo PV. All wolves were seronegative prior to vaccination. RVNA were detected in 14 (100%) captive wolves and in four of five (80%) free-ranging wolves. The geometric mean titer of the captive wolves at 1 mo PV was significantly higher (P = 0.023) than in the free-ranging wolves. Five of 13 (38.5%) captive wolves and none of the three (0%) free-ranging wolves had measurable RVNA at 3 mo PV. No measurable RVNA were detected in the serum samples collected from the free-ranging wolves at 4 and 6 mo PV. These results should be interpreted with caution because of the small number of free-ranging wolves tested. Further research is needed to properly assess immune function and antibody response to vaccination in captive wolves in comparison with their free-ranging counterparts.

  14. Naturally acquired antibody responses to recombinant Pfs230 and Pfs48/45 transmission blocking vaccine candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sophie; Grignard, Lynn; Nebie, Issa;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pfs48/45 and Pfs230 are Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage proteins and promising malaria transmission-blocking vaccine candidates. Antibody responses against these proteins may be naturally acquired and target antigens may be under selective pressure. This has consequences for the...... future evaluation of vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy in populations naturally exposed to malaria. METHODS: We determined naturally acquired antibody responses to the recombinant proteins Pfs48/45-10C and Pfs230-230CMB in children from three malaria endemic settings in Ghana, Tanzania and Burkina Faso...... region. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude there are naturally acquired antibody responses to both vaccine candidates which have functional relevance by reducing the transmissibility of infected individuals. We identified genetic polymorphisms, in pfs48/45 which exhibited geographical specificity....

  15. Chemokine receptor polymorphism and autologous neutralizing antibody response in long-term HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Joost, Mette; Gram, G J;

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported that slowly progressing HIV infection (SPI) was associated with the presence of contemporaneous autologous neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, a group of individuals with more rapidly progressing infection (RPI) generally lacked these antibodies. To understand the im...

  16. AAV Natural Infection Induces Broad Cross-Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Multiple AAV Serotypes in Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2016-06-01

    Cross-sectional studies of primates have revealed that natural neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to adeno-associated viruses (AAV) span multiple serotypes. This differs from the phenotype of the NAb response to an AAV vector delivered to seronegative nonhuman primates that is typically restricted to the administered AAV serotype. To better understand the mechanism by which natural AAV infections result in broad NAb responses, we conducted a longitudinal study spanning 10 years in which we evaluated serum-circulating AAV NAb levels in captive-housed chimpanzees. In a cohort of 25 chimpanzees we identified 3 distinct groups of animals: those that never seroconverted to AAV (naïve), those that were persistently seropositive (chronic), and those that seroconverted during the 10-year period (acute). For the chronic group we found a broad seroresponse characterized by NAbs reacting to multiple AAV serotypes. A similar cross-neutralization pattern of NAbs was observed in the acute group. These data support our hypothesis that a single natural infection with AAV induces a broadly cross-reactive NAb response to multiple AAV serotypes. PMID:27314914

  17. Evaluation of tests for rabies antibody and analysis of serum responses after administration of three different types of rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandien, M

    1977-01-01

    Humoral antibody response to three types of rabies vaccines were assayed by the neutralization (NT), the mixed hemadsorption (MH), and the indirect immunofluorescence (IF) tests. The NT and MH tests were used to detect antibodies combining with antigens at the surface of virions and infected cells, whereas the indirect IF test measured antibodies mainly to the rabies nucleocapsid antigen. After immunization with a human diploid cell vaccine, antibodies were detected by both the NT and the MH test in the 14th- and 30th-day serum samples from each of eight vaccinated persons. There was a good correlation between titers obtained with the two tests in this group of vaccinees. Antibodies elicited by duck embryo and nervous tissue vaccines occurred less frequently and in lower titers. In these groups of vaccinees, 5 of 14 and 5 of 10, respectively, had antibodies detectable by the NT test in the 14th- and 30th-day sera but were negative by the MH test. It is suggested that this was due to the high levels of immunoglobulin M antibodies, which are known to be elicited by daily injections of vaccine. Since antibodies of the immunoglobulin M class are considered to be less important for protection against rabies, the MH test is recommended for immunity determinations. Compared with the NT test, this test also offers the advantage of being technically more convenient because of its capacity for testing numerous sera in a single run. Antibody titers obtained by the indirect IF test in the human diploid cell vaccine group were relatively low. Titers in the duck embryo and nervous tissue vaccine groups were higher but did not correlate with the results of the NT test. PMID:323275

  18. Evaluation of antibody responses to pneumococcal vaccines with ELISA and opsonophagocytic assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, K H; Seoh, J. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Antibodies to a capsular polysaccharide (PS) provide protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae which express the homologous capsular serotype, and pneumococcal vaccines are designed to induce antibodies in the capsular PS. Levels and opsonophagocytic capacity of antibodies to the capsular PS of S. pneumoniae serotype 19F were determined by sera from adults immunized with 23-valent S. pneumoniae capsular PS vaccines. Geometric means of IgG anti-19F antibody level and specific opsonic titer r...

  19. Normally Occurring Human Anti-GM1 Immunoglobulin M Antibodies and the Immune Response to Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Alaniz, María E.; Lardone, Ricardo D.; Yudowski, Silvia L.; Farace, María I.; Nores, Gustavo A.

    2004-01-01

    Anti-GM1 antibodies of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) isotype are normal components of the antibody repertoire of adult human serum. Using a sensitive high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) immunostaining assay, we found that these antibodies were absent in the umbilical vein and children

  20. C3 polymorphism in a Danish cystic fibrosis population and its possible association with antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, P O; Høiby, N; Morling, N;

    1978-01-01

    The C3 types of human serum are reported for a material of 113 Danish cystic fibrosis patients, age 0-30 years. The frequency of the C3F gene was 0.2832 which was significantly higher (p less than 0.0005) than the frequency found in a control group of 224 healthy babies (C3F = 0.1585). It also...... differed significantly (p less than 0.01) from the C3F gene frequency of 0.1780 found in 177 blood donors, age 20-24 years. A significant association between any of the C3 phenotypes and the most serious infection in cystic fibrosis, chronic mucoid P. aeruginosa infection, or the antibody response against...

  1. Diversity of the antibody response to tetanus toxoid: comparison of hybridoma library to phage display library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Sorouri

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are important tools in research and since the 1990s have been an important therapeutic class targeting a wide variety of diseases. Earlier methods of mAb production relied exclusively on the lengthy process of making hybridomas. The advent of phage display technology introduced an alternative approach for mAb production. A potential concern with this approach is its complete dependence on an in vitro selection process, which may result in selection of V(H-V(L pairs normally eliminated during the in vivo selection process. The diversity of V(H-V(L pairs selected from phage display libraries relative to an endogenous response is unknown. To address these questions, we constructed a panel of hybridomas and a phage display library using the spleen of a single tetanus toxoid-immunized mouse and compared the diversity of the immune response generated using each technique. Surprisingly, the tetanus toxoid-specific antibodies produced by the hybridoma library exhibited a higher degree of V(H-V(L genetic diversity than their phage display-derived counterparts. Furthermore, the overlap among the V-genes from each library was very limited. Consistent with the notion that accumulation of many small DNA changes lead to increased antigen specificity and affinity, the phage clones displayed substantial micro-heterogeneity. Contrary to previous reports, we found that antigen specificity against tetanus toxoid is encoded by both V(κ and V(H genes. Finally, the phage-derived tetanus-specific clones had a lower binding affinity than the hybridomas, a phenomenon thought to be the result of random pairing of the V-genes.

  2. Concurrent influenza vaccination reduces anti-FVIII antibody responses in murine hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jesse D; Moorehead, Paul C; Sponagle, Kate; Steinitz, Katharina N; Reipert, Birgit M; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2016-06-30

    Inflammatory signals such as pathogen- and danger-associated molecular patterns have been hypothesized as risk factors for the initiation of the anti-factor VIII (FVIII) immune response seen in 25% to 30% of patients with severe hemophilia A (HA). In these young patients, vaccines may be coincidentally administered in close proximity with initial exposure to FVIII, thereby providing a source of such stimuli. Here, we investigated the effects of 3 vaccines commonly used in pediatric patients on FVIII immunogenicity in a humanized HA murine model with variable tolerance to recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII). Mice vaccinated intramuscularly against the influenza vaccine prior to multiple infusions of rhFVIII exhibited a decreased incidence of rhFVIII-specific neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies. Similar findings were observed with the addition of an adjuvant. Upon exposure to media from influenza- or FVIII-stimulated lymph node or splenic lymphocytes, naïve CD4(+) lymphocytes preferentially migrated toward media from influenza-stimulated cells, indicating that antigen competition, by means of lymphocyte recruitment to the immunization site, is a potential mechanism for the observed decrease in FVIII immunogenicity. We also observed no differences in incidence or titer of rhFVIII-specific antibodies and inhibitors in mice exposed to the live-attenuated measles-mumps-rubella vaccine regardless of route of administration. Together, our results suggest that concomitant FVIII exposure and vaccination against influenza does not increase the risk of inhibitor formation and may in fact decrease anti-FVIII immune responses. PMID:27034428

  3. Differential anti-glycan antibody responses in Schistosoma mansoni-infected children and adults studied by shotgun glycan microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela van Diepen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis (bilharzia is a chronic and potentially deadly parasitic disease that affects millions of people in (subtropical areas. An important partial immunity to Schistosoma infections does develop in disease endemic areas, but this takes many years of exposure and maturation of the immune system. Therefore, children are far more susceptible to re-infection after treatment than older children and adults. This age-dependent immunity or susceptibility to re-infection has been shown to be associated with specific antibody and T cell responses. Many antibodies generated during Schistosoma infection are directed against the numerous glycans expressed by Schistosoma. The nature of glycan epitopes recognized by antibodies in natural schistosomiasis infection serum is largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The binding of serum antibodies to glycans can be analyzed efficiently and quantitatively using glycan microarray approaches. Very small amounts of a large number of glycans are presented on a solid surface allowing binding properties of various glycan binding proteins to be tested. We have generated a so-called shotgun glycan microarray containing natural N-glycan and lipid-glycan fractions derived from 4 different life stages of S. mansoni and applied this array to the analysis of IgG and IgM antibodies in sera from children and adults living in an endemic area. This resulted in the identification of differential glycan recognition profiles characteristic for the two different age groups, possibly reflecting differences in age or differences in length of exposure or infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using the shotgun glycan microarray approach to study antibody response profiles against schistosome-derived glycan elements, we have defined groups of infected individuals as well as glycan element clusters to which antibody responses are directed in S. mansoni infections. These findings are significant for further

  4. Antibody responses following incident anal and penile infection with human papillomavirus in teenage men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Huachun; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Grulich, Andrew E; Hocking, Jane S; Garland, Suzanne M; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Cornall, Alyssa M; Fairley, Christopher K; Chen, Marcus Y

    2016-08-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal cancer. Few data exist on antibody responses following incident anogenital infection with HPV in teenage MSM. A cohort of 200 MSM aged 16-20 years from Melbourne, Australia were assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. At each visit anal and penile swabs were collected for HPV DNA and serum for HPV antibodies for genotypes 6, 11, 16 and 18 (Merck's Multiplex Assays using Luminex). The main outcome, seroconversion, was defined as the detection of HPV antibodies following a negative antibody result for the same HPV type at baseline. The seroincidence rates for HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18 were: 19 (95% CI 12-26), 7 (3-12), 4 (1-8) and 6 (3-11) per 100 person-years, respectively. Men who experienced incident anal HPV infections from types 6/11 were significantly more likely to develop serum antibodies to the same HPV type(s) than those who experienced incident anal infections from types 16/18 [73 vs. 18%, odds ratio (OR) = 15, 95% CI: 2-118]. The median time between incident anal HPV infection and seroconversion for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 was: 91, 38, 161 and 182 days, respectively. Antibody responses against HPV types 6/11 were significantly more likely to occur following incident anal compared with incident penile infection with HPV types 6/11 (OR = 6, 95% CI: 2-21). The likelihood of antibody responses following anogenital HPV infections depends on the HPV type and site of infection. PMID:26991809

  5. IgE antibody responses in schistosomiasis measured by a radioallergosorbent test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helminth infections are associated with the production of unusually high concentrations of circulating IgE antibody. Assays for IgE antibodies should provide useful approaches for the study of protective immunity and may also be of use in serodiagnosis of diseases induced by helminths. The radioallergosorbent test is carried out by attaching the antigen or allergen to an insoluble supportive material, allowing the IgE antibodies in the test serum to react with excess bound antigen, and then estimating the IgE antibody bound by its reaction with 125I-labelled goat anti-human IgE antibody

  6. A rapid immunization strategy with a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine elicits protective neutralizing antibody responses in non-human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuping eAmbuel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENVs cause approximately 390 million cases of DENV infections annually and over 3 billion people worldwide are at risk of infection. No dengue vaccine is currently available nor is there an antiviral therapy for DENV infections. We have developed a tetravalent live-attenuated DENV vaccine (TDV that consists of a molecularly characterized attenuated DENV-2 strain (TDV-2 and three chimeric viruses containing the pre-membrane and envelope genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 expressed in the context of the TDV-2 genome. To impact dengue vaccine delivery in endemic areas and immunize travelers, a simple and rapid immunization strategy (RIS is preferred. We investigated RIS consisting of two full vaccine doses being administered subcutaneously or intradermally on the initial vaccination visit (day 0 at two different anatomical locations with a needle-free disposable syringe jet injection (DSJI delivery devices (PharmaJet in non-human primates (NHP. This vaccination strategy resulted in efficient priming and induction of neutralizing antibody responses to all four DENV serotypes comparable to those elicited by the traditional prime and boost (two months later vaccination schedule. In addition, the vaccine induced CD4+ and CD8+ T cells producing IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α, and targeting the DENV-2 NS1, NS3 and NS5 proteins. Moreover, vaccine-specific T cells were cross-reactive with the non-structural NS3 and NS5 proteins of DENV-4. When animals were challenged with DENV-2 they were protected with no detectable viremia, and exhibited sterilizing immunity (no increase of neutralizing titers post- challenge. RIS could decrease vaccination visits and provide quick immune response to all four DENV serotypes. This strategy could increase vaccination compliance and would be especially advantageous for travelers into endemic areas.

  7. Effect of concurrent intratracheal lipopolysaccharide and human serum albumin challenge on primary and secondary antibody responses in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, H K; Klompen, A L; De Vries Reilingh, G; Lammers, A

    2008-10-01

    Activation of the innate immune system by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) may direct specific immune responses and as a consequence probably significantly affect vaccination. Previously, we described modulation of specific antibody responses to systemically administered model antigens by intravenously (i.v.) as well as intratracheally (i.t.) administered PAMP such as the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study effects of various doses of i.t.-administered LPS on primary and secondary specific total and individual isotype (IgM, IgG and IgA)-specific antibody responses of chickens simultaneously i.t. challenged with various doses of human serum albumin (HuSA) were determined. i.t.-administered LPS enhanced primary and secondary HuSA-specific total and isotype-specific antibody titers depending on the dose of LPS and the dose of simultaneously administered HuSA. i.t.-administered HuSA enhanced primary and secondary total antibody responses to 'environmental' LPS as shown in birds receiving the zero i.t. LPS treatment, which also depended on dose of HuSA. HuSA administration decreased antibody responses to high doses of LPS. Body weight gain as a measurement of an acute phase cachectin response to LPS was affected by a HuSA by LPS interaction, indicating that simultaneously administered higher doses of HuSA decreased LPS-induced cachectin responses of the birds. Our results suggest a complex interaction of innate and specific immune system activating airborne antigens, which may have significant consequences for vaccination and husbandry management procedures. PMID:18694797

  8. Boosting Newcastle disease vaccination efficacy under field conditions by aromatic plant essential oil extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S. Khalifeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the effects of commercially available aromatic plant essential oil extracts (MixOilTM on the protection outcome achieved after a Newcastle disease (ND vaccination. Antibody production, after a MixOil treatment administered along with a vaccination program applying a live attenuated Newcastle disease virus (NDV vaccine, was assessed under field conditions. The antibody response was evaluated via a Hemagglutination Inhibition test and an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Later, the experimental groups were challenged with two velogenic NDV strains: Herts 33 and a local virulent NDV strain. A MixOil treatment effect with a higher dose was also examined. It was observed that ND antibody titers were enhanced when the birds were placed on a MixOil immune system-boosting program during vaccination. The mortality rate decreased by at least 50% after regular MixOil immune boosting; it also decreased following larger treatment doses. Clearly, promoting a strong bird immune system through herbal supplementation would naturally be expected to create a successful vaccination outcome and healthy flocks of birds. In addition, the results suggest that, by applying a higher dose of MixOil, the treatment can exceed its immune-stimulator benefits; it resulted in controlling the mortality outcome from the experimental ND infection.

  9. Impact of radiotherapy boost on pathological complete response in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to quantify the pathological complete response (pCR) rate after preoperative (chemo)radiation with doses of ⩾60 Gy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Complete response is relevant since this could select a proportion of patients for which organ-preserving strategies might be possible. Furthermore, we investigated correlations between EQD2 dose and pCR-rate, toxicity or resectability, and additionally between pCR-rate and chemotherapy, boost-approach or surgical-interval. Methods and materials: PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane libraries were searched with the terms ‘radiotherapy’, ‘boost’ and ‘rectal cancer’ and synonym terms. Studies delivering a preoperative dose of ⩾60 Gy were eligible for inclusion. Original English full texts that allowed intention-to-treat pCR-rate calculation were included. Study variables, including pCR, acute grade ⩾3 toxicity and resectability-rate, were extracted by two authors independently. Eligibility for meta-analysis was assessed by critical appraisal. Heterogeneity and pooled estimates were calculated for all three outcomes. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between the variables mentioned earlier. Results: The search identified 3377 original articles, of which 18 met our inclusion criteria (1106 patients). Fourteen studies were included for meta-analysis (487 patients treated with ⩾60 Gy). pCR-rate ranged between 0.0% and 44.4%. Toxicity ranged between 1.3% and 43.8% and resectability-rate between 34.0% and 100%. Pooled pCR-rate was 20.4% (95% CI 16.8–24.5%), with low heterogeneity (I2 0.0%, 95% CI 0.00–84.0%). Pooled acute grade ⩾3 toxicity was 10.3% (95% CI 5.4–18.6%) and pooled resectability-rate was 89.5% (95% CI 78.2–95.3%). Conclusion: Dose escalation above 60 Gy for locally advanced rectal cancer results in high pCR-rates and acceptable early toxicity. This observation needs to be further investigated within

  10. Vaccination of Goats with 31 kDa and 32 kDa Schistosoma japonicum Antigens by DNA Priming and Protein Boosting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianfei Tang; Zhijun Zhou; Yuxiao Chen; Yonghui Luo; Linqian Wang; Liyu Chen; Fushen Huang; Xianfang Zeng; Xinyuan Yi

    2007-01-01

    Two Schistosoma japonicum vaccine candidate antigens Sj 31 and Sj 32, which have shown particular promise to induce protective immunity in mice, were used to immunize goats by using a DNA priming-protein boosting strategy in present work. DNA vaccine formulations of the two antigens (VRSj31 and VRSj32) were produced and injected intramuscularly twice at a 2-week interval and then recombinant proteins (rSj31 and rSj32) together with Freund Complete Adjuvant (FCA) were used to boost the goats. The experiment was repeated in different batche cercariae. A strong anamnestic antibody response was induced after boost. A significant reduction of liver egg counts and miracidial hatching was showed in both experiments. Significant protections against challenge infection were elicited with 31.6% of percentage reduction for worm recovery in the second experiment and 20.9% in the first experiment, respectively.

  11. Antibody response of healthy children to pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus

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    Esposito Susanna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the proportion of pediatric pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza cases who showed seroconversion, the magnitude of this seroconversion, or the factors that can affect the antibody level evoked by the pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza. Aims of this study were to analyse antibody responses and the factors associated with high antibody titres in a cohort of children with naturally acquired A/H1N1/2009 influenza infection confirmed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results Demographic, clinical and virologic data were collected from 69 otherwise healthy children with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza (27 females, mean age ± SD: 5.01 ± 4.55 years. Their antibody levels against pandemic A/H1N1/2009 and seasonal A/H1N1 influenza viruses were evaluated by measuring hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies using standard assays. Sixty-four patients (92.8% with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza had A/H1N1/2009 antibody levels of ≥40, whereas only 28/69 (40.6% were seroprotected against seasonal A/H1N1 influenza virus. Those who were seroprotected against seasonal A/H1N1 virus were significantly older, significantly more often hospitalised, had a diagnosis of pneumonia significantly more frequently, and were significantly more often treated with oseltamivir than those who were not seroprotected (p Conclusions Otherwise healthy children seem to show seroprotective antibody titres after natural infection with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus. The strength of the immune response seems to be related to the severity of the disease, but not to previous seasonal A/H1N1 influenza immunity.

  12. Prevention and Reversal of Antibody Responses Against Factor IX in Gene Therapy for Hemophilia B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RolandW.Herzog

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Intramuscular (IM administration of an adeno-associated viral (AAV vector represents a simple and safe method of gene transfer for treatment of the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B (factor IX, F.IX, deficiency. However, the approach is hampered by an increased risk of immune responses against F.IX. Previously, we demonstrated that the drug cocktail of immune suppressants rapamycin, IL-10, and a specific peptide (encoding a dominant CD4+ T cell epitope caused an induction of regulatory T cells (Treg with a concomitant apoptosis of antigen-specific effector T cells (J. Thromb. Haemost. 7:1523, 2009. This protocol was effective in preventing inhibitory antibody formation against human F.IX (hF.IX in muscle gene transfer to C3H/HeJ hemophilia B mice (with targeted F9 gene deletion. Here, we show that this protocol can also be used to reverse inhibitor formation. IM injection of AAV1-hF.IX vector resulted in inhibitors of on average 8-10 BU within 1 month. Subsequent treatment with the tolerogenic cocktail accomplished a rapid reduction of hF.IX-specific antibodies to <2 BU, which lasted for >4.5 months. Systemic hF.IX expression increased from undetectable to >200 ng/ml, and coagulation times improved. In addition, we developed an alternative prophylactic protocol against inhibitor formation that did not require knowledge of T cell epitopes, consisting of daily oral administration of rapamycin for 1-month combined with frequent, low-dose intravenous injection of hF.IX protein. Experiments in T cell receptor transgenic mice showed that the route and dosing schedule of drug administration substantially affected Treg induction. When combined with intravenous antigen administration, oral delivery of rapamycin had to be performed daily in order to induce Treg, which were suppressive and phenotypically comparable to natural Treg.

  13. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in Primary Human Macrophages; Balancing Higher Fusion against Antiviral Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, Jacky; Diosa-Toro, Mayra A; Hoornweg, Tabitha E; van de Pol, Denise P I; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M

    2016-01-01

    The dogma is that the human immune system protects us against pathogens. Yet, several viruses, like dengue virus, antagonize the hosts' antibodies to enhance their viral load and disease severity; a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study offers novel insights in the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection in primary human macrophages. No differences were observed in the number of bound and internalized DENV particles following infection in the absence and presence of enhancing concentrations of antibodies. Yet, we did find an increase in membrane fusion activity during ADE of DENV infection. The higher fusion activity is coupled to a low antiviral response early in infection and subsequently a higher infection efficiency. Apparently, subtle enhancements early in the viral life cycle cascades into strong effects on infection, virus production and immune response. Importantly, and in contrast to other studies, the antibody-opsonized virus particles do not trigger immune suppression and remain sensitive to interferon. Additionally, this study gives insight in how human macrophages interact and respond to viral infections and the tight regulation thereof under various conditions of infection. PMID:27380892

  14. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in Primary Human Macrophages; Balancing Higher Fusion against Antiviral Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, Jacky; Diosa-Toro, Mayra A.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P. I.; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    The dogma is that the human immune system protects us against pathogens. Yet, several viruses, like dengue virus, antagonize the hosts’ antibodies to enhance their viral load and disease severity; a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study offers novel insights in the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection in primary human macrophages. No differences were observed in the number of bound and internalized DENV particles following infection in the absence and presence of enhancing concentrations of antibodies. Yet, we did find an increase in membrane fusion activity during ADE of DENV infection. The higher fusion activity is coupled to a low antiviral response early in infection and subsequently a higher infection efficiency. Apparently, subtle enhancements early in the viral life cycle cascades into strong effects on infection, virus production and immune response. Importantly, and in contrast to other studies, the antibody-opsonized virus particles do not trigger immune suppression and remain sensitive to interferon. Additionally, this study gives insight in how human macrophages interact and respond to viral infections and the tight regulation thereof under various conditions of infection. PMID:27380892

  15. Antibody responses to surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte-infected erythrocytes and their relation to gametocytaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinko, B; King, E; Targett, G A T; Sutherland, C J

    2016-06-01

    An essential element for continuing transmission of Plasmodium falciparum is the availability of mature gametocytes in human peripheral circulation for uptake by mosquitoes. Natural immune responses to circulating gametocytes may play a role in reducing transmission from humans to mosquitoes. Here, antibody recognition of the surface of mature intra-erythrocytic gametocytes produced either by a laboratory-adapted parasite, 3D7, or by a recent clinical isolate of Kenyan origin (HL1204), was evaluated longitudinally in a cohort of Ghanaian school children by flow cytometry. This showed that a proportion of children exhibited antibody responses that recognized gametocyte surface antigens on one or both parasite lines. A subset of the children maintained detectable anti-gametocyte surface antigen (GSA) antibody levels during the 5 week study period. There was indicative evidence that children with anti-GSA antibodies present at enrolment were less likely to have patent gametocytaemia at subsequent visits (odds ratio = 0·29, 95% CI 0·06-1·05; P = 0·034). Our data support the existence of antigens on the surface of gametocyte-infected erythrocytes, but further studies are needed to confirm whether antibodies against them reduce gametocyte carriage. The identification of GSA would allow their evaluation as potential anti-gametocyte vaccine candidates and/or biomarkers for gametocyte carriage. PMID:27084060

  16. Profiles of acute cytokine and antibody responses in patients infected with avian influenza A H7N9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Huang

    Full Text Available The influenza A H7N9 virus outbreak in Eastern China in the spring of 2013 represented a novel, emerging avian influenza transmission to humans. While clinical and microbiological features of H7N9 infection have been reported in the literature, the current study investigated acute cytokine and antibody responses in acute H7N9 infection. Between March 27, 2013 and April 23, 2013, six patients with confirmed H7N9 influenza infection were admitted to Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing, China. Acute phase serum cytokine profiles were determined using a high-throughput multiplex assay. Daily H7 hemagglutinin (HA-specific IgG, IgM, and IgA responses were monitored by ELISA. Neutralizing antibodies specific for H7N9 viruses were determined against a pseudotyped virus expressing the novel H7 subtype HA antigen. Five cytokines (IL-6, IP-10, IL-10, IFNγ, and TNFα were significantly elevated in H7N9-infected patients when compared to healthy volunteers. Serum H7 HA-specific IgG, as well as IgM and IgA responses, were detected within 8 days of disease onset and increased in a similar pattern during acute infection. Neutralizing antibodies developed shortly after the appearance of binding antibody responses and showed similar kinetics as a fraction of the total H7 HA-specific IgG responses. H7N9 infection resulted in hallmark serum cytokine increases, which correlated with fever and disease persistence. The novel finding of simultaneous development of IgG, IgM, and IgA responses in acute H7N9 infection points to the potential for live influenza viruses to elicit fast and potent protective antibodies to limit the infection.

  17. Serum antibody responses in pigs trickle-infected with Ascaris and Trichuris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kringel, Helene; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Petersen, Heidi Huus;

    2015-01-01

    A humoral immune response following helminth infection in pigs is well documented. However, it has been difficult to confirm the existence of antibody mediated resistance against the large roundworm, Ascaris suum, and whipworm, Trichuris suis, in experimental settings by correlating worm burdens ...

  18. Development of a multiplex microsphere immunoassay for the quantitation of salivary antibody responses to selected waterborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliva has an important advantage over serum as a medium for antibody detection due to non-invasive sampling, which is critical for community-based epidemiological surveys. The development of a Luminex multiplex immunoassay for measurement of salivary IgG and IgA responses to pot...

  19. Association of bta-miR-24-3p with serum antibody response to Mycoplasma spp. in beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to identify microRNAs associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma spp. in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: summer of 2013, after calves were born; fall of the same year at weaning; and spring, 2014. All sera collec...

  20. Antibody responses measured by various serologic tests in pigs orally inoculated with low numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubey, J. P.; Andrews, C.D.; Lind, Peter; Kwok, O.C.H.; Thulliez, P.; Lunney, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    Objective-To follow antibody responses measured by various serologic tests in pigs orally inoculated with low (less than or equal to 10 oocysts) numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts. Animals-24, 2- to 3-month-old pigs. Procedure-Pigs (n = 42) were inoculated orally with 10 (14 pigs) or 1 (28 pigs...

  1. Insulin and C peptide response, and antibody levels in hepatitis C related chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Patients with cirrhosis due to hepatitis C (HC) have an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus. The pathogenic mechanism by which HC predisposes to DM is not clear. The objective of this study was to determine the insulin and C-peptide response to 75 gram oral glucose load and measure anti phospholipid antibody levels in patients with chronic liver disease due to HC. Design: a prospective study. Place and duration of study: This study was conducted at the department of medicine, Jinnah postgraduate medical centre over period of three months. Subjects and methods: An analytical case control study was carried out on 37 patients (m-18,f=19); none of these patients had received interferon. They were divided into four groups: (a) HC cirrhosis with DM (n=9 ), (b) HC cirrhosis without DM (n=11), (c) hepatitis B (HB) cirrhosis without DM (n=7), (d) chronic hepatitis C without DM (n=10). Group C and D were taken as controls. Fasting blood samples were taken and repeated after 2 hours of 75 gram oral glucose load (2 h PG). Result: mean ages of group A,B,C and D were (yr +- SD) 51.3 +- 7.6,48.9 +- 2.4, 33.7 +-10.8 and 31.7 +- 8.8 respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the age, Pugh score and body mass index of HC cirrhotic patients with and without DM. Patients of group A had higher fasting and 2 h PG glucose levels (P=0.003 and 0.000) and higher fasting insulin level (p=0.045). However, increments in insulin and c peptide levels 2 h PG were much less (p=0.048 and 0.003). HB cirrhotics without diabetes (group C behaved just like HC cirrhotic without diabetes (group B). Patients of group D had normal glucose tolerance and insulin and C peptide levels. All four groups had normal anti phospholipid antibody levels. Conclusion: Patients with cirrhosis due to HC nd HB show evidence of glucose intolerance in spite of hyperinsulinaemia probably due to insulin resistance. HC cirrhotics with diabetes have fasting hyperglycemia in spite of

  2. T cell regulation of the thymus-independent antibody response to trinitrophenylated-Brucella abortus (TNP-BA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanay, A.; Strober, S.

    1985-06-01

    The authors have previously observed a reduction of the T cell-dependent primary antibody response to dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and an enhancement of the T cell-independent response to trinitrophenylated Brucella abortus (TNP-BA) in BALB/c mice after treatment with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). To elucidate the relative contribution of T and B cells to the enhanced T cell-independent antibody responses after TLI, a syngeneic primary adoptive transfer system was utilized whereby irradiated hosts were reconstituted with unfractionated spleen cells or a combination of purified T and B cells from TLI-treated and untreated control mice. Antibody responses of purified splenic B cells from TLI-treated BALB/c mice (TLI/B) to TNP-BA were enhanced 10-fold as compared with those of unfractionated (UF) spleen cells or B cells from normal (NL) BALB/c mice (NL/UF and NL/B, respectively). Splenic T cells from normal animals (NL/T) suppressed the anti-TNP-BA response of TLI/B by more than 100-fold. NL/T neither suppressed nor enhanced the response of NL/B. On the other hand, T cells from TLI-treated mice (TLI/T) enhanced by 100-fold the anti-TNP-BA response of NL/B, but neither suppressed nor enhanced the response of TLI/B. Thus, T cells can regulate the T cell-independent antibody response to TNP-BA. However, experimental manipulation of the T and B cell populations is needed to demonstrate the regulatory functions.

  3. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Responses in a Large Longitudinal Sub-Saharan HIV Primary Infection Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Landais

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs are thought to be a critical component of a protective HIV vaccine. However, designing vaccines immunogens able to elicit bnAbs has proven unsuccessful to date. Understanding the correlates and immunological mechanisms leading to the development of bnAb responses during natural HIV infection is thus critical to the design of a protective vaccine. The IAVI Protocol C program investigates a large longitudinal cohort of primary HIV-1 infection in Eastern and South Africa. Development of neutralization was evaluated in 439 donors using a 6 cross-clade pseudo-virus panel predictive of neutralization breadth on larger panels. About 15% of individuals developed bnAb responses, essentially between year 2 and year 4 of infection. Statistical analyses revealed no influence of gender, age or geographical origin on the development of neutralization breadth. However, cross-clade neutralization strongly correlated with high viral load as well as with low CD4 T cell counts, subtype-C infection and HLA-A*03(- genotype. A correlation with high overall plasma IgG levels and anti-Env IgG binding titers was also found. The latter appeared not associated with higher affinity, suggesting a greater diversity of the anti-Env responses in broad neutralizers. Broadly neutralizing activity targeting glycan-dependent epitopes, largely the N332-glycan epitope region, was detected in nearly half of the broad neutralizers while CD4bs and gp41-MPER bnAb responses were only detected in very few individuals. Together the findings suggest that both viral and host factors are critical for the development of bnAbs and that the HIV Env N332-glycan supersite may be a favorable target for vaccine design.

  4. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M.; Hudson, William H.; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S.; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations. PMID:27354515

  5. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M; Hudson, William H; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J; Wilson, Patrick C; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-07-12

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations. PMID:27354515

  6. Polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies mimicking the small cell lung carcinoma antigen cluster-5A interact with a panel of antibodies and induce specific immune response in animals.

    OpenAIRE

    Zwicky, C.; Stahel, R A; Jaksche, H.; Waibel, R.; Lehmann, H. P.; Loibner, H

    1991-01-01

    Polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies (ab2) were generated by immunising goats with the murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody SWA20 which recognises the SCLC antigen cluster-5A, a tumour-associated sialoglycoprotein. Ab2 was shown to bind specifically to antibody SWA20, but not to isotype matched control antibodies. Pre-incubation with ab2 completely inhibited target cell binding of antibody SWA20 and of four other antibodies to cluster-5A antigen, while no effect was seen with antibodies to cluste...

  7. Symptoms of periodontitis and antibody responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, Lauren; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; McCracken, Courtney; Wang, Gabriel; Ponder, Lori A.; Angeles-Han, Sheila T.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly A; Hersh, Aimee O; Vogler, Larry B.; Bohnsack, John F.; Abramowicz, Shelly; Mikuls, Ted R; Prahalad, Sampath

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis is well established. Some children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) phenotypically resemble adults with RA, characterized by the presence of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies. We sought to investigate an association between CCP-positive JIA and symptoms of periodontitis and antibodies to oral microbiota. Methods Antibodies to oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, a...

  8. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events. PMID:11559561

  9. Hippocampus-Sparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy and Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Multiple Brain Metastases From Lung Adenocarcinoma: Early Response and Dosimetric Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Hye Ryun; Suh, Yang Gun; Kim, Jun Won; Choi, Chihwan; Baek, Jong Geal; Cho, Jaeho

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the volume response and treatment outcome after hippocampus-sparing whole-brain radiotherapy (HS-WBRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) using tomotherapy were evaluated. Patients with primary lung adenocarcinoma and multiple brain metastases who had a Karnofsky performance status ≥ 70 and exhibited well-controlled extracranial disease were treated. The prescribed dose was administered in 10 to 14 fractions as 25 to 28 Gy to whole-brain parenchyma, as 40 to 48 Gy to the gross metastatic lesion, and as 30 to 42 Gy to a 5-mm margin to the metastatic lesion. Double-dose gadolinium contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 1-mm slice thickness was performed before treatment and at 1, 4, and 7 months post-treatment. The tumor volume reduction ratio was calculated for each follow-up. Between July 2011 and September 2012, 11 patients with 70 lesions were included in this analysis. The median number of lesions per patient was 4 (range, 2-15). The median initial tumor volume was 0.235 cm(3) (range, 0.020-10.140 cm(3)). The treatment plans were evaluated regarding conformation number (CN), target coverage (TC), and homogeneity index (HI). The median follow-up duration was 14 months (range, 3-25 months) and the 1-year intracranial control rate was 67%. The tumor volume reduction was most prominent during the first month with a median reduction rate of 0.717 (range, -0.190 to 1.000). Complete remission was seen in 22 (33%) lesions, and 45 (64%) lesions showed more than 65% reduction in tumor volume. The CN, TC, and HI values were comparable to that of previous studies, and the mean hippocampal dose was 13.65 Gy. No treatment breaks or ≥ G3 acute toxicities were observed during or after treatment. The HS-WBRT with SIB in patients with multiple brain metastases was effective and feasible for volume reduction and showed excellent intracranial control. PMID:25601853

  10. Neutralizing antibody response during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection: type and group specificity and viral escape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Sönnerborg, A; Svennerholm, B; Akerblom, L; Nielsen, C; Clausen, H; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    The paradox that group-specific neutralizing antibodies (NA) exist in the majority of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients, whereas the NA response against autologous HIV-1 virus isolates is highly type-specific, motivated us to study the type- and group-specific NA...... demonstrated, suggesting that the majority of the change in neutralization sensitivity is driven by the selective pressure of type-specific NA. Furthermore, no differences were observed in sensitivity to neutralization by anti-carbohydrate neutralizing monoclonal antibodies or the lectin concanavalin A...

  11. Filarial-specific antibody response in East African bancroftian filariasis: effects of host infection, clinical disease, and filarial endemicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaoko, Walter G; Simonsen, Paul E; Meyrowitsch, Dan W;

    2006-01-01

    The effect of host infection, chronic clinical disease, and transmission intensity on the patterns of specific antibody responses in Bancroftian filariasis was assessed by analyzing specific IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, and IgE profiles among adults from two communities with high and low Wuchereria...... bancrofti endemicity. In the high endemicity community, intensities of the measured antibodies were significantly associated with infection status. IgG1, IgG2, and IgE were negatively associated with microfilaria (MF) status, IgG3 was negatively associated with circulating filarial antigen (CFA) status...

  12. T cell-independent type I antibody response against B cell epitopes expressed repetitively on recombinant virus particles

    OpenAIRE

    Fehr, Thomas; Skrastina, Dace; Pumpens, Paul; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant viral or virus-like particles offer new tools for vaccine development. This study investigated hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) capsids and RNA phage Qβ coats as carriers of a foreign epitope to induce antibody responses in mice. HBcAg capsids were shown to induce T cell-independent (TI) antibodies. We found that these particles behave as antigen-specific TI type 1 (TI-1) Ag comparable to other rigidly structured viruses. When a 5-aa long epitope of the pre-S1 domain of hepatitis ...

  13. TLR9-adjuvanted pneumococcal conjugate vaccine induces antibody-independent memory responses in HIV-infected adults

    OpenAIRE

    Offersen, Rasmus; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Paludan, Søren R; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Søgaard, Ole S.

    2012-01-01

    HIV-patients have excess of pneumococcal infection. We immunized 40 HIV-patients twice with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Prevnar, Pfizer) +/− a TLR9 agonist (CPG 7909). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with pneumococcal polysaccharides and cytokine concentrations measured. The CPG 7909 adjuvant group had significantly higher relative cytokine responses than the placebo group for IL-1β, IL-2R, IL-6, IFN-γ and MIP-β, which, did not correlate with IgG antibody responses. The...

  14. Long-Lived Antibody and B Cell Memory Responses to the Human Malaria Parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax

    OpenAIRE

    Wipasa, J; Suphavilai, C; Okell, LC; Cook, J; Corran, PH; Thaikla, K; Liewsaree, W; Riley, EM; Hafalla, JC

    2010-01-01

    Author Summary It is widely perceived that immunity to malaria is short-lived, rendering people susceptible to repeated malaria infections. However, there have been very few studies on “memory” responses, how the human immune system recognizes previously encountered malaria parasites. In particular, very little is known about the durability of malaria-specific B cells and antibodies. The aim of this study was to investigate the induction and maintenance of B cell memory responses to malaria p...

  15. Presence of maternal anti-HBs antibodies does not influence hepatitis B vaccine response in Brazilian neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Luiza N Junqueira; Viviane R Tavares; Regina MB Martins; Kamilla V Frauzino; Agabo M da Costa e Silva; Izolina MX Rodrigues; Ruth Minamisava; Teles, Sheila A

    2011-01-01

    Recently, it was suggested that maternal hepatitis B surface antigen antibodies (anti-HBs) acquired transplacentally could play a negative role in newborn infants' immune response to the hepatitis B vaccine. We compared the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine response in infants born to mothers previously vaccinated against HBV (n = 91) to infants born to mothers who were not previously vaccinated (n = 221). All newborn infants received three intramuscular doses (10 μg) of HBV vaccine (Butang®) a...

  16. A boost for KAON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earlier this year, a report by a specially-formed subcommittee of the US Nuclear Science Advisory Committee gave an important boost to the proposal to build a high intensity particle beam 'factory' at the Canadian TRIUMF laboratory in Vancouver. (orig./HSI).

  17. Antibody response in cattle, sheep and rats to infection with γ-irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattle, sheep and rats were infected orally with γ-irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica, or with normal metacercariae. The antibody response was monitored in each host to metacercarial tegument (T0), juvenile tegument (T1), adult tegument (T2) and gut antigens. The response was examined at weekly intervals for cattle and sheep throughout 15 weeks of infection and four weeks after infection in rats, using an indirect fluorescent antibody labelling technique. It was found that the irradiated metacercariae engendered a normal humoral response to T0, T1 and gut antigens in all three hosts although the antibody levels were somewhat reduced due to early death or stunting of the flukes. T0 and T1 appeared to be antigenically similar. Antibodies against T2 appeared late in the animals infected with γ-irradiated metacercariae and the titres attained were considerably lower than in the controls. The T2 antigen stimulus in the animals given γ-irradiated metacercariae was probably provided by flukes which 'broke through' the developmental barrier imposed by irradiation and which were found alive at autopsy. (author)

  18. Noninfectious retrovirus particles drive the APOBEC3/Rfv3 dependent neutralizing antibody response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana S Smith

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Members of the APOBEC3 family of deoxycytidine deaminases counteract a broad range of retroviruses in vitro through an indirect mechanism that requires virion incorporation and inhibition of reverse transcription and/or hypermutation of minus strand transcripts in the next target cell. The selective advantage to the host of this indirect restriction mechanism remains unclear, but valuable insights may be gained by studying APOBEC3 function in vivo. Apobec3 was previously shown to encode Rfv3, a classical resistance gene that controls the recovery of mice from pathogenic Friend retrovirus (FV infection by promoting a more potent neutralizing antibody (NAb response. The underlying mechanism does not involve a direct effect of Apobec3 on B cell function. Here we show that while Apobec3 decreased titers of infectious virus during acute FV infection, plasma viral RNA loads were maintained, indicating substantial release of noninfectious particles in vivo. The lack of plasma virion infectivity was associated with a significant post-entry block during early reverse transcription rather than G-to-A hypermutation. The Apobec3-dependent NAb response correlated with IgG binding titers against native, but not detergent-lysed virions. These findings indicate that innate Apobec3 restriction promotes NAb responses by maintaining high concentrations of virions with native B cell epitopes, but in the context of low virion infectivity. Finally, Apobec3 restriction was found to be saturable in vivo, since increasing FV inoculum doses resulted in decreased Apobec3 inhibition. By analogy, maximizing the release of noninfectious particles by modulating APOBEC3 expression may improve humoral immunity against pathogenic human retroviral infections.

  19. The effect of prophylactic antipyretic administration on post-vaccination adverse reactions and antibody response in children: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Ranjan Das

    Full Text Available Prophylactic antipyretic administration decreases the post-vaccination adverse reactions. Recent study finds that they may also decrease the antibody responses to several vaccine antigens. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence for a relationship between prophylactic antipyretic administration, post-vaccination adverse events, and antibody response in children.A systematic search of major databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE was carried out till March 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing prophylactic antipyretic treatment versus placebo post-vaccination in children ≤ 6 years of age were included. Two reviewers independently applied eligibility criteria, assessed the studies for methodological quality, and extracted data [PROSPERO registration: CRD42014009717].Of 2579 citations retrieved, a total of 13 RCTs including 5077 children were included in the review. Prophylactic antipyretic administration significantly reduced the febrile reactions (≥ 38.0 °C after primary and booster vaccinations. Though there were statistically significant differences in the antibody responses between the two groups, the prophylactic PCM group had what would be considered protective levels of antibodies to all of the antigens given after the primary and booster vaccinations. No significant difference in the nasopharyngeal carriage rates (short-term and long-term of H. influenzae or S. pneumoniae serotypes was found between the prophylactic and no prophylactic PCM group. There was a significant reduction in the local and systemic symptoms after primary, but not booster vaccinations.Though prophylactic antipyretic administration leads to relief of the local and systemic symptoms after primary vaccinations, there is a reduction in antibody responses to some vaccine antigens without any effect on the nasopharyngeal carriage rates of S. pneumoniae & H. influenza serotypes. Future trials and surveillance programs should also aim at

  20. Immunoproteomics analysis of the murine antibody response to vaccination with an improved Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Twine

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis is the causative agent of a spectrum of diseases collectively known as tularemia. An attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS has been shown to be efficacious in humans, but safety concerns have prevented its licensure by the FDA. Recently, F. tularensis LVS has been produced under Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP guidelines. Little is known about the immunogenicity of this new vaccine preparation in comparison with extensive studies conducted with laboratory passaged strains of LVS. Thus, the aim of the current work was to evaluate the repertoire of antibodies produced in mouse strains vaccinated with the new LVS vaccine preparation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study, we used an immunoproteomics approach to examine the repertoire of antibodies induced following successful immunization of BALB/c versus unsuccessful vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with the new preparation of F. tularensis LVS. Successful vaccination of BALB/c mice elicited antibodies to nine identified proteins that were not recognized by antisera from vaccinated but unprotected C57BL/6 mice. In addition, the CGMP formulation of LVS stimulated a greater repertoire of antibodies following vaccination compared to vaccination with laboratory passaged ATCC LVS strain. A total of 15 immunoreactive proteins were identified in both studies, however, 16 immunoreactive proteins were uniquely reactive with sera from the new formulation of LVS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report characterising the antibody based immune response of the new formulation of LVS in the widely used murine model of tularemia. Using two mouse strains, we show that successfully vaccinated mice can be distinguished from unsuccessfully vaccinated mice based upon the repertoire of antibodies generated. This opens the door towards downselection of antigens for incorporation into tularemia subunit vaccines. In addition, this work

  1. Neuraminidase inhibiting antibody responses in pigs differ between influenza A virus N2 lineages and by vaccine type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbulte, Matthew R; Gauger, Phillip C; Kitikoon, Pravina; Chen, Hongjun; Perez, Daniel R; Roth, James A; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-07-19

    The neuraminidase (NA) protein of influenza A viruses (IAV) has important functional roles in the viral replication cycle. Antibodies specific to NA can reduce viral replication and limit disease severity, but are not routinely measured. We analyzed NA inhibiting (NI) antibody titers in serum and respiratory specimens of pigs vaccinated with intramuscular whole-inactivated virus (WIV), intranasal live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV), and intranasal wild type (WT) IAV. NI titers were also analyzed in sera from an investigation of piglet vaccination in the presence of passive maternally-derived antibodies. Test antigens contained genetically divergent swine-lineage NA genes homologous or heterologous to the vaccines with mismatched hemagglutinin genes (HA). Naïve piglets responded to WIV and LAIV vaccines and WT infection with strong homologous serum NI titers. Cross-reactivity to heterologous NAs depended on the degree of genetic divergence between the NA genes. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens of LAIV and WT-immunized groups also had significant NI titers against the homologous antigen whereas the WIV group did not. Piglets of vaccinated sows received high levels of passive NI antibody, but their NI responses to homologous LAIV vaccination were impeded. These data demonstrate the utility of the enzyme-linked lectin assay for efficient NI antibody titration of serum as well as respiratory tract secretions. Swine IAV vaccines that induce robust NI responses are likely to provide broader protection against the diverse and rapidly evolving IAV strains that circulate in pig populations. Mucosal antibodies to NA may be one of the protective immune mechanisms induced by LAIV vaccines. PMID:27325350

  2. Different Levels of Immunogenicity of Two Strains of Fowlpox Virus as Recombinant Vaccine Vectors Eliciting T-Cell Responses in Heterologous Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Cottingham, Matthew G; van Maurik, Andre; Zago, Manola; Newton, Angela T.; Anderson, Richard J.; Howard, M. Keith; Schneider, Jörg; Skinner, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The FP9 strain of Fowlpox virus has been described as a more immunogenic recombinant vaccine vector than the Webster FPV-M (FPW) strain (R. J. Anderson et al., J. Immunol. 172:3094-3100, 2004). This study expands the comparison to include two separate recombinant antigens and multiple, rather than single, independent viral clones derived from the two strains. Dual-poxvirus heterologous prime-boost vaccination regimens using individual clones of recombinant FP9 or FPW in combination with recom...

  3. Chemokine receptor polymorphism and autologous neutralizing antibody response in long-term HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Joost, Mette; Gram, G J; Machuca, R; Nielsen, C; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported that slowly progressing HIV infection (SPI) was associated with the presence of contemporaneous autologous neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, a group of individuals with more rapidly progressing infection (RPI) generally lacked these antibodies. To understand the...... importance of autologous neutralizing antibodies in SPI more fully, we have now conducted a prospective study taking consecutive blood samples from the individuals with SPI (8 patients) and RPI (10 patients). Blood sampling in the group with SPI was done 110 and 123 months after the estimated seroconversion...... (geometric mean titer [GMT] 8.7 versus 1.6 in SPI and RPI, respectively; p = 0.0048). However, not all individuals withSPI possessed autologous neutralizing antibodies, indicating that other factors may be decisive for SPI. Furthermore, neutralizing antibody titers did not increase from early to late serum...

  4. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventeen monocloanl antibodies against the aminoterminal portion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were generated by using BALB/c mouse for immunization fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods, and a solid-phase screening assay. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat antimouse immunoglobulins specific for IgG heavy chains and μ(IgM). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background activity when 25,000 cpm of 125I-labelled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a radioimmunoassay

  5. Serum antibody responses to vaccinal antigens in lean and obese geriatric dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John; Gow, Sheryl; Rhodes, Carrie; Lacoste, Stacey; Kong, Lyndsay; Musil, Kristyna; Snead, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    The immune responses in control dogs [1 to 4 years of age, body condition score (BCS): 4 to 5 out of 9] were compared to those of aging dogs (based on breed and body size) either categorized as lean (BCS: 4 to 5 out of 9) or obese (BCS: 8 to 9 out of 9). Of interest were the serum titers to the following common agents found in vaccines, canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), and Bordetella bronchiseptica. There were no statistical differences in the antibodies to CPIV, B. bronchispetica, and CRCoV, among the age/weight categories, nor among the age/weight categories and the time, in days, between the date of sample collection and the date of the last recorded vaccination for CPIV, B. bronchiseptica, CPV, and CDV. For CPV, the control dogs had significantly (P < 0.002) higher serum neutralization (SN) titers than the lean geriatric dogs and the obese geriatric dogs. For CDV SN titers, the only statistically significant (P = 0.01) difference was that the control dogs had higher SN titers than the lean geriatric dogs. PMID:27152043

  6. Thymic abnormalities: antigen or antibody? Response to thymectomy in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, A S; Jaretzki, A; Wolff, M; Chang, H W; Tennyson, V

    1981-01-01

    The therapeutic value of thymectomy for myasthenia is still questioned although it retains an important place among management modalities that strive for sustained remission. Questions derive from uncertainty as to appropriate timing, variable extent of resection and quantitation of response. Forty-seven patients, followed one to seven years, underwent an extended transsternal or combined transcervical-transsternal procedure with anterior mediastinal exenteration. Sixteen have been in complete remission from six months to six years, four are asymptomatic on occasional pyridostigmine and eight are significantly improved. Evaluation of thymic pathology (hyperplasic, involuted areas, and thymoma) included a search for thymic myoid cells by fluorescence cytochemistry. Antibodies to acetylcholine receptor present in 38 of 43, decreased post-operatively to normal in four, by 50% to 80% in 14, by 20 to 50% in three and were unchanged in 14. Most remissions occurred in young women with noninvoluted hyperplastic glands and variably high anti-AChR titers which dropped toward normal in seven of 15. These results encourage us to utilize this procedure routinely. PMID:6951500

  7. Antibody response in animals immunized after oral delivery of attenuated liver hepatitis a vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microspheres were prepared by encapsulating live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine with PLA/PLG, and the rhesus monkeys and mice were immunized by such microspheres through oral route. Then serum was collected to detect the HAV-IgM, HAV-IgG, HAV-IgA with EIA, so as to find a convenient immunization way. Results showed that HAV-IgG in rhesus monkeys was detected in the 3rd week and reached a peak value (1267mlU/mL), and then decreased by degrees. HAV-IgM titer was 1:4000. After an oral booster was given, the HAV-IgG level increased, and HAV-IgM titer was 1:1000. The level reached 1244mIU/mL after challenge with wild virus strain, and HAV-IgM was 1:100. HAV-IgM was detected in the control group only after challenge with wild virus strain. HAV-IgG in mice was detected in the 2nd week and reached a peak value in the 4th week. HAV S-IgA was detected in the 1st week and reached a peak value in the 4th week. Antibody response was induced in the rhesus monkeys after oral delivery of the biodegradable microspheres containing live attenuated HA vaccine. The results in mice were similar with the report but the anti-HAV was present earlier as compared with rhesus monkeys. (authors)

  8. Immunization with recombinant enterovirus 71 viral capsid protein 1 fragment stimulated antibody responses in hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch’ng Wei-Choong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus 71 (EV71 causes severe neurological diseases resulting in high mortality in young children worldwide. Development of an effective vaccine against EV71 infection is hampered by the lack of appropriate animal models for efficacy testing of candidate vaccines. Previously, we have successfully tested the immunogenicity and protectiveness of a candidate EV71 vaccine, containing recombinant Newcastle disease virus capsids that display an EV71 VP1 fragment (NPt-VP11-100 protein, in a mouse model of EV71 infection. A drawback of this system is its limited window of EV71 susceptibility period, 2 weeks after birth, leading to restricted options in the evaluation of optimal dosing regimens. To address this issue, we have assessed the NPt-VP11-100 candidate vaccine in a hamster system, which offers a 4-week susceptibility period to EV71 infection. Results obtained showed that the NPt-VP11-100 candidate vaccine stimulated excellent humoral immune response in the hamsters. Despite the high level of antibody production, they failed to neutralize EV71 viruses or protect vaccinated hamsters in viral challenge studies. Nevertheless, these findings have contributed towards a better understanding of the NPt-VP11-100 recombinant protein as a candidate vaccine in an alternative animal model system.

  9. Recombinant outer membrane protein C of Aeromonas hydrophila elicits mixed immune response and generates agglutinating antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sunita Kumari; Meena, Jitendra Kumar; Sharma, Mahima; Dixit, Aparna

    2016-08-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram-negative fish pathogenic bacterium, also responsible for causing opportunistic pathological conditions in humans. It causes a number of diseases in fish due to which the fish industry incurs huge economic losses annually. Due to problems of antibiotic resistance, and the rapidity with which the infection spreads among fishes, vaccination remains the most effective strategy to combat this infection in fish populations. Among various virulence factors associated with bacterial virulence, outer membrane proteins have been widely evaluated for their vaccine potential owing to their surface exposure and related role in pathogenicity. In the present study, we have investigated the immunogenic potential of a non-specific porin, outer membrane protein C (OmpC) whose expression is regulated by the two-component regulatory system and plays a major role in the survival of A. hydrophila under different osmolaric conditions. The full-length gene (~1 kb) encoding OmpC of A. hydrophila was cloned, characterized and expressed in E. coli. High yield (~112 mg/L at shake flask level) of the recombinant OmpC (rOmpC) (~40 kDa) of A. hydrophila was obtained upon purification from inclusion bodies using Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. Immunization with purified rOmpC in murine model generated high endpoint (>1:40,000) titers. IgG isotyping, ELISA and ELISPOT assay indicated mixed immune response with a TH2 bias. Also, the anti-rOmpC antibodies were able to agglutinate A. hydrophila in vitro and exhibited specific cross-reactivity with different Aeromonas strains, which will facilitate easy detection of different Aeromonas isolates in infected samples. Taken together, these data clearly indicate that rOmpC could serve as an effective vaccine against different strains of Aeromonas, a highly heterogenous group of bacteria. PMID:27328672

  10. A DNA prime-oral Listeria boost vaccine in rhesus macaques induces a SIV-specific CD8 T cell mucosal response characterized by high levels of α4β7 integrin and an effector memory phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Neeson, Paul; Boyer, Jean; Kumar, Sanjeev; Lewis, Mark G.; Veazey, Lennox MattiasRon; Weiner, David; Paterson, Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    In this study in Rhesus macaques, we tested whether IL-12 or IL-15 in a DNA prime-oral Listeria boost amplifies the SIV-Gag specific CD8 mucosal response. SIV-specific CD8 T cells were demonstrated in the peripheral blood (PB) in all test vaccine groups, but not the control group. SIV Gag-specific CD8 T cells in the PB expressed α4β7 integrin, the gut-homing receptor; a minor subset co-express αEβ7 integrin. SIV Gag-specific CD8 T cells were also detected in the gut tissue, intraepithelial (I...

  11. Immunoprotective mechanisms in swine within the "grey zone" in antibody response after immunization with foot-and-mouth disease vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liu; Feng, Xia; Jin, Ye; Ma, Junwu; Cai, Hu; Zhang, Xiaoxia

    2016-07-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by the FMD virus (FMDV). Vaccination represents one approach for limiting the effects of FMD. The level of protection in vaccinated animals after challenge with foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is closely related to the antibody titer, which can be classified into three zones: a "white zone", a "grey zone", and a "black zone". The aim of the present study was to clarify the immunoprotective mechanisms operating in the grey zone, in which vaccinated animals have intermediate antibody titers, making it difficult to predict the level of protection. Thirty-three pigs were used to analyze the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations in whole blood and the expression levels of 40 cytokines before vaccination and challenge. The antibody titer in pigs in the grey zone ranged from 1:6-1:45. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte subpopulations, expression levels of Th1 cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-12, IL-15, IL-18, and monocyte interferon gamma inducing factor (MIG), and of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-1α, transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), and TWEAK R varied between protected and unprotected animals. The results of this study suggest that the cellular immune response is the key factor responsible for immunoprotection in vaccinated animals with antibody titers within the grey zone. PMID:27067203

  12. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the West Nile virus nonstructural protein 1 recognized by avian antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Encheng; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Nihong; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Qin, Yongli; Bu, Zhigao; Yang, Yinhui; Lunt, Ross A; Wang, Linfa; Wu, Donglai

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for serological diagnostic reagents. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the antigenic sites in NS1 that are targeted by host immune responses need to be identified and the potential diagnostic value of individual antigenic sites also needs to be defined. The present study describes comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes in the WNV NS1 using avian WNV NS1 antisera. We screened antisera from chickens, ducks and geese immunized with purified NS1 for reactivity against 35 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire WNV NS1. This study identified twelve, nine and six peptide epitopes recognized by chicken, duck and goose antibody responses, respectively. Three epitopes (NS1-3, 14 and 24) were recognized by antibodies elicited by immunization in all three avian species tested. We also found that NS1-3 and 24 were WNV-specific epitopes, whereas the NS1-14 epitope was conserved among the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) serocomplex viruses based on the reactivity of avian WNV NS1 antisera against polypeptides derived from the NS1 sequences of viruses of the JEV serocomplex. Further analysis showed that the three common polypeptide epitopes were not recognized by antibodies in Avian Influenza Virus (AIV), Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), Duck Plague Virus (DPV) and Goose Parvovirus (GPV) antisera. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study have potential applications in differential diagnostic approaches and subunit vaccines

  13. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the eastern equine encephalitis virus E2 protein recognized by avian antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encheng Sun

    Full Text Available Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV is a mosquito-borne virus that can cause both human and equine encephalitis with high case fatality rates. EEEV can also be widespread among birds, including pheasants, ostriches, emu, turkeys, whooping cranes and chickens. The E2 protein of EEEV and other Alphaviruses is an important immunogenic protein that elicits antibodies of diagnostic value. While many therapeutic and diagnostic applications of E2 protein-specific antibodies have been reported, the specific epitopes on E2 protein recognized by the antibody responses of different susceptible hosts, including avian species, remain poorly defined. In the present study, the avian E2-reactive polyclonal antibody (PAb response was mapped to linear peptide epitopes using PAbs elicited in chickens and ducks following immunization with recombinant EEEV E2 protein and a series of 42 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire EEEV E2 protein. We identified 12 and 13 peptides recognized by the chicken and duck PAb response, respectively. Six of these linear peptides were commonly recognized by PAbs elicited in both avian species. Among them five epitopes recognized by both avian, the epitopes located at amino acids 211-226 and 331-352 were conserved among the EEEV antigenic complex, but not other associated alphaviruses, whereas the epitopes at amino acids 11-26, 30-45 and 151-166 were specific to EEEV subtype I. The five common peptide epitopes were not recognized by avian PAbs against Avian Influenza Virus (AIV and Duck Plague Virus (DPV. The identification and characterization of EEEV E2 antibody epitopes may be aid the development of diagnostic tools and facilitate the design of epitope-based vaccines for EEEV. These results also offer information with which to study the structure of EEEV E2 protein.

  14. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the West Nile virus nonstructural protein 1 recognized by avian antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encheng Sun

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for serological diagnostic reagents. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the antigenic sites in NS1 that are targeted by host immune responses need to be identified and the potential diagnostic value of individual antigenic sites also needs to be defined. The present study describes comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes in the WNV NS1 using avian WNV NS1 antisera. We screened antisera from chickens, ducks and geese immunized with purified NS1 for reactivity against 35 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire WNV NS1. This study identified twelve, nine and six peptide epitopes recognized by chicken, duck and goose antibody responses, respectively. Three epitopes (NS1-3, 14 and 24 were recognized by antibodies elicited by immunization in all three avian species tested. We also found that NS1-3 and 24 were WNV-specific epitopes, whereas the NS1-14 epitope was conserved among the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV serocomplex viruses based on the reactivity of avian WNV NS1 antisera against polypeptides derived from the NS1 sequences of viruses of the JEV serocomplex. Further analysis showed that the three common polypeptide epitopes were not recognized by antibodies in Avian Influenza Virus (AIV, Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV, Duck Plague Virus (DPV and Goose Parvovirus (GPV antisera. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study have potential applications in differential diagnostic approaches and

  15. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: Genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors embarked upon a program to develop monoclonal antibodies to the biologically active amino terminal region of PTH. Using the BALB/c mouse for immunization, fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods and a solid-phase screening assay in which PTH-(1-34) was adhered to polyvinylchloride plates in a manner that preserved immunoreactivity. They generated 17 monoclonal antibodies against the amino-terminal portion of parathyroid hormone. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat anti-mouse immunoglobins specific for IgG heavy chains, γ/sub 1/, γ/sub 2a/, γ/sub 2b/, γ/sub 3/; α(IgA); and μ(Igm). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background radioactivity when 25,000 cpm of /sup 125/I-labeled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. All incubations with iodinated second antibodies to other heavy chain classes of immunoglobins demonstrated background radioactivity. Extensive synthetic work in the laboratory for multiple biologic studies of structure-activity relationships of PTH, as well as analog design, has led to the synthesis of many peptide analogues and fragments from 7 to 34 amino acids in length. Study of the antibody recognition site (region specificity) by two of these monoclonal antibodies, 10A/sub 7/, and 6B/sub 1/, was undertaken with synthetic peptides

  16. Breast boost - why, how, when...?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Breast conservation management including tumorectomy or quadrantectomy and external beam radiotherapy with a dose of 45 to 50 Gy in the treatment of small breast carcinomas is generally accepted. The use of a radiation boost - in particular for specific subgroups - has not been clarified. With regard to the boost technique there is some controversy between groups emphasizing the value of electron boost treatment and groups pointing out the value of interstitial boost treatment. This controversy has become even more complicated as there is an increasing number of institutions reporting the use of HDR interstitial brachytherapy for boost treatment. The most critical issue with regard to interstitial HDR brachytherapy is the assumed serious long-term morbidity after a high single radiation dose as used in HDR-treatments. Methods and Results: This article gives a perspective and recommendations on some aspects of this issue (indication, timing, target volume, dose and dose rate). Conclusion: More information about the indication for a boost is to be expected from the EORTC trial 22881/10882. Careful selection of treatment procedures for specific subgroups of patients and refinement in surgical procedures and radiotherapy techniques may be useful in improving the clinical and cosmetic results in breast conservation therapy. Prospective trials comparing on the one hand different boost techniques and on the other hand particular morphologic criteria in treatments with boost and without boost are needed to give more detailed recommendations for boost indication and for boost techniques. (orig.)

  17. Diversity-Based Boosting Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar A. Alzubi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Boosting is a well known and efficient technique for constructing a classifier ensemble. An ensemble is built incrementally by altering the distribution of training data set and forcing learners to focus on misclassification errors. In this paper, an improvement to Boosting algorithm called DivBoosting algorithm is proposed and studied. Experiments on several data sets are conducted on both Boosting and DivBoosting. The experimental results show that DivBoosting is a promising method for ensemble pruning. We believe that it has many advantages over traditional boosting method because its mechanism is not solely based on selecting the most accurate base classifiers but also based on selecting the most diverse set of classifiers.

  18. Boosting Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkin Eduardo García Díaz

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo, se presenta un algoritmo de clasificación binaria basado en Support Vector Machines (Máquinas de Vectores de Soporte que combinado apropiadamente con técnicas de Boosting consigue un mejor desempeño en cuanto a tiempo de entrenamiento y conserva características similares de generalización con un modelo de igual complejidad pero de representación más compacta./ In this paper we present an algorithm of binary classification based on Support Vector Machines. It is combined with a modified Boosting algorithm. It run faster than the original SVM algorithm with a similar generalization error and equal complexity model but it has more compact representation.

  19. Analytic Boosted Boson Discrimination

    CERN Document Server

    Larkoski, Andrew J; Neill, Duff

    2015-01-01

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, $D_2$, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits. By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted $Z...

  20. A Mycobacterium bovis BCG-naked DNA prime-boost vaccination strategy induced CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T-cell response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Miao; Xia, Zhi Yang; Bao, Lang

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is still a major global public health problem. Presently the only tuberculosis (TB) vaccine available is Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), although it fails to adequately protect against pulmonary TB in adults. To solve this problem, the development of a new effective vaccine is urgently desired. BCG-prime DNA-booster vaccinations strategy has been shown to induce greater protection against tuberculosis (TB) than BCG alone. Some studies have demonstrated that the two genes (Rv1769 and Rv1772) are excellent T-cell antigens and could induce T-cell immune responses. In this research, we built BCG-C or BCG-P prime-recombination plasmid PcDNA3.1-Rv1769 or PcDNA3.1-Rv1772 boost vaccinations strategy to immunize BALB/c mice and evaluated its immunogenicity. The data suggests that the BCG-C+3.1-72 strategy could elicit the most long-lasting and strongest Th1-type cellular immune responses and the BCG-C+3.1-69 strategy could induce the high level CD8+ T-cell response at certain time points. These findings support the ideas that the prime-boost strategy as a combination of vaccines may be better than a single vaccine for protection against tuberculosis. PMID:24741595

  1. Induction of antigen-specific antibody response in human pheripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro by a dog kidney cell vaccine against rabies virus (DKCV).

    OpenAIRE

    Uytdehaag, Fons; Osterhaus, Ab; Loggen, H.G.; Bakker, Roland; Van Asten, Jack; Kreeftenberg, J.G.; Marel, P.; Steenis, Bert

    1983-01-01

    textabstractIn the present report an in vitro method for obtaining a secondary human antibody response to a dog kidney cell vaccine against rabies virus (DKCV) is described. Cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal rabies-immune and nonimmune donors were stimulated in vitro by DKCV. The production of virus-specific antibody in supernatant fluids was monitored by ELISA. Antibody was produced by lymphocytes from rabies-immune individuals, whereas those of nonimmune subjects co...

  2. Prediction of clinical and endoscopic responses to anti-tumor necrosis factor-α antibodies in ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yukihiro; Bamba, Shigeki; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Imaeda, Hirotsugu; Nishida, Atsushi; Inatomi, Osamu; Sasaki, Masaya; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Andoh, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Objective In patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), the relationship between the initial endoscopic findings and the response to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibodies remains unclear. We herein evaluated the potential of endoscopic assessment using the ulcerative colitis endoscopic index of severity (UCEIS) to predict the response to anti-TNF-α antibodies. Methods We enrolled 64 patients with UC undergoing anti-TNF-α maintenance therapy with infliximab (IFX) or adalimumab (ADA) between April 2010 and March 2015. Anti-TNF-α trough levels were determined by ELISA. Endoscopic disease activity was assessed using the UCEIS. Results The clinical response rate at 8 weeks was 77.4% for IFX and 66.7% for ADA. Serum albumin levels were significantly higher and the UCEIS bleeding descriptor before treatment was significantly lower in the responders than in the non-responders (p CRP levels at 2 weeks were significantly lower in the responders (p CRP levels), is useful for the prediction of the treatment outcome of UC patients in response to anti-TNF-α antibodies. PMID:26888161

  3. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew J. Larkoski; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2015-01-01

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, $D_2$, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization t...

  4. SUSY using boosted techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, Giordon; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In this talk, I present a discussion of techniques used in supersymmetry searches in papers published by the ATLAS Collaboration from late Run 1 to early Run 2. The goal is to highlight concepts the analyses have in common, why/how they work, and possible SUSY searches that could benefit from boosted studies. Theoretical background will be provided for reference to encourage participants to explore in depth on their own time.

  5. StructBoost: Boosting Methods for Predicting Structured Output Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunhua Shen; Guosheng Lin; van den Hengel, Anton

    2014-10-01

    Boosting is a method for learning a single accurate predictor by linearly combining a set of less accurate weak learners. Recently, structured learning has found many applications in computer vision. Inspired by structured support vector machines (SSVM), here we propose a new boosting algorithm for structured output prediction, which we refer to as StructBoost. StructBoost supports nonlinear structured learning by combining a set of weak structured learners. As SSVM generalizes SVM, our StructBoost generalizes standard boosting approaches such as AdaBoost, or LPBoost to structured learning. The resulting optimization problem of StructBoost is more challenging than SSVM in the sense that it may involve exponentially many variables and constraints. In contrast, for SSVM one usually has an exponential number of constraints and a cutting-plane method is used. In order to efficiently solve StructBoost, we formulate an equivalent 1-slack formulation and solve it using a combination of cutting planes and column generation. We show the versatility and usefulness of StructBoost on a range of problems such as optimizing the tree loss for hierarchical multi-class classification, optimizing the Pascal overlap criterion for robust visual tracking and learning conditional random field parameters for image segmentation. PMID:26352637

  6. Effect of praziquantel treatment of Schistosoma mansoni during pregnancy on immune responses to schistosome antigens among the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tweyongyere, Robert; Mawa, Patrice A.; Kihembo, Macklyn; Jones, Frances M.; Webb, Emily L.; Cose, Stephen; Dunne, David W.; Vennervald, Birgitte J; Elliott, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    Offspring of women with schistosomiasis may exhibit immune responsiveness to schistosomes due to in utero sensitisation or trans-placental transfer of antibodies. Praziquantel treatment during pregnancy boosts maternal immune responses to schistosome antigens and reduces worm burden. Effects of...... praziquantel treatment during pregnancy on responses among offspring are unknown....

  7. Age affects quantity but not quality of antibody responses after vaccination with an inactivated flavivirus vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Stiasny

    Full Text Available The impairment of immune functions in the elderly (immunosenescence results in post-vaccination antibody titers that are significantly lower than in young individuals. It is, however, a controversial question whether also the quality of antibodies declines with age. In this study, we have therefore investigated the age-dependence of functional characteristics of antibody responses induced by vaccination with an inactivated flavivirus vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE. For this purpose, we quantified TBE virus-specific IgG and neutralizing antibody titers in post-vaccination sera from groups of young and elderly healthy adults and determined antibody avidities and NT/ELISA titer ratios (functional activity. In contrast to the quantitative impairment of antibody production in the elderly, we found no age-related differences in the avidity and functional activity of antibodies induced by vaccination, which also appeared to be independent of the age at primary immunization. There was no correlation between antibody avidity and NT/ELISA ratios suggesting that additional factors affect the quality of polyclonal responses, independent of age. Our work indicates that healthy elderly people are able to produce antibodies in response to vaccination with similar avidity and functional activity as young individuals, albeit at lower titers.

  8. Antibody response of cattle to vaccination with commercial modified live rabies vaccines in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Amy; Greenberg, Lauren; Moran, David; Alvarez, Danilo; Alvarado, Marlon; Garcia, Daniel L; Peruski, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Vampire bat rabies is a public and animal health concern throughout Latin America. As part of an ecological study of vampire bat depredation on cattle in southern Guatemala, we conducted a vaccine seroconversion study among three dairy farms. The main objectives of this cross sectional and cohort study were to understand factors associated with bat bites among cattle, to determine whether unvaccinated cattle had evidence of rabies virus exposure and evaluate whether exposure was related to bat bite prevalence, and to assess whether cattle demonstrate adequate seroconversion to two commercial vaccines used in Guatemala. In 2012, baseline blood samples were collected immediately prior to intramuscular inoculation of cattle with one of two modified live rabies vaccines. Post vaccination blood samples were collected 13 and 393 days later. Sera were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (rVNA) by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Across two years of study, 36% (254/702) of inspected cattle presented gross evidence of vampire bat bites. Individual cattle with a bat bite in 2012 were more likely have a bat bite in 2013. Prior to vaccination, 12% (42/350) of cattle sera demonstrated rVNA, but bite status in 2012 was not associated with presence of rVNA. Vaccine brand was the only factor associated with adequate rVNA response of cattle by day 13. However, vaccine brand and rVNA status at day 13 were associated with an adequate rVNA titer on day 393, with animals demonstrating an adequate titer at day 13 more likely to have an adequate titer at day 393. Our findings support stable levels of vampire bat depredation and evidence of rVNA in unvaccinated cattle. Brand of vaccine may be an important consideration impacting adequate rVNA response and long-term maintenance of rVNA in cattle. Further, the results demonstrate that initial response to vaccination is associated with rVNA status over one year following vaccination. PMID:25466762

  9. Control of Toll-like receptor-mediated T cell-independent type 1 antibody responses by the inducible nuclear protein IκB-ζ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses. PMID:25124037

  10. Evidence for a novel human-specific xeno-auto-antibody response against vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tho; Gregg, Christopher J; Karp, Felix; Chow, Renee; Padler-Karavani, Vered; Cao, Hongzhi; Chen, Xi; Witztum, Joseph L; Varki, Nissi M; Varki, Ajit

    2009-12-10

    Humans are genetically unable to synthesize the common mammalian sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). However, Neu5Gc can be metabolically incorporated and covalently expressed on cultured human cell surfaces. Meanwhile, humans express varying and sometimes high titers of polyclonal anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. Here, a survey of human tissues by immunohistochemistry with both a monospecific chicken anti-Neu5Gc antibody and with affinity-purified human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies demonstrates endothelial expression of Neu5Gc, likely originating from Neu5Gc-rich foods like red meats. We hypothesized that the combination of Neu5Gc incorporation and anti-Neu5Gc antibodies can induce endothelial activation. Indeed, the incubation of high-titer human sera with Neu5Gc-fed endothelial cells led to Neu5Gc-dependent antibody binding, complement deposition, endothelial activation, selectin expression, increased cytokine secretion, and monocyte binding. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha also selectively enhanced human anti-Neu5Gc antibody reactivity. Anti-Neu5Gc antibodies affinity-purified from human serum also directed Neu5Gc-dependent complement deposition onto cultured endothelial cells. These data indicate a novel human-specific mechanism in which Neu5Gc-rich foods deliver immunogenic Neu5Gc to the endothelium, giving anti-Neu5Gc antibody- and complement-dependent activation, and potentially contributing to human vascular pathologies. In the case of atherosclerosis, Neu5Gc is present both in endothelium overlying plaques and in subendothelial regions, providing multiple pathways for accelerating inflammation in this disease. PMID:19828701

  11. Antibody Responses against Pneumocystis jirovecii in Health Care Workers Over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Serena; Daly, Kieran R.; Tipirneni, Renuka; Leah G Jarlsberg; Djawe, Kpandja; Koch, Judy V.; Swartzman, Alexandra; Roth, Brenna; Walzer, Peter D.; Huang, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    In a previous cross-sectional study, we showed that clinical staff working in a hospital had significantly higher antibody levels than nonclinical staff to Pneumocystis jirovecii. We conducted a longitudinal study, described here, to determine whether occupation and self-reported exposure to a patient with P. jirovecii pneumonia were associated with antibody levels to P. jirovecii over time. Baseline and quarterly serum specimens were collected and analyzed by using an ELISA that targeted dif...

  12. Neutralizing Antibody Response in Dogs and Cats Inoculated with Commercial Inactivated Rabies Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    SHIRAISHI, Rikiya; NISHIMURA, Masaaki; NAKASHIMA, Ryuji; ENTA, Chiho; HIRAYAMA, Norio

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Japan, the import quarantine regulation against rabies has required from 2005 that dogs and cats should be inoculated with the rabies vaccine and that the neutralizing antibody titer should be confirmed to be at least 0.5 international units (IU)/ml. The fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test is used as an international standard method for serological testing for rabies. To achieve proper immunization of dogs and cats at the time of import and export, changes in the...

  13. Conformational epitopes of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein are targets of potentially pathogenic antibody responses in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Menge Til; Lalive Patrice H; von Büdingen H -Christian; Genain Claude P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a putative autoantigen in multiple sclerosis (MS). Establishing the pathological relevance and validity of anti-MOG antibodies as biomarkers has yielded conflicting reports mainly due to different MOG isoforms used in different studies. Because epitope specificity may be a key factor determining anti-MOG reactivity we aimed at identifying a priori immunodominant MOG epitopes by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and at assessing clini...

  14. Normally Occurring Human Anti-GM1 Immunoglobulin M Antibodies and the Immune Response to Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaniz, María E.; Lardone, Ricardo D.; Yudowski, Silvia L.; Farace, María I.; Nores, Gustavo A.

    2004-01-01

    Anti-GM1 antibodies of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) isotype are normal components of the antibody repertoire of adult human serum. Using a sensitive high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) immunostaining assay, we found that these antibodies were absent in the umbilical vein and children <1 month of age but could be detected after 1 month of age. Although most of the children older than 6 months of age were positive, there were still a few negative children. The appearance of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies showed a perfect concordance with two well-characterized antibacterial antibodies, anti-Forssman and anti-blood group A, which indicates a similar origin. We also studied IgM reactivity with lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from gram-negative bacteria isolated from stool samples from healthy babies and from Escherichia coli HB101 in serum from individuals of different ages. We found a positive reaction with both LPSs in all the children more than 1 month of age analyzed, even in those that were negative for anti-GM1 antibodies. Anti-GM1 IgM antibodies were purified from adult serum by affinity chromatography and tested for the ability to bind LPSs from different bacteria. This highly specific preparation showed reactivity only with LPS from a strain of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from a patient with diarrhea. We conclude that normally occurring IgM antibodies are generated after birth, probably during the immune defense against specific bacterial strains. PMID:15039337

  15. Antibody response to accelerated Hib immunisation in preterm infants receiving dexamethasone for chronic lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, M.; Campbell, F.; Powell, P; Sims, D; Thornton, C

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To study the effect of dexamethasone on the routine immunisation of preterm infants with chronic lung disease.
METHODS—Serum samples were obtained before and after immunisation from an unselected cohort of 59 preterm infants. Haemophilus influenzae antibodies were measured using an ELISA method and differences in the geometric mean values between the two groups of babies analysed.
RESULTS—Sixteen infants received no dexamethasone. Before and after immunisation antibody t...

  16. Toxoplasma-SPECIFIC IgG SUBCLASS ANTIBODY RESPONSE IN CEREBROSPINAL FLUID SAMPLES FROM PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL TOXOPLASMOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda S. NASCIMENTO

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Cerebral toxoplasmosis can be highly debilitating and occasionally fatal in persons with immune system deficiencies. In this study, we evaluated the Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgG subclass antibody response in 19 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis who had a positive IgG anti-T. gondii ELISA standardized with a cyst antigen preparation. There were no significant differences between the rates of positivity and the antibody concentrations (arithmetic means of the ELISA absorbances, MEA for IgG1 and IgG2, but the rates of positivity and MEA values for these two IgG subclasses were significantly higher than those for IgG3 and IgG4. The marked IgG2 response in CSF from patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis merits further investigation.

  17. A critical review of the role of Fc gamma receptor polymorphisms in the response to monoclonal antibodies in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellor James D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC is a major mechanism of action of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs such as cetuximab, rituximab and trastuzumab. Fc gamma receptors (FcgR on human white blood cells are an integral part of the ADCC pathway. Differential response to therapeutic mAbs has been reported to correlate with specific polymorphisms in two of these genes: FCGR2A (H131R and FCGR3A (V158F. These polymorphisms are associated with differential affinity of the receptors for mAbs. This review critically examines the current evidence for genotyping the corresponding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to predict response to mAbs in patients with cancer.

  18. HVR1-mediated antibody evasion of highly infectious in vivo adapted HCV in humanised mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentoe, Jannick; Verhoye, Lieven; Velázquez Moctezuma, Rodrigo;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: HCV is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide, but the role of neutralising antibodies (nAbs) in its natural history remains poorly defined. We analysed the in vivo role of hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) for HCV virion properties, including nAb susceptibility. DESIGN: Analysis...... using HVR1-deleted viruses as vaccine antigens to boost broadly reactive protective nAb responses....

  19. Intranasal Delivery of Group B Meningococcal Native Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine Induces Local Mucosal and Serum Bactericidal Antibody Responses in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Shoemaker, David R.; Saunders, Nancy B.; Brandt, Brenda L.; Moran, E. Ellen; LaClair, Andrew D.; Zollinger, Wendell D.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that intranasal immunization of mice with meningococcal native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) induces both a good local mucosal antibody response and a good systemic bactericidal antibody response. However, in the intranasal mouse model, some of the NOMV entered the lung and caused an acute granulocytic response. We therefore developed an alternate animal model using the rabbit. This model reduces the probability of lung involvement and more closely mimics intranasal ...

  20. IgA Antibody Response of Swine to Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection and Vaccination▿ #

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, Juan M.; Butler, John E.; Jew, Jessica; Ferman, Geoffrey S.; Zhu, James; Golde, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) continues to be a significant economic problem worldwide. Control of the disease involves the use of killed-virus vaccines, a control measure developed decades ago. After natural infection, the primary site of replication of FMDV is the pharyngeal area, suggesting that a mucosal immune response is the most effective. Humoral immunity to killed-virus vaccination induces antibodies that can prevent the clinical disease but not local infection. Determining whe...

  1. Antibody response of definitive hosts against antigens of two life stages of the neuropathogenic schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti

    OpenAIRE

    Turjanicová, Libuše; Mikeš, Libor; Pecková, Monika; Horák, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Background The nasal avian schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti spends part of its intravertebrate period of life within the central nervous system. Migration of the parasites can be accompanied by neuromotor disorders or paralysis in natural definitive hosts (ducks) and even in laboratory mammals. Cercariae are also able to penetrate human skin and induce cercarial dermatitis. While the cellular and antibody responses against cercariae and migrating schistosomula have been investigated in mic...

  2. Tumor therapy with an antibody-targeted superantigen generates a dichotomy between local and systemic immune responses.

    OpenAIRE

    Litton, M. J.; Dohlsten, M; Hansson, J.; Rosendahl, A; Ohlsson, L.; Kalland, T; Andersson, J; Andersson, U.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated injections of a fusion protein containing the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) combined with a Fab fragment of a tumor-specific antibody is a highly efficient immunotherapy for mice expressing lung melanoma micrometastasis. In the present study, the systemic and local immune responses generated by this therapy were analyzed at a cellular level. Two distinct but coupled immune reactions occurred after repeated therapy. Tumor necrosis factor and macrophage inflammatory p...

  3. Cellular Immune Responses in HIV-Negative Immunodeficiency with Anti-Interferon-γ Antibodies and Opportunistic Intracellular Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Wipasa, Jiraprapa; Wongkulab, Panuwat; Chawansuntati, Kriangkrai; Chaiwarit, Romanee; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell-mediated immunity plays a crucial role in resistance to intracellular infection. We previously reported antibodies against interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in HIV− negative (HIV−) patients with acquired immunodeficiency presenting with repeated episodes of disseminated infection caused by uncommon opportunistic intracellular fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens. This follow-up study aimed to investigate cellular immune responses in these unusual patients. Methods Twenty HIV− patient...

  4. Influenza A virus infection engenders a poor antibody response against the ectodomain of matrix protein 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wunner William

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix protein 2 (M2 is an integral tetrameric membrane protein of influenza A virus (IAV. Its ectodomain (M2e shows remarkably little diversity amongst human IAV strains. As M2e-specific antibodies (Abs have been shown to reduce the severity of infection in animals, M2e is being studied for its capability of providing protection against a broad range of IAV strains. Presently, there is little information about the concentration of M2e-specific Abs in humans. Two previous studies made use of ELISA and Western blot against M2e peptides and recombinant M2 protein as immunosorbents, respectively, and reported Ab titers to be low or undetectable. An important caveat is that these assays may not have detected all Abs capable of binding to native tetrameric M2e. Therefore, we developed an assay likely to detect all M2e tetramer-specific Abs. Results We generated a HeLa cell line that expressed full length tetrameric M2 (HeLa-M2 or empty vector (HeLa-C10 under the control of the tetracycline response element. These cell lines were then used in parallel as immunosorbents in ELISA. The assay was standardized and M2e-specific Ab titers quantified by means of purified murine or chimeric (mouse variable regions, human constant regions M2e-specific Abs in the analysis of mouse and human sera, respectively. We found that the cell-based ELISA was substantially more effective than immobilized M2e peptide in detecting M2e-specific Abs in sera of mice that had recovered from repetitive IAV infections. Still, titers remained low ( Conclusion The results provide convincing evidence that M2e-specific Ab-mediated protection is currently lacking or suboptimal in humans.

  5. Altered immune response of immature dendritic cells following dengue virus infection in the presence of specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Silvia; Flipse, Jacky; Upasani, Vinit C; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) replication is known to prevent maturation of infected dendritic cells (DCs) thereby impeding the development of adequate immunity. During secondary DENV infection, dengue-specific antibodies can suppress DENV replication in immature DCs (immDCs), however how dengue-antibody complexes (DENV-IC) influence the phenotype of DCs remains elusive. Here, we evaluated the maturation state and cytokine profile of immDCs exposed to DENV-ICs. Indeed, DENV infection of immDCs in the absence of antibodies was hallmarked by blunted upregulation of CD83, CD86 and the major histocompatibility complex molecule HLA-DR. In contrast, DENV infection in the presence of neutralizing antibodies triggered full DC maturation and induced a balanced inflammatory cytokine response. Moreover, DENV infection under non-neutralizing conditions prompted upregulation of CD83 and CD86 but not HLA-DR, and triggered production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The effect of DENV-IC was found to be dependent on the engagement of FcγRIIa. Altogether, our data show that the presence of DENV-IC alters the phenotype and cytokine profile of DCs. PMID:27121645

  6. Poly(I:C/alum mixed adjuvant priming enhances HBV subunit vaccine-induced immunity in mice when combined with recombinant adenoviral-based HBV vaccine boosting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Chuai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Virus-specific cellular immune responses play a critical role in virus clearance during acute or chronic HBV infection. Currently, the commercially available HBV vaccine is combined with alum adjuvant, which stimulates mainly Th2 immune responses. Therefore, development of new therapeutic HBV vaccine adjuvants and immune strategies that also promote Th1 and CTL responses is urgently needed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To improve the immunity induced by the novel HBSS1 HBV vaccine, we evaluated the ability of adjuvants, including alum, CpG and polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C], to enhance the response when boosted with the recombinant adenoviral vector vaccine rAdSS1. The immune responses to different adjuvant combinations were assessed in C57BL/6 mice by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, ELISpot and cytokine release assays. Among the combinations tested, a HBV protein particle vaccine with CpG/alum and poly(I:C/alum priming combinations accelerated specific seroconversion and produced high antibody (anti-PreS1, anti-S antibody titres with a Th1 bias. After boosting with recombinant adenoviral vector vaccine rAdSS1, both groups produced a strong multi-antigen (S and PreS1-specific cellular immune response. HBSS1 immunisation with poly(I:C/alum priming also generated high-level CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses in terms of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2. CONCLUSIONS: The protein-vaccine HBSS1 with mixed poly(I:C/alum adjuvant priming, followed by a rAdSS1 vaccine boost, maximises specific antibody and Th1-biased cellular immune responses. This regime might prove useful in the development of HBV therapeutic vaccines. Furthermore, this promising strategy might be applied to vaccines against other persistent infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis.

  7. Comparison of antibody responses after vaccination with two inactivated rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, J M; Bouvet, J; Cliquet, F; Wasniewski, M; Guiot, A L; Lemaitre, L; Cariou, C; Cozette, V; Vergne, L; Guigal, P M

    2009-01-13

    Thirty laboratory dogs were randomly assigned to two groups (A and B) of 15 dogs and subcutaneously vaccinated with a single dose of one of two commercially available monovalent inactivated rabies vaccines: RABISIN (Merial, France) (group A) and NOBIVAC Rabies (Intervet International) (group B). Rabies antibodies were measured over a period of 4 months using the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test. The two vaccines performed differently in terms of magnitude and persistence of rabies antibodies titers in dogs. Two weeks after vaccination, average rabies antibody titers peaked at 2.53 IU/mL (range, 0.17-13.77 IU/mL) and 1.26 IU/mL (range, 0.50-4.56 IU/mL) in groups A and B dogs, respectively. The average FAVN antibody titres against rabies on D28, D56, D84, D112 and D120 were significantly higher in group A than in group B. Although all dogs from group B serologically responded to vaccination, the proportion of dogs with antibody titres >or=0.5 IU/mL dropped significantly after D28 and was statistically significantly lower on D56, D84 and D112 compared to group A dogs. In conclusion, in the context of international trade, the choice of the vaccine and the timing of blood tests are critical factors in achieving successful serological test results after rabies vaccination. RABISIN induces high and sustained antibody titres against rabies, increasing the flexibility for the time of blood sampling after primo-vaccination. PMID:18757142

  8. Novel polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies against extracellular β-d-glucans from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C Semedo, Magda; Karmali, Amin; Martins, Sónia; Fonseca, Luís

    2016-01-01

    β-d-glucans from mushroom strains play a major role as biological response modifiers in several clinical disorders. Therefore, a specific assay method is of critical importance to find useful and novel sources of β-d-glucans with anti-tumor activity. Hybridoma technology was used to raise monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against extracellular β-d-glucans (EBG) from Pleurotus ostreatus. Two of these hybridoma clones (3F8_3H7 and 1E6_1E8_B3) secreting Mabs against EBG from P. ostreatus were selected and 3F8_3H7 was used to investigate if they are polyol-responsive Mabs (PR-Mabs) by using ELlSA-elution assay. This hybridoma cell line secreted Mab of IgM class, which was purified in a single step by gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-300HR, which revealed a protein band on native PAGE with Mr of 917 kDa. Specificity studies of Mab 3F8_3H7 revealed that it recognized a common epitope on several β-d-glucans from different basidiomycete strains as determined by indirect ELlSA and Western blotting under native conditions. This Mab exhibited high apparent affinity constant (KApp) for β-d-glucans from several mushroom strains. However, it revealed differential reactivity to some heat-treated β-d-glucans compared with the native forms suggesting that it binds to a conformation-sensitive epitope on β-d-glucan molecule. Epitope analysis of Mab 3F8_3H7 and 1E6_1E8_B3 was investigated by additivity index parameter, which revealed that they bound to the same epitope on some β-d-glucans and to different epitopes in other antigens. Therefore, these Mab can be used to assay for β-d-glucans as well as to act as powerful probes to detect conformational changes in these biopolymers. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:116-125, 2016. PMID:26580487

  9. Association of MicroRNAs with Antibody Response to Mycoplasma bovis in Beef Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Eduardo; Cai, Guohong; Kuehn, Larry A; Register, Karen B; McDaneld, Tara G; Neill, John D

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify microRNAs associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma bovis in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: in summer after calves were born, in fall at weaning, and in the following spring. All sera collected in the summer were ELISA-negative for anti-M. bovis. By the fall, eight animals were seropositive for IgG (positive group), while eight remained negative (negative group). By spring, all animals in both groups were seropositive. MicroRNAs were extracted from sera and sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq next-generation sequencer. A total of 1,374,697 sequences mapped to microRNAs in the bovine genome. Of these, 82% of the sequences corresponded to 27 microRNAs, each represented by a minimum of 10,000 sequences. There was a statistically significant interaction between ELISA response and season for bta-miR-24-3p (P = 0.0268). All sera collected at the initial summer had a similar number of copies of this microRNA (P = 0.773). In the fall, the positive group had an increased number of copies when compared to the negative group (P = 0.021), and this grew more significant by the following spring (P = 0.0001). There were 21 microRNAs associated (P< 0.05) with season. These microRNAs could be evaluated further as candidates to potentially improve productivity in cattle. The microRNAs bta-let-7b, bta-miR- 24-3p, bta-miR- 92a, and bta-miR-423-5p, were significatly associated with ELISA status (P< 0.05). These microRNAs have been recognized as playing a role in the host defense against bacteria in humans, mice, and dairy cattle. Further studies are needed to establish if these microRNAs could be used as diagnostic marker or indicator of exposure, or whether intervention strategies could be developed as an alternative to antibiotics for controlling disease due to M. bovis. PMID:27537842

  10. ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO EPSILON TOXIN OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN CAPTIVE RED DEER (CERVUS ELAPHUS) OVER A 13-MONTH PERIOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Christopher; Duffard, Nicolas; Beauchamp, Guy; Boullier, Séverine; Locatelli, Yann

    2016-03-01

    Deer are sensitive to clostridial diseases, and vaccination with clostridial toxoids is the method of choice to prevent these infections in ruminants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the serologic responses in red deer (Cervus elaphus) over a 13-mo period after vaccination with a multivalent clostridial vaccine, containing an aluminium hydroxide adjuvant. Antibody production to the Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxin component of the vaccine was measured using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Animals from group 1 (9 mo old; n = 6) were naïve and received an initial vaccination with a booster vaccine 4 wk apart and one annual booster. Animals from group 2 (21 mo old; n = 10) had been previously vaccinated 12 mo prior and received a first annual booster at the beginning of this study and a second annual booster 12 mo later. The multivalent clostridial vaccine induced a high antibody response that peaked after each injection and then slowly decreased with time. In group 1, a booster vaccine was required to obtain an initial high humoral response. The annual booster injection induced a strong, rapid, and consistent anamnestic response in both groups. The serologic responses persisted significantly over the baseline value for 9-12 mo in group 1, but more than 12 mo in group 2. It is unknown whether the measured humoral immune responses would have been protective as no challenge studies were performed. Further investigation is needed to determine the protective antibody titers to challenge and how long this immunity might persist after vaccination. PMID:27010263

  11. Neutralizing antibody response in dogs and cats inoculated with commercial inactivated rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Rikiya; Nishimura, Masaaki; Nakashima, Ryuji; Enta, Chiho; Hirayama, Norio

    2014-04-01

    In Japan, the import quarantine regulation against rabies has required from 2005 that dogs and cats should be inoculated with the rabies vaccine and that the neutralizing antibody titer should be confirmed to be at least 0.5 international units (IU)/ml. The fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test is used as an international standard method for serological testing for rabies. To achieve proper immunization of dogs and cats at the time of import and export, changes in the neutralizing antibody titer after inoculation of the rabies vaccine should be understood in detail. However, few reports have provided this information. In this study, we aimed to determine evaluated, such changes by using sera from experimental dogs and cats inoculated with the rabies vaccine, and we tested samples using the routine FAVN test. In both dogs and cats, proper, regular vaccination enabled the necessary titer of neutralizing antibodies to be maintained in the long term. However, inappropriate timing of blood sampling after vaccination could result in insufficient detected levels of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:24389741

  12. Depletion of OX-8 lymphocytes from the blood and airways using monoclonal antibodies enhances the late airway response in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Olivenstein, R.; Renzi, P M; Yang, J P; P. Rossi; Laberge, S.; Waserman, S; Martin, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a role for T lymphocytes in allergic airway responses. We hypothesized that reducing blood T suppressor cells (Ts) might increase the late airway response (LR). Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were sensitized with ovalbumin (OA). On days 8, 10, and 12, post-sensitization test SD (n = 14) received monoclonal antibody intravenously (OX-8; 1 mg) specific to rat Ts. Controls received saline (n = 7) or mouse ascites IgG (n = 7). On day 14, animals were challenged with OA aerosol ...

  13. Radiochemoimmunotherapy with intensity-modulated concomitant boost: interim analysis of the REACH trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Alexandra D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate efficacy and toxicity clinical in the intensified treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN with the combination of chemotherapy, the EGFR antibody cetuximab, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in a concomitant boost concept. Methods REACH is a prospective, bi-centric phase II trial of carboplatin/5-FU and cetuximab weekly combined with IMRT. Primary endpoint is locoregional control, secondary endpoints include acute radiation effects and adverse events. Evaluation of disease response is carried out according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST; toxicity is assessed using NCI CTC v 3.0. Results Treatment was tolerated moderately well, acneiforme erythema occurred in 74.1% (grade II/III, mucositis grade III in 28.6%, and radiation dermatitis grade III in 14.3%. Higher-grade side-effects resolved quickly until the first follow-up post treatment. Objective response rates were promising with 28.6% CR at first follow-up and 92.9% thereafter. Conclusion The combination of standard carboplatin/5-FU and cetuximab is feasible and results in promising objective response rates. The use of an IMRT concomitant boost is practicable in a routine clinical setting resulting in only moderate overall toxicity of the regimen. Trial Registration Number ISRCTN87356938.

  14. Radiochemoimmunotherapy with intensity-modulated concomitant boost: interim analysis of the REACH trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate efficacy and toxicity clinical in the intensified treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) with the combination of chemotherapy, the EGFR antibody cetuximab, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in a concomitant boost concept. REACH is a prospective, bi-centric phase II trial of carboplatin/5-FU and cetuximab weekly combined with IMRT. Primary endpoint is locoregional control, secondary endpoints include acute radiation effects and adverse events. Evaluation of disease response is carried out according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST); toxicity is assessed using NCI CTC v 3.0. Treatment was tolerated moderately well, acneiforme erythema occurred in 74.1% (grade II/III), mucositis grade III in 28.6%, and radiation dermatitis grade III in 14.3%. Higher-grade side-effects resolved quickly until the first follow-up post treatment. Objective response rates were promising with 28.6% CR at first follow-up and 92.9% thereafter. The combination of standard carboplatin/5-FU and cetuximab is feasible and results in promising objective response rates. The use of an IMRT concomitant boost is practicable in a routine clinical setting resulting in only moderate overall toxicity of the regimen.

  15. Boost C++ application development cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Polukhin, Antony

    2013-01-01

    This book follows a cookbook approach, with detailed and practical recipes that use Boost libraries.This book is great for developers new to Boost, and who are looking to improve their knowledge of Boost and see some undocumented details or tricks. It's assumed that you will have some experience in C++ already, as well being familiar with the basics of STL. A few chapters will require some previous knowledge of multithreading and networking. You are expected to have at least one good C++ compiler and compiled version of Boost (1.53.0 or later is recommended), which will be used during the exer

  16. Gradient boosting machines, a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natekin, Alexey; Knoll, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods with a strong focus on machine learning aspects of modeling. A theoretical information is complemented with descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. Three practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed. PMID:24409142

  17. Gradient Boosting Machines, A Tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey eNatekin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods. A theoretical information is complemented with many descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. A set of practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed.

  18. Immunoproteomic Analysis of Antibody Responses to Extracellular Proteins of Candida albicans Revealing the Importance of Glycosylation for Antigen Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ting; Krüger, Thomas; Knüpfer, Uwe; Kasper, Lydia; Wielsch, Natalie; Hube, Bernhard; Kortgen, Andreas; Bauer, Michael; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Dimopoulos, George; Brakhage, Axel A; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2016-08-01

    During infection, the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans undergoes a yeast-to-hypha transition, secretes numerous proteins for invasion of host tissues, and modulates the host's immune response. Little is known about the interplay of C. albicans secreted proteins and the host adaptive immune system. Here, we applied a combined 2D gel- and LC-MS/MS-based approach for the characterization of C. albicans extracellular proteins during the yeast-to-hypha transition, which led to a comprehensive C. albicans secretome map. The serological responses to C. albicans extracellular proteins were investigated by a 2D-immunoblotting approach combined with MS for protein identification. On the basis of the screening of sera from candidemia and three groups of noncandidemia patients, a core set of 19 immunodominant antibodies against secreted proteins of C. albicans was identified, seven of which represent potential diagnostic markers for candidemia (Xog1, Lip4, Asc1, Met6, Tsa1, Tpi1, and Prx1). Intriguingly, some secreted, strongly glycosylated protein antigens showed high cross-reactivity with sera from noncandidemia control groups. Enzymatic deglycosylation of proteins secreted from hyphae significantly impaired sera antibody recognition. Furthermore, deglycosylation of the recombinantly produced, secreted aspartyl protease Sap6 confirmed a significant contribution of glycan epitopes to the recognition of Sap6 by antibodies in patient's sera. PMID:27386892

  19. Chimpanzees Immunized with Recombinant Soluble CD4 Develop Anti-Self CD4 Antibody Responses with Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Lord, Carol I.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1992-06-01

    In view of the efficiency with which human immunodeficiency virus replication can be blocked in vitro with anti-CD4 antibodies, the elicitation of an anti-CD4 antibody response through active immunization might represent a useful therapeutic strategy for AIDS. Here we demonstrate that immunization of chimpanzees with recombinant soluble human CD4 elicited an anti-CD4 antibody response. The elicited antibody bound self CD4 on digitonin-treated but not freshly isolated lymphocytes. Nevertheless, this antibody blocked human immunodeficiency virus replication in chimpanzee and human lymphocytes. These observations suggest that immunization with recombinant soluble CD4 from human immunodeficiency virus-infected humans may be feasible and therapeutically beneficial.

  20. Induction of antibody responses to African horse sickness virus (AHSV in ponies after vaccination with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Chiam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: African horse sickness virus (AHSV causes a non-contagious, infectious disease in equids, with mortality rates that can exceed 90% in susceptible horse populations. AHSV vaccines play a crucial role in the control of the disease; however, there are concerns over the use of polyvalent live attenuated vaccines particularly in areas where AHSV is not endemic. Therefore, it is important to consider alternative approaches for AHSV vaccine development. We have carried out a pilot study to investigate the ability of recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA vaccines expressing VP2, VP7 or NS3 genes of AHSV to stimulate immune responses against AHSV antigens in the horse. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: VP2, VP7 and NS3 genes from AHSV-4/Madrid87 were cloned into the vaccinia transfer vector pSC11 and recombinant MVA viruses generated. Antigen expression or transcription of the AHSV genes from cells infected with the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Pairs of ponies were vaccinated with MVAVP2, MVAVP7 or MVANS3 and both MVA vector and AHSV antigen-specific antibody responses were analysed. Vaccination with MVAVP2 induced a strong AHSV neutralising antibody response (VN titre up to a value of 2. MVAVP7 also induced AHSV antigen-specific responses, detected by western blotting. NS3 specific antibody responses were not detected. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrates the immunogenicity of recombinant MVA vectored AHSV vaccines, in particular MVAVP2, and indicates that further work to investigate whether these vaccines would confer protection from lethal AHSV challenge in the horse is justifiable.

  1. A-Salivary antibody responses as an indicator of waterborne infections: Pilot community study before and after installation of UV treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This ongoing project involves the development, validation and pilot application of a multiplex immunoassay based on Luminex microsphere technology to measure salivary antibody responses to the potentially-waterborne pathogens, noroviruses (Norwalk, VA387 and VA207), rotaviruses, ...

  2. Analysis by Flow Cytometry of B-Cell Activation and Antibody Responses Induced by Toll-Like Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pone, Egest J

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed in B lymphocytes and contribute to B-cell activation, antibody responses, and their maturation. TLR stimulation of mouse B cells induces class switch DNA recombination (CSR) to isotypes specified by cytokines, and also induces formation of IgM(+) as well as class-switched plasma cells. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, while on its own inducing limited B-cell proliferation and no CSR, can enhance CSR driven by TLRs. Particular synergistic or antagonistic interactions among TLR pathways, BCR, and cytokine signaling can have important consequences for B-cell activation, CSR, and plasma cell formation. This chapter outlines protocols for the induction and analysis of B-cell activation and antibody production by TLRs with or without other stimuli. PMID:26803633

  3. Mucosal adjuvanticity of fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3: systemic and local antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhisheng Dang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that a bacterial fibronectin attachment protein (FAP is able to stimulate strong systemic and mucosal antibody responses when it is used alone or co-administrated with other antigens (Ags. Thus, it has been suggested to be a promising adjuvant candidate for the development of efficient vaccines. However, the co-administered Ags and FAP were cloned, expressed and purified individually to date. In a recent study, we first evaluated the adjuvanticity of a fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP, 24 amino acids of Mycobacterium avium FAP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3 (Em-TSP3 by detecting systemic and local antibody responses in intranasally (i.n. immunized BALB/c mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Em-TSP3 and FBP fragments were linked with a GSGGSG linker and expressed as a single fusion protein (Em-TSP3-FBP using the pBAD/Thio-TOPO expression vector. BALB/c mice were immunized i.n. with recombinant Em-TSP3-FBP (rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG and the systemic and local antibody responses were detected by ELISA. The results showed that both rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG evoked strong serum IgG (p<0.001 and IgG1 responses (p<0.001, whereas only the latter induced a high level IgG2α production (p<0.001, compared to that of rEm-TSP3 alone without any adjuvant. There were no significant differences in IgG and IgG1 production between the groups. Low level of serum IgA and IgM were detected in both groups. The tendency of Th1 and Th2 cell immune responses were assessed via detecting the IgG1/IgG2α ratio after the second and third immunizations. The results indicated that i.n. immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP resulted in an increased IgG1/IgG2α ratio (a Th2 tendency, while rEm-TSP3+CpG caused a rapid Th1 response that later shifted to a Th2 response. Immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP provoked significantly stronger IgA antibody responses in intestine (p<0.05, lung (p<0.001 and spleen (p<0.001 compared to those

  4. Analytic boosted boson discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2016-05-01

    Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, D 2, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits. By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted Z boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. Our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.

  5. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Poggianella

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well.

  6. One-prime multi-boost strategy immunization with recombinant DNA, adenovirus, and MVA vector vaccines expressing HPV16 L1 induces potent, sustained, and specific immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Li; Wang, He-Rong; Zhou, Zhi-Yi; Luo, Jing; Xiao, Xiang-Qian; Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Jin-Tao; Zhou, Yu-Bai; Zeng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with various human diseases, including cancer, and developing vaccines is a cost-efficient strategy to prevent HPV-related disease. The major capsid protein L1, which an increasing number of studies have confirmed is typically expressed early in infection, is a promising antigen for such a vaccine, although the E6 and E7 proteins have been characterized more extensively. Thus, the L1 gene from HPV16 was inserted into a recombinant vector, AdHu5, and MVA viral vectors, and administered by prime-boost immunization. Virus-like particles were used as control antigens. Our results indicate that prime-boost immunization with heterologous vaccines induced robust and sustained cellular and humoral response specific to HPV16 L1. In particular, sera obtained from mice immunized with DNA + DNA + Ad + MVA had excellent antitumor activity in vivo. However, the data also confirm that virus-like particles can only elicit low levels cellular immunity and not be long-lasting, and are therefore unsuitable for treatment of existing HPV infections. PMID:26821205

  7. Isotype-specific antibody responses to foot-and-mouth disease virus in sera and secretions of "carrier' and "non-carrier' cattle.

    OpenAIRE

    Salt, J. S.; Mulcahy, G; Kitching, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    Isotype-specific antibody responses to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) were measured in the sera and upper respiratory tract secretions of vaccinated and susceptible cattle challenged with FMDV by direct contact or by intranasal inoculation. A comparison was made between cattle that eliminated FMDV and those that developed and maintained a persistent infection. Serological and mucosal antibody responses were detected in all animals after challenge. IgA and IgM were detected before the dev...

  8. Antibody responses to vaccination and immune function in patients with haematological malignancies - studies in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia autologous stem cell recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Velden, A.M.T. van der

    2007-01-01

    This thesis concerns the antibody responses to vaccination and immune function of patients with several forms of haematological diseases. Antibody responses in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and in autologous stem cell transplant recipients were studied. In the autologous stem cell transplantation (aSCT) group, immune reconstitution after aSCT was analysed in detail during 15 months following transplantation. The first part of the thesis concerns patients with chronic lymph...

  9. The schistosoma-specific antibody response after treatment in non-immune travellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Liv Marie; Christensen, Anders Vittrup; Navntoft, Dorte;

    2009-01-01

    Egg detection is the gold standard in diagnosing and controlling treatment in schistosomiasis, but sensitivity is poor in lightly infected individuals, whereas Schistosoma-specific antibodies are more sensitive. The purpose of the study was to evaluate use of Gut Associated Antigen (GAA) and Memb...

  10. Antibody response to booster vaccination with tetanus and diphtheria in adults exposed to perfluorinated alkylates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsen, Katrine; Shamim, Zaiba; Ryder, Lars P;

    2016-01-01

    prospectively followed for 30 days after a booster vaccination with diphtheria and tetanus. The results indicated that serum-PFAS concentrations were positively correlated and positively associated with age and male sex. The specific antibody concentrations in serum were increased from Day 4 to Day 10 post...

  11. Specific serum antibody responses in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) provide limited protection against Streptococcus ictaluri challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passive immunization has been shown to provide a spectrum of protection against certain piscine pathogens, and studies were conducted to determine the role of specific antibodies in immunity to Streptococcus ictaluri. Adult Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were injected i.p. with tryptic soy br...

  12. Harnessing the immune system's arsenal: producing human monoclonal antibodies for therapeutics and investigating immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Meghan; Kaur, Kaval; Pauli, Noel; Wilson, Patrick C.

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technology has undergone rapid and innovative reinvention over the last 30 years. Application of these technologies to human samples revealed valuable therapeutic and experimental insights. These technologies, each with their own benefits and flaws, have proven indispensable for immunological research and in our fight to provide new treatments and improved vaccines for infectious disease.

  13. Harnessing the immune system's arsenal: producing human monoclonal antibodies for therapeutics and investigating immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Meghan; Kaur, Kaval; Pauli, Noel; Wilson, Patrick C

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technology has undergone rapid and innovative reinvention over the last 30 years. Application of these technologies to human samples revealed valuable therapeutic and experimental insights. These technologies, each with their own benefits and flaws, have proven indispensable for immunological research and in our fight to provide new treatments and improved vaccines for infectious disease. PMID:21876728

  14. Increased humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in growing pigs pre-treated with poly-γ-glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Hoon; Kang, Ik-Jae; Kim, A-Reum; Noh, You-Sun; Chung, Hee-Chun; Park, Bong-Kyun

    2016-06-30

    This study was conducted to determine if humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine improved in 8-week-old growing pigs born to well-vaccinated sows pre-treated with 60 mg of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) three days before vaccination. Antibody against FMD virus serotype O was measured 0, 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-vaccination, using a PrioCHECK FMDV type O ELISA kit. The results showed that positive antibody reactions against FMDV serotype O antigen among a component of the vaccine significantly increased in response to pre-injection with γ-PGA. PMID:26645341

  15. Increased humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in growing pigs pre-treated with poly-γ-glutamic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Hoon; Kang, Ik-Jae; Kim, A-Reum; Noh, You-Sun; Chung, Hee-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine improved in 8-week-old growing pigs born to well-vaccinated sows pre-treated with 60 mg of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) three days before vaccination. Antibody against FMD virus serotype O was measured 0, 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-vaccination, using a PrioCHECK FMDV type O ELISA kit. The results showed that positive antibody reactions against FMDV serotype O antigen among a component of the vaccine significantly increased in response to pre-injection with γ-PGA. PMID:26645341

  16. Antibody responses to a spore carbohydrate antigen as a marker of nonfatal inhalation anthrax in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saile, Elke; Boons, Geert-Jan; Buskas, Therese; Carlson, Russell W; Kannenberg, Elmar L; Barr, John R; Boyer, Anne E; Gallegos-Candela, Maribel; Quinn, Conrad P

    2011-05-01

    The Bacillus anthracis exosporium protein BclA contains an O-linked antigenic tetrasaccharide whose terminal sugar is known as anthrose (J. M. Daubenspeck et al., J. Biol. Chem. 279:30945-30953, 2004). We hypothesized that serologic responses to anthrose may have diagnostic value in confirming exposure to aerosolized B. anthracis. We evaluated the serologic responses to a synthetic anthrose-containing trisaccharide (ATS) in a group of five rhesus macaques that survived inhalation anthrax following exposure to B. anthracis Ames spores. Two of five animals (RM2 and RM3) were treated with ciprofloxacin starting at 48 hours postexposure and two (RM4 and RM5) at 72 h postexposure; one animal (RM1) was untreated. Infection was confirmed by blood culture and detection of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LF) in plasma. Anti-ATS IgG responses were determined at 14, 21, 28, and 35 days postexposure, with preexposure serum as a control. All animals, irrespective of ciprofloxacin treatment, mounted a specific, measurable anti-ATS IgG response. The earliest detectable responses were on days 14 (RM1, RM2, and RM5), 21 (RM4), and 28 (RM3). Specificity of the anti-ATS responses was demonstrated by competitive-inhibition enzyme immunoassay (CIEIA), in which a 2-fold (wt/wt) excess of carbohydrate in a bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate of the oligosaccharide (ATS-BSA) effected >94% inhibition, whereas a structural analog lacking the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-butyryl moiety at the C-4" of the anthrosyl residue had no inhibition activity. These data suggest that anti-ATS antibody responses may be used to identify aerosol exposure to B. anthracis spores. The anti-ATS antibody responses were detectable during administration of ciprofloxacin. PMID:21389148

  17. B7h-expressing dendritic cells and plasma B cells mediate distinct outcomes of ICOS costimulation in T cell-dependent antibody responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larimore Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ICOS-B7h costimulatory receptor-ligand pair is required for germinal center formation, the production of isotype-switched antibodies, and antibody affinity maturation in response to T cell-dependent antigens. However, the potentially distinct roles of regulated B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in T cell-dependent antibody responses have not been defined. Results We generated transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression to assess the cell-type specific roles of B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in regulating T cell-dependent antibody responses. Our results show that endogenous B7h expression is reduced on B cells after activation in vitro and is also reduced in vivo on antibody-secreting plasma B cells in comparison to both naïve and germinal center B cells from which they are derived. Increasing the level of B7h expression on activated and plasma B cells in B-B7hTg mice led to an increase in the number of antibody-secreting plasma cells generated after immunization and a corresponding increase in the concentration of antigen-specific high affinity serum IgG antibodies of all isotypes, without affecting the number of responding germinal center B cells. In contrast, ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells in DC-B7hTg mice contributed to germinal center formation and selectively increased IgG2a production without affecting the overall magnitude of antibody responses. Conclusions Using transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression, we have revealed distinct roles of ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells and B cells in the regulation of T cell-dependent antibody responses.

  18. Dengue Virus (DENV) Neutralizing Antibody Kinetics in Children After Symptomatic Primary and Postprimary DENV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Hannah E; Rodriguez-Barraquer, Isabel; Azman, Andrew S; Althouse, Benjamin M; Salje, Henrik; Gibbons, Robert V; Rothman, Alan L; Jarman, Richard G; Nisalak, Ananda; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Nimmannitya, Suchitra; Vaughn, David W; Green, Sharone; Yoon, In-Kyu; Cummings, Derek A T

    2016-05-01

    The immune response to dengue virus (DENV) infection is complex and not fully understood. Using longitudinal data from 181 children with dengue in Thailand who were followed for up to 3 years, we describe neutralizing antibody kinetics following symptomatic DENV infection. We observed that antibody titers varied by serotype, homotypic vs heterotypic responses, and primary versus postprimary infections. The rates of change in antibody titers over time varied between primary and postprimary responses. For primary infections, titers increased from convalescence to 6 months. By comparing homotypic and heterotypic antibody titers, we saw an increase in type specificity from convalescence to 6 months for primary DENV3 infections but not primary DENV1 infections. In postprimary cases, there was a decrease in titers from convalescence up until 6 months after infection. Beginning 1 year after both primary and postprimary infections, there was evidence of increasing antibody titers, with greater increases in children with lower titers, suggesting that antibody titers were boosted due to infection and that higher levels of neutralizing antibody may be more likely to confer a sterilizing immune response. These findings may help to model virus transmission dynamics and provide baseline data to support the development of vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26704615

  19. The initial antibody response to HIV-1: induction of ineffective early B cell responses against GP41 by the transmitted/founder virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, Leslie L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    A window of opportunity for immune responses to extinguish HIV -1 exists from the moment of transmission through establishment of the latent pool of HIV -I-infected cells. A critical time to study the initial immune responses to the transmitted/founder virus is the eclipse phase of HIV-1 infection (time from transmission to the first appearance of plasma virus) but, to date, this period has been logistically difficult to analyze. Studies in non-human primates challenged with chimeric simianhuman immunodeficiency virus have shown that neutralizing antibodies, when present at the time of infection, can prevent virus infection.

  20. Elicitation of strong immune responses by a DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 in murine and porcine animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Kang, H.N.; Babiuk, L.A.;

    2006-01-01

    . RESULTS: Intradermal injection of E2 DNA vaccine induced strong Th1-like immune responses in mice. In piglets, E2 DNA vaccine elicited moderate and more balanced immune responses. A DNA vaccine prime and protein boost vaccination, strategy induced significantly higher E2-specific antibody levels and...

  1. Depletion of T cell epitopes in lysostaphin mitigates anti-drug antibody response and enhances antibacterial efficacy in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongliang; Verma, Deeptak; Li, Wen; Choi, Yoonjoo; Ndong, Christian; Fiering, Steven N.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The enzyme lysostaphin possesses potent anti-staphylococcal activity and represents a promising antibacterial drug candidate; however, its immunogenicity poses a barrier to clinical translation. Here, structure-based biomolecular design enabled widespread depletion of lysostaphin’s DRB1*0401 restricted T cell epitopes, and resulting deimmunized variants exhibited striking reductions in anti-drug antibody responses upon administration to humanized HLA-transgenic mice. This reduced immunogenicity translated into improved efficacy in the form of protection against repeated challenges with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA. In contrast, while wild type lysostaphin was efficacious against the initial MRSA infection, it failed to clear subsequent bacterial challenges that were coincident with escalating anti-drug antibody titers. These results extend the existing deimmunization literature, in which reduced immunogenicity and retained efficacy are assessed independently of each other. By correlating in vivo efficacy with longitudinal measures of anti-drug antibody development, we provide the first direct evidence that T cell epitope depletion manifests enhanced biotherapeutic efficacy. PMID:26000749

  2. IgG and IgG subclasses antibody responses to rK39 in Leishmania donovani infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leishmania donovani infection cause a wide spectrum of human diseases ranging from self-healing subclinical infections to severe visceral leishmaniasis, post kal-azar dermal leishmaiasis, and mucosal leishmaiasis. The infection associated with high levels of anti-leishmania antibodies which offer a potential parameter for the serological diagnosis of L. donovani infection replacing the invasive parasitological methods. rK39, a cloned antigen of L. chagasis was reported to have high levels of anti-leishmania antibodies in Sudanese and American visceral leishmaniasis patients. In an assessment of rK39-ELISA in detecting L. donovani infection we found that the antigen detected visceral leishmaniasis, post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis, and mucosal leismaniasis with the sensitives of 96.6%, 95.91% and 90.91% respectively. The test has the specificity of 96.7%. Further investigation of 25 visceral leishmaniasis patients showed elevated anti-rK39 antibody responses of IgG subclasses with IgG1 and IgG3 significantly higher than IgG4. igG3 showed the highest sensitivity (84.00%) whereas IgG1 showed the highest sensitivity (100%). The dynamics of the serological reactivity to rK39 in l.donovani infections will be discussed in relation to exposure, infection, cure and relapse.(Author)

  3. Antibody-independent control of gamma-herpesvirus latency via B cell induction of anti-viral T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly B McClellan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available B cells can use antibody-dependent mechanisms to control latent viral infections. It is unknown whether this represents the sole function of B cells during chronic viral infection. We report here that hen egg lysozyme (HEL-specific B cells can contribute to the control of murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68 latency without producing anti-viral antibody. HEL-specific B cells normalized defects in T cell numbers and proliferation observed in B cell-/- mice during the early phase of gammaHV68 latency. HEL-specific B cells also reversed defects in CD8 and CD4 T cell cytokine production observed in B cell-/- mice, generating CD8 and CD4 T cells necessary for control of latency. Furthermore, HEL-specific B cells were able to present virally encoded antigen to CD8 T cells. Therefore, B cells have antibody independent functions, including antigen presentation, that are important for control of gamma-herpesvirus latency. Exploitation of this property of B cells may allow enhanced vaccine responses to chronic virus infection.

  4. Induction of protective neutralizing antibody responses against botulinum neurotoxin serotype C using plasmid carried by PLGA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwona, Tinashe B; Xu, Haiyue; Li, Junwei; Diaz-Arévalo, Diana; Kumar, Amit; Zeng, Mingtao; Cui, Zhengrong

    2016-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a lethal neurotoxin, for which there is currently not an approved vaccine. Recent efforts in developing vaccine candidates against botulism have been directed at the heavy chain fragment of BoNT, because antibodies against this region have been shown to prevent BoNT from binding to its receptor and thus to nerve cell surface, offering protection against BoNT intoxication. In the present study, it was shown that immunization with plasmid DNA that encodes the 50 KDa C-terminal fragment of the heavy chain of BoNT serotype C (i.e., BoNT/C-Hc50) and is carried by cationic poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles induces stronger BoNT/C-specific antibody responses, as compared to immunization with the plasmid alone. Importantly, the antibodies have BoNT/C-neutralizing activity, protecting the immunized mice from a lethal dose of BoNT/C challenge. A plasmid DNA vaccine encoding the Hc50 fragments of BoNT serotypes that cause human botulism may represent a viable vaccine candidate for protecting against botulinum neurotoxin intoxication. PMID:26837242

  5. Ultrarelativistic boost with scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svítek, O.; Tahamtan, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present the ultrarelativistic boost of the general global monopole solution which is parametrized by mass and deficit solid angle. The problem is addressed from two different perspectives. In the first one the primary object for performing the boost is the metric tensor while in the second one the energy momentum tensor is used. Since the solution is sourced by a triplet of scalar fields that effectively vanish in the boosting limit we investigate the behavior of a scalar field in a simpler setup. Namely, we perform the boosting study of the spherically symmetric solution with a free scalar field given by Janis, Newman and Winicour. The scalar field is again vanishing in the limit pointing to a broader pattern of scalar field behaviour during an ultrarelativistic boost in highly symmetric situations.

  6. Boosted Higgs channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In gluon fusion both a modified top Yukawa and new colored particles can alter the cross section. However in a large set of composite Higgs models and in realistic areas of the MSSM parameter space, these two effects can conspire and hide new physics in a Standard Model-like inclusive cross section. We first show that it is possible to break this degeneracy in the couplings by demanding a boosted Higgs recoiling against a high-pT jet. Subsequently we propose an analysis based on this idea in the H→2l+ET channels. This measurement allows an alternative determination of the important top Yukawa besides the t anti tH channel.

  7. Boosted Higgs shapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inclusive Higgs production rate through gluon fusion has been measured to be in agreement with the Standard Model (SM). We show that even if the inclusive Higgs production rate is very SM-like, a precise determination of the boosted Higgs transverse momentum shape offers the opportunity to see effects of natural new physics. These measurements are generically motivated by effective field theory arguments and specifically in extensions of the SM with a natural weak scale, like composite Higgs models and natural supersymmetry. We show in detail how a measurement at high transverse momentum of H→2l+pT via H→ττ and H→WW* could be performed and demonstrate that it offers a compelling alternative to the t anti tH channel. We discuss the sensitivity to new physics in the most challenging scenario of an exactly SM-like inclusive Higgs cross-section.

  8. Enhanced antibody responses to a detoxified lipopolysaccharide-group B meningococcal outer membrane protein vaccine are due to synergistic engagement of Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wilbur H; Basu, Subhendu; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Cross, Alan S

    2010-10-01

    When given passively or elicited actively, antibodies induced by a detoxified Escherichia coli Rc chemotype (J5) mutant lipopolysaccharide (J5dLPS)-group B meningococcal outer membrane protein (OMP) complex vaccine protected animals from lethal sepsis. The protection from sepsis is believed to be dependent on high levels of antibodies against the core glycolipid (CGL), a region of LPS that is rather conserved among Enterobacteriaceae. The addition of unmethylated deoxycytidyl-deoxyguanosine dinucleotide (CpG)-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) was used as an immuno-adjuvant to improve antibody responses. In preparation for a Phase I human trial, we elucidated potential contributions by which the sepsis vaccine (J5dLPS-OMP) and CpG ODN might enhance the antibody response and provide evidence that the generation of immune responses is Toll-like receptor (TLR) dependent. Toll-like receptor 2, TLR4, and TLR9 were each essential for generating robust cytokine and antibody responses. The signature cytokine of dendritic cells, interleukin-12, was one of the cytokines that demonstrated synergy with the optimal TLR ligand/ engagement combination. We conclude that the involvement of multiple TLRs upon immunization was critical for the generation of optimal antibody responses. These observations provide further evidence for the inclusion of innate immune-based adjuvants during the development of next-generation vaccines. PMID:19822632

  9. Protective antibody and CD8+ T-cell responses to the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induced by a nanoparticle vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Kaba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The worldwide burden of malaria remains a major public health problem due, in part, to the lack of an effective vaccine against the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. An effective vaccine will most likely require the induction of antigen specific CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells as well as long-lasting antibody responses all working in concert to eliminate the infection. We report here the effective modification of a self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN vaccine previously proven effective in control of a P. berghei infection in a rodent model to now present B- and T-cell epitopes of the human malaria parasite P. falciparum in a platform capable of being used in human subjects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To establish the basis for a SAPN-based vaccine, B- and CD8(+ T-cell epitopes from the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP and the universal CD4 T-helper epitope PADRE were engineered into a versatile small protein (∼125 amino acids that self-assembles into a spherical nanoparticle repetitively displaying the selected epitopes. P. falciparum epitope specific immune responses were evaluated in mice using a transgenic P. berghei malaria parasite of mice expressing the human malaria full-length P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (Tg-Pb/PfCSP. We show that SAPN constructs, delivered in saline, can induce high-titer, long-lasting (1 year protective antibody and poly-functional (IFNγ(+, IL-2(+ long-lived central memory CD8(+ T-cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these Ab or CD8(+ T-cells can independently provide sterile protection against a lethal challenge of the transgenic parasites. CONCLUSION: The SAPN construct induces long-lasting antibody and cellular immune responses to epitope specific sequences of the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP and prevents infection in mice by a transgenic P. berghei parasite displaying the full length PfCSP.

  10. Primary Immunization with a Triple Diphtheria-Tetanus-Whole Cell Pertussis Vaccine in Iranian Infants: An Analysis of Antibody Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarei Saeed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Universal vaccination of neonates and children against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis has had a tremendous impact on the control of these infectious diseases worldwide. Immunization by the triple diphtheria, tetanus and whole cell pertussis vaccine (DTwP has been applied in Iran for almost 50 years. Periodic assessment of immunogenicity of this vaccine is an important aspect of successful mass vaccination programs. The present study was performed to assess the antibody response against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis in a group of Iranian infants vaccinated with a local DTwP vaccine. In this prospective study, 330 infants received primary vaccination at 2, 4 and 6 months of age with DTwP vaccine manufactured by Razi Institute of Iran. Blood samples were taken 2-4 weeks after the third dose to assess seroprotection and geometric mean titers (GMT of specific antibodies. Among the 283 infants who completed the vaccination course, 98.2% and 100% developed antibodies against diphtheria and tetanus, respectively. The GMT of antibodies to tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, were 2.09 IU/ml, 2.08 IU/ml and 8.73 EU/ml, respectively. Comparison of the results obtained from this study with those from previous studies performed in other countries revealed a similar GMT and protection rates for diphtheria and tetanus components. In the absence of well-established serological criteria, judgment about protection rate against pertussis has not been possible. A prospective vaccination study using the local DTwP vaccine in parallel to a WHO approved standard vaccine, could enable assessment of immunogenicity of the pertussis component.

  11. Analysis of memory B cell responses and isolation of novel monoclonal antibodies with neutralizing breadth from HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Corti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that neutralize a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates and the characterization of the human neutralizing antibody B cell response to HIV-1 infection are important goals that are central to the design of an effective antibody-based vaccine. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We immortalized IgG(+ memory B cells from individuals infected with diverse clades of HIV-1 and selected on the basis of plasma neutralization profiles that were cross-clade and relatively potent. Culture supernatants were screened using various recombinant forms of the envelope glycoproteins (Env in multiple parallel assays. We isolated 58 mAbs that were mapped to different Env surfaces, most of which showed neutralizing activity. One mAb in particular (HJ16 specific for a novel epitope proximal to the CD4 binding site on gp120 selectively neutralized a multi-clade panel of Tier-2 HIV-1 pseudoviruses, and demonstrated reactivity that was comparable in breadth, but distinct in neutralization specificity, to that of the other CD4 binding site-specific neutralizing mAb b12. A second mAb (HGN194 bound a conserved epitope in the V3 crown and neutralized all Tier-1 and a proportion of Tier-2 pseudoviruses tested, irrespective of clade. A third mAb (HK20 with broad neutralizing activity, particularly as a Fab fragment, recognized a highly conserved epitope in the HR-1 region of gp41, but showed striking assay-dependent selectivity in its activity. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals that by using appropriate screening methods, a large proportion of memory B cells can be isolated that produce mAbs with HIV-1 neutralizing activity. Three of these mAbs show unusual breadth of neutralization and therefore add to the current panel of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies with potential for passive protection and template-based vaccine design.

  12. Detection of Illegitimate Emails using Boosting Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2011-01-01

    spam email detection. For our desired task, we have applied a boosting technique. With the use of boosting we can achieve high accuracy of traditional classification algorithms. When using boosting one has to choose a suitable weak learner as well as the number of boosting iterations. In this paper, we...... propose a Naive Bayes classifier as a suitable weak learner for the boosting algorithm. It achieves maximum performance with very few boosting iterations....

  13. Response of health care workers with isolated antibody to hepatitis B core antigen to hepatitis B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarakul, Supawadee; Eunumjitkul, Krissana; Vorapimol, Ar-Reerat; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Chimparlee, Nitinan; Poovorawan, Yong

    2011-07-01

    Isolated hepatitis B core antibody (antiHBc) without hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) or hepatitis B surface antibody (antiHBs) is found during routine screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) markers. Isolated antiHBc may indicate immunity against HBV or occult infection. To determine the immune response of health care workers (HCWs) with isolated antiHBc, HCWs were divided into two groups. A single dose of recombinant hepatitis B (HB) vaccine was administered to HCWs with isolated antiHBc (n = 36) and healthy HCWs (n = 20) seronegative for HBsAg, antiHBc and antiHBs. One month later, the subjects were tested for antiHBs. Twenty-one of 36 HCW (58.3%) in the antiHBc group had antiHBs, while only 1 of 20 HCW (5.0%) in the seronegative control group had a detectable antiHBs titer exceeding 10 mIU/ml. The antiHBs response in HCWs with antiHBc was significantly higher than in the seronegative group. The subjects' sera were tested for HBV DNA by nested PCR. Of those with antiHBc, 4 had detectable HBV DNA (occult HBV infection). None of these 4 responded to the vaccine. Therefore, the response elicited by a single dose of HB vaccine administered to patients with antiHBc may serve as an indicator of occult HBV infection. PMID:22299465

  14. Long-term anti-FVIII antibody response in Bethesda-negative haemophilia A patients receiving continuous replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintman, Jenny; Hillarp, Andreas; Berntorp, Erik; Astermark, Jan

    2013-11-01

    It has previously been shown that patients with haemophilia A may develop non-neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies (NNA) that escape detection by the Bethesda assay, but are detected using immune-based assays. We and others found NNAs to be directed not only towards non-functional parts of the protein, but towards all regions of the FVIII protein. We also showed a heterogeneous antibody response towards different FVIII products. However, the clinical relevance and the natural history of NNA remain unclear. Therefore, we followed a cohort of unrelated subjects with haemophilia A for 4 years with the goal of exploring the long-term development of NNA using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ten of 78 subjects (12·8%) exhibited an immune response that was transient and heterogeneous, and none of the subjects developed an FVIII inhibitor. The result of the ELISA was examined in relation to clinical variables and no significant associations between a positive ELISA and age, F8 mutation, port-à-cath implantation and HCV infection were shown. Interestingly, patients with NNA had significantly fewer bleeding episodes (P = 0·048) compared with NNA-negative subjects. The results indicate that the immune response to FVIII products within an individual may vary over time. However, the clinical impact of NNA remains unclear. PMID:24032553

  15. Development of a multiplexed fluorescent immunoassay for the quantitation of antibody responses to four Neisseria meningitidis serogroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Thomas B; Jaskowski, Troy D; Tebo, Anne; Hill, Harry R

    2009-03-15

    Neisseria meningitidis is a gram-negative bacterium causing disease world wide with a fatality rate of 5-10%. Five serogroups, A, B, C, Y and W-135 are responsible for virtually all cases of the disease in humans. We have developed a multiplexed assay for the simultaneous quantitation of IgG antibody responses to the four most immunogenic (A, C, Y, and W-135) N. meningitidis serogroups. A simple and less manipulative method was employed for conjugation of the capsular polysaccharide antigens to the microspheres. The multiplex assay compared well with traditional individual ELISAs, but demonstrated greater than 1 log increase in dynamic range and sensitivity. Specificity studies of the multiplex assay showed greater than 95% homologous inhibition and less than 5% heterologous inhibition for all four serogroups. Intra and inter-assay CVs were generally less than 10% and the limit of detection was <600 pg/ml. The multiplexed assay proved to be reproducible as well as specific and sensitive when compared to the standardized ELISAs. Advantages included a greater dynamic range and simultaneous detection of antibody responses to the four serogroups contained in the tetravalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine. PMID:19159627

  16. Anti-B7-H3 monoclonal antibody ameliorates the damage of acute experimental pancreatitis by attenuating the inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaohui; Shen, Jiaqing; Jia, Zhengyu; Wu, Airong; Xu, Ting; Shi, Yuqi; Xu, Chunfang

    2016-06-01

    B7-H3, a recently discovered B7 family member, is documented as a regulator in the inflammatory response as well as T cell-mediated immune responses. In this paper, we find that patients with acute pancreatitis revealed overwhelming levels of serum soluble B7-H3 (sB7-H3) associated with the clinical outcomes. Furthermore, B7-H3 protein was marked increased in l-arginine-induced acute experimental pancreatitis. Anti-B7-H3 monoclonal antibody treatment attenuated the proinflammatory cytokine production, downregulated the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and ameliorated the pancreas disruption in l-arginine-induced pancreatitis. In addition, although l-arginine alone failed to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokine and anti-B7-H3 mAb had no effect on the proinflammatory cytokine production of acinar cells, administration of anti-B7-H3 mAb in the coculture model of acinar cells and macrophages stimulated by l-arginine displayed the similar effects. On the whole, B7-H3 participates in the development of acute pancreatitis, and anti-B7-H3 monoclonal antibody ameliorates severity of acute experimental pancreatitis via attenuation of the inflammatory response. PMID:27003113

  17. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of antipolysaccharide antibody specificity: responses to meningococcal group C conjugate vaccines and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ojeda, Pablo A; Hardy, Sharon; Kozlowski, Steven; Stein, Kathryn E; Feavers, Ian M

    2004-06-01

    Antibody (Ab) responses to polysaccharides (PS), such as Neisseria meningitidis group C PS (MCPS), are characterized as being thymus independent and are restricted with regard to clonotype and isotype expression. PS conjugated to proteins, e.g., MCPS coupled with tetanus toxoid or the diphtheria toxin derivative CRM197, elicit thymus-dependent responses. The present study developed a surface plasmon resonance approach to evaluate Ab responses to MCPS conjugate vaccines, including either O-acetylated (OAc+) or de-O-acetylated (OAc-) forms of the PS. The results were generally consistent with those obtained by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and showed that sera from mice immunized with conjugate vaccines contain Abs that bind more effectively to OAc+ and OAc- MCPS than sera from mice immunized with fixed bacteria. The data suggest a critical shared or overlapping epitope recognized by all the conjugate vaccine immune sera and strategies for assessing polyclonal Ab avidity. PMID:15155652

  18. In vivo and in vitro study of the primary and secondary antibody response to a bacterial antigen in aged mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Borghesi, C.; Nicoletti, C.

    1995-01-01

    One of the most important manifestations of aging in both humans and laboratory animals is a gradual decline in immune effectiveness. However, it is not clear as to how general is this decline. We here report that aged BALB/c mice showed no decline in the magnitude of the in vivo primary antibody response to phosphorylcholine (PC), an immunodominant epitope of the Streptococcus pneumoniae R36a (Pn). Often it appeared that aged mice responded better than young syngeneic mice. In contrast, the ...

  19. Assessment of Antibody Responses in Local and Immigrant Residents of Areas with Autochthonous Malaria Transmission in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Piperaki, Evangelia-Theofano; Mavrouli, Maria; Tseroni, Maria; Routsias, John; Kallimani, Athina; Veneti, Lamprini; Georgitsou, Maria; Chania, Maria; Georgakopoulou, Theano; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2015-01-01

    Greece has been officially malaria free since 1974. However, from 2009 to 2012, several locally acquired, cases of Plasmodium vivax malaria were detected, in immigrants and in Greek citizens. In this study, the antibody (Ab) response of Greeks and immigrants with documented malaria was initially assessed, followed by an Ab screening of Greeks and immigrant residents of local transmission areas. Of the 38 patients tested, 10.5% of Greeks and 15.7% of immigrants were positive 5–7 months after i...

  20. Methylprednisolone does not restore biological response in multiple sclerosis patients with neutralizing antibodies against interferon-beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, D; Frederiksen, J L; Koch-Henriksen, N;

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) appearing during treatment with Interferon-beta (IFN-beta) reduce or abolish bioactivity and therapeutic efficacy. Initial combination therapy with methylprednisolone (MP) may reduce the frequency of NAb positive patients. We hypothesized that...... Resistance Protein A (MxA) mRNA induction in whole blood using real time PCR. Results: At the end of study, median NAb NC was 92% in both groups. Eight patients (21%) in the MP group and four patients (11%) in the control group had regained an in vivo MxA response to IFN-beta (P = 0.35). Conclusions: Monthly...

  1. Vaccination against encapsulated bacteria in hereditary C2 deficiency results in antibody response and opsonization due to antibody-dependent complement activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Jönsson, Göran; Lood, Christian; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Holmström, Eva M; Selander, Barbro; Braconier, Jean Henrik; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Bengtsson, Anders; Truedsson, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary C2 deficiency (C2D) is an important susceptibility factor for invasive infections caused by encapsulated bacteria such as pneumococci and Haemophilus influenzae type b. The infections are mostly seen in childhood indicating that antibody-mediated acquired immunity is affected. C2D persons and healthy controls were vaccinated with ActHIB® and Pneumo23®. Analysis of specific antibodies to pneumococci serotype 6B, 7F, and 23F, and Hib was performed. Post-vaccination IgG antibodies aga...

  2. Elicitation of broadly neutralizing influenza antibodies in animals with previous influenza exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chih-Jen; Yassine, Hadi M; McTamney, Patrick M; Gall, Jason G D; Whittle, James R R; Boyington, Jeffrey C; Nabel, Gary J

    2012-08-15

    The immune system responds to influenza infection by producing neutralizing antibodies to the viral surface protein, hemagglutinin (HA), which regularly changes its antigenic structure. Antibodies that target the highly conserved stem region of HA neutralize diverse influenza viruses and can be elicited through vaccination in animals and humans. Efforts to develop universal influenza vaccines have focused on strategies to elicit such antibodies; however, the concern has been raised that previous influenza immunity may abrogate the induction of such broadly protective antibodies. We show here that prime-boost immunization can induce broadly neutralizing antibody responses in influenza-immune mice and ferrets that were previously infected or vaccinated. HA stem-directed antibodies were elicited in mice primed with a DNA vaccine and boosted with inactivated vaccine from H1N1 A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (1999 NC) HA regardless of preexposure. Similarly, gene-based vaccination with replication-defective adenovirus 28 (rAd28) and 5 (rAd5) vectors encoding 1999 NC HA elicited stem-directed neutralizing antibodies and conferred protection against unmatched 1934 and 2007 H1N1 virus challenge in influenza-immune ferrets. Indeed, previous exposure to certain strains could enhance immunogenicity: The strongest HA stem-directed immune response was observed in ferrets previously infected with a divergent 1934 H1N1 virus. These findings suggest that broadly neutralizing antibodies against the conserved stem region of HA can be elicited through vaccination despite previous influenza exposure, which supports the feasibility of developing stem-directed universal influenza vaccines for humans. PMID:22896678

  3. Evaluation of Antibody Responses Elicited by Immunization of Mice with a Pneumococcal Antigen Genetically Fused to Murine HSP70 and Murine Interleukin-4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dennis O. GOR; Salamatu S. MAMBULA

    2006-01-01

    The heat shock (stress) protein HSP70 has been shown to be a potent stimulator of cellular immune responses. In order to determine whether HSP70 has the ability to stimulate antibody responses, we constructed and expressed fusion proteins consisting of murine HSP70 or murine interleukin (IL)-4 covalently linked to a pneumococcal cell wall-associated protein antigen designated PpmA. Immunization of mice with the PpmA-HSP70 fusion protein (PpmA-70) failed to elicit an increased PpmA-specific serum antibody response. In contrast, mice immunized with PpmA fused to IL-4 (PpmA-IL4), or PpmA fused to both IL-4 and HSP70 (PpmA-IL4-70) fusion proteins elicited high levels of PpmA-specific antibody responses.These data suggest that HSP70 has a limited capacity to stimulate immune responses to heterologous antigens in vivo.

  4. Intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate the serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Masato; Hosono, Akira; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Kihara-Fujioka, Miran; Hachimura, Satoshi; Itoh, Kikuji; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2010-08-16

    Colonization of the gut by commensal bacteria modulates the induction of oral tolerance and allergy. However, how these intestinal bacteria modulate antigen-specific T cell responses induced by oral antigens remains unclear. In order to investigate this, we used germ-free (GF) ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor transgenic (OVA23-3) mice. Conventional (CV) or GF mice were administered an OVA-containing diet. Cytokine production by CD4(+) cells from spleen (SP), mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) was evaluated by ELISA, as was the peripheral antibody titer. T cell phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry. CD4(+) cells from the SP and MLN of CV and GF mice fed an OVA diet for 3 weeks produced significantly less IL-2 than the corresponding cells from mice receiving a control diet, suggesting that oral tolerance could be induced at the T cell level in the systemic and intestinal immune systems of both bacterial condition of mice. However, we also observed that the T cell hyporesponsiveness induced by dietary antigen was delayed in the systemic immune tissues and was weaker in the intestinal immune tissues of the GF mice. Intestinal MLN and PP CD4(+) T cells from these animals also produced lower levels of IL-10, had less activated/memory type CD45RB(low) cells, and expressed lower levels of CTLA-4 but not Foxp3 compared to their CV counterparts. Furthermore, GF mice produced higher serum levels of OVA-specific antibodies than CV animals. CD40L expression by SP CD4(+) cells from GF mice fed OVA was higher than that of CV mice. These results suggest that intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigens through modulation of the intestinal and systemic T cell phenotype. PMID:20621647

  5. Species-specific antibody responses to the recombinant 53-kilodalton excretory and secretory proteins in mice infected with Trichinella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Isao; Wu, Zhiliang; Takahashi, Yuzo

    2008-03-01

    The 53-kDa proteins in larval excretory and secretory (E-S) products were expressed from five Trichinella species (T. spiralis, T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, and T. papuae), using the Escherichia coli expression system, and the antibody responses to the 53-kDa recombinant proteins in mice infected with Trichinella spp. were analyzed by Western blotting. The 53-kDa protein is conserved among the five Trichinella species, with >60% similarity in amino acid sequences. The 53-kDa recombinant proteins of T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis reacted to sera from mice infected with T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis at 8 days postinfection (p.i.), respectively. An antibody against the 53-kDa recombinant protein of T. spiralis recognized the 53-kDa protein in the crude extracts from adult worms and 30-day p.i. muscle larvae and E-S products from muscle larvae of T. spiralis but did not recognize any proteins from T. pseudospiralis. The sera from the mice infected with T. spiralis strongly reacted with the 53-kDa recombinant protein of T. spiralis but did not react with the 53-kDa recombinant proteins of T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, and T. papuae. Similarly, the sera from mice infected with T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, or T. papuae strongly reacted with the 53-kDa recombinant proteins of T. britovi, T. nativa, T. pseudospiralis, or T. papuae, respectively. These results showed that the 53-kDa recombinant proteins provide early and species-specific antibody responses in mice infected with Trichinella spp. PMID:18184826

  6. Screening Response to Hepatitis C Virus Antibodies among Diabetic Patients Attending UITH Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Ndako

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have suggested that hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a risk factor for the development of diabetes mellitus (DM type 2; hence this study was carried out to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis C Virus (HCV among diabetic patients attending University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH. A total number of one hundred and eighty diabetic patients made up of seventy five males (41.7% and one hundred and five females (58.3% were recruited for the study. Structured questionnaire on demographic data and risk factors for HCV was administered to the participants. The sera of all the subjects were assayed for antibodies to HCV using a fourth generation enzyme linked immunosorbent Assay [Forte Diagnostic Limited], All the sera were tested for antibodies to Hepatitis C virus by ELISA method. The overall prevalence of HCV infection among diabetic patients was 5.0%. Of the nine participants’ positive for anti-HCV antibodies, three were males (1.7% while six were females (3.3%. Although more female attended the diabetic clinic, there was no significant difference between HCV infection and sex (p = 0.603; p>0.05. The prevalence of HCV infection was highest in the 40-60 age categories. Two of the seropositive individuals had elevated transaminases, with one of the two being an alcoholic consumer. Type 2 diabetes is a debilitating disease condition especially in individuals above 30 years of age, with these scenario it has become very vital for screening exercise to be carried out so as to determine the prevalence rate of HCV among diabetic patient.

  7. The strength of the antibody response to the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides inversely correlates with levels of B-Cell Activating Factor (BAFF)

    OpenAIRE

    Bornacelly, Adriana; Mercado, Dilia; Acevedo, Nathalie; Caraballo, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Background B-Cell Activating Factor (BAFF) is a cytokine regulating antibody production. Polymorphisms in the gene encoding BAFF were associated with the antibody response to Ascaris but not to mite allergens. In the present study we evaluated the relationship between BAFF and specific antibodies against Ascaris and mites in 448 controls and 448 asthmatics. Soluble BAFF was measured by ELISA and BAFF mRNA by qPCR. Surface expression of BAFF and its receptor (BAFF-R) was analyzed by flow cytom...

  8. Suppression of in vivo polyclonal IgE responses by monoclonal antibody to the lymphokine B-cell stimulatory factor 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Finkelman, F D; Katona, I M; Urban, J F; Snapper, C M; Ohara, J; Paul, W E

    1986-01-01

    The lymphokine B-cell stimulatory factor 1 (BSF-1) has been shown to greatly enhance the differentiation of lipopolysaccharide-activated B cells into IgG1- and IgE-secreting cells in vitro. To determine whether in vivo IgG1 and IgE antibody responses are BSF-1 dependent, the ability of a monoclonal rat IgG1 anti-BSF-1 antibody, 11B11, to affect polyclonal IgG1 and IgE production in mice infected with the nematode parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis or injected with a purified goat antibody ...

  9. Physics with boosted top quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Kuutmann, Elin Bergeaas

    2014-01-01

    The production at the LHC of boosted top quarks (top quarks with a transverse momentum that greatly exceeds their rest mass) is a promising process to search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model. In this contribution several examples are discussed of new techniques to reconstruct and identify (tag) the collimated decay topology of the boosted hadronic decays of top quarks. Boosted top reconstruction techniques have been utilized in searches for new physical phenomena. An overview is given of searches by ATLAS, CDF and CMS for heavy new particles decaying into a top and an anti-top quark, vector-like quarks and supersymmetric partners to the top quark.

  10. Regulation of B Cell Differentiation by Intracellular Membrane-Associated Proteins and microRNAs: Role in the Antibody Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Zheng; Casali, Paolo; Xu, Zhenming

    2015-01-01

    B cells are central to adaptive immunity and their functions in antibody responses are exquisitely regulated. As suggested by recent findings, B cell differentiation is mediated by intracellular membrane structures (including endosomes, lysosomes, and autophagosomes) and protein factors specifically associated with these membranes, including Rab7, Atg5, and Atg7. These factors participate in vesicle formation/trafficking, signal transduction and induction of gene expression to promote antigen presentation, class switch DNA recombination (CSR)/somatic hypermutation (SHM), and generation/maintenance of plasma cells and memory B cells. Their expression is induced in B cells activated to differentiate and further fine-tuned by immune-modulating microRNAs, which coordinates CSR/SHM, plasma cell differentiation, and memory B cell differentiation. These short non-coding RNAs would individually target multiple factors associated with the same intracellular membrane compartments and collaboratively target a single factor in addition to regulating AID and Blimp-1. These, together with regulation of microRNA biogenesis and activities by endosomes and autophagosomes, show that intracellular membranes and microRNAs, two broadly relevant cell constituents, play important roles in balancing gene expression to specify B cell differentiation processes for optimal antibody responses. PMID:26579118

  11. CD45/CD8 myeloid histioid antigen and plasma cell antibody immune response in a case of malignant melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu-Velez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune response in metastatic melanoma is not well established and therefore is of particular interest to test for recruitment of immune cells to the tumor. A 46-year-old Caucasian female was evaluated for an asymptomatic right forearm mass. The lesion had been present for at least 4 years and had become painful 4 months ago. Biopsies for hematoxylin and eosin (H and E staining, as well as immunohistochemical analysis were performed on the primary tumor and on sentinel lymph nodes. The H and E staining was consistent with metastatic melanoma. Positive staining was noted on the tumor cells with S-100, Mart-1/Melan A/CD63, PNL2, HMB45, and tyrosinase. Peritumoral and intratumoral inflammatory cells stained positive for CD8, CD45, PCNA, myeloid histoid antigen, antihuman plasma cell antibody, and focal BRCA1. The staining patterns of CD8/CD45, myeloid histoid antigen and plasma cell antibody on inflammatory cells around the melanoma cells suggest an unusual type of immune response.

  12. Regulation of B cell differentiation by intracellular membrane associated proteins and microRNAs: role in the antibody response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eLou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available B cells are central to adaptive immunity and their functions in antibody responses are exquisitely regulated. As suggested by recent findings, B cell differentiation is mediated by intracellular membrane structures (including endosomes, lysosomes and autophagosomes and protein factors specifically associated with these membranes, including Rab7, Atg5 and Atg7. These factors participate in vesicle formation/trafficking, signal transduction and induction of gene expression to promote antigen presentation, CSR/SHM, and generation/maintenance of plasma cells and memory B cells. Their expression is induced in B cells activated to differentiate and further fine-tuned by immune-modulating microRNAs, which coordinates CSR/SHM, plasma cell differentiation and memory B cell differentiation. These short non-coding RNAs would individually target multiple factors associated with the same intracellular membrane compartments and collaboratively target a single factor in addition to regulate AID and Blimp-1. These, together with regulation of microRNA biogenesis and activities by endosomes and autophagosomes, show that intracellular membranes and microRNAs, two broadly relevant cell constituents, play important roles in balancing gene expression to specify B cell differentiation processes for optimal antibody responses.

  13. The Early Protective Thymus-Independent Antibody Response to Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Is Mediated by Splenic CD9+ B Lymphocytes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrowski, Matias; Vermeulen, Monica; Zabal, Osvaldo; Zamorano, Patricia I; Sadir, Ana M; Jorge R. Geffner; Lopez, Osvaldo J.

    2007-01-01

    Infection of mice with cytopathic foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) induces a rapid and specific thymus-independent (TI) neutralizing antibody response that promptly clears the virus. Herein, it is shown that FMDV-infected dendritic cells (DCs) directly stimulate splenic innate-like CD9+ B lymphocytes to rapidly (3 days) produce neutralizing anti-FMDV immunoglobulin M antibodies without T-lymphocyte collaboration. In contrast, neither follicular (CD9−) B lymphocytes from the spleen nor B ly...

  14. Antibody Responses in Patients with Staphylococcal Septicemia against Two Staphylococcus aureus Fibrinogen Binding Proteins: Clumping Factor and an Extracellular Fibrinogen Binding Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Colque-Navarro, Patricia; Palma, Marco; Söderquist, Bo; Flock, Jan-Ingmar; Möllby, Roland

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the serum antibody responses against two Staphylococcus aureus fibrinogen binding proteins, the cell-bound clumping factor (Clf) and an extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb). The material consisted of 105 consecutive serum samples from 41 patients suffering from S. aureus septicemia and 72 serum samples from healthy individuals. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed. Healthy individuals showed variable levels of antibodies against the studied antigens...

  15. Lacto-N-fucopentaose III (Lewis x), a target of the antibody response in mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni.

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, D.; Incani, R N; Harn, D A

    1996-01-01

    Carbohydrates on soluble egg antigens are major epitopes for the antibody responses of patients and mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Recently, protective sera of mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae were shown to recognize carbohydrate epitopes on schistosomal glutathione S-transferase. The present study demonstrates that carbohydrate epitopes are major targets of sera from C57BL/6J and CBA/J mice vaccinated with 15- or 50-kilorad-irradiated cercariae of S. mansoni. Antibody titer...

  16. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines Resposta imune humoral anti-rábica em bovinos imunizados com vacina inativada e atenuada

    OpenAIRE

    Andréa de Cássia RODRIGUES da SILVA; Caporale, Graciane Maria Medeiros; GONÇALVES Celso Alberto; TARGUETA Mosar Couteiro; Fabiano COMIN; Carlos Roberto ZANETTI; Kotait, Ivanete

    2000-01-01

    Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac) and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac) vaccine. The antibody ti...

  17. Seroprevalence of antibodies to measles, mumps, and rubella, and serologic responses after vaccination among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infected adults in Northern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Chaiwarith, Romanee; Praparattanapan, Jutarat; Nuket, Khanuengnit; Kotarathitithum, Wilai; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai

    2016-01-01

    Background After the global implementation of national immunization programs for prevention of measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR), the prevalences of protective antibodies to these viruses are high in general population. However, there are limited data among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infected individuals. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of antibodies to these viruses, and the serologic responses after vaccination among HIV-infected adults in Northern Thailand. Metho...

  18. Interplay of foot-and-mouth disease virus, antibodies and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: virus opsonization under non-neutralizing conditions results in enhanced interferon-alpha responses

    OpenAIRE

    Lannes Nils; Python Sylvie; Summerfield Artur

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly infectious member of the Picornaviridae inducing an acute disease of cloven-hoofed species. Vaccine-induced immune protection correlates with the presence of high levels of neutralizing antibodies but also opsonising antibodies have been proposed as an important mechanism of the immune response contributing to virus clearance by macrophages and leading to the production of type-I interferon (IFN) by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). T...

  19. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Thyroid Antibodies Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Thyroid Autoantibodies; Antithyroid Antibodies; Antimicrosomal Antibody; Thyroid Microsomal Antibody; ...

  20. Resistant metastatic penile carcinoma and response to biochemotherapy with paclitaxel and epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody, nimotuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma penis is one of the common malignancies in developing world especially among rural population. Multimodality treatment with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy for advanced penile carcinoma with groin nodal metastasis is crucial to optimise the outcome. Cisplatin, fluorouracil, methotrexate, vinorelbine, bleomycin and paclitaxel are the common chemotherapeutic agents used along with local therapy. Paucity of data to show superiority of one chemotherapeutic regime over another and only modest response to any combination chemotherapy. Progression of disease after surgery, radiation and chemotherapy is associated with poor outcome and quality of life. Nimotuzumab, Anti EGFR monoclonal antibody, along with paclitaxel in our case of resistant metastatic penile carcinoma has shown good symptomatic palliation and clinical response.

  1. Triiodothyronine improves the primary antibody response to sheep red blood cells in severely undernourished weanling mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three experiments were conducted in which weanling mice were fed a nutritionally complete diet either ad libitum or in restricted quantities such that they lost about 30% of their initial weight over a 14-day period. In Experiments 1 and 2, half the animals from each group received dietary triiodothyronine (T3) supplements. In Experiment 3, food-intake-restricted mice were fed graded levels of potassium iodide. Malnutrition reduced the number of nucleated cells per spleen, the number of splenic IgG plaque-forming cells (PFC) per 106 cells, and the serum antibody titers against sheep red blood cells as determined by radioimmunoassay. T3 supplements increased antibody titers, the number of nucleated cells per spleen, and both IgM and IgG PFC per 106 spleen cells in malnourished mice, but had no effect on well-nourished mice. The beneficial effect of T3 was not a result of improved protein, energy, or iodine status in the malnourished mice

  2. Merozoite surface protein 2 allelic variation influences the specific antibody response during acute malaria in individuals from a Brazilian endemic area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Sallenave-Sales

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The antibody response to Plasmodium falciparum parasites of naturally infected population is critical to elucidate the role of polymorphic alleles in malaria. Thus, we evaluated the impact of antigenic diversity of repetitive and family dimorphic domains of the merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP-2 on immune response of 96 individuals living in Peixoto de Azevedo (MT-Brazil, by ELISA using recombinant MSP-2 proteins. The majority of these individuals were carrying FC27-type infections. IgG antibody responses were predominantly directed to FC27 parasites and were correlated to the extension of polymorphism presented by each MSP-2 region. This finding demonstrated the impact of the genetic polymorphism on antibody response and therefore, its importance on malaria vaccine efficacy.

  3. A longitudinal study of human antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum rhoptry-associated protein 1 in a region of seasonal and unstable malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonjungo, P N; Elhassan, I M; Cavanagh, D R; Theander, T G; Hviid, L; Roper, C; Arnot, D E; McBride, J S

    1999-01-01

    Rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP1) of Plasmodium falciparum is a nonpolymorphic merozoite antigen that is considered a potential candidate for a malaria vaccine against asexual blood stages. In this longitudinal study, recombinant RAP1 (rRAP1) proteins with antigenicity similar to that of P....... falciparum-derived RAP1 were used to analyze antibody responses to RAP1 over a period of 4 years (1991 to 1995) of 53 individuals naturally exposed to P. falciparum malaria. In any 1 year during the study, between 23 and 39% of individuals who had malaria developed immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies...... a few months after the end of malaria transmission, during the dry season, or by the start of the next malaria season. Thus, RAP1 IgG responses were very short-lived. The short duration of RAP1 antibody response may explain the apparent lack of response in a surprisingly high proportion of...

  4. Kinetics of antibody response in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice bitten by Phlebotomus papatasi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Vlkova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phlebotomine sand flies are blood-sucking insects transmitting Leishmania parasites. In bitten hosts, sand fly saliva elicits specific immune response and the humoral immunity was shown to reflect the intensity of sand fly exposure. Thus, anti-saliva antibodies were suggested as the potential risk marker of Leishmania transmission. In this study, we examined the long-term kinetics and persistence of anti-Phlebotomus papatasi saliva antibody response in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We also tested the reactivity of mice sera with P. papatasi salivary antigens and with the recombinant proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sera of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice experimentally bitten by Phlebotomus papatasi were tested by ELISA for the presence of anti-saliva IgE, IgG and its subclasses. We detected a significant increase of specific IgG and IgG1 in both mice strains and IgG2b in BALB/c mice that positively correlated with the number of blood-fed P. papatasi females. Using western blot and mass spectrometry we identified the major P. papatasi antigens as Yellow-related proteins, D7-related proteins, antigen 5-related proteins and SP-15-like proteins. We therefore tested the reactivity of mice sera with four P. papatasi recombinant proteins coding for most of these potential antigens (PpSP44, PpSP42, PpSP30, and PpSP28. Each mouse serum reacted with at least one of the recombinant protein tested, although none of the recombinant proteins were recognized by all sera. CONCLUSIONS: Our data confirmed the concept of using anti-sand fly saliva antibodies as a marker of sand fly exposure in Phlebotomus papatasi-mice model. As screening of specific antibodies is limited by the availability of salivary gland homogenate, utilization of recombinant proteins in such studies would be beneficial. Our present work demonstrates the feasibility of this implementation. A combination of recombinant salivary proteins is recommended for evaluation of intensity of

  5. Acute sleep deprivation has no lasting effects on the human antibody titer response following a novel influenza A H1N1 virus vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental studies in humans have yielded evidence that adaptive immune function, including the production of antigen-specific antibodies, is distinctly impaired when sleep is deprived at the time of first antigen exposure. Here we examined the effects of a regular 24- hour sleep-wake cycle (including 8 hours of nocturnal sleep and a 24-hour period of continuous wakefulness on the 7-week antibody production in 11 males and 13 females in response to the H1N1 (swine flu virus vaccination. The specific antibody titer in serum was assayed by the hemagglutination inhibition test on the days 5, 10, 17, and 52 following vaccination. Results In comparison to the sleep group, sleep-deprived males but not females had reduced serum concentration of H1N1-specific antibodies five days after vaccination, whereas antibody titers at later time points did not differ between the conditions. Conclusions These findings concur with the notion that sleep is a supportive influence in the very early stage of an adaptive immune response to a viral antigen. However, our results do not support the view that acute sleep deprivation has lasting effects on the human antibody titer response to influenza vaccination.

  6. Immune Response to Recombinant Capsid Proteins of Adenovirus in Humans: Antifiber and Anti-Penton Base Antibodies Have a Synergistic Effect on Neutralizing Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahéry-Ségard, Hanne; Farace, Françoise; Godfrin, Dominique; Gaston, Jesintha; Lengagne, Renée; Tursz, Thomas; Boulanger, Pierre; Guillet, Jean-Gérard

    1998-01-01

    Replication-deficient adenovirus used in humans for gene therapy induces a strong immune response to the vector, resulting in transient recombinant protein expression and the blocking of gene transfer upon a second administration. Therefore, in this study we examined in detail the capsid-specific humoral immune response in sera of patients with lung cancer who had been given one dose of a replication-defective adenovirus. We analyzed the immune response to the three major components of the viral capsid, hexon (Hx), penton base (Pb), and fiber (Fi). A longitudinal study of the humoral response assayed on adenovirus particle-coated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates showed that patients had preexisting immunity to adenovirus prior to the administration of adenovirus–β-gal. The level of the response increased in three patients after adenovirus administration and remained at a maximum after three months. One patient had a strong immune response to adenovirus prior to treatment, and this response was unaffected by adenovirus administration. Sera collected from the patients were assayed for recognition of each individual viral capsid protein to determine more precisely the molecular basis of the humoral immune response. Clear differences existed in the humoral response to the three major components of the viral capsid in serum from humans. Sequential appearance of these antibodies was observed: anti-Fi antibodies appeared first, followed by anti-Pb antibodies and then by anti-Hx antibodies. Moreover, anti-Fi antibodies preferentially recognized the native trimeric form of Fi protein, suggesting that they recognized conformational epitopes. Our results showed that sera with no neutralizing activity contained only anti-Fi antibodies. In contrast, neutralizing activity was only obtained with sera containing anti-Fi and anti-Pb antibodies. More importantly, we showed that anti-native Fi and anti-Pb antibodies had a synergistic effect on neutralization. The

  7. Low-dose immunization with adenovirus expressing the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor A-subunit deviates the antibody response toward that of autoantibodies in human Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Rong; Pichurin, Pavel; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D; Aliesky, Holly; Nagayama, Yuji; McLachlan, Sandra M; Rapoport, Basil

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with adenovirus expressing the TSH receptor (TSHR) induces hyperthyroidism in 25-50% of mice. Even more effective is immunization with a TSHR A-subunit adenovirus (65-84% hyperthyroidism). Nevertheless, TSHR antibody characteristics in these mice do not mimic accurately those of autoantibodies in typical Graves' patients, with a marked TSH-blocking antibody response. We hypothesized that this suboptimal antibody response was consequent to the standard dose of TSHR-adenovirus providing too great an immune stimulus. To test this hypothesis, we compared BALB/c mice immunized with the usual number (10(11)) and with far fewer viral particles (10(9) and 10(7)). Regardless of viral dose, hyperthyroidism developed in a similar proportion (68-80%) of mice. We then examined the qualitative nature of TSHR antibodies in each group. Sera from all mice had TSH binding-inhibitory (TBI) activity after the second immunization, with TBI values in proportion to the viral dose. After the third injection, all groups had near-maximal TBI values. Remarkably, in confirmation of our hypothesis, immunization with progressively lower viral doses generated TSHR antibodies approaching the characteristics of autoantibodies in human Graves' disease as follows: 1) lower TSHR antibody titers on ELISA and 2) lower TSH-blocking antibody activity without decrease in thyroid-stimulating antibody activity. In summary, low-dose immunization with adenovirus expressing the free TSHR A-subunit provides an induced animal model with a high prevalence of hyperthyroidism as well as TSHR antibodies more closely resembling autoantibodies in Graves' disease. PMID:14576177

  8. Distribution-Specific Agnostic Boosting

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, Vitaly

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of boosting the accuracy of weak learning algorithms in the agnostic learning framework of Haussler (1992) and Kearns et al. (1992). Known algorithms for this problem (Ben-David et al., 2001; Gavinsky, 2002; Kalai et al., 2008) follow the same strategy as boosting algorithms in the PAC model: the weak learner is executed on the same target function but over different distributions on the domain. We demonstrate boosting algorithms for the agnostic learning framework that only modify the distribution on the labels of the points (or, equivalently, modify the target function). This allows boosting a distribution-specific weak agnostic learner to a strong agnostic learner with respect to the same distribution. When applied to the weak agnostic parity learning algorithm of Goldreich and Levin (1989) our algorithm yields a simple PAC learning algorithm for DNF and an agnostic learning algorithm for decision trees over the uniform distribution using membership queries. These results substantia...

  9. Rosacea Might Boost Parkinson's Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157883.html Rosacea Might Boost Parkinson's Risk: Study Research found an association, but did ... may be linked to an increased risk for Parkinson's disease, a large, new study suggests. Among more ...

  10. Respons Antibodi terhadap Penyakit Tetelo pada Ayam yang Divaksin Tetelo dan Tetelo-Flu Burung (NEWCASTLE DISEASE/ND ANTIBODY RESPONSE OF CHICKENS VACCINATED WITH ND SINGLE AND COMBINED ND AND AVIAN INFLUENZA VACCINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Ayu Yuniati Kencana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate antibody response of specific pathogen-free (SPF chickens vaccinatedwith single inactivated Newcastle disease (ND vaccine and combined inactive ND and avian influenza(AI vaccines and to known the efficacy of both vaccines. The vaccines used were killed ND vaccine andkilled ND-AI vaccine produced by PT. Sanbio Laboratories Bogor, West Java. SPF chickens were vaccinatedwith 3 different doses. Antibody titer of SPF chickens against ND virus were determined byhaemagglutination inhibition (HI test. As many as 130 two week old SPF chickens were used and theywere divided into 2 groups (A and B consisting of 60 chickens and 10 chickens were used as control withoutvaccine. Group A chickens were vaccinated with ND-K vaccine and group B were vaccinated with combinedkilled ND-AI vaccines. Each group was further divided into 3 subsgroups (1, 2 and 3 consisting 20 chickens.Subgroups 1, 2 and 3 were vaccinated intramuscularly respectively with intramuskular 1, 1/10 and 1/100doses of each vaccines. Antibody response of chickens against ND virus was examined before vaccinationand every three week after vaccination and was expresses as geometric mean titre (GMT HI units. Theresult showed that the titre antibody against ND increased at the second week following the vaccination.The antibody titer against ND virus of chickens vaccinated single killed ND at the second week in eachdose were 6.05 GMT HI unit, 4.05 GMT HI unit, and 0.9 GMT HI unit. The antibody titre at the third week were 7.90 GMT HI unit ,5.40 GMT HI unit and 2.20 GMT HI unit. The antibody titre against ND virus ofchickens vaccinated with combined ND-AI vaccine at the second week were 6.30 GMT HI unit , 4.15 GMTHI unit , and 2.05 GMT HI unit. At the third week, the antibody titre against ND virus of chickensvaccinated with combined ND-AI vaccine in each subgroup were 7.45 GMT HI unit, 5.60 GMT HI unit , and2.40 GMT HI unit . It showed that the antibody titers

  11. Serum Antibody Response to Koala Retrovirus Antigens Varies in Free-Ranging Koalas ( Phascolarctos cinereus ) in Australia: Implications for Vaccine Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Courtney; Gillett, Amber; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter

    2016-04-28

    Little is known about the immune response in the koala ( Phascolarctos cinereus ) to its retroviruses. Koala retroviruses (KoRVs) have been linked to neoplasia in wild and captive koalas, but there is no treatment available. We tested the KoRV-specific serum immunoglobulin G antibody response in nonimmunized and immunized koalas. PMID:27054470

  12. Serotype-specific immunoglobulin G antibody responses to pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in children with sickle cell anemia : Effects of continued penicillin prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bjornson, AB; Falletta, JM; Verter, JI; Buchanan, GR; Miller, ST; Pegelow, CH; Iyer, RV; Johnstone, HS; DeBaun, MR; Wethers, DL; Woods, GM; Holbrook, CT; Becton, DL; Kinney, TR; Reaman, GH; Kalinyak, K; Grossman, NJ; Vichinsky, E; Reid, CD

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To determine serotype-specific IgG antibody responses to reimmunization with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine at age 5 years ski children with sickle cell anemia and (2) to determine whether continued penicillin prophylaxis had any adverse effects on these responses. Study design:

  13. Gradient boosting machines, a tutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Natekin, Alexey; Knoll, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods with a strong focus on machine learning aspects of modeling. A theoretical information is complemented with de...

  14. Gradient Boosting Machines, A Tutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Alexey Natekin; Alois Knoll

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods. A theoretical information is complemented with many descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all th...

  15. Potassium channel antibody-associated encephalopathy: a potentially immunotherapy-responsive form of limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Angela; Buckley, Camilla; Schott, Jonathan M; Baker, Ian; Dewar, Bonnie-Kate; Detert, Niels; Clover, Linda; Parkinson, Abigail; Bien, Christian G; Omer, Salah; Lang, Bethan; Rossor, Martin N; Palace, Jackie

    2004-03-01

    Patients presenting with subacute amnesia are frequently seen in acute neurological practice. Amongst the differential diagnoses, herpes simplex encephalitis, Korsakoff's syndrome and limbic encephalitis should be considered. Limbic encephalitis is typically a paraneoplastic syndrome with a poor prognosis; thus, identifying those patients with potentially reversible symptoms is important. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC-Ab) have recently been reported in three cases of reversible limbic encephalitis. Here we review the clinical, immunological and neuropsychological features of 10 patients (nine male, one female; age range 44-79 years), eight of whom were identified in two centres over a period of 15 months. The patients presented with 1-52 week histories of memory loss, confusion and seizures. Low plasma sodium concentrations, initially resistant to treatment, were present in eight out of 10. Brain MRI at onset showed signal change in the medial temporal lobes in eight out of 10 cases. Paraneoplastic antibodies were negative, but VGKC-Ab ranged from 450 to 5128 pM (neurological and healthy controls memory, with sparing of general intellect in all but two patients, and of nominal functions in all but one. Variable regimes of steroids, plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin were associated with variable falls in serum VGKC-Abs, to values between 2 and 88% of the initial values, together with marked improvement of neuropsychological functioning in six patients, slight improvement in three and none in one. The improvement in neuropsychological functioning in seven patients correlated broadly with the fall in antibodies. However, varying degrees of cerebral atrophy and residual cognitive impairment were common. Over the same period, only one paraneoplastic case of limbic encephalitis was identified between the two main centres. Thus, VGKC-Ab-associated encephalopathy is a relatively common form of autoimmune, non-paraneoplastic, potentially

  16. Heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine elicits similar antibody response as standard 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine in adult patients with RA treated with immunomodulating drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanovic, Meliha Crnkic; Roseman, Carmen; Jönsson, Göran; Truedsson, Lennart

    2011-12-01

    The objectives of the study were to compare antibody response in immunosuppressed patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after vaccination with heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) to that of RA patients and healthy controls vaccinated with 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and to study the impact of disease and/or treatment characteristics and type of vaccine on antibody response following pneumococcal vaccination in patients with RA. In total, 253 RA patients treated with methotrexate (MTX), anti-TNF blockers as monotherapy or anti-TNF + MTX were vaccinated with a single dose (0.5 ml) of PCV7. In addition, 149 RA patients receiving corresponding treatments and 47 healthy controls were vaccinated with a single dose (0.5 ml) of PPV23. Serotype-specific IgG to 23F and 6B were measured at vaccination and 4-6 weeks after vaccination using ELISA. Antibody response ratio (ARR), i.e. ratio between post-/prevaccination antibody levels, was compared between corresponding treatment groups. Differences in ARR were analysed using analysis of variance. Positive antibody response (posAR) was defined as equal to or greater than twofold increase in prevaccination antibody levels. Possible predictors of posAR were analysed using logistic regression model. Corresponding RA treatment groups showed similar ARR and posAR for both serotypes regardless of vaccine type. Higher age at vaccination and concomitant MTX were identified as predictors of impaired posAR for both serotypes tested, whereas type of vaccine did not influence posAR significantly. PCV7 elicits similar antibody response as PPV23 in patients with RA receiving immunosuppressive treatment. In RA patients, higher age and MTX treatment but not type of vaccine predicted impaired posAR. PMID:21956234

  17. Complement C3d conjugation to anthrax protective antigen promotes a rapid, sustained, and protective antibody response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi V Kolla

    Full Text Available B. anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax. Pathogenesis is primarily mediated through the exotoxins lethal factor and edema factor, which bind protective antigen (PA to gain entry into the host cell. The current anthrax vaccine (AVA, Biothrax consists of aluminum-adsorbed cell-free filtrates of unencapsulated B. anthracis, wherein PA is thought to be the principle target of neutralization. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the natural adjuvant, C3d, versus alum in eliciting an anti-PA humoral response and found that C3d conjugation to PA and emulsion in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA imparted superior protection from anthrax challenge relative to PA in IFA or PA adsorbed to alum. Relative to alum-PA, immunization of mice with C3d-PA/IFA augmented both the onset and sustained production of PA-specific antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies to the receptor-binding portion (domain 4 of PA. C3d-PA/IFA was efficacious when administered either i.p. or s.c., and in adolescent mice lacking a fully mature B cell compartment. Induction of PA-specific antibodies by C3d-PA/IFA correlated with increased efficiency of germinal center formation and plasma cell generation. Importantly, C3d-PA immunization effectively protected mice from intranasal challenge with B. anthracis spores, and was approximately 10-fold more effective than alum-PA immunization or PA/IFA based on dose challenge. These data suggest that incorporation of C3d as an adjuvant may overcome shortcomings of the currently licensed aluminum-based vaccine, and may confer protection in the early days following acute anthrax exposure.

  18. Antibody response to Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae bacterium in small holder dairy goats in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swai, Emmanuel Senyael; Kaaya, Jackson Eliona; Noah, Elly Yesse

    2013-10-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), an Office International des Epizooties listed disease, can cause significant levels of morbidity and mortality in goats in Africa, the Middle East, and Western Asia. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence of CCPP, in two contrasting administrative districts of northern Tanzania, namely, Babati and Arumeru. A total of 337 serum samples were collected from January to July 2010, from apparently clinically healthy unvaccinated dairy goats breeds of different ages and sexes. Samples were subjected to monoclonal antibody-based competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the specific measurement of antibodies to Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae bacterium. The overall animal flock and village-level seroprevalence of CCPP was found to be 3.3 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.6-5.8], 9.6 % (95 % CI = 4.7-16.9), and 31.5 % (95 % CI = 15.6-56.5), respectively. There was no evidence (p = 0.659) of differences in seroprevalence between samples from the two administrative locations. Despite the fact that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in seropositivity between sex and age and between breeds sampled, there was a significant difference (p goats showing a higher seroprevalence. The findings of this survey revealed evidence of dairy goat exposure to M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, although at a low prevalence. It is therefore advisable to include CCPP serology in the seromonitoring program so as to give a better indication of flock immunity. This should lead to the establishment of appropriate CCPP control measures in smallholder dairy goat flocks, which are increasingly being recognized for their value as a vital source of livelihood for resource poor livestock keepers in Tanzania. PMID:23558376

  19. Removing N-terminal sequences in pre-S1 domain enhanced antibody and B-cell responses by an HBV large surface antigen DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Guohong; Wang, Shixia; Han, Yaping; Zhang, Chunhua; Lu, Shan; Huang, Zuhu

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of recombinant hepatitis B virus surface (HBsAg) protein vaccine has successfully reduced global hepatitis B infection, there are still a number of vaccine recipients who do not develop detectable antibody responses. Various novel vaccination approaches, including DNA vaccines, have been used to further improve the coverage of vaccine protection. Our previous studies demonstrated that HBsAg-based DNA vaccines could induce both humoral and CMI responses in experimental animal models. However, one form of the the HBsAg antigen, the large S antigen (HBs-L), expressed by DNA vaccine, was not sufficiently immunogenic in eliciting antibody responses. In the current study, we produced a modified large S antigen DNA vaccine, HBs-L(T), which has a truncated N-terminal sequence in the pre-S1 region. Compared to the original HBs-L DNA vaccine, the HBs-L(T) DNA vaccine improved secretion in cultured mammalian cells and generated significantly enhanced HBsAg-specific antibody and B cell responses. Furthermore, this improved HBsL DNA vaccine, along with other HBsAg-expressing DNA vaccines, was able to maintain predominantly Th1 type antibody responses while recombinant HBsAg protein vaccines produced in either yeast or CHO cells elicited mostly Th2 type antibody responses. Our data indicate that HBsAg DNA vaccines with improved immunogenicity offer a useful alternative choice to recombinant protein-based HBV vaccines, particularly for therapeutic purposes against chronic hepatitis infection where immune tolerance led to poor antibody responses to S antigens. PMID:22844502

  20. Removing N-terminal sequences in pre-S1 domain enhanced antibody and B-cell responses by an HBV large surface antigen DNA vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohong Ge

    Full Text Available Although the use of recombinant hepatitis B virus surface (HBsAg protein vaccine has successfully reduced global hepatitis B infection, there are still a number of vaccine recipients who do not develop detectable antibody responses. Various novel vaccination approaches, including DNA vaccines, have been used to further improve the coverage of vaccine protection. Our previous studies demonstrated that HBsAg-based DNA vaccines could induce both humoral and CMI responses in experimental animal models. However, one form of the the HBsAg antigen, the large S antigen (HBs-L, expressed by DNA vaccine, was not sufficiently immunogenic in eliciting antibody responses. In the current study, we produced a modified large S antigen DNA vaccine, HBs-L(T, which has a truncated N-terminal sequence in the pre-S1 region. Compared to the original HBs-L DNA vaccine, the HBs-L(T DNA vaccine improved secretion in cultured mammalian cells and generated significantly enhanced HBsAg-specific antibody and B cell responses. Furthermore, this improved HBsL DNA vaccine, along with other HBsAg-expressing DNA vaccines, was able to maintain predominantly Th1 type antibody responses while recombinant HBsAg protein vaccines produced in either yeast or CHO cells elicited mostly Th2 type antibody responses. Our data indicate that HBsAg DNA vaccines with improved immunogenicity offer a useful alternative choice to recombinant protein-based HBV vaccines, particularly for therapeutic purposes against chronic hepatitis infection where immune tolerance led to poor antibody responses to S antigens.

  1. The successful induction of T-cell and antibody responses by a recombinant measles virus-vectored tetravalent dengue vaccine provides partial protection against dengue-2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui-Mei; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ju; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chung, Han-Hsuan; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Pan, Chien-Hsiung

    2016-07-01

    Dengue has a major impact on global public health, and the use of dengue vaccine is very limited. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a dengue vaccine made from a recombinant measles virus (MV) that expresses envelope protein domain III (ED3) of dengue-1 to 4. Following immunization with the MV-vectored dengue vaccine, mice developed specific interferon-gamma and antibody responses against dengue virus and MV. Neutralizing antibodies against MV and dengue viruses were also induced, and protective levels of FRNT50 ≥ 10 to 4 serotypes of dengue viruses were detected in the MV-vectored dengue vaccine-immunized mice. In addition, specific interferon-gamma and antibody responses to dengue viruses were still induced by the MV-vectored dengue vaccine in mice that were pre-infected with MV. This finding suggests that the pre-existing immunity to MV did not block the initiation of immune responses. By contrast, mice that were pre-infected with dengue-3 exhibited no effect in terms of their antibody responses to MV and dengue viruses, but a dominant dengue-3-specific T-cell response was observed. After injection with dengue-2, a detectable but significantly lower viremia and a higher titer of anti-dengue-2 neutralizing antibodies were observed in MV-vectored dengue vaccine-immunized mice versus the vector control, suggesting that an anamnestic antibody response that provided partial protection against dengue-2 was elicited. Our results with regard to T-cell responses and the effect of pre-immunity to MV or dengue viruses provide clues for the future applications of an MV-vectored dengue vaccine. PMID:26901482

  2. Predictive correlates of response to the anti-PD-L1 antibody MPDL3280A in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Roy S; Soria, Jean-Charles; Kowanetz, Marcin; Fine, Gregg D; Hamid, Omid; Gordon, Michael S; Sosman, Jeffery A; McDermott, David F; Powderly, John D; Gettinger, Scott N; Kohrt, Holbrook E K; Horn, Leora; Lawrence, Donald P; Rost, Sandra; Leabman, Maya; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Mokatrin, Ahmad; Koeppen, Hartmut; Hegde, Priti S; Mellman, Ira; Chen, Daniel S; Hodi, F Stephen

    2014-11-27

    The development of human cancer is a multistep process characterized by the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that drive or reflect tumour progression. These changes distinguish cancer cells from their normal counterparts, allowing tumours to be recognized as foreign by the immune system. However, tumours are rarely rejected spontaneously, reflecting their ability to maintain an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1; also called B7-H1 or CD274), which is expressed on many cancer and immune cells, plays an important part in blocking the 'cancer immunity cycle' by binding programmed death-1 (PD-1) and B7.1 (CD80), both of which are negative regulators of T-lymphocyte activation. Binding of PD-L1 to its receptors suppresses T-cell migration, proliferation and secretion of cytotoxic mediators, and restricts tumour cell killing. The PD-L1-PD-1 axis protects the host from overactive T-effector cells not only in cancer but also during microbial infections. Blocking PD-L1 should therefore enhance anticancer immunity, but little is known about predictive factors of efficacy. This study was designed to evaluate the safety, activity and biomarkers of PD-L1 inhibition using the engineered humanized antibody MPDL3280A. Here we show that across multiple cancer types, responses (as evaluated by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours, version 1.1) were observed in patients with tumours expressing high levels of PD-L1, especially when PD-L1 was expressed by tumour-infiltrating immune cells. Furthermore, responses were associated with T-helper type 1 (TH1) gene expression, CTLA4 expression and the absence of fractalkine (CX3CL1) in baseline tumour specimens. Together, these data suggest that MPDL3280A is most effective in patients in which pre-existing immunity is suppressed by PD-L1, and is re-invigorated on antibody treatment. PMID:25428504

  3. Viremia and antibody response of small African and laboratory animals to Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, A J; Leman, P A; Swanepoel, R

    1989-05-01

    Eleven species of small African wild mammals, laboratory rabbits, guinea pigs, and Syrian hamsters were infected with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus. Low-titered viremia followed by development of antibody was observed in scrub hares (Lepus saxatilis), Cape ground squirrels (Xerus inauris), red veld rats (Aethomys chrysophilus), white tailed rats (Mystromys albicaudatus), bushveld gerbils (Tatera leucogaster), striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio), and guinea pigs. The maximum viremic titer in 4 scrub hares was 10(1.7-4.2) 50% mouse lethal doses/ml. Viremia was detected in 1/17 infected laboratory rabbits. Antibody response was only detected in South African hedgehogs (Atelerix frontalis), highveld gerbils (T. brantsii), Namaqua gerbils (Desmodillus auricularis), 2 species of multimammate mouse (Mastomys natalensis and M. coucha), and Syrian hamsters. The results of the study indicate that a proportion of infected scrub hares develop CCHF viremia of an intensity shown in the Soviet Union to be sufficient for infection of feeding immature ixodid ticks, but that South African hedgehogs and wild rodents are unlikely to be of importance as maintenance hosts of the virus in southern Africa. PMID:2499205

  4. An epitope tag derived from human transcription factor IIB that reacts with a polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duellman, Sarah J; Thompson, Nancy E; Burgess, Richard R

    2004-05-01

    Polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies (PR-mAbs) provide a strategy to purify active, nondenatured proteins by a single-step immunoaffinity chromatography procedure. The high affinity interaction between these antibodies and the antigen can be dissociated in the presence of a nonchaotropic salt and a low molecular weight polyhydroxylated compound (polyol). The epitope for PR-mAb IIB8 is located near the N-terminus of the human transcription factor IIB (TFIIB). The epitope is an eight amino acid sequence, TKDPSRVG, that can be fused to a desired protein for use as a purification tag. This epitope tag (termed hIIB) was fused to the C-terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP). An additional GFP fusion protein utilized another version of hIIB containing a point mutation at position two. These fusion proteins, expressed in Escherichia coli, allowed successful separation of the desired protein in a single chromatographic step. This strategy extends PR-mAb gentle-release purification to numerous expressed proteins. PMID:15039078

  5. Genomic selection for the improvement of antibody response to Newcastle disease and avian influenza virus in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianfei Liu

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease (ND and avian influenza (AI are the most feared diseases in the poultry industry worldwide. They can cause flock mortality up to 100%, resulting in a catastrophic economic loss. This is the first study to investigate the feasibility of genomic selection for antibody response to Newcastle disease virus (Ab-NDV and antibody response to Avian Influenza virus (Ab-AIV in chickens. The data were collected from a crossbred population. Breeding values for Ab-NDV and Ab-AIV were estimated using a pedigree-based best linear unbiased prediction model (BLUP and a genomic best linear unbiased prediction model (GBLUP. Single-trait and multiple-trait analyses were implemented. According to the analysis using the pedigree-based model, the heritability for Ab-NDV estimated from the single-trait and multiple-trait models was 0.478 and 0.487, respectively. The heritability for Ab-AIV estimated from the two models was 0.301 and 0.291, respectively. The estimated genetic correlation between the two traits was 0.438. A four-fold cross-validation was used to assess the accuracy of the estimated breeding values (EBV in the two validation scenarios. In the family sample scenario each half-sib family is randomly allocated to one of four subsets and in the random sample scenario the individuals are randomly divided into four subsets. In the family sample scenario, compared with the pedigree-based model, the accuracy of the genomic prediction increased from 0.086 to 0.237 for Ab-NDV and from 0.080 to 0.347 for Ab-AIV. In the random sample scenario, the accuracy was improved from 0.389 to 0.427 for Ab-NDV and from 0.281 to 0.367 for Ab-AIV. The multiple-trait GBLUP model led to a slightly higher accuracy of genomic prediction for both traits. These results indicate that genomic selection for antibody response to ND and AI in chickens is promising.

  6. Studies on the antibody response of mice and humans after immunization with potential influenza virus A (H1N1) vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antibody response of mice and adult humans to immunization with subunit vaccines derived from a pair of antigenically distinct influenza A H1N1 viruses isolate in eggs was investigated. Although the haemagglutinin molecule of each virus differed by only three amino acid residues, highly specific antibody responses were elicited in mice as determined by haemagglutination inhibition and radioimmunoprecipitation assays. Results from competitive radioimmunoassays using monoclonal antibodies of known specificity and a study of the reactivity of mouse antisera with H1N1 field strains indicated that the marked differences in the antibody responses to the two vaccines was due to an amino acid substitution in the distal tip of the haemagglutinin molecule. In contrast, cross reactive antibody responses were elicited in humans presumably due to exposure to viruses related to the candidate vaccine prior to vaccination. Although immunogenic differences are apparent in this pair of antigenically distinct viruses in naive laboratory animals, these differences are not apparent following vaccination of humans that had prior exposure to related viruses. 21 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs

  7. Relationship between Exposure to Vector Bites and Antibody Responses to Mosquito Salivary Gland Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Albin Fontaine; Aurélie Pascual; Eve Orlandi-Pradines; Ibrahima Diouf; Franck Remoué; Frédéric Pagès; Thierry Fusaï; Christophe Rogier; Lionel Almeras

    2011-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases are major health problems worldwide. Serological responses to mosquito saliva proteins may be useful in estimating individual exposure to bites from mosquitoes transmitting these diseases. However, the relationships between the levels of these IgG responses and mosquito density as well as IgG response specificity at the genus and/or species level need to be clarified prior to develop new immunological markers to assess human/vector contact. To this end, a kinetic study...

  8. Single peptide and anti-idiotype based immunizations can broaden the antibody response against the variable V3 domain of HIV-1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, F; Keller, H; Kieny, M P; Thèze, J

    1995-05-01

    The third variable (V3) domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) external envelope glycoprotein gp120 is a major target of neutralizing antibodies in infected persons and in experimental immunized animals. Given the high degree of sequence variability of V3, the humoral response toward this region is very type-specific. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of a single peptide and an anti-idiotypic antibody to broaden the anti-V3 antibody specificity in BALB/c mice. We show that a synthetic peptide derived from the V3 determinant of HIV-1 MN isolate (V3MN), when used as an immunogen, was able to induce an antibody response to multiple (up to six) HIV-1 strains. The extent of this cross-reactivity, which tended to enlarge as the injections increased, appeared to be inversely correlated with the binding affinity to V3MN peptide. These data thus present evidence that, despite its great sequence heterogeneity, the V3 loop encompasses conserved amino-acid positions and/or stretches which may be less immunogenic than their variable counterparts. We additionally demonstrate that a rabbit anti-idiotype (Ab2), recognizing a binding site related idiotype on a V3-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (Ab1), could mount a broadened humoral response (Ab3) in mice. Unlike nominal antibody Ab1 which strictly reacted with the European HIV-1 LAI isolate, elicited Ab3 recognized the two divergent HIV-1 strains SF2 and 1286, originating respectively from North America and Central Africa, in addition to LAI. The reasons accounting for this Ab2-induced enlargement of the V3 antibody response are discussed. Our findings suggest that single peptide and anti-idiotype based immunizations may provide viable approaches to overcome, at least in part, HIV epitope variability. PMID:7783749

  9. Novel ISCOMs from Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce mucosal and systemic antibody production, T-cell responses and improved antigen uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Quirici, Lenora; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Ferreira, Fernando; Silveira, Fernando

    2016-02-24

    In the last decades, significant efforts have been dedicated to the search for novel vaccine adjuvants. In this regard, saponins and its formulations as "immunostimulating complexes" (ISCOMs) have shown to be capable of stimulating potent humoral and cellular immune responses, enhanced cytokine production and activation of cytotoxic T cells. The immunological activity of ISCOMs formulated with a saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis (QB-90 fraction) as an alternative to classical ISCOMs based on Quil A(®) (IQA) is presented here. The ISCOMs prepared with QB-90, named IQB-90, typically consist of 40-50nm, spherical, cage-like particles, built up by QB-90, cholesterol, phospholipids and antigen (ovalbumin, OVA). These nanoparticles were efficiently uptaken in vitro by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Subcutaneously inoculated IQB-90 induced strong serum antibody responses encompassing specific IgG1 and IgG2a, robust DTH reactions, significant T cell proliferation and increases in Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) cytokine responses. Intranasally delivered IQB-90 elicited serum IgG and IgG1, and mucosal IgA responses at distal systemic sites (nasal passages, large intestine and vaginal lumen). These results indicate that IQB-90 is a promising alternative to classic ISCOMs as vaccine adjuvants, capable of enhancing humoral and cellular immunity to levels comparable to those induced by ISCOMs manufactured with Quillaja saponaria saponins. PMID:26826546

  10. A comparison of antibody responses to commercial equine influenza vaccines following primary vaccination of Thoroughbred weanlings--a randomised blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, Sarah; Arkins, Sean; Walsh, Cathal; Cullinane, Ann

    2011-11-15

    Many racing authorities, sales companies and equestrian bodies have mandatory vaccination policies for equine influenza (EI). The consequences of lack of vaccine efficacy include clinical disease, disruption to training programmes, the cancellation of equestrian events and the introduction of virus to susceptible populations. The correlation between antibody against the virus haemagglutinin and protection against influenza has been well established. The objective of this study was to compare the antibody responses of 66 unvaccinated Thoroughbred weanlings on four different stud farms, following primary vaccination (V1, V2 and V3) with the five EI vaccines commercially available in Ireland (Duvaxyn IET Plus, Equilis Resequin, Equip FT, Equilis Prequenza Te, ProteqFlu Te). Antibody responses were monitored for 6 months post V3 by single radial haemolysis. The pattern of antibody response was similar for all vaccines and for all antigens tested. A rapid decline of antibody level was observed by 3 months post V2 for all vaccines. The antibody response of the horses vaccinated with the whole virus vaccine Duvaxyn IET Plus was significantly higher than that of the horses vaccinated with the other four products. Five weanlings had maternally derived antibodies (MDA) at the time of V1. The canary pox recombinant vaccine, subunit vaccine and whole virus inactivated vaccines administered to these weanlings did not induce a detectable antibody response against the background of MDA but effectively primed the animals as revaccination resulted in a strong antibody response. In this study 43% of the weanlings failed to seroconvert after V1. This high incidence of poor responders has not been reported in previous experimental studies relating to these products. The poor responders were observed in all vaccine groups except those vaccinated with Duvaxyn IET Plus. Post V2 the incidence of poor responders was reduced to 7% and all horses responded to V3. The study demonstrates that

  11. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    While allergic reactions to soya are increasingly investigated, the normal immune response to ingested soya is scarcely described. In the present study, we wanted to characterise the soya-specific immune response in healthy mice ingesting soya protein. Mice fed a soya-containing diet (F0) and mic...

  12. Comparison of human immune responses to purified Vero cell and human diploid cell rabies vaccines by using two different antibody titration methods.

    OpenAIRE

    Kitala, P M; Lindqvist, K J; Koimett, E; Johnson, B. K; Chunge, C N; Perrin, P.; Olsvik, O

    1990-01-01

    Antibody responses to a conventional rabies preexposure regimen of a new purified Vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV) and a human diploid cell vaccine (HDCV) were compared in 80 healthy Kenyan veterinary students. Forty-three of the students received the PVRV and 37 received the HDCV on days 0, 7, and 28. Antibody responses were monitored by using the rapid fluorescent-focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and an inhibition enzyme immunoassay (INH EIA) on days 0, 7, 28, and 49. Both vaccines elicited a r...

  13. Protective Effect of an Antibody against Specific Extracellular Domain of TLR2 on Agonists-Driven Inflammatory and Allergic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tianwu; Cai, Jun; Peng, Yanxia; Zhang, Lifang; Lan, Qiaofen; Chen, Yanwen; Liao, Huanjin; Xie, Tong; Wu, Ping; Pan, Qingjun

    2016-01-01

    Specific blocking strategies of TLR2-mediated inflammatory signaling and hypersensitivity reactions may offer novel therapeutic strategies to prevent a variety of diseases. In this study, we investigated the blocking effects of a new anti-TLR2 antibody anti-T20 against a 20 mer peptide T20 located in the extracellular specific domain of mouse TLR2. In addition, the effects of the anti-T20 in vitro, measuring the inhibition of the IL-6 and TNF-α production in response to PGN, LTA, and Pam3CSK4-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, were determined. In vivo, the effects of anti-T20 on a lethal anaphylaxis model using PGN-challenged OVA allergic mice, including the rectal temperature and mortality, and serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and LTC4 were assayed. The results showed that anti-T20 specifically bound to TLR2 and significantly inhibited PGN, LTA, and Pam3CSK4-driven TNF-α and IL-6 production by RAW264.7 cells. Also, anti-T20 protected OVA allergic mice from PGN-induced lethal anaphylaxis, and the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and LTC4 of anti-T20 treated PGN-challenged OVA allergic mice were decreased as compared to isotype control of anti-T20 treated mice. In summary, this study produced a new antibody against the specific extracellular domain of TLR2 which has protective effect on TLR2 agonists-driven inflammatory and allergic response.

  14. Towards a human oral vaccine for anthrax: the utility of a Salmonella Typhi Ty21a-based prime-boost immunization strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Leslie W J; Rodriguez, Ana L; Moore, Stephen; Atkins, Helen S; Feng, Chiguang; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2008-11-11

    We previously demonstrated the ability of an orally administered attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain expressing the protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis to confer protection against lethal anthrax aerosol spore challenge [Stokes MG, Titball RW, Neeson BN, et al. Oral administration of a Salmonella enterica-based vaccine expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen confers protection against aerosolized B. anthracis. Infect Immun 2007;75(April (4)):1827-34]. To extend the utility of this approach to humans we constructed variants of S. enterica serovar Typhi Ty21a, an attenuated typhoid vaccine strain licensed for human use, which expressed and exported PA via two distinct plasmid-based transport systems: the Escherichia coli HlyA haemolysin and the S. Typhi ClyA export apparatus. Murine immunogenicity studies confirmed the ability of these constructs, especially Ty21a expressing the ClyA-PA fusion protein, to stimulate strong PA-specific immune responses following intranasal immunization. These responses were further enhanced by a subsequent boost with either parenterally delivered recombinant PA or the licensed US human alum-adsorbed anthrax vaccine (AVA). Anthrax toxin neutralizing antibody responses using this prime-boost regimen were rapid, vigorous and broad in nature. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of employing a mucosal prime with a licensed Salmonella Typhi vaccine strain followed by a parenteral protein boost to stimulate rapid protective immunity against anthrax. PMID:18805452

  15. Interplay of foot-and-mouth disease virus, antibodies and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: virus opsonization under non-neutralizing conditions results in enhanced interferon-alpha responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lannes Nils

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV is a highly infectious member of the Picornaviridae inducing an acute disease of cloven-hoofed species. Vaccine-induced immune protection correlates with the presence of high levels of neutralizing antibodies but also opsonising antibodies have been proposed as an important mechanism of the immune response contributing to virus clearance by macrophages and leading to the production of type-I interferon (IFN by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC. The present study demonstrates that the opsonising antibody titres mediating enhanced IFN-α responses in pDC were similar to neutralizing titres, when antigenically related viruses from the same serotype were employed. However, sera cross-reacted also with non-neutralized isolates of multiple serotypes, when tested in this assay. Both uncomplexed virus and immune complexed virus stimulated pDC via Toll-like receptor 7. An additional finding of potential importance for strain-specific differences in virulence and/or immunogenicity was that pDC activation by FMDV strongly differed between viral isolates. Altogether, our results indicate that opsonising antibodies can have a broader reactivity than neutralizing antibodies and may contribute to antiviral responses induced against antigenically distant viruses.

  16. Subsets of memory CD4+ T cell and bactericidal antibody response to Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C after immunization of HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar G Milagres

    Full Text Available Meningococcal disease is endemic in Brazil, with periodic outbreaks and case fatality rates reach as high as 18 to 20% of cases. Conjugate vaccines against meningococci are immunogenic in healthy children. However, we have previously shown a poor bactericidal antibody response to a Men C conjugate vaccine in Brazilian HIV-infected children and adolescents after a single vaccine administration. The goal of the present work was to investigate associations between bactericidal antibody response induced by MenC vaccine and the frequency and activation profile (expression of CD38, HLA-DR and CCR5 molecules of total CD4+ memory T cell sub-populations in HIV-1-infected children and adolescents. Responders to vaccination against MenC had a predominance (about 44% of CD4+ TINTERMEDIATE subset followed by TTRANSITIONAL memory subset (23 to 26%. Importantly, CD4+ TINT frequency was positively associated with bactericidal antibody response induced by vaccination. The positive correlation persisted despite the observation that the frequency TINT CD38+HLA-DR+ was higher in responders. In contrast, CD4+ TCENTRAL MEMORY (TCM subset negatively correlated with bactericidal antibodies. In conclusion, these data indicate that less differentiated CD+ T cells, like TCM may be constantly differentiating into intermediate and later differentiated CD4+ T cell subsets. These include CD4 TINT subset which showed a positive association with bactericidal antibodies.

  17. Human Survivors of Disease Outbreaks Caused by Ebola or Marburg Virus Exhibit Cross-Reactive and Long-Lived Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Mohan; Jensen, Stig M; Keasey, Sarah L; Kamata, Teddy; Kuehne, Ana I; Stonier, Spencer W; Lutwama, Julius Julian; Lobel, Leslie; Dye, John M; Ulrich, Robert G

    2016-08-01

    A detailed understanding of serological immune responses to Ebola and Marburg virus infections will facilitate the development of effective diagnostic methods, therapeutics, and vaccines. We examined antibodies from Ebola or Marburg survivors 1 to 14 years after recovery from disease, by using a microarray that displayed recombinant nucleoprotein (NP), viral protein 40 (VP40), envelope glycoprotein (GP), and inactivated whole virions from six species of filoviruses. All three outbreak cohorts exhibited significant antibody responses to antigens from the original infecting species and a pattern of additional filoviruses that varied by outbreak. NP was the most cross-reactive antigen, while GP was the most specific. Antibodies from survivors of infections by Marburg marburgvirus (MARV) species were least cross-reactive, while those from survivors of infections by Sudan virus (SUDV) species exhibited the highest cross-reactivity. Based on results revealed by the protein microarray, persistent levels of antibodies to GP, NP, and VP40 were maintained for up to 14 years after infection, and survival of infection caused by one species imparted cross-reactive antibody responses to other filoviruses. PMID:27335383

  18. The respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein formulated with a novel combination adjuvant induces balanced immune responses in lambs with maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R; Latimer, L; Gerdts, V; Potter, A; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S

    2015-03-10

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe respiratory illness in infants. There are no licensed vaccines to prevent RSV infection. The neonate receives short-term protection from maternally derived antibodies, which, however, can also interfere with the active response to vaccination. A RSV vaccine consisting of a truncated version of the fusion protein formulated with polyI:C, innate defense regulator peptide and polyphosphazene (ΔF/TriAdj), was evaluated in two to three week-old lambs. When delivered intrapulmonary, ΔF/TriAdj elicited IgA production in the lung in addition to a robust systemic response similar to that induced by intramuscular immunization. To investigate potential interference by maternal antibodies, pregnant ewes were vaccinated with ΔF/TriAdj. Lambs born to RSV F-immune or non-immune ewes were then given three vaccinations with ΔF/TriAdj at 3 days, 4 weeks and 8 weeks post-birth. Lambs immunized intramuscularly with ΔF/TriAdj vaccine developed high-affinity ΔF-specific serum IgG and virus neutralizing antibodies, and displayed an increase in the frequency of IFN-γ-secreting cells by in vitro restimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Maternal antibodies did not interfere with the development of an immune response to ΔF/TriAdj in the newborn lambs. These results indicate that immunization of neonates with ΔF/TriAdj is effective even in the face of maternal antibodies. PMID:25637860

  19. Evaluation of an in vitro method for the measurement of specific IgE antibody responses: the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of allergenic potential is a key parameter in the safety assessment of novel proteins, including those expressed in genetically modified crops and foodstuffs. The majority of allergic reactions to food proteins are immediate type hypersensitivity reactions in which the principal biological effector is IgE antibody; the accurate measurement of specific IgE antibody is therefore a critical factor in experimental systems designed to characterize protein allergenic potential. Due to the presence of much higher concentrations of other immunoglobulin isotypes, the assessment of specific serum IgE antibody poses substantial technical challenges. We have examined the utility of the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell line for the measurement of murine IgE responses. RBL cells were sensitized with mouse monoclonal anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody and challenged with DNP-albumin conjugates with various hapten substitution ratios (SR). Polyclonal anti-OVA IgE antisera were also assessed for activity in the RBL assay. Results were compared with titers measured in homologous passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) assay. Marked degranulation of RBL cells was induced by conjugates with SRs of between 16 and 32, whereas conjugates with lower SRs (of 10 or 3) failed to elicit significant serotonin release. All conjugates were able to induce mast cell degranulation in vivo in a PCA assay. Anti-OVA antisera with PCA titers of 1/32 to 1/64 failed to stimulate RBL cell degranulation, whereas high titer antibody (1/2048 to 1/4096 by PCA) induced a positive RBL cell response. Successful stimulation of RBL cell degranulation requires not only appropriate epitope densities but also high affinity antibody. These data indicate that this assay is inappropriate for the routine analysis of specific polyclonal IgE antibody responses such as those that are induced by exposure to complex protein allergens

  20. A Phase I Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Study of the Safety and Immunogenicity of Electroporated HIV DNA with or without Interleukin 12 in Prime-Boost Combinations with an Ad35 HIV Vaccine in Healthy HIV-Seronegative African Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet Mpendo

    Full Text Available Strategies to enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in humans include i co-administration of molecular adjuvants, ii intramuscular administration followed by in vivo electroporation (IM/EP and/or iii boosting with a different vaccine. Combining these strategies provided protection of macaques challenged with SIV; this clinical trial was designed to mimic the vaccine regimen in the SIV study.Seventy five healthy, HIV-seronegative adults were enrolled into a phase 1, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Multi-antigenic HIV (HIVMAG plasmid DNA (pDNA vaccine alone or co-administered with pDNA encoding human Interleukin 12 (IL-12 (GENEVAX IL-12 given by IM/EP using the TriGrid Delivery System was tested in different prime-boost regimens with recombinant Ad35 HIV vaccine given IM.All local reactions but one were mild or moderate. Systemic reactions and unsolicited adverse events including laboratory abnormalities did not differ between vaccine and placebo recipients. No serious adverse events (SAEs were reported. T cell and antibody response rates after HIVMAG (x3 prime-Ad35 (x1 boost were independent of IL-12, while the magnitude of interferon gamma (IFN-γ ELISPOT responses was highest after HIVMAG (x3 without IL-12. The quality and phenotype of T cell responses shown by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS were similar between groups. Inhibition of HIV replication by autologous T cells was demonstrated after HIVMAG (x3 prime and was boosted after Ad35. HIV specific antibodies were detected only after Ad35 boost, although there was a priming effect with 3 doses of HIVMAG with or without IL-12. No anti-IL-12 antibodies were detected.The vaccines were safe, well tolerated and moderately immunogenic. Repeated administration IM/EP was well accepted. An adjuvant effect of co-administered plasmid IL-12 was not detected.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01496989.

  1. Flagellin induces antibody responses through a TLR5- and inflammasome-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Yglesias, Américo Harry; Zhao, Xiaodan; Quarles, Ellen K; Lai, Marvin A; VandenBos, Tim; Strong, Roland K; Smith, Kelly D

    2014-02-15

    Flagellin is a potent immunogen that activates the innate immune system via TLR5 and Naip5/6, and generates strong T and B cell responses. The adaptor protein MyD88 is critical for signaling by TLR5, as well as IL-1Rs and IL-18Rs, major downstream mediators of the Naip5/6 Nlrc4-inflammasome. In this study, we define roles of known flagellin receptors and MyD88 in Ab responses generated toward flagellin. We used mice genetically deficient in flagellin recognition pathways to characterize innate immune components that regulate isotype-specific Ab responses. Using purified flagellin from Salmonella, we dissected the contribution of innate flagellin recognition pathways to promote Ab responses toward flagellin and coadministered OVA in C57BL/6 mice. We demonstrate IgG2c responses toward flagellin were TLR5 and inflammasome dependent; IgG1 was the dominant isotype and partially TLR5 and inflammasome dependent. Our data indicate a substantial flagellin-specific IgG1 response was induced through a TLR5-, inflammasome-, and MyD88-independent pathway. IgA anti-FliC responses were TLR5 and MyD88 dependent and caspase-1 independent. Unlike C57BL/6 mice, flagellin-immunized A/J mice induced codominant IgG1 and IgG2a responses. Furthermore, MyD88-independent, flagellin-induced Ab responses were even more pronounced in A/J MyD88(-/-) mice, and IgA anti-FliC responses were suppressed by MyD88. Flagellin also worked as an adjuvant toward coadministered OVA, but it only promoted IgG1 anti-OVA responses. Our results demonstrate that a novel pathway for flagellin recognition contributes to Ab production. Characterization of this pathway will be useful for understanding immunity to flagellin and the rationale design of flagellin-based vaccines. PMID:24442437

  2. Specific effect of estradiol on the genital mucosal antibody response in chlamydial ocular and genital infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Rank, R G; Barron, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Estradiol treatment of female guinea pigs was found to alter the course of genital, but not ocular, infection with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA responses in genital secretions of genitally infected animals were delayed by estradiol treatment, but neither response in the eye resulting from either ocular or genital infection was affected. However, the appearance of IgG in the genital tract after ocular infection was markedly inhibit...

  3. Genetic control of antibody responses induced by recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing a foreign antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Lagranderie, M; Lo-Man, R; Dériaud, E; Gicquel, B; Gheorghiu, M; Leclerc, C

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing foreign antigens represents a promising candidate for the development of future vaccines and was shown in several experimental models to induce protective immunity against bacterial or parasitic infections. Innate resistance to BCG infection is under genetic control and could modify the immune responses induced against an antigen delivered by such engineered microorganisms. To investigate this question, we analyzed the immune responses of various...

  4. Distinct Mechanisms Underlie Boosted Polysaccharide-Specific IgG Responses Following Secondary Challenge with Intact Gram-Negative versus Gram-Positive Extracellular Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Swagata; Arjunaraja, Swadhinya; Akkoyunlu, Mustafa; Pier, Gerald B; Snapper, Clifford M

    2016-06-01

    Priming of mice with intact, heat-killed cells of Gram-negative Neisseria meningitidis, capsular serogroup C (MenC) or Gram-positive group B Streptococcus, capsular type III (GBS-III) bacteria resulted in augmented serum polysaccharide (PS)-specific IgG titers following booster immunization. Induction of memory required CD4(+) T cells during primary immunization. We determined whether PS-specific memory for IgG production was contained within the B cell and/or T cell populations, and whether augmented IgG responses following booster immunization were also dependent on CD4(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer of purified B cells from MenC- or GBS-III-primed, but not naive mice resulted in augmented PS-specific IgG responses following booster immunization. Similar responses were observed when cotransferred CD4(+) T cells were from primed or naive mice. Similarly, primary immunization with unencapsulated MenC or GBS-III, to potentially prime CD4(+) T cells, failed to enhance PS-specific IgG responses following booster immunization with their encapsulated isogenic partners. Furthermore, in contrast to GBS-III, depletion of CD4(+) T cells during secondary immunization with MenC or another Gram-negative bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii, did not inhibit augmented PS-specific IgG booster responses of mice primed with heat-killed cells. Also, in contrast with GBS-III, booster immunization of MenC-primed mice with isolated MenC-PS, a TI Ag, or a conjugate of MenC-PS and tetanus toxoid elicited an augmented PS-specific IgG response similar to booster immunization with intact MenC. These data demonstrate that memory for augmented PS-specific IgG booster responses to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria is contained solely within the B cell compartment, with a differential requirement for CD4(+) T cells for augmented IgG responses following booster immunization. PMID:27183619

  5. HAHA--nothing to laugh about. Measuring the immunogenicity (human anti-human antibody response) induced by humanized monoclonal antibodies applying ELISA and SPR technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechansky, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Immunogenicity induced by passively applied proteins is a serious issue because it is directly related to the patient's safety. The out-come of an immune reaction to a therapeutic protein can range from transient appearance of antibodies without any clinical significance to severe life threatening conditions. Within this article, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methodology to measure immunogenicity are compared and the pros and cons are discussed. PMID:19679421

  6. Competitive Selection from Single Domain Antibody Libraries Allows Isolation of High-Affinity Antihapten Antibodies That Are Not Favored in the llama Immune Response

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Sofia Tabares-da; Rossotti, Martin; Carleiza, Carmen; Carrión, Federico; Pritsch, Otto; Ahn, Ki Chang; Last, Jerold A.; Hammock, Bruce D.; González-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2011-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) found in camelids, lack a light chain and their antigen-binding site sits completely in the heavy-chain variable domain (VHH). Their simplicity, thermostability, and ease in expression have made VHHs highly attractive. While this has been successfully exploited for macromolecular antigens, their application to the detection of small molecules is still limited to a very few reports, mostly describing low affinity VHHs. Using triclocarban (TCC) as a model hapten...

  7. Glycan-modified liposomes boost CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses by targeting DC-SIGN on dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.W.J. Unger; A.J. van Beelen; S.C. Bruijns; M. Joshi; C.M. Fehres; L. van Bloois; M.I. Verstege; M. Ambrosini; H. Kalay; K. Nazmi; J.G. Bolscher; E. Hooiberg; T.D. de Gruijl; G. Storm; Y. van Kooyk

    2012-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy requires potent tumor-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell responses, initiated by dendritic cells (DCs). Tumor antigens can be specifically targeted to DCs in vivo by exploiting their expression of C-type lectin receptors (CLR), which bind carbohydrate structures on antigens, resultin

  8. In situ delivery of tumor antigen- and adjuvant-loaded liposomes boosts antigen-apecific T-Cell responses by human dermal dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, M.A.; Bruijns, Sven C.M.; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; Bloois, van Louis; Storm, G.; Gruijl, de T.D.; Kooyk, van Y.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have an important role in tumor control via the induction of tumor-specific T-cell responses and are therefore an ideal target for immunotherapy. The human skin is an attractive site for tumor vaccination as it contains various DC subsets. The simultaneous delivery of tumor ant

  9. In situ Delivery of Tumor Antigen- and Adjuvant-Loaded Liposomes Boosts Antigen-Specific T-Cell Responses by Human Dermal Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Martine A.; Bruijns, Sven C M; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; Van Bloois, Louis; Storm, G; De Gruijl, Tanja; Van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have an important role in tumor control via the induction of tumor-specific T-cell responses and are therefore an ideal target for immunotherapy. The human skin is an attractive site for tumor vaccination as it contains various DC subsets. The simultaneous delivery of tumor ant

  10. In situ Delivery of Tumor Antigen- and Adjuvant-Loaded Liposomes Boosts Antigen-Specific T-Cell Responses by Human Dermal Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boks, Martine A; Bruijns, Sven C M; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; van Bloois, Louis; Storm, Gert; de Gruijl, Tanja; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have an important role in tumor control via the induction of tumor-specific T-cell responses and are therefore an ideal target for immunotherapy. The human skin is an attractive site for tumor vaccination as it contains various DC subsets. The simultaneous delivery of tumor antigen with an adjuvant is beneficial for cross-presentation and the induction of tumor-specific T-cell responses. We therefore developed liposomes that contain the melanoma-associated antigen glycoprotein 100280-288 peptide and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligand monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) as adjuvant. These liposomes are efficiently taken up by monocyte-derived DCs, and antigen presentation to CD8(+) T cells was significantly higher with MPLA-modified liposomes as compared with non-modified liposomes or the co-administration of soluble MPLA. We used a human skin explant model to evaluate the efficiency of intradermal delivery of liposomes. Liposomes were efficiently taken up by CD1a(+) and especially CD14(+) dermal DCs. Induction of CD8(+) T-cell responses by emigrated dermal DCs was significantly higher when MPLA was incorporated into the liposomes as compared with non-modified liposomes or co-administration of soluble MPLA. Thus, the modification of antigen-carrying liposomes with TLR ligand MPLA significantly enhances tumor-specific T-cell responses by dermal DCs and is an attractive vaccination strategy in human skin. PMID:26083554

  11. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology. PMID:27236550

  12. Human antibody response to dengue virus: implications for dengue vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kurane, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Dengue, a global health threat, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical countries. Dengue can range from asymptomatic, relatively mild dengue fever to severe and life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever. Disease severity and outcome is largely associated with the host immune response. Several candidate vaccines in clinical trials appear promising as effective measures for dengue disease control. Vaccine development has been hampered by safety and efficacy issues, driven by a lack of understanding of the host immune response. This review focuses on recent research findings on the dengue host immune response, particularly in humans, and the relevance of these findings to challenges in vaccine development. PMID:27398060

  13. Trichinella britovi human infection in Spain : antibody response to surface, excretory/secretory and somatic antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Osorio M.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A third outbreak of Trichinella britovi with 140 people involved, occurred in Granada Spain (December 1998. The source of infection was sausage made from uninspected wild boar meat. Fifty-two patients agreed to participated in this study. An elevated eosinophil level (> 5 % was detected in 59.6 % of patients, and persisted in most of these cases for two months. A moderate IgG response was observed. At the onset of symptoms, Western blot (WB test detected more positive cases than Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF. Six months from infection, ELISA revealed fewer positive cases than the other two tests. It would appear that the response to somatic antigens starts earlier than those to cuticular and excretory/secretory (ES antigens and that the response to ES antigens is the first to decrease.

  14. Hepatitis B vaccine antibody response and the risk of clinical AIDS or death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Landrum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whether seroresponse to a vaccine such as hepatitis B virus (HBV vaccine can provide a measure of the functional immune status of HIV-infected persons is unknown.This study evaluated the relationship between HBV vaccine seroresponses and progression to clinical AIDS or death. METHODS AND FINDINGS: From a large HIV cohort, we evaluated those who received HBV vaccine only after HIV diagnosis and had anti-HBs determination 1-12 months after the last vaccine dose. Non-response and positive response were defined as anti-HBs <10 and ≥ 10 IU/L, respectively. Participants were followed from date of last vaccination to clinical AIDS, death, or last visit. Univariate and multivariable risk of progression to clinical AIDS or death were evaluated with Cox regression models. A total of 795 participants vaccinated from 1986-2010 were included, of which 41% were responders. During 3,872 person-years of observation, 122 AIDS or death events occurred (53% after 1995. Twenty-two percent of non-responders experienced clinical AIDS or death compared with 5% of responders (p<0.001. Non-response to HBV vaccine was associated with a greater than 2-fold increased risk of clinical AIDS or death (HR 2.47; 95% CI, 1.38-4.43 compared with a positive response, after adjusting for CD4 count, HIV viral load, HAART use, and delayed type hypersensitivity skin test responses (an in vivo marker of cell-mediated immunity. This association remained evident among those with CD4 count ≥ 500 cells/mm³ (HR 3.40; 95% CI, 1.39-8.32. CONCLUSIONS: HBV vaccine responses may have utility in assessing functional immune status and risk stratificating HIV-infected individuals, including those with CD4 count ≥ 500 cells/mm³.

  15. Immunomodulatory activity of andrographolide on macrophage activation and specific antibody response

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei; Jing WANG; Dong, Sheng-Fu; Liu, Chun-Hong; Italiani, Paola; Sun, Shu-Hui; Xu, Jing; Boraschi, Diana; Ma, Shi-ping; Qu, Di

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the immunomodulatory effects of andrographolide on both innate and adaptive immune responses. Methods: Andrographolide (10 μg/mL in vitro or 1 mg/kg in vivo) was used to modulate LPS-induced classical activated (M1) or IL-4-induced alternative activated (M2) macrophages in vitro and humor immune response to HBsAg in vivo. Cytokine gene expression profile (M1 vs M2) was measured by real-time PCR, IL-12/IL-10 level was detected by ELISA, and surface antigen expression was ev...

  16. Using the local immune response from the natural buffalo host to generate an antibody fragment library that binds the early larval stages of Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Christopher G; Driguez, Patrick; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Ilag, Leodevico L; Gladman, Simon; Li, Yuesheng; Piedrafita, David; McManus, Donald P; Meeusen, Els N T; de Veer, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Antibodies isolated from the local draining inguinal lymph node of field exposed-water buffaloes following challenge with Schistosoma japonicum cercariae showed high reactivity towards S. japonicum antigen preparations and bound specifically to formaldehyde-fixed S. japonicum schistosomules. Using this specific local immune response we produced a series of single-chain antibody Fv domain libraries from the same lymph nodes. Removal of phage that cross reacted with epitopes on adult parasites yielded a single-chain antibody Fv domain-phage library that specifically bound to whole formaldehyde-fixed and live S. japonicum schistosomules. DNA sequencing indicated clear enrichment of the single-chain antibody Fv domain library for buffalo B-cell complementarity determining regions post-selection for schistosomule binding. This study also revealed that long heavy chain complementarity determining regions appear to be an important factor when selecting for antibody binding fragments against schistosomule proteins. The selected single-chain antibody Fv domain-phage were used to probe a schistosome-specific protein microarray, which resulted in the recognition of many proteins expressed across all schistosome life-cycle stages. Following absorption to adult worms, the single-chain antibody Fv domain-phage library showed significantly reduced binding to most proteins, whilst two proteins (NCBI GenBank accession numbers AY915878 and AY815196) showed increased binding. We have thus developed a unique set of host derived single-chain antibody Fv domains comprising buffalo B-cell variable regions that specifically bind to early S. japonicum life-stages. PMID:26116907

  17. Boost.Asio C++ network programming

    CERN Document Server

    Torjo, John

    2013-01-01

    What you want is an easy level of abstraction, which is just what this book provides in conjunction with Boost.Asio. Switching to Boost.Asio is just a few extra #include directives away, with the help of this practical and engaging guide.This book is great for developers that need to do network programming, who don't want to delve into the complicated issues of a raw networking API. You should be familiar with core Boost concepts, such as smart pointers and shared_from_this, resource classes (noncopyable), functors and boost::bind, boost mutexes, and the boost date/time library. Readers should

  18. Reduced antibody responses against Plasmodium falciparum vaccine candidate antigens in the presence of Trichuris trichiura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esen, Meral; Mordmüller, Benjamin; de Salazar, Pablo Martinez;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helminth infections are highly prevalent in the tropics and may have an effect on immune responses to vaccines due to their immunomodulatory effect. The prevalence of helminth infections in young children, the target group for malaria and most other vaccines, is high. Therefore we ass...

  19. CD4 T-helper cell cytokine phenotypes and antibody response following tetanus toxoid booster immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routine methods for enumerating antigen-specific T-helper cells may not identify low-frequency phenotypes such as Th2 cells. We compared methods of evaluating such responses to identify tetanus toxoid- (TT) specific Th1, Th2, Th17 and IL10+ cells. Eight healthy subjects were given a TT booster vacci...

  20. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111In, 67Ga and 131I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  1. Boosted Horizon of a Boosted Space-Time Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Battista, Emmanuele; Scudellaro, Paolo; Tramontano, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We apply the ultrarelativistic boosting procedure to map the metric of Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime into a metric describing de Sitter spacetime plus a shock-wave singularity located on a null hypersurface, by exploiting the picture of the embedding of an hyperboloid in a five-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. After reverting to the usual four-dimensional formalism, we also solve the geodesic equation and evaluate the Riemann curvature tensor of the boosted Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric by means of numerical calculations, which make it possible to reach the ultrarelativistic regime gradually by letting the boost velocity approach the speed of light. Eventually, the analysis of the Kretschmann invariant (and of the geodesic equation) shows the global structure of space- time, as we demonstrate the presence of a "scalar curvature singularity" within a 3-sphere and find that it is also possible to define what we have called "boosted horizon", a sort of elastic wall where all particles are surprisingly pushe...

  2. Co-administration of Interleukin-2 Enhances Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses to HIV Vaccine DNA Prime/MVA Boost Regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chun-lai; YU Xiang-hui; WU Yong-ge; LI Wei; KONG Wei

    2005-01-01

    Interleukine-2(IL-2) is a growth factor for antigen-stimulated T lymphocytes and is responsible for T-cell clonal expansion after antigen recognition. It has been demonstrated that DNA vaccine-elicited immune responses in mice could be augmented substantially by using either an IL-2 protein or a plasmid expressing IL-2. Twenty mice, divided into four experimental groups, were immunized with: (1) sham plasmid; (2) HIV-1 DNA vaccine alone; (3) HIV-1 DNA vaccine and IL-2 protein; or (4) HIV-1 DNA vaccine and IL-2 plasmid, separately. All the groups were immunized 3 times at a 2-week interval. Fourteen days after the last DNA vaccine injection, recombinant MVA was injected into all the mice except those in group 1. ELISA and ELISPOT were employed to investigate the effect of IL-2 on DNA vaccine immune responses. The obtained results strongly indicate that the efficacy of HIV vaccine can be enhanced by co-administration of a plasmid encoding IL-2.

  3. Immunization with heat-inactivated Staphylococcus aureus induced an antibody response mediated by IgG1 and IgG2 in patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Romo, Gina Stella; Gonzalez-Ibarra, Misael; Donis-Hernandez, Felipe Raul; Zendejas-Buitron, Victor Manuel; Pedroza-Gonzalez, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Currently Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant pathogen isolated from the respiratory tract of patients with recurrent tonsillitis. Because of an increase in multi-drug resistant strains of S. aureus, there is a pressing need for effective treatments and preventive approaches to reduce the risk of invasive and life-threatening infections. A preventive vaccine against S. aureus would have a tremendous clinical impact. However, multiple clinical trials have failed to identify an agent that can induce protective responses. Most trials have been based on subunit vaccines using one or a few purified antigens, which may not be enough to confer protection. Here, the impact of a whole-cell vaccine comprised of heat-inactivated S. aureus was investigated in patients with RT. The vaccine was well tolerated and had no significant local or systemic reactions. Immunization with heat-inactivated S. aureus elicited a significant antibody response characterized by production of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies and, to a lesser extent, of IgA antibodies. Notably, this response was associated with an important decrease in the incidence of tonsillitis and bacterial colonization of the oropharyngeal mucosa. Our results show that whole-cell inactivated S. aureus is safe and capable of evoking specific antibody responses in patients with recurrent tonsillitis. PMID:25648612

  4. Comparison of histopathology, cultivation of tissues and rectal contents, and interferon-gamma and serum antibody responses for the diagnosis of bovine paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, A.; Jensen, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    contents, and (3) examination of repeated blood samples for interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and antibody responses. Tissue samples were taken from the small and large intestine and corresponding mesenteric lymph nodes, and from the pharyngeal tonsil and other lymphoid nodes (retropharyngeal, mediastinal...

  5. Induction of antigen-specific antibody response in human pheripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro by a dog kidney cell vaccine against rabies virus (DKCV).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Ab); H.G. Loggen; R.H.J. Bakker (Roland); J.A.A.M. van Asten (Jack); J.G. Kreeftenberg; P. van der Marel; G. van Steenis (Bert)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractIn the present report an in vitro method for obtaining a secondary human antibody response to a dog kidney cell vaccine against rabies virus (DKCV) is described. Cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal rabies-immune and nonimmune donors were stimulated in vitro by DKCV

  6. Liraglutide Treatment Is Associated with a Low Frequency and Magnitude of Antibody Formation with No Apparent Impact on Glycemic Response or Increased Frequency of Adverse Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buse, John B; Garber, Alan; Rosenstock, Julio;

    2011-01-01

    Context: Therapeutic proteins/peptides can produce immunogenic responses that may increase the risk of adverse events or reduce efficacy. Objective: The objectives were to measure and characterize antibody formation to liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, to investigate the...

  7. Long term response to interferon treatment in chronic hepatitis C patients is associated with a significant reduction in anti-E1 envelope antibody titers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depraetere, S; Van Kerschaever, E; Van Vlierberghe, H; Elewaut, A; Brouwer, J T; Niesters, H G; Schalm, S W; Maertens, G; Leroux-Roels, G

    2000-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) alfa has been used widely for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections but only a small number of patients treated have shown a sustained biochemical and virological response. Anti-envelope E1 and E2 antibody titers were assessed retrospectively before, during, an

  8. Influence of strain and dose of virus and age at inoculation on subgroup J avian leukosis virus persistence, antibody response and oncogenicity in commercial meat-type chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of viral strain and dose, and age at inoculation on Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV J) persistence, neutralizing antibody (NAb) response, and tumors were studied in commercial meat-type chickens. Chickens were inoculated on the 5th day of embryonation (5 ED) or on day of hatch (DOH...

  9. Immunogenicities of Env glycoproteins from circulating HIV-1 isolates in China focusing on the strategy of "DNA prime plus protein boost"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng; WANG Shi-xia; LIU Si-yang; BAO Zuo-yi; ZHUANG Dao-min; LI Lin; ZHANG Chun-hua; ZHANG Lu; LI Jing-yun; LU Shan

    2009-01-01

    Background The adenovirus-based HIV-1 vaccine developed by Merck Company suffered from an unexpected failure in September 2007. This generated a big shift in the strategy of HIV vaccine development with renewed focus on the induction of neutralizing antibodies. A major challenge in developing an HIV-1 vaccine is to identify immunogens and adopt delivery methods that can elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies against primary isolates of different genetic subtypes.Methods Most circulating HIV-1 isolates in China are composed of clades Thai-B, CRF_BC and CRF01_AE. In order to construct DNA vaccines against these 3 HIV-1 subtypes, DNA vaccines carrying the gp120 regions from HIV-1 isolates of GX48(AE), GX79(AE), NX22(BC), GS22(BC), HN24(Thai-B) were constructed. Expression of gp120 from these DNA vaccines was detected by Western blotting in transiently transfected 293T cells. Pilot immunizations of New Zealand white rabbits were performed using the strategy of "DNA prime plus protein boost" and the neutralizing antibody response was detected in a Tzm-bl cell based assay against different HIV-1 strains.Results Response of gp120-specific antibody was relatively low after DNA primes (mean titer=10~(4.72)); however, the titer of gp120-specific antibody went up with 2 protein boosts (mean titer=10~(6.81)). Above all, neutralizing antibody (Nab) titers induced by this combined approach were much better than those elicited by DNA or protein used alone (P <0.01). Neutralizing activities of immunized rabbit sera against several pseudoviruses and laboratorial strains were evaluated, most rabbit sera primed with monovalent vaccine were capable of neutralizing only 1 of 5 viruses, however, sera primed with the polyvalent DNA vaccines were able to neutralize at least 2 of 5 viruses.Conclusion Polyvalent DNA prime plus protein boost is an effective immunization strategy to broaden the neutralization breadth and further research should be performed on the basis of this pilot study.

  10. Soluble human CD4 elicits an antibody response in rhesus monkeys that inhibits simian immunodeficiency virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhesus monkeys infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques (SIVmac) demonstrate significant virologic and clinical improvement as a result of treatment with human recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4). The authors show that human rsCD4 does not efficiently inhibit SIVmac replication in bone marrow macrophages of rhesus monkeys and does not significantly augment bone marrow hematopoietic colony formation in vitro. However, plasma of human rsCD4-treated rhesus monkeys does exhibit significant anti-SIVmac activity in vitro. Plasma of these animals efficiently blocks SIVmac replicaton in peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow macrophages. It also increases granulocyte/macrophage colony formation in vitro by bone marrow cells of SIVmac-infected monkeys. This plasma and the IgG fraction of plasma from a rhesus monkey immunized with human rsCD4 in adjuvant demonstrate reactivity with a soluble form of the rhesus monkey CD4 molecule, exhibit binding to CD4+ but not CD8+ concanavalin A-activated rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes, and precipitate the CD4 molecule from surface-labeled activated rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-viral activity is demonstrable in the IgG fraction of plasma from a human rsCD4-immunized monkey. These studies raise the possibility that a modified human CD4 molecule serving as an immunogen might elicit an antibody response that could potentially induce a beneficial therapeutic response in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals

  11. Comparative evaluation of antibody response in rabbits vaccinated with toxoid, alum precipitated and alum precipitated oil adjuvant enterotoxaemia vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Rai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the newly formulated enterotoxaemia vaccine having oil and alum adjuvants, with presently available toxoid and alum precipitated vaccines. Materials and Methods: Three types of enterotoxaemia vaccines, namely toxoid (TV, alum precipitated (APV and alum precipitated oil adjuvant vaccine (AOV were prepared using a highly toxigenic strain of Clostridium perfringens type D procured from Division of Biological Standardization, IVRI, Izatnagar. Humoral immunity generated in rabbits with these vaccines was then quantified using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and mice neutralization test (MNT. Results: Out of three enterotoxaemia vaccines tested, alum precipitated oil adjuvant vaccine produced higher and persistent antibody titre for more than 45 days without any booster dose and did not produce any untoward reactions at the injection site. Alum precipitated vaccine elicited better and persistent immune response than toxoid vaccine though it was less than alum precipitated oil adjuvant vaccine. In MNT, alum precipitated and alum precipitated oil adjuvant vaccines showed protection at 45th day of post vaccination while toxoid vaccine showed only up to 28th day. Conclusion: Results of the study unfolded the synergistic role of adjuvants in the induction of better and persistent immune response and also indicated the superiority of alum precipitated oil adjuvant vaccine over the currently available toxoid and alum precipitated enterotoxaemia vaccines. [Vet World 2013; 6(4.000: 200-204

  12. Presence of maternal anti-HBs antibodies does not influence hepatitis B vaccine response in Brazilian neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza N Junqueira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it was suggested that maternal hepatitis B surface antigen antibodies (anti-HBs acquired transplacentally could play a negative role in newborn infants' immune response to the hepatitis B vaccine. We compared the hepatitis B virus (HBV vaccine response in infants born to mothers previously vaccinated against HBV (n = 91 to infants born to mothers who were not previously vaccinated (n = 221. All newborn infants received three intramuscular doses (10 μg of HBV vaccine (Butang® at 0,1 and six months. The first dose was administered at the maternity hospital within 12 h of birth. The geometric mean titres of anti-HBs were not different among newborn infants born to mothers who were anti-HBs-negative (492.7 mIU/mL and anti-HBs-positive (578.7 mIU/mL (p = 0.38. Eight infants did not respond to the HBV vaccine. Of them, six were born to anti-HBs-negative mothers and two were born to mothers with anti-HBs titres less than 50 mlU/mL. Despite the mother's anti-HBs-positive status, our data show a good immunogenicity of the Brazilian HBV recombinant vaccine in neonates.

  13. Chronic spinal cord injury impairs primary antibody responses, but spares existing humoral immunity in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Oropallo, Michael A.; HELD, KATHERINE S.; Goenka, Radhika; Ahmad, Sifat A.; O’Neill, Patrick J.; Steward, Oswald; Lane, Thomas E.; Cancro, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in immune depression. To better understand how injury inhibits humoral immunity, the effects of chronic thoracic SCI on B cell development and immune responses to thymus-independent (TI) type-2 and thymus-dependent (TD) antigens were determined. Mice received complete crush injury or control laminectomy at either thoracic level 3 (T3), which disrupts descending autonomic control of the spleen, or at T9, which conserves most splenic sympathetic activity. Althou...

  14. Analysis of Heavy-Chain Antibody Responses and Resistance to Parelaphostrongylus tenuis in Experimentally Infected Alpacas

    OpenAIRE

    Purdy, S. R.; Gagliardo, L. F.; Lefman, S.; Hamel, P. J. S.; Ku, S.; Mainini, T.; Hoyt, G.; Justus, K.; Daley-Bauer, L. P.; Duffy, M. S.; Appleton, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The parasitic nematode Parelaphostrongylus tenuis is an important cause of neurologic disease of camelids in central and eastern North America. The aim of this study was to determine whether alpacas develop resistance to disease caused by P. tenuis in response to a previous infection or a combination of controlled infection and immunization. Alpacas were immunized with a homogenate of third-stage larvae (L3) and simultaneously implanted subcutaneously with diffusion chambers containing 20 liv...

  15. Maternal HIV-1 envelope–specific antibody responses and reduced risk of perinatal transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Sallie R Permar; Fong, Youyi; Vandergrift, Nathan; Genevieve G Fouda; Gilbert, Peter; Parks, Robert,; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Pollara, Justin; Martelli, Amanda; Liebl, Brooke E.; Lloyd, Krissey; Yates, Nicole L.; Overman, R. Glenn; Shen, Xiaoying; Whitaker, Kaylan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the wide availability of antiretroviral drugs, more than 250,000 infants are vertically infected with HIV-1 annually, emphasizing the need for additional interventions to eliminate pediatric HIV-1 infections. Here, we aimed to define humoral immune correlates of risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1, including responses associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial. Eighty-three untreated, HIV-1–transmitting mothers and 165 propensity score–mat...

  16. Antibody responses to virion polypeptides in gnotobiotic dogs infected with canine distemper virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Miele, J A; KRAKOWKA, S

    1983-01-01

    A radioimmunoprecipitation-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis technique was applied to sera from canine distemper virus-infected dogs. Sera from fatally infected dogs precipitated only the nucleoprotein, the matrix protein, and trace amounts of fusion glycoprotein. Sera from normal convalescent dogs precipitated all five major polypeptides. In contrast, sera from persistently infected dogs were characterized by a modest overall response compared with sera from convalescent dogs and by no or l...

  17. Prevention and Reversal of Antibody Responses Against Factor IX in Gene Therapy for Hemophilia B

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Sushrusha; Sarkar, Debalina; Perrin, George Q; Moghimi, Babak; Hoffman, Brad E; Zhou, Shangzhen; Byrne, Barry J.; Herzog, Roland W

    2011-01-01

    Intramuscular (IM) administration of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector represents a simple and safe method of gene transfer for treatment of the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B (factor IX, F.IX, deficiency). However, the approach is hampered by an increased risk of immune responses against F.IX. Previously, we demonstrated that the drug cocktail of immune suppressants rapamycin, IL-10, and a specific peptide (encoding a dominant CD4+ T cell epitope) caused an induction of regulat...

  18. A monoclonal antibody (8H3) that binds to rat T lineage cells and augments in vitro proliferative responses

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody, designated 8H3, recognizes a cell surface antigen expressed exclusively on rat T lineage cells. 8H3 antibody immunoprecipitated 180-, 120-, and 90-kD components from rat thymocytes as well as splenic T cells under nonreducing conditions. 8H3 antibody specifically inhibited the binding of thymocytes to fibronectin. Furthermore, binding of rat thymocytes to immobilized synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro-Cys-BSA was inhibited by 8H3 antibody as was Gly-Arg-Gl...

  19. Antibody isotype responses to egg antigens in human chronic Schistosomiasis mansoni before and after treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Yara M

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present communication we analyzed the levels of IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4 and IgE isotypes to soluble egg antigen of Schistosoma mansoni by ELISA in individuals from an endemic area for schistosomiasis in Northeast Brazil. The analysis was performed before and after treatment to evaluate the age-dependent pattern, and to identify differences in the reactivities to antigens. Our results suggest that schistosomiasis treatment would not interfere with this sort of immune response.

  20. Can you boost your metabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more calories than fat. So will building more muscle not boost your metabolism? Yes, but only by a small amount. Most ... you burn. Plus, when not in active use, muscles burn very few calories. Most ... most of your metabolism. What to do: Lift weights for stronger bones ...

  1. Impaired Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific Neutralizing Antibody Response during Acute Infectious Mononucleosis Is Coincident with Global B-Cell Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkar, Archana; Smith, Corey; Hislop, Andrew; Tellam, Nick; Dasari, Vijayendra; Hogquist, Kristin A; Wykes, Michelle; Moss, Denis J; Rickinson, Alan; Balfour, Henry H; Khanna, Rajiv

    2015-09-01

    Here we present evidence for previously unappreciated B-cell immune dysregulation during acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated infectious mononucleosis (IM). Longitudinal analyses revealed that patients with acute IM have undetectable EBV-specific neutralizing antibodies and gp350-specific B-cell responses, which were associated with a significant reduction in memory B cells and no evidence of circulating antibody-secreting cells. These observations correlate with dysregulation of tumor necrosis factor family members BAFF and APRIL and increased expression of FAS on circulating B cells. PMID:26109734

  2. "PERSISTENCE OF ANTI-HBs ANTIBODIES IN HEALTHY IRANIAN CHILDREN VACCINATED WITH RECOMBINANT HEPATITIS B VACCINE AND RESPONSE TO A BOOSTER DOSE"

    OpenAIRE

    Jafarzadeh, A; S. M. A. Sajjadi

    2005-01-01

    Long-term protection against hepatitis B virus (HBV) is dependent on persistence of anti-HBs antibodies and/or strong immunological memory. In this study we evaluated the persistence of anti-HBs antibodies in healthy Iranian children 5 years after primary vaccination and the response to a booster dose using recombinant hepatitis B vaccine. Totally, 81 children who had received primary course of hepatitis B vaccine at 0, 1.5 and 9 months of age were included in this study. A booster dose of he...

  3. Removing N-Terminal Sequences in Pre-S1 Domain Enhanced Antibody and B-Cell Responses by an HBV Large Surface Antigen DNA Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Guohong Ge; Shixia Wang; Yaping Han; Chunhua Zhang; Shan Lu; Zuhu Huang

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of recombinant hepatitis B virus surface (HBsAg) protein vaccine has successfully reduced global hepatitis B infection, there are still a number of vaccine recipients who do not develop detectable antibody responses. Various novel vaccination approaches, including DNA vaccines, have been used to further improve the coverage of vaccine protection. Our previous studies demonstrated that HBsAg-based DNA vaccines could induce both humoral and CMI responses in experimental animal ...

  4. Merozoite surface protein 2 allelic variation influences the specific antibody response during acute malaria in individuals from a Brazilian endemic area

    OpenAIRE

    Selma Sallenave-Sales; Clarissa Perez Faria; Mariano Gustavo Zalis; Cláudio Tadeu Daniel-Ribeiro; Maria de Fátima Ferreira-da-Cruz

    2007-01-01

    The antibody response to Plasmodium falciparum parasites of naturally infected population is critical to elucidate the role of polymorphic alleles in malaria. Thus, we evaluated the impact of antigenic diversity of repetitive and family dimorphic domains of the merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP-2) on immune response of 96 individuals living in Peixoto de Azevedo (MT-Brazil), by ELISA using recombinant MSP-2 proteins. The majority of these individuals were carrying FC27-type infections. IgG ant...

  5. Boosting Applied to Word Sense Disambiguation

    OpenAIRE

    Escudero, Gerard; Marquez, Lluis; Rigau, German

    2000-01-01

    In this paper Schapire and Singer's AdaBoost.MH boosting algorithm is applied to the Word Sense Disambiguation (WSD) problem. Initial experiments on a set of 15 selected polysemous words show that the boosting approach surpasses Naive Bayes and Exemplar-based approaches, which represent state-of-the-art accuracy on supervised WSD. In order to make boosting practical for a real learning domain of thousands of words, several ways of accelerating the algorithm by reducing the feature space are s...

  6. Evaluation of mucosal and systemic immune responses elicited by GPI-0100- adjuvanted influenza vaccine delivered by different immunization strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    Full Text Available Vaccines for protection against respiratory infections should optimally induce a mucosal immune response in the respiratory tract in addition to a systemic immune response. However, current parenteral immunization modalities generally fail to induce mucosal immunity, while mucosal vaccine delivery often results in poor systemic immunity. In order to find an immunization strategy which satisfies the need for induction of both mucosal and systemic immunity, we compared local and systemic immune responses elicited by two mucosal immunizations, given either by the intranasal (IN or the intrapulmonary (IPL route, with responses elicited by a mucosal prime followed by a systemic boost immunization. The study was conducted in BALB/c mice and the vaccine formulation was an influenza subunit vaccine supplemented with GPI-0100, a saponin-derived adjuvant. While optimal mucosal antibody titers were obtained after two intrapulmonary vaccinations, optimal systemic antibody responses were achieved by intranasal prime followed by intramuscular boost. The latter strategy also resulted in the best T cell response, yet, it was ineffective in inducing nose or lung IgA. Successful induction of secretory IgA, IgG and T cell responses was only achieved with prime-boost strategies involving intrapulmonary immunization and was optimal when both immunizations were given via the intrapulmonary route. Our results underline that immunization via the lungs is particularly effective for priming as well as boosting of local and systemic immune responses.

  7. Evaluation of Mucosal and Systemic Immune Responses Elicited by GPI-0100- Adjuvanted Influenza Vaccine Delivered by Different Immunization Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng; Patil, Harshad P.; de Vries-Idema, Jacqueline; Wilschut, Jan; Huckriede, Anke

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines for protection against respiratory infections should optimally induce a mucosal immune response in the respiratory tract in addition to a systemic immune response. However, current parenteral immunization modalities generally fail to induce mucosal immunity, while mucosal vaccine delivery often results in poor systemic immunity. In order to find an immunization strategy which satisfies the need for induction of both mucosal and systemic immunity, we compared local and systemic immune responses elicited by two mucosal immunizations, given either by the intranasal (IN) or the intrapulmonary (IPL) route, with responses elicited by a mucosal prime followed by a systemic boost immunization. The study was conducted in BALB/c mice and the vaccine formulation was an influenza subunit vaccine supplemented with GPI-0100, a saponin-derived adjuvant. While optimal mucosal antibody titers were obtained after two intrapulmonary vaccinations, optimal systemic antibody responses were achieved by intranasal prime followed by intramuscular boost. The latter strategy also resulted in the best T cell response, yet, it was ineffective in inducing nose or lung IgA. Successful induction of secretory IgA, IgG and T cell responses was only achieved with prime-boost strategies involving intrapulmonary immunization and was optimal when both immunizations were given via the intrapulmonary route. Our results underline that immunization via the lungs is particularly effective for priming as well as boosting of local and systemic immune responses. PMID:23936066

  8. Anti-Inulin [β-(2→1)-Linked Polyfructose] and Anti-Grass Levan [β-(2→6)-Linked Polyfructose] Antibody Response in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    Anti-inulin [β-(2 → 1) polyfructosan Brucella abortus (InuBA)] and anti-grass levan [β-(2 → 6) polyfructosan] antibody responses in BALB/c and C57BL mice and in their F1 and backcross progeny, as well as in immunoglobulin congenic and Bailey recombinant inbred strains derived from BALB/c and C57BL mice, were examined. The anti-inulin antibodies could accommodate both β-(2 → 1)- and β-(2 → 6)-linked polyfructosans, and 97% of the anti-inulin plaque-forming cells (PFC) from BALB/c mice expressed the cross-reactive idiotypes (InuIdX) shared by the BALB/c inulin- and levan-binding myeloma proteins. Of the C57BL mice, only 25% produced high anti-inulin response, and none exhibited the InuIdX of BALB/c anti-inulin antibodies. The percentages of InuIdX+ anti-inulin PFC were also examined in other strains with high anti-inulin response. In C58 and AL mice, 80% of anti-inulin PFC were InuIdX+, whereas in A/He and RIII mice, only 40% were InuIdX+. All strains examined developed high anti-grass levan response, and the antibodies were specific for β-(2 → 6) structures and did not exhibit InuIdX. Comparison of the magnitude of the anti-inulin antibody titers in response to InuBA in BALB/c, C57BL, and their F1 and backcross progeny, as well as in immunoglobulin congenic (i.e., B.C-8, BAB-14, and C.B-20) and recombinant inbred strains derived from BALB/c and C57BL mice, showed that all mice having the IgCHa(BALB/c) allotype gave high anti-inulin response. In addition to the InuIdX structural genes, the effects of allotype-linked or unlinked “regulatory” genes were also indicated by the lower anti-inulin response in B.C-8 and BAB-14 mice compared with BALB/c mice and the higher anti-inulin response in C.B-20 mice compared with C57BL mice. A multigene interaction in controlling the production of the anti-inulin antibodies was implicated. PMID:6769806

  9. Application of 125I-labelled soluble proteins in the histoautoradiographic detection of antigen and antibodies in the spleen of rabbits during primary immune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An autoradiographic method for detecting soluble antigen (chicken serum albumin, CSA) and specific antibodies in the spleen of rabbits during a primary immune response is described. The method consists of incubating sections from the spleen with 125I-labelled IgG2 anti CSA (for demonstration of antigen) or with 125I-labelled antigen (for demonstration of specific antibodies). This treatment of histological sections combines the advantages and principles of the immunofluorescence technique with the possibility of evaluating the exact localization of the proteins by light microscopy in preparations stained with haematoxylin or methyl green-pyronin. The sensitivity of detection is very high: both antigen and antibodies could be demonstrated in the spleen follicles for as long as 42 days after the primary intravenous injection

  10. Synergistic innate and adaptive immune response to combination immunotherapy with anti-tumor antigen antibodies and extended serum half-life IL-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Eric F; Gai, Shuning A; Opel, Cary F; Kwan, Byron H; Surana, Rishi; Mihm, Martin C; Kauke, Monique J; Moynihan, Kelly D; Angelini, Alessandro; Williams, Robert T; Stephan, Matthias T; Kim, Jacob S; Yaffe, Michael B; Irvine, Darrell J; Weiner, Louis M; Dranoff, Glenn; Wittrup, K Dane

    2015-04-13

    Cancer immunotherapies under development have generally focused on either stimulating T cell immunity or driving antibody-directed effector functions of the innate immune system such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). We find that a combination of an anti-tumor antigen antibody and an untargeted IL-2 fusion protein with delayed systemic clearance induces significant tumor control in aggressive isogenic tumor models via a concerted innate and adaptive response involving neutrophils, NK cells, macrophages, and CD8(+) T cells. This combination therapy induces an intratumoral "cytokine storm" and extensive lymphocyte infiltration. Adoptive transfer of anti-tumor T cells together with this combination therapy leads to robust cures of established tumors and development of immunological memory. PMID:25873172

  11. A prime-boost immunization with Tc52 N-terminal domain DNA and the recombinant protein expressed in Pichia pastoris protects against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Marina N; Sánchez Alberti, Andrés; Morales, Celina; Cazorla, Silvia I; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2016-06-14

    We have previously reported that the N-terminal domain of the antigen Tc52 (NTc52) is the section of the protein that confers the strongest protection against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. To improve vaccine efficacy, we conducted here a prime-boost strategy (NTc52PB) by inoculating two doses of pcDNA3.1 encoding the NTc52 DNA carried by attenuated Salmonella (SNTc52), followed by two doses of recombinant NTc52 expressed in Picchia pastoris plus ODN-CpG as adjuvant. This strategy was comparatively analyzed with the following protocols: (1) two doses of NTc52+ODN-CpG by intranasal route followed by two doses of NTc52+ODN-CpG by intradermal route (NTc52CpG); (2) four doses of SNTc52; and (3) a control group with four doses of Salmonella carrying the empty plasmid. All immunized groups developed a predominant Th1 cellular immune response but with important differences in antibody development and protection against infection. Thus, immunization with just SNTc52 induces a strong specific cellular response, a specific systemic antibody response that is weak yet functional (considering lysis of trypomastigotes and inhibition of cell invasion), and IgA mucosal immunity, protecting in both the acute and chronic stages of infection. The group that received only recombinant protein (NTc52CpG) developed a strong antibody immune response but weaker cellular immunity than the other groups, and the protection against infection was clear in the acute phase of infection but not in chronicity. The prime-boost strategy, which combines DNA and protein vaccine and both mucosal and systemic immunizations routes, was the best assayed protocol, inducing strong cellular and humoral responses as well as specific mucosal IgA, thus conferring better protection in the acute and chronic stages of infection. PMID:27177947

  12. The time course of the specific antibody response by various ELISAs in pigs experimentally infected with Toxoplasma gondii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Peter; Haugegaard, J.; Wingstrand, Anne;

    1997-01-01

    With the aim of developing routine serological tests for monitoring the Toxoplasma infection status of Danish swine herds, four ELISAs based on tachyzoite antigen were set up: (1) an indirect ELISA for IgG-antibody; (2) a blocking ELISA for antibody to the membrane antigen, P-30; (3) an indirect ...

  13. Altered immune response of immature dendritic cells upon dengue virus infection in the presence of specific antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres, Silvia; Flipse, Jacky; Upasani, Vinit C; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) replication is known to prevent maturation of infected DCs thereby impeding the development of adequate immunity. During secondary DENV infection, dengue-specific antibodies can suppress DENV replication in immature DCs (immDCs), however how dengue-antibody complexes (DENV-IC) in

  14. A New Potent Route of DNA Vaccine Inoculation: DNA-Liposome Complexes on Bare Skin Induce Antigen-Special Antibody Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Duan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous immunization is a novel strategy for genetic vaccine immunization to induce detectable antigen-special antibody in humor and mucosal. In this study, plasmid expressing hepatitis B surface antigen (pGFP-HBsAg was encapsulated in liposome, then DNA- liposome complexes were glued on bare skin of mice ear in different dosage (50μg, 10μg and 1μg. As control, DNA- liposome complexes of pGFP-HBsAg and pGFP vector were inoculated intraperitoneally. The anti-HBsAg antibodies of serum were detected weekly by ELISA. It was found that the detectable antibodies of transcutaneous immunized mouse were elicited after four weeks, and reached a maximum at the sixth week. Even 1μg plasmid DNA in liposomes through immune skin can elicit the highest ELISA antibody titer (> 1:512 in test group, and corresponding percentage of positive response is up to 71% at sixth week, but higher amounts of plasmid DNA (50μg DNA per mice on immune skin cannot induce higher antibody levels. The result showed that DNA- liposome complexes glued on bare skin appear to be a novel method for the administration of DNA vaccines.

  15. Detection of antibody responses by using haemagglutination inhibiton test and the protection titer of avian influenza virus H5N1 subtype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Indriani

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Study on the detection of antibody responses using haemagglutination inhibition (HI test and the protection titer to Avian influenza (AI virus H5N1 subtype local isolate has been conducted at the Research Institute for Veterinary Science (RIVS. A total number of 50 village chicken (10 chicken served as un-injected controls and 30 quail were injected intramuscularly with inactivated virus of AI H5N1 subtype local isolate. Serum samples were collected 3 weeks after injection and were tested using haemagglutination inhibition tests. The correlation between antibody titer and its protection to AI virus H5N1 local isolate were measured by challenging the birds with AI virus H5N1 local isolate The HI test was then used to determine field serum samples. A total number of 48 village chicken from three (3 Districts (Bekasi, Tangerang and Bogor and 96 quails from two (2 farms in District of Sukabumi which were all vaccinated with commercial AI adjuvant vaccine were sampled. The study revealed that village chicken and quails showed antibody responses after 3 weeks vaccination and that titer of ≥ 3 log 2 was able to protect chicken and quails when they were challenged with local isolate virus. Based on this result, village chicken field samples from Districts of Tangerang, Bekasi and Bogor showed antibody titer which will protect 50, 100 and 85% of the flocks respectively. While quail field samples from Farm I and Farm II in District of Sukabumi showed antibody titer which will protect 60-100% and 0-80% of the flocks respectively. It is concluded that the study has successfully measured antibody titer to AI virus H5N1 subtype which protect village chicken and quails from local isolate virus challenge so that the results will be used to analyze field serum samples after vaccination program to eradicate AI from Indonesia.

  16. Suppression of unprimed T and B cells in antibody responses by irradiation-resistant and plastic-adherent suppressor cells in Toxoplasma gondii-infected mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the acute phase of Toxoplasma infection, the function of both helper T and B cells was suppressed in primary antibody responses to dinitrophenol (DNP)-conjugated protein antigens. During the course of infection, the suppressive effect on T cells seems to continue longer than that on B cells, since suppression in responses to sheep erythrocytes, a T-dependent antigen, persisted longer than those to DNP-Ficoll, a T-independent antigen. Plastic-adherent cells from the spleens of Toxoplasma-infected and X-irradiated (400 rads) mice had strong suppressor activity in primary anti-sheep erythrocyte antibody responses of normal mouse spleen cells in vitro. These data suggest that the activation of irradiation-resistant and plastic-adherent suppressor cells causes the suppression of both T and B cells in Toxoplasma-infected mice

  17. Candidate Multi-Peptide-Vaccine Against Classical Swine Fever Virus Induces Strong Antibody Response with Predefined Specificity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张耿; 董晓楠; 陈应华

    2002-01-01

    Previous investigations demonstrated that the envelope glycoprotein E2 (gp55) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the most immunogenic protein. Interestingly, recombinant protein E2 that contains only one structural antigenic unit (unit B/C or A) could protect pigs from a lethal challenge of CSFV. Based on these findings, we designed and prepared five overlapping synthetic peptides that covered the sequence unit B/C (aa 693-777) of Shimen E2 and conjugated individual peptides with bovine serum albumin (BSA). After the vaccination, the specificity of the rabbit sera was analyzed in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). The results show that each of the five candidate peptide-vaccines can successfully induce a high titer of specific antibodies in New Zealand White Rabbits (n=3). Subsequently, the five candidate peptide-vaccines were applied in combination for immunization of pigs (n=10) and induced specific and strong humoral responses against all of the five designed peptides in pigs. Our studies indicate that the candidate multi-peptide-vaccine would prove an excellent marker vaccine against CSFV and provide a model for developing effective synthetic peptide vaccines to stop viral epidemics in humans and animals.

  18. Combination peptide immunotherapy suppresses antibody and helper T-cell responses to the RhD protein in HLA-transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lindsay S; Hall, Andrew M; Pickford, Wendy; Vickers, Mark A; Urbaniak, Stanislaw J; Barker, Robert N

    2014-03-01

    The offspring from pregnancies of women who have developed anti-D blood group antibodies are at risk of hemolytic disease of the newborn. We have previously mapped four peptides containing immunodominant T-helper cell epitopes from the RhD protein and the purpose of the work was to develop these into a product for suppression of established anti-D responses. A panel of each of the four immunodominant RhD peptides was synthesized with modifications to improve manufacturability and solubility, and screened for retention of recognition by human T-helper cells. A selected version of each sequence was combined in a mixture (RhDPmix), which was tested for suppressive ability in a humanized murine model of established immune responses to RhD protein. After HLA-DR15 transgenic mice had been immunized with RhD protein, a single dose of RhDPmix, given either intranasally (P=0.008, Mann-Whitney rank sum test) or subcutaneously (P=0.043), rapidly and significantly suppressed the ongoing antibody response. This was accompanied by reduced T-helper cell responsiveness, although this change was less marked for subcutaneous RhDPmix delivery, and by the recruitment of cells with a regulatory T-cell phenotype. The results support human trials of RhDPmix peptide immunotherapy in women with established antibody responses to the RhD blood group. PMID:24441145

  19. Synonymous Deoptimization of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Causes Attenuation In Vivo while Inducing a Strong Neutralizing Antibody Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Medina, Gisselle N.; Ramirez-Medina, Elizabeth; Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Koster, Marla; Grubman, Marvin J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Codon bias deoptimization has been previously used to successfully attenuate human pathogens, including poliovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus. We have applied a similar technology to deoptimize the capsid-coding region (P1) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Despite the introduction of 489 nucleotide changes (19%), synonymous deoptimization of the P1 region rendered a viable FMDV progeny. The resulting strain was stable and reached cell culture titers similar to those obtained for wild-type (WT) virus, but at reduced specific infectivity. Studies in mice showed that 100% of animals inoculated with the FMDV A12 P1 deoptimized mutant (A12-P1 deopt) survived, even when the animals were infected at doses 100 times higher than the dose required to cause death by WT virus. All mice inoculated with the A12-P1 deopt mutant developed a strong antibody response and were protected against subsequent lethal challenge with WT virus at 21 days postinoculation. Remarkably, the vaccine safety margin was at least 1,000-fold higher for A12-P1 deopt than for WT virus. Similar patterns of attenuation were observed in swine, in which animals inoculated with A12-P1 deopt virus did not develop clinical disease until doses reached 1,000 to 10,000 times the dose required to cause severe disease in 2 days with WT A12. Consistently, high levels of antibody titers were induced, even at the lowest dose tested. These results highlight the potential use of synonymous codon pair deoptimization as a strategy to safely attenuate FMDV and further develop live attenuated vaccine candidates to control such a feared livestock disease. IMPORTANCE Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most feared viral diseases that can affect livestock. Although this disease appeared to be contained in developed nations by the end of the last century, recent outbreaks in Europe, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, etc., have demonstrated that infection can spread rapidly, causing

  20. Toll-like receptor 5 is not essential for the promotion of secretory immunoglobulin A antibody responses to flagellated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptor 5 recognizes bacterial flagellin, plays a critical role in innate immunity, and contributes to flagellin-specific humoral immunity. Further, TLR5-expressing dendritic cells play an important role in IgA synthesis in the intestine; however, the contribution of TLR5 to antigen (Ag)-specific mucosal immunity remains unclear. Thus, whether TLR5 is essential for the induction of intestinal secretory (S)IgA antibody (Ab) responses against flagellin and bacterial Ags attached to the bacterial surface in response to an oral flagellated bacterium, Salmonella, was explored in this study. Our results indicate that when TLR5 knockout (TLR5(-/-)) mice are orally immunized with recombinant Salmonella expressing fragment C of tetanus toxin (rSalmonella-Tox C), tetanus toxoid (TT)- and flagellin (FliC)-specific systemic IgG and intestinal SIgA Abs are elicited. The numbers of TT-specific IgG Ab-forming cells (AFCs) in the spleen and IgA AFCs in the lamina propria (LP) of TLR5(-/-) mice were comparable to those in wild-type mice. rSalmonella-Tox C was equally disseminated in TLR5(-/-) mice, TLR5(-/-) mice lacking Peyer's patches (PPs), and wild-type mice. In contrast, TLR5(-/-) PP-null mice failed to induce TT- and FliC-specific SIgA Abs in the intestine and showed significantly reduced numbers of TT-specific IgA AFCs in the LP. These results suggest that TLR5 is dispensable for the induction of flagellin and surface Ag-specific systemic and mucosal immunity against oral flagellated bacteria. Rather, pathogen recognition, which occurs in PPs, is a prerequisite for the induction of mucosal immunity against flagellated bacteria. PMID:26564803