WorldWideScience

Sample records for book endangered species

  1. Texas Endangered Species Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kathleen Marie; Campbell, Linda

    This publication is the result of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Division's (TPWD's) commitment to education and the fertile partnerships formed between TPWD biologists and educators. This activity book brings together the expertise and practical knowledge of a classroom teacher with the technical knowledge and skills of a TPWD biologist and artist.…

  2. Book review: Implementing the Endangered Species Act on the Platte Basin water commons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherfy, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    The Platte River is a unique midcontinent ecosystem that is world-renowned for its natural resources, particularly the spectacular spring concentrations of migratory birds, such as sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis), ducks, and geese. The Platte River basin also provides habitat for four federally listed endangered or threatened species—interior least tern (Sternula antillarum athalassos), piping plover (Charadrius melodus), whooping crane (G. americana), and pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus)—that require specific hydrological conditions in order for habitat to be suitable. Flows on the Platte River are subject to regulation by a number of dams, and it is heavily relied upon for irrigation in Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska. Accordingly, it also has become a political battleground for the simple reason that the demand for water exceeds supply. David Freeman’s book takes a detailed look at water-use issues on the Platte River, focusing on how implementation of the Endangered Species Act influences decision-making about water allocations. 

  3. Endangered Species Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  4. Endangered Species Act Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Critical habitat (CH) is designated for the survival and recovery of species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Critical...

  5. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The Endangered Species Act and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act are major federal statutes designed to protect plant and animal resources from adverse effects due to development projects. Both Acts require consultation with wildlife authorities prior to committing resources to certain types of projects. The purposes and requirements of the two statutes are summarized in the following subsections. Also presented is a list of contacts in the regional and field offices of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

  6. California Endangered Species Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Los Angeles.

    This document was developed in response to California Senate Bill No. 885, "The Endangered Species Education Project," that called for a statewide program in which schools adopt a local endangered species, research past and current efforts to preserve the species' habitat, develop and implement an action plan to educate the community about the…

  7. 76 FR 74778 - Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA850 Endangered Species AGENCY: National Marine..., notice was published in the Federal Register (76 FR 33703) that a request for a scientific research... with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and Floy tags, if untagged; and sample genetic fin...

  8. 75 FR 53708 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  9. 78 FR 57650 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  10. 78 FR 16703 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  11. 76 FR 50751 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  12. 76 FR 20004 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  13. 76 FR 14424 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  14. 78 FR 55287 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  15. 77 FR 37700 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with ] endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows...

  16. 75 FR 20857 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  17. 75 FR 66123 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  18. 75 FR 69699 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  19. 75 FR 79387 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  20. 75 FR 23287 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  1. 78 FR 37840 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act), prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a...

  2. 78 FR 27249 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  3. 76 FR 6490 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... conduct certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such...

  4. Threatened & Endangered Species Occurrences

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The database consists of a single statewide coverage of location records for 54 species contained in the Kansas Natural Heritage Inventory database of the Kansas...

  5. Save Our Species: Protecting Endangered Species from Pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This full-size poster profiles 11 wildlife species that are endangered. Color illustrations of animals and plants are accompanied by narrative describing their habitats and reasons for endangerment. The reverse side of the poster contains information on the Endangered Species Act, why protecting endangered and threatened species is important, how…

  6. Endangered Species & Biodiversity: A Classroom Project & Theme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro, Brook

    2012-01-01

    Students discover the factors contributing to species losses worldwide by conducting a project about endangered species as a component of a larger classroom theme of biodiversity. Groups conduct research using online endangered- species databases and present results to the class using PowerPoint. Students will improve computer research abilities…

  7. Endangered Species: Real Life in Two Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Lynette K.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of "Endangered Species: Real Life in Two Dimensions" is to create awareness about a critical environmental issue. There is a special urgency to this project because large numbers of animal species are currently endangered or on the brink of extinction. In addition to being enlightened about this important topic through research, students…

  8. ESUSA: US endangered species distribution file

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, J.; Calef, C.E.

    1979-10-01

    This report describes a file containing distribution data on endangered species of the United States of Federal concern pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Included for each species are (a) the common name, (b) the scientific name, (c) the family, (d) the group (mammal, bird, etc.), (e) Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) listing and recovery priorities, (f) the Federal legal status, (g) the geographic distribution by counties or islands, (h) Federal Register citations and (i) the sources of the information on distribution of the species. Status types are endangered, threatened, proposed, formally under review, candidate, deleted, and rejected. Distribution is by Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) county code and is of four types: designated critical habitat, present range, potential range, and historic range.

  9. ESUSA: U. S. endangered species distribution file

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, J; Calef, C E

    1978-05-01

    A file containing distribution data on federally listed or proposed endangered species of the United States is described. Included are (a) the common name, (b) the scientific name, (c) the taxonomic family, (d) the OES/FWS/USDI group (mammal, bird, etc.), (e) the status, (f) the geographic distribution by counties, and (g) Federal Register references. Status types are endangered, threatened, proposed, under review, deleted, and rejected. Distribution is by Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) county code and is of four types: designated critical habitat, present range, potential range, and historic range. The file is currently being used in conjunction with similar data on projected future energy facilities to anticipate possible conflicts. However, the file would be useful to any project correlating endangered species with location information expressed by county. An example is as an aid in evaluating Forest Service or Bureau of Land Management proposed wilderness areas.

  10. 77 FR 61835 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for Cape Sable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... 2010d, p. 5). Rockland Hammock Rockland hammock is a species-rich tropical hardwood forest on upland... and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for Cape Sable Thoroughwort, Florida... Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for Cape Sable Thoroughwort,...

  11. 76 FR 7577 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys for the following species: Texas blind salamander... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and... with endangered species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). The Act...

  12. 78 FR 20352 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... current permit for research and recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys of following species... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and... conduct certain activities with endangered or threatened species. The Endangered Species Act of 1973,...

  13. 76 FR 46837 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... recovery purposes to collect voucher specimens and seeds from the following species within New Mexico... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and... with endangered species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). The Act...

  14. 78 FR 55091 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys for the following species in Arizona, New Mexico, and... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and... applications to conduct certain activities with endangered or threatened species. The Endangered Species Act...

  15. 77 FR 7175 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... research and recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys of the following species within Arizona... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and... conduct certain activities with endangered or threatened species. The Endangered Species Act of 1973,...

  16. 76 FR 14985 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... Species Applicant: Tom Stehn, Whooping Crane Recovery Plan Coordinator, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit AGENCY: Fish and... certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act...

  17. Knowledge Discovery in Endangered Species Diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Naeem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification of regional territories and countries related to endangered species has been investigated by data mining techniques and graphical modeling using an extensive data set of species. We developed the graphical models (hereafter referred to as ‘ESDI’ using cosine, jaccard similarity, K Mean clustering and cliques in graph modeling for a large number of countries. Environmental variables associated with species records were identified in context of their diversification to integration with our proposed prototype. We have shown that the problem of finding the most coherent clusters is reducible to finding maximum clique. Key findings include the urge to ameliorate communication about the loss and protection of endangered species and their concerned projects. The proposed framework is presented to serves a portal to knowledge discovery. We have concluded that the proposed framework model and its associated data mining similarity measures can be useful for investigating various scientific and management oriented questions related to protection of endangered species with emphasis on collaboration among regional countries. The rationale behind the proposed approach is that the countries which have been grouped into same clique inherit a lot of argues illustrating common reasons of their struggles towards ecological safety with minimization of perils for endangered species. The development and implementation of a regional approach based on this similar grouping address the actions that could offer significant benefits in achieving their goal for ecological policies. Other critical actions at this clique level include fortifying and elevating harmonization of legal frameworks with emphasis on prevention procedural issues; awareness realizations of endangered species issues and its priority. Such actions will eventually lead towards implementation of essential plans fulfilling co-operative expertise and common endeavors.

  18. Threatened and Endangered Species: Tour Packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Victoria; Samia, Cory

    This resource unit contains a teacher information packet and a middle school student activity packet to be used in creating a threatened and endangered species unit. The packet of student activities is designed to help maximize a field trip to the zoo and build on students' zoo experience in the classroom. The teacher information packet covers the…

  19. National Wildlife. Special Issue: Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, John, Ed.

    This is the first special issue in the 12-year history of "National Wildlife," and is devoted entirely to endangered species of animals and plants in the United States. An overview of the problem stresses the impact of man's haphazard development, suburban sprawl, and urban pollution upon a fragile environment, resulting in dozens of wild animals…

  20. FWS Critical Habitat for Threatened and Endangered Species Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — When a species is proposed for listing as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service must consider whether there...

  1. Energy resellers - An endangered species?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many markets, including the travel, music, and book markets, are undergoing dramatic changes due do the development of electronic commerce. Reseller margins often decrease significantly and some times even entire links in the supply chain are becoming completely superfluous. Even though power markets have been deregulated already for some years in many countries, electronic commerce has not yet had a major impact on the business logic. This paper presents some of the major obstacles to electronic power trade, and presents promising solutions to these obstacles. In particular it is described how software agent mediated trade may enable medium and small size consumers and producers to trade directly from power pools, without the need of traditional energy resellers. The conclusion that is there are good reasons to believe that energy resellers are as threatened in the new information era as, e.g., traditional travel agencies, and music and book-shops are

  2. 77 FR 54565 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC192 Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery... the adoption of a Final Endangered Species Act (ESA) recovery plan for the Central California Coast... 56138). Due to severe declines, we uplisted the species to endangered status on June 28, 2005 (70...

  3. 78 FR 41911 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC008 Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery... Endangered Species Act (ESA) recovery plan for Lower Columbia River Chinook salmon (Oncoryhnchus tschawytscha... the time and costs required to implement recovery actions. The Endangered Species Act (ESA)...

  4. 76 FR 52317 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA647 Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery... the adoption of an Endangered Species Act (ESA) recovery plan for the Upper Willamette Chinook salmon... recovery plans for the conservation and survival of threatened and endangered species under...

  5. 78 FR 77430 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC279 Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery... the adoption of an Endangered Species Act (ESA) recovery plan for the South-Central California Coast... implement recovery plans for the conservation and survival of threatened and endangered species under...

  6. Book review: Inside the Equal Access to Justice Act: Environmental litigation and the crippling battle over America's lands, endangered species, and critical habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, John

    2016-01-01

    Inside the Equal Access to Justice Act is authored by Lowell E. Baier, an attorney, political scientist, and historian whose conservation portfolio includes the J. N. “Ding” Darling Conservation Award from the National Wildlife Federation (2016), Citizen Conservationist Award from the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (2013), Conservationist of the Year Award from Outdoor Life magazine (2010), and Conservationist of the Year Award from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (2008). In the book, Baier stresses the need to reform the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA) because of unintended provisions that incentivize and reward environmental litigants for filing suit against federal regulatory and land management agencies, consequentially hindering pro-active, cooperative, conservation efforts. The book is the culmination of several years of legal research, case history analyses, and personal interviews with several key individuals from congress, conservation management agencies, and non-government organizations.

  7. Man...An Endangered Species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

    The general theme of this 1968 yearbook is that man is a threatened species, facing overpopulation and unbridled technology - both self induced. The presentation is broad, relating to many aspects of conservation and natural resources in the United States in a descriptive, non-technical style. The yearbook is divided into major topics: Land…

  8. 75 FR 78974 - Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... threatened species (50 CFR 222-226). Permit 10022-01, issued on May 12, 2010 (75 FR 26715) authorizes the...-net or set-net. Animals may be weighed, measured, photographed, skin biopsied, flipper and passive... by hand/dip net, flipper and PIT tagged, measured, weighed, photographed, and temporarily...

  9. MEDICINAL USES OF ADANSONIA DIGITATA L.: AN ENDANGERED TREE SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sugandha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Adansonia digitata L. belongs to the Bombacaceae family and is generally known as the African Baobab. It is called “Kalpvriksha” in India and has mythological significance in India and elsewhere. The tree already faces a crisis of survival and is listed as an endangered species in the Red Data Book. It is a massive, deciduous tree up to 25 m in height and may live for hundreds of years. It is considered to be the queen of all carbon storage trees as it absorbs huge quantities of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Currently the tree is suffering from drought and desertification and fear has been expressed about its regeneration. It is also reported that baobab seeds have very hard seed coats and germination rate is usually less than 20%. There is lack of awareness by the local population on the need to plant, protect and manage this endangered tree species. Several parts of the tree are reported to have interesting antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and are used for healing purposes. For the conservation of such a multipurpose tree species, tissue culture studies are found to be the most lucrative and promising alternative as recently some tissue culture reports are coming up. The conservation strategy under Indian subtropical states will help in studying its medicinal properties for further research. To explore its other pharmacological uses and isolation of bioactive components of this species, cell and suspension culture technology will be the most promising in near future.

  10. 76 FR 51945 - Endangered Species; File No. 16548

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... recovery plan outline for this species. The permit would not authorize any takes from the wild, nor would... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA648 Endangered Species; File No. 16548 AGENCY... subject permit is requested under the authority of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA;...

  11. 78 FR 57410 - Endangered Species; Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... issued the following permits to conduct activities with endangered species in response to recovery and... research or would benefit the recovery or the enhancement of survival of the species, and that the terms... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species; Issuance of Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...

  12. 76 FR 15300 - Endangered Species; File Nos. 16266 and 16291

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... from the NMFS recovery plan outline for this species. The permits would not authorize any takes from... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA306 Endangered Species; File Nos. 16266 and... requested under the authority of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA; 16 U.S.C. 1531 et...

  13. 78 FR 23909 - Endangered Species; Permit No. 16507-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... sampling program to help assess recovery of the species. The permit holder is now authorized to capture and... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA713 Endangered Species; Permit No. 16507-01... granted under the authority of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA; 16 U.S.C. 1531 et...

  14. Endangered Species Act and energy facility planning: compliance and conflict

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shreeve, D; Calef, C; Nagy, J

    1978-05-01

    New energy facilities such as coal mines, gasification plants, refineries, and power plants--because of their severe environmental impacts--may, if sited haphazardly, jeopardize endangered species. By law, conflicts between energy-facility siting and endangered species occurrence must be minimized. To assess the likelihood of such conflicts arising, the authors used data from the Fish and Wildlife Service, Endangered Species Office, that describe the species' ranges by county. This data set was matched with county-level occurrences of imminent energy developments to find counties of overlap and hence potential conflict. An index was developed to measure the likelihood of actual conflict occurring in such counties. Factors determining the index are: numbers of endangered species inhabiting the county, number of energy-related developments, and to what degree the county remains in a wild or undeveloped state. Maps were prepared showing (1) geographic ranges of endangered species by taxonomic groups (mammals, fish, etc.) and (2) counties of conflict.

  15. 77 FR 55191 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC008 Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery... notice on May 16, 2012, announcing that the Proposed Endangered Species Act (ESA) Recovery Plan for Lower... comment (77 FR 28855; May 16, 2012) or our Web site at...

  16. 75 FR 25204 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XV18 Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery... Chief, Endangered Species Division, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service..., announced the release of the Draft Recovery Plan for Central California Coast coho salmon (Draft Plan)...

  17. 77 FR 40375 - Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... (Nicrophorus americanus) for the purpose of scientific study and species recovery efforts. These activities... Fish and Wildlife Service Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits AGENCY: Fish and... public to comment on the following applications to conduct certain activities with endangered...

  18. 78 FR 56924 - Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... the purpose of conducting presence/absence/population surveys and assisting in species recovery... Fish and Wildlife Service Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits AGENCY: Fish and... public to comment on the following applications to conduct certain activities with endangered...

  19. 77 FR 7134 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA907 Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery..., 2012. Angela Somma, Chief, Endangered Species Division, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine... announced the release of the Draft Southern Oregon/Northern California Coast Recovery Plan (Draft Plan)...

  20. 75 FR 27705 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XV18 Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery.... Authority: 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq. Dated: May 12, 2010. Angela Somma, Chief, Endangered Species Division..., NMFS, extended the public comment period for the Draft Recovery Plan for Central California Coast...

  1. Are LDC marketing units an endangered species?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local distribution company (LDC) marketing affiliates are an ''endangered species,'' according to consultant Porter Bennett, president of Bentek Energy Research. This is true, he says, because the gas marketing industry is ''rapidly becoming a large-volume, low-margin business.'' As a result, the need for economies of scale will produce mergers in the gas marketing business until all that's left are six or 12 national companies. But Bruce Henning, A.G.A.'s chief economist, says don't bury LDC marketing units yet. Though he agrees that ''there is increasing pressure on marketers of energy services to reduce their margins to remain competitive,'' he adds that ''it's hard to say how big a company will have to be to capture the economies of scale necessary to be effective.'' These differing views are discussed in terms of size of company, the concerns about retail markets, and the trends towards mergers

  2. Lunar Gene Bank for Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Ramakrushna

    2016-07-01

    Introduction: Before the dawn of the 22nd century, we face the huge risk of losing our genetic heritage accumulated during aeons of evolution. The losses include hundreds of vertebrates, human gene pools, hundreds of thousands of plants and over a million insect species. As we have observed, adequate conservation of habitat is unfeasible and active breeding programs cover only a handful of the many thousand species threatened. We propose cryopreservation of germplasms by constructing a cDNA library based gene bank for endangered species in the permanently shadowed polar lunar craters that would provide immunity from both natural disadvantages and humanitarian intrusions. Rationale: Under such alarming circumstances, we turned to cryopreservation as an option but over thousands of years economic depression, sabotage, conflicts, warfare or even a brief disruption to the precise cryopreservation can hamper the storage of genetic samples.When we are considering conservation it is always preferable to go for a more secure and permanent solution. It was found out that the climatic and strategic location of the lunar polar craters are adequately hospitable, remote and free of maintenance and human observation as they provide naturally cryogenic temperature, reduced gravity and vacuum environment, non-reactive surface, safety from celestial intrusion and permanent shadow which doesn't allow the temperature to fluctuate thus providing most suitable storage facilities for the germplasms. PSRs provide steady temperature of 40- 60K and immunity to earthquakes due to low seismic activity. At these sites, burial in one meter or more of the regolith will provide protection against the solar wind, solar and galactic cosmic rays and micrometeorite impact. It provides the minimum necessary barrier from human intervention and at the same time enables easy retrieval for future usage. Genetic samples of endangered species can enable restoration even after its extinction. Preserved

  3. Allocating Conservation Resources under the Endangered Species Act

    OpenAIRE

    Langpap, Christian; Kerkvliet, Joe

    2007-01-01

    The necessity to develop a priority system to guide the allocation of resources to the conservation of endangered species is widely recognized. The economic theory of biodiversity has established a framework to do so, and has identified priority criteria that should be considered when making conservation decisions. This paper uses a random effects ordered probit model of endangered species recovery to simulate the effects of reallocating conservation funds among species listed under the Endan...

  4. Rare and Endangered Geophyte Plant Species in Serpentine of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Berisha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our study documents information on rarity, geographical distribution, taxonomy and conservation status of 11 geophyte species in serpentine soils of Kosovo, already included in the Red Book of Vascular Flora of Kosovo. Kosovo’s serpentine vegetation represents a diversity that yet has not been sufficiently explored. Large serpentine complexes are found in the northern Kosovo but also southern part of the country is rich in serpentines, therefore in endemics. Serpentine rocks and soils are characterized by low level of principal plant nutrients (N, P, K, Ca and exceptionally high levels of Mg and Fe. Serpentines play particular importance for flora of the country due to their richness in endemic plant species. The following 11 plant species have been studied: Aristolochia merxmuelleri, Colchicum hungaricum, Crocus flavus, Crocus kosaninii, Epimedium alpinum, Gentiana punctata, Gladiolus illyricus, Lilium albanicum, Paeonia peregrina, Tulipa gesneriana and Tulipa kosovarica. Five out of eleven studied geophytes fall within Critically Endangered IUCN based threat category and five out of eleven are local endemics. Aristolochia merxmuelleri and Tulipa kosovarica are steno-endemic plant species that are found exclusively in serpentine soils. Information in our database should prove to be valuable to efforts in ecology, floristics, biosystematics, conservation and land management.

  5. Threatened and Endangered Terrestrial Animal Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all U.S. listed threatened and endangered mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians in the Middle-Atlantic...

  6. 40 CFR 230.30 - Threatened and endangered species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service of the Department of the Interior (codified annually at 50 CFR 17.... (a) An endangered species is a plant or animal in danger of extinction throughout all or...

  7. 78 FR 47582 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for the Sharpnose Shiner...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... would decrease the contiguous, unfragmented river habitat required by these species for successful...; Endangered Species Status for the Sharpnose Shiner and Smalleye Shiner AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... the sharpnose shiner (Notropis oxyrhynchus) and smalleye shiner (N. buccula), two fish species...

  8. 77 FR 28402 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... research and recovery purposes to conduct presence/absences surveys of the following wildlife species, and... for research and recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys of the following species within... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish...

  9. 78 FR 9067 - Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... assisting in species recovery efforts. These activities will be conducted in Escambia and Walton Counties... purpose of scientific research and species recovery. These activities will occur in North Carolina. Permit... Fish and Wildlife Service Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits AGENCY: Fish...

  10. 75 FR 81793 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Seven Brazilian Bird Species as Endangered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... requirements of the black-hooded antwren are still unclear, the species is not considered a tropical forest... Plants; Listing Seven Brazilian Bird Species as Endangered Throughout Their Range AGENCY: Fish and... petition, we published a substantial 90-day finding on May 12, 1981 (46 FR 26464), for 58 foreign...

  11. 77 FR 60777 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Determination of Endangered Species Status for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... to list the coqu llanero as an endangered species (76 FR 63420). In that document, we explained that... species. On October 12, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 63420) our 12-month finding on... loss of habitat connectivity, degradation of water quality, direct mortality, edge effects of the...

  12. The future of the US endangered species act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losos, E

    1993-09-01

    The United States Endangered Species Act of J973 (ESA) is the strongest tool for protecting plants and animals in the US and has served as a model of species protection for many other nations. Because the goals of the Act - to conserve all endangered and threatened species in the US and the ecosystems upon which they depend - are widely supported among US environmentalists and biologists, it is commonly believed that these groups offer united support for the legislation. Within the US, however, vigorous debate ensues among conservation biologists as to the effectiveness of the species-oriented approach of the Act. PMID:21236184

  13. Rare and endangered species of plants--the soviet side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, T S

    1983-01-01

    In late 1972, the Soviet Union embarked on a program to identify and document plant species that are threatened with extinction. Perhaps 2000 species in the Soviet Union are in need of monitoring or protective measures, while nearly 200 may be in immediate danger of extinction. Currently, the Soviet Union has an official, national list of endangered species, and each of the 15 republics has prepared a regional list. Once a revised national list is prepared, Soviet scientists hope that the Supreme Soviet will pass a law protecting those species. A corresponding law for endangered animals was passed in 1980. PMID:17734310

  14. Endangered fish species of the world - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Hărşan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper summarizes a large part of the endangered and critically endangered fish species of the world. The list was constructed using the comprehensive IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (available in December 2008 and the well elaborated FISHBASE (available on the official website, in 2008 for taxonomy and accepted scientific names of the species. To these two important sources, many scientific papers and communications were added when recent and useful reports were found. However, there is a long way from the fish species list of this review to the world?s complete list of endangered and critically endangered fish species. In our list were not included subspecies, populations, varieties, or species having a debatable taxonomic status. The scope of this review was not to inventorize all the fishes included in these two categories, but to make possible drawing some general conclusions regarding most important possible causes of fish species extinction and to make suggestions concerning fish species conservation possibilities through aquaculture.

  15. Refuge Trip Report Endangered Species Meeting - White River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report reviews endangered species management activities on White River National Wildlife Refuge with endangered species personnel. Target species include bald...

  16. 78 FR 61003 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for the Florida Bonneted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... Florida bonneted bat's historical distribution is provided in the proposed listing rule (77 FR 60750). We... bonneted bat as an endangered species (77 FR 60750). After careful consideration of all public and peer... details about the Florida bonneted bat can be found in the proposed listing rule (77 FR 60750)....

  17. 77 FR 19552 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Range Extension for Endangered Central California Coast Coho...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... the area south of San Francisco between San Gregorio and Aptos creeks, a range which spanned three... FR 56138) and subsequently reclassified as an endangered species on June 28, 2005 (70 FR 37160). At... southward to and including the San Lorenzo River in central California, as well as four...

  18. Are cattle, sheep, and goats endangered species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taberlet, P; Valentini, A; Rezaei, H R; Naderi, S; Pompanon, F; Negrini, R; Ajmone-Marsan, P

    2008-01-01

    For about 10 000 years, farmers have been managing cattle, sheep, and goats in a sustainable way, leading to animals that are well adapted to the local conditions. About 200 years ago, the situation started to change dramatically, with the rise of the concept of breed. All animals from the same breed began to be selected for the same phenotypic characteristics, and reproduction among breeds was seriously reduced. This corresponded to a strong fragmentation of the initial populations. A few decades ago, the selection pressures were increased again in order to further improve productivity, without enough emphasis on the preservation of the overall genetic diversity. The efficiency of modern selection methods successfully increased the production, but with a dramatic loss of genetic variability. Many industrial breeds now suffer from inbreeding, with effective population sizes falling below 50. With the development of these industrial breeds came economic pressure on farmers to abandon their traditional breeds, and many of these have recently become extinct as a result. This means that genetic resources in cattle, sheep, and goats are highly endangered, particularly in developed countries. It is therefore important to take measures that promote a sustainable management of these genetic resources; first, by in situ preservation of endangered breeds; second, by using selection programmes to restore the genetic diversity of industrial breeds; and finally, by protecting the wild relatives that might provide useful genetic resources. PMID:17927711

  19. 78 FR 9725 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... certain activities with endangered species (76 FR 51052). We are now reopening the comment period to allow... Applicant: Hawthorn Corporation, Grayslake, IL; PRT-058735, 059163, 068350, 068353, 154232, 154233,...

  20. 76 FR 74070 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    ... the Endangered Species Act, as amended (Act). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Lisa Mandell, at (612) 713-5343 (phone) or lisa_mandell@fws.gov (email). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: We have issued the... Information Act, by any party who submits a written request for a copy of such documents to Lisa Mandell...

  1. The Economics of Captive Breeding and Endangered Species Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damania, R.; Bulte, E.H.

    2007-01-01

    There is growing concern that the traditional ¿protectionist¿ approach to conservation is expensive and insufficient to deliver the desired environmental outcomes. ¿Supply side¿ policies to conserve endangered species have drawn support. By generating supplies from captive-bred animals, wildlife com

  2. All about Owls: Studying Owls, State Birds, and Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Leonard P.

    1991-01-01

    Activities are included that acquaint students with the parts of birds and the structure of feathers; that identify the prey of owls by opening owl pellets; working with information about threatened and endangered species of birds; and follow-up activities for bird study. A list of state and provincial birds of the United States and Canada and…

  3. 75 FR 66724 - Endangered and Threatened Species; 5-Year Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... sawfish should remain listed as endangered species because it is in danger of extinction throughout its.... The list is published at 50 CFR 17.11 (for animals) and 17.12 (for plants). Section 4(c)(2) of the ESA... U.S. DPS of smalltooth sawfish in May 2008, and solicited information from the public (73 FR...

  4. Endangered Species, Provincialism, and a Continental Approach to Bird Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Craig

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available I examined lists of endangered species from northeastern and midwestern United States to assess the extent to which they were dominated by species considered rare due to their vulnerability to anthropogenic stressors or, instead, by species whose rarity might be explained otherwise. Northeastern states had longer species lists than midwestern states, and more species associated with locally rare prairie habitats. More species at the edge of their geographic range appeared on lists from the Northeast than the Midwest. About 70% of listed species overall have shown either no significant population trend, or increases, at the continental scale, but wetland and prairie species were frequently listed, consistent with the generally acknowledged, widespread loss of these habitats. Curiously, midwestern states tended to list fewer forest species, despite evidence that forest fragmentation there has had strongly deleterious effects on regional bird populations. Overall, species appear to be listed locally for a variety of reasons not necessarily related to their risk of extinction generally, potentially contributing to inefficient distributions of limited resources to deal effectively with species that legitimately require conservation attention. I advocate a continental perspective when listing species locally, and propose enhanced criteria for characterizing species as endangered at the local level.

  5. Alabama's many endangered aquatic species are unprotected

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Newspaper article on the vulnerability of watercress darter and other fish species in Alabama after a significant fish kill in Roebuck Spring pond in 2008.

  6. Conservation triage or injurious neglect in endangered species recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Leah R

    2016-03-29

    Listing endangered and threatened species under the US Endangered Species Act is presumed to offer a defense against extinction and a solution to achieve recovery of imperiled populations, but only if effective conservation action ensues after listing occurs. The amount of government funding available for species protection and recovery is one of the best predictors of successful recovery; however, government spending is both insufficient and highly disproportionate among groups of species, and there is significant discrepancy between proposed and actualized budgets across species. In light of an increasing list of imperiled species requiring evaluation and protection, an explicit approach to allocating recovery funds is urgently needed. Here I provide a formal decision-theoretic approach focusing on return on investment as an objective and a transparent mechanism to achieve the desired recovery goals. I found that less than 25% of the $1.21 billion/year needed for implementing recovery plans for 1,125 species is actually allocated to recovery. Spending in excess of the recommended recovery budget does not necessarily translate into better conservation outcomes. Rather, elimination of only the budget surplus for "costly yet futile" recovery plans can provide sufficient funding to erase funding deficits for more than 180 species. Triage by budget compression provides better funding for a larger sample of species, and a larger sample of adequately funded recovery plans should produce better outcomes even if by chance. Sharpening our focus on deliberate decision making offers the potential to achieve desired outcomes in avoiding extinction for Endangered Species Act-listed species. PMID:26976572

  7. Conservation triage or injurious neglect in endangered species recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Leah R

    2016-03-29

    Listing endangered and threatened species under the US Endangered Species Act is presumed to offer a defense against extinction and a solution to achieve recovery of imperiled populations, but only if effective conservation action ensues after listing occurs. The amount of government funding available for species protection and recovery is one of the best predictors of successful recovery; however, government spending is both insufficient and highly disproportionate among groups of species, and there is significant discrepancy between proposed and actualized budgets across species. In light of an increasing list of imperiled species requiring evaluation and protection, an explicit approach to allocating recovery funds is urgently needed. Here I provide a formal decision-theoretic approach focusing on return on investment as an objective and a transparent mechanism to achieve the desired recovery goals. I found that less than 25% of the $1.21 billion/year needed for implementing recovery plans for 1,125 species is actually allocated to recovery. Spending in excess of the recommended recovery budget does not necessarily translate into better conservation outcomes. Rather, elimination of only the budget surplus for "costly yet futile" recovery plans can provide sufficient funding to erase funding deficits for more than 180 species. Triage by budget compression provides better funding for a larger sample of species, and a larger sample of adequately funded recovery plans should produce better outcomes even if by chance. Sharpening our focus on deliberate decision making offers the potential to achieve desired outcomes in avoiding extinction for Endangered Species Act-listed species.

  8. FORUM: Using the Best Scientific Data for Endangered Species Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood; Beyea; Morrison

    1999-11-01

    / The Endangered Species Act calls for the use of the best scientific data in conserving threatened or endangered species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The language of this act and other environmental laws and relevant judicial rulings also require assessments based on modern scientific standards that are routinely applied in ecological research. Particularly for the Endangered Species Act, "take" decisions should be made only after the supporting documents provide: (1) designation of critical habitat based on use and availability methods; (2) risk assessment(s) for proposed take and other project impacts; (3) ecosystem assessment by trained ecosystem ecologists; (4) a description of an adaptive management program involving more than post hoc adjustments to problems in mitigation design; (5) a description of the proposed scientific monitoring along with thresholds for application of adaptive management; (6) uncertainty analysis along with estimates of species' abundance and project impacts; (7) nonselective, academic-quality referencing of data, methods, and theory supporting the conclusions; and (8) reviews of the assessment by independent scientists. These standards have been rarely applied to assessments of environmental take, due to lack of incentives for cooperation among academic scientists, environmental consultants, and the government regulatory agencies. Particularly important is requiring the type of independent review used by academic scientists. Such review would help ensure that take decisions are based on use of the appropriate scientific standards, thereby qualifying the supporting data as scientific and the best available, no matter how limited the data. Until these standards are applied prior to political trade-off and pragmatism, the environmental laws will continue to have little bearing on conservation.KEY WORDS: Endangered Species Act; Habitat conservation plans; Independent review; Risk assessment; Scientific data; Uncertainty

  9. A bioeconomic perspective on the Endangered Species Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salau, K. R.; Fenichel, E. P.

    2012-12-01

    Habitat destruction threatens species existence and has recently accelerated due to population growth, urban sprawl, agricultural development and other profitable land conversions on public and private lands. To exacerbate this issue, the public good nature of species existence creates strong incentives for landowners to engage in free-riding behavior and forego conservation on managed lands. To reverse these negative effects, the United States Congress passed the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1973 to create a set of rules for planning government intervention to protect dwindling fish, wildlife, and plant populations and create a platform for recovery and conservation. The ESA is quite explicit about how to make tradeoffs when listing a species as threatened or endangered - only evaluation of biological risks faced are considered. But the act is unclear about what information can or should be used when determining delisting criteria for endangered species. The ESA mandates federal participation in conservation and, in many cases, agencies must curtail socially beneficial activities (e.g. grazing, renewable energy development, mining, military training) in order to meet species recovery objectives. As funding for conservation on federal lands is limited, this creates an implicit tradeoff between recovering species - to gain post-delisting managerial flexibility - and preventing extinction - to minimize management costs. In this respect, reconciliation of biological recovery goals amidst budget constraints and alternate land-use benefits should be supplemented by economic analysis. Economic tradeoffs are inherent in species recovery under the ESA, but the act does not discuss how agencies should structure a recovery plan in light of such factors. This study outlines a bioeconomic approach to framing the recovery problem under the ESA and provides a framework for simultaneously establishing measurable delisting criteria and a least-cost path to recovery. This

  10. Misuse of Checklist Assessments in Endangered Species Recovery Efforts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary H. Ruckelshaus

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural resource agencies worldwide must develop species recovery plans that specify threats, propose targets required for recovery, and evaluate the extent to which habitat alteration and restoration may influence species decline and recovery. To evaluate the impacts of proposed habitat alterations on species of conservation concern, standardized protocols may be adopted even when supporting data are scarce. For example, a habitat matrix was developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS to guide consultations under the Endangered Species Act for actions that may affect the functioning of the freshwater habitat used by several federally listed salmonid species. The habitat matrix has also been advocated as a tool for recovery planning by agencies apart from the NMFS, who could use it to define the habitat conditions assumed to be necessary for salmonid population viability and hence recovery. This use of the habitat matrix in a recovery context has not been evaluated, and, despite its widespread use as a regulatory tool, the empirical relationships between many of the habitat matrix variables and salmonid populations remain unexplored. By amassing data on habitat assessments and trends in fish abundance, we empirically evaluate the relationship between habitat matrix scores and salmonid population metrics. We found that abundance trends for populations of three species of threatened and endangered salmonids (chinook, coho, and steelhead were unrelated to these habitat matrix assessments. This study reveals the danger of assuming quantitative relationships between habitat and organism and cautions against co-opting protocols from the regulatory realm for recovery planning for endangered species.

  11. The Pricelessness of Biodiversity: Using the Endangered Species Act to Help Combat Extinction and Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Falberg, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    The science is clear. Climate change is happening, and it has aserious adverse effect on the majority of biodiversity, species,and ecosystems. Currently, there are no laws that serve to protect biodiversity and species from the oncoming changes; however, there is a law that serves to protect endangered and threatened species generally: the Endangered Species Act. This paper proposes using conservation biology principles to suggest several amendments to the Endangered Species Act to help save ...

  12. Endangered species management and ecosystem restoration: finding the common ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Casazza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Management actions to protect endangered species and conserve ecosystem function may not always be in precise alignment. Efforts to recover the California Ridgway's Rail (Rallus obsoletus obsoletus; hereafter, California rail, a federally and state-listed species, and restoration of tidal marsh ecosystems in the San Francisco Bay estuary provide a prime example of habitat restoration that has conflicted with species conservation. On the brink of extinction from habitat loss and degradation, and non-native predators in the 1990s, California rail populations responded positively to introduction of a non-native plant, Atlantic cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora. California rail populations were in substantial decline when the non-native Spartina was initially introduced as part of efforts to recover tidal marshes. Subsequent hybridization with the native Pacific cordgrass (Spartina foliosa boosted California rail populations by providing greater cover and increased habitat area. The hybrid cordgrass (S. alterniflora à - S. foliosa readily invaded tidal mudflats and channels, and both crowded out native tidal marsh plants and increased sediment accretion in the marsh plain. This resulted in modification of tidal marsh geomorphology, hydrology, productivity, and species composition. Our results show that denser California rail populations occur in invasive Spartina than in native Spartina in San Francisco Bay. Herbicide treatment between 2005 and 2012 removed invasive Spartina from open intertidal mud and preserved foraging habitat for shorebirds. However, removal of invasive Spartina caused substantial decreases in California rail populations. Unknown facets of California rail ecology, undesirable interim stages of tidal marsh restoration, and competing management objectives among stakeholders resulted in management planning for endangered species or ecosystem restoration that favored one goal over the other. We have examined this perceived conflict

  13. Endangered species management and ecosystem restoration: Finding the common ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casazza, Michael L.; Overton, Cory T.; Bui, Thuy-Vy D.; Hull, Joshua M.; Albertson, Joy D.; Bloom, Valary K.; Bobzien, Steven; McBroom, Jennifer; Latta, Marilyn; Olofson, Peggy; Rohmer, Tobias M.; Schwarzbach, Steven E.; Strong, Donald R.; Grijalva, Erik; Wood, Julian K.; Skalos, Shannon; Takekawa, John Y.

    2016-01-01

    Management actions to protect endangered species and conserve ecosystem function may not always be in precise alignment. Efforts to recover the California Ridgway’s Rail (Rallus obsoletus obsoletus; hereafter, California rail), a federally and state-listed species, and restoration of tidal marsh ecosystems in the San Francisco Bay estuary provide a prime example of habitat restoration that has conflicted with species conservation. On the brink of extinction from habitat loss and degradation, and non-native predators in the 1990s, California rail populations responded positively to introduction of a non-native plant, Atlantic cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora). California rail populations were in substantial decline when the non-native Spartina was initially introduced as part of efforts to recover tidal marshes. Subsequent hybridization with the native Pacific cordgrass (Spartina foliosa) boosted California rail populations by providing greater cover and increased habitat area. The hybrid cordgrass (S. alterniflora × S. foliosa) readily invaded tidal mudflats and channels, and both crowded out native tidal marsh plants and increased sediment accretion in the marsh plain. This resulted in modification of tidal marsh geomorphology, hydrology, productivity, and species composition. Our results show that denser California rail populations occur in invasive Spartina than in native Spartina in San Francisco Bay. Herbicide treatment between 2005 and 2012 removed invasive Spartina from open intertidal mud and preserved foraging habitat for shorebirds. However, removal of invasive Spartina caused substantial decreases in California rail populations. Unknown facets of California rail ecology, undesirable interim stages of tidal marsh restoration, and competing management objectives among stakeholders resulted in management planning for endangered species or ecosystem restoration that favored one goal over the other. We have examined this perceived conflict and propose

  14. Low profile harmonic radar transponder for tracking small endangered species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriazi, John; Nakakura, Jayson; Hall, Kevin; Hafner, Noah; Lubecke, Victor

    2007-01-01

    Fragmentation of threatened species' habitat attributable to anthropogenic activity is a major concern. Understanding these animals' dispersal ecology and range utilization can greatly aid in designing preserves for their conservation, but this data is extremely difficult to obtain for populations of small animals. Presented here is a study miniature passive harmonic radar tags which allow the tracking of an endangered snail species without adversely affecting the tagged subjects. Whip antennas were found to be problematic through snagging and interference with snail activity. Alternative low-profile planar antennas were also tested, with bow-tie related antenna forms providing reasonable (up to 7 ft) detection range.

  15. Climate change, marine environments, and the US Endangered species act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seney, Erin E; Rowland, Melanie J; Lowery, Ruth Ann; Griffis, Roger B; McClure, Michelle M

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is expected to be a top driver of global biodiversity loss in the 21st century. It poses new challenges to conserving and managing imperiled species, particularly in marine and estuarine ecosystems. The use of climate-related science in statutorily driven species management, such as under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA), is in its early stages. This article provides an overview of ESA processes, with emphasis on the mandate to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to manage listed marine, estuarine, and anadromous species. Although the ESA is specific to the United States, its requirements are broadly relevant to conservation planning. Under the ESA, species, subspecies, and "distinct population segments" may be listed as either endangered or threatened, and taking of most listed species (harassing, harming, pursuing, wounding, killing, or capturing) is prohibited unless specifically authorized via a case-by-case permit process. Government agencies, in addition to avoiding take, must ensure that actions they fund, authorize, or conduct are not likely to jeopardize a listed species' continued existence or adversely affect designated critical habitat. Decisions for which climate change is likely to be a key factor include: determining whether a species should be listed under the ESA, designating critical habitat areas, developing species recovery plans, and predicting whether effects of proposed human activities will be compatible with ESA-listed species' survival and recovery. Scientific analyses that underlie these critical conservation decisions include risk assessment, long-term recovery planning, defining environmental baselines, predicting distribution, and defining appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Although specific guidance is still evolving, it is clear that the unprecedented changes in global ecosystems brought about by climate change necessitate new information and approaches to conservation of imperiled species. El

  16. Protecting endangered species: do the main legislative tools work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E Gibbs

    Full Text Available It is critical to assess the effectiveness of the tools used to protect endangered species. The main tools enabled under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA to promote species recovery are funding, recovery plan development and critical habitat designation. Earlier studies sometimes found that statistically significant effects of these tools could be detected, but they have not answered the question of whether the effects were large enough to be biologically meaningful. Here, we ask: how much does the recovery status of ESA-listed species improve with the application of these tools? We used species' staus reports to Congress from 1988 to 2006 to quantify two measures of recovery for 1179 species. We related these to the amount of federal funding, years with a recovery plan, years with critical habitat designation, the amount of peer-reviewed scientific information, and time listed. We found that change in recovery status of listed species was, at best, only very weakly related to any of these tools. Recovery was positively related to the number of years listed, years with a recovery plan, and funding, however, these tools combined explain <13% of the variation in recovery status among species. Earlier studies that reported significant effects of these tools did not focus on effect sizes; however, they are in fact similarly small. One must conclude either that these tools are not very effective in promoting species' recovery, or (as we suspect that species recovery data are so poor that it is impossible to tell whether the tools are effective or not. It is critically important to assess the effectiveness of tools used to promote species recovery; it is therefore also critically important to obtain population status data that are adequate to that task.

  17. 76 FR 18239 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... Argentina for the purpose of scientific research. Applicant: Museum of Zoology and Herbarium, University of... museum/herbarium specimens of endangered and threatened species (excluding bald eagles)...

  18. An introduction to adaptive management for threatened and endangered species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Management of threatened and endangered species would seem to be a perfect context for adaptive management. Many of the decisions are recurrent and plagued by uncertainty, exactly the conditions that warrant an adaptive approach. But although the potential of adaptive management in these settings has been extolled, there are limited applications in practice. The impediments to practical implementation are manifold and include semantic confusion, institutional inertia, misperceptions about the suitability and utility, and a lack of guiding examples. In this special section of the Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management, we hope to reinvigorate the appropriate application of adaptive management for threatened and endangered species by framing such management in a decision-analytical context, clarifying misperceptions, classifying the types of decisions that might be amenable to an adaptive approach, and providing three fully developed case studies. In this overview paper, I define terms, review the past application of adaptive management, challenge perceived hurdles, and set the stage for the case studies which follow.

  19. Intelligent Tinkering: the Endangered Species Act and Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Harm. Benson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Endangered Species Act (ESA is one of the most powerful and controversial environmental laws in the United States. As a result of its uncompromising position against biodiversity loss, the ESA has become the primary driver of many ecological restoration efforts in the United States. This article explains why the ESA has become the impetus for so many of these efforts and assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the ESA as a primary driver from a resilience-based perspective. It argues that in order to accommodate resilience theory, several changes to ESA implementation and enforcement should be made. First and foremost, there is a need to shift management strategies from a species-centered to a systems-based approach. Chief among the shifts required will be a more integrated approach to governance that includes a willingness to reassess demands placed on ecological systems by our social systems. Building resilience will also require more proactive management efforts that support the functioning of system processes before they are endangered and on the brink of regime change. Finally, resilience thinking requires a reorientation of management away from goals associated with achieving preservation, restoration, and optimization and toward goals associated with fostering complexity and adaptive capacity.

  20. Biological review of 82 species of coral petitioned to be included in the Endangered Species Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Russell E.; Birkeland, Charles; Eakin, C. Mark; McElhany, Paul; Miller, Margaret W.; Patterson, Matt; Piniak, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    list 83 coral species as threatened or endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The petition was based on a predicted decline in available habitat for the species, citing anthropogenic climate change and ocean acidification as the lead factors among the various stressors responsible for the potential decline. The NMFS identified 82 of the corals as candidate species, finding that the petition provided substantive information for a potential listing of these species. The NMFS established a Biological Review Team (BRT) to prepare this Status Review Report that examines the status of these 82 candidate coral species and evaluates extinction risk for each of them. This document makes no recommendations for listing, as that is a separate evaluation to be conducted by the NMFS.

  1. Videographic evidence of endangered species depredation by feral cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Seth; Lippert, Jill S.; Misajon, Kathleen; Hu, Darcy; Hess, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Feral cats (Felis cafus) have long been implicated as nest predators of endangered 'Ua'u (Hawaiian Petrel; Pterodroma sandwichensis) on Hawaii Island, but until recently, visual confirmation has been limited by available technology. 'Ua'u nest out of view, deep inside small cavities, on alpine lava flows. During the breeding seasons of 2007 and 2008, we monitored known burrows within Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Digital infrared video cameras assisted in determining the breeding behaviour and nesting success at the most isolated of burrows. With 7 cameras, we collected a total of 819 videos and 89 still photographs of adult and nestling 'Ua'u at 14 burrows. Videos also confirmed the presence of rats (Rattus spp.) at 2 burrows, 'Ōmao (Myadestes obscurus) at 8 burrows, and feral cats at 6 burrows. A sequence of videos showed a feral cat taking a downy 'Ua'u chick from its burrow, representing the first direct evidence of 'Ua'u depredation by feral cat in Hawai'i. This technique provides greater understanding of feral cat behaviour in 'Ua'u colonies, which may assist in the development of more targeted management strategies to reduce nest predation on endangered insular bird species.

  2. Rare and Endangered Geophyte Plant Species in Serpentine of Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Naim Berisha; Fadil Millaku; Elez Krasniqi; Bekim Gashi

    2014-01-01

    Our study documents information on rarity, geographical distribution, taxonomy and conservation status of 11 geophyte species in serpentine soils of Kosovo, already included in the Red Book of Vascular Flora of Kosovo. Kosovo’s serpentine vegetation represents a diversity that yet has not been sufficiently explored. Large serpentine complexes are found in the northern Kosovo but also southern part of the country is rich in serpentines, therefore in endemics. Serpentine rocks and soils are cha...

  3. 77 FR 15019 - Revision of Regulations Implementing the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ..., 2012 (77 FR 14200), we published a proposed rule to revise the regulations that implement CITES... Implementing the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES... implement the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)...

  4. 76 FR 12292 - Listing Endangered and Threatened Species: Correction To Codify in the Code of Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... to clarify that take prohibitions under section 4(d) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 223 RIN 0648-XA082 Listing Endangered and Threatened Species: Correction To Codify in the Code of Federal Regulations Application of Take...

  5. Hybridization and endangered species protection in the molecular era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Robert K; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2016-06-01

    After decades of discussion, there is little consensus on the extent to which hybrids between endangered and nonendangered species should be protected by US law. As increasingly larger, genome-scale data sets are developed, we can identify individuals and populations with even trace levels of genetic admixture, making the 'hybrid problem' all the more difficult. We developed a decision-tree framework for evaluating hybrid protection, including both the processes that produced hybrids (human-mediated or natural) and the ecological impact of hybrids on natural ecosystems. We then evaluated our decision tree for four case studies drawn from our own work and briefly discuss several other cases from the literature. Throughout, we highlight the management outcomes that our approach provides and the nuances of hybridization as a conservation problem.

  6. Mycorrhizal dependency of some endemic and endangered Hawaiian plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemma, J N; Koske, R E; Habte, M

    2002-02-01

    Four endemic species of Hawaiian plants were tested for their response to inoculation with a Hawaiian isolate of Glomus aggregatum (an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus [AMF]) when grown in a native soil with or without P added to achieve different soil-solution P levels. The endangered species (Sesbania tomentosa [Fabaceae] and Colubrina oppositifolia [Rhamnaceae]) and two nonendangered species (Bidens sandvicensis and B. asymmetrica × sandvicensis [Asteraceae]) were tested. When soil-solution P levels in greenhouse trials were similar to unfertilized field soils (e.g., 0.005-0.020 mg P/L), shoots of inoculated plants were 2.1 to 7.0 times larger than noninoculated plants. Leaf tissue P levels and root biomass in these species showed similar responses to inoculation. Mycorrhizal dependencies ranging from 44 to 88% were measured when plants were grown in low-P soils and were -4-42% in soil with P levels typical of highly productive agricultural soils. A survey of P levels in a variety of native (nonagricultural) Hawaiian soils indicated the widespread occurrence of P-limited sites (mean = 0.010 mg P/L, range = <0.001-0.030 mg P/L; N = 41). The terms "ecological mycorrhizal dependency" (EMD) and "agricultural mycorrhizal dependency" (AMD) are introduced to refine the concept of mycorrhizal dependency. PMID:21669742

  7. Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program threatened and endangered species survey: Progress report. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, A.L.; Awl, D.J.; Gabrielsen, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    The Endangered Species Act (originally passed in 1973) is a Federal statute that protects both animal and plant species. The Endangered Species Act identifies species which are, without careful management, in danger of becoming extinct and species that are considered threatened. Along with the designation of threatened or endangered, the Endangered Species Act provides for the identification of appropriate habitat for these species. Since 1993, the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has supported a program to survey the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for threatened and endangered species. The Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program initiated vascular plant surveys during fiscal year 1993 and vertebrate animal surveys during fiscal year 1994 to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered species on the ORR at the present time. Data collected during these surveys are currently aiding Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigations on the ORR. They also provide data for ER and Waste Management decision documents, ensure that decisions have technical and legal defensibility, provide a baseline for ensuring compliance with principal legal requirements and will increase public confidence in DOE`s adherence to all related environmental resources rules, laws, regulations, and instructions. This report discusses the progress to date of the threatened and endangered species surveys of the ORR.

  8. Recovery of imperiled species under the Endangered Species Act: The need for a new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J.M.; Goble, D.D.; Wiens, J.A.; Wilcove, D.S.; Bean, M.; Male, T.

    2005-01-01

    The recovery (delisting) of a threatened or endangered species is often accompanied by the expectation that conservation management of the species will no longer be necessary. However, the magnitude and pace of human impacts on the environment make it unlikely that substantial progress will be made in delisting many species unless the definition of "recovery" includes some form of active management. Preventing delisted species from again being at risk of extinction may require continuing, species-specific management actions. We characterize such species as "conservation-reliant", and suggest that viewing "recovery" as a continuum of states rather than as a simple "recovered/not recovered" dichotomy may enhance our ability to manage such species within the framework of the Endangered Species Act. With ongoing loss of habitat, disruption of natural disturbance regimes, and the increasing impacts of non-native invasive species, it is probable that the number of conservation-reliant species will increase. We propose the development of "recovery management agreements", with legally and biologically defensible contracts that would provide for continu-ing conservation management following delisting. The use of such formalized agreements will facilitate shared management responsibilities between federal wildlife agencies and other federal agencies, and with state, local, and tribal governments, as well as with private entities that have demonstrated the capability to meet the needs of conservation-reliant species. ?? The Ecological Society of America.

  9. Endangered Species Program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Chevron USA. Production Company (CPDN). Four federally-listed endangered animal species and one federally-threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, giant kangaroo rat, Tipton kangaroo rat, and Hoover`s wooly-star. All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, which declares that it is ``...the policy of Congress that all Federal departments and agencies shall seek to conserve endangered species and threatened species and shall utilize their authorities in furtherance of the purposes of the Act.`` DOE is also obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The major objective of the EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. Endangered Species Program on NPRC is to provide DOE with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the Endangered Species Act. The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress and results of the Endangered Species Program made during fiscal year 1993.

  10. Establishing endangered species recovery criteria using predictive simulation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Conor P.; Catlin, Daniel H.; Shaffer, Terry L.; Gratto-Trevor, Cheri L.; Aron, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Listing a species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and developing a recovery plan requires U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to establish specific and measurable criteria for delisting. Generally, species are listed because they face (or are perceived to face) elevated risk of extinction due to issues such as habitat loss, invasive species, or other factors. Recovery plans identify recovery criteria that reduce extinction risk to an acceptable level. It logically follows that the recovery criteria, the defined conditions for removing a species from ESA protections, need to be closely related to extinction risk. Extinction probability is a population parameter estimated with a model that uses current demographic information to project the population into the future over a number of replicates, calculating the proportion of replicated populations that go extinct. We simulated extinction probabilities of piping plovers in the Great Plains and estimated the relationship between extinction probability and various demographic parameters. We tested the fit of regression models linking initial abundance, productivity, or population growth rate to extinction risk, and then, using the regression parameter estimates, determined the conditions required to reduce extinction probability to some pre-defined acceptable threshold. Binomial regression models with mean population growth rate and the natural log of initial abundance were the best predictors of extinction probability 50 years into the future. For example, based on our regression models, an initial abundance of approximately 2400 females with an expected mean population growth rate of 1.0 will limit extinction risk for piping plovers in the Great Plains to less than 0.048. Our method provides a straightforward way of developing specific and measurable recovery criteria linked directly to the core issue of extinction risk. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. 78 FR 47635 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Designation of Critical Habitat for Yelloweye Rockfish, Canary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and bocaccio as endangered (75 FR 22276). We are responsible for... yelloweye rockfish, canary rockfish, and bocaccio (74 FR 18516, April 23, 2009), we requested information on... Sound/Georgia Basin DPS for yelloweye rockfish, canary rockfish, and bocaccio (Drake et al. 2010; 75...

  12. Community habitats and biodiversity in the Taburno-Camposauro Regional Park. Woodland, rare species, endangered species and their conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guarino C

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Taburno-Camposauro Regional Park is an area of major natural interest in the region of Campania (southern Italy: it represents a protected area isolated from the main axis of the Campanian Apennines, including two sites of community importance (SCIs - ITA8020007 - ITA8020008 covering about 75% of the whole area. The present study aims to identify and describe the community habitats and forest biodiversity in the park, as well as to provide suggestions for their conservation. By a large survey carried out from March 2004 to October 2005, nine community-interest habitats were identified, five of which are priority habitats. Some 26 tree forest species and 971 other plant species including grasses and shrubs were also identified and classified, 14 of which are listed in the red data book of plants. As conservation of each species is strictly linked to the conservation of its habitat, on the basis of legislation in force at regional, national and EU levels, management guidelines were drawn up for the various habitat types and for the most endangered species in order to ensure biodiversity conservation.

  13. 78 FR 56924 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... export and re-import non-living museum/herbarium specimens of endangered and threatened...

  14. Threatened and Endangered Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all US listed Threatened and Endangered freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic...

  15. 75 FR 76022 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... include. The comments and recommendations that will be most useful and likely to influence agency..., in interstate commerce specimen cultures from endangered non-human primates for the purpose...

  16. An evaluation of contaminant exposure of three endangered bat species in Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A background contaminant study was conducted on bat guano and insects in Virginia caves to determine the possibility of exposure of endangered species of bats in...

  17. Endangered Species Consultation Request : Opening to Sports & Commercial Fishing Ottawa and Cedar Point NWR’s

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Endangered Species Consultation Request states that the Ottawa and Cedar Point NWRs Fishery Management Plan will not affect bald eagles on the Refuge.

  18. Endangered plant species of the Nevada Test Site, Ash Meadows, and Central-Southern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatley, J.C.

    1977-02-01

    A total of 15 vascular plant taxa, currently appearing on the Endangered Species list, occur in southern Nye County, Nevada, and/or adjacent Inyo County, California. It is the purpose of this report to record in detail the locations of the plant collections upon which the distributions are based, and other information relevant to their status as Endangered Species, and to recommend the areas to be designated critical habitats.

  19. The Influence of the Academic Conservation Biology Literature on Endangered Species Recovery Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Hudgens, Brian R.; Moyle, Leonie C.; John Stinchcombe; Bloch, Philip L.; Sathya Chinnadurai; Morris, William F.

    2002-01-01

    Despite the volume of the academic conservation biology literature, there is little evidence as to what effect this work is having on endangered species recovery efforts. Using data collected from a national review of 136 endangered and threatened species recovery plans, we evaluated whether recovery plans were changing in response to publication trends in four areas of the academic conservation biology literature: metapopulation dynamics, population viability analysis, conservation corridors...

  20. Integrating Genomic Data Sets for Knowledge Discovery: An Informed Approach to Management of Captive Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Kristopher J L; Bryant, Doug; Kalish, Jordan; Eng, Curtis; Schmidt, Peggy L; Barrett, Gini; Barr, Margaret C

    2016-01-01

    Many endangered captive populations exhibit reduced genetic diversity resulting in health issues that impact reproductive fitness and quality of life. Numerous cost effective genomic sequencing and genotyping technologies provide unparalleled opportunity for incorporating genomics knowledge in management of endangered species. Genomic data, such as sequence data, transcriptome data, and genotyping data, provide critical information about a captive population that, when leveraged correctly, can be utilized to maximize population genetic variation while simultaneously reducing unintended introduction or propagation of undesirable phenotypes. Current approaches aimed at managing endangered captive populations utilize species survival plans (SSPs) that rely upon mean kinship estimates to maximize genetic diversity while simultaneously avoiding artificial selection in the breeding program. However, as genomic resources increase for each endangered species, the potential knowledge available for management also increases. Unlike model organisms in which considerable scientific resources are used to experimentally validate genotype-phenotype relationships, endangered species typically lack the necessary sample sizes and economic resources required for such studies. Even so, in the absence of experimentally verified genetic discoveries, genomics data still provides value. In fact, bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches offer mechanisms for translating these raw genomics data sets into integrated knowledge that enable an informed approach to endangered species management.

  1. 77 FR 74506 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR.... Applicant: Utah State University-Intermountain Herbarium, Logan, UT; PRT-92157A The applicant requests a permit to export and re-import non-living museum/herbarium specimens of endangered and threatened...

  2. SUCCESS OR FAILURE? ORDERED PROBIT APPROACHES TO MEASURING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT

    OpenAIRE

    Langpap, Christian; Kerkvliet, Joe

    2002-01-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is one of the most controversial pieces of environmental legislation. Part of the controversy stems from doubts about its effectiveness in generating improvements in species viability. This paper uses ordered probit models to test whether the ESA has been successful in promoting species recovery. We find a negative correlation between listing and species recovery. Additionally, we find evidence of positive effects for species-specific spending and the achievem...

  3. Public Preferences for Endangered Species Recovery: An Examination of Geospatial Scale and Non-Market Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy eWallmo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-market valuation allows society to express their preferences for goods and services whose economic value is not reflected in traditional markets. One issue that arises in applying non-market values in policy settings is defining the extent of the economic jurisdiction – the area that includes all people who hold values – for a good or service. In this paper we estimate non-market values for recovering eight threatened and endangered marine species in the US for two geographically embedded samples: households on the west coast of the US and households throughout the nation. We statistically compare species values between the two samples to help determine the extent of and variation in the economic jurisdiction for endangered species recovery. Our findings offer support to the tenet that the summation of non-market values across the country is appropriate when evaluating alternative policies for endangered species recovery.

  4. Endangered Species Act listing: three case studies of data deficiencies and consequences of ESA 'threatened' listing on research output

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijerman, M.W.; Birkeland, C.; Piniak, G.A.; Miller, M.W.; Eakin, C.M.; McElhany, P.; Dunlap, M.J.; Patterson, M.; Brainard, R.E.

    2014-01-01

    Determining whether a species warrants listing as threatened or endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act depends on the government's assessment of the species' extinction risk, usually in response to a petition. Deciding whether data are sufficient to make a listing determination is a challe

  5. 77 FR 38762 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of Seven Listed Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... 5-year status reviews under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act), of seven animal... to as the List) in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 50 CFR 17.11 (for animals) and 17.12 (for... interbreeds when mature; (B) Endangered species means any species that is in danger of extinction...

  6. 76 FR 44564 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of Seven Listed Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... 5-year status reviews under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act), of seven animal... to as the List) in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 50 CFR 17.11 (for animals) and 17.12 (for... interbreeds when mature; (B) Endangered species means any species that is in danger of extinction...

  7. 76 FR 12308 - Listing Endangered and Threatened Species: 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List Six Species of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ....S. DPS of smalltooth sawfish as endangered on April 1, 2003 (68 FR 15674). Smalltooth sawfish whose... reclassifying a species under the ESA (61 FR 4722; February 7, 1996). A species, subspecies, or DPS is... then infused into a medicinal tea, which is used to treat ``whooping cough, bronchitis, laryngitis...

  8. Updating Known Distribution Models for Forecasting Climate Change Impact on Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Antonio-Román; Márquez, Ana Luz; Real, Raimundo

    2013-01-01

    To plan endangered species conservation and to design adequate management programmes, it is necessary to predict their distributional response to climate change, especially under the current situation of rapid change. However, these predictions are customarily done by relating de novo the distribution of the species with climatic conditions with no regard of previously available knowledge about the factors affecting the species distribution. We propose to take advantage of known species distribution models, but proceeding to update them with the variables yielded by climatic models before projecting them to the future. To exemplify our proposal, the availability of suitable habitat across Spain for the endangered Bonelli's Eagle (Aquila fasciata) was modelled by updating a pre-existing model based on current climate and topography to a combination of different general circulation models and Special Report on Emissions Scenarios. Our results suggested that the main threat for this endangered species would not be climate change, since all forecasting models show that its distribution will be maintained and increased in mainland Spain for all the XXI century. We remark on the importance of linking conservation biology with distribution modelling by updating existing models, frequently available for endangered species, considering all the known factors conditioning the species' distribution, instead of building new models that are based on climate change variables only. PMID:23840330

  9. Advances in the reintroduction of rare and endangered wild plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hai; Jian, ShuGuang; Liu, HongXiao; Zhang, QianMei; Lu, HongFang

    2014-06-01

    Human disturbance and climate change have increased the risk of extinction for rare and endangered wild plant species. One effective way to conserve these rare and endangered species is through reintroduction. In this review, we summarize the advances in wild plant reintroduction from five perspectives: the establishment of reintroduction biology as an important tool for biodiversity conservation; the importance of genetic diversity in reintroduction; reintroduction under global climate change; recruitment limitation in reintroduction; and reintroduction and ecological restoration. In addition, we consider the future of plant reintroduction strategies. PMID:24824586

  10. Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1997-03-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

  11. Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as 'endangered' when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A 'threatened' classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals

  12. Species diversity, structure and dynamics of two populations of an endangered species, Magnolia dealbata (Magnoliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Velásquez, Lázaro R; Pineda-López, María del Rosario

    2006-09-01

    Little is known about the ecology and demography of the genus Magnolia. Magnolia dealbata Zucc. is an endangered species endemic to Mexico. Two contrasting populations of M. dealbata (one from the grasslands and other from a secondary cloud forest) were studied. We asked the following questions: (a) Are size structure (diameter at breast height, DBH) and infrutescence production significantly different between the two populations? (b) What are the populations' growth rates (lambda) based on an initial 1987 study? (c) Are the associated species diversity indices of these M. dealbata populations significantly different? The results show no significant differences between the population size structure (p=.094); the growth rates of the populations were 0.992 in grassland and 1.053 in secondary cloud forest. The number of infrutescences produced in year 2001 and DBH relationship were significantly linear (p.01) between their slopes. The diversity indices were not significantly different (p>.05), and only 54% of the species were common to both sites. Our study suggests that both populations are relatively stable and that the management history could impact more on the species composition than on the diversity indices. PMID:18494171

  13. By the numbers: how is recovery defined by the U.S. Endangered Species Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Maile C.; Leidner, Allison K.; Haines, Aaron; Goble, Dale D.; Scott, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 40 years after passage of the US Endangered Species Act, the prospects for listed species remain dim because they are too severely imperiled by the time they receive the act's protection. Even if threats are abated, the low abundances required for recovery often preclude a high probability of persistence. The lack of sufficient data for setting recovery objectives also remains a barrier. Delisting is considered possible for only 74% of the 1173 species with recovery plans—92% of threatened and 69% of endangered species. The median number of populations required for delisting (8) was at or below the historical numbers for 64% and at or below the numbers at listing for 37% of the species. The median number of individuals required for recovery (2400) exceeded the abundances at listing for 93% of the species, but most were below the levels considered necessary for long-term persistence, especially in changing environments.

  14. Potential Risk of Hybridization in Ex Situ Collections of Two Endangered Species of Sinojackia Hu (Styracaceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous hybridization in ex situ facilities can undermine the genetic integrity of ex situ collections and potentially contaminate open-pollinated seeds or seedlings destined for the reintroduction of endangered plant species into the wild. In the present study, the potential risk of hybridization between two endangered Chinese endemic species, namely Sinojackia xylocarpa Hu and S. rehderiana Hu, which are naturally allopatric species but were conserved ex situ in Wuhan Botanical Garden (WBG), Wuhan, China, were investigated over three consecutive years from 2003 to 2005. The entire overlapping flowering period of the two species was 14-20 d and the two species shared the same pollinator insects during the entire flowering season in WBG. The floral isolation between the two species was not an issue in the ex situ collection at WBG. The results suggest an opportunity for pollen transfer between species and a potential risk of genetic introgression and loss of genetic identity of open-pollinated seeds produced in the ex situ collection of these two endangered species. An artificial reciprocal cross between S. xylocarpa and S. rehderiana confirmed that the two congener species could readily set seeds, indicating no post-pollination barriers to hybridization and the importance of spatial isolation as a barrier to inter-specific crossing. Therefore, to manage these crossable species with overlapping flowering times and shared pollination vectors in ex situ facilities, spatial isolation should be carefully considered to minimize the possibility of spontaneous hybridization.

  15. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, annual report FY97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are oil fields administered by the DOE in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California. Four federally endangered animal species and one federally threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), blunt-nosed leopard lizard (Gambelia silus), giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), Tipton kangaroo rat (Dipodomys nitratoides), and Hoover`s wooly-star (Eriastrum hooveri). All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. The DOE/NPRC is obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The primary objective of the Endangered Species and Cultural Resources Program is to provide NPRC with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the ESA, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress, results, and accomplishments of the program during fiscal year 1997 (FY97).

  16. 78 FR 48943 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Act Listing Determination for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ...). Recent efforts to assess the evolutionary origins of landlocked alewives indicate that they rapidly... have jurisdiction over species ``which either (1) reside the major portion of their lifetimes in marine waters; or (2) are species which spend part of their lifetimes in estuarine waters, if the major...

  17. 78 FR 55599 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Determination of Endangered Species Status for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... Santa Fe National Forest for management and conservation of the species (New Mexico Endemic Salamander... salamander is one of two species of plethodontid salamanders' endemic (native and restricted to a particular... Laboratory, with some habitat located on tribal land and private lands (New Mexico Endemic Salamander...

  18. Sea-level rise: Destruction of threatened and endangered species habitat in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Richard C.; White, Tammy W.; Chapman, Kimberly K.

    1993-05-01

    Concern for the environment has increased over the past century, and the US Congress has responded to this concern by passing legislation designed to protect the nation’s ecological biodiversity. This legislation, culminating with the Endangered Species Act of 1973, has been instrumental in defining methods for identifying and protecting endangered or threatened species and their habitats. Current legislation, however, assumes that the range of a protected species will stay constant over time. This assumption may no longer be valid, as the unprecedented increase in the number and concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has the potential to cause a global warming of 1.0-4.5°C and a sea-level rise (SLR) of 31-150 cm by the year 2100. Changes in climate of this magnitude are capable of causing shifts in the population structure and range of most animal species. This article examines the effects that SLR may have on the habitats of endangered and threatened species at three scales. At the regional scale 52 endangered or threatened plant and animal species were found to reside within 3 m of mean sea level in the coastal stages of the US Southeast. At the state level, the habitats of nine endangered or threatened animals that may be at risk from future SLR were identified. At the local level, a microscale analysis was conducted in the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina, USA, on the adverse effects that SLR may have on the habitats of the American alligator, brown pelican, loggerhead sea turtle, and wood stork.

  19. 75 FR 81584 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plan for the Sperm Whale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... endangered species under the ESA on December 2, 1970 (35 FR 18319). Sperm whales have a global distribution... comments from the public on July 6, 2006 (71 FR 38385). A summary of comments and NMFS responses to... Plan for the Sperm Whale AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and...

  20. 76 FR 20179 - Endangered and Threatened Species: Designation of Critical Habitat for Cook Inlet Beluga Whale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ..., 2008, we published a Final Rule to list the Cook Inlet beluga whale as an endangered species (73 FR... beluga whales. This critical habitat was subsequently proposed on December 2, 2009 (74 FR 63080). The... the Cook Inlet beluga whale may be found in the Proposed Listing Rule (72 FR 19854; April 20,...

  1. FY 1994 Endangered Species Recovery Activities on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — St. Vincent NWR received endangered species recovery funds 1113 for the red wolf 25,000 and sea turtles 3,000 in. FY 1994. The refuge also hosted nesting and...

  2. 75 FR 57977 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    .... Endangered Species Applicant: University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT; PRT-14240A The applicant requests a... applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: Christina Marisa Tellez, University of California Los Angeles... permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus) culled...

  3. 75 FR 78731 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... activities to be conducted by the applicant over a 5-year period Applicant: Natural History Museum of Los... sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus) culled from a captive herd... certain activities with endangered species (75 FR 57977). The applicant subsequently submitted...

  4. 78 FR 43005 - Endangered and Threatened Species: Designation of Critical Habitat for the Northwest Atlantic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... Atlantic Ocean DPS (78 FR 18000, March 25, 2013). For the Sargassum habitat, we reviewed data on the... the species as threatened to nine DPSs, listed as either threatened or endangered (76 FR 58868... on March 25, 2013 (78 FR 18000). We refer to those terrestrial areas in this report where...

  5. 76 FR 68718 - Marine Mammals and Endangered Species; File No. 16305

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA807 Marine Mammals and Endangered Species; File No. 16305 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... John P. Wise, Sr., Ph.D., Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center...

  6. 78 FR 74116 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Take of Anadromous Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... Anadromous Fish AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... the form of Hatchery and Genetic Management Plans (HGMPs), pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of...: Written responses to the application should be sent to Craig Busack, National Marine Fisheries...

  7. 78 FR 31518 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Take of Anadromous Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... Anadromous Fish AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Genetic Management Plans (HGMPs), pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA). The... the draft environmental assessment should be sent to Brett Farman, National Marine Fisheries...

  8. Student Science Teachers' Ideas about Endangered Bird Species: Hermit Ibis, Chukar Partridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardak, Osman; Dikmenli, Musa

    2009-01-01

    In this study, student science teachers' ideas and views of endangered bird species and their protection are analysed. 173 student science teachers studying at Selcuk University in the department of science education, participated in the study. Data analysis provides evidence that the majority of students thought that human intervention is…

  9. The Influence of the Academic Conservation Biology Literature on Endangered Species Recovery Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Hudgens

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the volume of the academic conservation biology literature, there is little evidence as to what effect this work is having on endangered species recovery efforts. Using data collected from a national review of 136 endangered and threatened species recovery plans, we evaluated whether recovery plans were changing in response to publication trends in four areas of the academic conservation biology literature: metapopulation dynamics, population viability analysis, conservation corridors, and conservation genetics. We detected several changes in recovery plans in apparent response to publication trends in these areas (e.g., the number of tasks designed to promote the recovery of an endangered species shifted, although these tasks were rarely assigned a high priority. Our results indicate that, although the content of endangered species recovery plans changes in response to the literature, results are not uniform across all topics. We suggest that academic conservation biologists need to address the relative importance of each topic for conservation practice in different settings. [See Erratum

  10. 78 FR 29659 - Forfeiture Procedures Under the Endangered Species Act and the Lacey Act Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ....S.C. 1531 et seq.), was passed to prevent the extinction of native and non- native animals and... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 356 RIN 0579-AD50 Forfeiture Procedures Under the Endangered Species Act and the Lacey Act Amendments AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service,...

  11. Factors influencing willingness to donate to marine endangered species recovery in the Galapagos National Park, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana A Cardenas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Willingness to donate money for the conservation of endangered species may depend on numerous factors. In this paper, we analyze data from a survey given to tourists visiting Ecuador’s Galapagos National Park and Marine Reserve to investigate determinants of their willingness to donate (WTD towards the conservation of two marine endangered species--the scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini and the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas. Specifically, we use regression analysis to analyze the influence of attitudes and beliefs toward species conservation, levels of concern for specific species, recreational motivations, and past donation patterns on WTD, while also controlling for individual characteristics such as age, gender, place of residence, and other demographics. Additionally, we evaluate the sensitivity of WTD to the species being protected by conservation efforts. Our results demonstrate that specific concern about the species, beliefs about donating to the protection program, and past donation behavior significantly influence the intention to donate money towards the recovery of the two marine endangered species. The likelihood of donating to green sea turtle conservation efforts is marginally higher than for hammerhead sharks, possibly due to its more charismatic nature. In contrast, visitors who are more willing to donate for shark conservation appear to be those with a strong desire to see them in the wild. The results provide useful information on the heterogeneity of tourist preferences towards donating to species conservation efforts, which has broad implications for resource agencies seeking ways to fund conservation actions.

  12. 78 FR 69376 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List 19 Species and 3...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... Caribbean (Trinidad, Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana) to northern Brazil and possibly in waters off... species under the ESA (61 FR 4722; February 7, 1996). A species, subspecies, or DPS is ``endangered''...

  13. 78 FR 19517 - Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... surveys and assisting in species recovery efforts. These activities may be conducted throughout the States... presence/absence surveys and assisting in species recovery efforts. These activities may be conducted... presence/absence surveys and assisting in species recovery efforts. These activities will be conducted...

  14. 77 FR 59959 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys of the following species within Texas: Barton Springs... permit for research and recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys of the following species... for research and recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys of the following species...

  15. 78 FR 60607 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for Echinomastus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... the effects of drought and climate change (Factor A) in combination with predation by native insect... effects of drought and climate change; predation by native insect and small mammal predators; habitat... species. Summary of Changes From Proposed Rule Since the publication of the October 3, 2012 (77 FR...

  16. 77 FR 60749 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Endangered Species Status for the Florida...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... current status, range, distribution, and population size of this species, including the locations of any... and foraging habitat, nightly and seasonal movements, dispersal capabilities, diet, and seasonal...: (a) The amount and distribution of habitat for the Florida bonneted bat; (b) What areas, which...

  17. Misuse of Checklist Assessments in Endangered Species Recovery Efforts

    OpenAIRE

    Mary H. Ruckelshaus; Harms, Tamara K.; Thomas P. Good

    2003-01-01

    Natural resource agencies worldwide must develop species recovery plans that specify threats, propose targets required for recovery, and evaluate the extent to which habitat alteration and restoration may influence species decline and recovery. To evaluate the impacts of proposed habitat alterations on species of conservation concern, standardized protocols may be adopted even when supporting data are scarce. For example, a habitat matrix was developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service...

  18. Protecting endangered species under future climate change: From single-species preservation to an anticipatory policy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomgarden, Carol A.

    1995-09-01

    Anthropogenic climate climate change presents a unique challenge for endangered species policy and an opportunity for policy makers to develop a more predictive and robust approach to preserving the nation's biological resources. Biological and ecological reactions to shifting climate conditions and the potential feedbacks and synergistic effects of such changes may threaten the well-being of many species, particularly of those already in jeopardy of extinction. The United States Endangered Species Act of 1973 will fail to keep pace with increasing numbers of species needing protection as long as it remains focused on protecting species individually. The act must not be abandoned, however; it holds tremendous promise for preserving biological diversity through a more proactive, anticipatory perspective. The current Endangered Species Act should be reinforced and improved by better integration of scientific expertise into habitat and community preservation listing decisions and recovery plan devlopment. Given the uncertainties surrounding long-term environmental consequences of human activities and resource use, a longer-term perspective must be integrated into all efforts to protect our biotic resources.

  19. 78 FR 53473 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... (Addax nasomaculatus), dama gazelle (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species... nasomaculatus), dama gazelle (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species' propagation...

  20. 78 FR 14817 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche), to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This...), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This notification...

  1. 77 FR 51042 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ...) (Ambystoma californiense) and California tiger salamander (Santa Barbara County Distinct Population Segment) (Ambystoma californiense) in conjunction with survey activities throughout the range of the species in... aristulatum var. parishii (San Diego button-celery) Fremontodendron mexicanum (Mexican...

  2. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Threatened and Endangered Species REST Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data characterize the marine and coastal environments and wildlife based on sensitivity to spilled oil. Coastal species that...

  3. 78 FR 9727 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... California tiger salamander (central DPS) (Ambystoma californiense) in Napa, Solano, Contra Costa, Alameda...) the California tiger salamander (central DPS) (Ambystoma californiense) in conjunction with survey and scientific research activities throughout the range of each species in Alameda, Contra Costa, Fresno,...

  4. 76 FR 6118 - Endangered Species; File No. 14726

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... threatened species (50 CFR 222-226). Permit No. 14726, issued on September 3, 2010 (75 FR 61133), authorizes... exposure of pelagic sea turtles associated with floating Sargassum as part of the post-spill...

  5. 76 FR 14682 - Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... take of the following species for the purposes of research, management, and captive propagation in... Chionanthus pygmaeus (pygmy fringe tree) from Federal lands in Florida, to retain as voucher specimens at...

  6. 76 FR 51051 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... enhancement of the survival of the species. Applicant: Valley Zoological Society dba Gladys Porter Zoo... (Crocodylus intermedius) from Ontario, Canada for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the...

  7. Conservation triage or injurious neglect in endangered species recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Gerber, Leah R.

    2016-01-01

    Although government funding available for species protection and recovery is one of the best predictors of successful recovery, government spending is both insufficient and highly disproportionate among groups of species. Here I demonstrate that expenditures for recovery in excess of the recommended recovery budget would not necessarily translate into better conservation outcomes. More importantly, elimination of the budget surplus for “costly yet futile” recovery plans can provide sufficient...

  8. Endangered Species and Natural Resource Exploitation: Extinction vs. Coexistence

    OpenAIRE

    Tsur, Yacov; Zemel, Amos

    1994-01-01

    The threat on the survival of animal species due to intensive use of natural resources is incorporated within resource management models, paying special attention to uncertainty regarding the conditions that lead to extinction. The manner in which the potential benefits forgone due to the species extinction (denoted extinction penalty) induce more conservative exploitation policies is studied in detail. When the extinction penalty is ignored, the optimal policy is to drive the resource stock ...

  9. 78 FR 24432 - Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    ... for the purpose of conducting presence/absence/population surveys and assisting in species recovery... conducting presence/absence surveys, studies to document habitat use, and population monitoring. Permit... spider (Microhexura montivaga) during habitat studies in North Carolina and Virginia. Permit...

  10. 76 FR 60862 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Republic of South Africa, for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the species. Applicant: Daniel... ESA law requires that we invite public comment before issuing these permits. DATES: We must receive... analyses of, the applicable laws and regulations. We will not consider or include in our...

  11. 77 FR 28855 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... they satisfy the ESA requirements. We make the recovery plans, along with any additional plan elements... recovery plans. Scientists on these teams were nominated because of their geographic and species expertise... the methods used in the management unit plans to develop the principal plan components. For...

  12. 77 FR 12611 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... California for the purpose of enhancing the species' survival. Permit No. TE-836491 Applicant: Michael D... Applicant: United States Geological Survey, Bishop Field Station, Bishop, California. The applicant requests.... Michael Long, Acting Regional Director, Region 8, Sacramento, California. BILLING CODE 4310-55-P...

  13. 77 FR 1061 - Endangered Species; File Nos. 16229 and 16548

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-09

    ... the Federal Register (76 FR 51945 and 76 FR 40699) that requests for enhancement permits to take... Zoo, 4401 Zoo ] Parkway, Asheboro, NC 27203 , and the Springfield Science Museum, 21 Edwards Street... species (50 CFR parts 222-226). The North Carolina Zoo and the Springfield Science Museum have been...

  14. 77 FR 34059 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... would violate the Privacy Act or Freedom of Information Act. Before including your address, phone number... registration under 50 CFR 17.21(g) for the following families, genus, and species, to enhance their...

  15. 77 FR 19311 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR 4685; January 26, 2009... Privacy Act or Freedom of Information Act. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or...) for the following families, genus, and species, to enhance their propagation or survival....

  16. 77 FR 3493 - Endangered Species Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR 4685; January 26, 2009... Privacy Act or Freedom of Information Act. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or... following families, genus, and species to enhance their propagation or survival. This notification...

  17. 77 FR 26779 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... would violate the Privacy Act or Freedom of Information Act. Before including your address, phone number...-bred wildlife registration under 50 CFR 17.21(g) for the following families, genus, and species,...

  18. Conservation of Endangered Species: What Do Children Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Sarah; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes results of questionnaire studies of children's ideas on which species most warrant conservation and why. When six animals meriting conservation were presented, children listed them in the following order: whale, panda, elephant, monkey, shark, and crocodile. The study showed that children tend to be most influenced toward the worthiness…

  19. 78 FR 59951 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This notification... dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) from the captive herd maintained at their facility, for the...

  20. 78 FR 25296 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This...), dama gazelle (Nanger dama), red lechwe (Kobus leche), bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus),...

  1. 77 FR 54604 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... male scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah), and one male lechwe (Kobus leche) culled from captive herds in... dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This...

  2. 78 FR 54479 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This... lechwe (Kobus leche) from the captive herd maintained at their facility, for the purpose of...

  3. 78 FR 16292 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR...), dama gazelle (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species' propagation or... nasomaculatus), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) from the captive herd maintained at their facility, for the...

  4. 78 FR 19731 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    ... and Open Government (74 FR 4685; January 26, 2009), which call on all Federal agencies to promote... (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This... (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) from the captive herd maintained at their facility, for...

  5. 77 FR 68809 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... ] leche) to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This notification covers activities to be...), addax (Addax nasomaculatus), dama gazelle (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance...

  6. 78 FR 4162 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This... eldii), scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the...

  7. The Path towards Endangered Species: Prehistoric Fisheries in Southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Mariana Samôr; Bertucci, Thayse Cristina Pereira; Rapagnã, Luciano; Tubino, Rafael de Almeida; Monteiro-Neto, Cassiano; Tomas, Acácio Ribeiro Gomes; Tenório, Maria Cristina; Lima, Tânia; Souza, Rosa; Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge Domingo; Haimovici, Manuel; Macario, Kita; Carvalho, Carla; Aguilera Socorro, Orangel

    2016-01-01

    Brazilian shellmounds are archaeological sites with a high concentration of marine faunal remains. There are more than 2000 sites along the coast of Brazil that range in age from 8,720 to 985 cal BP. Here, we studied the ichthyoarchaeological remains (i.e., cranial/postcranial bones, otoliths, and teeth, among others) at 13 shellmounds on the southern coast of the state of Rio de Janeiro, which are located in coastal landscapes, including a sandy plain with coastal lagoons, rocky islands, islets and rocky bays. We identified patterns of similarity between shellmounds based on fish diversity, the ages of the assemblages, littoral geomorphology and prehistoric fisheries. Our new radiocarbon dating, based on otolith samples, was used for fishery characterization over time. A taxonomical study of the ichthyoarchaeological remains includes a diversity of 97 marine species, representing 37% of all modern species (i.e., 265 spp.) that have been documented along the coast of Rio de Janeiro state. This high fish diversity recovered from the shellmounds is clear evidence of well-developed prehistoric fishery activity that targeted sharks, rays and finfishes in a productive area influenced by coastal marine upwelling. The presence of adult and neonate shark, especially oceanic species, is here interpreted as evidence of prehistoric fisheries capacity for exploitation and possibly overexploitation in nursery areas. Various tools and strategies were used to capture finfish in seasonal fisheries, over rocky reef bottoms and in sandy littoral environments. Massive catches of whitemouth croaker, main target dermersal species of South Atlantic coast, show evidence of a reduction in body size of approximately 28% compared with modern fisheries. Fishery activity involving vulnerable species, especially in nursery areas, could mark the beginning of fish depletion along the southeastern Brazilian coast and the collapse of natural fish populations. PMID:27355355

  8. The Path towards Endangered Species: Prehistoric Fisheries in Southeastern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Samôr Lopes

    Full Text Available Brazilian shellmounds are archaeological sites with a high concentration of marine faunal remains. There are more than 2000 sites along the coast of Brazil that range in age from 8,720 to 985 cal BP. Here, we studied the ichthyoarchaeological remains (i.e., cranial/postcranial bones, otoliths, and teeth, among others at 13 shellmounds on the southern coast of the state of Rio de Janeiro, which are located in coastal landscapes, including a sandy plain with coastal lagoons, rocky islands, islets and rocky bays. We identified patterns of similarity between shellmounds based on fish diversity, the ages of the assemblages, littoral geomorphology and prehistoric fisheries. Our new radiocarbon dating, based on otolith samples, was used for fishery characterization over time. A taxonomical study of the ichthyoarchaeological remains includes a diversity of 97 marine species, representing 37% of all modern species (i.e., 265 spp. that have been documented along the coast of Rio de Janeiro state. This high fish diversity recovered from the shellmounds is clear evidence of well-developed prehistoric fishery activity that targeted sharks, rays and finfishes in a productive area influenced by coastal marine upwelling. The presence of adult and neonate shark, especially oceanic species, is here interpreted as evidence of prehistoric fisheries capacity for exploitation and possibly overexploitation in nursery areas. Various tools and strategies were used to capture finfish in seasonal fisheries, over rocky reef bottoms and in sandy littoral environments. Massive catches of whitemouth croaker, main target dermersal species of South Atlantic coast, show evidence of a reduction in body size of approximately 28% compared with modern fisheries. Fishery activity involving vulnerable species, especially in nursery areas, could mark the beginning of fish depletion along the southeastern Brazilian coast and the collapse of natural fish populations.

  9. The Path towards Endangered Species: Prehistoric Fisheries in Southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Mariana Samôr; Bertucci, Thayse Cristina Pereira; Rapagnã, Luciano; Tubino, Rafael de Almeida; Monteiro-Neto, Cassiano; Tomas, Acácio Ribeiro Gomes; Tenório, Maria Cristina; Lima, Tânia; Souza, Rosa; Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge Domingo; Haimovici, Manuel; Macario, Kita; Carvalho, Carla; Aguilera Socorro, Orangel

    2016-01-01

    Brazilian shellmounds are archaeological sites with a high concentration of marine faunal remains. There are more than 2000 sites along the coast of Brazil that range in age from 8,720 to 985 cal BP. Here, we studied the ichthyoarchaeological remains (i.e., cranial/postcranial bones, otoliths, and teeth, among others) at 13 shellmounds on the southern coast of the state of Rio de Janeiro, which are located in coastal landscapes, including a sandy plain with coastal lagoons, rocky islands, islets and rocky bays. We identified patterns of similarity between shellmounds based on fish diversity, the ages of the assemblages, littoral geomorphology and prehistoric fisheries. Our new radiocarbon dating, based on otolith samples, was used for fishery characterization over time. A taxonomical study of the ichthyoarchaeological remains includes a diversity of 97 marine species, representing 37% of all modern species (i.e., 265 spp.) that have been documented along the coast of Rio de Janeiro state. This high fish diversity recovered from the shellmounds is clear evidence of well-developed prehistoric fishery activity that targeted sharks, rays and finfishes in a productive area influenced by coastal marine upwelling. The presence of adult and neonate shark, especially oceanic species, is here interpreted as evidence of prehistoric fisheries capacity for exploitation and possibly overexploitation in nursery areas. Various tools and strategies were used to capture finfish in seasonal fisheries, over rocky reef bottoms and in sandy littoral environments. Massive catches of whitemouth croaker, main target dermersal species of South Atlantic coast, show evidence of a reduction in body size of approximately 28% compared with modern fisheries. Fishery activity involving vulnerable species, especially in nursery areas, could mark the beginning of fish depletion along the southeastern Brazilian coast and the collapse of natural fish populations.

  10. The Path towards Endangered Species: Prehistoric Fisheries in Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Mariana Samôr; Bertucci, Thayse Cristina Pereira; Rapagnã, Luciano; Tubino, Rafael de Almeida; Monteiro-Neto, Cassiano; Tomas, Acácio Ribeiro Gomes; Tenório, Maria Cristina; Lima, Tânia; Souza, Rosa; Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge Domingo; Haimovici, Manuel; Macario, Kita; Carvalho, Carla; Aguilera Socorro, Orangel

    2016-01-01

    Brazilian shellmounds are archaeological sites with a high concentration of marine faunal remains. There are more than 2000 sites along the coast of Brazil that range in age from 8,720 to 985 cal BP. Here, we studied the ichthyoarchaeological remains (i.e., cranial/postcranial bones, otoliths, and teeth, among others) at 13 shellmounds on the southern coast of the state of Rio de Janeiro, which are located in coastal landscapes, including a sandy plain with coastal lagoons, rocky islands, islets and rocky bays. We identified patterns of similarity between shellmounds based on fish diversity, the ages of the assemblages, littoral geomorphology and prehistoric fisheries. Our new radiocarbon dating, based on otolith samples, was used for fishery characterization over time. A taxonomical study of the ichthyoarchaeological remains includes a diversity of 97 marine species, representing 37% of all modern species (i.e., 265 spp.) that have been documented along the coast of Rio de Janeiro state. This high fish diversity recovered from the shellmounds is clear evidence of well-developed prehistoric fishery activity that targeted sharks, rays and finfishes in a productive area influenced by coastal marine upwelling. The presence of adult and neonate shark, especially oceanic species, is here interpreted as evidence of prehistoric fisheries capacity for exploitation and possibly overexploitation in nursery areas. Various tools and strategies were used to capture finfish in seasonal fisheries, over rocky reef bottoms and in sandy littoral environments. Massive catches of whitemouth croaker, main target dermersal species of South Atlantic coast, show evidence of a reduction in body size of approximately 28% compared with modern fisheries. Fishery activity involving vulnerable species, especially in nursery areas, could mark the beginning of fish depletion along the southeastern Brazilian coast and the collapse of natural fish populations. PMID:27355355

  11. Limitations of captive breeding in endangered species recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, N.F.R.; Derrickson, S.R.; Beissenger, S.R.; Wiley, J.W.; Smith, T.B.; Toone, W.D.; Miller, B.

    1996-01-01

    The use of captive breeding in species recovery has grown enormously in recent years, but without a concurrent growth in appreciation of its limitations. Problems with (1) establishing self-sufficient captive populations, (2) poor success in reintroductions, (3.) high costs, (4) domestication, (5) preemption of other recovery techniques, (6) disease outbreaks, and (7) maintaining administrative continuity have all been significant. The technique has often been invoked prematurely and should not normally be employed before a careful field evaluation of costs and benefits of all conservation alternatives has been accomplished and a determination made that captive breeding is essential for species survival. Merely demonstrating that a species population is declining or bas fallen below what may be a minimum viable size does not constitute enough analysis to justify captive breeding as a recovery measure. Captive breeding should be reviewed as a last resort in species recovery and not a prophylactic or long-term solution because of the inexorable genetic and phenotypic changes that occur in captive environments. Captive breeding can play a crucial role in recovery of some species for witch effective alternatives are unavailable in the short term. However, it should not displace habitat and ecosystem protection nor should it be invoked in the absence of comprehensive efforts to maintain or restore populations in wild habitats. Zoological institutions with captive breeding programs should operate under carefully defined conditions of disease prevention and genetic/behavioral management. More important, these institutions should help preserve biodiversity through their capacities for public education, professional training, research, and support of in situ conservation efforts.

  12. Rare and endangered plant species of the Chinese Altai Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marina; V.OLONOVA

    2010-01-01

    Altai (also named Altay in China) Mountain Country (Mountain System) is a unique natural region,located on the border between different floristic regimes of the Boreal and ancient Mediterranean sub-kingdoms,where distribution of plant species is actually limited. It is known to have sufficient endemic floral biodiversity in the Northern Asia. Many plants of Altai Mountain System need effective care and proper conservation measures for their survival and longer-term protection. Important Plant Area identified as the IUCN (the International Union for Conservation of Nature),specified criteria attract global attention for protection of floral biodiversity across the world. The records of 71 plant species from the Chinese Altai Mountains attributed to the criterion A and the dark conifer forests of Chinese Altai Mountains satisfied the criterion C,which may help qualify to fulfill the national obligation of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

  13. On the value of endangered and other species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagoff, Mark

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes two frameworks—utilitarian and Kantian—society uses to make decisions concerning environmental management and, in particular, species protection. The utilitarian framework emphasizes the consequences of choices for prior preferences. A perfectly competitive market, on this model, correctly values environmental resources. The Kantian approach identifies rules appropriate to recognized situations given the identity of the decision maker. It relies on democratic political processes and institutions to provide the means by which citizens determine the identity of their community—its moral character and aspirations—and match appropriate rules to recognized situations. This paper argues that markets do not fail in any general way in measuring the economic value of plants and animals. Market prices, in general, correctly represent the marginal or exchange value of species. If society legislates against extinction, this must be understood as an exercise in Kantian decision making in view of the moral value of species, not as an attempt to “correct” a market failure or to promote social welfare or utility.

  14. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci for the Moroccan endemic endangered species Argania spinosa (Sapotaceae) 1

    OpenAIRE

    Yasmina El Bahloul; Nicolas Dauchot; Ikrame Machtoun; Fatima Gaboun; Pierre Van Cutsem

    2014-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the Moroccan endemic endangered species Argania spinosa with a combination of a typical library enrichment procedure and a 454 GS FLX Titanium–based high-throughput sequencing approach. Methods and Results: A genomic DNA library was enriched and further screened using (GA)15, (GTA)8, and (TTC)8 biotin-labeled probes coupled with chemi-luminescence detection. To increase simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci number, an ultra-hig...

  15. Xenografting as a Tool to Preserve Endangered Species: Outcomes and Challenges in Model Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mota, Paula C.; João Ramalho-Santos; Stefan Schlatt

    2011-01-01

    The use of testis tissue xenografting as a valuable tool to rescue endangered and genetically valuable individuals that die young or otherwise fail to produce sperm has been the subject of much interest. Although the technique has been successfully applied to a wide variety of species, little is known about what determines the outcome. Furthermore, to improve the applicability of xenografting, new methods to preserve and transport testis tissue from valuable animals are emerging. However, one...

  16. The World of Endangered Wildlife. [Filmstrip, Cassette Tape Narration, Teacher's Guide, Two Copies of National Wildlife Magazine's Special Issue on Endangered Species, State-by-State List of Endangered Animals, and Wildlife Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    The gradual disappearance of many species of wildlife, too often a prelude to extinction, is a problem of large proportions and increasing urgency. This filmstrip kit is designed to help students and teachers to understand the more serious threats to endangered species, what is being done about them, and how the individual can help. The kit…

  17. Karyotype and identification of sex in two endangered crane species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodpasture, C.; Seluja, G.; Gee, G.

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory procedure for sex identification of monomorphic birds was developed using modern cytological methods of detecting chromosome abnormalities in human amniotic fluid samples. A pin feather is taken from a pre-fledging bird for tissue culture and karyotype analysis. Through this method, the sex was identified and the karyotype described of the whooping crane (Grus americana) and the Mississippi sandhill crane (G. canadensis pulla). Giemsa-stained karyotypes of these species showed an identical chromosome constitution with 2n = 78 + 2. However, differences in the amount of centromeric heterochromatin were observed in the Mississippi sandhill crane when compared to the whooping crane C-banded karyotype.

  18. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, pdogs 2004, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  19. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, dogs 1995, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  20. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, exist dogs, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  1. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, dog area, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  2. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, dog study, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  3. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, pdog seed, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  4. Relaxin concentrations in serum and urine of endangered and crazy mixed-up species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, B; Lasano, S; de Haas van Dorsser, F; Glickman, S; Bergfelt, D; Santymire, R; Songsassen, N; Swanson, W

    2009-04-01

    The human population explosion has pushed many mammalian wildlife species to the brink of extinction. Conservationists are increasingly turning to captive breeding as a means of preserving the gene pool. We previously reported that serum immunoactive relaxin provided a reliable means of distinguishing between true and pseudopregnancy in domestic dogs, and this method has since been found to be a reliable indicator of true pregnancy in endangered Asian and African elephants and Sumatran rhinoceroses. Our canine relaxin radioimmunoassay (RIA) has now been adapted and validated to measure relaxin in the serum and urine of felids, including domestic and wild species. Moreover, a commercially available canine serum relaxin kit (Witness) Relaxin Kit; Synbiotics, San Diego, CA), has been adapted for reliable detection of relaxin in urine of some felid species. Our porcine relaxin RIA has also been utilized to investigate the role of relaxin in reproductive processes of the spotted hyena, a species in which the female fetuses are severely masculinized in utero. Indeed, this species might well now be extinct were it not for the timely secretion of relaxin to enable copulation and birth of young through the clitoris. Additional studies have suggested relaxin may be a useful marker of pregnancy in the northern fur seal and the maned wolf (the former species has been designated as "depleted" and the latter as "near threatened"). Given appropriate immunoassay reagents, relaxin determination in body fluids thus provides a powerful tool for conservationists and biologists investigating reproduction in a wide variety of endangered and exotic species. PMID:19416182

  5. Mine Spoil Prairies Expand Critical Habitat for Endangered and Threatened Amphibian and Reptile Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan J. Engbrecht

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Coal extraction has been occurring in the Midwestern United States for over a century. Despite the pre-mining history of the landscape as woodlands, spent surface coalfields are often reclaimed to grasslands. We assessed amphibian and reptile species on a large tract of coal spoil prairie and found 13 species of amphibians (nine frog and four salamander species and 19 species of reptiles (one lizard, five turtle, and 13 snake species. Two state-endangered and three state species of special concern were documented. The amphibian diversity at our study site was comparable to the diversity found at a large restored prairie situated 175 km north, within the historic prairie peninsula.

  6. Xenografting as a Tool to Preserve Endangered Species: Outcomes and Challenges in Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula C. Mota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of testis tissue xenografting as a valuable tool to rescue endangered and genetically valuable individuals that die young or otherwise fail to produce sperm has been the subject of much interest. Although the technique has been successfully applied to a wide variety of species, little is known about what determines the outcome. Furthermore, to improve the applicability of xenografting, new methods to preserve and transport testis tissue from valuable animals are emerging. However, one major issue remains: the application of xenografting implies the development of subsequent ART techniques to produce offspring from the recovered material. This paper focuses on these three aspects of testis tissue xenografting as a tool for rescuing endangered and valuable genetic pools.

  7. An evaluation of the contaminant impacts on plants serving as habitat for an endangered species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeShields, B.R.; Stelljes, M.E.; Hawkins, E.T.; Alsop, W.R. [Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA (United States); Collins, W. [Dept. of the Army, Fort Ord, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    As part of an ecological risk assessment at a Superfund site in Monterey County, California, potential impacts on an endangered species, the Smith`s blue butterfly (Euphilotes enoptes smithi) were evaluated. This species of butterfly lives along beach dunes historically used as small arms trainfire ranges. Historical land use resulted in the accumulation of spent bullets and varying concentrations of metals in site soil. Two species of buckwheat occurring at the site (Erigonium parvifolium and E. latifolium) that serve as the sole habitat for the butterfly were evaluated. It was assumed that if there were no impacts to the habitat, there would be no impacts to the endangered species itself. Surface soil and collocated plants were sampled and chemically analyzed in order to correlate soil concentrations with plant tissue concentrations. Surface soil and collocated plants were also sampled at reference sites to determine background concentrations. Tissue concentrations were compared to benchmark concentrations to evaluate potential impacts. In addition, soil samples and seeds from buckwheat growing at the site were collected and used to conduct root elongation assays in the laboratory. The objective of the assays was to assess effects of metals associated with the spent bullets in soil on plant growth. Within the plants, higher concentrations of all metals except zinc were found in the roots; zinc was equally distributed throughout the plants. No chemical-related impacts to the plants were identified.

  8. Valuing the Endangered Species Antirrhinum lopesianum: Neuroprotective Activities and Strategies for in vitro Plant Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Gomes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant phytochemicals are described as possessing considerable neuroprotective properties, due to radical scavenging capacity and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity, important bioactivities in neurodegeneration. Antirrhinum lopesianum is a rare endemism from the Iberian Peninsula, occurring at the northeastern border between Portugal and Spain. It is classified as Endangered, due to its highly fragmented geographical occupation, facing a high risk of extinction in the Portuguese territory, within 20 years. Here, we describe for the first time the chemical characterization of extracts of the species concerning total phenol content, flavonoid content and antioxidant properties. The profile of high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD of the polyphenol-enriched fraction of plant extracts was also performed, showing the great potential of the species as a source of bioactive phytochemical compounds. A. lopesianum’s potential for neuroprotection was revealed by a significant acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity and also by a neuroprotective effect on a human cell model of neurodegeneration. Moreover, this is the first report describing a successful procedure for the in vitro propagation of this endangered species. The comparison of phenolic content and the HPLC-DAD profile of wild and in vitro propagated plants revealed that in vitro plants maintain the ability to produce secondary metabolites, but the profiles are differentially affected by the growth regulators. The results presented here greatly contribute to the value for this species regarding its potential as a source of phytochemicals with prospective neuroprotective health benefits.

  9. Assessing the impact of the U.S. Endangered Species Act recovery planning guidelines on managing threats for listed species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Caitlin M; Gerber, Leah R

    2015-10-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of the United States was enacted in 1973 to prevent the extinction of species. Recovery plans, required by 1988 amendments to the ESA, play an important role in organizing these efforts to protect and recover species. To improve the use of science in the recovery planning process, the Society for Conservation Biology (SCB) commissioned an independent review of endangered species recovery planning in 1999. From these findings, the SCB made key recommendations for how management agencies could improve the recovery planning process, after which the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service redrafted their recovery planning guidelines. One important recommendation called for recovery plans to make threats a primary focus, including organizing and prioritizing recovery tasks for threat abatement. We sought to determine the extent to which results from the SCB study were incorporated into these new guidelines and whether the SCB recommendations regarding threats manifested in recovery plans written under the new guidelines. Recovery planning guidelines generally incorporated the SCB recommendations, including those for managing threats. However, although recent recovery plans have improved in their treatment of threats, many fail to adequately incorporate threat monitoring. This failure suggests that developing clear guidelines for monitoring should be an important priority in improving ESA recovery planning. PMID:26108948

  10. Short Communication: Rediscovery of a remnant habitat of the critically endangered species, Hopea sangal, in Pasuruan District, East Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOEJONO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Soejono. 2014. Rediscovery of a remnant habitat of the critically endangered species, Hopea sangal, in Pasuruan District, East Java, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 15: 236-239. During recent exploration for surviving indigenous flora carried out in Pasuruan District, East Java, the endangered tree species, Hopea sangal Korth., has been rediscovered in a previously unknown location in East Java. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, 2012, stated that H. sangal is critically endangered, A1cd, B1+2c, C1, D ver 2.3. This discovery of H. sangal, and other supporting species that may still survive, can support the program of recovery of threatened plant species. At least for Pasuruan region, the remaining habitat, can be used as the core for H. sangal protection, thus H. sangal can breed naturally and sustainably. This information also can be used as one of the references or consideration tools for stakeholders to determine the priority of restoration policy.

  11. INTRODUCTION OF SOME RARE AND ENDANGERED SPECIES OF WESTERN CAUCASUS FLORA TO IN VITRO CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolov R. N.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There were developed some methods of sterilization and introduction of the following endangered species of Caucasian flora to in vitro culture: Campanula sclerophylla Kolak., Lilium caucasicum Miscz. ex Grossh., Daphne woronowii Kolak., Pancratium maritimum L.. The effect of different plant hormones as well as their combinations and concentrations on the regeneration, growth and development of plants is studied. As a result of clonal propagation, more than 100 plants of Campanula sclerophylla Kolak, about 30 plants of Pancratium maritimum L., and 150 samples of Lilium caucasicum Miscz. Ex Grossh are saved in tissue culture

  12. Public preferences for endangered species recovery: an examination of geospatial scale and non-market values

    OpenAIRE

    Wallmo, Kristy; Daniel K Lew

    2015-01-01

    Non-market valuation allows society to express their preferences for goods and services whose economic value is not reflected in traditional markets. One issue that arises in applying non-market values in policy settings is defining the extent of the economic jurisdiction—the area that includes all people who hold values—for a good or service. In this paper, we estimate non-market values for recovering eight threatened and endangered marine species in the US for two geographically embedded sa...

  13. Public Preferences for Endangered Species Recovery: An Examination of Geospatial Scale and Non-Market Values

    OpenAIRE

    Kristy eWallmo; Daniel K Lew

    2015-01-01

    Non-market valuation allows society to express their preferences for goods and services whose economic value is not reflected in traditional markets. One issue that arises in applying non-market values in policy settings is defining the extent of the economic jurisdiction – the area that includes all people who hold values – for a good or service. In this paper we estimate non-market values for recovering eight threatened and endangered marine species in the US for two geographically embedd...

  14. Available data support protection of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher under the Endangered Species Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theimer, Tad C.; Smith, Aaron D.; Mahoney, Sean M.; Ironside, Kirsten E.

    2016-01-01

    Zink (2015) argued there was no evidence for genetic, morphological, or ecological differentiation between the federally endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) and other Willow Flycatcher subspecies. Using the same data, we show there is a step-cline in both the frequency of a mtDNA haplotype and in plumage variation roughly concordant with the currently recognized boundary between E. t. extimus and E. t adastus, the subspecies with which it shares the longest common boundary. The geographical pattern of plumage variation is also concordant with previous song analyses differentiating those 2 subspecies and identified birds in one low-latitude, high-elevation site in Arizona as the northern subspecies. We also demonstrate that the ecological niche modeling approach used by Zink yields the same result whether applied to the 2 flycatcher subspecies or to 2 unrelated species, E. t. extimus and Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia). As a result, any interpretation of those results as evidence for lack of ecological niche differentiation among Willow Flycatcher subspecies would also indicate no differentiation among recognized species and would therefore be an inappropriate standard for delineating subspecies. We agree that many analytical techniques now available to examine genetic, morphological, and ecological differentiation would improve our understanding of the distinctness (or lack thereof) of Willow Flycatcher subspecies, but we argue that currently available evidence supports protection of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher under the Endangered Species Act.

  15. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  16. Bidens meyeri (Asteraceae, Coreopsideae: a new critically endangered species from Rapa, Austral Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki Funk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bidens meyeri (Asteraceae/Compositae is described and illustrated from Rapa, Austral Islands, (French Polynesia. This new species is presumed to be most closely related to Bidens saint-johniana from nearby Marotiri Island. Bidens meyeri may be distinguished from B. saint-johniana based on the length of the peduncle (3 cm versus 10 cm, apex of the inner involucral bracts (glabrous vs. puberulent, smaller leaves (2.0–2.3 cm vs. 5–6 cm, and the general smaller size of the new species. Known from less than 50 individuals and restricted to one remote location, Bidens meyeri falls into the IUCN Critically Endangered (CR category. The new species is named in honor of Dr. Jean-Yves Meyer, Délégation à la Recherche, Polynésie Française,

  17. The role of demographic compensation theory in incidental take assessments for endangered species

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Conor P.; Ryan, Mark R.; Runge, Michael C.; Millspaugh, Joshua J.; Cochrane, Jean Fitts

    2011-01-01

    Many endangered species laws provide exceptions to legislated prohibitions through incidental take provisions as long as take is the result of unintended consequences of an otherwise legal activity. These allowances presumably invoke the theory of demographic compensation, commonly applied to harvested species, by allowing limited harm as long as the probability of the species' survival or recovery is not reduced appreciably. Demographic compensation requires some density-dependent limits on survival or reproduction in a species' annual cycle that can be alleviated through incidental take. Using a population model for piping plovers in the Great Plains, we found that when the population is in rapid decline or when there is no density dependence, the probability of quasi-extinction increased linearly with increasing take. However, when the population is near stability and subject to density-dependent survival, there was no relationship between quasi-extinction probability and take rates. We note however, that a brief examination of piping plover demography and annual cycles suggests little room for compensatory capacity. We argue that a population's capacity for demographic compensation of incidental take should be evaluated when considering incidental allowances because compensation is the only mechanism whereby a population can absorb the negative effects of take without incurring a reduction in the probability of survival in the wild. With many endangered species there is probably little known about density dependence and compensatory capacity. Under these circumstances, using multiple system models (with and without compensation) to predict the population's response to incidental take and implementing follow-up monitoring to assess species response may be valuable in increasing knowledge and improving future decision making.

  18. Snail Darters and Sacred Places: Creative Application of the Endangered Species Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmer, Robert Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Rather than exploring how indigenous people have been alienated from resources by environmental policies, this paper explores how indigenous peoples have worked with environmental organizations to use the broad protections provided by environmental laws to protect cultural resources. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, along with other concerned groups, partnered with environmentalists in opposing the destruction of the endangered snail darter’s critical habitat by the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Tellico Dam. The dam had been opposed by a shifting alliance of Cherokees, local farmers, trout fisherman, and environmentalists since it was announced in 1963. A previous lawsuit by this coalition delayed the project from 1972 to 1974 under the National Environmental Policy Act. The Endangered Species Act provided this coalition with a powerful tool for opposing the destruction of burial grounds and sacred village sites throughout the lower Little Tennessee River valley. The coalition of environmental organizations, Cherokees, and others was ultimately unsuccessful in stopping the dam from being built, but was successful in establishing a strict precedent for the enforcement of the Endangered Species Act. The lawsuit also created a space for the Eastern Band to negotiate for the return of Cherokee remains and halt the removal of any additional burials. In this situation, the strategic support of environmental regulation enabled the Eastern Band to exert some degree of control over the fate of cultural resources in the valley, and also demonstrates the significant role American Indian peoples played in one of the seminal events of the environmental movement during the 1970s.

  19. 77 FR 69993 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    .... Dyer's woad (Isatis tinctoria), an invasive, nonnative plant that may prevent germination of Siskiyou... and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for Listing as... Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for Listing...

  20. Parasite species of the endangered Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus and a sympatric widespread carnivore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Figueiredo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Parasites have a profound impact on wildlife population dynamics. However, until some years ago, studies on the occurrence and prevalence of wildlife parasites were neglected comparatively with the studies on humans and domestic animals. In this study, we determined the parasite prevalence of two sympatric wild canids: the endangered Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus and the widespread red fox (Vulpes vulpes, in central Portugal. From November 2014 to July 2015, fresh fecal samples from both species were collected monthly in several transects distributed throughout the study area. All samples were submitted to several coprological techniques. In total, 6 helminth parasites (Crenosoma vulpis, Angiostrongylus vasorum, Toxocara canis, Trichuris vulpis, Ancylostomatidae, Toxascaris leonina, and a protozoa (Balantidium coli were identified based on size and morphology. The red fox was infected by seven different parasites while the Iberian wolf was infected by four. All parasites present in wolf were also present in the red fox. C. vulpis had the higher prevalence in red fox, while Ancylostomatidae were the most prevalent parasites in wolf. To our knowledge, this is the first study in this isolated subpopulation of the Iberian wolf. Our results show that both carnivores carry parasites that are of concern as they are pathogenic to humans and other wild and domestic animals. We suggest that surveillance programs must also include monitoring protocols of wildlife; particularly endangered species.

  1. Parasite species of the endangered Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus) and a sympatric widespread carnivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Ana; Oliveira, Lucia; Madeira de Carvalho, Luís; Fonseca, Carlos; Torres, Rita Tinoco

    2016-08-01

    Parasites have a profound impact on wildlife population dynamics. However, until some years ago, studies on the occurrence and prevalence of wildlife parasites were neglected comparatively with the studies on humans and domestic animals. In this study, we determined the parasite prevalence of two sympatric wild canids: the endangered Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus) and the widespread red fox (Vulpes vulpes), in central Portugal. From November 2014 to July 2015, fresh fecal samples from both species were collected monthly in several transects distributed throughout the study area. All samples were submitted to several coprological techniques. In total, 6 helminth parasites (Crenosoma vulpis, Angiostrongylus vasorum, Toxocara canis, Trichuris vulpis, Ancylostomatidae, Toxascaris leonina), and a protozoa (Balantidium coli) were identified based on size and morphology. The red fox was infected by seven different parasites while the Iberian wolf was infected by four. All parasites present in wolf were also present in the red fox. C. vulpis had the higher prevalence in red fox, while Ancylostomatidae were the most prevalent parasites in wolf. To our knowledge, this is the first study in this isolated subpopulation of the Iberian wolf. Our results show that both carnivores carry parasites that are of concern as they are pathogenic to humans and other wild and domestic animals. We suggest that surveillance programs must also include monitoring protocols of wildlife; particularly endangered species. PMID:27358768

  2. Linking density, productivity and trends of an endangered species: The Bonelli's eagle in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascal, Luis M.; Seoane, Javier

    2009-05-01

    Whether regional population density is a good indicator of environmental quality according to demographic variables such as breeding success or short-term population trends is controversial. In this paper we analyze the interrelationships among regional population density, breeding success and recent population trends of an endangered species, Bonelli's eagle in the Iberian Peninsula. We also analyze the different influence of geographical, climatic, landscape structure and human impact variables on regional variation in those demographic variables. Breeding success was higher and population decrease was lower in those areas where the population density of Bonelli's eagle was greater. Breeding success, density and recent population trends of Bonelli's eagle were tightly related, increasing from northern to southern Iberian Peninsula (with highest figures at intermediate latitudes), and as sun radiation increased, and altitude decreased. Breeding success and population density were significantly lower in the periphery of the distribution range than in core areas in the Iberian Peninsula. Population trends between 2000 and 2005 were also more negative (decreasing) in the periphery. Overall, these results suggest that population density in this endangered species of large home-range is a good indicator of environmental quality and reproductive output, and that peripheral populations occupy low-suitability areas with lower breeding success, where negative short-term population trends are more likely.

  3. Unveiling the conservation biogeography of a data-deficient endangered bird species under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junhua; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    It remains a challenge to identify the geographical patterns and underlying environmental associations of species with unique ecological niches and distinct behaviors. This in turn hinders our understanding of the ecology as well as effective conservation management of threatened species. The white-eared night heron (Gorsachius magnificus) is a non-migratory nocturnal bird species that has a patchy distribution in the mountainous forests of East Asia. It is currently categorized as "Endangered" on the IUCN Red List, primarily due to its restricted range and fragmented habitat. To improve our knowledge of the biogeography and conservation of this species, we modeled the geographical pattern of its suitable habitat and evaluated the potential impacts of climate change using ecological niche modeling with a maximum entropy approach implemented in Maxent. Our results indicated that the amount of suitable habitat in all of East Asia was about 130 000 km(2), which can be spatially subdivided into several mountain ranges in southern and southwestern China and northern Vietnam. The extent of suitable habitat range may shrink by more than 35% under a predicted changing climate when assuming the most pessimistic condition of dispersal, while some more suitable habitat would be available if the heron could disperse unrestrainedly. The significant future changes in habitat suitability suggested for Gorsachius magnificus urge caution in any downgrading of Red List status that may be considered. Our results also discern potentially suitable areas for future survey efforts on new populations. Overall, this study demonstrates that ecological niche modeling offers an important tool for evaluating the habitat suitability and potential impacts of climate change on an enigmatic and endangered species based on limited presence data. PMID:24404169

  4. Unveiling the conservation biogeography of a data-deficient endangered bird species under climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Hu

    Full Text Available It remains a challenge to identify the geographical patterns and underlying environmental associations of species with unique ecological niches and distinct behaviors. This in turn hinders our understanding of the ecology as well as effective conservation management of threatened species. The white-eared night heron (Gorsachius magnificus is a non-migratory nocturnal bird species that has a patchy distribution in the mountainous forests of East Asia. It is currently categorized as "Endangered" on the IUCN Red List, primarily due to its restricted range and fragmented habitat. To improve our knowledge of the biogeography and conservation of this species, we modeled the geographical pattern of its suitable habitat and evaluated the potential impacts of climate change using ecological niche modeling with a maximum entropy approach implemented in Maxent. Our results indicated that the amount of suitable habitat in all of East Asia was about 130 000 km(2, which can be spatially subdivided into several mountain ranges in southern and southwestern China and northern Vietnam. The extent of suitable habitat range may shrink by more than 35% under a predicted changing climate when assuming the most pessimistic condition of dispersal, while some more suitable habitat would be available if the heron could disperse unrestrainedly. The significant future changes in habitat suitability suggested for Gorsachius magnificus urge caution in any downgrading of Red List status that may be considered. Our results also discern potentially suitable areas for future survey efforts on new populations. Overall, this study demonstrates that ecological niche modeling offers an important tool for evaluating the habitat suitability and potential impacts of climate change on an enigmatic and endangered species based on limited presence data.

  5. Biobanking efforts and new advances in male fertility preservation for rare and endangered species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Comizzoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and sustaining biodiversity is a multi-disciplinary science that benefits highly from the creation of organized and accessible collections of biomaterials (Genome Resource Banks. Large cryo-collections are invaluable tools for understanding, cataloging, and protecting the genetic diversity of the world′s unique animals and plants. Specifically, the systematic collection and preservation of semen from rare species has been developed significantly in recent decades with some biobanks now being actively used for endangered species management and propagation (including the introduction of species such as the black-footed ferret and the giant panda. Innovations emerging from the growing field of male fertility preservation for humans, livestock species, and laboratory animals are also becoming relevant to the protection and the propagation of valuable domestic and wild species. These new approaches extend beyond the "classical" methods associated with sperm freezing to include testicular tissue preservation combined with xenografting or in vitro culture, all of which have potential for rescuing vast amounts of unused germplasm. There also are other options under development that are predicted to have a high impact within the next decade (stem cell technologies, bio-stabilization of sperm cells at ambient temperatures, and the use of genomics tools. However, biobanking efforts and new fertility preservation strategies have to expand the way beyond mammalian species, which will offer knowledge and tools to better manage species that serve as valuable biomedical models or require assistance to reverse endangerment.

  6. Biobanking efforts and new advances in male fertility preservation for rare and endangered species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comizzoli, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and sustaining biodiversity is a multi-disciplinary science that benefits highly from the creation of organized and accessible collections of biomaterials (Genome Resource Banks). Large cryo-collections are invaluable tools for understanding, cataloging, and protecting the genetic diversity of the world's unique animals and plants. Specifically, the systematic collection and preservation of semen from rare species has been developed significantly in recent decades with some biobanks now being actively used for endangered species management and propagation (including the introduction of species such as the black-footed ferret and the giant panda). Innovations emerging from the growing field of male fertility preservation for humans, livestock species, and laboratory animals are also becoming relevant to the protection and the propagation of valuable domestic and wild species. These new approaches extend beyond the "classical" methods associated with sperm freezing to include testicular tissue preservation combined with xenografting or in vitro culture, all of which have potential for rescuing vast amounts of unused germplasm. There also are other options under development that are predicted to have a high impact within the next decade (stem cell technologies, bio-stabilization of sperm cells at ambient temperatures, and the use of genomics tools). However, biobanking efforts and new fertility preservation strategies have to expand the way beyond mammalian species, which will offer knowledge and tools to better manage species that serve as valuable biomedical models or require assistance to reverse endangerment. PMID:25966625

  7. Phylogeography of the European sturgeon (Acipenser sturio): A critically endangered species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Olivier; Desse-Berset, Nathalie; Hänni, Catherine; Hughes, Sandrine; Berrebi, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The European sturgeon (Acipenser sturio) was once a common species throughout Europe, but the sole remaining natural population presently inhabits the Gironde Estuary in France (Atlantic coast). The species was classified as 'Critically Endangered' in 1996, and the Gironde population is now on the verge of extinction. In this setting, and for the first time, we present the past phylogeographical features of this species throughout Europe along with an assessment of its former genetic diversity. This study was based on a molecular analysis (mtDNA CR sequencing) of 10 living specimens from the Gironde Estuary, 55 museum specimens that had been caught along 19th and 20th centuries, and 59 archaeological remains dating back to 260-5000years BP, from which mitochondrial DNA was extracted and amplified. Although discontinuous, the produced data provided a realistic image of the former structure of A. sturio in Europe. Reconstruction of the phylogenetic trees and haplotypes network led to the identification of several clades. The mitochondrial genetic diversity of this species was found to be much greater at the core (Iberian Peninsula, Mediterranean and Adriatic regions) than along the margins (Atlantic-Northern Europe, Black Sea) of its range. A series of hypotheses on the dates and causes of changes in the species' major structures are put forward on the basis of these data. Finally, competition with A. oxyrinchus, a sibling species whose presence in Northern Europe was recently reconsidered, is presented as a major factor in the evolution of this species. PMID:26424382

  8. Redescription of the Advertisement Call of Five Species of Thoropa (Anura, Cycloramphidae), Including Recordings of Rare and Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes-de-Almeida, Carlos H L; Assis, Clodoaldo L; Feio, Renato N; Toledo, Luís Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Frogs of the genus Thoropa comprise six endemic Brazilian species on the Eastern side of the country. Little is known about their natural history, especially about their acoustic communication. Therefore, aiming to provide an overview of their vocalizations, we analyzed and redescribed male advertisement calls of three living and two possibly extinct species. The smaller species, T. petropolitana and T. lutzi, produce simple calls (one single note) with a higher frequency range than the remaining larger ones. On the other hand, the larger species present complex calls, with more than one note: T. megatympanum calls have three notes, T. taophora calls have four notes, and T. miliaris calls varies from three to six notes. Population snout-vent length negatively correlated with peak of dominant frequency as expected. However, highlighted differences between two populations of T. lutzi, which could indicate need of further taxonomic evaluation of those lineages. Peculiar morphology, such as the absence of vocal sacs and slits, may have contributed to their call variation and highly banded frequency structure. If the observed population differences reflect species-level differences, T. lutzi may be classified as a critically endangered species, as T. petropolitana. Furthermore, we provided a suggestion to an unusual behavior in frogs: calling with the mouth open in the smaller species of the genus. PMID:27617833

  9. Redescription of the Advertisement Call of Five Species of Thoropa (Anura, Cycloramphidae), Including Recordings of Rare and Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, Clodoaldo L.; Feio, Renato N.; Toledo, Luís Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Frogs of the genus Thoropa comprise six endemic Brazilian species on the Eastern side of the country. Little is known about their natural history, especially about their acoustic communication. Therefore, aiming to provide an overview of their vocalizations, we analyzed and redescribed male advertisement calls of three living and two possibly extinct species. The smaller species, T. petropolitana and T. lutzi, produce simple calls (one single note) with a higher frequency range than the remaining larger ones. On the other hand, the larger species present complex calls, with more than one note: T. megatympanum calls have three notes, T. taophora calls have four notes, and T. miliaris calls varies from three to six notes. Population snout-vent length negatively correlated with peak of dominant frequency as expected. However, highlighted differences between two populations of T. lutzi, which could indicate need of further taxonomic evaluation of those lineages. Peculiar morphology, such as the absence of vocal sacs and slits, may have contributed to their call variation and highly banded frequency structure. If the observed population differences reflect species-level differences, T. lutzi may be classified as a critically endangered species, as T. petropolitana. Furthermore, we provided a suggestion to an unusual behavior in frogs: calling with the mouth open in the smaller species of the genus. PMID:27617833

  10. Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, David Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hathcock, Charles Dean [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-11-17

    Los Alamos National Laboratory’s (LANL) Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan (HMP) fulfills a commitment made to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the “Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Mitigation Action Plan” (DOE 1996). The HMP received concurrence from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in 1999 (USFWS consultation numbers 2-22-98-I-336 and 2-22-95-I-108). This 2015 update retains the management guidelines from the 1999 HMP for listed species, updates some descriptive information, and adds the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) and Yellow-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) which were federally listed in 2014 (Keller 2015: USFWS consultation number 02ENNM00- 2015-I-0538).

  11. Distribution and status of Vicia menziesii Spreng. (Leguminosae): Hawaii's first officially listed endangered plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshauer, F.R.; Jacobi, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Vicia menziesii Spreng., Hawai'i's first officially listed endangered plant species, formerly occurred across a large area in the upper montane-mesic forest habitat on the windward side of the island of Hawai'i. Until this species was `rediscovered? in 1974, it had last been seen in 1915, and it was presumed to be extinct. The population is presently thought to number 150?300 plants, most of which are seedlings. These are located within a 200 ha area on the eastern flank of Mauna Loa volcano. The primary factors responsible for the decline of V. menziesii are habitat loss and excessive predation on the plants by introduced ungulates. Continued logging and cattle grazing within its remnant range are major threats to its existence. Enhancing the survival of V. menziesii may best be accomplished by stabilizing its remaining habitat and allowing the population to reestablish itself naturally.

  12. Age Structure and Growth Pattern of an Endangered Species, Amentotaxus formosana Li

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chinsu Lin; Ming-Hsun Chan; Feng-Sheng Chen; Ya-Nan Wang

    2007-01-01

    Amentotaxus formosana Li is a native, tolerant, and under-wood species in Taiwan. This particular species is only distributed around the Chachayalaishan and Dawushan areas. Because of its rarity, and the endangered and native properties of the species, we explored the regeneration process of the species in the native environment. This paper, therefore, aims to outline the age distribution and growth characteristics of A. formosana in the native stand using the techniques of tree ring analysis. An inventory was conducted in a site at the Chachayalaishan area from 2004 to 2006. According to the inventory, there are 67 trees in the sampling plot among which 16 individual A.formosana trees were counted. This is roughly 24% of the total population. This particular species is distributed around the understory space, while other species such as Litsea spp., Meliosma squamulata Hance, Schefflera octophylla Harms, Elaeocarpus japonicus Sieb et Zucc and Cleyera japonica Thunb are the major species whose canopy occupying the upperstory space of the stand. Results of tree-ring analysis suggest that the age of most of the trees in the sampling plot is between 31 and 90 years old with an average of 56. For the endangered species, A.formosana, age of the individuals varied from 14 and 126 years old and the average was 58 years old. Age distribution of the species was modeled using the Weibull probability density function and was statistically assessed using Sigmaplot statistical software. The estimate of shape parameter is 1.404 5 indicating a medium regeneration situation. The diameter growth rate of A. formosana is 0.32 cm and ranks 20th among the 26 species in the sampling plot. Using the age as a regressor variable, we can predict the diameter increment of A. formosana efficiently. The coefficient of determination, R2, is 0.832 2. The diameter growth among the trees of the upperstory and understory was competitive. Relationship between the growth change percentage of A

  13. Endangered Animals. Second Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Marcia

    This second grade teaching unit centers on endangered animal species around the world. Questions addressed are: What is an endangered species? Why do animals become extinct? How do I feel about the problem? and What can I do? Students study the definition of endangered species and investigate whether it is a natural process. They explore topics…

  14. Naming Potentially Endangered Parasites: Foliicolous Mycobiota of Dimorphandra wilsonii, a Highly Threatened Brazilian Tree Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Meiriele; Pinho, Danilo B; Pereira, Olinto L; Fernandes, Fernando M; Barreto, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    A survey of foliicolous fungi associated with Dimorphandra wilsonii and Dimorphandra mollis (Fabaceae) was conducted in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Dimorphandra wilsonii is a tree species native to the Brazilian Cerrado that is listed as critically endangered. Fungi strictly depending on this plant species may be on the verge of co-extinction. Here, results of the pioneering description of this mycobiota are provided to contribute to the neglected field of microfungi conservation. The mycobiota of D. mollis, which is a common species with a broad geographical distribution that co-occurs with D. wilsonii, was examined simultaneously to exclude fungal species occurring on both species from further consideration for conservation because microfungi associated with D. wilsonii should not be regarded as under threat of co-extinction. Fourteen ascomycete fungal species were collected, identified, described and illustrated namely: Byssogene wilsoniae sp. nov., Geastrumia polystigmatis, Janetia dimorphandra-mollis sp. nov., Janetia wilsoniae sp. nov., Johansonia chapadiensis, Microcalliopsis dipterygis, Phillipsiella atra, Piricauda paraguayensis, Pseudocercospora dimorphandrae sp. nov., Pseudocercosporella dimorphandrae sp. nov., Ramichloridiopsis wilsoniae sp. and gen. nov., Stomiopeltis suttoniae, Trichomatomyces byrsonimae and Vesiculohyphomyces cerradensis. Three fungi were exclusively found on D. wilsonii and were regarded as potentially threatened of extinction: B. wilsoniae, J. wilsoniae and R. wilsoniae. PMID:26910334

  15. Status of endangered and threatened plant species on Tonopah Test Range: a survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six species under consideration by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for endangered or threatened status were found on or near the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in southern central Nevada. Based on recognized threats to these species, their overall distribution, rarity, and other factors, status recommendations were prepared for Sandia Corporation. In addition, ten species that occur in the vicinity of TTR, and which may yet be found on TTR, are discussed in brief. Each species is discussed in relation to distribution, rarity, taxonomy, habitat requirements, endangerment, assessment of status, and proposed protection and monitoring needs. Construction activities and off-road vehicle travel are the most prominent man-caused threats to species on TTR; habitat destruction by trampling and over-grazing by feral horses and non-permit cattle significantly modifies habitats of certain species. We recommend two kinds of protective measures. First is the planning of activities so that habitats, particularly the suggested protected habitats, are not disturbed. Second, and directed to the same end, off-road traffic should be curtailed in the regions of the proposed protected habitats

  16. An artificial water body provides habitat for an endangered estuarine seahorse species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassens, Louw

    2016-10-01

    Anthropogenic development, especially the transformation of natural habitats to artificial, is a growing concern within estuaries and coastal areas worldwide. Thesen Islands marina, an artificial water body, added 25 ha of new estuarine habitat to the Knysna Estuary in South Africa, home to the Knysna seahorse. This study aimed to answer: (I) Can an artificial water body provide suitable habitat for an endangered seahorse species? And if so (II) what characteristics of this new habitat are important in terms of seahorse utilization? Four major habitat types were identified within the marina canals: (I) artificial reno mattress (wire baskets filled with rocks); (II) Codium tenue beds; (III) mixed vegetation on sediment; and (IV) barren canal floor. Seahorses were found throughout the marina system with significantly higher densities within the reno mattress habitat. The artificial water body, therefore, has provided suitable habitat for Hippocampus capensis, a noteworthy finding in the current environment of coastal development and the increasing shift from natural to artificial.

  17. The effect of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species on scientific collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David L; Solow, Andrew R

    2008-04-22

    The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) was conceived in the spirit of cooperation, with the aim of ensuring that the international trade in wild animals and plants, including all parts and derivatives, did not threaten their survival. However, concerns have been raised by scientists that CITES hinders the cross-border movement of scientific specimens. To our knowledge, no empirical analysis has been undertaken to demonstrate the existence of this effect. We test for a CITES effect on the collection record of orchids from Brazil and Costa Rica using the collection records of bromeliads, which are not covered by CITES, as a control. Highly significant effects are found in both countries. PMID:18252676

  18. Climate change hampers endangered species through intensified moisture-related plant stresses (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomeus, R.; Witte, J.; van Bodegom, P.; Dam, J. V.; Aerts, R.

    2010-12-01

    capture climate change effects. We demonstrate that increased rainfall variability in interaction with predicted changes in temperature and CO2, affects soil moisture conditions and plant oxygen and water demands such, that both oxygen stress and water stress will intensify due to climate change. Moreover, these stresses will increasingly coincide, causing variable stress conditions. These variable stress conditions were found to decrease future habitat suitability, especially for plant species that are presently endangered. The future existence of such species is thus at risk by climate change, which has direct implications for policies to maintain endangered species, as applied by international nature management organisations (e.g. IUCN). Our integrated mechanistic analysis of two stresses combined, which has never been done so far, reveals large impacts of climate change on species extinctions and thereby on biodiversity.

  19. Endangered and threatened plant species of the Nevada Test Site, Ash Meadows, and central-southern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatley, J.C.

    1977-07-01

    Three plant species included among the Nevada Threatened or Endangered Flora of the Federal Register list of July 1, 1975, were omitted from the recent reports dealing with these groups of plants in central-southern Nevada. Two of the species, Ephedra funerea and Mirabilis pudica, were not included because they are both widely distributed and locally common in southern Nevada and were understood (unofficially) to be no longer considered candidates for either an Endangered or Threatened status. The third species, Machaeranthera ammophila, is now included with M. arida, an uncommon species of central and eastern Mojave Desert of southern California (to southern Nevada, Arizona, and Sonora), and is therefore no longer a candidate for the status of Threatened Species in Nevada.

  20. Personal Moral Norms and Attitudes Toward Endangered Species Policies on Private Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research across multiple disciplines has shown that personal moral norms can play an important role in shaping individuals′ attitudes and behaviour. Despite this, we know relatively little about patterns of support among landowners for either a personal moral norm favouring a strong, ′intrinsic′ right of private ownership, or a moral duty to prevent extinction. In addition, we know even less about the ability of such norms to predict attitudes toward species protection on private lands, especially for non-charismatic species with few qualities that typically generate positive attitudes for conservation. Results from a mail survey of central Indiana landowners suggest broad support for a personal moral norm favouring a strong, ′intrinsic′ right of ownership as well as a personal moral norm to prevent extinction, and that these norms are better predictors of attitudes toward endangered species policies than partisan identification, identification as an environmentalist, strong religious beliefs, or several other demographic factors. The results suggest that those seeking to influence landowner attitudes toward species protection policies should pay closer attention to the influence of these personal moral norms.

  1. Hearing sensitivity in context: Conservation implications for a highly vocal endangered species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. Owen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hearing sensitivity is a fundamental determinant of a species’ vulnerability to anthropogenic noise, however little is known about the hearing capacities of most conservation dependent species. When audiometric data are integrated with other aspects of species’ acoustic ecology, life history, and characteristic habitat topography and soundscape, predictions can be made regarding probable vulnerability to the negative impacts of different types of anthropogenic noise. Here we used an adaptive psychoacoustic technique to measure hearing thresholds in the endangered giant panda; a species that uses acoustic communication to coordinate reproduction. Our results suggest that giant pandas have functional hearing into the ultrasonic range, with good sensitivity between 10.0 and 16.0 kHz, and best sensitivity measured at 12.5–14.0 kHz. We estimated the lower and upper limits of functional hearing as 0.10 and 70.0 kHz respectively. While these results suggest that panda hearing is similar to that of some other terrestrial carnivores, panda hearing thresholds above 14.0 kHz were significantly lower (i.e., more sensitive than those of the polar bear, the only other bear species for which data are available. We discuss the implications of this divergence, as well as the relationship between hearing sensitivity and the spectral parameters of panda vocalizations. We suggest that these data, placed in context, can be used towards the development of a sensory-based model of noise disturbance for the species.

  2. Genetic diversity of the endangered species Rosa rugosa Thunb. in China and implications for conservation strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Hong YANG; Shu-Ping ZHANG; Jian LIU; Wen ZHAI; Ren-Qing WANG

    2009-01-01

    Rosa rugosa Thunb. is one of the dominant and important shrub species in estuary dunes and shingle beaches of northern China. However, its area of distribution, the number of populations, and the size of each population have decreased rapidly in the past two decades because of habitat degradation and loss. Random amplified polymorphic DNA markers were used to determine the genetic diversity of four remaining large natural populations of R. rugosa and to discuss an effective conservation strategy for this endangered species in China. High genetic variations were detected in R. rugosa populations in China. The mean percentage of polymorphic loci (P%) within four local populations was 57.99%, with the P% of the total population being 75.30%. Mean Shannon's information index (H_0) was 0.2826, whereas total H_0 was 0.3513. The genetic differentiation among populations was 0.1878, which indicates that most genetic diversity occurs within populations. Population Tumenjiang (TMJ) showed the highest genetic diversity (P% = 66.27%; H_0 = 0.3117) and contained two exclusive bands. Population Changshandao (CSD) showed higher genetic diversity (P% = 59.04%; H_0 = 0.3065). Populations TMJ and CSD contained 95.33% and 99.33%, respectively, of loci with moderate to high frequency (P>0.05) of the total population. These results indicate that populations TMJ and CSD should be given priority for in situ conservation and regarded as seed or propagule sources for ex situ conservation. The results of the present study also suggest that R. rugosa in China has become endangered as a result of human actions rather than genetic depression of populations; thus, human interference should be absolutely forbidden in R. rugosa habitats.

  3. 76 FR 30377 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Reviews of Species in California, Nevada...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... 16, 2011 Lead Fish and Common name Scientific name Recommendation Wildlife Office Contact ANIMALS... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Reviews of Species in California, Nevada, and the Klamath Basin of Oregon AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior....

  4. 77 FR 25112 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Reviews of Species in California and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... Between March 17, 2011 and February 29, 2012 Lead fish and wildlife Common name Scientific name... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Reviews of Species in California and Nevada AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  5. 75 FR 4528 - Endangered and Threatened Species: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Recovery Plan for Cook Inlet...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ... prepare recovery plan; request for information. ] SUMMARY: NMFS is required by the Endangered Species Act... recovery plan for the Cook Inlet beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) and requests information from the...-mail information for recovery planning is CIBRP@noaa.gov . Please include ``Cook Inlet Beluga...

  6. 78 FR 64691 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Five Foreign Bird Species in Colombia and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... numerous threats and warrant listing under the Act as endangered species (74 FR 32308). Therefore, we... reopened the comment period for an additional 60 days (74 FR 57987). During the comment periods, we sought... published a positive 90-day finding on May 12, 1981 (46 FR 26464), to initiate a status review for...

  7. Biodiversity and the Recovery of Threatened and Endangered Salmon Species in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report of 8 of 11.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, C. R. (Cleveland R.)

    1993-06-01

    The stated purpose of the Endangered Species Act is to provide a means whereby the ecosystem upon which endangered species and threatened species depend may be conserved. Conservation of the Columbia River ecosystem and the diversity of gene pools, life histories, species, and communities that comprise it, should become a major objective of species recovery and fish and wildlife management programs in the Columbia River Basin. Biodiversity is important to both species and ecosystem health, and is a prerequisite to long-term sustainability of biological resources. In this paper, I provide an overview of various approaches to defining, measuring, monitoring, and protecting biodiversity. A holistic approach is stressed that simultaneously considers diverse species and resource management needs. Emphasis is on threatened and endangered species of salmon and their associated habitat.

  8. Discovery of the Critically Endangered Tarantula Species of the Genus Poecilotheria (Araneae: Theraphosidae, Poecilotheria hanumavilasumica, From Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranil P. Nanayakkara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The arboreal spiders in the genus Poecilotheria is represented by 16 species and restricted to India and Sri Lanka. Each country has eight endemic species. During a survey on mygalomorph spiders in the Northern Province of Sri Lanka, the critically endangered species of Theraphosidae Poecilotheria hanumavilasumica was discovered for the first time outside of its native habitat in India, expanding its range to northern Sri Lanka. The discovery of P. hanumavilasumica is unique, as it used to be a critically endangered and endemic species of the genus Poecilotheria found in India, and it is evident that during the land bridge connection between India and Sri Lanka, when the Pleistocene epoch biotic exchange took place between the two countries, taxa were dispersed through the land connections.

  9. 外来的捕食物种对濒危物种的影响%EFFECTS OF EXOTIC SPECIES ON ENDANGERED SPECIES THROUGH PREDATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张少林

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, an important problem arising from conservation biology is considered. Namely, how does the introduced species affect the survival of a native endangered species through predation? By using Kamke comparison theorem and some results in Cui and Chen's paper(1998), some sufficient conditions that guarantee the permanence of the species and global stability of a unique positive periodic solution are obtained. Biological implication of these results are discussed.

  10. Validity and sensitivity of a model for assessment of impacts of river floodplain reconstruction on protected and endangered species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) must account for legally protected and endangered species. Uncertainties relating to the validity and sensitivity of EIA arise from predictions and valuation of effects on these species. This paper presents a validity and sensitivity analysis of a model (BIO-SAFE) for assessment of impacts of land use changes and physical reconstruction measures on legally protected and endangered river species. The assessment is based on links between species (higher plants, birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians, butterflies and dragon- and damselflies) and ecotopes (landscape ecological units, e.g., river dune, soft wood alluvial forests), and on value assignment to protected and endangered species using different valuation criteria (i.e., EU Habitats and Birds directive, Conventions of Bern and Bonn and Red Lists). The validity of BIO-SAFE has been tested by comparing predicted effects of landscape changes on the diversity of protected and endangered species with observed changes in biodiversity in five reconstructed floodplains. The sensitivity of BIO-SAFE to value assignment has been analysed using data of a Strategic Environmental Assessment concerning the Spatial Planning Key Decision for reconstruction of the Dutch floodplains of the river Rhine, aimed at flood defence and ecological rehabilitation. The weights given to the valuation criteria for protected and endangered species were varied and the effects on ranking of alternatives were quantified. A statistically significant correlation (p < 0.01) between predicted and observed values for protected and endangered species was found. The sensitivity of the model to value assignment proved to be low. Comparison of five realistic valuation options showed that different rankings of scenarios predominantly occur when valuation criteria are left out of the assessment. Based on these results we conclude that linking species to ecotopes can be used for adequate impact assessments

  11. Conservation genetics of a critically endangered limpet genus and rediscovery of an extinct species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diarmaid Ó Foighil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A third of all known freshwater mollusk extinctions worldwide have occurred within a single medium-sized American drainage. The Mobile River Basin (MRB of Alabama, a global hotspot of temperate freshwater biodiversity, was intensively industrialized during the 20(th century, driving 47 of its 139 endemic mollusk species to extinction. These include the ancylinid limpet Rhodacmea filosa, currently classified as extinct (IUCN Red List, a member of a critically endangered southeastern North American genus reduced to a single known extant population (of R. elatior in the MRB. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We document here the tripling of known extant populations of this North American limpet genus with the rediscovery of enduring Rhodacmea filosa in a MRB tributary and of R. elatior in its type locality: the Green River, Kentucky, an Ohio River Basin (ORB tributary. Rhodacmea species are diagnosed using untested conchological traits and we reassessed their systematic and conservation status across both basins using morphometric and genetic characters. Our data corroborated the taxonomic validity of Rhodacmea filosa and we inferred a within-MRB cladogenic origin from a common ancestor bearing the R. elatior shell phenotype. The geographically-isolated MRB and ORB R. elatior populations formed a cryptic species complex: although overlapping morphometrically, they exhibited a pronounced phylogenetic disjunction that greatly exceeded that of within-MRB R. elatior and R. filosa sister species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Rhodacmea filosa, the type species of the genus, is not extinct. It persists in a Coosa River tributary and morphometric and phylogenetic analyses confirm its taxonomic validity. All three surviving populations of the genus Rhodacmea merit specific status. They collectively contain all known survivors of a phylogenetically highly distinctive North American endemic genus and therefore represent a concentrated fraction of

  12. Genetic management of endangered species at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, R.R.; Gee, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    Summary: The Patuxent Wildlife Research Center conducts one of the world's largest and best-known research programs for captive propagation of endangered wildlife. In order to be effective and to ensure the long-term survival of species, researchers at Patuxent attempt to manage captive populations according to the principles of population genetics. This includes the use of estimated inbreeding levels for mate selections in Masked Bobwhites and biochemical analyses to measure extant genetic material and determine relationships among Whooping Cranes. As added insurance against catastrophic losses, or even random losses of key individuals representing unique lineages, cryopreservation of semen has been studied and used for some species. Artificial insemination, using either stored or fresh semen, is used to improve fertility rates, thereby increasing the chances for survival of unique genetic lines. Finally, a periodic influx of unrelated stock occurs, when feasible, in order to enhance the genetic base of captive populations. The application of these techniques will ensure that future releases utilize genetically viable animals, thereby improving the potential for successful reintroductions into the wild.

  13. Optimization methods for selecting founder individuals for captive breeding or reintroduction of endangered species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Webb; Wright, Stephen J; Zhang, Yu; Schuster, Stephan C; Hayes, Vanessa M

    2010-01-01

    Methods from genetics and genomics can be employed to help save endangered species. One potential use is to provide a rational strategy for selecting a population of founders for a captive breeding program. The hope is to capture most of the available genetic diversity that remains in the wild population, to provide a safe haven where representatives of the species can be bred, and eventually to release the progeny back into the wild. However, the founders are often selected based on a random-sampling strategy whose validity is based on unrealistic assumptions. Here we outline an approach that starts by using cutting-edge genome sequencing and genotyping technologies to objectively assess the available genetic diversity. We show how combinatorial optimization methods can be applied to these data to guide the selection of the founder population. In particular, we develop a mixed-integer linear programming technique that identifies a set of animals whose genetic profile is as close as possible to specified abundances of alleles (i.e., genetic variants), subject to constraints on the number of founders and their genders and ages. PMID:19908356

  14. Endangered species and cultural resources program Naval petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    In FY96, Enterprise Advisory Services, Inc. (EASI) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on federal properties. Population monitoring activities were conducted for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. Kit fox abundance and distribution was assessed by live-trapping over a 329-km{sup 2} area. Kit fox reproduction and mortality were assessed by radiocollaring and monitoring 22 adults and two pups. Reproductive success and litter size were determined through live-trapping and den observations. Rates and sources of kit fox mortality were assessed by recovering dead radiocollared kit foxes and conducting necropsies to determine cause of death. Abundance of coyotes and bobcats, which compete with kit foxes, was determined by conducting scent station surveys. Kit fox diet was assessed through analysis of fecal samples collected from live-trapped foxes. Abundance of potential prey for kit foxes was determined by conducting transect surveys for lagornorphs and live-trapping small mammals.

  15. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci for the Moroccan endemic endangered species Argania spinosa (Sapotaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bahloul, Yasmina; Dauchot, Nicolas; Machtoun, Ikrame; Gaboun, Fatima; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the Moroccan endemic endangered species Argania spinosa with a combination of a typical library enrichment procedure and a 454 GS FLX Titanium–based high-throughput sequencing approach. • Methods and Results: A genomic DNA library was enriched and further screened using (GA)15, (GTA)8, and (TTC)8 biotin-labeled probes coupled with chemi-luminescence detection. To increase simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci number, an ultra-high-throughput sequencing-based approach was used. Evaluation of all primer pairs was performed with labeled dUTP on an ABI 3130xl sequencer. Eleven polymorphic SSR loci were selected out of 79 SSR regions and extensively characterized on 150 individuals from eight populations. Total alleles ranged from six to 19 alleles per locus while expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.618 to 0.869. • Conclusions: The SSRs developed here will be used to further characterize the genetic diversity of A. spinosa across its distribution range, mainly in the southern part of Morocco and southwestern Algeria. They may also be transferable to other Sapotaceae species. PMID:25202614

  16. Development and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci for the Moroccan Endemic Endangered Species Argania spinosa (Sapotaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmina El Bahloul

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the Moroccan endemic endangered species Argania spinosa with a combination of a typical library enrichment procedure and a 454 GS FLX Titanium–based high-throughput sequencing approach. Methods and Results: A genomic DNA library was enriched and further screened using (GA15, (GTA8, and (TTC8 biotin-labeled probes coupled with chemi-luminescence detection. To increase simple sequence repeat (SSR loci number, an ultra-high-throughput sequencing-based approach was used. Evaluation of all primer pairs was performed with labeled dUTP on an ABI 3130xl sequencer. Eleven polymorphic SSR loci were selected out of 79 SSR regions and extensively characterized on 150 individuals from eight populations. Total alleles ranged from six to 19 alleles per locus while expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.618 to 0.869. Conclusions: The SSRs developed here will be used to further characterize the genetic diversity of A. spinosa across its distribution range, mainly in the southern part of Morocco and southwestern Algeria. They may also be transferable to other Sapotaceae species.

  17. Guidance on the Use of Best Available Science under the U.S. Endangered Species Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Dennis D.; Weiland, Paul S.

    2016-07-01

    The Endangered Species Act's best available science mandate has been widely emulated and reflects a Congressional directive to ensure that decisions made under the Act are informed by reliable knowledge applied using a structured approach. We build on a standing literature by describing the role of the best science directive in the Act's implementation and best practices that can be employed to realize the directive. Next we describe recurring impediments to realizing determinations by the federal wildlife agencies that are based on the best available science. We then identify the types of data, analyses, and modeling efforts that can serve as best science. Finally, we consider the role and application of best available science in effects analysis and adaptive management. We contend that more rigorous adherence by the wildlife agencies to the best available science directive and more assiduous judicial oversight of agency determinations and actions is essential for effective implementation of the Act, particularly where it has substantial ramifications for listed species, stakeholder segments of society, or both.

  18. Development of microsatellite markers for the endangered Neotropical tree species Tibouchina papyrus (Melastomataceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, M P C; Peixoto, F P; Lima, J S; Resende, L V; Vianello, R P; Walter, M E M T; Collevatti, R G

    2011-01-01

    We isolated and characterized 12 microsatellite loci for Tibouchina papyrus (Melastomataceae), an endangered species with narrow and disjunct range, endemics to a few localities in "cerrado rupestre" from Central Brazil. These microsatellites were obtained by sequencing of a genomic shotgun library for primer design. Leaves from 96 individuals collected in the three known local populations were genotyped using the 12 primers designed to analyze the polymorphisms at each locus. The number of alleles per locus ranged from one to six; two loci were monomorphic. Among the polymorphic loci, expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.161 to 0.714. Combined paternity exclusion probability was 0.957 and combined genetic identity (0.051) was high for studies on parentage. Tibouchina papyrus is a rare and endemic tree species of outcrop quartzite and sandstone soils, with highly isolated populations, which may have lead to the low degree of polymorphism that we detected. Also, motifs of most loci are larger than dinucleotide, which typically display lower levels of polymorphism. PMID:21365547

  19. Response of an endangered tree species from Caatinga to mycorrhization and phosphorus fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ricardo Gonçalves de Oliveira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Schinopsis brasiliensis is an endangered tree species found in the Caatinga biome. It presents a characteristic slow development and difficult propagation, although it has been traditionally exploited in the region. Application of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and phosphorus (P fertilization may be beneficial to S. brasiliensis development at the seedling stage, which at the same time may help species conservation and the recovery of degraded areas in the Caatinga biome. We assessed the response of S. brasiliensis to AMF inoculation (Claroideoglomus etunicatum and Acaulospora longula and P fertilization (0, 12, 24, and 48 mg dm−3 addition of P2O5. S. brasiliensis responded positively to both AMF inoculation and P fertilization. At low P concentrations, the inoculated plants showed higher leaf area and enhanced vegetative development, nutrient content and biomass production compared with non-inoculated plants. Conversely, increasing levels of P fertilization decreased the level of mycorrhizal colonization, plant responsiveness to inoculation, and spore production in C. etunicatum. Thus, P concentrations were able to influence the response of S. brasiliensis to mycorrhization and responsiveness to increased mycorrhization with the decrease in P availability. These results showed that mycorrhizal symbiosis plays an essential role in the development of S. brasiliensis.

  20. Guidance on the Use of Best Available Science under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Dennis D; Weiland, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    The Endangered Species Act's best available science mandate has been widely emulated and reflects a Congressional directive to ensure that decisions made under the Act are informed by reliable knowledge applied using a structured approach. We build on a standing literature by describing the role of the best science directive in the Act's implementation and best practices that can be employed to realize the directive. Next we describe recurring impediments to realizing determinations by the federal wildlife agencies that are based on the best available science. We then identify the types of data, analyses, and modeling efforts that can serve as best science. Finally, we consider the role and application of best available science in effects analysis and adaptive management. We contend that more rigorous adherence by the wildlife agencies to the best available science directive and more assiduous judicial oversight of agency determinations and actions is essential for effective implementation of the Act, particularly where it has substantial ramifications for listed species, stakeholder segments of society, or both.

  1. Biological Assessment of the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally Listed Threatened and Endangered Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Leslie A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2006-09-19

    This biological assessment considers the effects of continuing to operate Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally listed threatened or endangered species, based on current and future operations identified in the 2006 Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS; DOE In Prep.). We reviewed 40 projects analyzed in the SWEIS as well as two aspects on ongoing operations to determine if these actions had the potential to affect Federally listed species. Eighteen projects that had not already received U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) consultation and concurrence, as well as the two aspects of ongoing operations, ecological risk from legacy contaminants and the Outfall Reduction Project, were determined to have the potential to affect threatened or endangered species. Cumulative impacts were also analyzed.

  2. Modeling Spatial Distribution of a Rare and Endangered Plant Species (Brainea insignis) in Central Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.-C.; Lo, N.-J.; Chang, W.-I.; Huang, K.-Y.

    2012-07-01

    With an increase in the rate of species extinction, we should choose right methods that are sustainable on the basis of appropriate science and human needs to conserve ecosystems and rare species. Species distribution modeling (SDM) uses 3S technology and statistics and becomes increasingly important in ecology. Brainea insignis (cycad-fern, CF) has been categorized a rare, endangered plant species, and thus was chosen as a target for the study. Five sampling schemes were created with different combinations of CF samples collected from three sites in Huisun forest station and one site, 10 km farther north from Huisun. Four models, MAXENT, GARP, generalized linear models (GLM), and discriminant analysis (DA), were developed based on topographic variables, and were evaluated by five sampling schemes. The accuracy of MAXENT was the highest, followed by GLM and GARP, and DA was the lowest. More importantly, they can identify the potential habitat less than 10% of the study area in the first round of SDM, thereby prioritizing either the field-survey area where microclimatic, edaphic or biotic data can be collected for refining predictions of potential habitat in the later rounds of SDM or search areas for new population discovery. However, it was shown unlikely to extend spatial patterns of CFs from one area to another with a big separation or to a larger area by predictive models merely based on topographic variables. Follow-up studies will attempt to incorporate proxy indicators that can be extracted from hyperspectral images or LIDAR DEM and substitute for direct parameters to make predictive models applicable on a broader scale.

  3. Threatened and Endangered Species Survey for Patrick Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddy, Donna M.; Stolen, Eric D.; Schmalzer, Paul A.; Larson, Vickie L.; Hall, Patrice; Hensley, Melissa A.

    1997-01-01

    A review of previous environmental work conducted at Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB) indicated that several threatened, endangered, or species of special concern occurred or had the potential to occur there. This study was implemented to collect more information on protected species at PAFB. A map of landcover types was prepared for PAFB using aerial photography, groundtruthing, and a geographic information system (GIS). Herbaceous vegetation was the most common vegetation type. The second most abundant vegetation type was disturbed shrubs/exotics. The beach and associated dune vegetation comprised 3.2% of the land area, but was the most extensive natural community within PAFB. A few isolated mangrove communities exist along the Banana River. Seventy-seven species of vascular plants occurred on the dunes, including four species listed by state agencies: spider lily (Hymenocallis latifolia), prickly pear cactus (Opuntia stricta), beach star (Remirea maritima), and inkberry (Scaevola plumien). Surveys of other habitats revealed eighty-four species of vascular plants including two state-listed species: spider lily and prickly pear cactus. Many of these areas are dominated by invasive, exotic species, particularly Brazilian pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius) and Australian pine (Casuarina equisetifolia), and native species of open or disturbed sites such as camphorweed (Heterotheca subaxillaris) and beardgrass (Andropogon spp.). Due to the isolation of PAFB from other natural areas, most exotic plant populations on the base are not an immediate threat to intact native plant communities. Dune habitat was surveyed for the southeastem beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus niveiventris) by quarterly trapping along eight 100 m transects. No beach mice were found. The limited extent of dune habitat, its fragmented condition, and the isolation of PAFB from extant populations of the beach mouse probably accounts for its absence. Surveys of birds on PAFB found an avifauna

  4. 76 FR 46361 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 23 Species on Oahu as Endangered and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... encroachment by nonnative plant and animal species. Oahu Ecosystems The seven Oahu ecosystems that support the... ecosystem, but may include some specialized plants and animals such as nesting seabirds and the rare native... extinction of plant species that currently have fewer than 50 individuals remaining in the wild on...

  5. Climate change hampers endangered species through intensified moisture-related plant stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    (Ruud) Bartholomeus, R. P.; (Flip) Witte, J. P. M.; (Peter) van Bodegom, P. M.; (Jos) van Dam, J. C.; (Rien) Aerts, R.

    2010-05-01

    soil moisture contents hamper oxygen transport from the atmosphere, through the soil - where part of the oxygen additionally disappears by soil microbial oxygen consumption - and to the root cells. Reduced respiration negatively affects the energy supply to plant metabolism. Plant transpiration, which responds to increased temperatures and atmospheric CO2-concentrations, is the first physiological process that will be inhibited by low soil moisture contents, negatively affecting both photosynthesis and cooling. As both the supply and demand of oxygen and water depend strongly on the prevailing meteorological conditions, both oxygen and water stress were calculated dynamically in time to capture climate change effects. We demonstrate that increased rainfall variability in interaction with predicted changes in temperature and CO2, affects soil moisture conditions and plant oxygen and water demands such, that both oxygen stress and water stress will intensify due to climate change. Moreover, these stresses will increasingly coincide, causing variable stress conditions. These variable stress conditions were found to decrease future habitat suitability, especially for plant species that are presently endangered. The future existence of such species is thus at risk by climate change, which has direct implications for policies to maintain endangered species, as applied by international nature management organisations (e.g. IUCN). Our integrated mechanistic analysis of two stresses combined, which has never been done so far, reveals large impacts of climate change on species extinctions and thereby on biodiversity.

  6. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California: Annual report FY95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    In FY95, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 674 preactivity surveys covering approximately 211 hectares (521 acres) were conducted in FY95. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY95, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was completed, and the results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In FY95, reclamation success was monitored on 50 sites reclaimed in 1985. An investigation of factors influencing the distribution and abundance of kit foxes at NPRC was initiated in FY94. Factors being examined include habitat disturbance, topography, grazing, coyote abundance, lagomorph abundance, and shrub density. This investigation continued in FY95 and a manuscript on this topic will be completed in FY96. Also, Eg and G/EM completed collection of field data to evaluate the effects of a well blow-out on plant and animal populations. A final report will be prepared in FY96. Finally, EG and G/EM completed a life table analysis on San Joaquin kit foxes at NPRC.

  7. Effects of nonylphenol and ethinylestradiol on copper redhorse (Moxostoma hubbsi), an endangered species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais, Domynick; Roy, Robert L

    2014-10-01

    The copper redhorse, Moxostoma hubbsi, is an endangered species endemic to Quebec. The presence of contaminants, in particular endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), in its habitat has been advanced as partly responsible for the reproductive difficulties encountered by the species. In the present study, immature copper redhorse were exposed to the estrogenic surfactant nonylphenol (NP; 1, 10 and 50µg/l) and the synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2; 10ng/l) for 21 days in a flow-through system. The endpoints investigated included general health indicators (hepatosomatic index and hematocrit), thyroid hormones, sex steroids, brain aromatase activity, plasma and mucus vitellogenin (VTG), cytochrome P4501A protein expression and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and muscle acetylcholinesterase. Exposure to 10ng EE2/l significantly increased brain aromatase activity. Exposure to 50µg NP/l resulted in a significant reduction of plasma testosterone concentrations and a significant induction of hepatic HSP70 protein expression. NP at 50µg/l also induced plasma and mucus VTG. The presence of elevated VTG levels in the surface mucus of immature copper redhorse exposed to NP, and its correlation to plasma VTG, supports the use of mucus VTG as a non-invasive biomarker to evaluate copper redhorse exposure to EDCs in the environment and contribute to restoration efforts of the species. The results of the present study indicate that exposure to high environmentally relevant concentrations of NP and EE2 can affect molecular endpoints related to reproduction in the copper redhorse. PMID:25063883

  8. Sylvatic plague vaccine: A new tool for conservation of threatened and endangered species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rachel C.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Bunck, Christine M.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2012-01-01

    Plague, a disease caused by Yersinia pestis introduced into North America about 100 years ago, is devastating to prairie dogs and the highly endangered black-footed ferret. Current attempts to control plague in these species have historically relied on insecticidal dusting of prairie dog burrows to kill the fleas that spread the disease. Although successful in curtailing outbreaks in most instances, this method of plague control has significant limitations. Alternative approaches to plague management are being tested, including vaccination. Currently, all black-footed ferret kits released for reintroduction are vaccinated against plague with an injectable protein vaccine, and even wild-born kits are captured and vaccinated at some locations. In addition, a novel, virally vectored, oral vaccine to prevent plague in wild prairie dogs has been developed and will soon be tested as an alternative, preemptive management tool. If demonstrated to be successful, oral vaccination of selected prairie dog populations could decrease the occurrence of plague epizootics in key locations, thereby reducing the source of bacteria while avoiding the indiscriminate environmental effects of dusting. Just as rabies in wild carnivores has largely been controlled through an active surveillance and oral vaccination program, we believe an integrated plague management strategy would be similarly enhanced with the addition of a cost-effective, bait-delivered, sylvatic plague vaccine for prairie dogs. Control of plague in prairie dogs, and potentially other rodents, would significantly advance prairie dog conservation and black-footed ferret recovery.

  9. Integrating land cover modeling and adaptive management to conserve endangered species and reduce catastrophic fire risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breininger, David; Duncan, Brean; Eaton, Mitchell J.; Johnson, Fred; Nichols, James

    2014-01-01

    Land cover modeling is used to inform land management, but most often via a two-step process, where science informs how management alternatives can influence resources, and then, decision makers can use this information to make decisions. A more efficient process is to directly integrate science and decision-making, where science allows us to learn in order to better accomplish management objectives and is developed to address specific decisions. Co-development of management and science is especially productive when decisions are complicated by multiple objectives and impeded by uncertainty. Multiple objectives can be met by the specification of tradeoffs, and relevant uncertainty can be addressed through targeted science (i.e., models and monitoring). We describe how to integrate habitat and fuel monitoring with decision-making focused on the dual objectives of managing for endangered species and minimizing catastrophic fire risk. Under certain conditions, both objectives might be achieved by a similar management policy; other conditions require tradeoffs between objectives. Knowledge about system responses to actions can be informed by developing hypotheses based on ideas about fire behavior and then applying competing management actions to different land units in the same system state. Monitoring and management integration is important to optimize state-specific management decisions and to increase knowledge about system responses. We believe this approach has broad utility and identifies a clear role for land cover modeling programs intended to inform decision-making.

  10. Effects of Population Size on Reproductive Success of the Endangered and Endemic Species Primula merrilliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wen Shao; Xiao-Ping Zhang; Zhong-Xing Zhang; Guo-Ping Zhu

    2008-01-01

    The reproductive ability related to the population size of the endangered and endemic species Primula merrilliana Schltr.was investigated.In 26 populations observed,only four contain more than 500 flowering individuals,whereas most of them(53.8%) consist of less than 100 flowering individuals.Though the ratio of pin and thrum plants keeps its balance at 1:1 for all populations,the frequency of pin and thrum flowers was significantly biased in most small populations.Population size strongly affected reproductive success; plants in small populations produced significantly fewer flowers and fruits per plant and fewer seeds per fruit,and therefore fewer seeds per plant.The floral density was another important factor that influenced the reproductive success of P.merrilliana,because four main reproductive success parameters (fruits per plant,seeds per fruit,seeds per plant,and the proportion of flowers setting fruit) were all positively correlated with floral density.The size of plants and the number of leaves per plant (measure of habitat quality) were not influenced by the variation of population size,suggesting that the reduced fecundity in small populations may not be a consequence of lower habitat quality,inbreeding depression and pollen limitation as a result of less attractiveness in small populations are therefore likely explanations for these patterns.

  11. To be or not to be - common and endangered arable weed species in the face of Global Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Rühl, Anna Theresa; Donath, Tobias W.; Eckstein, R. Lutz; Otte, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Arable weeds are one of the most endangered species groups in Europe. Modern agriculture and intensive land use management with the application of herbicides and fertilisers, enhanced seed cleaning, simplified crop rotations and abandonment of marginal arable sites are the main causes for the continuous decline of arable weeds. However, besides these changes in land use also global climate change may challenge the adaptability of arable weeds. Most scientists agree that the frequency of extre...

  12. Monitoring rarity: the critically endangered Saharan cheetah as a flagship species for a threatened ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Belbachir

    Full Text Available Deserts are particularly vulnerable to human impacts and have already suffered a substantial loss of biodiversity. In harsh and variable desert environments, large herbivores typically occur at low densities, and their large carnivore predators occur at even lower densities. The continued survival of large carnivores is key to healthy functioning desert ecosystems, and the ability to gather reliable information on these rare low density species, including presence, abundance and density, is critical to their monitoring and management. Here we test camera trap methodologies as a monitoring tool for an extremely rare wide-ranging large felid, the critically endangered Saharan cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus hecki. Two camera trapping surveys were carried out over 2-3 months across a 2,551 km2 grid in the Ti-n-hağğen region in the Ahaggar Cultural Park, south central Algeria. A total of 32 records of Saharan cheetah were obtained. We show the behaviour and ecology of the Saharan cheetah is severely constrained by the harsh desert environment, leading them to be more nocturnal, be more wide-ranging, and occur at lower densities relative to cheetah in savannah environments. Density estimates ranged from 0.21-0.55/1,000 km2, some of the lowest large carnivore densities ever recorded in Africa, and average home range size over 2-3 months was estimated at 1,583 km2. We use our results to predict that, in order to detect presence of cheetah with p>0.95 a survey effort of at least 1,000 camera trap days is required. Our study identifies the Ahaggar Cultural Park as a key area for the conservation of the Saharan cheetah. The Saharan cheetah meets the requirements for a charismatic flagship species that can be used to "market" the Saharan landscape at a sufficiently large scale to help reverse the historical neglect of threatened Saharan ecosystems.

  13. THE ENDANGERED SPECIES Aristelliger georgeensis (Squamata: Sphaerodactylidae IN RONCADOR CAY, COLOMBIAN CARIBBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateo LÓPEZ-VICTORIA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aristelliger georgeensis, previously known to occur in the Yucatan peninsula (Mexico, the coasts and islands from Belize and Honduras, and the oceanic islands of Colombia in the Caribbean (San Andres, Providence and Saint Catalina was registered for the first time in Roncador Cay, a flat and small island of coralline origin, located in the southwest of the Caribbean. Being considered as an endangered species at the national level, the new locality for this gecko constitutes an opportunity for its conservation. Some topics regarding the possible origins of this new population are discussed. This new locality represents the eastern most documented record of this species so far.La especie amenazada Aristelliger georgeensis (Squamata: Sphaerodactylidae en el Cayo Roncador, Caribe colombianoAristelliger georgeensis, previamente conocido de la península de Yucatán (México, las costas e islas de Belice y Honduras y de las islas oceánicas de Colombia en el Caribe (San Andrés, Providencia y Santa Catalina, fue registrado por primera vez en el Cayo Roncador, una isla plana y pequeña de origen coralino, ubicada en el suroccidente del Caribe. Siendo considerada como una especie amenazada a nivel nacional, la nueva localidad para este geco constituye una oportunidad para su conservación. Se discuten algunos tópicos relacionados con el posible origen de esta nueva población. Esta nueva localidad representa el registro documentado más al Este para la especie. 

  14. To be or not to be - common and endangered arable weed species in the face of Global Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rühl, Anna Theresa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Arable weeds are one of the most endangered species groups in Europe. Modern agriculture and intensive land use management with the application of herbicides and fertilisers, enhanced seed cleaning, simplified crop rotations and abandonment of marginal arable sites are the main causes for the continuous decline of arable weeds. However, besides these changes in land use also global climate change may challenge the adaptability of arable weeds. Most scientists agree that the frequency of extreme meteorological conditions will increase in the future. As a consequence, plants of Central Europe will be subject to higher temperatures and reduced water supply due to longer intervals without precipitation during the growing season. We exposed seeds of five common and five endangered arable weed species to different temperatures and water potentials to study i how this plant group responds to higher temperatures and lower moisture during germination in general and ii whether there is a significant difference between common and endangered species in this respect.

  15. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, a list shp - prairie dogs, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  16. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, dogs 1995 shp, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  17. Endangered Species and Wildlife Resources Inventory Kwajalein Atoll, U.S. Army , Republic of the Marshall Islands 1996 (NODC Accession 0000251)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report summarizes the results of the first Environmental Standards and Procedures (UES) inventory of endangered species and wildlife resources at United States...

  18. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, 1300 ft dogs 98, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  19. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, dog buff 1300 ft shp, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  20. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, dog area shp, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  1. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, b list shp - prairie dogs, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  2. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, irco 30 - 40 shp - prairie dogs, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  3. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, exist dogs c shp, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  4. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, 1300 ft dogs 98 shp, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  5. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, exist dogs c, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  6. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, irco 50 - 100 shp - prairie dogs, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  7. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, irco 5-10 shp - prairie dogs, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  8. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, Piute no dogs, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  9. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, IC dog relocate shp, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  10. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, irco 10 - 20 shp - prairie dogs, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  11. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, exist dogs shp, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  12. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, irco 40 - 50 shp - prairie dogs, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  13. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, dog buff 1300 ft, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  14. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, dog study area, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  15. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, irco 20- 30 shp - prairie dogs, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  16. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, irco 100 shp - prairie dogs, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  17. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, Piute no dogs shp, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  18. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, IC dog relocate, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  19. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, dog study shp, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  20. Inventory of endangered species and wildlife resources at the US Army Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, 1988 (NODC Accession 0000631)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An inventory of endangered species and the wildlife resources at the US Army Kwajelein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Island were conducted from 30 October 1998 to...

  1. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, pdog seed shp, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  2. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, Study tier join, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  3. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, ic relocate shp, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is...

  4. Endangered and Threatened Animal Species and Subspecies of U.S., Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and Trust Territory. 1979 and 1980 Editions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    Presented is a listing of threatened and endangered animal species and subspecies both by State and collectively for the United States, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and Trust Territory. (BW)

  5. "Endangered Spaces, Enduring Places: Change, Identity, and Survival in Rural America," by Janet M. Fitchen. Book Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Judi

    1994-01-01

    Reviews a book that describes changes affecting rural America including the farm crisis, growing poverty, and in-migration of those who contribute little to the local economy. Addresses implications for rural service delivery and government policy. (LP)

  6. 77 FR 57647 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Status for 23 Species on Oahu and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ...; (C) disease or predation; (D) the inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms; or (E) other natural... species face threats from destruction and modification of their habitats from hurricanes, landslides... proposed rule (76 FR 46362), which was published on that date. Publication of the proposed rule opened a...

  7. Darwin's Book: "On the Origin of Species"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    This essay is an interpretation of Charles Darwin's "Origin of Species". It focuses on the contents of the "Origin" as Darwin intended them to be understood and the background to the work, thus revealing the originality (or otherwise) of the work.

  8. Optimal regeneration planning for old-growth forest: addressing scientific uncertainty in endangered species recovery through adaptive management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C.T.; Conroy, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic and structural uncertainties about forest dynamics present challenges in the management of ephemeral habitat conditions for endangered forest species. Maintaining critical foraging and breeding habitat for the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) requires an uninterrupted supply of old-growth forest. We constructed and optimized a dynamic forest growth model for the Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge (Georgia, USA) with the objective of perpetuating a maximum stream of old-growth forest habitat. Our model accommodates stochastic disturbances and hardwood succession rates, and uncertainty about model structure. We produced a regeneration policy that was indexed by current forest state and by current weight of evidence among alternative model forms. We used adaptive stochastic dynamic programming, which anticipates that model probabilities, as well as forest states, may change through time, with consequent evolution of the optimal decision for any given forest state. In light of considerable uncertainty about forest dynamics, we analyzed a set of competing models incorporating extreme, but plausible, parameter values. Under any of these models, forest silviculture practices currently recommended for the creation of woodpecker habitat are suboptimal. We endorse fully adaptive approaches to the management of endangered species habitats in which predictive modeling, monitoring, and assessment are tightly linked.

  9. A Crosswalk from the Endangered Species Act to the HCP Handbook and Real HCPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SMALLWOOD

    2000-07-01

    The U.S. Departments of Interior and Commerce published the HCP handbook in 1996 to guide the issuance of incidental take permits (ITPs). The HCP handbook lists six guidelines and provides many others throughout the text. However, the guidelines sometimes contradict the intent of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and some are vague due to their use of improperly defined terms, such as ecosystem, region(al), net benefits, and habitat types. A proposed addendum provides little improvement to the HCP handbook. The guidelines in the HCP handbook could be prepared to better match those that scientists would expect from the language of the ESA. Three HCPs met only 3-10% of the 39 guidelines I would expect based on the ESA, and they met only 7-20% of the 30 guidelines in the HCP handbook. Based on a recent legal decision on the Alabama Beach Mouse HCP, ITP applicants are expected to follow the guidelines in the HCP handbook. The three HCPs I reviewed are vulnerable to similar legal decisions. However, many of the guidelines in the HCP handbook are inconsistent with the ESA. Therefore, I recommend that the HCP handbook be revised so that it is consistent with the ESA and with academic standards in the use of scientific methods. The guidelines need to be more explicit to be operationally consistent. Such a revision would provide ITP applicants and all the stakeholders with much more certainty in the outcome of the process. In lieu of a revised HCP handbook, I recommend that ITP applicants prepare their HCPs using the standards presented in Smallwood and others (Environmental Management, 1999, 24:421-435), thereby giving their HCPs a strong scientific foundation. PMID:10801988

  10. A Study on Photosynthetic Physiological Characteristics of Six Rare and Endangered Species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tailin ZHONG; Guangwu ZHAO; Jiamiao CHU; Xiaomin GUO; Genyou LI

    2014-01-01

    The parameters of gas exchange and chlorophyl fluorescence in leaves of six rare and endangered species Neolitsea sericea, Cinnamomum japonicum var. cheni , Sinojackia microcarpa, Discocleidion glabrum var. trichocarpum, Parrotia sub-aequalis, Cercidiphyl um japonicum were measured in fields. The results showed that there were significant differences in photosynthetic capacity, intrinsic water use effi-ciency (WUEi ), the efficiency of primary conversion of light energy of PSⅡ and its potential activity, the quantum yield of PSⅡ electron transport, and the potential ca-pacity of heat dissipation among the six species. However, there was no significant difference in WUE. The highest values of net photosynthetic rate (Pn), transpiration rate (Tr) and stomatal conductance (gs) occurred in D. glabrum var. trichocarpum and the lowest in S. microcarpa. On the contrary, D. glabrum var. trichocarpum had the lowest WUE, intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi ) and S. microcarpa had the highest. The results indicated that D. glabrum var. trichocarpum had higher photo-synthetic capacity and poorer WUE, while S. microcarpa had lower photosynthetic capacity and greater WUE. Furthermore, the mean values of maximal fluorescence (Fm), potential efficiency of primary conversion of light energy of PSⅡ (Fv/Fm),ΦPSⅡ, actual efficiency of primary conversion of light energy of PSⅡ (F′v/F′m) and non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ) were the highest in S. micro-carpa, indicating that its PSⅡ had higher capacity of heat dissipation and could prevent photosynthetic apparatus from damage by excessive light energy. Correlation analysis showed that there were significant correlations among photosynthetic physi-ological parameters. However, the initial fluorescence (Fo) was not significantly cor-related with any other parameters. This study also revealed the extremely significant positive correlations between Pn and Tr, gs, apparent quantum yield (AQY), be-tween Tr and

  11. Endangered Species. Management Improvements Could Enhance Recovery Program. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Fisheries and Wildlife Conservation and the Environment, Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Resources, Community, and Economic Development Div.

    Extinction of animal and plant species has become a serious problem that threatens to become more acute in coming years. The endangered species program was established to prevent further extinctions and ultimately recover species designated as threatened or endangered through the development and implementation of species recovery plans. Concerned…

  12. A new species of Dactylogyrus (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) parasitic on an endangered freshwater fish, Rhodeus atremius atremius, endemic to Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Masato; Nagasawa, Kazuya

    2016-10-01

    A new dactylogyrid monogenean Dactylogyrus bicorniculus sp. nov. is described from the gills of the kazetoge bitterling, Rhodeus atremius atremius (Jordan and Thompson, 1914), an endemic species in Japan, from Saga Prefecture, northern Kyūshū. D. bicorniculus sp. nov. resembles Dactylogyrus bicornis Malevitskaja, 1941 and Dactylogyrus lophogonus Zhang and Ji, 1980 because they have two common features, a large V-shaped ventral bar and well-developed second marginal hooks. However, the new species is distinguished from these congeners by a shorter penis and an accessory piece. A phylogenetic analysis of 28S rDNA shows that D. bicorniculus sp. nov. is a basal species with the T-shaped ventral bar in the genus. The new species has strict host-specificity to R. a. atremius, one of the endangered freshwater fishes in Japan, and may face the danger of co-extinction with its host.

  13. A new species of Dactylogyrus (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) parasitic on an endangered freshwater fish, Rhodeus atremius atremius, endemic to Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Masato; Nagasawa, Kazuya

    2016-10-01

    A new dactylogyrid monogenean Dactylogyrus bicorniculus sp. nov. is described from the gills of the kazetoge bitterling, Rhodeus atremius atremius (Jordan and Thompson, 1914), an endemic species in Japan, from Saga Prefecture, northern Kyūshū. D. bicorniculus sp. nov. resembles Dactylogyrus bicornis Malevitskaja, 1941 and Dactylogyrus lophogonus Zhang and Ji, 1980 because they have two common features, a large V-shaped ventral bar and well-developed second marginal hooks. However, the new species is distinguished from these congeners by a shorter penis and an accessory piece. A phylogenetic analysis of 28S rDNA shows that D. bicorniculus sp. nov. is a basal species with the T-shaped ventral bar in the genus. The new species has strict host-specificity to R. a. atremius, one of the endangered freshwater fishes in Japan, and may face the danger of co-extinction with its host. PMID:27377236

  14. Generation Conservation: Children's Developing Folkbiological and Moral Conceptions of Protecting Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckert, Jolina H.

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: This study investigated folkbiological concepts that structure children's moral reasoning regarding conservation. Participants (N = 52; 7- and 10-year-olds, gender balanced) were interviewed regarding their values, moral obligations, and rights concerns for endangered and extinct animals. Across the 2 ages, children drew on the…

  15. 76 FR 43985 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plan for the Sei Whale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... Plan for the Sei Whale AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric... the sei whale (Balaenoptera borealis). NMFS is soliciting review and comment from the public and all... would not promote its recovery. The sei whale has been listed as ``endangered'' under the...

  16. 78 FR 34347 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plan for the North Pacific Right Whale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... Plan for the North Pacific Right Whale AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and... Pacific right whale (Eubalaena japonica). ADDRESSES: Electronic copies of the Final Recovery Plan are... recovery. The Northern right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) has been listed as ``endangered'' under...

  17. Valuing the Endangered Species Antirrhinum lopesianum: Neuroprotective Activities and Strategies for in vitro Plant Propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Andreia Gomes; Sofia Fortalezas; Rui Pimpão; Inês Figueira; João Maroco; Carlos Aguiar; Ricardo B. Ferreira; Célia Miguel; Cláudia N. Santos

    2013-01-01

    Plant phytochemicals are described as possessing considerable neuroprotective properties, due to radical scavenging capacity and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity, important bioactivities in neurodegeneration. Antirrhinum lopesianum is a rare endemism from the Iberian Peninsula, occurring at the northeastern border between Portugal and Spain. It is classified as Endangered, due to its highly fragmented geographical occupation, facing a high risk of extinction in the Portuguese territor...

  18. 75 FR 319 - Endangered and Threatened Species: Proposed Rule To Revise the Critical Habitat Designation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    .... (1999) compared temperature-dependent sex determination patterns between the Atlantic (French Guiana... in 1994-1995 (Spotila et al., 2000). Leatherbacks nesting in French Guiana and St. Croix had... The leatherback sea turtle was listed as endangered throughout its range on June 2, 1970 (35 FR...

  19. 75 FR 62139 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ...; PRT-22592A; Applicant: Anthony Clemenza, Brooklyn, NY; PRT-22557A; Applicant: Richard Young, West..., Wimberley, TX; PRT-23150A. B. Endangered Marine Mammals and Marine Mammals Applicant: Florida Fish and... the permit to allow additional sampling and harassment of Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus)...

  20. 78 FR 47590 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Threatened Species Status for Graham's Beardtongue...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... centered on the road (Sanders 2008, p. 20). Excessive dust can clog plant pores, increase leaf temperature...; Ferguson et al. 1999, p. 2), negatively affecting plant growth and reproduction. Roads may act as a barrier... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 RIN 1018-AY95 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and...

  1. 78 FR 69374 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Take of Anadromous Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ....): Endangered Puget Sound/Georgia Basin (PS/ GB) bocaccio (Sebastes paucispinis); threatened PS/GB canary..., and PS steelhead, and adult PS/GB bocaccio. The researchers may also take adult PS/GB canary rockfish... Basin DPS populations of bocaccio, canary rockfish, and yelloweye rockfish. The research would...

  2. ISSR Analysis of the Genetic Diversity of the Endangered Species Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Royle) Ying from Western Sichuan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Xiao; Qun Li; Li Wang; Liang Guo; Jing Li; Lin Tang; Fang Chen

    2006-01-01

    Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Royle) Ying Is an important medicinal and endangered species. Inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) analysis was conducted on seven natural populations from western Sichuan Province to investigate the genetic diversity of S. hexandrum. Leaf samples of 140 individuals were collected.Of the 139 discernible fragments generated by 12 selected primers (among 100 primers), 54 appeared to be polymorphic. The percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB) was 38.85% at the species level, and PPB within a population ranged from 7.91% to 23.74%. Low levels of genetic variation (He=0.092, Ho=0.142) and high levels of genetic differentiation among the populations (Gst= 62.25%) was detected on the basis of results from POPGENE and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA), respectively. Furthermore, the limited gene flow (Nm=0.361) may result from biological characteristics, such as self-pollination and short distance seed dispersal. Based on the genetic and ecological information available for S. hexandrum, we propose some appropriate strategies for the conservation of the endangered medicinal species in this region,namely rescuing and conserving the core populations for in situ conservation and sampling and preserving more populations with fewer individuals from each population for ex situ conservation.

  3. Wildlife mortality investigation and disease research: contributions of the USGS National Wildlife Health Center to endangered species management and recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey—National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) provides diagnostic services, technical assistance, applied research, and training to federal, state, territorial, and local government agencies and Native American tribes on wildlife diseases and wildlife health issues throughout the United States and its territories, commonwealth, and freely associated states. Since 1975, >16,000 carcasses and specimens from vertebrate species listed under the Endangered Species Act have been submitted to NWHC for determination of causes of morbidity or mortality or assessment of health/disease status. Results from diagnostic investigations, analyses of the diagnostic database, technical assistance and consultation, field investigation of epizootics, and wildlife disease research by NWHC wildlife disease specialists have contributed importantly to the management and recovery of listed species.

  4. Parasite species of the endangered Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus) and a sympatric widespread carnivore

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Ana; Oliveira, Lucia; Madeira de Carvalho, Luís; Fonseca, Carlos; Torres, Rita Tinoco

    2016-01-01

    Parasites have a profound impact on wildlife population dynamics. However, until some years ago, studies on the occurrence and prevalence of wildlife parasites were neglected comparatively with the studies on humans and domestic animals. In this study, we determined the parasite prevalence of two sympatric wild canids: the endangered Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus) and the widespread red fox (Vulpes vulpes), in central Portugal. From November 2014 to July 2015, fresh fecal samples from bo...

  5. Managing Endangered Species Within the Use-Preservation Paradox: The Florida Manatee ( Trichechus manatus latirostris) as a Tourism Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorice, Michael G.; Shafer, C. Scott; Ditton, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    A significant challenge to wildlife managers in tourism settings is to provide visitors with opportunities to observe rare and endangered wildlife while simultaneously protecting the target species from deleterious impacts. Nearly 100,000 people annually visit Crystal River, Florida, USA to observe and swim with the Florida manatee, an endangered species. This research aimed to investigate and describe human-manatee interactions in a tourism context, to understand the salient issues related to such interactions as identified by stakeholders, and to recommend a course of action to address multiple interests in the planning and management of human-manatee interactions. Five issues were identified by all stakeholder groups: water quality, harassment, density and crowding, education, and enforcement. Currently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which is responsible for manatee management, does not have mechanisms in place to manage the tourism component of the manatee encounter. Although a regulatory approach can be taken, a better approach would be to create an organization of tour operators to establish “best practices” that reflect the goal of the managing agency to enhance manatee protection (and thus ensure their livelihood) and to enhance the visitor experience.

  6. Wildlife Preservation and Endangered Species: Decision, Discretion and Policy Implementation in the Island Special Constabulary Force, Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.D. Brooks

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There is worldwide interest to preserve wild and endangered species. Several countries have become signatories to, or have acceded to international agreements, and have developed appropriate law enforcement institutions. Simultaneously, and within the context of Jamaica, law enforcement emphases have instead been occupied with ‘major crimes’. Jamaican police are expected to prioritize the solution of ‘serious crimes’ rather than enforcing the Wildlife Protection Act (WPA and the Endangered Species Act (ESA. The Island Special Constabulary Force (ISCF has been mandated to enforce the WPA and the ESA. The aim of this case study was to investigate how capacity impacts implementation of the WPA and the ESA; to assess the discretion across the different ISCF ranks impacts implementation of the WPA and the ESA; to conduct an investigation into how the level of import/seriousness placed on WPA and the ESA impacts implementation; and to evaluate how implementation of the WPA and the ESA stacked in relation to the enforcement of other offences. Enforcement was influenced by; 1 ignorance by ignorance of the complexities of the law; 2 lack of sufficient emphasis within the ISCF; 3 disconnect between ISCF strategic goals and operational realities; 4 implementation susceptible to excessive use of discretion and 5 a strong organizational culture that defined and placed emphasis on traditional notions of crime. The findings are far reaching and can be employed to provide action, direction and focus for policy makers, particularly in the ISCF.

  7. Willingness to pay for threatened and endangered marine species:A review of the literature and prospects for policy use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K Lew

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-market valuation methods have been employed to estimate willingness to pay for numerous threatened, endangered, and rare (TER species over the past few decades. While most of these efforts have focused on terrestrial species, over 30 published studies have been conducted to measure economic values associated with the preservation, protection, and enhancement of scores of marine species. In this paper, this literature is reviewed and assessed, and an evaluation of the suitability of existing TER species values as inputs for the analysis of marine and coastal policies, and the prospects and challenges for improving them, are discussed. The published literature is found to suffer from coverage issues, both geographical and in terms of species types. It includes stated preference valuation studies focused on marine species only in developed countries (United States, Canada, Australia, United Kingdom, Spain, and Greece, with the highest concentration of studies occurring in the United States. The species valued primarily can be classified as charismatic megafauna—seals and sea lions, whales, and sea turtles—plus well-known fish species, like salmon. Only a small handful of lesser known species are included among those valued to date. Species value estimates were as much as $356 (2013 U.S. dollars, but differed in the frequency of payments (e.g., lump sum vs. annual, the entity paying (e.g., household, resident, or visitor, and the specific good being valued (e.g., species preservation or a type of enhancement. Potential sources of errors arising from the use of these values for policy analyses, and the temporal stability of them, provide reasons to be cautious in their application. Nevertheless, several trends in the literature appear to provide reasons to be optimistic about the literature, particularly the recent expansion of types of species valued and more policy-relevant values.

  8. Applying clinically proven human techniques for contraception and fertility to endangered species and zoo animals: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Sherman J; Barbey, Natalie; Lenahan, Kathy; Silber, David Z

    2013-12-01

    Reversible contraception that does not alter natural behavior is a critical need for managing zoo populations. In addition to reversible contraception, other fertility techniques perfected in humans may be useful, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) or oocyte and embryo banking for endangered species like amphibians and Mexican wolves (Canis lupus baileyi). Furthermore, the genetics of human fertility can give a better understanding of fertility in more exotic species. Collaborations were established to apply human fertility techniques to the captive population. Reversible vasectomy might be one solution for reversible contraception that does not alter behavior. Reversible approaches to vasectomy, avoiding secondary epididymal disruption, were attempted in South American bush dogs (Speothos venaticus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), Przewalski's horse (Equus przewalski poliakov), and Sika deer (Cervus nippon) in a variety of zoos around the world. These techniques were first perfected in > 4,000 humans before attempting them in zoo animals. In vitro fertilization with gestational surrogacy was used to attempt to break the vicious cycle of hand rearing of purebred orangutans, and egg and ovary vitrification in humans have led to successful gamete banking for Mexican wolves and disappearing amphibians. The study of the human Y chromosome has even explained a mechanism of extinction related to global climate change. The best results with vasectomy reversal (normal sperm counts, pregnancy, and live offspring) were obtained when the original vasectomy was performed "open-ended," so as to avoid pressure-induced epididymal disruption. The attempt at gestational surrogacy for orangutans failed because of severe male infertility and the lack of success with human ovarian hyperstimulation protocols. Vitrification of oocytes is already being employed for the Amphibian Ark Project and for Mexican wolves. Vasectomy can be a reversible contraception

  9. 77 FR 13248 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of 46 Species in Idaho...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ...)....... 50 FR 33731; 8/21/ 1985. Kopa Hedyotis Endangered........ U.S.A. (HI)....... 64 FR 48323; 9/3... listing rule Animals Akepa, Maui Loxops coccineus Endangered........ U.S.A. (HI)....... 35 FR 16047; 10/13/ ochraceus. 1970. Creeper, Molokai Paroreomyza Endangered........ U.S.A. (HI)....... 35 FR 16047;...

  10. 78 FR 8185 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of 5-Year Status Reviews of 44 Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ...; 05/ (=Hedyotis 15/1992. coriacea). Koki`o Kokia Endangered U.S.A (HI)....... 49 FR 47400; 12..., nightingale reed...... Acrocephalus Endangered Western Pacific 35 FR 8491; 06/02/ luscinia. Ocean--U.S.A 1970. (Guam, Alamagan, Saipan). Swiftlet, Mariana gray (=Guam Aerodramus Endangered Western Pacific 49...

  11. ANATOMICAL PROPERTIES OF Shorea mujongensis P.S. Ashton, A CRITICALLY ENDANGERED SPECIES OF DIPTEROCARPS FROM KALIMANTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Listya Mustika Dewi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Wood anatomy of Shorea mujongensis P.S. Ashton was investigated in order to ensure this species belongs to yellow meranti group. Such study is very important since this species is already listed in the red list of IUCN and classified as critically endangered species. The microscopic slides were prepared according to the Johansen's method, while the anatomical features observed according to the IAWA  List. The results show that S. mujongensis wood exhibit brown heartwood, light brown sapwood, rough texture, straight grain sometimes interlocked and somewhat rough. The main microscopic characters are growth rings indistinct; vessel diffuse, mostly solitary, rounded to oval; simple perforation plate and alternate intervessel pits; parenchyma scanty paratracheal to thin vasicentric; axial intercellular canals in long tangential line, radial intercellular canal and vasicentric tracheids present; rays uniseriate and multiseriate, prismatic crystal in procumbent cells; fiber length 1,294 µm, diameter 26 µm and wall thickness 4µm. Macroscopic and microscopic observation of S. mujongensis wood confirms the species belongs to yellow meranti group. The assesment on fiber dimensions and derived values of the wood fibers classified the wood into class quality II. It indicates that this species is moderately favorable as raw material for pulp and paper manufacture.

  12. Estimating effects of tidal power projects and climate change on threatened and endangered marine species and their food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, D Shallin; Greene, Correigh M; Good, Thomas P

    2013-12-01

    Marine hydrokinetic power projects will operate as marine environments change in response to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We considered how tidal power development and stressors resulting from climate change may affect Puget Sound species listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) and their food web. We used risk tables to assess the singular and combined effects of tidal power development and climate change. Tidal power development and climate change posed risks to ESA-listed species, and risk increased with incorporation of the effects of these stressors on predators and prey of ESA-listed species. In contrast, results of a model of strikes on ESA-listed species from turbine blades suggested that few ESA-listed species are likely to be killed by a commercial-scale tidal turbine array. We applied scenarios to a food web model of Puget Sound to explore the effects of tidal power and climate change on ESA-listed species using more quantitative analytical techniques. To simulate development of tidal power, we applied results of the blade strike model. To simulate environmental changes over the next 50 years, we applied scenarios of change in primary production, plankton community structure, dissolved oxygen, ocean acidification, and freshwater flooding events. No effects of tidal power development on ESA-listed species were detected from the food web model output, but the effects of climate change on them and other members of the food web were large. Our analyses exemplify how natural resource managers might assess environmental effects of marine technologies in ways that explicitly incorporate climate change and consider multiple ESA-listed species in the context of their ecological community. Estimación de los Efectos de Proyectos de Energía de las Mareas y el Cambio Climático sobre Especies Marinas Amenazadas y en Peligro y su Red Alimentaria. PMID:24299085

  13. What Factors Affect Diversity and Species Composition of Endangered Tumbesian Dry Forests in Southern Ecuador?

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa Iñiguez, Carlos Ivan; Cabrera, Omar; Luzuriaga, Arantzazu L.; Escudero, Adrián

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a study on species richness and composition of Tumbesian dry forest communities. We tested two alternative hypotheses about species assemblage processes in tropical dry forests: (1) species assemblage is determined by the filtering effect of environmental conditions and (2) species assemblage is determined by facilitative processes along the gradient of water availability, and thus, species richness and evenness increase as water becomes limited. In addition, we also explor...

  14. Designing conservation strategies to preserve the genetic diversity of Astragalus edulis Bunge, an endangered species from western Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas, Julio; Barrios, Sara; Bobo-Pinilla, Javier; Lorite, Juan; Martínez-Ortega, M Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus edulis (Fabaceae) is an endangered annual species from the western Mediterranean region that colonized the SE Iberian Peninsula, NE and SW Morocco, and the easternmost Macaronesian islands (Lanzarote and Fuerteventura). Although in Spain some conservation measures have been adopted, it is still necessary to develop an appropriate management plan to preserve genetic diversity across the entire distribution area of the species. Our main objective was to use population genetics as well as ecological and phylogeographic data to select Relevant Genetic Units for Conservation (RGUCs) as the first step in designing conservation plans for A. edulis. We identified six RGUCs for in situ conservation, based on estimations of population genetic structure and probabilities of loss of rare alleles. Additionally, further population parameters, i.e. occupation area, population size, vulnerability, legal status of the population areas, and the historical haplotype distribution, were considered in order to establish which populations deserve conservation priority. Three populations from the Iberian Peninsula, two from Morocco, and one from the Canary Islands represent the total genetic diversity of the species and the rarest allelic variation. Ex situ conservation is recommended to complement the preservation of A. edulis, given that effective in situ population protection is not feasible in all cases. The consideration of complementary phylogeographic and ecological data is useful for management efforts to preserve the evolutionary potential of the species. PMID:26844014

  15. Designing conservation strategies to preserve the genetic diversity of Astragalus edulis Bunge, an endangered species from western Mediterranean region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas, Julio; Barrios, Sara; Bobo-Pinilla, Javier; Lorite, Juan; Martínez-Ortega, M Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus edulis (Fabaceae) is an endangered annual species from the western Mediterranean region that colonized the SE Iberian Peninsula, NE and SW Morocco, and the easternmost Macaronesian islands (Lanzarote and Fuerteventura). Although in Spain some conservation measures have been adopted, it is still necessary to develop an appropriate management plan to preserve genetic diversity across the entire distribution area of the species. Our main objective was to use population genetics as well as ecological and phylogeographic data to select Relevant Genetic Units for Conservation (RGUCs) as the first step in designing conservation plans for A. edulis. We identified six RGUCs for in situ conservation, based on estimations of population genetic structure and probabilities of loss of rare alleles. Additionally, further population parameters, i.e. occupation area, population size, vulnerability, legal status of the population areas, and the historical haplotype distribution, were considered in order to establish which populations deserve conservation priority. Three populations from the Iberian Peninsula, two from Morocco, and one from the Canary Islands represent the total genetic diversity of the species and the rarest allelic variation. Ex situ conservation is recommended to complement the preservation of A. edulis, given that effective in situ population protection is not feasible in all cases. The consideration of complementary phylogeographic and ecological data is useful for management efforts to preserve the evolutionary potential of the species.

  16. UPLC-QTOFMS(E)-Guided Dereplication of the Endangered Chinese Species Garcinia paucinervis to Identify Additional Benzophenone Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Anandhi Senthilkumar, Harini; Figueroa, Mario; Wu, Shi-Biao; Fata, Jimmie E; Kennelly, Edward J; Long, Chunlin

    2016-06-24

    A number of Garcinia species accumulate benzophenone derivatives that may be useful for the treatment of breast cancer. The dereplication of new benzophenone derivatives from Garcinia species is challenging due to the occurrence of multiple isomers and the known compounds found in their extracts. In the current study, a strategy is described using the UPLC-QTOFMS(E) technique to identify tentatively the known and uncharacterized benzophenones of interest based upon the characteristic fragmentation ions. Several UPLC-QTOFMS peaks (a-ee) appeared to contain benzophenone derivatives, and 12 of these peaks contained compounds with MS ionization profiles not consistent with previously identified compounds from the seeds of Garcinia paucinervis, an endangered Chinese species. The targeted isolation of unidentified compounds of interest afforded five new benzophenones, paucinones E-I (1-5), which were determined by MS and NMR analysis and ECD spectroscopy. These compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity against three breast cancer cell lines inclusive of MDA-MB-231, SKBR3, and MCF-7. These results indicate that the UPLC-QTOFMS(E)-guided isolation procedure is an efficient strategy for isolating new benzophenones from Garcinia species. PMID:27266714

  17. 18 CFR Appendix I to Subpart F of... - Procedures for Compliance With the Endangered Species Act of 1973 Under § 157.206(b)(3)(i)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR 402.02. The certificate holder shall be deemed in compliance with § 157.206(b)(2)(vi) of the... appropriate) as determined pursuant to 50 CFR 402.01 for the purpose of initiating informal consultations. 2... Compliance With the Endangered Species Act of 1973 Under § 157.206(b)(3)(i) I Appendix I to Subpart F...

  18. Limited population structure, genetic drift and bottlenecks characterise an endangered bird species in a dynamic, fire-prone ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Brown

    Full Text Available Fire is a major disturbance process in many ecosystems world-wide, resulting in spatially and temporally dynamic landscapes. For populations occupying such environments, fire-induced landscape change is likely to influence population processes, and genetic patterns and structure among populations. The Mallee Emu-wren Stipiturus mallee is an endangered passerine whose global distribution is confined to fire-prone, semi-arid mallee shrublands in south-eastern Australia. This species, with poor capacity for dispersal, has undergone a precipitous reduction in distribution and numbers in recent decades. We used genetic analyses of 11 length-variable, nuclear loci to examine population structure and processes within this species, across its global range. Populations of the Mallee Emu-wren exhibited a low to moderate level of genetic diversity, and evidence of bottlenecks and genetic drift. Bayesian clustering methods revealed weak genetic population structure across the species' range. The direct effects of large fires, together with associated changes in the spatial and temporal patterns of suitable habitat, have the potential to cause population bottlenecks, serial local extinctions and subsequent recolonisation, all of which may interact to erode and homogenise genetic diversity in this species. Movement among temporally and spatially shifting habitat, appears to maintain long-term genetic connectivity. A plausible explanation for the observed genetic patterns is that, following extensive fires, recolonisation exceeds in-situ survival as the primary driver of population recovery in this species. These findings suggest that dynamic, fire-dominated landscapes can drive genetic homogenisation of populations of species with low-mobility and specialised habitat that otherwise would be expected to show strongly structured populations. Such effects must be considered when formulating management actions to conserve species in fire-prone systems.

  19. Three new rarely collected or endangered species of Annonaceae from Venezuela

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatrou, L.W.; Pirie, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    Three new species of Annonaceae from Venezuela are described here: Cremastosperma venezuelanum Pirie, Klarobelia subglobosa Chatrou, and Pseudomalmea wingfieldii Chatrou. All three are represented by few collections (in comparison to those of other Neotropical species of Annonaceae). Klarobelia subg

  20. 76 FR 21858 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Take of Anadromous Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... exercised, would not operate to the disadvantage of the listed species that are the subject of the permit... probability-based sampling of aquatic habitat conditions and species diversity and abundance. This status...

  1. Relaxin concentrations in serum and urine of endangered species: correlations with physiologic events and use as a marker of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bernard G; Brown, Janine L; Roth, Terri L; Czekala, Nancy

    2005-05-01

    Many mammalian species are facing extinction due to problems created by human encroachment, agriculture, pollution, and willful slaughter. Among those at risk are the Asian and African elephant, Sumatran rhinoceros, and giant panda. Conservation groups try to save species in the wild by preserving habitat and limiting animal-human conflicts, often with limited success. Another alternative is to preserve the extant gene pool through captive breeding as a hedge against extinction. Measurement of circulating reproductive hormones is impractical for most wildlife species; determination of urinary or fecal hormone metabolites provides a more viable approach. To aid breeding management, one important tool is the ability to diagnose and monitor pregnancy, especially in species with long gestations (e.g., rhinos over 15 mo and elephants over 20 mo). Unfortunately, measuring progestins often is not useful diagnostically, because concentrations are similar during at least part of the pregnancy and the nonpregnant luteal phase in some species (e.g., elephants, rhinoceroses, and giant pandas). As serum relaxin reliably distinguishes between pregnancy and pseudopregnancy in bitches, relaxin measurement might also provide a method for detecting a successful pregnancy in endangered species. Appropriate immunoassay reagents have enabled the estimation of relaxin concentrations in the serum of elephants and rhinos and the determination of pregnancy establishment and the outcome. Relaxin was also detected in panda serum and urine. However, the extreme variability of the time between observed mating and parturition and the confounding factors of delayed implantation, pseudopregnancy, and frequent fetal resorptions made it impossible to use the panda relaxin data as a specific marker of pregnancy. PMID:15956734

  2. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of a Brazilian endangered tree species Caryocar brasiliense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collevatti, R G; Brondani, R V; Grattapaglia, D

    1999-12-01

    In this work we report the development and characterization of 10 microsatellite loci for the endangered tree species Caryocar brasiliense. Using genomic library enrichment, the efficiency of SSR marker development was 14.4% from sequencing data to operationally useful loci. Primer sequences for this set of 10 loci are made available together with their estimates of expected heterozygosity, probability of paternity exclusion and probability of identity. Mendelian inheritance and segregation was confirmed for all 10 loci in open-pollinated half-sib families as well as the absolute transferability of these 10 loci to five other species of the same genus. Number of alleles per locus ranged from 10 to 22 with a mean value of 16 and expected heterozygosity varying from 0.84 to 0.94. The combined probability of genetic identity was on the order of 10-17 clearly demonstrating that SSR multilocus genotypes are likely to be unique and capable of readily discriminating individuals of C. brasiliense. The very high combined probability of paternity exclusion (0.99999995) also indicates that these markers will permit detailed parentage studies in natural populations even in situations where both maternity and paternity are unknown. The battery of microsatellite markers developed and characterized in this study opens a new perspective for the generation of fundamental population genetic data for devising sound collection and conservation procedures for C. brasiliense and related species of the genus. PMID:10651920

  3. Moving Targets and Biodiversity Offsets for Endangered Species Habitat: Is Lesser Prairie Chicken Habitat a Stock or Flow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd K. BenDor

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The US Fish and Wildlife Service will make an Endangered Species Act listing decision for the lesser prairie chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus; “LPC” in March 2014. Based on the findings of a single, Uzbek antelope study, conservation plans put forth for the LPC propose to modify and re-position habitat in the landscape through a series of temporary preservation/restoration efforts. We argue that for certain species, including the LPC, dynamic habitat offsets represent a dangerous re-interpretation of habitat provision and recovery programs, which have nearly-universally viewed ecosystem offsets (habitat, wetlands, streams, etc. as “stocks” that accumulate characteristics over time. Any effort to create a program of temporary, moving habitat offsets must consider species’ (1 life history characteristics, (2 behavioral tendencies (e.g., avoidance of impacted areas, nesting/breeding site fidelity, and (3 habitat restoration characteristics, including long temporal lags in reoccupation. If misapplied, species recovery programs using temporary, moving habitat risk further population declines.

  4. Studies on endangered and rare non-commercial fish species recorded in the Pomeranian Bay (southern Baltic Sea) in 2010-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Więcaszek, Beata; Sobecka, Ewa; Keszka, Sławomir; Stepanowska, Katarzyna; Dudko, Stanisław; Biernaczyk, Marcin; Wrzecionkowski, Konrad

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the results of studies on endangered and rare non-commercial fish species ( Spinachia spinachia, Nerophis ophidion, Syngnathus typhle, Agonus cataphractus, Pholis gunnellus, Enchelyopus cimbrius, Cyclopterus lumpus) and one lamprey species ( Lampetra fluviatilis), recorded as bycatch during monitoring surveys in 2010-2013 in the Pomeranian Bay. Two species were observed for the first time in the Pomeranian Bay: A. cataphractus and E. cimbrius. Descriptions of parasite fauna are provided for C. lumpus and E. cimbrius, which were infected with four pathogenic species from Neomonada, Digenea, Nematoda, and Acanthocephala. Almost all parasite species were new in the hosts examined.

  5. In Vitro Propagation of R. maddeni Hook. F. an Endangered Rhododendron Species of Sikkim Himalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Kumar SINGH

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A protocol is described for rapid and large scale propagation of an endangered, important Sikkim Himalayan rhododendron (R. maddeni Hook. f. by in vitro culture of cotyledonary nodes from 15 days old seedlings. Several cytokinin types were evaluated for their effect on shoot multiplication from cotyledonary nodes. Maximum numbers of shoot (12.00 �0.58 were observed on the AM containing 7 mg/l 2iP, 0.1 mg/l IAA after eight weeks of culture. Incorporation of 0.1 mg/l IAA in the medium during the first subculture after establishment and initiation of shoot buds significantly improved the shoot elongation. Regenerated shoots were separated and rooted on same strength AM medium supplemented with 0.2 mg/l of IBA alone for three weeks. Well-developed complete plantlets were transferred on to specially made plastic cup containing soilrite. The rooted plantlets were hardened and successfully established in greenhouse, the plants were transferred to field site at Pangthang arboretum of the Institute and the �Rare & Threatened Plant Conservation Park� of Zoological Park, Gangtok, Sikkim.

  6. Unveiling the Conservation Biogeography of a Data-Deficient Endangered Bird Species under Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Junhua Hu; Yang Liu

    2014-01-01

    It remains a challenge to identify the geographical patterns and underlying environmental associations of species with unique ecological niches and distinct behaviors. This in turn hinders our understanding of the ecology as well as effective conservation management of threatened species. The white-eared night heron (Gorsachius magnificus) is a non-migratory nocturnal bird species that has a patchy distribution in the mountainous forests of East Asia. It is currently categorized as "Endangere...

  7. 7 CFR 650.22 - Rare, threatened, and endangered species of plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... with land use planning of privately owned rural land and with professional conservation employees... the same species or smaller taxa in common spatial arrangements that interbreed when mature....

  8. 75 FR 50813 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Three Foreign Bird Species From Latin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... overwintered at Lagos Uru Uru and Poop (Caziani et al. 2007, p. 279). Laguna Saquewa and Laguna Macaya are also... FR 26464) for 58 foreign species, noting that 2 of the foreign species identified in the petition were already listed under the Act, and initiated a status review. On January 20, 1984 (49 FR 2485),...

  9. 76 FR 49201 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Four Foreign Parrot Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... remaining parrot species for which a 90-day finding was made on July 14, 2009 (74 FR 33957) in subsequent... Federal Regulations (50 CFR 424.14(a)). On July 14, 2009 (74 FR 33957), we published a 90-day finding in... and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Four Foreign Parrot Species; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal...

  10. Dorstenia triseriata (Moraceae) a new and endangered species from Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson Machado; Jorge Fontella Pereira; Pedro P. Carauta

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Moraceae is described, illustrated and compared to its close morphological relatives. Dorstenia triseriata presents similarities with Dorstenia turnerifolia but distinguished by size of peduncle, diameter of receptacle, number of bract rows, color of marginal bracts, and by an indistinct fringe on inflorescence. A conservation assessment based on IUCN criteria determines the new species to be vulnerable (VU).

  11. 78 FR 1201 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Take of Anadromous Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ... to the disadvantage of the listed species that are the subject of the permit; and (3) are consistent... diversity. The CRITFC does not intend to kill any of the fish being captured, but a small percentage may die... steelhead abundance, status, distribution, diversity, species/ecological interactions, and behavior in...

  12. 77 FR 61627 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... leche) to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This notification covers activities to be... leche) to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This notification covers activities to...

  13. 78 FR 30325 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR 4685; January 26, 2009), which call on... leche) to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This notification covers activities to be... leche) to enhance the species' propagation or survival. This notification covers activities to...

  14. Using species distribution model to estimate the wintering population size of the endangered scaly-sided merganser in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zeng

    Full Text Available Scaly-sided Merganser is a globally endangered species restricted to eastern Asia. Estimating its population is difficult and considerable gap exists between populations at its breeding grounds and wintering sites. In this study, we built a species distribution model (SDM using Maxent with presence-only data to predict the potential wintering habitat for Scaly-sided Merganser in China. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC method suggests high predictive power of the model (training and testing AUC were 0.97 and 0.96 respectively. The most significant environmental variables included annual mean temperature, mean temperature of coldest quarter, minimum temperature of coldest month and precipitation of driest quarter. Suitable conditions for Scaly-sided Merganser are predicted in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River, especially in Jiangxi, Hunan and Hubei Provinces. The predicted suitable habitat embraces 6,984 km of river. Based on survey results from three consecutive winters (2010-2012 and previous studies, we estimated that the entire wintering population of Scaly-sided Merganser in China to be 3,561 ± 478 individuals, which is consistent with estimate in its breeding ground.

  15. Decline in endangered species as an indication of anthropic pressures: the case of European mink Mustela lutreola Western population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodé, T; Cormier, J P; Le Jacques, D

    2001-12-01

    Populations of threatened species, especially predators at the top of the food chain, may be affected by anthropic pressures. The endangered western population of European mink Mustela lutreola has shown a large decline over 50% of its natural range. M. lutreola disappeared from northwestern France between 1984 and 1997, and the decline was associated with an increase in mustelid trapping, changes in watercourse quality, and habitat modifications due to agricultural practices. The pattern of decline showed a fragmentation restricting the minks into very small areas. Trapping was the first known cause of mortality. Although feral American mink Mustela vison may compete with autochthonous carnivores, M. lutreola had disappeared from streams before the introduction of the American species, suggesting that competitive interactions were not responsible. Furthermore, American mink has never been found or has remained rare in 62.4% of the area from which M. lutreola has disappeared. During the past 25 years, permanent grassland surfaces were reduced by 40%, whereas fodder culture increased by 470%, causing considerable habitat changes. Furthermore, 55.7% of water courses were classified as being of bad quality or polluted. Therefore, our data suggests that a conjunction of intensive trapping, alterations in water quality and habitat modification was critical for the European mink's decline. Although there are difficulties in ascribing specific cause to distribution changes in a top predator, this decline can be regarded as an indication for anthropic pressures on natural habitats.

  16. Living in isolation - population structure, reproduction, and genetic variation of the endangered plant species Dianthus gratianopolitanus (Cheddar pink).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Christina M; Schmid, Christoph; Reisch, Christoph

    2015-09-01

    The endangered plant species Dianthus gratianopolitanus exhibits a highly fragmented distribution range comprising many isolated populations. Based upon this pattern of distribution, we selected a study region in Switzerland with a lower magnitude of isolation (Swiss Jura) and another study region in Germany with a higher degree of isolation (Franconian Jura). In each region, we chose ten populations to analyze population structure, reproduction, and genetic variation in a comparative approach. Therefore, we determined population density, cushion size, and cushion density to analyze population structure, investigated reproductive traits, including number of flowers, capsules, and germination rate, and analyzed amplified fragment length polymorphisms to study genetic variation. Population and cushion density were credibly higher in German than in Swiss populations, whereas reproductive traits and genetic variation within populations were similar in both study regions. However, genetic variation among populations and isolation by distance were stronger in Germany than in Switzerland. Generally, cushion size and density as well as flower and capsule production increased with population size and density, whereas genetic variation decreased with population density. In contrast to our assumptions, we observed denser populations and cushions in the region with the higher magnitude of isolation, whereas reproductive traits and genetic variation within populations were comparable in both regions. This corroborates the assumption that stronger isolation must not necessarily result in the loss of fitness and genetic variation. Furthermore, it supports our conclusion that the protection of strongly isolated populations contributes essentially to the conservation of a species' full evolutionary potential.

  17. Species discovery and validation in a cryptic radiation of endangered primates: coalescent-based species delimitation in Madagascar's mouse lemurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotaling, Scott; Foley, Mary E; Lawrence, Nicolette M; Bocanegra, Jose; Blanco, Marina B; Rasoloarison, Rodin; Kappeler, Peter M; Barrett, Meredith A; Yoder, Anne D; Weisrock, David W

    2016-05-01

    Implementation of the coalescent model in a Bayesian framework is an emerging strength in genetically based species delimitation studies. By providing an objective measure of species diagnosis, these methods represent a quantitative enhancement to the analysis of multilocus data, and complement more traditional methods based on phenotypic and ecological characteristics. Recognized as two species 20 years ago, mouse lemurs (genus Microcebus) now comprise more than 20 species, largely diagnosed from mtDNA sequence data. With each new species description, enthusiasm has been tempered with scientific scepticism. Here, we present a statistically justified and unbiased Bayesian approach towards mouse lemur species delimitation. We perform validation tests using multilocus sequence data and two methodologies: (i) reverse-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling to assess the likelihood of different models defined a priori by a guide tree, and (ii) a Bayes factor delimitation test that compares different species-tree models without a guide tree. We assess the sensitivity of these methods using randomized individual assignments, which has been used in bpp studies, but not with Bayes factor delimitation tests. Our results validate previously diagnosed taxa, as well as new species hypotheses, resulting in support for three new mouse lemur species. As the challenge of multiple researchers using differing criteria to describe diversity is not unique to Microcebus, the methods used here have significant potential for clarifying diversity in other taxonomic groups. We echo previous studies in advocating that multiple lines of evidence, including use of the coalescent model, should be trusted to delimit new species. PMID:26946180

  18. An integrative taxonomy on the locally endangered species of the Korean Scarabaeus (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Taeman; Kim, Jin Ill; Yi, Dae-Am; Jeong, Jongchel; An, Seung Lak; Park, In Gyun; Park, Haechul

    2016-01-01

    The ball-rolling dung beetles of the genus Scarabaeus are very ecologically important for the recycling of feces of large herbivores and the related nature management. There has been a significant decline, however, in the numbers of many species at the population and individual levels. S. typhon is currently thought to be the sole member of Scarabaeus distributed in Korea; however, that species underwent serious local extinctions in the 1970s. Before planning a full-scale species recovery, it is important to have an understanding of the exact species diversity and genetic structures of the focal species. We therefore attempted an integrative taxonomy focused on the Korean population of S. typhon and also on S. pius and S. sacer, which were once thought to be distributed in Korea, using both morphological and molecular approaches. The results of both approaches reveal the Korean species of Scarabaeus to be S. typhon and S. pius. In particular, our molecular results inferred from cytochrome c oxidase subunit I genetic analysis show that S. typhon should be considered a single species despite having various haplotypes throughout its wide geographical range from Europe to Korea. We identified two distinct lineages of S. pius (groups A and B) across a wide distributional range. We conclude that the Korean specimens of S. pius belong to group A and that S. pius is new to Korea under the current taxonomic treatment. PMID:27470822

  19. 75 FR 71726 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 5-Year Status Reviews of 58 Species in Washington...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    .... (HI).... 56 FR 55770; 10/29/1991. mollis. Kuahiwi laukahi Plantago Endangered U.S.A. (HI).... 59 FR... listing rule ANIMALS Butterfly, Oregon silverspot Speyeria zerene Threatened U.S.A. (CA, OR, 45 FR 44935; 7/2/1980. hippolyta. WA). Creeper, Oahu Paroreomyza Endangered U.S.A. (HI).... 35 FR 16047;...

  20. 76 FR 77490 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Take of Anadromous Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    .... Comments will not be accepted if submitted via email or the Internet. The applications and related... for in good faith; (2) would not operate to the disadvantage of the listed species which are...

  1. 78 FR 5481 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... marine otters (Lontra felina), sea otters (Enhydra lutris), all species of Sirenia (Trichechus manatus, T... Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR 4685; January 26,...

  2. 77 FR 27186 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Take of Anadromous Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... would be collected (using backpack electrofishers, minnow traps, angling, seines, and weir traps... surveys, and habitat surveys. The GPNF would also capture (using backpack electrofishing equipment or... species share. Researchers would use backpack electrofishing equipment to capture fish. The FWS...

  3. Interspecific relationships in the forest community dominated by Pinus kwangtungensis,an endangered species endemic to China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lu; SU Zhiyao; CHEN Beiguang

    2007-01-01

    Interspecific relationships in a natural forest dominated by Pinus kwangtungensis,a rare and endangered pine species endemic to China,were studied based on inventory data from 7,200 m2 plots in Nanling National Nature Reserve.With the aim to quantitatively analyze the relationships of P kwangtungensis to other species in the forest community and to their habitat,the continuous transect sampling method was employed by placing a horizontal transect (10 m ×120 m) at a 100 m altitudinal interval from 1,100 m to 1,600 m a.s.l.,which represents the altitudinal range of P kwangtungensis in Nanling National Nature Reserve.Each transect was further divided into 12 contiguous quadrats (10 m × 10 m) for plant censuses.Both canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and cluster analysis were used to detect the interspecific relationships.The results showed the following: 1) occurrence frequency of P kwangtungensis in Nanling was ranked Class A in terms of Raunkiaer's law of frequency.P.kwangtungensis dominated in the canopy more than in the subcanopy and understory;2)both Spearman rank correlation (SRC) coefficients and Pearson correlation coefficients indicated that the number of positive covariation couplets was significantly higher than the negative covariation couplets in the forest community,although SRC appeared to be more sensitive than Pearson correlation analysis.Except for the negative covariation with Litsea elongata,P.kwangtungensis exhibited no significant correlation with other dominant species;3) altitude,slope,slope aspect,slope shape,thickness of humus layer,and thickness of litter all had significant correlations with the three axes in CCA plot,and the environmental factors in the first two axes defined the ecological conditions of the community.The grouping of the 105 canopy tree species was made according to the characteristics of the species along the first axis.Altitude was the most effective factor influencing the distribution of P.kwangtungensis;4

  4. Umbrella species in marine systems: using the endangered humphead wrasse to conserve coral reefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weng, Kevin C.; Pedersen, Martin Wæver; Del Raye, Gen A.;

    2015-01-01

    .4 to 14 km and changed with ontogeny. Females had larger home ranges than other reef fishes studied to date (n = 68), indicating value as an umbrella species for coral reefs. We compared the home range of the species to the size distribution of tropical marine protected areas (MPAs), and used a model...... of the humphead wrasse as an umbrella species for coral reef conservation, we conducted a multi-year study of humphead wrasse home range at Palmyra Atoll, Central Tropical Pacific, tagging juvenile, female, and male individuals with acoustic transmitters. We quantified home range using 2 metrics, length and area......, and determined if these metrics were related to the sex and maturity status of the individual. We recorded individual movements during 5030 fish-days, yielding detailed records for 14 individuals comprising 3 juveniles, 5 females, and 6 males. The home range of humphead wrasse measured over a 2 yr study was 0...

  5. Viral Encephalopathy and Retinopathy in groupers (Epinephelus spp. in southern Italy: a threat for wild endangered species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vendramin Niccolò

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Betanodaviruses are the causative agents of Viral Encephalopathy and Retinopathy (VER. To date, more than 50 species have proved to be susceptible and among them, those found in genus Epinephelus are highly represented. Clinical disease outbreaks are generally characterized by typical nervous signs and significant mortalities mainly associated with aquaculture activities, although some concerns for the impact of this infection in wild fish have been raised. In this study, the authors present the first documented report describing an outbreak of VER in wild species in the Mediterranean basin. Case presentation In late summer - early winter 2011 (September-December, significant mortalities affecting wild Dusky grouper (Epinephelus marginatus, Golden grouper (Epinephelus costae and European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax were reported in the municipality of Santa Maria di Leuca (Northern Ionian Sea, Italy. The affected fish showed an abnormal swimming behavior and swollen abdomens. During this epizootic, five moribund fish showing clear neurological signs were captured and underwent laboratory investigations. Analytical results confirmed the diagnosis of VER in all the specimens. Genetic characterization classified all betanodavirus isolates as belonging to the RGNNV genotype, revealing a close genetic relationship with viral sequences obtained from diseased farmed fish reared in the same area in previous years. Conclusion The close relationship of the viral sequences between the isolates collected in wild affected fish and those isolated during clinical disease outbreaks in farmed fish in the same area in previous years suggests a persistent circulation of betanodaviruses and transmission between wild and farmed stocks. Further investigations are necessary to assess the risk of viral transmission between wild and farmed fish populations, particularly in marine protected areas where endangered species are present.

  6. Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species, Layer identifies occurrences of rare, threatened and endangered plants, animals, exemplary or unique natural communities, and important animal assemblages., Published in 1995, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, NC DENR / Office of Conservation, Planning, and Community Affairs / Natural Heritage Program.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of...

  7. 76 FR 28715 - Endangered and Threatened Species: Designation of a Nonessential Experimental Population for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... species. Specific land and water management activities that may negatively impact steelhead populations... Yakima River, Washington, excluding steelhead from the Snake River Basin (64 FR 14517, March 24, 1999; 71... status of threatened in 2006 (71 FR 834, January 5, 2006). These programs are the Touchet River...

  8. 77 FR 43108 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR 4685; January 26, 2009... Taxidermy, Brady, TX; PRT-75675A The applicant requests a permit to export the sport-hunted trophy/ trophies... species. Applicant: University of Florida, Davie, FL; PRT-71355A The applicant requests a permit to...

  9. 77 FR 46514 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR 4685; January 26, 2009... Hole Oceanographic Institute, Woods Hole, MA; PRT-130062 On July 27, 2012, (77 FR 44264), we published... species. Applicant: Wildlife Artistry Taxidermy, Centreville, MD; PRT-77276A The applicant requests...

  10. 78 FR 2725 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Designation of Critical Habitat for Lower Columbia River Coho...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... the role they play in the salmon's life cycle. Salmon are anadromous--born in fresh water, migrating... predators. During all life stages salmon and steelhead require cool water that is free of contaminants. They... component in the evolutionary legacy of the biological species (56 FR 58612, November 20, 1991)....

  11. Ex situ Conservation of Three Endemic and/or Endangered Dianthus Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria CRISTEA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the current context of declining biodiversity, the botanical gardens play an essential role in its conservation. Dianthus callizonus, D. glacialis ssp. gelidus and D. spiculifolius are the species that we seek to preserve in "Alexandru Borza" Botanical Garden of Cluj-Napoca (Romania. Several replicates were collected for each taxon from different populations in order to avoid the genetic uniformity. The material collected from the natural sites, was planted on a rockery, specially designed for this collection in the Botanical Garden. At the time of planting, each individual was sampled for setting up an in vitro collection and further biochemical and molecular analyses. In case of ex situ outdoor conservation of the three Dianthus species, 80.6% of the individuals collected in the field survived during the first year but the percentage decreased drastically after four years. In the case of in situ collected individuals, as well as in the case of in vitro individuals, D. spiculifolius had the best ability to acclimatize in the Botanical Garden, and D. callizonus presented the lowest number of surviving individuals. The ex vitro acclimatization of the plantlets had 80% efficiency at 10ºC, using three different substrates: soil and pearl stone mix 1/1, soil and sand mix 1/1 and pearl stone. All the three species are preserved in vitro, whereas the plantlets are acclimatized outdoors. Ex situ conservation of these species will have a positive impact on the biodiversity conservation.

  12. 77 FR 40171 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Two Foreign Macaw Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ..., Ecuador, Venezuela, Peru, Colombia, and Bolivia. In situations where species are rare or have small... of Policy and Directives Management; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, MS 2042... Federal Regulations (50 CFR 424.14(a)). On July 14, 2009 (74 FR 33957), we published a 90-day finding...

  13. 77 FR 67794 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Take of Anadromous Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    .... Rockfish: Puget Sound/Georgia Basin (PS/GB) bocaccio (Sebastes paucispinis); PS/GB canary rockfish..., PS steelhead, and PS/GB bocaccio. The UW research may also cause them to take the following species..., PS steelhead, and PS/GB bocaccio. The researchers may also take PS/GB canary rockfish and...

  14. 78 FR 69310 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Protective Regulations for the Gulf of Maine Distinct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... prohibit any act covered under section 9(a)(1). Whether section 9(a)(1) prohibitions are necessary and... prohibited by NMFS in 1999 (64 FR 9449; February 26, 1999). However, despite these prohibitions on directed... site (see ADDRESSES). Classification National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Whenever a species...

  15. 78 FR 12777 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR... nasomaculatus), dama gazelle (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species' propagation or... (Oryx dammah), addax (Addax nasomaculatus), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the...

  16. 78 FR 44961 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ... Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR 4685; January 26, 2009... (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species propagation or survival. This... lechwe (Kobus leche) from the captive herd maintained at their facility, for the purpose of...

  17. 78 FR 50083 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR 4685; January 26, 2009... (Addax nasomaculatus), dama gazelle (Nanger dama), and red lechwe (Kobus leche) to enhance the species... leche) from the captive herd maintained at their facility, for the purpose of enhancement of...

  18. Addressing Potential Cumulative Impacts of Development on Threatened Species: The Case of the Endangered Black-Throated Finch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Peter Vanderduys

    Full Text Available Where threatened biodiversity is adversely affected by development, policies often state that "no net loss" should be the goal and biodiversity offsetting is one mechanism available to achieve this. However, developments are often approved on an ad hoc basis and cumulative impacts are not sufficiently examined. We demonstrate the potential for serious threat to an endangered subspecies when multiple developments are planned. We modelled the distribution of the black-throated finch (Poephila cincta cincta using bioclimatic data and Queensland's Regional Ecosystem classification. We overlaid granted, extant extractive and exploratory mining tenures within the known and modelled ranges of black-throated finches to examine the level of incipient threat to this subspecies in central Queensland, Australia. Our models indicate that more than half of the remaining P. cincta cincta habitat is currently under extractive or exploratory tenure. Therefore, insufficient habitat exists to offset all potential development so "no net loss" is not possible. This has implications for future conservation of this and similarly distributed species and for resource development planning, especially the use of legislated offsets for biodiversity protection.

  19. Addressing Potential Cumulative Impacts of Development on Threatened Species: The Case of the Endangered Black-Throated Finch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderduys, Eric Peter; Reside, April E; Grice, Anthony; Rechetelo, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Where threatened biodiversity is adversely affected by development, policies often state that "no net loss" should be the goal and biodiversity offsetting is one mechanism available to achieve this. However, developments are often approved on an ad hoc basis and cumulative impacts are not sufficiently examined. We demonstrate the potential for serious threat to an endangered subspecies when multiple developments are planned. We modelled the distribution of the black-throated finch (Poephila cincta cincta) using bioclimatic data and Queensland's Regional Ecosystem classification. We overlaid granted, extant extractive and exploratory mining tenures within the known and modelled ranges of black-throated finches to examine the level of incipient threat to this subspecies in central Queensland, Australia. Our models indicate that more than half of the remaining P. cincta cincta habitat is currently under extractive or exploratory tenure. Therefore, insufficient habitat exists to offset all potential development so "no net loss" is not possible. This has implications for future conservation of this and similarly distributed species and for resource development planning, especially the use of legislated offsets for biodiversity protection. PMID:26934622

  20. Movement patterns for a critically endangered species, the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea, linked to foraging success and population status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Bailey

    Full Text Available Foraging success for pelagic vertebrates may be revealed by horizontal and vertical movement patterns. We show markedly different patterns for leatherback turtles in the North Atlantic versus Eastern Pacific, which feed on gelatinous zooplankton that are only occasionally found in high densities. In the Atlantic, travel speed was characterized by two modes, indicative of high foraging success at low speeds (<15 km d(-1 and transit at high speeds (20-45 km d(-1. Only a single mode was evident in the Pacific, which occurred at speeds of 21 km d(-1 indicative of transit. The mean dive depth was more variable in relation to latitude but closer to the mean annual depth of the thermocline and nutricline for North Atlantic than Eastern Pacific turtles. The most parsimonious explanation for these findings is that Eastern Pacific turtles rarely achieve high foraging success. This is the first support for foraging behaviour differences between populations of this critically endangered species and suggests that longer periods searching for prey may be hindering population recovery in the Pacific while aiding population maintenance in the Atlantic.

  1. Naive Prey versus Nonnative Predators: A Role for Behavior in Endangered Species Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Kraft, Stephanie A

    2009-01-01

    Fish are one of the most imperiled groups of vertebrates worldwide. Threats to fish fall into one of four general categories: physical habitat loss or degradation, chemical pollution, overfishing, and nonnative species introductions. Nonnative predatory fish often have a devastating impact on native prey, especially with endemic fish, whose restricted distribution and often limited evolutionary history with predators make them particularly susceptible to nonnative predators. One reason nonnat...

  2. Hearing sensitivity in context: Conservation implications for a highly vocal endangered species

    OpenAIRE

    Megan A. Owen; Keating, Jennifer L; Samuel K. Denes; Kathy Hawk; Angela Fiore; Julie Thatcher; Jennifer Becerra; Suzanne Hall; Swaisgood, Ronald R.

    2016-01-01

    Hearing sensitivity is a fundamental determinant of a species’ vulnerability to anthropogenic noise, however little is known about the hearing capacities of most conservation dependent species. When audiometric data are integrated with other aspects of species’ acoustic ecology, life history, and characteristic habitat topography and soundscape, predictions can be made regarding probable vulnerability to the negative impacts of different types of anthropogenic noise. Here we used an adaptive ...

  3. Biobanking efforts and new advances in male fertility preservation for rare and endangered species

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Comizzoli

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and sustaining biodiversity is a multi-disciplinary science that benefits highly from the creation of organized and accessible collections of biomaterials (Genome Resource Banks). Large cryo-collections are invaluable tools for understanding, cataloging, and protecting the genetic diversity of the world's unique animals and plants. Specifically, the systematic collection and preservation of semen from rare species has been developed significantly in recent decades with some biob...

  4. Use of Artificial Propagation and Supplementation for Rebuilding Salmon Stocks Listed under the Endangered Species Act : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 5 of 11.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichatowich, Jim; Watson, Bruce

    1993-06-01

    Conventional hatcheries, supplementation, and habitat protection are management activities located on a production continuum. At one end of the continuum is the conventional hatchery which attempts to separate artificially propagated fish from naturally reproducing populations. On the other end of the continuum is natural production. Supplementation which attempts to increase natural production through the use of artificial propagation lies somewhere between natural production and conventional hatcheries on the continuum. The use of artificial propagation in the recovery of listed species is controversial. Guidance on the use of artificial propagation in the recovery of listed species comes from three sources: The Endangered Species Act (ESA), US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) policies and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) guidelines.

  5. Conservation of charismatic endangered species in Wehea Forest, Borneo: Interplay of ecological and social factors in a community-based conservation project

    OpenAIRE

    Loken, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Borneo is blessed with incredible biodiversity, including some of the most charismatic endangered species on the planet. Yet despite being recognized as a biodiversity hotspot, Borneo’s forests, and the biodiversity contained therein, are being lost faster than anywhere else on the planet, with the main threats from habitat loss and hunting. Given the perceived failure of protected areas on Borneo to conserve biodiversity, some NGOs are implementing community-based conservation (CBC) and beli...

  6. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of methanolic leaf extract of the endangered tree species, Hildegardia populifolia (Roxb.) Schott and Endl

    OpenAIRE

    Saradha Maran; Paulsamy Subramanium

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of methanolic leaf extracts of the endangered medicinal tree species, Hildegardia populifolia on laboratory animal. Methods: The anti-inflammatory potential of the extract has been determined by using carrageenan, formalin and histamine induced paw edema assays in Wistar rats. Indomethacin was used as a reference drug. The analgesic activity was tested by using acetic acid induced writhing res...

  7. Predicting patch occupancy in fragmented landscapes at the rangewide scale for an endangered species: an example of an American warbler

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Bret A.

    2011-08-25

    AIM: Our objective was to identify the distribution of the endangered golden-cheeked warbler (Setophaga chrysoparia) in fragmented oak-juniper woodlands by applying a geoadditive semiparametric occupancy model to better assist decision-makers in identifying suitable habitat across the species breeding range on which conservation or mitigation activities can be focused and thus prioritize management and conservation planning. LOCATION: Texas, USA. METHODS: We used repeated double-observer detection/non-detection surveys of randomly selected (n = 287) patches of potential habitat to evaluate warbler patch-scale presence across the species breeding range. We used a geoadditive semiparametric occupancy model with remotely sensed habitat metrics (patch size and landscape composition) to predict patch-scale occupancy of golden-cheeked warblers in the fragmented oak-juniper woodlands of central Texas, USA. RESULTS: Our spatially explicit model indicated that golden-cheeked warbler patch occupancy declined from south to north within the breeding range concomitant with reductions in the availability of large habitat patches. We found that 59% of woodland patches, primarily in the northern and central portions of the warbler\\'s range, were predicted to have occupancy probabilities ≤0.10 with only 3% of patches predicted to have occupancy probabilities >0.90. Our model exhibited high prediction accuracy (area under curve = 0.91) when validated using independently collected warbler occurrence data. MAIN CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a distinct spatial occurrence gradient for golden-cheeked warblers as well as a relationship between two measurable landscape characteristics. Because habitat-occupancy relationships were key drivers of our model, our results can be used to identify potential areas where conservation actions supporting habitat mitigation can occur and identify areas where conservation of future potential habitat is possible. Additionally, our results can be

  8. In vitro propagation of critically endangered species Scilla autumnalis L. – biochemical analyses of the regenerants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian BANCIU

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study belongs to the international efforts for plant conservation from the areas threatened by human activities. The saline soils areas are restricting for agriculture and in some cases for fishery facilities and the plant species are extinct from those areas. Scilla autumnalis L. is one of the threatened plants (rare on the national red list of vascular plants from Romania that grows in the Natural Park Comana, Giurgiu County, South Romania. Seeds from plants grown in the natural habitat have been used for in vitro plant regeneration and multiplication. After successfully rooting and acclimatization of the regenerated plantlets from germinated seeds, biochemical studies have been performed in order to compare the regenerants from in vitro cultures with native plants from genetically point of view. Peroxydase and esterase’s spectra were the biochemical markers used.The results indicated that this plant species can be multiplicated, rooted and acclimatized on synthetic medium (MS supplemented with NAA, IBA, IAA, kinetin and BAP with a good efficiency and the regenerants had no genetic alterations determinated by culture conditions.

  9. The European medicinal leech Hirudo medicinalis L.: Morphology and occurrence of an endangered species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Kutschera

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the European medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis L. 1758 is one of the best-known members of the Hirudinea due to its use in phlebotomy, this species has been confused with the Mediterranean taxon H. verbana Carena 1820. Here we describe the morphology of adult and juvenile H. medicinalis and document its genetic distance to H. verbana, using newly acquired mitochondrial DNA-sequence (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, CO-I-data from specimens collected in Germany. Our CO-I analysis shows that H. medicinalis and H. verbana differ by 9.4 %. Hence, the original Hirudo-population diverged ca. 10 million years ago so that today two geographically separated biospecies exist that co-occur in only a few natural habitats. We analyzed the behaviour of adult H. medicinalis, but could not find differences with respect to its sister taxon H. verbana. Finally, we summarize the occurrence of H. medicinalis in Central Europe and conclude that this once widely distributed freshwater species largely disappeared in many countries. We suggest that the loss of natural freshwater ecosystems, with flat, warm banks, and amphibians (frogs, newts and toads as preferred host organisms for the juveniles, are largely responsible for the decline of H. medicinalis in Northern Europe.

  10. Endangered West African Chimpanzees Pan troglodytes verus (Schwarz, 1934 (Primates: Hominidae in Senegal prefer Pterocarpus erinaceus, a threatened tree species, to build their nests: implications for their conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.I. Ndiaye

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The West African Chimpanzee Pan troglodytes verus is Endangered (A4cd ver 3.1 in Senegal (Humle et al. 2008, mainly due to habitat fragmentation and destruction. We gathered qualitative and quantitative data on the tree species preferences of the West African Chimpanzee for nest building in order to gain insight into habitat dependence. Between March 1998 and Febrary 2000 we identified tree species in which a sample of 1790 chimpanzee nests had been built, and ranked species in preference order. We compared this sample to the relative abundance of tree species in the chimpanzee habitat to determine whether particular species were chosen for nesting. We observed that about a quarter (25.42% of nests were built in Pterocarpus erinaceus, which is considerably greater than would be expected from the abundance of this species in the habitat (6.35%, indicating a strong preference by chimpanzees. We examined the physical traits of the most-used tree species and concluded that height and wood hardness may be key choice features. P. erinaceus is threatened in Senegal due to extensive cutting, which may endanger chimpanzees living outside the boundaries of protected areas. In the current anthropogenic setting our results provide conservation managers with information on how to protect a key aspect of the chimpanzee natural environment.

  11. The Foraging Ecology of the Endangered Cape Verde Shearwater, a Sentinel Species for Marine Conservation off West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Vitor H; Geraldes, Pedro; Rodrigues, Isabel; Melo, Tommy; Melo, José; Ramos, Jaime A

    2015-01-01

    Large Marine Ecosystems such as the Canary Current system off West Africa sustains high abundance of small pelagic prey, which attracts marine predators. Seabirds are top predators often used as biodiversity surrogates and sentinel species of the marine ecosystem health, thus frequently informing marine conservation planning. This study presents the first data on the spatial (GPS-loggers) and trophic (stable isotope analysis) ecology of a tropical seabird-the endangered Cape Verde shearwater Calonectris edwardsii-during both the incubation and the chick-rearing periods of two consecutive years. This information was related with marine environmental predictors (species distribution models), existent areas of conservation concern for seabirds (i.e. marine Important Bird Areas; marine IBAs) and threats to the marine environment in the West African areas heavily used by the shearwaters. There was an apparent inter-annual consistency on the spatial, foraging and trophic ecology of Cape Verde shearwater, but a strong alteration on the foraging strategies of adult breeders among breeding phases (i.e. from incubation to chick-rearing). During incubation, birds mostly targeted a discrete region off West Africa, known by its enhanced productivity profile and thus also highly exploited by international industrial fishery fleets. When chick-rearing, adults exploited the comparatively less productive tropical environment within the islands of Cape Verde, at relatively close distance from their breeding colony. The species enlarged its trophic niche and increased the trophic level of their prey from incubation to chick-rearing, likely to provision their chicks with a more diversified and better quality diet. There was a high overlap between the Cape Verde shearwaters foraging areas with those of European shearwater species that overwinter in this area and known areas of megafauna bycatch off West Africa, but very little overlap with existing Marine Important Bird Areas. Further

  12. The Foraging Ecology of the Endangered Cape Verde Shearwater, a Sentinel Species for Marine Conservation off West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor H Paiva

    Full Text Available Large Marine Ecosystems such as the Canary Current system off West Africa sustains high abundance of small pelagic prey, which attracts marine predators. Seabirds are top predators often used as biodiversity surrogates and sentinel species of the marine ecosystem health, thus frequently informing marine conservation planning. This study presents the first data on the spatial (GPS-loggers and trophic (stable isotope analysis ecology of a tropical seabird-the endangered Cape Verde shearwater Calonectris edwardsii-during both the incubation and the chick-rearing periods of two consecutive years. This information was related with marine environmental predictors (species distribution models, existent areas of conservation concern for seabirds (i.e. marine Important Bird Areas; marine IBAs and threats to the marine environment in the West African areas heavily used by the shearwaters. There was an apparent inter-annual consistency on the spatial, foraging and trophic ecology of Cape Verde shearwater, but a strong alteration on the foraging strategies of adult breeders among breeding phases (i.e. from incubation to chick-rearing. During incubation, birds mostly targeted a discrete region off West Africa, known by its enhanced productivity profile and thus also highly exploited by international industrial fishery fleets. When chick-rearing, adults exploited the comparatively less productive tropical environment within the islands of Cape Verde, at relatively close distance from their breeding colony. The species enlarged its trophic niche and increased the trophic level of their prey from incubation to chick-rearing, likely to provision their chicks with a more diversified and better quality diet. There was a high overlap between the Cape Verde shearwaters foraging areas with those of European shearwater species that overwinter in this area and known areas of megafauna bycatch off West Africa, but very little overlap with existing Marine Important Bird

  13. Modelling the Species Distribution of Flat-Headed Cats (Prionailurus planiceps), an Endangered South-East Asian Small Felid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Andrew J.; Hesse, Deike; Mohamed, Azlan; Traeholdt, Carl; Cheyne, Susan M.; Sunarto, Sunarto; Jayasilan, Mohd-Azlan; Ross, Joanna; Shapiro, Aurélie C.; Sebastian, Anthony; Dech, Stefan; Breitenmoser, Christine; Sanderson, Jim; Duckworth, J. W.; Hofer, Heribert

    2010-01-01

    the flat-headed cat should focus on the identified remaining key localities and be implemented through a continuous dialogue between local stakeholders, conservationists and scientists to ensure its long-term survival. The flat-headed cat can serve as a flagship species for the protection of several other endangered species associated with the threatened tropical lowland forests and surface fresh-water sources in this region. PMID:20305809

  14. Modelling the species distribution of flat-headed cats (Prionailurus planiceps, an endangered South-East Asian small felid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Wilting

    efforts for the flat-headed cat should focus on the identified remaining key localities and be implemented through a continuous dialogue between local stakeholders, conservationists and scientists to ensure its long-term survival. The flat-headed cat can serve as a flagship species for the protection of several other endangered species associated with the threatened tropical lowland forests and surface fresh-water sources in this region.

  15. Recognition of endangered and protected species in the flora and their current condition: an example from Sokołowice forest administration region (Oleśnica forest district)

    OpenAIRE

    Gorzelak, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    This article is an attempt to draw attention to the differentiation used to conserve endangered and protected species of flora in an area that is administered by the management board of the State Forests. I also draw attention to areas of insufficient knowledge of this subject-matter. A detailed inventory of endangered and protected species of flora for the purpose of planning in forestry would be very useful in light of laws related to nature conservation and the problem of preserving biolo...

  16. Effects of herbicides on Behr's metalmark butterfly, a surrogate species for the endangered butterfly, Lange's metalmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, John D; Chen, Xue Dong; Johnson, Catherine S

    2012-05-01

    Lange's metalmark butterfly, Apodemia mormo langei Comstock, is in danger of extinction due to loss of habitat caused by invasive exotic plants which are eliminating its food, naked stem buckwheat. Herbicides are being used to remove invasive weeds from the dunes; however, little is known about the potential effects of herbicides on butterflies. To address this concern we evaluated potential toxic effects of three herbicides on Behr's metalmark, a close relative of Lange's metalmark. First instars were exposed to recommended field rates of triclopyr, sethoxydim, and imazapyr. Life history parameters were recorded after exposure. These herbicides reduced the number of adults that emerged from pupation (24-36%). Each herbicide has a different mode of action. Therefore, we speculate that effects are due to inert ingredients or indirect effects on food plant quality. If these herbicides act the same in A. mormo langei, they may contribute to the decline of this species. PMID:22310058

  17. Endangered and Threatened Species at Kennedy Space Center Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdolfi, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Throughout my internship, I assisted with the long-term monitoring of the Florida Scrub- Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens), a threatened species endemic to Florida. The Florida Scrub Jay diet consists of insects and small vertebrates throughout most of the year; however, during the winter their primary diet is acorns because the insect population is low. Furthermore, the Florida Scrub-Jay is a habitat specialist that lives in a disappearing plant community called the scrub, which consists of sand live oak, myrtle oak and chapman oak. The Florida Scrub-Jay is considered threatened because its numbers are decreasing primarily due to the loss of habitat that it needs to survive. Scrub habitat is highly desirable for human development because it is high, dry, and sandy. Periodic controlled burns maintain the scrub in a low, open condition favored by Scrub-Jays. Florida Scrub-Jays build their nests approximately 3-5 feet (approximately 1.5 m) above the ground in shrubby oaks (Breininger 153), mate for life and are cooperative breeders; which means that the young jays remain in their natal territory for at least a year to help their parents defend their territory, feed the young, and mob predators. (Breininger 152). I assisted in conducting monthly censuses at long-term monitoring sites and a juvenile in July survey to determine reproductive success for the year. In addition, to Scrub-Jay monitoring, I also had the opportunity to assist with some long term monitoring of ecosystem recovery. Scrub is a fire maintained system. Fire maintains the structure of scrub necessary for many of the threatened species that reside in the scrub habitat.

  18. Effects of herbicides on Behr's metalmark butterfly, a surrogate species for the endangered butterfly, Lange's metalmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange's metalmark butterfly, Apodemia mormo langei Comstock, is in danger of extinction due to loss of habitat caused by invasive exotic plants which are eliminating its food, naked stem buckwheat. Herbicides are being used to remove invasive weeds from the dunes; however, little is known about the potential effects of herbicides on butterflies. To address this concern we evaluated potential toxic effects of three herbicides on Behr's metalmark, a close relative of Lange's metalmark. First instars were exposed to recommended field rates of triclopyr, sethoxydim, and imazapyr. Life history parameters were recorded after exposure. These herbicides reduced the number of adults that emerged from pupation (24–36%). Each herbicide has a different mode of action. Therefore, we speculate that effects are due to inert ingredients or indirect effects on food plant quality. If these herbicides act the same in A. mormo langei, they may contribute to the decline of this species. - Highlights: ► We evaluated the effects of three herbicides on the butterfly, Behr's metalmark. ► These herbicides are used to control invasive weeds in butterfly habitat. ► The herbicides reduced adult butterfly emergence. - Herbicides are used to remove invasive weeds from butterfly habitat. Certain herbicides may be having a negative effect on butterflies.

  19. Distribución y conservación de especies amenazadas en Mesoamérica, Chocó y Andes tropicales Distribution and conservation of endangered species in Mesoamerica, Chocó and Tropical Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecilia Londoño-Murcia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se modeló el nicho ecológico proyectado como distribución potencial de 313 especies amenazadas en Mesoamérica, Chocó y los Andes tropicales, según las listas de la UICN. De estas especies, 285 fueron plantas y 28 fueron vertebrados terrestres. La superposición de las distribuciones de las especies amenazadas cubrió prácticamente toda la región. Ecuador mostró cerca del 30% de su área con 50 especies. Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua y Panamá mostraron > 50, aunque en 50% de su área. El Salvador y Honduras, de 11 a 20 en > 50% de su área y México de 1 a 5 especies en > 50% de su área. La distribución de estas especies en áreas transformadas (agricultura y áreas urbanas varió del 11al 30%; El Salvador, Panamá y Guatemala mostraron > 50% de la distribución; Colombia, Honduras y México This study modeled ecological niches projected as potential distributions for 313 endangered species listed in the IUCN for Mesoamerica, Chocó and Tropical Andes, of which 285 were plants, and 28 terrestrial vertebrates. Overlapping of endangered species distributions covered most of the region. Ecuador showed close to 30% of its area with 50 endangered species. Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua y Panama showed more than 50 endangered species in 50% of its area with endangered species (21 to 50 species were Costa Rica, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Panama. El Salvador and Honduras showed > 50% of its area with 11 to 20 endangered species; Mexico showed 50% of endangered species in transformed areas; Colombia, Honduras and Mexico showed < 40%, and Belize and Ecuador showed < 25% of endangered species in transformed areas, respectively. El Salvador, Honduras, Panama, Nicaragua and Mexico showed a high proportion of endangered species in transformed areas for the Classes Amphibia, Liliopsida, Polipodiopsida, and the Orders Asterales, Fabales, Laurales, Myrtales, Scrophulariales and Rubiales. Less than 35% of endangered

  20. Human-animal chimeras for vaccine development: an endangered species or opportunity for the developing world?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daar Abdallah S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the field of vaccines for diseases such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV which take a heavy toll in developing countries has faced major failures. This has led to a call for more basic science research, and development as well as evaluation of new vaccine candidates. Human-animal chimeras, developed with a 'humanized' immune system could be useful to study infectious diseases, including many neglected diseases. These would also serve as an important tool for the efficient testing of new vaccine candidates to streamline promising candidates for further trials in humans. However, developing human-animal chimeras has proved to be controversial. Discussion Development of human-animal chimeras for vaccine development has been slowed down because of opposition by some philosophers, ethicists and policy makers in the west-they question the moral status of such animals, and also express discomfort about transgression of species barriers. Such opposition often uses a contemporary western world view as a reference point. Human-animal chimeras are often being created for diseases which cause significantly higher morbidity and mortality in the developing world as compared to the developed world. We argue in our commentary that given this high disease burden, we should look at socio-cultural perspectives on human-animal chimera like beings in the developing world. On examination, it's clear that such beings have been part of mythology and cultural descriptions in many countries in the developing world. Summary To ensure that important research on diseases afflicting millions like malaria, HIV, Hepatitis-C and dengue continues to progress, we recommend supporting human-animal chimera research for vaccine development in developing countries (especially China and India which have growing technical expertise in the area. The negative perceptions in some parts of the west about human-animal chimeras can be used as an

  1. A Mixed-Method Approach for Quantifying Illegal Fishing and Its Impact on an Endangered Fish Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, Christopher M; Jensen, Olaf P; Mendsaikhan, Bud

    2015-01-01

    Illegal harvest is recognized as a widespread problem in natural resource management. The use of multiple methods for quantifying illegal harvest has been widely recommended yet infrequently applied. We used a mixed-method approach to evaluate the extent, character, and motivations of illegal gillnet fishing in Lake Hovsgol National Park, Mongolia and its impact on the lake's fish populations, especially that of the endangered endemic Hovsgol grayling (Thymallus nigrescens). Surveys for derelict fishing gear indicate that gillnet fishing is widespread and increasing and that fishers generally use 3-4 cm mesh gillnet. Interviews with resident herders and park rangers suggest that many residents fish for subsistence during the spring grayling spawning migration and that some residents fish commercially year-round. Interviewed herders and rangers generally agree that fish population sizes are decreasing but are divided on the causes and solutions. Biological monitoring indicates that the gillnet mesh sizes used by fishers efficiently target Hovsgol grayling. Of the five species sampled in the monitoring program, only burbot (Lota lota) showed a significant decrease in population abundance from 2009-2013. However, grayling, burbot, and roach (Rutilus rutilus) all showed significant declines in average body size, suggesting a negative fishing impact. Data-poor stock assessment methods suggest that the fishing effort equivalent to each resident family fishing 50-m of gillnet 11-15 nights per year would be sufficient to overexploit the grayling population. Results from the derelict fishing gear survey and interviews suggest that this level of effort is not implausible. Overall, we demonstrate the ability for a mixed-method approach to effectively describe an illegal fishery and suggest that these methods be used to assess illegal fishing and its impacts in other protected areas.

  2. A Mixed-Method Approach for Quantifying Illegal Fishing and Its Impact on an Endangered Fish Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Free

    Full Text Available Illegal harvest is recognized as a widespread problem in natural resource management. The use of multiple methods for quantifying illegal harvest has been widely recommended yet infrequently applied. We used a mixed-method approach to evaluate the extent, character, and motivations of illegal gillnet fishing in Lake Hovsgol National Park, Mongolia and its impact on the lake's fish populations, especially that of the endangered endemic Hovsgol grayling (Thymallus nigrescens. Surveys for derelict fishing gear indicate that gillnet fishing is widespread and increasing and that fishers generally use 3-4 cm mesh gillnet. Interviews with resident herders and park rangers suggest that many residents fish for subsistence during the spring grayling spawning migration and that some residents fish commercially year-round. Interviewed herders and rangers generally agree that fish population sizes are decreasing but are divided on the causes and solutions. Biological monitoring indicates that the gillnet mesh sizes used by fishers efficiently target Hovsgol grayling. Of the five species sampled in the monitoring program, only burbot (Lota lota showed a significant decrease in population abundance from 2009-2013. However, grayling, burbot, and roach (Rutilus rutilus all showed significant declines in average body size, suggesting a negative fishing impact. Data-poor stock assessment methods suggest that the fishing effort equivalent to each resident family fishing 50-m of gillnet 11-15 nights per year would be sufficient to overexploit the grayling population. Results from the derelict fishing gear survey and interviews suggest that this level of effort is not implausible. Overall, we demonstrate the ability for a mixed-method approach to effectively describe an illegal fishery and suggest that these methods be used to assess illegal fishing and its impacts in other protected areas.

  3. Induced spawning of the endangered Neotropical species Steindachneridion parahybae (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Caneppele

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The "surubim do Paraíba" (Steindachneridion parahybae is a freshwater catfish endemic to the Paraíba do Sul River basin, Brazil. This species has been seriously threatened by environmental disturbances in the last several decades. Wild Steindachneridion parahybae males and females were collected in 2003 and taken to the hatchery of a power plant of the Companhia Energética de São Paulo (CESP. Steindachneridion parahybae broodstocks were artificially induced to reproduce in December 2003 using a combination of carp pituitary extract (CPE and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG. Oocytes and milt were stripped; the fertilized eggs were transferred to 60-liter conical incubators and hatched larvae distributed in nine horizontal trays. Exogenous feed was started just after yolk sac absorption. A high rate of cannibalism and photophobia were observed during the larval period, resulting in a 26% survival rate from larvae to fingerlings.O "surubim do Paraíba" (Steindachneridion parahybae é um bagre de água doce, endêmico da bacia do rio Paraíba do Sul, Brasil. Esta espécie foi seriamente ameaçada por distúrbios ambientais nas últimas décadas. Machos e fêmeas selvagens de Steindachneridion parahybae foram coletados em 2003 e transferidos para a piscicultura da CESP (Companhia Energética de São Paulo. Reprodutores de S. parahybae foram induzidos à reprodução artificial em dezembro de 2003 usando uma combinação de extrato hipofisário de carpa (CPE e gonadotropina coriônica humana (hCG. Após a extrusão dos óvulos e do sêmen, os ovos fertilizados foram transferidos para incubadoras cônicas de 60 litros e, em seguida, as larvas eclodidas distribuídas em nove incubadoras horizontais. Após a absorção do saco vitelino, a alimentação exógena foi iniciada. Uma alta taxa de canibalismo e fotofobia foram observados durante o período larval, resultando em uma taxa de sobrevivência de 26% de larvas para os alevinos

  4. Effects of knowledge of an endangered species on recreationists' attitudes and stated behaviors and the significance of management compliance for ohlone tiger beetle conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelisse, Tara M; Duane, Timothy P

    2013-12-01

    Recreation is a leading cause of species decline on public lands, yet sometimes it can be used as a tool for conservation. Engagement in recreational activities, such as hiking and biking, in endangered species habitats may even enhance public support for conservation efforts. We used the case of the endangered Ohlone tiger beetle (Cicindela ohlone) to investigate the effect of biking and hiking on the beetle's behavior and the role of recreationists' knowledge of and attitudes toward Ohlone tiger beetle in conservation of the species. In Inclusion Area A on the University of California Santa Cruz (U.S.A.) campus, adult Ohlone tiger beetles mate and forage in areas with bare ground, particularly on recreational trails; however, recreation disrupts these activities. We tested the effect of recreation on Ohlone tiger beetles by observing beetle behavior on trails as people walked and road bikes at slow and fast speed and on trails with no recreation. We also surveyed recreationists to investigate how their knowledge of the beetle affected their attitudes toward conservation of the beetle and stated compliance with regulations aimed at beetle conservation. Fast cycling caused the beetles to fly off the trail more often and to fly farther than slow cycling or hiking. Slow cycling and hiking did not differ in their effect on the number of times and distance the beetles flew off the trail. Recreationists' knowledge of the beetle led to increased stated compliance with regulations, and this stated compliance is likely to have tangible conservation outcomes for the beetle. Our results suggest management and education can mitigate the negative effect of recreation and promote conservation of endangered species. Efectos del Conocimiento de una Especie en Peligro sobre las Actitudes y Comportamientos Declarados de los Recreacionistas y el Significado del Manejo de la Conformidad para la Conservación del Escarabajo Tigre de Ohlone. PMID:23869997

  5. Women Protecting Endangered Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    ON the Yongding River, 40 kilometers south of Beijing lies the Beijing Center for Breeding Endangered Animals.Built more than 10 years ago it is the only rare and endangered animal base in China, incorporating such functions as Scientific research, raising, breeding and medical treatment. There are more than 30 national and international rare species, with a total of more than 1,000 animals. Among them, the snub-nosed golden monkey, Chinese monal pheasant and eared pheasant account for the largest number of man-bred species in the world.

  6. The role of integrative taxonomy in the conservation management of cryptic species: the taxonomic status of endangered earless dragons (Agamidae: Tympanocryptis in the grasslands of Queensland, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Melville

    Full Text Available Molecular phylogenetics is increasingly highlighting the prevalence of cryptic species, where morphologically similar organisms have long independent evolutionary histories. When such cryptic species are known to be declining in numbers and are at risk of extinction due to a range of threatening processes, the disjunction between molecular systematics research and conservation policy becomes a significant problem. We investigate the taxonomic status of Tympanocryptis populations in Queensland, which have previously been assigned to T. tetraporophora, using three species delimitation approaches. The taxonomic uncertainties in this species-group are of particular importance in the Darling Downs Earless Dragon (T. cf. tetraporophora, which is ranked as an endangered 'species' of high priority for conservation by the Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage Protection. We undertook a morphological study, integrated with a comprehensive genetic study and species delimitation analyses, to investigate the species status of populations in the region. Phylogenetic analyses of two gene regions (mtDNA: ND2; nuclear: RAG1 revealed high levels of genetic divergence between populations, indicating isolation over long evolutionary time frames, and strongly supporting two independent evolutionary lineages in southeastern Queensland, from the Darling Downs, and a third in the Gulf Region of northern Queensland. Of the three species delimitation protocols used, we found integrative taxonomy the most applicable to this cryptic species complex. Our study demonstrates the utility of integrative taxonomy as a species delimitation approach in cryptic complexes of species with conservation significance, where limited numbers of specimens are available.

  7. Europeans: an endangered species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Cube, A

    1986-10-01

    Below replacement fertility has become the norm in 21 of Europe's 27 countries. Their average total fertility rate is 1.69. This trend has raised concerns about insufficient numbers in the economically active population and prospective personnel shortages in the military. In the Federal Republic of Germany, fertility has been below replacement for the past 17 years and its 1985 total fertility rate of 1.28 is a record low. Only a few European countries (Bulgaria, France, and Romania) have explicitly pronatalist policies. Other nations (Belgium, Finland, Luxembourg, and the German Democratic Republic) have instituted a progressive system of child allowances, increasing payments with each additional birth. Ironically, policies that seek to promote social opportunities for women, such as participation in the labor force, are likely to reduce fertility even farther. Without increased services such as reasonably priced housing, child care centers, and economic incentives to compensate women for lost opportunity costs in the labor market, policies that seek to increase fertility will not succeed. Policy options that were once available to increase fertility (for example, prohibiting abortion) are no longer socially acceptable. New policies will have to be developed through research on the determinants of fertility behavior in postindustrial societies. PMID:12315251

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of endangered Maroon-fronted Parrot (Rhynchopsitta terrisi) - conspecific relation of the species with Thick-billed Parrot (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urantowka, Adam Dawid; Strzała, Tomasz; Grabowski, Krzysztof Aleksander

    2014-12-01

    Maroon-fronted Parrot (Rhynchopsitta terrisi) is an endangered parrot endemic to pine-oak forests in north-eastern Mexico. According to all present classifications, R. terrisi as well as Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha are treated as a separate species based on some morphological and behavioral discrepancies. Despite this formal separation of the two species, some taxonomists conjecture their conspecific character. However, mutual taxonomic position of both species/subspecies was never verified by molecular research. We sequenced full mitochondrial genome of R. terrisi and constructed phylogenetic tree using sequences of mitochondrial ND2 gene from R. terrisi. R. pahyrchyncha and some other representative species of the tribe Arini. Our results indicated that in contrast to formal classification, both Rhynchopsitta taxa should be treated as subspecies. PMID:23841618

  9. Endangered Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Ken; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Endangered languages, or languages on the verge of becoming extinct, are discussed in relation to the larger process of loss of cultural and intellectual diversity. This article summarizes essays presented at the 1991 Linguistic Society of America symposium, "Endangered Languages and Their Preservation." (11 references) (LB)

  10. 75 FR 28636 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of 5-Year Reviews of 34 Species in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... California and Nevada for Which 5-Year Reviews Were Completed in FY 2009 and Early FY 2010 Lead fish and... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of 5- Year Reviews... Nevada AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of initiation of 5-year...

  11. 75 FR 42684 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Initiation of a 5-year Review of the Baiji/Chinese River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... of a 5-year Review of the Baiji/Chinese River Dolphin/Yangtze River Dolphin AGENCY: National Marine... the Baiji/Chinese River Dolphin/Yangtze River Dolphin (Lipotes vexillifer) under the Endangered... Baiji/Chinese River Dolphin/Yangtze River Dolphin that has become available. Based on the results...

  12. 78 FR 19510 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of 5-Year Reviews of 56 Species in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    .... 1998. Dudleya abramsii subsp. parva... Conejo dudleya.... Endangered........ U.S.A. (CA)....... 62 FR..., delta green ground...... Elaphrus viridis.. Threatened........ U.S.A. (CA)....... 45 FR 52807; 08/08... 95825. Butterfly, bay checkerspot...... Euphydryas editha Threatened........ U.S.A. (CA)....... 49...

  13. 76 FR 30309 - Marine Mammals and Endangered Species; File Nos. 14245, 1596-03, and 14726-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ..., 2010 and December 29, 2010, notices were published in the Federal Register (75 FR 26715 and 81970... Arctic Oceans on marine mammals including endangered blue (Balaenoptera musculus), sei (B. borealis), fin.... On May 12, 2010, notice was published in the Federal Register (75 FR 26715) that a modification...

  14. 77 FR 4169 - Endangered and Threatened Species: Final Rule To Revise the Critical Habitat Designation for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... PCE, with specific concerns regarding the impact of non-point source pollution, storm water runoff... along the California coast from Point Arena to Point Arguello east of the 3,000 meter depth contour; and... leatherback sea turtle was listed as endangered throughout its range on June 2, 1970 (35 FR 8491). Pursuant...

  15. 75 FR 17377 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Initiation of 5-Year Review for Southern Resident Killer Whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... Southern Resident killer whale distinct population segment (DPS) currently listed as endangered (70 FR... in November 2006 (71 FR 69054) and includes 2,560 square miles (6,630 sq km) of marine habitat in... final Recovery Plan was released in January 2008 (73 FR 4176), and contains detailed information...

  16. Length-weight relationships and condition factor of the eaglebeak pacu Ossubtus xinguense Jégu, 1992 (Characiformes, Serrasalmidae), an endangered species from Rio Xingu rapids, northern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, M C; Jesus, A J S; Giarrizzo, T

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on the length-weight relationships and condition factor for the endangered rheophilic fish Ossubtus xinguense Jégu from Rio Xingu rapids. This species is threatened by construction of the third largest hydroelectric in the world, the Belo Monte dam close to the city of Altamira, northern Brazil. Specimens were collected in the dry season between July 2012 and September 2012. Male specimens have body length larger than females, atypical in serrasalmid fishes, and different length-weight relationships were found between adult and juvenile specimens. This study presents the first biological characteristics for O. xinguense. PMID:26691082

  17. population viability analysis of gloydius shedaoensis from northeastern china: a contribution to the assessment of the conservation and management status of an endangered species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    shedao pit-vipers (gloydius shedaoensis) on snake island in the liaoning province,china,are among the most imperiled species in china.the isolated and unique populations are crucial in the recovery of this endangered species by providing a way for conservation and management.research based on the ecological simulation tools can evaluate alternative mitigation strategies in terms of their benefits to the populations,which are vital for informed decision-making.in this paper,using the program vortex 9.42,we developed a population viability analysis (pva) for the shedao pit-viper to:(1) address the extinction likelihood of the population; (2) simulate population dynamics under various environment events,and (3) evaluate the efficacy of current protection and management strategies.overall,we found the population to be susceptible to the factors of catastrophic events,mortality and environment capacity.the population is recovering slowly at present on account of improvement of habitat and greater food availability.under the current conditions,the probability of extinction in 100 years is approximately zero.these data coincide with the evidence that the wild population may be arriving at k.our results strengthen the view that protection and management can create a pronounced effect on populations of this endangered species.

  18. Wetland Accretion Rate Model of Ecosystem Resilience (WARMER) and its application to habitat sustainability for endangered species in the San Francisco Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Thorne, Karen M.; Casazza, Michael L.; Overton, Cory T.; Callaway, John C.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2014-01-01

    Salt marsh faunas are constrained by specific habitat requirements for marsh elevation relative to sea level and tidal range. As sea level rises, changes in relative elevation of the marsh plain will have differing impacts on the availability of habitat for marsh obligate species. The Wetland Accretion Rate Model for Ecosystem Resilience (WARMER) is a 1-D model of elevation that incorporates both biological and physical processes of vertical marsh accretion. Here, we use WARMER to evaluate changes in marsh surface elevation and the impact of these elevation changes on marsh habitat for specific species of concern. Model results were compared to elevation-based habitat criteria developed for marsh vegetation, the endangered California clapper rail (Rallus longirostris obsoletus), and the endangered salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) to determine the response of marsh habitat for each species to predicted >1-m sea-level rise by 2100. Feedback between vertical accretion mechanisms and elevation reduced the effect of initial elevation in the modeled scenarios. Elevation decreased nonlinearly with larger changes in elevation during the latter half of the century when the rate of sea-level rise increased. Model scenarios indicated that changes in elevation will degrade habitat quality within salt marshes in the San Francisco Estuary, and degradation will accelerate in the latter half of the century as the rate of sea-level rise accelerates. A sensitivity analysis of the model results showed that inorganic sediment accumulation and the rate of sea-level rise had the greatest influence over salt marsh sustainability.

  19. Environmental status of the Lake Michigan region. Volume II. Natural areas of the Lake Michigan drainage basin and endangered or threatened plant and animal species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stearns, F.; Lindsley, D.

    1977-09-01

    The accelerating encroachment of human activity on the natural landscape has made many citizens appreciate the need to save representative biotic communities before urbanization and technologically induced change eliminate such communities. Active programs in natural-area preservation are now in progress in the four basin states; these programs have strong public support and legislative mandate. Local, state, and federal agencies and private individuals have taken an active interest in protecting select areas as samples of the biotic communities and natural features of the Basin. Most natural areas described in this report have been dedicated or reserved in some fashion. Other areas are being added by the basin states each year. The maintenance of natural communities is closely linked to the preservation of endangered and threatened species of plants and animals which would cease to survive as isolated populations. Under federal regulations, certain plants and animals are listed as endangered or threatened in the Basin. As individual state lists are prepared and investigations proceed, it is probable that many more threatened species will be found.

  20. Effects of Ethnic Settlements and Land Management Status on Species Distribution Patterns: A Case Study of Endangered Musk Deer (Moschus spp.) in Northwest Yunnan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueyou; Bleisch, William V; Jiang, Xuelong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the status and spatial distribution of endangered species in biologically and ethnologically diverse areas is important to address correlates of cultural and biological diversity. We developed models for endangered musk deer (Moschus spp.) abundance indices in and around protected areas inhabited by different ethnic groups in northwest Yunnan China to address different anthropogenic and management-related questions. We found that prediction of relative abundance of musk deer was best accomplished using ethnicity of settlements, conservation status and poaching pressure in an area. Musk deer were around 5 times more abundant in Tibetan regions relative to Lisu regions. We found no significant negative correlates of gathering and transhumance activities on musk deer abundance. Hunting pressure showed no significant differences between protected and non-protected areas, but showed significant differences among ethnic groups. Hunting pressures in areas adjacent to Lisu settlements was 7.1 times more than in areas adjacent to Tibetan settlements. Our findings indicate protected areas in southwest China are not fully effective in deterring human disturbance caused by traditional practices. We suggest that conservation and management strategies should engage traditional culture and practices with a positive conservation impact. Better understanding of indigenous culture may open up new opportunities for species conservation in much wider tracts of unprotected and human-dominated lands. Traditional practices that are not destructive to biodiversity should be allowed as a way of providing a link between the local communities and protected areas thereby creating incentives for conservation. PMID:27159052

  1. Effects of Ethnic Settlements and Land Management Status on Species Distribution Patterns: A Case Study of Endangered Musk Deer (Moschus spp.) in Northwest Yunnan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueyou; Bleisch, William V; Jiang, Xuelong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the status and spatial distribution of endangered species in biologically and ethnologically diverse areas is important to address correlates of cultural and biological diversity. We developed models for endangered musk deer (Moschus spp.) abundance indices in and around protected areas inhabited by different ethnic groups in northwest Yunnan China to address different anthropogenic and management-related questions. We found that prediction of relative abundance of musk deer was best accomplished using ethnicity of settlements, conservation status and poaching pressure in an area. Musk deer were around 5 times more abundant in Tibetan regions relative to Lisu regions. We found no significant negative correlates of gathering and transhumance activities on musk deer abundance. Hunting pressure showed no significant differences between protected and non-protected areas, but showed significant differences among ethnic groups. Hunting pressures in areas adjacent to Lisu settlements was 7.1 times more than in areas adjacent to Tibetan settlements. Our findings indicate protected areas in southwest China are not fully effective in deterring human disturbance caused by traditional practices. We suggest that conservation and management strategies should engage traditional culture and practices with a positive conservation impact. Better understanding of indigenous culture may open up new opportunities for species conservation in much wider tracts of unprotected and human-dominated lands. Traditional practices that are not destructive to biodiversity should be allowed as a way of providing a link between the local communities and protected areas thereby creating incentives for conservation.

  2. Effects of Ethnic Settlements and Land Management Status on Species Distribution Patterns: A Case Study of Endangered Musk Deer (Moschus spp. in Northwest Yunnan, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyou Li

    Full Text Available Understanding the status and spatial distribution of endangered species in biologically and ethnologically diverse areas is important to address correlates of cultural and biological diversity. We developed models for endangered musk deer (Moschus spp. abundance indices in and around protected areas inhabited by different ethnic groups in northwest Yunnan China to address different anthropogenic and management-related questions. We found that prediction of relative abundance of musk deer was best accomplished using ethnicity of settlements, conservation status and poaching pressure in an area. Musk deer were around 5 times more abundant in Tibetan regions relative to Lisu regions. We found no significant negative correlates of gathering and transhumance activities on musk deer abundance. Hunting pressure showed no significant differences between protected and non-protected areas, but showed significant differences among ethnic groups. Hunting pressures in areas adjacent to Lisu settlements was 7.1 times more than in areas adjacent to Tibetan settlements. Our findings indicate protected areas in southwest China are not fully effective in deterring human disturbance caused by traditional practices. We suggest that conservation and management strategies should engage traditional culture and practices with a positive conservation impact. Better understanding of indigenous culture may open up new opportunities for species conservation in much wider tracts of unprotected and human-dominated lands. Traditional practices that are not destructive to biodiversity should be allowed as a way of providing a link between the local communities and protected areas thereby creating incentives for conservation.

  3. Methods for Assessing the Impact of Fog Oil Smoke on Availability, Palatability, & Food Quality of Relevant Life Stages of Insects for Threatened and Endangered Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driver, Crystal J.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Herrington, Ricky S.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Rogers, Lee E.

    2007-04-01

    A methodology for quantifying population dynamics and food source value of insect fauna in areas subjected to fog oil smoke was developed. Our approach employed an environmentally controlled re-circulating wind tunnel outfitted with a high-heat vaporization and re-condensation fog oil generator that has been shown to produce aerosols of comparable chemistry and droplet-size distribution as those of field releases of the smoke. This method provides reproducible exposures of insects under realistic climatic and environmental conditions to fog oil aerosols that duplicate chemical and droplet-size characteristics of field releases of the smoke. The responses measured take into account reduction in food sources due to death and to changes in availability of relevant life stages of insects that form the prey base for the listed Threatened and Endangered Species. The influence of key environmental factors, wind speed and canopy structure on these responses were characterized. Data generated using this method was used to develop response functions related to particle size, concentration, wind speed, and canopy structure that will allow military personnel to assess and manage impacts to endangered species from fog oil smoke used in military training.

  4. 75 FR 54649 - Endangered Wildlife; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... a recovery permit to conduct certain activities with endangered species under section 10(a)(1)(A) of... to carry out recovery actions which will enhance the species' propagation and survival. Public... the requirements of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act), we, the U.S. Fish...

  5. Before It's Too Late: Teaching about Endangered Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Describes a teaching unit on endangered species that helps students understand factors that cause species to become endangered, identify how personal attitudes and values impact solutions to the problem, and explore some alternatives for positive action. A list of ways to improve the situation for endangered species is provided. (BC)

  6. Towards the conservation of endangered avian species: a recombinant West Nile Virus vaccine results in increased humoral and cellular immune responses in Japanese Quail (Coturnix japonica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay A Young

    Full Text Available West Nile Virus (WNV arrived in North America in 1999 and is now endemic. Many families of birds, especially corvids, are highly susceptible to WNV and infection often results in fatality. Avian species susceptible to WNV infection also include endangered species, such as the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus uropbasianuts and the Eastern Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus migrans. The virus has been shown to contribute towards the likelihood of their extinction. Although a clear and present threat, there exists no avian WNV vaccine available to combat this lethal menace. As a first step in establishing an avian model for testing candidate WNV vaccines, avian antibody based reagents were assessed for cross-reactivity with Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica T cell markers CD4 and CD8; the most reactive were found to be the anti-duck CD8 antibody, clone Du-CD8-1, and the anti-chicken/turkey CD4 antibody, clone CT4. These reagents were then used to assess vaccine performance as well as to establish T cell populations in quail, with a novel population of CD4/CD8 double positive T cells being identified in Japanese quail. Concurrently, non-replicating recombinant adenoviruses, expressing either the WNV envelope or NS3 'genes' were constructed and assessed for effectiveness as avian vaccines. Japanese Quail were selected for testing the vaccines, as they provide an avian model that parallels the population diversity of bird species in the wild. Both the level of WNV specific antibodies and the number of T cells in vaccinated birds were increased compared to unvaccinated controls. The results indicate the vaccines to be effective in increasing both humoral and cellular immune responses. These recombinant vaccines therefore may find utility as tools to protect and maintain domestic and wild avian populations. Their implementation may also arrest the progression towards extinction of endangered avian species and reduce the viral reservoir that

  7. Assessing the risks of pesticides to threatened and endangered species using population modeling: A critical review and recommendations for future work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Valery E; Galic, Nika; Schmolke, Amelie; Vavra, Janna; Pastorok, Rob; Thorbek, Pernille

    2016-08-01

    United States legislation requires the US Environmental Protection Agency to ensure that pesticide use does not cause unreasonable adverse effects on the environment, including species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA; hereafter referred to as listed species). Despite a long history of population models used in conservation biology and resource management and a 2013 report from the US National Research Council recommending their use, application of population models for pesticide risk assessments under the ESA has been minimal. The pertinent literature published from 2004 to 2014 was reviewed to explore the availability of population models and their frequency of use in listed species risk assessments. The models were categorized in terms of structure, taxonomic coverage, purpose, inputs and outputs, and whether the models included density dependence, stochasticity, or risk estimates, or were spatially explicit. Despite the widespread availability of models and an extensive literature documenting their use in other management contexts, only 2 of the approximately 400 studies reviewed used population models to assess the risks of pesticides to listed species. This result suggests that there is an untapped potential to adapt existing models for pesticide risk assessments under the ESA, but also that there are some challenges to do so for listed species. Key conclusions from the analysis are summarized, and priorities are recommended for future work to increase the usefulness of population models as tools for pesticide risk assessments. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1904-1913. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:27037541

  8. Cytochrome P4501A1 expression in blubber biopsies of endangered false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) and nine other odontocete species from Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltz, Kerry M; Baird, Robin W; Ylitalo, Gina M; Jensen, Brenda A

    2014-11-01

    Odontocetes (toothed whales) are considered sentinel species in the marine environment because of their high trophic position, long life spans, and blubber that accumulates lipophilic contaminants. Cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) is a biomarker of exposure and molecular effects of certain persistent organic pollutants. Immunohistochemistry was used to visualize CYP1A1 expression in blubber biopsies collected by non-lethal sampling methods from 10 species of free-ranging Hawaiian odontocetes: short-finned pilot whale, melon-headed whale, pygmy killer whale, common bottlenose dolphin, rough-toothed dolphin, pantropical spotted dolphin, Blainville's beaked whale, Cuvier's beaked whale, sperm whale, and endangered main Hawaiian Islands insular false killer whale. Significantly higher levels of CYP1A1 were observed in false killer whales and rough-toothed dolphins compared to melon-headed whales, and in general, trophic position appears to influence CYP1A1 expression patterns in particular species groups. No significant differences in CYP1A1 were found based on age class or sex across all samples. However, within male false killer whales, juveniles expressed significantly higher levels of CYP1A1 when compared to adults. Total polychlorinated biphenyl (∑PCBs) concentrations in 84% of false killer whales exceeded proposed threshold levels for health effects, and ∑PCBs correlated with CYP1A1 expression. There was no significant relationship between PCB toxic equivalent quotient and CYP1A1 expression, suggesting that this response may be influenced by agonists other than the dioxin-like PCBs measured in this study. No significant differences were found for CYP1A1 expression among social clusters of false killer whales. This work provides a foundation for future health monitoring of the endangered stock of false killer whales and other Hawaiian odontocetes. PMID:25134676

  9. Endangered West African Chimpanzees Pan troglodytes verus (Schwarz, 1934) (Primates: Hominidae) in Senegal prefer Pterocarpus erinaceus, a threatened tree species, to build their nests: implications for their conservation

    OpenAIRE

    P.I. Ndiaye; Galat-Luong, A; G. Galat; G. Nizinski

    2013-01-01

    The West African Chimpanzee Pan troglodytes verus is Endangered (A4cd ver 3.1) in Senegal (Humle et al. 2008), mainly due to habitat fragmentation and destruction. We gathered qualitative and quantitative data on the tree species preferences of the West African Chimpanzee for nest building in order to gain insight into habitat dependence. Between March 1998 and Febrary 2000 we identified tree species in which a sample of 1790 chimpanzee nests had been built, and ranked species in preference o...

  10. Book review: Flight ways: Life and loss at the edge of extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banko, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    In less than 200 pages, Thom van Dooren aims in his ambitious book, Flight Ways, to reconnect humans empathetically with the rest of the planet's inhabitants, but especially vanishing species. This is asking a lot, but he succeeds—or at least makes great strides—using evocative storytelling and compelling discourse. A number of themes are carefully woven together with the goal of awakening sensitivities, building understanding, and motivating commitment to stopping the decline of populations and species. As one who works in the field of endangered Hawaiian bird research, I found this book illuminating, thought-provoking, and insightful. It probes deeply into the evolution, ecology, and ethics of our interactions with other species and offers useful lessons for thinking about endangered species and extinction in more meaningful ways. It will likely spur self-examination and further inquiry by readers, which can open new lines of communication with the general public about conservation.

  11. Genetic Evidence of Hybridization between the Endangered Native Species Iguana delicatissima and the Invasive Iguana iguana (Reptilia, Iguanidae in the Lesser Antilles: Management Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Vuillaume

    introgression, as observed in recent population history over several islands. These results have profound implications for species management of the endangered I. delicatissima and practical conservation recommendations are being discussed in the light of these findings.

  12. 76 FR 33334 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of 5-Year Reviews of Nine Species...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... species means any species that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its...) Population size or trends; (B) Species biology or ecology; (C) The effects of current land management on... of Nine Species: Purple Bean, Clubshell, Roanoke Logperch, Swamp Pink, Northern Riffleshell,...

  13. 76 FR 50051 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Six Foreign Birds as Endangered Throughout...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... six foreign bird species as endangered under the Act (75 FR 286). Following publication of the... extinction'' under the National Catalog of Endangered Species, a recovery plan for the Cantabrian... recovery plan and adopts measures for the protection of the species in the Community of Castilla and...

  14. Analyses on population pattern and endangered causes of endangered species Manglietia grandis Hu et Cheng%濒危植物大果木莲种群格局及濒危原因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈少瑜; 付玉嫔; 吴涛; 司马永康; 郝佳波; 韩燕

    2012-01-01

    采用径级结构代替年龄结构以及方差均值比率法对木兰科(Magnoliaceae)木莲属(Manglietia Bl.)濒危植物大果木莲(Manglietia grandis Hu et Cheng)种群的年龄结构和种群格局进行了研究,并编制了大果木莲种群的特定时间生命表和存活曲线;结合生殖生物学特征以及遗传多样性研究结果,分析了导致大果木莲濒危的主要原因.根据株高和胸径可分别将大果木莲种群的年龄结构分为5级、高度结构分为6级;在大果木莲的5个年龄结构分级中,成年个体较多,幼年个体较少;其高度结构完整,个体高度主要在20 m以下.种群的方差均值比率为0.838 3,其空间分布格局属于随机分布.根据特定时间生命表可将大果木莲种群的发育分为3个阶段:幼树阶段(年龄级为Ⅱ~Ⅲ级)、成树阶段(年龄级为Ⅲ~Ⅳ级)、老树阶段(年龄级为Ⅳ~Ⅴ级),其中成树阶段个体死亡率最低.大果木莲种群存活曲线接近Deevey Ⅰ型,属于衰退型种群.种群自我更新能力差、种子生产力低下、有性生殖困难、生境片断化导致的基因流受限以及人为干扰是大果木莲濒危的主要原因.针对大果木莲濒危现状和致危原因,提出了相应的保护对策和建议.%Using the way of diameter structure instead of age structure and variance/mean ratio method, the age structure and population pattern of the endangered species Manglietia grandis Hu et Cheng belonging to Manglietia Bl. in Magnoliaceae were studied, and the time-specific life table and survival curve of the species was created. And combining with research results of propagation and genetic diversity, the main endangered causes were analyzed. According to tree height and diameter of breath height, age structure of M. grandis population is divided into five classes and its height structure into six classes. There are more adults and less young trees in five age classes. The height structure of M

  15. Status Survey of the Endangered Watercress Darter, Etheostoma nuchale

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Watercress Darter Etheostoma nuchale is one of the most imperiled fishes in the southeastern U.S. and is listed as endangered on the U.S. endangered species...

  16. Landscape-scale Habitat Templates and Life Histories of Endangered and Invasive Fish Species in Large Rivers of the Mid-Continent USA (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, R. B.; Braaten, P. J.; Chapman, D.; DeLonay, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Many fish species migrate through river systems to complete their life cycles, occupying specific habitats during specific life stages. Regional geomorphology sets a template for their habitat-use patterns and ontogenetic development. In large rivers of the Mid-continent USA, understanding of relations of fish life histories to landscape-scale habitat templates informs recovery of endangered species and prevention of spread of invasive species. The endangered pallid sturgeon has evolved in the Missouri-Mississippi river system over 150 Ma. Its present-day distribution probably results from extensive drainage re-arrangements during the Pleistocene, followed by contemporary fragmentation. The reproductive and early life-stage needs of pallid sturgeon encompass hundreds of km, as adults migrate upstream to spawn and free embryos and larvae disperse downstream. Spawning requires coarse, hard substrate for incubation of adhesive eggs but adult pallid sturgeon are found predominately over sand, indicating that coarse substrate is a critical but transient habitat need. Once hatched, free-embryos initiate 9-17 days of downstream dispersal that distributes them over several hundreds of km. Lotic conditions at the dispersal terminus are required for survival. Persistent recruitment failure has been attributed to dams and channelization, which have fragmented migration and dispersal corridors, altered flow regimes, and diminished rearing habitats. Key elements of the natural history of this species remain poorly understood because adults are rare and difficult to observe, while the earliest life stages are nearly undetectable. Recent understanding has been accelerated using telemetry and hydroacoustics, but such assessments occur in altered systems and may not be indicative of natural behaviors. Restoration activities attempt - within considerable uncertainty -- to restore elements of the habitat template where they are needed. In comparison, invasive Asian carps have been

  17. A holistic approach to taxonomic evaluation of two closely related endangered freshwater mussel species, the oyster mussel Epioblasma capsaeformis and tan riffleshell Epioblasma florentina walkeri (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.W.; Neves, R.J.; Ahlstedt, S.A.; Hallerman, E.M.

    2006-01-01

    Species in the genus Epioblasma have specialized life history requirements and represent the most endangered genus of freshwater mussels (Unionidae) in the world. A genetic characterization of extant populations of the oyster mussel E. capsaeformis and tan riffleshell E. florentina walkeri sensu late was conducted to assess taxonomic validity and to resolve conservation issues for recovery planning. These mussel species exhibit pronounced phenotypic variation, but were difficult to characterize phylogenetically using DNA sequences. Monophyletic lineages, congruent with phenotypic variation among species, were obtained only after extensive analysis of combined mitochondrial (1396 bp of 16S, cytochrome-b, and ND1) and nuclear (515 bp of ITS-1) DNA sequences. In contrast, analysis of variation at 10 hypervariable DNA microsatellite loci showed moderately to highly diverged populations based on FST and R ST values, which ranged from 0.12 to 0.39 and 0.15 to 0.71, respectively. Quantitative variation between species was observed in fish-host specificity, with transformation success of glochidia of E. capsaeformis significantly greater (P<0.05) on greenside darter Etheostoma blennioides, and that of E. f. walkeri significantly greater (P<0.05) on fantail darter Etheostoma flabellare. Lengths of glochidia differed significantly (P<0.001) among species and populations, with mean sizes ranging from 241 to 272 ??m. The texture and colour of the mantle-pad of E. capsaeformis sensu stricto is smooth and bluish-white, whereas that of E. f. walkeri is pustuled and brown, with tan mottling. Based on extensive molecular, morphological and life history data, the population of E. capsaeformis from the Duck River, Tennessee, USA is proposed as a separate species, and the population of E. f. walkeri from Indian Creek, upper Clinch River, Virginia, USA is proposed as a distinct subspecies.

  18. Propagation and introduction of Arnica montana L. into cultivation: a step to reduce the pressure on endangered and high-valued medicinal plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugier, Danuta; Sugier, Piotr; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    Arnica montana (L.) is an endangered and endemic medicinal plant species in Europe. The pressure on natural sources of this plant is alleviated by a suitable use of arnica resources in the European region and introduction into cultivation. The objective of this study was to describe the impact of different ways of plant propagation and introduction on the growth and reproduction mode of this species. During the six consecutive years of the field experiment, the vegetative and reproductive traits were monitored, and survival time was assessed. The particular ways of arnica plant propagation and introduction determined all the intrinsic species traits and plant survival. The values of the characteristics studied indicated good acclimatization of the arnica ecotype to the climatic conditions of eastern Poland. Practical implications from the data presented here include the possibility of using the presented modes of arnica propagation and introduction in the short- and long-term perspective of arnica cultivation, which can give a possibility of better adjustment of raw material production.

  19. Propagation and Introduction of Arnica montana L. into Cultivation: A Step to Reduce the Pressure on Endangered and High-Valued Medicinal Plant Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Sugier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Arnica montana (L. is an endangered and endemic medicinal plant species in Europe. The pressure on natural sources of this plant is alleviated by a suitable use of arnica resources in the European region and introduction into cultivation. The objective of this study was to describe the impact of different ways of plant propagation and introduction on the growth and reproduction mode of this species. During the six consecutive years of the field experiment, the vegetative and reproductive traits were monitored, and survival time was assessed. The particular ways of arnica plant propagation and introduction determined all the intrinsic species traits and plant survival. The values of the characteristics studied indicated good acclimatization of the arnica ecotype to the climatic conditions of eastern Poland. Practical implications from the data presented here include the possibility of using the presented modes of arnica propagation and introduction in the short- and long-term perspective of arnica cultivation, which can give a possibility of better adjustment of raw material production.

  20. 濒危植物凹叶厚朴种实特性%Fruit and seed traits of endangered species Magnolia officinalis subsp, biloba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨旭; 杨志玲; 王洁; 檀国印

    2012-01-01

    凹叶厚朴(Magnolia officinalis subsp.biloba)为中国二级保护植物.本文对该树种不同分布群体的种实性状进行了研究.结果表明:凹叶厚朴结实数量较少,平均结实3.19个;种实特征在不同种群间差异显著,其变异主要来源于单株间及单株内,其中果实性状的方差分量要大于种子性状,表明果实的性状较易受环境的影响;果实性状与郁闭度及土壤养分含量存在显著或极显著的相关性,种子宽与种子质量与海拔呈显著负相关,种子厚度与海拔呈极显著负相关,而与生境及土壤条件相关性并不明显.凹叶厚朴在野生状态下单株结实率低,单果出种率低是其濒危的重要原因之一.%Magnolia officinalis subsp. biloba is an endangered plant in China. This paper studied the fruit and seed traits of different M. officinalis subsp. biloba populations, aimed to understand why this plant species is endangered. M, officinalis subsp. biloba fruited less, with the average number of fruits per plant being 3.19. There were significant differences in the fruit traits among different populations, and the variation mainly came from both among and within the individuals. The mean variance components of fruit characters were higher than those of seed characters , indicating that fruit was easily affected by the environment. The fruit characters had significant correlations with crown density and soil nutrient contents, and the seed characters including diameter, weight, and thickness had negative correlation with altitude but poor correlation with habitat and soil conditions. The low fruiting rate per plant and the low seed production rate per fruit could be the main factors causing the endangering of M. officinalis subsp. biloba.

  1. Pollination and seedling ecology of Decalepis hamiltonii Wight & Arn. (Periplocaceae, a commercially important, endemic and endangered species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J.S. Raju

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Decalepis hamiltonii is a woody climber and annual bloomer. The flowers are characterized by nectariferous coralline corona, gynostegium and pollinia containing tetrads. The floral features such as greenish white corolla, mild fragrance, flat-shape for easy access to floral rewards, and ovary protection from the biting mouthparts of the pollinator make up cantharophilous pollination syndrome. Brachinus beetle is the principal pollinator. Thrips use floral buds to raise their offspring; they also effect pollination while collecting nectar; but they are important largely for self-pollination due to their short distance flying ability. The plant is a self-incompatible, obligate outcrosser and is substantiated by 2% natural fruit set, but each fruit produces numerous seeds. Fruits dehisce during the dry season and seed dispersal is by wind. Seeds germinate as soon as they fall in a favourable place, but only a small percentage establish seedlings. Over-exploitation, bottlenecks in sexual reproduction and seedling establishment may contribute to the endangered status of D. hamiltonii.

  2. Karyotype description of two Neotropical Psittacidae species: the endangered Hyacinth Macaw, Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus, and the Hawk-headed Parrot, Deroptyus accipitrinus (Psittaciformes: Aves), and its significance for conservation plans

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor de Oliveira Lunardi; Mercival Roberto Francisco; Guaracy Tadeu Rocha; Beatriz Goldschmidt; Pedro Manoel Galetti Junior

    2003-01-01

    Neotropical parrots are among the most threatened groups of birds in the world, and many species are facing extinction in a near future. At the same time, the taxonomic position of many species remains unclear. Karyotype analysis has been used to elucidate the phylogenetic status of many bird groups, also providing important information for both in situ and ex situ conservation plans. The objective of the present study was to describe for the first time the karyotypes of the endangered Hyacin...

  3. Reviews Equipment: Chameleon Nano Flakes Book: Requiem for a Species Equipment: Laser Sound System Equipment: EasySense VISION Equipment: UV Flash Kit Book: The Demon-Haunted World Book: Nonsense on Stilts Book: How to Think about Weird Things Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND Requiem for a Species This book delivers a sober message about climate change Laser Sound System Sound kit is useful for laser demonstrations EasySense VISION Data Harvest produces another easy-to-use data logger UV Flash Kit Useful equipment captures shadows on film The Demon-Haunted World World-famous astronomer attacks pseudoscience in this book Nonsense on Stilts A thought-provoking analysis of hard and soft sciences How to Think about Weird Things This book explores the credibility of astrologers and their ilk WORTH A LOOK Chameleon Nano Flakes Product lacks good instructions and guidelines WEB WATCH Amateur scientists help out researchers with a variety of online projects

  4. Can Recent Global Changes Explain the Dramatic Range Contraction of an Endangered Semi-Aquatic Mammal Species in the French Pyrenees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnel, Anaïs; Laffaille, Pascal; Biffi, Marjorie; Blanc, Frédéric; Maire, Anthony; Némoz, Mélanie; Sanchez-Perez, José Miguel; Sauvage, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) are the main tool to predict global change impacts on species ranges. Climate change alone is frequently considered, but in freshwater ecosystems, hydrology is a key driver of the ecology of aquatic species. At large scale, hydrology is however rarely accounted for, owing to the lack of detailed stream flow data. In this study, we developed an integrated modelling approach to simulate stream flow using the hydrological Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). Simulated stream flow was subsequently included as an input variable in SDMs along with topographic, hydrographic, climatic and land-cover descriptors. SDMs were applied to two temporally-distinct surveys of the distribution of the endangered Pyrenean desman (Galemys pyrenaicus) in the French Pyrenees: a historical one conducted from 1985 to 1992 and a current one carried out between 2011 and 2013. The model calibrated on historical data was also forecasted onto the current period to assess its ability to describe the distributional change of the Pyrenean desman that has been modelled in the recent years. First, we found that hydrological and climatic variables were the ones influencing the most the distribution of this species for both periods, emphasizing the importance of taking into account hydrology when SDMs are applied to aquatic species. Secondly, our results highlighted a strong range contraction of the Pyrenean desman in the French Pyrenees over the last 25 years. Given that this range contraction was under-estimated when the historical model was forecasted onto current conditions, this finding suggests that other drivers may be interacting with climate, hydrology and land-use changes. Our results imply major concerns for the conservation of this endemic semi-aquatic mammal since changes in climate and hydrology are expected to become more intense in the future. PMID:27467269

  5. Biological Characteristics of the Critically Endangered Species Hibiscus yunnanensis Population%极危植物云南芙蓉种群生物学特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李云琴; 杜凡; 冷天鑫; 汪建; 刘娟

    2012-01-01

    Hibiscus yunnanensis is one of the critically endangered (CR) species in the China Species Red List. The geographic distribution, habitat conditions, population status, growth and morphological characteristics of H. yunnanensis were surveyed, and the reasons leading to the critically endangered status were analyzed. According to the previous records, two old distribution spots of H. yunnanensis were found adjacent to Kunluo highway and close to Dong'e gas station, three new distribution points were discovered close to Wusa Village, adjacent to the Overseas Chinese Farm, and by the Agricultural Science and Technology Extension Station of Yuanjiang County. H. yun-nanensis is a heliophilous sub-shrub species, not drought resistant, it usually grows in the sunny but moist habitats, whose accompany plants are mainly tropical heliophilous secondary species. H. yunnanensis plants do not generate root suckers, and do not fall easily. There are seldom seedlings in the H. yunnanensis communities although the a-dult plants may regularly blossom and bear fruits, with long florescence duration and large quantity of fruits. The distribution area of H. yunnanensis is shrinking, and the number of the plants has decreased rapidly, showing the overall declining trend. It was proposed that the human interference has been the main reason to cause the sharp reduction of H. yunnanensis plant number in the wild populations. The limitation of its self pollination, the spreading way of its seeds by gravity and the poor ability of natural regeneration might be the internal reasons leading to be extremely endangered.%对云南芙蓉的分布、生境、居群现状、生长状况和形态学特征作专题调研,并分析其极危原因.结果表明:在元江县城附近昆洛公路边和元江县东俄加油站公路边2个原有分布点找寻到其植株,并发现元江边武洒村旁、元江县农业技术推广站附近和华侨农场附近3个新分布点;云南芙蓉为阳性不

  6. DNA Barcoding of the Endangered Aquilaria (Thymelaeaceae) and Its Application in Species Authentication of Agarwood Products Traded in the Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shiou Yih; Ng, Wei Lun; Mahat, Mohd Noor; Nazre, Mohd; Mohamed, Rozi

    2016-01-01

    The identification of Aquilaria species from their resinous non-wood product, the agarwood, is challenging as conventional techniques alone are unable to ascertain the species origin. Aquilaria is a highly protected species due to the excessive exploitation of its precious agarwood. Here, we applied the DNA barcoding technique to generate barcode sequences for Aquilaria species and later applied the barcodes to identify the source species of agarwood found in the market. We developed a reference DNA barcode library using eight candidate barcode loci (matK, rbcL, rpoB, rpoC1, psbA-trnH, trnL-trnF, ITS, and ITS2) amplified from 24 leaf accessions of seven Aquilaria species obtained from living trees. Our results indicated that all single barcodes can be easily amplified and sequenced with the selected primers. The combination of trnL-trnF+ITS and trnL-trnF+ITS2 yielded the greatest species resolution using the least number of loci combination, while matK+trnL-trnF+ITS showed potential in detecting the geographical origins of Aquilaria species. We propose trnL-trnF+ITS2 as the best candidate barcode for Aquilaria as ITS2 has a shorter sequence length compared to ITS, which eases PCR amplification especially when using degraded DNA samples such as those extracted from processed agarwood products. A blind test conducted on eight agarwood samples in different forms using the proposed barcode combination proved successful in their identification up to the species level. Such potential of DNA barcoding in identifying the source species of agarwood will contribute to the international timber trade control, by providing an effective method for species identification and product authentication.

  7. 77 FR 51767 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Five Species of Sturgeon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... spawn in freshwater habitats while spending part of their life cycle in marine or estuarine waters (i.e...--Persian sturgeon; A. stellatus--stellate sturgeon/star sturgeon; A. baerii--Siberian sturgeon; A... species under the ESA (``DPS Policy''; 61 FR 4722; February 7, 1996). A species, subspecies, or DPS...

  8. 78 FR 70103 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Review of Native Species That are Candidates for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... potential stressors that may affect the species. Surface and groundwater use for irrigation, habitat changes.... The most recent CNOR (prior to this CNOR) was published on November 21, 2012 (77 FR 69994). CNORs... for assigning an LPN for each candidate species (48 FR 43098). Using this guidance, we assign...

  9. 77 FR 67390 - Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... control and regulate international trade in certain animal and plant species that are now or potentially may become threatened with extinction. These species are listed in Appendices to CITES, which are..., consider reports presented by the Secretariat and the permanent CITES committees (Standing, Animals,...

  10. Population biology of an endangered species: the common guitarfish Rhinobatos rhinobatos in Lebanese marine waters of the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lteif, M; Mouawad, R; Khalaf, G; Lenfant, P; Verdoit-Jarraya, M

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on the population biology of the common guitarfish Rhinobatos rhinobatos, a cartilaginous fish listed as Endangered in the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. Between December 2012 and January 2014, 67 individuals were collected by bottom longlining in coastal Lebanese marine waters at different ports at depths ranging from 10 to 110 m. The total length (LT ) of the specimens ranged from 50 to 143 cm, and the mean ± s.d. was 76·2 ± 19·7 cm. The most common LT classes were between 60 and 70 cm. The total mass of the specimens ranged from 410 to 10 000 g, and the mean ± s.d. was 1841 ± 1987 g. A total of 34 males and 33 females were collected, and the sex ratio was not significantly different from 1:1. The mass and LT relationship showed positive allometric growth (b = 3·096 and r(2)  = 0·99), and the mean ± s.d. LT at which 50% of the individuals were sexually mature was 84·73 ± 5·81 cm for females and 78·57 ± 4·88 cm for males. The gonado-somatic and hepato-somatic indices were determined along with a condition factor, and parturition appeared to occur in winter. The primary prey items found in the fish stomachs during the autumn and winter seasons were Penaeidae. The results of this study will help to parameterize models of the population dynamics for this exploited fish stock to ensure the long-term sustainability of its fishery. PMID:26928654

  11. INTEGRATED CONSERVATION OF THE RARE AND ENDANGERED THERMOPHILOUS SPECIES CYPERUS POLYSTACHYUS: INVESTIGATION ON RECRUITMENT STRATEGIES AND SHORT-TERM ASSESSMENT OF TRANSLOCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. FABRINI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyperus polystachyus Rottb. is a threatened species occurring in Europe only in two sites located in wetland habitat in mediterranean Southern Italy. According to the IUCN red list for Italy (1997, the species is listed as critically endangered (CR. This study investigated recruitment and habitat limitations referred to the population located south of Rome, in the Tor Caldara Regional Reserve. The site is an isolated island of vegetation. Natural expansion of the species is highly limited by the absence of “wet” sites in the surroundings. Importantly the study also endorsed an “in wild translocation program”, which aimed to decrease the risk of species extinction linked to demographic stochasticity, extreme climatic events or mismanagement. Seed germination, seed and site limitations, and germplasm translocation were investigated. Seed viability and seed germination were tested at the Rome Botanical Garden; results showed that the species has high recruitment potential, especially in thermophilous conditions. Germplasm (seeds was translocated in a vegetation remnant within the Protected Area of Decima Malafede overseen by RomaNatura, a Regional Agency for the management of PAs, which, together with the National Environment Research Institute (ISPRA was one of the partners in this research. The site limitation and translocation studies were undertaken in a glade with a seasonal pond. Seeds were sown and seedlings planted within an experimental framework, protected by a metal cage to prevent grazing. The new site is within the natural dispersion range of the species in an area with similar ecological and biogeographic conditions. It is surrounded by thermophilous oak woodland and cultivated fields which exclude germplasm escape. Results showed that, due to the germination behaviour, the establishment is limited by the absence of microsites suitable for recruitment. Competition with perennial species and delayed germination are the main

  12. POPULATION GENETIC STRUCTURE OF ENDANGERED SPECIES PLATΥPHARODON EXTREMUS ( SCHIZOTHORACINAE, CYPRINIDAE )IN YELLOW RIVER, CHINA%黄河上游极边扁咽齿鱼种群遗传结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏军虎; 张艳萍; 娄忠玉; 刘焕章; 焦文龙; 魏彦明

    2012-01-01

    Plafypharodon extremis is one of an endemic Schizothoracin fishes and historically was distributed in several headwater streams of the Yellow River in the Northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. With the intensification of human activities, habitat destruction / alteration, water pollution and overexploitation, the wild populations of this species have rapidly declined in recent years and its distribution has been drastically reduced. Now mainly distributed in the upper reach of the Yellow River on the hinterland of the Qinghai-Tibet plateau in Western China. And it was listed as endangered species in the " China Red Data Book (Pisces)" , Vulnerable (V) by the National Environmental Protection Agency and Endangered Species Scientific Commission. To assess the genetic diversity, population structure and demographic history of P. Extremus, three populations including 107 individuals from the upper reaches of the Yellow River were investigated based on 695 bp nudeoride sequences of mtDNA partial control region. The sequences analysis results showed that only 101 variable sites in the sequences (14. 5 % ) , including 58 parsimony informative sites. In the total 107 sequences, 87 haplotypes were detected, the haplotype diversity (h) and nudeotide diversity (π) were 0.995, 0.0129 respectively. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that genetic variation within the populations was 5. 28 °/o , among the populations was 94. 72 %. Phylogenetic analysis failed to detect significant geographic structure. Mismatch distribution and neutrality tests indicated that P. Extremus in this research hadn't experienced population expansion.%极边扁咽齿鱼Platypharodon extremus是黄河上游的特有鱼类,近年来由于过度捕捞、环境变迁等因素,其资源量剧减,种群处于濒危状态.研究中采集了分布于黄河上游的3个种群(n= 107),基于线粒体DNA控制区695bp 序列,共检测到101个可变位点,占总分析位点的14.5%,其中58

  13. Endangered and Rare Species of Marine Medicinal Organisms and Their Protection in China%中国海洋药用生物濒危珍稀物种及其保护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅秀梅; 王长云; 邵长伦; 韩磊; 武云飞; 伍汉霖; 钱树本; 管华诗

    2009-01-01

    首次对中国海洋药用生物濒危珍稀物种及其资源状况进行了调查和评价.结果显示,中国海洋药用生物及具有药用开发价值的海洋生物物种被列入濒危或保护物种的达235种,濒危比率达14.0%.极危物种9种,濒危物种112种,易危物种88种,近危物种5种,珍稀物种1种;其中,国家一级保护动物10种,国家二级保护动物44种.过度开发利用和海洋环境恶化是造成海洋野生药用生物濒危的主要原因.加强海洋自然保护区和海洋特别保护区的建设是保护海洋药用生物物种多样性和遏制资源衰退的有效途径.%The states of endangered and rare species of marine medicinal organisms in China were investigated and evaluated for the first time by field survey and data analysis together with literature data. It revealed that up to 235 species of marine medicinal organisms in China are in the Red List Categories and as protected species, including 9 critically endangered species, 112 endangered species, 88 vulnerable species, 5 near threatened species and 1 rare species, with an endangered rate of 14.0%. Among the endangered medicinal organisms, the species belonging to national protected animal categories Ⅰ and Ⅱ are 10 and 44, respectively. Over-fishing, pollution and other anthropogenic activities have resulted in the destruction of marine bioresources, especially acute degradation of biodiversity of marine medicinal animals. The feasible strategies for conservation of biodiversities and bioresources of Chinese marine medicinal species should be to improve the construction and management of marine natural reserves system as well as marine special reserves.

  14. Role of New Nature Reserve in Assisting Endangered Species Conservation - Case Study of Giant Pandas in the Northern Qionglai Mountains, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Tian-Pei; Owens, Jacob R; Gong, Ming-Hao; Liu, Gang; Ouyang, Zhi-Yun; Song, Yan-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The creation of nature reserves is the most direct way to save endangered species populations and their habitat. Development of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) nature reserve network in China was initiated in the 1960s, though the effort to create new reserves boomed considerably after the year 2000. Given this rapid development of protected areas in panda habitats, and the potential conflicting interests between conservation administrations and local economic development, it is essential to assess the role of new nature reserves in the overall giant panda conservation effort and reserve network. We utilized data from national giant panda surveys conducted in 2000 and 2012 to compare the size, spatial use, and distribution of panda populations, as well as the habitat suitability and connectivity in the Northern Qionglai Mountains between the two survey years. Our results show that although the total giant panda population in the study area did not change remarkably, local changes did occur. Most notably, the population in Wolong Nature Reserve declined by 27.3% (N = 39) and the population in Caopo Nature Reserve increased by 71.4% (N = 29) over the 12-year study period. We also found habitat suitability and availability decreased in both Wolong (12.4%) and Caopo (7.4%), but that the relative density of giant pandas declined (19.2%) and increased (84.6%) at each site, respectively. The distance between centers of high IUA were more distant in 2012 (14.1±1.9km) than that in 2000 (6.1±0.9km; t = -7.4, df = 5, p = 0.001), showing a scattered spatial pattern. Habitat availability decreased by 42% within the corridor between the two reserves, however panda occurrences in the corridor increased 24.6%. Compared to the total number of encounters, the proportion of the corridor increased 45.76%. Our results show the importance and success of the newly established Caopo to the conservation of giant pandas, and how crucial it is to identify and repair reserve

  15. Association of Critically Endangered Bengal Florican with other bird species in two sites of Manas, Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namita Brahma

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Birds and animals group together for diverse benefits, including anti-predator, foraging, and reproductive advantages. Present study is aimed to know association of Bengal florican with other bird species found in two different habitats, one is natural and other human intervened based on association analysis in Manas National Park and understand potential benefits derived from these associations. This study was carried out in two site one in natural habitat of Bengal florican Kuribeel inside Manas National Park and other one in Koklabari Agricultural Farm outside Manas National Park which is man made habitat. Study was conducted from morning 0530 - 1000 hrs and afternoon 1500 hrs - 1700 hrs in 100 m radius circular plots, centre on the interactions of 50 m by 50 m regular grid in Bengal florican territories. Fourteen bird species found to associate with Bengal florican, of which nine species in Kuribeel, and thirteen species of birds in Koklabari seed farm. From association analysis, it is found that Bengal florican had stronger interspecific associations with Indian peafowl in the natural habitat (Kuribeel. However, in Kokalabari seed farm Bengal florican was found to associate with Red wattle lapwing. In this study, association strengths of Bengal florican with other bird species follow different trends in the two study sites.

  16. Endangered Metaphors

    CERN Document Server

    Idström, Anna; Falzett, Tiber FM

    2012-01-01

    When the last speaker of a language dies, s/he takes to oblivion the memories, associations and the rich imagery this language community has once lived by. The cultural heritage encoded in conventional linguistic metaphors, handed down through generations, will be lost forever. This volume consists of fifteen articles about metaphors in endangered languages, from Peru to Alaska, from India to Ghana.The empirical data demonstrate that the assumptions of contemporary cognitive linguistic theory about "universal" metaphors and the underlying cognitive processes are still far from plausible, since

  17. Quantitative method for identifying networks of minimum priority sites for protection of rare and endangered plant species in Guangdong,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benyang WANG; Fuhe LUO; Xuening ZHEN; Shixiao YU

    2009-01-01

    The approaches to enlarge the protected areas are deeply embedded in the conservation planning.In practice,however,even in some sites of top conservation priority,there exist problems of inefficient conservation for lack of funding,to say nothing of assisting all species under threat from the viewpoint of conservationists.Identifying priority sites for conservation and establishing networks of minimum priority sites (NOMPS) are helpful for promoting the transition from number and size oriented,to quality and effectiveness oriented practices of biological conservation,and for realizing the target of biodiversity conservation with the most benefits for the least costs.Based on heuristic algorithm and integer linear programming (ILP),we propose a refined method of heuristic integer linear programming (HILP) for quantitative identification of the NOMPS to protect rare and endangered plant species (REPS) in Guangdong Province,China.The results indicate that there are 19 priority sites which are essential for protecting all of the 107 REPS distributed in 83 sites in Guangdong.These should be the paramount targets of financing and management.Compared with the ILP,which uses minimum number of sites as the only constraint,HILP takes into consideration of the effect of species richness,and is thus more suitable for conservation practices though with a little more number of priority sites selected.It is suggested that ILP and HILP are both effective quantitative methods for identifying NOMPS and can yield important information for decision making,especially when economic factors are constraints for biological conservation.

  18. Reproductive ecology of Scalesia cordata (Asteraceae), an endangered species from the Galápagos Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipp, Marianne; Nielsen, Lene Rostgaard

    2010-01-01

    the reproductive system limits the recruitment of young individuals. Pollinator observations revealed that each capitulum received, on average, 2.5 visits per hour and exposed receptive stigmas received many pollen grains. Even so, the seed set and recruitment of trees was poor. Crossing experiments showed that S....... cordata produced about twice as many fertile seeds after outcrossing than after selfing. In addition, self-pollinated capitula flowered for a longer time than outcrossed capitula (3.8 ± 1.1 days vs. 2.1 ± 0.8 days). These results may suggest that the species is partly self-incompatible, as other species...

  19. Recovery of a US Endangered Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Mark B. Bain; Nancy Haley; Peterson, Douglas L.; Arend, Kristin K.; Mills, Kathy E.; Patrick J. Sullivan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More fish have been afforded US Endangered Species Act protection than any other vertebrate taxonomic group, and none has been designated as recovered. Shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum) occupy large rivers and estuaries along the Atlantic coast of North America, and the species has been protected by the US Endangered Species Act since its enactment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data on the shortnose sturgeon in the Hudson River (New York to Albany, NY, USA) were obtai...

  20. 75 FR 69221 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... calcareous soils derived from oil shale barrens of the Green River Formation in the Uinta Basin of..., 2009 (74 FR 57804). CNORs published since 1994 are available on our Web site, http://www.fws.gov... assigning an LPN for each candidate species (48 FR 43098). Using this guidance, we assign each candidate...

  1. 75 FR 1582 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Designation of Critical Habitat for the Cook Inlet Beluga Whale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... for the Cook Inlet beluga whale in the Federal Register of December 2, 2009 (74 FR 63080). We received... rule published December 2, 2009 (74 FR 63080) is extended to March 3, 2010. ADDRESSES: Send comments to... Species; Designation of Critical Habitat for the Cook Inlet Beluga Whale AGENCY: National Marine...

  2. Modeling the Potential Distribution of Picea chihuahuana Martínez, an Endangered Species at the Sierra Madre Occidental, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Aguilar-Soto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models (SDMs help identify areas for the development of populations or communities to prevent extinctions, especially in the face of the global environmental change. This study modeled the potential distribution of the tree Picea chihuahuana Martínez, a species in danger of extinction, using the maximum entropy modeling method (MaxEnt at three scales: local, state and national. We used a total of 38 presence data from the Sierra Madre Occidental. At the local scale, we compared MaxEnt with the reclassification and overlay method integrated in a geographic information system. MaxEnt generated maps with a high predictive capability (AUC > 0.97. The distribution of P. chihuahuana is defined by vegetation type and minimum temperature at national and state scales. At the local scale, both models calculated similar areas for the potential distribution of the species; the variables that better defined the species distribution were vegetation type, aspect and distance to water flows. Populations of P. chihuahuana have always been small, but our results show potential habitat greater than the area of the actual distribution. These results provide an insight into the availability of areas suitable for the species’ regeneration, possibly through assisted colonization.

  3. 78 FR 38011 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Notice of Intent To Prepare a Recovery Plan for Oregon Coast...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... 1100, Portland, OR 97232 ATTN: OC coho Recovery Coordinator. Business hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m... goal. Section 4(f) of the ESA, as amended in 1988, requires that public notice and an opportunity for..., monitoring and evaluation needs to address knowledge gaps and uncertainties, to assess the species'...

  4. 78 FR 66675 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List Multiple Species of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... purposes of listing, delisting, and reclassifying a species under the ESA (``DPS Policy''; 61 FR 4722... known from only five museum specimens collected from Sagami Bay and just south of Tokyo Bay, Japan. No... occurred as a result of anthropogenic climate change and the consequent destruction of their habitat....

  5. 77 FR 43433 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Foreign Bird Species in Peru and Bolivia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... proposed rule published on January 5, 2010 (75 FR 606). Summary of Changes From the Proposed Rule This... take climate change into account when evaluating threats to these species. Although the science of climate change is still uncertain with respect to how it will affect the long-term viability of...

  6. 76 FR 6383 - Endangered and Threatened Species; 12-Month Finding on a Petition To Delist Coho Salmon South of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... characteristics and life history traits. In the proposed listing determination for the CCC coho salmon ESU (60 FR... Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) scientists in Soquel Creek for the first time in many years...) was listed as a threatened species on October 31, 1996 (61 FR 56138), and subsequently reclassified...

  7. 77 FR 34463 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 38 Species on Molokai, Lanai, and Maui as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... consequences of very small populations which increased the potential for extinction of the species due to... exclusion outweigh the benefits of designation, unless the exclusion will result in the extinction of the..., unless failure to designate that specific area as critical habitat will result in the extinction of...

  8. 78 FR 63941 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List 23 Species of Corals as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... occurs in the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic Ocean. Only Porites eridani is noted as... of dead zone in the northern Gulf of Mexico is from an area outside the range of the petitioned... deforestation activity somewhere near or within its range. While this species is restricted to a...

  9. 78 FR 10601 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition to List 44 Species of Corals as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... of Coral Species Corals are defined as ``animals in the cnidarian class Anthozoa and Hydrozoa that... consequently our knowledge of their distribution is largely limited to expertly identified museum specimens... our knowledge of their distribution is largely limited to expertly identified museum specimens....

  10. 75 FR 8293 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Review of Native Species That Are Candidates for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Federal Register on November 9, 2009 (74 FR 57804), regarding the review of species that are candidates.... Correction In the notice of review (74 FR 57804; November 9, 2009), we correct page 57830, under the section... Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of review; correction. SUMMARY: This document corrects language used...

  11. Multi-species call-broadcast improved detection of endangered Yuma clapper rail compared to single-species call-broadcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Christopher P.; Conway, Courtney J.; Piest, Linden; Burger, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Broadcasting calls of marsh birds during point-count surveys increases their detection probability and decreases variation in the number of birds detected across replicate surveys. However, multi-species monitoring using call-broadcast may reduce these benefits if birds are reluctant to call once they hear broadcasted calls of other species. We compared a protocol that uses call-broadcast for only one species (Yuma clapper rail [Rallus longirostris yumanensis]) to a protocol that uses call-broadcast for multiple species. We detected more of each of the following species using the multi-species protocol: 25 % more pied-billed grebes, 160 % more American bitterns, 52 % more least bitterns, 388 % more California black rails, 12 % more Yuma clapper rails, 156 % more Virginia rails, 214 % more soras, and 19 % more common gallinules. Moreover, the coefficient of variation was smaller when using the multi-species protocol: 10 % smaller for pied-billed grebes, 38 % smaller for American bitterns, 19 % smaller for least bitterns, 55 % smaller for California black rails, 5 % smaller for Yuma clapper rails, 38 % smaller for Virginia rails, 44 % smaller for soras, and 8 % smaller for common gallinules. Our results suggest that multi-species monitoring approaches may be more effective and more efficient than single-species approaches even when using call-broadcast.

  12. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of methanolic leaf extract of the endangered tree species, Hildegardia populifolia (Roxb. Schott and Endl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saradha Maran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was aimed at to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of methanolic leaf extracts of the endangered medicinal tree species, Hildegardia populifolia on laboratory animal. Methods: The anti-inflammatory potential of the extract has been determined by using carrageenan, formalin and histamine induced paw edema assays in Wistar rats. Indomethacin was used as a reference drug. The analgesic activity was tested by using acetic acid induced writhing response and hot plate method in swiss albino mice. Aspirin and pentazocine were used as reference drugs respectively for these models. Results: The oral administration of leaf extract at doses, 100 and 200 mg/kg significantly (P < 0.05-0.01 inhibited the carrageenan, formalin and histamine induced inflammation. The acute treatment of the extract produced a significant (P < 0.05-0.01 antinociceptive effect in the animals of acetic acid induced pain and the animals tested in a hot plate method. Acute toxicity test showed that the plant may be safe for pharmacological uses. Conclusions: It is very clear that H. populifolia has both anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities and so may be used as pharmaceuticals.

  13. Species diversity of rare and endangered species and endemic species and conservation of Guilin Karst World Heritage Nominated Property%桂林喀斯特世界自然遗产提名地珍稀濒危和特有生物物种多样性及保护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈利娜; 侯满福; 张远海; 陈伟海; 向垂升; 李晓娜

    2014-01-01

    珍稀濒危和特有物种是地区生物物种的重要组成,研究珍稀濒危和特有物种的多样性对生物保护和良好生态环境的维护有重要意义。本文在对桂林喀斯特世界自然遗产提名地生物物种调查的基础上,对提名地内的珍稀濒危和特有生物物种及其受威胁级别情况进行了统计,并从种群、群落和生境3个层面对珍稀濒危和特有物种的保护提出了建议。结果表明,在167.5 hm2范围内共有高等植物754种,脊椎动物525种;列入 IUCN红色名录443种、濒危野生动植物国际贸易公约67种、中国物种红色名录145种、中国国家重点保护野生动植物55种,并包括部分古老孑遗植物,珍稀濒危生物多样性较高;此外提名地还拥有87种特有种,是动植物特有种的重要资源地。在珍稀濒危和特有物种多样性的保护上,应根据提名地的珍稀濒危物受威胁级别,有计划地开展种群调查和生境分析,确定不同级别珍稀濒危物种的最小生存种群和最小动态区,并采取就地保护或迁地保护的措施,以促进小种群的发展;加强顶级群落的保护和监测研究,实施封山育林和群落恢复工程,促进群落的正向演替;划定珍稀濒危和特有种群和群落保护范围,建立自然保护区,维护其生存繁衍所必需生境量;此外着重加强对野生兰科植物的研究及生存空间保护,加强洞穴、峰林、峭壁等独特生境的保护。%Rare and endangered species,and endemic species are important to regional biological species com-position.Rare and endangered species,and endemic species biodiversity research is very significant for bio-logical conservation and maintaining the ecological environment.The rare and endangered species,and en-demic species of Guilin Karst World Natural Heritage nominated area are statistical analysis based on species investigation.Conservation suggestions of rare

  14. In search for key biogeochemical factors for the conservation of plant species of acidic nutrient-poor habitats: comparing growth sites of common and endangered species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, D.; Bekker, R.M.; Bobbink, R.; Graaf, de M.C.C.; Roelofs, J.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary During the last century, many plant species typical of heathland and nutrient-poor acidic grasslands have become rare whereas others have remained common. Habitat restoration often fails to enhance the rare species, which may in part be caused by the failure to restore the biogeochemical con

  15. The Scotch broom, Cytisus scoparius (Fabaceae), a paradox in Denmark – an invasive plant or endangered native species?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenmeier, Lars; Kjær, Erik Dahl; Nielsen, Lene Rostgaard

    2013-01-01

    plants showed that the two gene pools correspond to populations exhibiting either a horizontal habit and non-invasive behaviour or an erect habit and, in some cases, invasive behaviour. The Italian population clustered with the erect ones. We discuss the origin and taxonomic status of the two gene pools......Scotch broom, Cytisus scoparius, spreads rapidly in parts of Denmark and is considered an invasive species by some authors. However, the species has been present in the Danish flora for centuries and is therefore considered native to Denmark. In the present study we explore whether Danish Scotch...... broom consists of one or two gene pools with potential differences in phenotype and invasiveness. One plastid and five nuclear microsatellite markers were used to reveal potential substructuring of Danish Scotch broom. Nine populations were included representing populations exhibiting invasive behaviour...

  16. Presence of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (Gaba) in the Pedal Mucus of the Critically Endangered Species Patella ferruginea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Ingraham, G A; Espinosa, F; Krock, B

    2015-05-01

    Patella ferruginea is a giant patellid limpet endemic to the Mediterranean Sea. It presently is in danger of extinction, and many have called for developing conservation measures including the mass production of spats for re-introduction projects. However, so far all attempts have been relatively unsuccessful. Previous work analyzing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the recruitment of patellid limpets has shown that larvae respond to the presence of this signaling molecule. This response could explain the gregarious distribution typical of this species. In the present study, we demonstrated that GABA is naturally secreted by P. ferruginea in the pedal mucus. GABA is preferentially secreted during the summer, coinciding with the reproductive resting period of the species. Further research should aim to analyze the effects of GABA on larval development and metamorphosis in order to assess its potential use to improve conservation efforts.

  17. Public awareness and perceptual factors in the conservation of elusive species: The case of the endangered Ryukyu flying fox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ernest Vincenot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of biological conservation initiatives is not solely reliant on the collection of ecological information, but equally on public adherence to protection programs. Awareness and perception of target species condition the intensity and orientation of public involvement in conservation initiatives. Their evaluation is critical in the case of elusive animals, for which incertitude surrounding public attitude is maximized. This study featured the first assessment of public awareness and perceptual factors of a megabat (Pteropodidae. We investigated inhabitants’ feelings, knowledge, and frequency of sightings related to the solitary Ryukyu flying fox (Pteropus dasymallus on Ishigaki island, Japan. The willingness to protect this species and mitigate its impact on agriculture was evaluated through contingent valuation. This fruit bat was not credited with aesthetic or scientific values, yet atypically did not trigger negativistic attitude. While respondents were reasonably aware of its existence, they were largely ignorant of its ecological importance. An overall lack of interest for this species was revealed by a low willingness-to-pay for its protection. The rejection of lethal control as means to protect orchards was, however, unequivocal. The success of P. dasymallus preservation may depend on the prior implementation of education programs focusing on aesthetic, ecological and utilitarian values.

  18. Genetic variation in Whitmania pigra, Hirudo nipponica and Poecilobdella manillensis, three endemic and endangered species in China using SSR and TRAP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Guo, Qiao-Sheng; Shi, Hong-Zhuan; Cheng, Bo-Xing; Lu, Yu-Xi; Gou, Ling; Wang, Jia; Shen, Wen-Biao; Yan, Shi-Meng; Wu, Man-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Leeches are not only important medicinal animals worldwide but also are endangered. We aimed to (i) explore the level of genetic diversity within/among populations of three leeches, (ii) assess genetic differentiation among these three leeches, and (iii) discuss an appropriate strategy for conserving leech germplasm. A total of 315 individuals of Whitmania pigra, Hirudo nipponica and Poecilobdella manillensis from 21 populations were collected in China and Vietnam. The genetic structure and genetic diversity among and within the 21 populations were evaluated using target region amplified polymorphism (TRAP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Sixteen pairs of TRAP primers generated a total of 398 fragments, of which 396 (99.50%) were polymorphic; fourteen pairs of SSR primers generated a total of 60 fragments, of which 59 (98.33%) were polymorphic. Shannon's index (I) and Nei's gene diversity index (H) for the three leeches were high at the species level (I=0.4980 and H=0.3323 for TRAPs, I=0.4487 and H=0.2969 for SSRs in W. pigra; I=0.4147/0.3769, H=0.2788/0.2566 for H. nipponica; and I=0.4616/0.4717, H=0.3099/0.3203 for P. manillensis). However, low genetic diversity was determined at the population level; the average genetic diversity measures within populations were H=0.1767/0.1376, I=0.2589/0.2043 for W. pigra, H=0.2149/0.2021, I=0.3184/0.3000 for H. nipponica and H=0.2850/0.2724, I=0.4152/0.3967 for P. manillensis. We conclude that there was limited gene exchange within/among populations and species, as the gene flow number (Nm) was 0.5493/0.5807. However, for all three species, the genetic diversity was different at the population level. Gene differentiation (Gst) and Nm were 0.4682 /0.5364 and 0.5678/0.4321 for W. pigra, 0.2294/0.2127 and 1.6797/1.8512 for H. nipponica and 0.1214/0.1496 and 3.6202/2.8412 for P. manillensis. STRUCTURE analysis, Unweighted Pair-Group Method with Arithmetic means (UPGMA) cluster analysis and Principal Coordinates Analysis

  19. Primordial germ cell-mediated chimera technology produces viable pure-line Houbara bustard offspring: potential for repopulating an endangered species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Wernery

    tool for propagation and conservation of endangered avian species that cannot breed in captivity.

  20. Trophy hunting for endangered species, including Asian caprinae: comments from the perspective of a cites scientific authority of an EC-Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimm, U.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Trophy hunting for endangered species is a subject tackled from two angles within the German Federal Agency for Nature Conservation: (a in its general discussion on the subject of "nature conservation and sustainable consumptive use" and (b by acting as national CTTES Scientific Authority which is empowered to approve or deny import permits for specimens of CTTES listed species. Both approaches are described below.

    [fr]
    Pour l’Agence Fédérale de la Conservation de la Nature d'Allemagne, la chasse au trophée sur les espèces en danger est un sujet discuté de deux angles différents: a dans sa discussion générale sur la «conservation de la nature et utilisation soutenable» et b en agissant en tant qu'Autorité Scientifique Nationale du CITES, laquelle a le pouvoir d'autoriser ou refuser les permis d'importation des spécimens inclus dans la liste d'espèces CTTES. Les deux approches sont décrites ci-dessous.
    [es]
    La caza de trofeo de especies amenazadas es un tema que la Agenda Federal Alemana para la Conservación de la Naturaleza acomete desde dos pimtos de vista: (a mediante la valoración general del tema "conservación de la naturaleza y su uso como recurso sostenible" y (b actuando como Autoridad Científica Nacional de CITES, que tiene la facultad de aprobar o denegar los permisos de importación de especies catalogadas en dicho convenio. Ambos enfoques se describen a continuación.

  1. Relação preliminar das espécies de peixes (Pisces, Elasmobranchii, Actinopterygii ameaçadas no Brasil Preliminary list of endangered fish species (Pisces, Elasmobranchii , Actinopterygii in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo S Rosa

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian fish fauna is still poorly known with respect to its diversity and conservation status, particularly of freshwater species. Human activities and population growth are rapidly impacting this fauna to an unchecked extent, so that many fish species are presently threatened. Also, some areas have been so critically altered that their fish fauna can no longer be properly inventoried. There is an urgent need to evaluate the conservation status of Brazilian fish species, since none are presently listed as endangered by federal legislation. Based on a literature search and a survey directed to the Neotropical ichthyologists, we present an unofficial list including a total of 78 threatened fish species (12 elasmobranchs and 66 actinopterygians. Of these, sixteen actinopterygian species are listed as endangered, three elasmobranchs and nine actinopterygians as vulnerable, and seven actinopterygians as rare; 40 species either have indeterminate status or are data deficient to yield an adequate assessment, and three species are listed as extinct or possibly extinct.

  2. Empirical Prediction of Leaf Area Index (LAI of Endangered Tree Species in Intact and Fragmented Indigenous Forests Ecosystems Using WorldView-2 Data and Two Robust Machine Learning Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galal Omer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Leaf area index (LAI is an important biophysical trait for forest ecosystem and ecological modeling, as it plays a key role for the forest productivity and structural characteristics. The ground-based methods like the handheld optical instruments for predicting LAI are subjective, pricy and time-consuming. The advent of very high spatial resolutions multispectral data and robust machine learning regression algorithms like support vector machines (SVM and artificial neural networks (ANN has provided an opportunity to estimate LAI at tree species level. The objective of the this study was therefore to test the utility of spectral vegetation indices (SVI calculated from the multispectral WorldView-2 (WV-2 data in predicting LAI at tree species level using the SVM and ANN machine learning regression algorithms. We further tested whether there are significant differences between LAI of intact and fragmented (open indigenous forest ecosystems at tree species level. The study shows that LAI at tree species level could accurately be estimated using the fragmented stratum data compared with the intact stratum data. Specifically, our study shows that the accurate LAI predictions were achieved for Hymenocardia ulmoides using the fragmented stratum data and SVM regression model based on a validation dataset (R2Val = 0.75, RMSEVal = 0.05 (1.37% of the mean. Our study further showed that SVM regression approach achieved more accurate models for predicting the LAI of the six endangered tree species compared with ANN regression method. It is concluded that the successful application of the WV-2 data, SVM and ANN methods in predicting LAI of six endangered tree species in the Dukuduku indigenous forest could help in making informed decisions and policies regarding management, protection and conservation of these endangered tree species.

  3. Endangered Animals Around the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1985-01-01

    Contains teaching activities designed to help elementary students understand the meaning of "endangered" and to recognize the major causes of species loss throughout the world. Organizes the exercises by grade levels and also by time required for the activity's completion. The major concepts and skills of each lesson are identified. (ML)

  4. Impact and Recovery Pattern of a Spring Fire on a Pacific Coast Marsh - Observations and Implications for Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L. N.; Willis, K. S.; Ambrose, R. F.; MacDonald, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    The flammability of California coastal marsh vegetation is highest in winter and spring when dominant high marsh plants such as Sarcocornia pacifica are dormant. With climate change the number of cool-season fires are increasing in the state, and marsh systems are becoming more vulnerable to fire disturbance. Very little information exists in peer-reviewed or grey literature on the presence of fire in Pacific Coast tidal marshes. In 1993, the Green Meadows fire in Ventura County, California burned a small portion of tidally influenced Sarcocornia­-dominated marsh at Point Mugu. After the May 2013 Springs Fire burned a similar portion of the salt marsh vegetation, we conducted a two-year vegetation recovery survey using transects of surface vegetation plots and MODIS derived NDVI remote sensing monitoring. Recovery during the first year was limited. Sixteen months into the recovery period, percent plant coverage reached an average of approximately 60% for all plots in the burned area, as opposed to an average of 100% in control plots, and remained at that level for the duration of the study. NDVI did not approach near pre-fire conditions until 19 months after the fire. While recovery may have been influenced by California's current extreme drought conditions, the recurrence of fire and rate of recovery raise many important questions as to the role of fire in Pacific coast tidal marshes. For example, the lack of Salicornia cover over more than an entire breeding season would be detrimental to protected species such as Rallus obsoletus. Fire adds new vulnerabilities on critical tidal marsh habitat already taxed by the threat of sea-level rise, coastal squeeze and invasive species.

  5. Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium (Myrtaceae, an endemic and endangered tropical tree species in the southern Eastern Ghats of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J.S. Raju

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Syzygium alternifolium is a semi-evergreen mass-flowering tree species of dry deciduous forest in the southern Eastern Ghats of India. It is a mass bloomer with flowering during dry season. The floral traits suggest a mixed pollination syndrome involving entomophily and anemophily together called as ambophily. Further, the floral traits suggest generalist pollination system adapted for a guild of pollinating insects. The plant is self-incompatible and obligate out-crosser. The flowers are many-ovuled but only a single ovule forms seed and hence, fruit and seed set rates are the same. Natural fruit set stands at 11%. Bud infestation by a moth, flower predation by the beetle, Popillia impressipyga and bud and flower mounds significantly limit fruit set rate. The ability of the plant to repopulate itself is limited by the collection of fruits by locals due to their edible nature, short viability of seeds, high seedling mortality due to water stress, nutrient deficiency and erratic rainfall or interval of drought within the rainy season. Therefore, S. alternifolium is struggling to populate itself under various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Further studies should focus on how to assist the plant to increase its population size in its natural area taking into account the information provided in this paper.

  6. 莲座蕨属五种珍稀濒危植物种群特征%Population Structure of 5 Rare and Endangered Species of Angiopteris (Marattiaceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    信金伟; 王佳冠; 姜立举; 王崇云; 和兆荣

    2016-01-01

    本文以莲座蕨属5种珍稀濒危植物为研究对象,通过野外调查和数据统计,绘制了5个种的种群高度、丛径、叶柄数和马蹄数结构图,在此基础上编制了圆基莲座蕨和阔羽莲座蕨种群特定时间生命表,分析了存活曲线等重要参数。结果表明,圆基莲座蕨种群结构稳定,阔羽莲座蕨种群结构相对稳定,但受人为干扰较大;秦氏莲座蕨、二回莲座蕨种群目前仍表现为稳定型种群,但种群数量较少,容易受环境胁迫和人为干扰;法斗莲座蕨植株数极少,种群结构极不稳定,已濒临灭绝。5种莲座蕨均需就地保护和迁地保护,特别是法斗莲座蕨和二回莲座蕨亟需通过人工抚育来恢复种群数量,以实现抢救性保护。%Taking 5 rare and endangered species of Angiopteris (Marattiaceae) as research subject, specific life-time table of Angiopteris subrotundata and Angiopteris latipinna population was drawn and key parameters such as survival curve were analyzed based on structure charts of population heights, cluster diameters, petiole numbers and horseshoes drawn by sample plot survey and statistics data .The results showed that population structure of An-giopteris subrotundata was stable , and that of Angiopteris latipinna was relatively stable but influenced by human disturbance .The population structure of Angiopteris chingii and Angiopteirs bipinnata were also stable but their pop-ulation number were less and vulnerable to environmental stress and human disturbance .Population quantity of An-giopteris sparsisora was extreme low and its population structure was in a quite unstable situation even to species ex-tinction.This study indicated that all these 5 Angiopteris species are needed to take in situ and ex-situ conservation actions, and especially for Angiopteris sparsisora and Angiopteris bipinnata.

  7. 77 FR 36569 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Thick-Billed Parrot Draft Recovery Plan Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... listed as an endangered species on June 3, 1970 (35 FR 8491), pursuant to the Endangered Species... as endangered in the United States (see 45 FR 49844, page 49845). In 2009, the U.S. Department of the... always been listed as endangered throughout its entire range (see 74 FR 33957). Today, the...

  8. Numeric Dynamics of Population of Endangered Species Dendrobium fimbriatum, Orchidaceae%濒危兰科植物流苏石斛的种群数量动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘强; 殷寿华; 兰芹英

    2012-01-01

    This research studied the numeric dynamics of two populations of Dendrobium fimbriatum (21°58'N, 101°13'E, human disturbance and 21°54'N, 101°17'E, in-situ conservation), an endangered species of Orchidaceae in Xishuangbanna Dai Autonomous Prefecture, Yunnan, China. The static life table, the fecundity schedule and the Leslie matrix model were applied to understand the numeric dynamics and the age structure of the population. The results showed that the survival curves of two populations were the Deevey-Ⅰ type. The net reproduction rate (Ro), the intrinsic increase rate (rm) and the finite increase rate (A) of the two populations were all very low, indicating that the two populations were in a situation of downward tendency. The Leslie matrix model predicted that in the next 25 years the number of the two populations would continuously decrease. The key threats to this species are most likely human's disturbance and deforestation and habitat fragmentation.%运用静态生命表、生殖力表和Leslie矩阵模型,研究了云南西双版纳地区流苏石斛两个种群——A种群(21°58'N,101°13'E,保护区之外)和B种群(21°54'N,101°17’E,保护区内)的种群数量动态.结果表明:种群存活曲线表现为Deevey-Ⅰ型.A、B种群均表现出幼龄个体死亡率高,中龄级个体数量少,说明中龄阶段曾受到较大的人为干扰种群的净增长率(R.)、内禀增长率(γm)和周限增长率(λ)都较低,表现为衰退种群,Leslie矩阵模型分析表明在未来25年种群各龄级的个体数及种群总数均表现出持续下降趋势.种群下降可能是由于当地人为的采挖和严重的生境破碎化所导致.

  9. Rare and endangered plants in Mount Jinggangshan region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of rare, endangered, and protected plant species is of importance in assessing the status of local biodiversity and the environment as well as developing strategies for nature conservation and management. The abundance and distribution of rare and endangered plants in the Mount Jinggangshan region were investigated as well as the community characteristics of important woody species. The resultsdemonstrate that rare and endangered species have high conservation value and significant importance in systematics and biogeography. This area contains two endangered bryophyte species and 199 species of vascular plants. Among them, 50 species are included in the IUCN Red List of Threatened species, 160 species in the China Species Red List, 49 species in the List of Wild Plants Under State Protection (First Batch, and 90 species in the Appendices of CITES. The variety and abundance of rare and endangered species in this area are equivalent to those for Mount Emei and higher than those for Mount Wuyi and MountTaibai. Many perfectly preserved communities, covering a large area, exist in the Mount Jinggangshan vicinity, and are dominated by rare and endangered species, such as Abies beshanzuensis var. ziyuanensis,Corylus chinensis, Pseudotaxus chienii, Taxus wallichiana var. mairei, Fokienia hodginsii, Amentotaxus argotaenia, Phoebe bournei, Pieris japonica, Rhododendron jinggangshanicum, etc. The communities where some important rare and endangered plants occur are described in detail and suggestions are made for their protection.

  10. Women--an endangered species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-30

    Throughout India and China, South Korea and Taiwan, Pakistan and Malaysia, the same sentiment recurs: "The birth of girl is an occasion for gloom, not cheer, for bitterness, not pleasure." In all these countries "patriarchal traditions and social stigmas" make females the unwanted sex, reports Asiaweek. The tragic result: prenatal gender tests are flourishing. And for many women, if the test indicates a female, they abort. In India, sex tests and abortions are legal, cheap and readily available. Some 1500 sex-tested girls are aborted annually in Bombay alone. In China, abortions are legal, but gender tests strictly forbidden. Says one official: We cannot afford to let people know what sex the fetus is because all the girls would be aborted." Yet the numbers of baby girls in China have been reduced--and illicit gender tests and female infanticide are considered partly to blame. In South Korea, gender tests have been banned and most abortions are illegal, but "clandestine tests" are available, and according to the government some 30,000 pregnancies are terminated annually. The number of aborted females is not known, but birth ratios have shown "an alarming swing towards males" in recent years. Can laws and education change the social attitudes against girls in these Asian countries? Indian activist Vibhuti Patel, a lobbyist for stronger controls over sex-testing, hopes so. She urges a "continuous campaign" to fight the "centuries-old values" that encourages gender tests. Says Patel: Nothing less than the very survival of women is at stake." PMID:12269045

  11. Karyotype description of two Neotropical Psittacidae species: the endangered Hyacinth Macaw, Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus, and the Hawk-headed Parrot, Deroptyus accipitrinus (Psittaciformes: Aves, and its significance for conservation plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor de Oliveira Lunardi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Neotropical parrots are among the most threatened groups of birds in the world, and many species are facing extinction in a near future. At the same time, the taxonomic position of many species remains unclear. Karyotype analysis has been used to elucidate the phylogenetic status of many bird groups, also providing important information for both in situ and ex situ conservation plans. The objective of the present study was to describe for the first time the karyotypes of the endangered Hyacinth Macaw, Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus, and of the Hawk-headed Parrot, Deroptyus accipitrinus. A diploid number of 2n = 70 and a karyotype similar to the main pattern previously found for the genera Ara, Cyanopsitta, Aratinga, Propyrrhura, Pionites, Pionopsitta, Nandayus, and Guaruba were found for both species. These karyotype descriptions can be a starting point for the genetic monitoring of these two declining species.

  12. Book Review: Book review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, C. S.

    2015-02-01

    The subject of the theory of vibrations has carried an aesthetic appeal to generations of engineering students for its richness of ideas, and for the intellectual challenges it offers. Also, the diverse range of its applications (covering civil, mechanical, automotive, and aerospace structures) has provided obvious motivations for its study. For most students, the subject provides, perhaps, the first encounter in substantial application of mathematical tools (differential equations, calculus of variations, Fourier/Laplace transforms, and matrix algebra) to engineering problems. The intimate relationship that the subject of mechanics has with mathematics strikes home probably for the first time. While teaching this subject, the instructor is spoilt for choice in selecting a text book and so are the students who wish to pursue a self-study of the subject. Many luminaries in the field have offered their own exposition of the subject: starting from the classics of Rayleigh, Timoshenko, Den Hartog, Bishop and Johnson, and the works of more recent vintage (e.g., the books by Meirovich, Clough, and Penzien, and works with computational flavour, such as, those by Bathe and Petyt), several works easily come to one's mind. Given this milieu, it requires a distinctive conviction to write a new book on this subject. And, here we have a book, written by a practitioner, which aims to deal with fundamental aspects of vibrations of engineering systems. The scepticism that this reviewer had on the need for having one more such book vanished as he browsed through the book and read selectively a few sections. The author's gift for elegant explanations is immediately noticeable even in such a preliminary reading. After a more careful reading, the reviewer has found this book to be insightful and he considers the book to be a welcome addition to the family of books on vibration engineering. The author has struck a fine balance between physical explanations, mathematical niceties

  13. ANALYSIS OF THE ENVIRONMENT FEATURE OF BREEDING AREA AND ENDANGERED FACTORS OF RED-CROWNED CRANE IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Red-crowned Crane ( Grus japonensis), a kind of endangered large-scale wader, is one of valuable and rare birds in the world. It has been indexed in China Red Data Book of Endangered Animals (Aves), China Data Book of Major Protection Wild Animals, World Red Data Book of Birds, State Trade Protocol of Endangered Wild Plants and Animals Species. The paper studies the amount, distribution, habit, growth and habitat of Red-crowned Crane in China in detail, systematically analyses the ecological environment feature of Red-crowned Crane breeding area, including the vegetation feature, the vertical distribution law of absolute humidity and temperature, some carnivorous food and herbivo rous food for Red-crowned Crane. At present, the ecological environment of breeding area has been destroyed seriously by human activity. The area of marshland is reduced rapidly. A large area of reeds has been disappeared. The survival of Red-crowned Crane is threatened greatly. So it′s necessary to maintain the biodiversity of breeding area in order to pro tect Red-crowned Crane.

  14. Endangered Languages Data Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Akira Y., Comp.

    1996-01-01

    This preliminary report presents the results of a 1995 Linguistic Society of America survey on endangered languages. The Endangered Languages Survey was prepared in consultation with other linguistic organizations such as the German Linguistic Group, Endangered Languages Clearing House, and the Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of…

  15. Using Biotechnology for Conservation of Endangered Endemic Animal Species%利用生物技术保护地方和濒危物种的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫文龙

    2007-01-01

    The conservation of biodiversity is very important to the sustainable use of all the resources in the whole environment in which human beings live. Many countries make great efforts to protect the species of plants, animals and microbes and their habitats by building national parks, botany gardens, museums and other conventional means. In this article, we take the Alpas Cashmere Goat in Inner Mongolia in the northern part of China as the model animal and use biological technologies of superovluation and embryo transfer (ET) to enlarge the population of such endemic and endangered animals, and build Genome Resource Bank (GRB) to preserve genetic materials by cryopreservation for preventing extinction of these animals. The results show that the number of ovulation rate has been raised to 18.4 by using superovulation, which is far higher than under normal situations, and pregnancy rate is 84.1% for fresh embryos transferred and 75% for frozen embryos transferred, suggesting that all these methods could be used in resource conservation of Alpas Cashmere Goat and other animals.%生物多样性的保护是当今世界各国研究的一个热点, 它关系到所有物种的可持续利用及人类的可持续发展问题. 中国是生物多样性保护条约的缔约国, 从1992年至今, 我国投入了很大的财力和物力, 利用很多常规的方法来保护生物多样性, 目前已取得了很大的成果. 但是最近几年来, 由于偷猎和畜牧的盲目改良, 使得我国北方地区的一些珍稀动物和地方优良品种的数量急剧下降, 有些甚至濒临灭绝. 针对这种情况, 该文提出以超数排卵、胚胎冷冻及胚胎移植等现代生物技术来保护这些动物的思路, 通过在绒山羊上的应用证明该方法是可行的, 可以高效率地扩大动物种群和实现遗传种质资源的保存.

  16. Demographic vulnerability of the clonal and endangered meadow thistle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongejans, E.; Vere, de N.; Kroon, de H.

    2008-01-01

    For effective management of endangered species it is pivotal to understand why a species is endangered and which key life cycle components are involved in its response to environmental changes. Our objective was to investigate the response of rosettes of the redlisted clonal herb Cirsium dissectum t

  17. 78 FR 50032 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Whale Shark as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... FR 4722; February 7, 1996). A species, subspecies, or DPS is ``endangered'' if it is in danger of... discrete from other populations of the species and significant to the species as a whole (61 FR 4722... Finding on a Petition To List the Whale Shark as Threatened or Endangered Under the Endangered Species...

  18. Embryonic development and larval stages of Steindachneridion parahybae (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae: implications for the conservation and rearing of this endangered Neotropical species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato M. Honji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Steindachneridion parahybae is a freshwater catfish endemic to the Paraíba do Sul River and is classified as an endangered Neotropical species. An increasing number of conservation biologists are incorporating morphological and physiological research data to help conservation managers in rescue these endangered species. This study investigated the embryonic and larval development of S. parahybae in captivity, with emphasis in major events during the ontogeny of S. parahybae. Broodstocks were artificially induced to reproduce, and the extrusion occurred 200-255 degree-hours after hormonal induction at 24°C. Larval ontogeny was evaluated every 10 minutes under microscopic/stereomicroscopic using fresh eggs samples. The main embryogenic development stages were identified: zygote, cleavage, including the morula, blastula, gastrula phase, organogenesis, and hatching. The extruded oocytes showed an average diameter of 1.10 ± 0.10 mm, and after fertilization and hydration of eggs, the average diameter of eggs increased to about 1.90 ± 0.60 mm, characterized by a large perivitelline space that persisted up to embryo development, the double chorion, and the poles (animal and vegetative. Cell division started about 2 minutes after fertilization (AF, resulting in 2, 4, 8 (4 x 2 arrangement of cells, 16 (4 x 4, 32 (4 x 8 and 64 (2 x 4 x 8 cells. Furthermore, the blastula and gastrula stages followed after these cells divisions. The closed blastopore occurred at 11 h 20 min AF; following the development, the organogenetic stages were identified and subdivided respectively in: early segmentation phase and late segmentation phase. In the early segmentation phase, there was the establishment of the embryonic axis, and it was possible to distinguish between the cephalic and caudal regions; somites, and the optic vesicles developed about 20 h AF. Total hatching occurred at 54 h AF, and the larvae average length was 4.30 ± 0.70 mm. Gradual yolk sac reduction

  19. 77 FR 76065 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Recovery Plan for Kendall Warm...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ..., exotic species, grazing, hydrologic changes, invasive plants, pollution, and energy resource exploration... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Recovery Plan...-772-2374. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Restoring an endangered or threatened animal or...

  20. 江苏省陆栖濒危脊椎动物物种丰富度及分布格局%Species Abundance and Distribution Patterns of Endangered Terrestrial Vertebrates in Jiangsu Province.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于莉; 田苗苗; 李志艺; 赵言文

    2011-01-01

    To build up a binary distribution database of endangered terrestrial vertebrates in Jiangsu Province with county as its basic geographic unit, field investigations were carried out in combination with information and data collection. To explore richness patterns of the endangered animal species in Jiangsu, GIS technology was applied; and to analyze similarity distribution patterns of the endangered animal species, cluster analysis was performed of similarity between geographic units in species composition. Results show that Jiangsu has 83 species of terrestrial vertebrates in 62 generas and 35 families, under the category of endangered; they are relatively high in richness in the hilly region of Southwest Jiangsu, Yancheng, Lianyungang and Qidong; and quite low in the centre of Jiangsu, such as Taizhou and Huaiyin, which basically accords with the distribution of biodiversity hotspots in Jiangsu, and their richness is positively related to the total species richness (P <0. 01 , n =73) , with Pearson correlation coefficient being 0. 869. Based on species composition similarity , the 73 basic units can be clustered into 3, 4 and 5 groups, when the distance between the groups is 23. 8, 20. 6 and 18. 8, respectively. The cluster analysis indicates that the distribution of endangered terrestrial vertebrates is affected by the geographical sub-region, topography and human activities of their habitats.%采用实地调查与资料收集相结合的方法,以县(市)为基本地理单元建立江苏省陆栖濒危脊椎动物二元分布数据库;基于GIS技术,研究濒危动物物种丰富度格局;依据地理单元中物种组成的相似程度进行聚类分析,探讨江苏省濒危动物相似性分布格局.结果显示,江苏省陆栖濒危脊椎动物共有35科62属83种;西南部丘陵山区、盐城、连云港及启东地区濒危物种丰富度较高,江苏中部地区(主要为泰州和淮安)濒危物种丰富度较低,这与江苏省生物多样性