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Sample records for bones dna preservation

  1. Comparing ancient DNA preservation in petrous bone and tooth cementum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik B.; Damgaard, Peter de Barros; Margaryan, Ashot

    2017-01-01

    preservation in these two substrates obtained from the same human skulls, across a range of different ages and preservation environments. Both substrates display significantly higher endogenous DNA content (average of 16.4% and 40.0% for teeth and petrous bones, respectively) than parietal skull bone (average...

  2. Preservation of ancient DNA in thermally damaged archaeological bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottoni, Claudio; Koon, Hannah E. C.; Collins, Matthew J.; Penkman, Kirsty E. H.; Rickards, Olga; Craig, Oliver E.

    2009-02-01

    Evolutionary biologists are increasingly relying on ancient DNA from archaeological animal bones to study processes such as domestication and population dispersals. As many animal bones found on archaeological sites are likely to have been cooked, the potential for DNA preservation must be carefully considered to maximise the chance of amplification success. Here, we assess the preservation of mitochondrial DNA in a medieval cattle bone assemblage from Coppergate, York, UK. These bones have variable degrees of thermal alterations to bone collagen fibrils, indicative of cooking. Our results show that DNA preservation is not reliant on the presence of intact collagen fibrils. In fact, a greater number of template molecules could be extracted from bones with damaged collagen. We conclude that moderate heating of bone may enhance the retention of DNA fragments. Our results also indicate that ancient DNA preservation is highly variable, even within a relatively recent assemblage from contexts conducive to organic preservation, and that diagenetic parameters based on protein diagenesis are not always useful for predicting ancient DNA survival.

  3. Preservation of ancient DNA in thermally damaged archaeological bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottoni, Claudio; Koon, Hannah E C; Collins, Matthew J; Penkman, Kirsty E H; Rickards, Olga; Craig, Oliver E

    2009-02-01

    Evolutionary biologists are increasingly relying on ancient DNA from archaeological animal bones to study processes such as domestication and population dispersals. As many animal bones found on archaeological sites are likely to have been cooked, the potential for DNA preservation must be carefully considered to maximise the chance of amplification success. Here, we assess the preservation of mitochondrial DNA in a medieval cattle bone assemblage from Coppergate, York, UK. These bones have variable degrees of thermal alterations to bone collagen fibrils, indicative of cooking. Our results show that DNA preservation is not reliant on the presence of intact collagen fibrils. In fact, a greater number of template molecules could be extracted from bones with damaged collagen. We conclude that moderate heating of bone may enhance the retention of DNA fragments. Our results also indicate that ancient DNA preservation is highly variable, even within a relatively recent assemblage from contexts conducive to organic preservation, and that diagenetic parameters based on protein diagenesis are not always useful for predicting ancient DNA survival.

  4. DNA and bone structure preservation in medieval human skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M; Norton, Andrew L; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Ali, Nadir; Elmrghni, Samir; Gil, Cristiane D; Sasso, Gisela R S; Dixon, Ronald A; Nader, Helena B

    2015-06-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural data from archaeological human bones are scarce, particularly data that have been correlated with information on the preservation of molecules such as DNA. Here we examine the bone structure of macroscopically well-preserved medieval human skeletons by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry, and the quantity and quality of DNA extracted from these skeletons. DNA technology has been increasingly used for analyzing physical evidence in archaeological forensics; however, the isolation of ancient DNA is difficult since it is highly degraded, extraction yields are low and the co-extraction of PCR inhibitors is a problem. We adapted and optimised a method that is frequently used for isolating DNA from modern samples, Chelex(®) 100 (Bio-Rad) extraction, for isolating DNA from archaeological human bones and teeth. The isolated DNA was analysed by real-time PCR using primers targeting the sex determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY) and STR typing using the AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler PCR Amplification kit. Our results clearly show the preservation of bone matrix in medieval bones and the presence of intact osteocytes with well preserved encapsulated nuclei. In addition, we show how effective Chelex(®) 100 is for isolating ancient DNA from archaeological bones and teeth. This optimised method is suitable for STR typing using kits aimed specifically at degraded and difficult DNA templates since amplicons of up to 250bp were successfully amplified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fossil avian eggshell preserves ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskam, Charlotte L; Haile, James Seymour; McLay, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Owing to exceptional biomolecule preservation, fossil avian eggshell has been used extensively in geochronology and palaeodietary studies. Here, we show, to our knowledge, for the first time that fossil eggshell is a previously unrecognized source of ancient DNA (aDNA). We describe the successful...

  6. DNA FROM ANCIENT STONE TOOLS AND BONES EXCAVATED AT BUGAS-HOLDING, WYOMING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traces of DNA may preserve on ancient stone tools. We examined 24 chipped stone artifacts recovered from the Bugas-Holding site in northwestern Wyoming for the presence of DNA residues, and we compared DNA preservation in bones and stone tools from the same stratigraphic context...

  7. Alveolar ridge sockets preservation with bone grafting--review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, Sergio; Koening, Bruno; Allegrini, Marcia Rivellino Facci; Yoshimoto, Marcelo; Gedrange, Tomasz; Fanghaenel, Jochen; Lipski, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Alveolar bone seems to play a key role in providing support to the teeth, which are anchored to the bone by desmodontal fibers. The progressive alveolar bone resorption process occurs due to a loss of anatomic, biologic and mechanical factors. Mechanical stimulation of alveolar bone during mastication is crucial in keeping the teeth and underlying bone healthy. Tooth extraction leads to typical bone deficiency of ridge width and height of alveolar crest and reduces the possibility of placing screw titanium implants. When tooth extraction is necessary, trauma should be minimized during the procedure and bone preservation should receive careful attention. The literature has shown that early bone loss can be significantly reduced by socket grafting. The process of socket grafting requires an understanding of wound healing and an appreciation of the biological properties of the products available for socket grafting. Augmentative measures may, thus, be required to guarantee optimal prosthetic replacement of the lost tissue. Success or failure of augmentation procedures is dependent on revascularization and remodelling of the grafted bone into a vital, load bearing bone. In contrast to a visible three-dimensional change, the concept of remodelling refers to the internal turnover of bone, which is a coupled process where osteoclastic resorption and osteoblastic formation are more or less balanced. To restore alveolar bone loss and support efficient placement of dental implants, many different bone substitute such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, synthetic biomaterials and osteoactive agents have been proposed. In order to avoid harvesting an autograft, and thereby eliminating additional surgical procedures and risks, bone grafting materials and substitutes are alternative filler materials to be used for ridge augmentation. To present a literature review about biomaterials applicable in alveolar ridge sockets preservation to future implants insertion. The

  8. Preservation of bone flap after craniotomy infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-López, Pedro David; Martín-Velasco, V; Castilla-Díez, J M; Galacho-Harriero, A M; Rodríguez-Salazar, A

    2009-04-01

    The estimated incidence of craniotomy infection is 5%, ranging from 1-11% depending on the presence of certain risk factors, such as, prior radiation therapy, repeated surgery, CSF leak, duration of surgery over 4h, interventions involving nasal sinuses and emergency surgeries. The standard treatment for infected craniotomies is bone flap discarding and delayed cranioplasty. Adequate cosmetic results, unprotected brain and disfiguring deformity until cranioplasty are controversial features following bone removal. We present a limited series of five patients with craniotomy infection, that were successfully treated with wound debridement, in situ bone sterilization, reposition of the bone flap and antibiotic irrigation through a wash-in and wash-out draining system, all in the same surgical procedure. All infections cleared and every patient saved his/her bone flap. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 5 patients with craniotomy infection that presented with wound swelling, purulent discharge and fever. The operative technique consisted on three manoeuvres: wound debridement, bone flap sterilization (either autoclaved or soaked in a sterilizing solution), and insertion of subgaleal/epidural drains for non-continuous antibiotic irrigation (vancomycin 50mg in 20cc of saline every 12h alternating with cephotaxime 100mg in 20cc of saline every 12h). Also, patients received equal systemic endovenous antibiotherapy and oral antibiotics after discharge, until complete resolution of infection and wound healing. Patients in the series (2 women and 3 men) ranged in age from 36 to 77. No patient had received prior radiation therapy and only one had undergone surgery involving nasal sinuses. The initial operations correspond to craniotomies performed for two intracranial tumours (meningiomas), one arteriovenous malformation and two decompressive craniotomies (haemorrhagic contusions and acute subdural haematoma). The duration of surgeries ranged from 1h30' to 5h30', only

  9. Preserved bone health in adolescent elite rhythmic gymnasts despite hypoleptinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courteix, D; Rieth, N; Thomas, T; Van Praagh, E; Benhamou, C L; Collomp, K; Lespessailles, E; Jaffré, C

    2007-01-01

    Leptin is linked to hormonal disturbances occurring in anorexia and positively linked with bone mineral density. The aim of this study was to determine whether hypoleptinemia occurring in rhythmic gymnasts may affect bone health. Leptin, insulin, cortisol, IGF1 levels and bone markers were determined in 36 rhythmic gymnasts (EG) and 20 controls (C). Body composition, BMD at the whole body (WBBMD), lumbar spine (LSBMD) and bone ultrasound properties (SOS, BUA) were measured. The rhythmic gymnasts had lower fat mass and leptin level than the controls. There was no difference for IGF1, cortisol and insulin levels. Bone turnover rate was higher in elite gymnasts. The uncoupling index showed that remodeling favored the bone formation. LSBMD, WBBMD, SOS and BUA were higher in elite gymnasts after adjustment for fat mass. Leptin correlated positively with fat mass and negatively with physical activity. High impact training is able to counterbalance bone effects usually encountered in hormonally disturbed subjects. Our results suggest that hypoleptinaemia might be related to direct osteogenic effects and indirect hormonal mechanisms including preservation of IGF and cortisol levels. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Small-angle X-ray scattering: a high-throughput technique for investigating archaeological bone preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiller, J.C.; Collins, M.J.; Chamberlain, A.T.; Wess, T.J.

    2004-01-01

    Diagenetic alteration to archaeological bone can cause significant disruption to both the biogenic mineral structure and the preservation of biomolecular resources such as protein and DNA over archaeological time. We report here the use of a technique, small-angle X-ray scattering, which makes it

  11. Three-Dimensional Radiological Assessment of Alveolar Bone Volume Preservation Using Bovine Bone Xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qabbani, Ali; Al Kawas, Sausan; A Razak, Noor Hayati; Al Bayatti, Saad Wahby; Enezei, Hamid Hammad; Samsudin, A Rani; Sheikh Ab Hamid, Suzina

    2018-03-01

    Alveolar bone is critical in supporting natural teeth, dental implants as well as a removable and fixed prosthesis. Alveolar bone volume diminishes when its associated natural tooth is lost. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of bovine bone granules on alveolar bone socket augmentation for ridge preservation following atraumatic tooth extraction. Twenty medically fit patients (12 males and 8 females aged between 18 and 40 years) who needed noncomplicated tooth extraction of 1 mandibular premolar tooth were divided randomly and equally into 2 groups. In control group I, the empty extraction socket was left untreated and allowed to heal in a conventional way. In group II, the empty extraction socket wound was filled with lyophilized bovine bone xenograft granules 0.25 to 1 mm of size, 1 mL/vial. A resorbable pericardium membrane was placed to cover the defect. Clinical and 3-dimensional radiological assessments were performed at day 0, 3 months, and 9 months postoperative. There were no clinical differences in general wound healing between the groups. Comparisons within the groups showed a significant difference of bone resorption of 1.49 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.63-2.35) at 3 months, and further resorption of 1.84 mm (P ≤ 0.05) at 9 months in the control group. No significant changes of bone resorption were observed in group II during the same time interval. Comparison between groups showed a significant difference of bone resorption at 3 and 9 months (2.40 and 2.88 mm, respectively). The use of lyophilized demineralized bovine bone granules in socket preservation to fill in the extraction socket seems essential in preserving the alveolar bone dimension as it showed excellent soft and hard tissue healing. This study concludes that the alveolar bone socket exhibited a dynamic process of resorption from the first day of tooth extraction. Evidence shows the possibility of using bovine bone granules routinely in socket volume

  12. Field collection, preservation and large scale DNA extraction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some genetic studies using molecular methods such as diversity assessment or marker-assisted selection require collection of a large number of samples from fields located in the vicinity or in remote areas, followed by isolation of good quality DNA in a short time span. In the present study, different tissue preservation ...

  13. High-fidelity organic preservation of bone marrow in ca. 10 Ma amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Maria E.; Orr, Patrick J.; Kearns, Stuart L.; Alcalá, Luis; Anadón, Pere; Peñalver-Mollá, Enrique

    2006-08-01

    Bone marrow in ca. 10 Ma frogs and salamanders from the Miocene of Libros, Spain, represents the first fossilized example of this extremely decay-prone tissue. The bone marrow, preserved in three dimensions as an organic residue, retains the original texture and red and yellow color of hematopoietic and fatty marrow, respectively; moldic osteoclasts and vascular structures are also present. We attribute exceptional preservation of the fossilized bone marrow to cryptic preservation: the bones of the amphibians formed protective microenvironments, and inhibited microbial infiltration. Specimens in which bone marrow is preserved vary in their completeness and articulation and in the extent to which the body outline is preserved as a thin film of organically preserved bacteria. Cryptic preservation of these labile tissues is thus to a large extent independent of, and cannot be predicted by, the taphonomic history of the remainder of the specimen.

  14. Comparison of DNA preservation methods for environmental bacterial community samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michael A.; Pratte, Zoe A.; Kellogg, Christina A.

    2013-01-01

    Field collections of environmental samples, for example corals, for molecular microbial analyses present distinct challenges. The lack of laboratory facilities in remote locations is common, and preservation of microbial community DNA for later study is critical. A particular challenge is keeping samples frozen in transit. Five nucleic acid preservation methods that do not require cold storage were compared for effectiveness over time and ease of use. Mixed microbial communities of known composition were created and preserved by DNAgard™, RNAlater®, DMSO–EDTA–salt (DESS), FTA® cards, and FTA Elute® cards. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and clone libraries were used to detect specific changes in the faux communities over weeks and months of storage. A previously known bias in FTA® cards that results in lower recovery of pure cultures of Gram-positive bacteria was also detected in mixed community samples. There appears to be a uniform bias across all five preservation methods against microorganisms with high G + C DNA. Overall, the liquid-based preservatives (DNAgard™, RNAlater®, and DESS) outperformed the card-based methods. No single liquid method clearly outperformed the others, leaving method choice to be based on experimental design, field facilities, shipping constraints, and allowable cost.

  15. True single-molecule DNA sequencing of a pleistocene horse bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Raghavan, Maanasa

    2011-01-01

    -preserved Pleistocene horse bone using the Helicos HeliScope and Illumina GAIIx platforms, respectively. We find that the percentage of endogenous DNA sequences derived from the horse is higher among the Helicos data than Illumina data. This result indicates that the molecular biology tools used to generate sequencing...

  16. The half-life of DNA in bone: measuring decay kinetics in 158 dated fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allentoft, Morten E; Collins, Matthew; Harker, David; Haile, James; Oskam, Charlotte L; Hale, Marie L; Campos, Paula F; Samaniego, Jose A; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Willerslev, Eske; Zhang, Guojie; Scofield, R Paul; Holdaway, Richard N; Bunce, Michael

    2012-12-07

    Claims of extreme survival of DNA have emphasized the need for reliable models of DNA degradation through time. By analysing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 158 radiocarbon-dated bones of the extinct New Zealand moa, we confirm empirically a long-hypothesized exponential decay relationship. The average DNA half-life within this geographically constrained fossil assemblage was estimated to be 521 years for a 242 bp mtDNA sequence, corresponding to a per nucleotide fragmentation rate (k) of 5.50 × 10(-6) per year. With an effective burial temperature of 13.1°C, the rate is almost 400 times slower than predicted from published kinetic data of in vitro DNA depurination at pH 5. Although best described by an exponential model (R(2) = 0.39), considerable sample-to-sample variance in DNA preservation could not be accounted for by geologic age. This variation likely derives from differences in taphonomy and bone diagenesis, which have confounded previous, less spatially constrained attempts to study DNA decay kinetics. Lastly, by calculating DNA fragmentation rates on Illumina HiSeq data, we show that nuclear DNA has degraded at least twice as fast as mtDNA. These results provide a baseline for predicting long-term DNA survival in bone.

  17. Natural mummification of the human gut preserves bacteriophage DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Fornaciari, Gino; Luciani, Stefania; Dowd, Scot E; Toranzos, Gary A; Marota, Isolina; Cano, Raul J

    2016-01-01

    The natural mummification process of the human gut represents a unique opportunity to study the resulting microbial community structure and composition. While results are providing insights into the preservation of bacteria, fungi, pathogenic eukaryotes and eukaryotic viruses, no studies have demonstrated that the process of natural mummification also results in the preservation of bacteriophage DNA. We characterized the gut microbiome of three pre-Columbian Andean mummies, namely FI3, FI9 and FI12, and found sequences homologous to viruses. From the sequences attributable to viruses, 50.4% (mummy FI3), 1.0% (mummy FI9) and 84.4% (mummy FI12) were homologous to bacteriophages. Sequences corresponding to the Siphoviridae, Myoviridae, Podoviridae and Microviridae families were identified. Predicted putative bacterial hosts corresponded mainly to the Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and included Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Clostridium, Escherichia, Vibrio, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas and Yersinia. Predicted functional categories associated with bacteriophages showed a representation of structural, replication, integration and entry and lysis genes. The present study suggests that the natural mummification of the human gut results in the preservation of bacteriophage DNA, representing an opportunity to elucidate the ancient phageome and to hypothesize possible mechanisms of preservation. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Evaluation of specimen preservatives for DNA analyses of bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, M.; Droege, S.; Conrad, T.; Prager, S.; Richards, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale insect collecting efforts that are facilitated by the use of pan traps result in large numbers of specimens being collected. Storage of these specimens can be problematic if space and equipment are limited. In this study, we investigated the effects of various preservatives (alcohol solutions and DMSO) on the amount and quality of DNA extracted from bees (specifically Halictidae, Apidae, and Andrenidae). In addition, we examined the amount and quality of DNA obtained from bee specimens killed and stored at -80 degrees C and from specimens stored for up to 24 years in ethanol. DNA quality was measured in terms of how well it could be PCR-amplified using a set of mitochondrial primers that are commonly used in insect molecular systematics. Overall the best methods of preservation were ultra-cold freezing and dimethyl sulfoxide, but these are both expensive and in the case of ultra-cold freezing, somewhat impractical for field entomologists. Additionally, dimethyl sulfoxide was shown to have adverse effects on morphological characters that are typically used for identification to the level of species. We therefore recommend that the best alternative is 95% ethanol, as it preserves bee specimens well for both morphological and molecular studies.

  19. Preservation of bone mass and structure in hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus) through elevated expression of anabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Vadim B; Goropashnaya, Anna V; Tøien, Øivind; Stewart, Nathan C; Chang, Celia; Wang, Haifang; Yan, Jun; Showe, Louise C; Showe, Michael K; Donahue, Seth W; Barnes, Brian M

    2012-06-01

    Physical inactivity reduces mechanical load on the skeleton, which leads to losses of bone mass and strength in non-hibernating mammalian species. Although bears are largely inactive during hibernation, they show no loss in bone mass and strength. To obtain insight into molecular mechanisms preventing disuse bone loss, we conducted a large-scale screen of transcriptional changes in trabecular bone comparing winter hibernating and summer non-hibernating black bears using a custom 12,800 probe cDNA microarray. A total of 241 genes were differentially expressed (P 1.4) in the ilium bone of bears between winter and summer. The Gene Ontology and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis showed an elevated proportion in hibernating bears of overexpressed genes in six functional sets of genes involved in anabolic processes of tissue morphogenesis and development including skeletal development, cartilage development, and bone biosynthesis. Apoptosis genes demonstrated a tendency for downregulation during hibernation. No coordinated directional changes were detected for genes involved in bone resorption, although some genes responsible for osteoclast formation and differentiation (Ostf1, Rab9a, and c-Fos) were significantly underexpressed in bone of hibernating bears. Elevated expression of multiple anabolic genes without induction of bone resorption genes, and the down regulation of apoptosis-related genes, likely contribute to the adaptive mechanism that preserves bone mass and structure through prolonged periods of immobility during hibernation.

  20. Mechanical properties of human bone-tendon-bone grafts preserved by different methods and radiation sterilised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, A.; Gut, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Patellar tendon auto and allografts are commonly used in orthopaedic surgery for reconstruction of the anterior crucial ligaments (ACL). Autografts are mainly used for primary reconstruction, while allografts are useful for revision surgery. To avoid the risk of infection diseases transmission allografts should be radiation-sterilised. As radiation-sterilisation is supposed to decrease the mechanical strength of tendon tissue, it is important to establish methods of allografts preservation and sterilisation resulting in their best quality and safety. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to compare the tensile strength of the central one third of human patellar tendon (as used for ACL reconstruction), preserved by different methods (deep fresh freezing, lyophilisation) and subsequently radiation-sterilised with doses of 0 (control), 25, 50 or 100 kGy. Bone-tendon-bone grafts were prepared from cadaveric human patella tendon with both patellar and tibial attachments. BTB grafts were preserved by deep freezing, glicerolisation or lyophilisation and radiation-sterilised with doses of 0 (control), 25, 50 or 100 kGy. To estimate mechanical properties all samples were subjected to tensile tests to failure using Instron system. Before these tests all lyophilised grafts were rehydrated. We found decrease of tensile strength of irradiated grafts compared to non-irradiated controls. Obtained results of the mechanical testing of studied grafts indicate their potential usefulness for clinical applications.(Author)

  1. DNA in ancient bone - where is it located and how should we extract it?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, Paula; Craig, Oliver E.; Turner-Walker, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    . The question arises as to whether this may be due to post-collection preservation or just an artefact of the extraction methods used in these different studies? In an attempt to resolve these questions, we examine the efficacy of DNA extraction methods, and the quality and quantity of DNA recovered from both......Despite the widespread use of bones in ancient DNA (aDNA) studies, relatively little concrete information exists in regard to how the DNA in mineralised collagen degrades, or where it survives in the material's architecture. While, at the macrostructural level, physical exclusion of microbes...... and other external contaminants may be an important feature, and, at the ultrastructural level, the adsorption of DNA to hydroxyapatite and/or binding of DNA to Type I collagen may stabilise the DNA, the relative contribution of each, and what other factors may be relevant, are unclear...

  2. Survival and regeneration of deep-freeze preserved autologous cranial bones after cranioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Hui, Guozhen; Liu, Fengqiang; Wang, Zhengan; Tang, Yuming; Gao, Shuxing

    2012-04-01

    After decompressive craniectomy, a deep-freeze-preserved autologous cranial bone graft can be used for cranioplasty to avoid immunoreaction against an artificial patch material. Autologous cranial bone grafts not only have better physical properties, such as heat conduction, compared to artificial patch materials, but they also have the advantages of a lower medical cost and satisfactory physical flexibility. The discussion over (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT static cranial bone tomography in the diagnosis of survival and regeneration in deep-freeze preservation autologous cranial bones after cranioplasty is valuable. Objective. To investigate whether deep-freeze-preserved autologous cranial bone grafts could survive and regenerate after autologous reimplantation. The method of cranial bone preservation involved removing the cranial graft and sealing it in a double-layer sterile plastic bag under sterile surgical conditions. On the day of the cranioplasty operation, the cranial bone graft was disinfected by immersing it in 3% povidone-iodine for 30 minutes. At short-term (2 weeks), medium-term (3 months), and long-term (12 months) postoperative follow-up visits, (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT static cranial bone tomography was used to examine the reimplanted cranial bone. Results. There were no postoperative infections or seromas in all 16 cases. Two weeks following cranial bone graft reimplantation, the SPECT tomography showed some radioactivity uptake in the reimplanted cranial bone graft, which was lower than that in the cranial bone on the healthy side. At 3 months and 12 months after the operation, the radioactivity uptake in the reimplanted cranial bone graft was the same as that in the cranial bone on the healthy side. X-ray films showed blurred sutures in the reimplanted cranial bone graft at 12 months after surgery. Reimplanted deep-freeze-preserved autologous cranial bone can survive in the short term and regenerate in the medium and long terms.

  3. Use and preservation methods of bone grafts in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Garabet Agopian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present review describes the main characteristics of bone grafts used in small animals. Bone grafts are tissues without vasculature, which facilitate the production of new bone cells with osteogenic and osteoinductive factors that lead to the differentiation of cells and structural support for bone marrow. The transplant of a graft is followed by three stages: osteogenesis, or the formation of new bone; osteoinduction, which is the differentiation of cells; and osteoconduction, the process of growth of mesenchymal cells and capillaries that results in new bone formation. The composition of bone grafts may include spongy bone, cortical bone, cortical-spongy bone, cartilage or bone marrow. Grafts can also be classified according to their origin, being autogenous tissue when they are transplanted from the same individual, allogenous (homologous when originating from another individual of the same species, and xenogenous when obtained from a different species.

  4. Long term effects of formaldehyde preservation on subsequent bone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hot water maceration showed changes in color of the bones, shrinkage of the bones, oily substances were seen on the surface of the chloroform during degreasing and the bones were very soft after bleaching but got harder after drying with sunlight. Cold water maceration on the other hand kept the bones white and ...

  5. Disparities in correlating microstructural to nanostructural preservation of dinosaur femoral bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Kyun; Kwon, Yong-Eun; Lee, Sang-Gil; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Huh, Min; Lee, Eunji; Kim, Youn-Joong

    2017-03-01

    Osteohistological researches on dinosaurs are well documented, but descriptions of direct correlations between the bone microstructure and corresponding nanostructure are currently lacking. By applying correlative microscopy, we aimed to verify that well-preserved osteohistological features correlate with pristine fossil bone nanostructures from the femoral bones of Koreanosaurus boseongensis. The quality of nanostructural preservation was evaluated based on the preferred orientation level of apatite crystals obtained from selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns and by measuring the “arcs” from the {100} and {002} diffraction rings. Unlike our expectations, our results revealed that well-preserved microstructures do not guarantee pristine nanostructures and vice versa. Structural preservation of bone from macro- to nanoscale primarily depends on original bioapatite density, and subsequent taphonomical factors such as effects from burial, pressure, influx of external elements and the rate of diagenetic alteration of apatite crystals. Our findings suggest that the efficient application of SAED analysis opens the opportunity for comprehensive nanostructural investigations of bone.

  6. Ancient pathogen DNA in human teeth and petrous bones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margaryan, Ashot; Hansen, Henrik B.; Rasmussen, Simon

    2018-01-01

    pestis. Based on shotgun sequencing data, four of these five plague victims showed clearly detectable levels of Y.pestis DNA in the teeth, whereas all the petrous bones failed to produce Y.pestis DNA above baseline levels. A broader comparative metagenomic analysis of teeth and petrous bones from 10...

  7. Is amino acid racemization a useful tool for screening for ancient DNA in bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Matthew J; Penkman, Kirsty E H; Rohland, Nadin; Shapiro, Beth; Dobberstein, Reimer C; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Hofreiter, Michael

    2009-08-22

    Many rare and valuable ancient specimens now carry the scars of ancient DNA research, as questions of population genetics and phylogeography require larger sample sets. This fuels the demand for reliable techniques to screen for DNA preservation prior to destructive sampling. Only one such technique has been widely adopted: the extent of aspartic acid racemization (AAR). The kinetics of AAR are believed to be similar to the rate of DNA depurination and therefore a good measure of the likelihood of DNA survival. Moreover, AAR analysis is only minimally destructive. We report the first comprehensive test of AAR using 91 bone and teeth samples from temperate and high-latitude sites that were analysed for DNA. While the AAR range of all specimens was low (0.02-0.17), no correlation was found between the extent of AAR and DNA amplification success. Additional heating experiments and surveys of the literature indicated that d/l Asx is low in bones until almost all the collagen is lost. This is because aspartic acid is retained in the bone within the constrained environment of the collagen triple helix, where it cannot racemize for steric reasons. Only if the helix denatures to soluble gelatin can Asx racemize readily, but this soluble gelatine is readily lost in most burial environments. We conclude that Asx d/l is not a useful screening technique for ancient DNA from bone.

  8. Use and preservation methods of bone grafts in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Garabet Agopian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2016v29n3p11 The present review describes the main characteristics of bone grafts used in small animals. Bone grafts are tissues without vasculature, which facilitate the production of new bone cells with osteogenic and osteoinductive factors that lead to the differentiation of cells and structural support for bone marrow. The transplant of a graft is followed by three stages: osteogenesis, or the formation of new bone; osteoinduction, which is the differentiation of cells; and osteoconduction, the process of growth of mesenchymal cells and capillaries that results in new bone formation. The composition of bone grafts may include spongy bone, cortical bone, cortical-spongy bone, cartilage or bone marrow. Grafts can also be classified according to their origin, being autogenous tissue when they are transplanted from the same individual, allogenous (homologous when originating from another individual of the same species, and xenogenous when obtained from a different species.

  9. TEMPORAL MODELING OF DNA DEGRADATION IN BONE REMAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to follow the changes that occur, in time, at DNA level and to establish an efficient and reliable protocol for ancestral DNA extraction from bones found in archaeological sites. To test whether the protocol is efficient and capable of yielding good quality DNA, extraction was first performed on fresh bones. The material consists of fresh pig (Sus scrofa and cow (Bos taurus bones that were grounded by using a drill operating at low speed. The bone powder was then incubated in lysis buffer in the presence of proteinase K. DNA isolation and purification were done by using the phenol:chloroform protocol and DNA was precipitated with absolute ethanol stored at -20oC. The extractions were carried out once every month for a total of four extractions

  10. Salmon DNA Accelerates Bone Regeneration by Inducing Osteoblast Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ayako; Kajiya, Hiroshi; Mori, Nana; Sato, Hironobu; Fukushima, Tadao; Kido, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    The initial step of bone regeneration requires the migration of osteogenic cells to defective sites. Our previous studies suggest that a salmon DNA-based scaffold can promote the bone regeneration of calvarial defects in rats. We speculate that the salmon DNA may possess osteoinductive properties, including the homing of migrating osteogenic cells. In the present study, we investigated the influence of the salmon DNA on osteoblastic differentiation and induction of osteoblast migration using MG63 cells (human preosteoblasts) in vitro. Moreover, we analyzed the bone regeneration of a critical-sized in vivo calvarial bone defect (CSD) model in rats. The salmon DNA enhanced both mRNA and protein expression of the osteogenesis-related factors, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), alkaline phosphatase, and osterix (OSX) in the MG63 cells, compared with the cultivation using osteogenic induction medium alone. From the histochemical and immunohistochemical assays using frozen sections of the bone defects from animals that were implanted with DNA disks, many cells were found to express aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, one of the markers for mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, OSX was observed in the replaced connective tissue of the bone defects. These findings indicate that the DNA induced the migration and accumulation of osteogenic cells to the regenerative tissue. Furthermore, an in vitro transwell migration assay showed that the addition of DNA enhanced an induction of osteoblast migration, compared with the medium alone. The implantation of the DNA disks promoted bone regeneration in the CSD of rats, compared with that of collagen disks. These results indicate that the salmon DNA enhanced osteoblastic differentiation and induction of migration, resulting in the facilitation of bone regeneration. PMID:28060874

  11. Crestal bone preservation: A review of different approaches for successful implant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Krishna Prasad

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review all the possible methods to preserve the crestal bone, when each method should be used and their success rates in an attempt to address this complex problem of crestal bone resorption. "PubMed" and "Google Scholar" were used to find out any studies involving platform switching concept from 1990 up to 2009. Twenty-four studies involving methods for preservation of crestal bone were evaluated, which included 26% studies on platform switching, 22% on non-submerged approach, 17% on scalloped implants, 13% on progressive loading and 22% on immediate implant placement. Crestal bone preservation should be thought of starting from the design of the implant to be placed. The technique to be followed in a given case will depend upon the density of bone, force factors by the patient, bone volume and amount of soft tissues, etc. The best possible method or the combination of the methods should be used to preserve the crestal bone for the long-term success of the implants.

  12. Preservation of RNA and DNA from mammal samples under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Sanchez, Miguel; Burraco, Pablo; Gomez-Mestre, Ivan; Leonard, Jennifer A

    2013-07-01

    Ecological and conservation genetics require sampling of organisms in the wild. Appropriate preservation of the collected samples, usually by cryostorage, is key to the quality of the genetic data obtained. Nevertheless, cryopreservation in the field to ensure RNA and DNA stability is not always possible. We compared several nucleic acid preservation solutions appropriate for field sampling and tested them on rat (Rattus rattus) blood, ear and tail tip, liver, brain and muscle. We compared the efficacy of a nucleic acid preservation (NAP) buffer for DNA preservation against 95% ethanol and Longmire buffer, and for RNA preservation against RNAlater (Qiagen) and Longmire buffer, under simulated field conditions. For DNA, the NAP buffer was slightly better than cryopreservation or 95% ethanol, but high molecular weight DNA was preserved in all conditions. The NAP buffer preserved RNA as well as RNAlater. Liver yielded the best RNA and DNA quantity and quality; thus, liver should be the tissue preferentially collected from euthanized animals. We also show that DNA persists in nonpreserved muscle tissue for at least 1 week at ambient temperature, although degradation is noticeable in a matter of hours. When cryopreservation is not possible, the NAP buffer is an economical alternative for RNA preservation at ambient temperature for at least 2 months and DNA preservation for at least 10 months. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) show microstructural bone loss during hibernation but preserve bone macrostructural geometry and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Stoll, Danielle M; Mantila, Emily R; Fahrner, Bryna K; Carey, Hannah V; Donahue, Seth W

    2011-04-15

    Lack of activity causes bone loss In most animals. Hibernating bears have physiological processes to prevent cortical and trabecular bone loss associated with reduced physical activity, but different mechanisms of torpor among hibernating species may lead to differences in skeletal responses to hibernation. There are conflicting reports regarding whether small mammals experience bone loss during hibernation. To investigate this phenomenon, we measured cortical and trabecular bone properties in physically active and hibernating juvenile and adult 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, previous genus name Spermophilus). Cortical bone geometry, strength and mineral content were similar in hibernating compared with active squirrels, suggesting that hibernation did not cause macrostructural cortical bone loss. Osteocyte lacunar size increased (linear regression, P=0.001) over the course of hibernation in juvenile squirrels, which may indicate an osteocytic role in mineral homeostasis during hibernation. Osteocyte lacunar density and porosity were greater (+44 and +59%, respectively; Phibernating compared with active squirrels, which may reflect a decrease in osteoblastic activity (per cell) during hibernation. Trabecular bone volume fraction in the proximal tibia was decreased (-20%; P=0.028) in hibernating compared with physically active adult squirrels, but was not different between hibernating and active juvenile squirrels. Taken together, these data suggest that 13-lined ground squirrels may be unable to prevent microstructural losses of cortical and trabecular bone during hibernation, but importantly may possess a biological mechanism to preserve cortical bone macrostructure and strength during hibernation, thus preventing an increased risk of bone fracture during remobilization in the spring.

  14. Quality of Life Following Amputation or Limb Preservation in Patients with Lower Extremity Bone Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Mason

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Although functional differences have been described between patients with lower extremity bone sarcoma with amputation and limb preservation surgery, differences have not clearly been shown between the two groups related to quality of life. The aim of the study was to determine if there is a difference in overall quality of life in lower extremity bone sarcoma survivors related to whether they had an amputation or a limb preservation procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-two long-term survivors of lower extremity bone sarcoma were studied to make a comparison of the overall quality of life, pain assessment and psychological evaluations in limb preservation and amputation patients. Forty-eight patients with limb preservation and thirty-four patients with amputations were enrolled in the study. Validated psychometric measures including the Quality of Life Questionnaire, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and visual analog scales were utilized.RESULTS: The overall quality of life of patients with limb preservation was significantly higher than patients with amputation (p-value < 0.01. Significant differences were noted in the categories of material well being, job satisfiers and occupational relations. CONCLUSION: The overall quality of life of patients with limb preservation appears to be better than for those patients with amputation based on the quality of life questionnaire in patients surviving lower extremity bone sarcoma. Further analysis needs to verify the results and focus on the categories that significantly affect the overall quality of life.

  15. Ridge preservation with the use of deproteinized bovine bone mineral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhe, Jan; Cecchinato, Denis; Donati, Mauro; Tomasi, Cristiano; Liljenberg, Birgitta

    2014-07-01

    The aim was to examine the tissue composition of extraction sockets that had been grafted with deproteinized bovine bone mineral and allowed to heal for 6 months. Twenty-five subjects with one tooth each scheduled for extraction and replacement with dental implants were recruited. The assigned teeth were carefully removed. The site/patient was thereafter allocated to a test or a control group. In the test group patients, Bio-Oss(®) Collagen was placed to fill the fresh extraction socket while in the controls no grafting was performed. After about 6 months of healing, a biopsy was sampled from the center of the extraction site. The specimens were decalcified, embedded in paraffin, sectioned, and stained in HTX. The proportions occupied by mineralized bone, osteoid, bone marrow, fibrous tissue, and Bio-Oss(®) particles were determined by morphometric point counting. Mineralized bone made up 57.4 ± 12.4% of the control sites (C) and 48.9 ± 8.5% of the T1 sites (graft material not included). The amount of bone marrow (C: 7.1 ± 6.1%, T1: 2.1 ± 3.1%) and osteoid (C: 7.3 ± 4.9%, T1: 1.9 ± 2.1%) was about five times greater in the control than in the test sites. Fibrous tissue comprised 23.1 ± 16.3% (C) and 40.0 ± 11.9% (T1). I n the T2 sites (graft material included), the percentage mineralized bone was 39.9 ± 8.6 while the proportions of bone marrow and osteoid were 1.8 ± 2.5% and 1.6 ± 1.8%. Fibrous tissue occupied 32.4 ± 9.2% and Bio-Oss(®) particles 19.0 ± 6.5% of the T2 sites. Placement of the biomaterial in the fresh extraction socket retarded healing. The Bio-Oss(®) particles were not resorbed but became surrounded by new bone. This may explain why grafted extraction sites may fail to undergo dimensional change. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. DNA damage in preserved specimens and tissue samples: a molecular assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantin Elizabeth

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The extraction of genetic information from preserved tissue samples or museum specimens is a fundamental component of many fields of research, including the Barcode of Life initiative, forensic investigations, biological studies using scat sample analysis, and cancer research utilizing formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Efforts to obtain genetic information from these sources are often hampered by an inability to amplify the desired DNA as a consequence of DNA damage. Previous studies have described techniques for improved DNA extraction from such samples or focused on the effect of damaging agents – such as light, oxygen or formaldehyde – on free nucleotides. We present ongoing work to characterize lesions in DNA samples extracted from preserved specimens. The extracted DNA is digested to single nucleosides with a combination of DNase I, Snake Venom Phosphodiesterase, and Antarctic Phosphatase and then analyzed by HPLC-ESI-TOF-MS. We present data for moth specimens that were preserved dried and pinned with no additional preservative and for frog tissue samples that were preserved in either ethanol, or formaldehyde, or fixed in formaldehyde and then preserved in ethanol. These preservation methods represent the most common methods of preserving animal specimens in museum collections. We observe changes in the nucleoside content of these samples over time, especially a loss of deoxyguanosine. We characterize the fragmentation state of the DNA and aim to identify abundant nucleoside lesions. Finally, simple models are introduced to describe the DNA fragmentation based on nicks and double-strand breaks.

  17. As solid as a rock-comparison of CE- and MPS-based analyses of the petrosal bone as a source of DNA for forensic identification of challenging cranial bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulstein, Galina; Hadrys, Thorsten; Wiegand, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) typing from skeletal remains can be a difficult task. Dependent on the environmental conditions of the provenance of the bones, DNA can be degraded and STR typing inhibited. Generally, dense and compact bones are known to preserve DNA better. Several studies already proved that femora and teeth have high DNA typing success rates. Unfortunately, these elements are not present in all cases involving skeletal remains. Processing partial or singular skeletal elements, it is favorable to select bone areas where DNA preservation is comparably higher. Especially, cranial bones are often accidentally discovered during criminal investigations. The cranial bone is composed of multiple parts. In this examination, we evaluated the potential of the petrous bone for human identification of skeletal remains in forensic case work. Material from different sections of eight unknown cranial bones and-where available-additionally other skeletal elements, collected at the DNA department of the Institute of Legal Medicine in Ulm, Germany, from 2010 to 2017, were processed with an optimized DNA extraction and STR typing strategy. The results highlight that STR typing from the petrous bones leads to reportable profiles in all individuals, even in cases where the analysis of the parietal bone failed. Moreover, the comparison of capillary electrophorese (CE) typing to massively parallel sequencing (MPS) analysis shows that MPS has the potential to analyze degraded human remains and is even capable to provide additional information about phenotype and ancestry of unknown individuals.

  18. Efficient decellularization for tissue engineering of the tendon-bone interface with preservation of biomechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Xu

    Full Text Available Interfaces between tendon/ligament and bone ("entheses" are highly specialized tissues that allow for stress transfer between mechanically dissimilar materials. Entheses show very low regenerative capacity resulting in high incidences of failure after surgical repair. Tissue engineering is a promising approach to recover functionality of entheses. Here, we established a protocol to decellularize porcine entheses as scaffolds for enthesis tissue engineering. Chemical detergents as well as physical treatments were investigated with regard to their efficiency to decellularize 2 mm thick porcine Achilles tendon entheses. A two-phase approach was employed: study 1 investigated the effect of various concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and t-octylphenoxypolyethoxy-ethanol (Triton X-100 as decellularization agents. The most efficient combination of SDS and Triton was then carried forward into study 2, where different physical methods, including freeze-thaw cycles, ultrasound, perfusion, and hydrostatic washing were used to enhance the decellularization effect. Cell counts, DNA quantification, and histology showed that washing with 0.5% SDS + 1% Triton X-100 for 72 h at room temperature could remove ~ 98% cells from the interface. Further investigation of physical methods proved that washing under 200 mmHg hydrostatic pressure shortened the detergent exposing time from 72 h to 48 h. Biomechanical tensile testing showed that the biomechanical features of treated samples were preserved. Washing under 200 mmHg hydrostatic pressure with 0.5% SDS + 1% Triton X-100 for 48 h efficiently decellularized entheses with preservation of matrix structure and biomechanical features. This protocol can be used to efficiently decellularize entheses as scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  19. Maintenance of host DNA integrity in field-preserved mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) blood meals for identification by DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Lawrence E; Holderman, Chris J; Gillett-Kaufman, Jennifer L; Kawahara, Akito Y; Kaufman, Phillip E

    2016-09-15

    Determination of the interactions between hematophagous arthropods and their hosts is a necessary component to understanding the transmission dynamics of arthropod-vectored pathogens. Current molecular methods to identify hosts of blood-fed arthropods require the preservation of host DNA to serve as an amplification template. During transportation to the laboratory and storage prior to molecular analysis, genetic samples need to be protected from nucleases, and the degradation effects of hydrolysis, oxidation and radiation. Preservation of host DNA contained in field-collected blood-fed specimens has an additional caveat: suspension of the degradative effects of arthropod digestion on host DNA. Unless effective preservation methods are implemented promptly after blood-fed specimens are collected, host DNA will continue to degrade. Preservation methods vary in their efficacy, and need to be selected based on the logistical constraints of the research program. We compared four preservation methods (cold storage at -20 °C, desiccation, ethanol storage of intact mosquito specimens and crushed specimens on filter paper) for field storage of host DNA from blood-fed mosquitoes across a range of storage and post-feeding time periods. The efficacy of these techniques in maintaining host DNA integrity was evaluated using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect the presence of a sufficient concentration of intact host DNA templates for blood meal analysis. We applied a logistic regression model to assess the effects of preservation method, storage time and post-feeding time on the binomial response variable, amplification success. Preservation method, storage time and post-feeding time all significantly impacted PCR amplification success. Filter papers and, to a lesser extent, 95 % ethanol, were the most effective methods for the maintenance of host DNA templates. Amplification success of host DNA preserved in cold storage at -20 °C and desiccation was poor. Our data

  20. Ridge preservation after ridge expansion with simultaneous guided bone regeneration: a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Andres; Fleiner, Jonathan; Stübinger, Stefan; Fleiner, Henrik; Buser, Daniel; Bosshardt, Dieter D

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate ridge preservation after ridge splitting with simultaneous implant placement and guided bone regeneration (GBR) in a miniature pig model. In miniature pigs, the mandibular premolars and first molars were extracted together with removal of the interdental and buccal bone. Three months later, ridge splitting and expansion of the buccal plate were performed with simultaneous placement of two titanium implants per quadrant. On the test side, access by a mucoperiosteal flap followed by GBR with a biphasic calcium phosphate and a collagen membrane was performed. On the contralateral control side, a mucosal flap (MF), leaving the periosteum attached to the buccal bone, was elevated. After healing periods of 6 and 12 weeks, eight and four animals, respectively, were sacrificed for histological and histometric evaluation. In the MF group, all 16 implants were osseointegrated, while in the GBR group, one bone fracture occurred, and six of 16 implants were lost. After 6 weeks, significantly higher bone crest levels were found for the GBR group than for the MF group both buccally and lingually (P bone thickness was greater in the GBR group than in the MF group (P bone was significantly higher in the GBR group compared to the MF group. Furthermore, buccal bone thickness in the GBR group was 0.93, 4.5, and 5.94 mm at, and 2 and 4 mm apical to the IS, respectively. The corresponding values in the MF group were greatly reduced (0, 0.21, and 2.56 mm). Bone loss on the buccal side compared to the lingual side was significantly greater only in the MF group. In this ridge expansion model in miniature pigs, the buccal bone volume was significantly better preserved with GBR when compared to a mucosal access flap, provided that soft tissue healing occurred complication free. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Ethanol and sodium acetate as a preservation method to delay degradation of environmental DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladell, Bridget A.; Walleser, Liza R.; McCalla, S. Grace; Erickson, Richard A.; Amberg, Jon J.

    2018-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) samples that are collected from remote locations depend on rapid stabilization of the DNA. The degradation of eDNA in water samples is minimized when samples are stored at ≤ 4 °C. Developing a preservation technique to maintain eDNA integrity at room temperature would allow a wider range of locations to be sampled. We evaluated an ethanol and sodium acetate solution to maintain the integrity of the DNA samples for the time between collection and lab testing. For this evaluation, replicate water samples taken from a tank housing Asian carp were placed on ice or held at room temperature. At both temperatures, water samples were left untreated or were preserved with an ethanol and sodium acetate solution (EtOH–NaAc). Every day for 6 days following collection, a subset of the samples was removed from each preservation method and DNA was extracted and nuclear and mitochondrial markers were assayed with qPCR. Results showed comparable persistence of DNA between iced samples without the EtOH–NaAc treatment and samples that received EtOH–NaAc treatment that were kept at room temperature. We found that DNA can be amplified from preserved samples using an EtOH–NaAc solution after up to 7 days at room temperature.

  2. The room temperature preservation of filtered environmental DNA samples and assimilation into a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol DNA extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Mark A; Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; McVeigh, Margaret M; Lodge, David M

    2015-01-01

    Current research targeting filtered macrobial environmental DNA (eDNA) often relies upon cold ambient temperatures at various stages, including the transport of water samples from the field to the laboratory and the storage of water and/or filtered samples in the laboratory. This poses practical limitations for field collections in locations where refrigeration and frozen storage is difficult or where samples must be transported long distances for further processing and screening. This study demonstrates the successful preservation of eDNA at room temperature (20 °C) in two lysis buffers, CTAB and Longmire's, over a 2-week period of time. Moreover, the preserved eDNA samples were seamlessly integrated into a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol (PCI) DNA extraction protocol. The successful application of the eDNA extraction to multiple filter membrane types suggests the methods evaluated here may be broadly applied in future eDNA research. Our results also suggest that for many kinds of studies recently reported on macrobial eDNA, detection probabilities could have been increased, and at a lower cost, by utilizing the Longmire's preservation buffer with a PCI DNA extraction. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The room temperature preservation of filtered environmental DNA samples and assimilation into a phenol–chloroform–isoamyl alcohol DNA extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Mark A; Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; McVeigh, Margaret M; Lodge, David M

    2015-01-01

    Current research targeting filtered macrobial environmental DNA (eDNA) often relies upon cold ambient temperatures at various stages, including the transport of water samples from the field to the laboratory and the storage of water and/or filtered samples in the laboratory. This poses practical limitations for field collections in locations where refrigeration and frozen storage is difficult or where samples must be transported long distances for further processing and screening. This study demonstrates the successful preservation of eDNA at room temperature (20 °C) in two lysis buffers, CTAB and Longmire's, over a 2-week period of time. Moreover, the preserved eDNA samples were seamlessly integrated into a phenol–chloroform–isoamyl alcohol (PCI) DNA extraction protocol. The successful application of the eDNA extraction to multiple filter membrane types suggests the methods evaluated here may be broadly applied in future eDNA research. Our results also suggest that for many kinds of studies recently reported on macrobial eDNA, detection probabilities could have been increased, and at a lower cost, by utilizing the Longmire's preservation buffer with a PCI DNA extraction. PMID:24834966

  4. Alveolar bone preservation subsequent to miniscrew implant placement in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsen, B; Huja, S S; Chien, H-H; Dalstra, M

    2015-05-01

    To assess the effects of transcortical screws on alveolar (bone) ridge preservation following extraction. Four adult beagle dogs had mandibular premolars extracted bilaterally. After 6 weeks, using a split-mouth design, two transcortical screws were inserted unilaterally below the alveolar crest on the experimental side in the region of the extraction. The dogs were killed after 12 weeks. The bone at the extraction sites was analyzed using μCT and 3D analysis. A cylindrical core was placed around the actual and a virtual screw placed in the identical location on the control side. The bone volume within the cylinders was quantified. An insertion of a dental implant was simulated bilaterally at the insertion site. The height of the clinical crown and the alveolar crest were determined on both sides. The bone turnover was assessed histomorphometrically on un-decalcified bucco-lingual sections stained with basic fuchsine and toluidine blue. Comparison of the two sides revealed a significant difference both with regard to the bone volume and morphology. The transcortical screw caused an increase in bone density and less ridge atrophy. When simulating a dental implant placement on both sides, the bone preservation on the experimental side led to a need for a shorter clinical crown compared to the control side. A higher activity level of the bone in the experimental side was demonstrated histologically. In this dog model the insertion of a mini-implant across the healing alveolar process results in increased density not only adjacent to the screws, but also in the region where a potential dental implant would be inserted. In humans, the insertion of transcortical screws may maintain bone when for various reasons insertion of a permanent dental implant has to be postponed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Alveolar bone width preservation after decoronation of ankylosed anterior incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaul; Schwarz-Arad, Dvorah; Ashkenazi, Malka

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the alteration of alveolar ridge dimensions after decoronation procedures in children and adolescents at least 1 year after surgery. Twelve children who underwent decoronation of ankylosed maxillary anterior incisors with at least 1 year after surgery follow-up were recalled for reevaluation. All decoronations were performed when the ankylosed teeth were submerged 1-1.5 mm. During the recall appointment, impressions of the upper arch were obtained. The bucco-palatal alveolar dimensions of the decoronated teeth were measured on the cast at the mid-mesiodistal distance from the missing tooth and were compared with the distance from the contralateral healthy incisor. Overall, 12 children (9 male and 3 female) were reevaluated up to 82 months after decoronation (mean, 49.58 ± 24 months). The mean age of the patients at the time of trauma was 9.83 ± 2.8 years. The average bucco-palatal dimension of the alveolar ridge at the mid-decoronation area was 9 ± 1 mm compared with 10.17 ± 0.9 mm at the contralateral homologous tooth (difference of 1.67 ± 1.12, P = .004). The findings show a positive statistical correlation between the duration of the follow-up period and the bucco-palatal dimension of the alveolar ridge (P = .027). Although decoronation of ankylosed young permanent incisors resulted in a decrease in the bucco-palatal dimension with time, it did not prevent additional alveolar growth that occurs with age in a developing child and thus may help maintain the alveolar bone ridge width, height, and continuity and assist in future rehabilitation with less invasive ridge augmentation procedures required for implant placement. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Laboratory methods used for testing the effect of radiation sterilization and preservation procedures on bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziedzic-Goclawska, A.

    1999-01-01

    Sterilization of tissue allografts with ionizing radiation introduced in the mid of 1950s is more and more frequently used in tissue banking practice. The dose of 25 kGy is currently recommended and commonly used by many tissue banks in the world with the exception of the Central Tissue Bank in Warsaw where the dose of 33 kGy + 10 % has been routinely used since 1963, and from 1997 the dose of 35 kGy + 10 % has been introduced. To study the effect of radiation-sterilization on bone allografts the interdisciplinary investigations have been undertaken and several techniques have been implemented in our tissue bank. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the amount, origin and stability of free radicals and other paramagnetic entities induced in radiation-sterilized bone allografts. This technique has been also utilized for quantitative evaluation of remodeling process of radiation-sterilized bone allografts and for estimation of the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation using bone tissue as a dosimeter. A model of heterotopically induced osteogenesis after transplantation of devitalized bone matrix into the muscle (described by Urist in 1965) is very useful in tissue banking practice. It allows one to determine the contribution the graft itself makes to osteogenesis. This model is routinely used in our tissue bank to evaluate the effect of various sterilization and preservation procedures on osteoinductive properties of bone allografts. The solubility in vitro of collagen - a carrier for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPS) and a major constituent of bone and the other connective tissue grafts, has been studied by measuring the amount of extracted neutral, acid and total soluble collagen from bone grafts preserved by different methods at irradiated at vanous experimental conditions. A positive correlation between collagen solubility in vitro and the rate of graft resorption in vivo has been observed. The high doses of

  7. Checking collagen preservation in archaeological bone by non-destructive studies (Micro-CT and IBA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, L., E-mail: lucile.beck@cea.fr [C2RMF - UMR171 CNRS, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, Palais du Louvre, Porte des Lions, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cuif, J.-P. [UMR IDES 8148, Universite Paris XI-Orsay, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Pichon, L. [C2RMF - UMR171 CNRS, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, Palais du Louvre, Porte des Lions, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Vaubaillon, S. [CEA, INSTN, Laboratoire JANNUS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dambricourt Malasse, A. [Departement de Prehistoire, Museum national d' Histoire naturelle, UMR 7194 - CNRS, Institut de Paleontologie Humaine, 1, rue Rene Panhard, 75013 Paris (France); Abel, R.L. [The Natural History Museum, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    The material to be studied is a piece of human skull discovered (1999) in Pleistocene sediments from the Orsang river (Gujarat state, India). From anatomical view point, this skull is highly composite: modern Homo sapiens characters are associated to undoubtedly more ancient features. Absolute dating by {sup 14}C is critical to understand this discovery. Prior to dating measurements, non-destructive studies have been carried out. Micro-CT reconstruction (X-ray microtomography) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) have been undertaken to check the structural preservation of the fossil and the collagen preservation. PIXE elemental map was used to select well-preserved bone area. RBS/EBS and NRA were used for light element quantification, in particular C, N and O contents. We also demonstrate that the PIXE-RBS/EBS combination is a effective tool for the whole characterization of archaeological and recent bones by analysing in one experiment both mineral and organic fractions. We have shown that the archaeological bone, a fragment of the potentially oldest modern Indian, is enough preserved for radiocarbon dating. We propose that Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) using 3 MeV protons could be a good non destructive alternative to conventional CHN method using Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen analyzer for measuring C and N before {sup 14}C dating.

  8. Checking collagen preservation in archaeological bone by non-destructive studies (Micro-CT and IBA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.; Cuif, J.-P.; Pichon, L.; Vaubaillon, S.; Dambricourt Malassé, A.; Abel, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    The material to be studied is a piece of human skull discovered (1999) in Pleistocene sediments from the Orsang river (Gujarat state, India). From anatomical view point, this skull is highly composite: modern Homo sapiens characters are associated to undoubtedly more ancient features. Absolute dating by 14 C is critical to understand this discovery. Prior to dating measurements, non-destructive studies have been carried out. Micro-CT reconstruction (X-ray microtomography) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) have been undertaken to check the structural preservation of the fossil and the collagen preservation. PIXE elemental map was used to select well-preserved bone area. RBS/EBS and NRA were used for light element quantification, in particular C, N and O contents. We also demonstrate that the PIXE-RBS/EBS combination is a effective tool for the whole characterization of archaeological and recent bones by analysing in one experiment both mineral and organic fractions. We have shown that the archaeological bone, a fragment of the potentially oldest modern Indian, is enough preserved for radiocarbon dating. We propose that Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) using 3 MeV protons could be a good non destructive alternative to conventional CHN method using Carbon–Hydrogen–Nitrogen analyzer for measuring C and N before 14 C dating.

  9. Even with rehydration, preservation in ethanol influences the mechanical properties of bone and how bone responds to experimental manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesper, Evan O; Hammond, Max A; Allen, Matthew R; Wallace, Joseph M

    2017-04-01

    Typically, bones are harvested at the time of animal euthanasia and stored until mechanical testing. However, storage methods are not standardized, and differential effects on mechanical properties are possible between methods. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects that two common preservation methods (freezing wrapped in saline-soaked gauze and refrigerating ethanol fixed samples) have on bone mechanical properties in the context of an in vitro ribosylation treatment designed to modify mechanical integrity. It was hypothesized that there would be an interactive effect between ribose treatment and preservation method. Tibiae from twenty five 11week old female C57BL/6 mice were separated into 2 preservation groups. Micro-CT scans of contralateral pairs assessed differences in geometry prior to storage. After 7weeks of storage, bones in each pair of tibiae were soaked in a solution containing either 0M or 0.6M ribose for 1week prior to 4 point bending tests. There were no differences in any cortical geometric parameters between contralateral tibiae. There was a significant main effect of ethanol fixation on displacement to yield (-16.3%), stiffness (+24.5%), strain to yield (-13.9%), and elastic modulus (+18.5%) relative to frozen specimens. There was a significant main effect of ribose treatment for yield force (+13.9%), ultimate force (+9.2%), work to yield (+22.2%), yield stress (+14.1%), and resilience (+21.9%) relative to control-soaked bones. Postyield displacement, total displacement, postyield work, total work, total strain, and toughness were analyzed separately within each preservation method due to significant interactions. For samples stored frozen, all six properties were lower in the ribose-soaked group (49%-68%) while no significant effects of ribose were observed in ethanol fixed bones. Storage in ethanol likely caused changes to the collagen matrix which prevented or masked the embrittling effects of ribosylation that were seen in

  10. Analysis of collagen preservation in bones recovered in archaeological contexts using NIR Hyperspectral Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincke, Damien; Miller, Rebecca; Stassart, Édith; Otte, Marcel; Dardenne, Pierre; Collins, Matthew; Wilkinson, Keith; Stewart, John; Baeten, Vincent; Fernández Pierna, Juan Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The scope of this article is to propose an innovative method based on Near Infrared Hyperspectral Chemical Imaging (NIR-HCI) to rapidly and non-destructively evaluate the relative degree of collagen preservation in bones recovered from archaeological contexts. This preliminary study has allowed the evaluation of the potential of the method using bone samples from the Early Upper Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic periods at the site of Trou Al'Wesse in Belgium. NIR-HCI, combined with chemometric tools, has identified specific spectral bands characteristic of collagen. A chemometric model has been built using Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) to identify bones with and without collagen. This enables the evaluation of the degree of collagen preservation and homogeneity in bones within and between different strata, which has direct implications for archaeological applications (e.g., taphonomic analyses, assemblage integrity) and sample selection for subsequent analyses requiring collagen. Two archaeological applications are presented: comparison between sub-layers in an Early Upper Palaeolithic unit, and evaluation of the range of variability in collagen preservation within a single Holocene stratum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Action of Calendula officinalis essence on bone preservation after the extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe-Fentanes, Laura K; Soriano-Padilla, Fernando; Pérez-Frutos, Jorge Raúl; Veras-Hernández, Miriam Alejandra

    2018-01-01

    Calendula officinalis is a phytodrug used as analgesic, antiseptic and wound-healing agent due to its collagenogenic effect, which is why it is a convenient and affordable treatment that promotes alveolar bone preservation after tooth extraction in vivo. The aim of this study was to use Calendula officinalis during and after tooth extraction to determine its ability to preserve bone after this procedure. We established two groups matched by age, gender and position of the third molar. We used with patients on the experimental group Calendula officinalis diluted 10% as an irrigant during surgical extraction of third molars. We performed the conventional way with the control group irrigating with saline solution. Subsequently, both groups continued to make mouthwash for a week with the irrigating agent. Every week for a month, each patient underwent periapical radiography, out of which we took measurements of alveolar ridges and depth of alveolar bone, which were compared. There is statistically significant evidence to state that Calendula officinalis favorably affects bone preservation after extraction.

  12. Alveolar socket preservation with demineralised bovine bone mineral and a collagen matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorana, Carlo; Poli, Pier Paolo; Deflorian, Matteo; Testori, Tiziano; Mandelli, Federico; Nagursky, Heiner; Vinci, Raffaele

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the healing of post-extraction sockets following alveolar ridge preservation clinically, radiologically, and histologically. Overall, 7 extraction sockets in 7 patients were grafted with demineralised bovine bone mineral and covered with a porcine-derived non-crosslinked collagen matrix (CM). Soft tissue healing was clinically evaluated on the basis of a specific healing index. Horizontal and vertical ridge dimensional changes were assessed clinically and radiographically at baseline and 6 months after implant placement. For histological and histomorphometric analysis, bone biopsies were harvested from the augmented sites during implant surgery 6 months after the socket preservation procedure. Clinically, healing proceeded uneventfully in all the sockets. A trend towards reduced horizontal and vertical socket dimensions was observed from baseline to the final examination. The mean width and height of resorption were 1.21 mm ( P =0.005) and 0.46 mm ( P =0.004), respectively. Histologically, residual xenograft particles (31.97%±3.52%) were surrounded by either newly formed bone (16.02%±7.06%) or connective tissue (50.67%±8.42%) without fibrous encapsulation. The CM underwent a physiological substitution process in favour of well-vascularised collagen-rich connective tissue. Socket preservation using demineralised bovine bone mineral in combination with CM provided stable dimensional changes of the alveolar ridge associated with good re-epithelialisation of the soft tissues during a 6-month healing period.

  13. True single-molecule DNA sequencing of a pleistocene horse bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Ludovic; Ginolhac, Aurelien; Raghavan, Maanasa; Vilstrup, Julia; Rasmussen, Morten; Magnussen, Kim; Steinmann, Kathleen E.; Kapranov, Philipp; Thompson, John F.; Zazula, Grant; Froese, Duane; Moltke, Ida; Shapiro, Beth; Hofreiter, Michael; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A.S.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Willerslev, Eske

    2011-01-01

    Second-generation sequencing platforms have revolutionized the field of ancient DNA, opening access to complete genomes of past individuals and extinct species. However, these platforms are dependent on library construction and amplification steps that may result in sequences that do not reflect the original DNA template composition. This is particularly true for ancient DNA, where templates have undergone extensive damage post-mortem. Here, we report the results of the first “true single molecule sequencing” of ancient DNA. We generated 115.9 Mb and 76.9 Mb of DNA sequences from a permafrost-preserved Pleistocene horse bone using the Helicos HeliScope and Illumina GAIIx platforms, respectively. We find that the percentage of endogenous DNA sequences derived from the horse is higher among the Helicos data than Illumina data. This result indicates that the molecular biology tools used to generate sequencing libraries of ancient DNA molecules, as required for second-generation sequencing, introduce biases into the data that reduce the efficiency of the sequencing process and limit our ability to fully explore the molecular complexity of ancient DNA extracts. We demonstrate that simple modifications to the standard Helicos DNA template preparation protocol further increase the proportion of horse DNA for this sample by threefold. Comparison of Helicos-specific biases and sequence errors in modern DNA with those in ancient DNA also reveals extensive cytosine deamination damage at the 3′ ends of ancient templates, indicating the presence of 3′-sequence overhangs. Our results suggest that paleogenomes could be sequenced in an unprecedented manner by combining current second- and third-generation sequencing approaches. PMID:21803858

  14. Radiographic alveolar bone changes following ridge preservation with two different biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardas, Nikos; D'Aiuto, Francesco; Mezzomo, Luis; Arzoumanidi, Marina; Donos, Nikolaos

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate radiographical bone changes following alveolar ridge preservation with a synthetic bone substitute or a bovine xenograft. Alveolar ridge preservation was performed in 27 patients randomized in two groups. In the test group (n=14), the extraction socket was treated with Straumann bone ceramic(®) (SBC) and a collagen barrier membrane (Bio-Gide(®)), whereas in the control group (n=13) with deproteinized bovine bone mineral and the same barrier. Standardized periapical X-rays were taken at 4 time points, BL: after tooth extraction, GR: immediately after socket grafting, 4M: 16 weeks, 8M: 32 weeks post-operatively. The levels of the alveolar bone crest at the mesial (Mh), and distal (Dh) and central aspects of the socket were measured at all time points. All the radiographs obtained were subtracted from the follow-up images. The gain, loss and unchanged areas in terms of grey values were tested for significant difference between the two groups. In the test group, the Mh and Dh showed a mean difference (± standard deviation) of 0.9 ± 1.2 and 0.7 ± 1.8 mm, respectively, among BL-8M. In the control group, the Mh and Dh showed a mean difference of 0.4 ± 1.3 and 0.7 ± 1.3 mm, respectively (P>0.05). Both treatments presented similar gain in grey values between BL-GR, BL-4M and BL-8M. The SBC presented less loss in grey values between BL-4M and BL-8M (Palveolar bone changes when used for alveolar ridge preservation. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Where is DNA preserved in soil organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Claudio; Beneduce, Luciano; Plaza, César

    2015-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) consists of long chains of alternating sugar and phosphate residues twisted in the form of a helix. Upon decomposition of plant and animal debris, this nucleic acid is released into the soil, where its fate is still not completely understood. In fact, although DNA is one of the organic compounds from living cells that is apparently broken down rapidly in soils, it is also potentially capable of being incorporated in (or interact with) the precursors of humic molecules. In order to track DNA occurrence in soil organic matter (SOM) fractions, an experiment was set up as a randomized complete block design with two factors, namely biochar addition and organic amendment. In particular, biochar (BC), applied at a rate of 20 t/ha, was combined with municipal solid waste compost (BC+MC) at a rate equivalent to 75 kg/ha of potentially available N, and with sewage sludge (BC+SS) at a rate equivalent to 75 kg/ha of potentially available N. Using a physical fractionation method, free SOM located between aggregates (unprotected C pool; FR), SOM occluded within macroaggregates (C pool weakly protected by physical mechanisms; MA), SOM occluded within microaggregates (C pool strongly protected by physical mechanisms; MI), and SOM associated with the mineral fractions (chemically-protected C pool; MIN) were separated from soil samples. DNA was then isolated from each fraction of the two series, as well as from the unamended soil (C) and from the bulk soils (WS), using Powersoil DNA isolation kit (MoBio, CA, USA) with a modified protocol. Data clearly show that the DNA survived the SOM fractionation, thus suggesting that physical fractionation methods create less artifacts compared to the chemical ones. Moreover, in both BC+MC and BC+SS series, most of the isolated DNA was present in the FR fraction, followed by the MA and the MI fractions. No DNA was recovered from the MIN fraction. This finding supports the idea that most of the DNA occurring in the SOM

  16. Preservation and rapid purification of DNA from decomposing human tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Amy; Rahman, Elizabeth; Canela, Cassandra; Gangitano, David; Hughes-Stamm, Sheree

    2016-11-01

    One of the key features to be considered in a mass disaster is victim identification. However, the recovery and identification of human remains are sometimes complicated by harsh environmental conditions, limited facilities, loss of electricity and lack of refrigeration. If human remains cannot be collected, stored, or identified immediately, bodies decompose and DNA degrades making genotyping more difficult and ultimately decreasing DNA profiling success. In order to prevent further DNA damage and degradation after collection, tissue preservatives may be used. The goal of this study was to evaluate three customized (modified TENT, DESS, LST) and two commercial DNA preservatives (RNAlater and DNAgard ® ) on fresh and decomposed human skin and muscle samples stored in hot (35°C) and humid (60-70% relative humidity) conditions for up to three months. Skin and muscle samples were harvested from the thigh of three human cadavers placed outdoors for up to two weeks. In addition, the possibility of purifying DNA directly from the preservative solutions ("free DNA") was investigated in order to eliminate lengthy tissue digestion processes and increase throughput. The efficiency of each preservative was evaluated based on the quantity of DNA recovered from both the "free DNA" in solution and the tissue sample itself in conjunction with the quality and completeness of downstream STR profiles. As expected, DNA quantity and STR success decreased with time of decomposition. However, a marked decrease in DNA quantity and STR quality was observed in all samples after the bodies entered the bloat stage (approximately six days of decomposition in this study). Similar amounts of DNA were retrieved from skin and muscle samples over time, but slightly more complete STR profiles were obtained from muscle tissue. Although higher amounts of DNA were recovered from tissue samples than from the surrounding preservative, the average number of reportable alleles from the "free DNA" was

  17. Comparison of the effectiveness of two different bone substitute materials for socket preservation after tooth extraction: a controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaie-M, Behnam

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two bone substitute materials for socket preservation after tooth extraction. Extraction sockets in 10 patients were filled with either inorganic bovine bone material (Bio-Oss) or with synthetic material consisting of hydroxyapatite and silicon dioxide (NanoBone). Extraction sockets without filling served as the control. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented protocol for socket preservation and that the choice of a suitable bone substitute material is crucial. The dimensions of the alveolar ridge were significantly better preserved with Bio-Oss than with NanoBone or without treatment. Bio-Oss treatment resulted in better bone quality and quantity for successful implant placement.

  18. Bone matrix mineralization is preserved during early perimenopausal stage in healthy women: a paired biopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misof, B M; Roschger, P; Blouin, S; Recker, R; Klaushofer, K

    2016-05-01

    Bone matrix mineralization based on quantitative backscatter electron imaging remained unchanged during the first year of menopause in paired transiliac biopsy samples from healthy women. This suggests that the reported early perimenopausal reductions in bone mineral density are caused by factors other than decreases in the degree of mineralization. It is unknown whether perimenopausal loss of bone mass is associated with a drop in bone matrix mineralization. For this purpose, we measured the bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) by quantitative backscatter electron imaging (qBEI) in n = 17 paired transiliac bone biopsy samples at premenopausal baseline and 12 months after last menses (obtained at average ages of 49 ± 2 and 55 ± 2 years, respectively) in healthy women. For interpretation of BMDD outcomes, previously measured bone mineral density (BMD) and biochemical and histomorphometric markers of bone turnover were revisited for the present biopsy cohort. Menopause significantly decreased BMD at the lumbar spine (-4.5 %) and femoral neck (-3.8 %), increased the fasting urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine ratio (+60 %, all p  0.05). Mean calcium concentrations of cancellous (Cn.CaMean) and cortical bone (Ct.CaMean) were within normal range (p > 0.05 compared to established reference data). Ct.CaMean was significantly correlated with Cn.CaMean before (R = 0.81, p mineralized tissue (Ct.Po.) after menopause (R = -0.57, p = 0.02). Surprisingly, the BMDD was found not affected by the changes in bone turnover rates in this cohort. This suggests that the substantial increase in bone formation rates took place shortly before the second biopsy, and the bone mineralization changes lag behind. We conclude that during the first year after the last menses, the degree of bone matrix mineralization is preserved and does not contribute to the observed reductions in BMD.

  19. Alveolar ridge preservation with deproteinized bovine bone graft and collagen membrane and delayed implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chaoyuan; Ding, Yuxiang; Zhou, Hongzhi; Qin, Ruifeng; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Guoliang; Hu, Kaijin

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate clinically and radiographically an alveolar ridge, preservation technique with deproteinized bovine bone graft and absorbable collagen membrane and then restoration with delayed implants were done. The study included 30 patients. The trial group's sockets were filled with deproteinized bovine bone graft (Bio-Oss) and covered with absorbable collagen membrane (Bio-Gide). The control group's sockets healed without any treatment. Panoramic radiograph and computed tomography were taken immediately after graft and 3 and 6 months later to evaluate the height, width, and volume change of the alveolar ridge bone. Dental implants were inserted in all sockets at 6 months, and osseointegration condition was evaluated in the following 12 months. All sockets healed uneventfully. In the trial group, the mean (SD) height reduction of the alveolar ridge bone was 1.05 (0.24) mm at 3 months and 1.54 (0.25) mm at 6 months. The width reduction was 1.11 (0.13) mm at 3 months and 1.84 (0.35) mm at 6 months. Bone volume reduction was 193.79 (21.47) mm at 3 months and 262.06 (33.08) mm at 6 months. At the same trend, in the control group, the bone height reduction was 2.12 (0.15) mm at 3 months and 3.26 (0.29) mm at 6 months. The width reduction was 2.72 (0.19) mm at 3 months and 3.56 (0.28) mm at 6 months. Bone volume reduction was 252.19 (37.21) mm at 3 months and 342.32 (36.41) mm at 6 months. There was a significant difference in alveolar ridge bone height, width, and volume reduction in the 2 groups. The osseointegration condition had no significant difference between the 2 groups. This study suggested that the deproteinized bovine bone graft and absorbable collagen membrane were beneficial to preserve the alveolar ridge bone and had no influence on the osseointegration of delayed implant.

  20. Alveolar bone preservation subsequent to miniscrew implant placement in a canine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melsen, Birte; Huja, Sarandeep; Chien, Hua-Hong

    2015-01-01

    -implant across the healing alveolar process results in increased density not only adjacent to the screws, but also in the region where a potential dental implant would be inserted. In humans, the insertion of transcortical screws may maintain bone when for various reasons insertion of a permanent dental implant......Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of transcortical screws on alveolar (bone) ridge preservation following extraction. DESIGN: Four adult beagle dogs had mandibular premolars extracted bilaterally. After 6 weeks, using a split-mouth design, two transcortical screws were inserted unilaterally...... below the alveolar crest on the experimental side in the region of the extraction. The dogs were killed after 12 weeks. The bone at the extraction sites was analyzed using μCT and 3D analysis. A cylindrical core was placed around the actual and a virtual screw placed in the identical location...

  1. Planktonic foraminifera-derived environmental DNA extracted from abyssal sediments preserves patterns of plankton macroecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Raphaël; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Darling, Kate F.; Lecroq-Bennet, Béatrice; Winther Pedersen, Mikkel; Orlando, Ludovic; Pawlowski, Jan; Mulitza, Stefan; de Vargas, Colomban; Kucera, Michal

    2017-06-01

    Deep-sea sediments constitute a unique archive of ocean change, fueled by a permanent rain of mineral and organic remains from the surface ocean. Until now, paleo-ecological analyses of this archive have been mostly based on information from taxa leaving fossils. In theory, environmental DNA (eDNA) in the sediment has the potential to provide information on non-fossilized taxa, allowing more comprehensive interpretations of the fossil record. Yet, the process controlling the transport and deposition of eDNA onto the sediment and the extent to which it preserves the features of past oceanic biota remains unknown. Planktonic foraminifera are the ideal taxa to allow an assessment of the eDNA signal modification during deposition because their fossils are well preserved in the sediment and their morphological taxonomy is documented by DNA barcodes. Specifically, we re-analyze foraminiferal-specific metabarcodes from 31 deep-sea sediment samples, which were shown to contain a small fraction of sequences from planktonic foraminifera. We confirm that the largest portion of the metabarcode originates from benthic bottom-dwelling foraminifera, representing the in situ community, but a small portion (DNA is preserved in a range of marine sediment types, the composition of the recovered eDNA metabarcode is replicable and that both the similarity structure and the diversity pattern are preserved. Our results suggest that sedimentary eDNA could preserve the ecological structure of the entire pelagic community, including non-fossilized taxa, thus opening new avenues for paleoceanographic and paleoecological studies.

  2. RECQL4 localizes to mitochondria and preserves mitochondrial DNA integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Croteau, Deborah L; Rossi, Marie L; Canugovi, Chandrika

    2012-01-01

    in premature aging. There is no information about whether any of the RecQ helicases play roles in mitochondrial biogenesis, which is strongly implicated in the aging process. Here, we used microscopy to visualize RECQL4 in mitochondria. Fractionation of human and mouse cells also showed that RECQL4 was present......RECQL4 is associated with Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome (RTS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by premature aging, genomic instability, and cancer predisposition. RECQL4 is a member of the RecQ helicase family, and has many similarities to WRN protein, which is also implicated...... in mitochondria. Q-PCR amplification of mitochondrial DNA demonstrated that mtDNA damage accumulated in RECQL4-deficient cells. Microarray analysis suggested that mitochondrial bioenergetic pathways might be affected in RTS. Measurements of mitochondrial bioenergetics showed a reduction in the mitochondrial...

  3. [Evaluation with different measuring methods for the alveolar bone change of ridge preservation in molar sites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-ping; Zhan, Ya-lin; Hu, Wen-jie; Xu, Tao; Wei, Yi-ping; Zhen, Min; Wang, Cui

    2016-02-18

    To investigate the changes of the vertical height and width of the alveolar bone six months after the alveolar ridge preservation in periodontal compromised molar sites of severe alveolar bone defects with clinical direct measurement, parallel periapical radiographs, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and to analyze the effect of the three different methods of measurement. In this study, 20 subjects requiring tooth extraction on account of periodontal disease with a total of 23 extracted molars were enrolled. Extractions were performed atraumatically and patients were received alveolar ridge preservation procedure with Bio-Oss and Bio-Gide. Clinical direct measurements were taken after tooth extraction and during the implant surgery 6 months later, CBCT scans and parallel periapical radiographs were taken immediately after ridge preservation and 6 months later. The changes of alveolar ridge width and vertical height after six months were measured and analyzed through the above-mentioned three methods and the similarities and differences of the measured effect were compared. There were no significant difference of alveolar vertical height in the center of the extraction sites, the center of distal aspect, and distobuccal aspect between the clinical direct measurements and the CBCT measurements (P>0.05), alveolar vertical height in other points and alveolar width measurements were statically significant (Palveolar increased significantly and the changes of alveolar vertical height of clinical direct and CBCT measurement were (6.15 ± 1.73) mm and (6.59 ± 2.53) mm, respectively. The measurements of the width of the alveolar bone were (8.45 ± 1.18) mm and (8.52 ± 1.27) mm, respectively. The measurements of the two methods were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The change of the alveolar height in the center of the extraction socket after six months measured by parallel periapical was (5.84 ± 4.28) mm, which was closed to the clinical direct measurement

  4. Clinical Outcome of a Wide-diameter Bone-anchored Hearing Implant and a Surgical Technique With Tissue Preservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowinckel, Marius S; Møller, Martin N; Wielandt, Kirsten N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical outcome of a surgical technique with tissue preservation for a wide bone-anchored hearing implant concerning postoperative complications, skin reactions, implant loss, and implant stability. STUDY DESIGN: Consecutive, prospective case series. SETTING: Tertia...

  5. Differential Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Preservation in Post-Mortem Teeth with Implications for Forensic and Ancient DNA Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B.; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard

  6. Preservation and Significance of Extracellular DNA in Ferruginous Sediments from Lake Towuti, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurèle Vuillemin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is ubiquitous in soil and sediment and constitutes a dominant fraction of environmental DNA in aquatic systems. In theory, extracellular DNA is composed of genomic elements persisting at different degrees of preservation produced by processes occurring on land, in the water column and sediment. Extracellular DNA can be taken up as a nutrient source, excreted or degraded by microorganisms, or adsorbed onto mineral matrices, thus potentially preserving information from past environments. To test whether extracellular DNA records lacustrine conditions, we sequentially extracted extracellular and intracellular DNA from anoxic sediments of ferruginous Lake Towuti, Indonesia. We applied 16S rRNA gene Illumina sequencing on both fractions to discriminate exogenous from endogenous sources of extracellular DNA in the sediment. Environmental sequences exclusively found as extracellular DNA in the sediment originated from multiple sources. For instance, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Acidobacteria derived from soils in the catchment. Limited primary productivity in the water column resulted in few sequences of Cyanobacteria in the oxic photic zone, whereas stratification of the water body mainly led to secondary production by aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs. Chloroflexi and Planctomycetes, the main degraders of sinking organic matter and planktonic sequences at the water-sediment interface, were preferentially preserved during the initial phase of burial. To trace endogenous sources of extracellular DNA, we used relative abundances of taxa in the intracellular DNA to define which microbial populations grow, decline or persist at low density with sediment depth. Cell lysis became an important additional source of extracellular DNA, gradually covering previous genetic assemblages as other microbial genera became more abundant with depth. The use of extracellular DNA as nutrient by active microorganisms led to selective removal of

  7. Alveolar socket preservation technique: Effect of biomaterial on bone regenerative pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canullo, Luigi; Pellegrini, Gaia; Canciani, Elena; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Galliera, Emanuela; Dellavia, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    There is a lack of evidence in the literature on the correlation between histomorphometric findings and gene/protein expression markers for bone metabolism. Evaluation of the histological features, changes in protein expression and gene activation for specific markers of bone metabolism following application of the alveolar ridge preservation technique with magnesium-enriched hydroxyapatite (MgHA). For each patient (n=15), bone samples were harvested after tooth extraction and processed for immunohistochemical and gene expression analysis (T0). Then, all alveolar sockets were grafted with MgHA. After 4 months (T1), bone samples were harvested for histomorphometrical, immunohistochemical and gene expression analysis. Gene expression and protein expression were evaluated for: RANK, RANKL, OPG, IL-6, TNF-α. For all markers, gene expression increased, but not significantly, from T0 to T1. The mean RANKL/OPG ratio was 1.88±1.24. Protein expression increased significantly (ppreservation with MgHA, markers for bone catabolism were activated. No significant correlation was found between histomorphometrical features of the regenerated tissue and protein expression at baseline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Artificial Gravity: Will it Preserve Bone Health on Long-Duration Missions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Street, Janis; Paloski, William H.

    2005-01-01

    Prolonged microgravity exposure disrupts bone, muscle, and cardiovascular homeostasis, sensory-motor coordination, immune function, and behavioral performance. Bone loss, in particular, remains a serious impediment to the success of exploration-class missions by increasing the risks of bone fracture and renal stone formation for crew members. Current countermeasures, consisting primarily of resistive and aerobic exercise, have not yet proven fully successful for preventing bone loss during long-duration spaceflight. While other bone-specific countermeasures, such as pharmacological therapy and dietary modifications, are under consideration, countermeasure approaches that simultaneously address multiple physiologic systems may be more desirable for exploration-class missions, particularly if they can provide effective protection at reduced mission resource requirements (up-mass, power, crew time, etc). The most robust of the multi-system approaches under consideration, artificial gravity (AG), could prevent all of the microgravity-related physiological changes from occurring. The potential methods for realizing an artificial gravity countermeasure are reviewed, as well as selected animal and human studies evaluating the effects of artificial gravity on bone function. Future plans for the study of the multi-system effects of artificial gravity include a joint, cooperative international effort that will systematically seek an optimal prescription for intermittent AG to preserve bone, muscle, and cardiovascular function in human subjects deconditioned by 6 degree head-down-tilt-bed rest. It is concluded that AG has great promise as a multi-system countermeasure, but that further research is required to determine the appropriate parameters for implementation of such a countermeasure for exploration-class missions.

  9. Planktonic foraminifera-derived environmental DNA extracted from abyssal sediments preserves patterns of plankton macroecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Morard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea sediments constitute a unique archive of ocean change, fueled by a permanent rain of mineral and organic remains from the surface ocean. Until now, paleo-ecological analyses of this archive have been mostly based on information from taxa leaving fossils. In theory, environmental DNA (eDNA in the sediment has the potential to provide information on non-fossilized taxa, allowing more comprehensive interpretations of the fossil record. Yet, the process controlling the transport and deposition of eDNA onto the sediment and the extent to which it preserves the features of past oceanic biota remains unknown. Planktonic foraminifera are the ideal taxa to allow an assessment of the eDNA signal modification during deposition because their fossils are well preserved in the sediment and their morphological taxonomy is documented by DNA barcodes. Specifically, we re-analyze foraminiferal-specific metabarcodes from 31 deep-sea sediment samples, which were shown to contain a small fraction of sequences from planktonic foraminifera. We confirm that the largest portion of the metabarcode originates from benthic bottom-dwelling foraminifera, representing the in situ community, but a small portion (< 10 % of the metabarcodes can be unambiguously assigned to planktonic taxa. These organisms live exclusively in the surface ocean and the recovered barcodes thus represent an allochthonous component deposited with the rain of organic remains from the surface ocean. We take advantage of the planktonic foraminifera portion of the metabarcodes to establish to what extent the structure of the surface ocean biota is preserved in sedimentary eDNA. We show that planktonic foraminifera DNA is preserved in a range of marine sediment types, the composition of the recovered eDNA metabarcode is replicable and that both the similarity structure and the diversity pattern are preserved. Our results suggest that sedimentary eDNA could preserve the ecological structure of

  10. Successful Function-Preserving Therapy for Chondroblastoma of the Temporal Bone Involving the Temporomandibular Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junkichi Yokoyama

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a case involving a late diagnosis of chondroblastoma of the temporal skull base involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Following an initial misdiagnosis and unsuccessful treatment over a period of 5 years, the patient was referred to our department for further evaluation and possible surgical intervention for occlusal abnormalities, trismus, clicking of the TMJ, and hearing impairment. Based on preoperative immunochemical studies showing positive reaction of multinucleated giant cells for S-100 protein, the final diagnosis was chondroblastoma. The surgical approach – postauricular incision and total parotidectomy, with complete removal of the temporal bone, including the TMJ via the extended middle fossa – was successful in preserving facial nerves and diminishing clinical manifestations. This study highlights a misdiagnosed case in an effort to underline the importance of medical examinations and accurate differential diagnosis in cases involving any tumor mass in the temporal bone.

  11. Effectiveness and safety of subcutaneous abdominal preservation of autologous bone flap after decompressive craniectomy: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, Sara; Tacconi, Leonello

    2010-05-01

    The aim was to assess the effectiveness and safety of reconstructing a cranial bone defect after decompressive craniectomy using an autologous bone flap banked in a subcutaneous pocket in the patient's abdominal wall. A prospective pilot study was performed on 12 of 15 consecutive patients who had undergone decompressive craniotomy and subsequent autologous bone flap replacement. The bone flap had been stored in the abdominal wall for an average period of 40 days. To assess the safety of this method, we evaluated the infections rate and the need for a surgical revision. Efficacy was evaluated under different points of view: 1) clinical standpoint, as the cosmetic reconstructive result at 6 months after the replacement; 2) imaging point of view, as the extent of residual bony gap detectable on a three-dimensional computed tomography scan as well as the extent of the bone flap revascularization, detected with a three-phase technetium bone scan. All the bone flaps were evaluated to assess their viability by histological investigations. There was no bone flap infection. The only significant complication encountered in two cases was the formation of a collection under the bone flap, which required its removal. This preliminary and limited experience has led us to believe that the subcutaneous preservation of autologous bone flap is feasible. This method may be a very inexpensive option that preserves the viability of the bone flap, which can be ultimately responsible for the good cosmetic results and the very low infection rate. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Thick-Sectioning Technique for Preservation of Bone-Metal Interfaces,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    of the interface was easily characterized with Eosin. Microscopic evaluations of osseointegrated dental implants mau be greatlu facilitated with this...AD-RI68 525 R THICK-SECTIONING TECHNIQUE FOR PRESERVATION OF 1/1 BONE-METRL INTERFACES(U) ARMY INST OF DENTAL RESEARCH NASHINGTON DC J MIZGRLR ET RL...Institute of Dental Research Walter Read Armu Medical Center >n Washington, DC 20307-5300 LLJ C.,*Address for reprints DSII fIO IrTEEII IApproved for? Public

  13. Novel actions of bisphosphonates in bone: Preservation of osteoblast and osteocyte viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Teresita; Plotkin, Lilian I.

    2010-01-01

    Bisphosphonates stop bone loss by inhibiting the activity of bone resorbing osteoclasts. However, the effect of bisphosphonates on bone mass cannot completely explain the reduction in fracture incidence observed in patients treated with these agents. Recent research efforts provided an explanation to this dichotomy by demonstrating that part of the beneficial effect of bisphosphonates on the skeleton is due to prevention of osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis. Work of our group, independently confirmed by other investigators, demonstrated that bisphosphonates are able to prevent osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. This pro-survival effect is strictly dependent on the expression of connexin (Cx)43, as demonstrated in vitro using cells lacking Cx43 or expressing dominant negative mutants of the protein as well as in vivo using Cx43 osteoblast/osteocyte-specific conditional knock-out mice. Remarkably, this Cx43-dependent survival effect of bisphosphonates is independent of gap junctions and results from opening of Cx43 hemichannels. Hemichannel opening leads to activation of the kinases Src and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), followed by phosphorylation of the ERK cytoplasmic target p90RSK kinase and its substrates BAD and C/EBPβ, resulting in inhibition of apoptosis. The anti-apoptotic effect of bisphosphonates is separate from the effect of the drugs on osteoclasts, as analogs that lack anti-resorptive activity are still able to inhibit osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, a bisphosphonate analog that does not inhibit osteoclast activity prevented osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis and the loss of bone mass and strength induced by glucocorticoids in mice. Preservation of the bone forming function of mature osteoblasts and maintenance of the osteocytic network, in combination with lack anti-catabolic actions, open new therapeutic possibilities for bisphosphonates in the treatment of osteopenic conditions in

  14. Chronic intermittent hypoxia preserves bone density in a mouse model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Marta; Montserrat, Josep M; Pavía, Javier; Dalmases, Mireia; Ros, Domenec; Fernandez, Yolanda; Barbé, Ferran; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2013-12-01

    Very recent clinical research has investigated whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may modulate bone homeostasis but the few data available are conflicting. Here we report novel data obtained in a mouse study specifically designed to determine whether chronic intermittent hypoxia realistically mimicking OSA modifies bone mineral density (BMD). Normal male and female mice and orchidectomized mice (N=10 each group) were subjected to a pattern of high-frequency intermittent hypoxia (20s at 5% and 40s at 21%, 60 cycles/h) for 6h/day. Identical groups breathing room air (normoxia) were the controls. After 32 days of intermittent hypoxia/normoxia the trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) in the peripheral femora were measured by micro-CT scanning. When compared with normoxia (two-way ANOVA), intermittent hypoxia did not significantly modify BMD in the three animal groups tested. Data in this study suggest that the type of intermittent hypoxia characterizing OSA, applied as a single challenge, preserves bone homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Outcomes of Alveolar Ridge Preservation With Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemi, Neda; Khoshkam, Vahid; Rafiee, Sahar; Bahrami, Naghmeh; Aslroosta, Hoori

    2018-02-01

    The main focused question of this systematic review was as follows: Does the application of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) placed in extraction sockets reduce the alveolar ridge changes? A systematic literature search was performed up to February 2017. Clinical studies published in English were included. Outcome variables of interest were as follows: changes in alveolar ridge width and height, the quality of new bone, patient's safety, adverse events, and postoperative complications. Seven articles were included. Because of the vast heterogeneity and high risk of bias among the studies, performing a meta-analysis deemed not feasible. Application of rhBMP-2 in the extraction socket was more effective in the reduction of ridge width compared with that of ridge height. The superiority of 1.5 mg/mL rhBMP-2/absorbable collagen sponge over the carrier alone on alveolar ridge width/height remodeling was more significant when it was applied in the sockets with ≥50% buccal bone dehiscence. The limited available data showed that rhBMP-2 did not improve the quality of new bone. Antibodies against rhBMP-2 were detected in the serum in 1 trial. Within the limits of this review, 1.5 mg/mL rhBMP-2 might be beneficial for preserving the alveolar ridge width within extraction sockets given as to whether the cost-effectiveness is justifiable. Studies with lower risk of bias should be performed to confirm the above findings.

  16. Preserving Yeast Genetic Heritage through DNA Damage Checkpoint Regulation and Telomere Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huilin Zhou

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to preserve genome integrity, extrinsic or intrinsic DNA damages must be repaired before they accumulate in cells and trigger other mutations and genome rearrangements. Eukaryotic cells are able to respond to different genotoxic stresses as well as to single DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, suggesting highly sensitive and robust mechanisms to detect lesions that trigger a signal transduction cascade which, in turn, controls the DNA damage response (DDR. Furthermore, cells must be able to distinguish natural chromosomal ends from DNA DSBs in order to prevent inappropriate checkpoint activation, DDR and chromosomal rearrangements. Since the original discovery of RAD9, the first DNA damage checkpoint gene identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes that have a role in this pathway have been identified, including MRC1, MEC3, RAD24, RAD53, DUN1, MEC1 and TEL1. Extensive studies have established most of the genetic basis of the DNA damage checkpoint and uncovered its different functions in cell cycle regulation, DNA replication and repair, and telomere maintenance. However, major questions concerning the regulation and functions of the DNA damage checkpoint remain to be answered. First, how is the checkpoint activity coupled to DNA replication and repair? Second, how do cells distinguish natural chromosome ends from deleterious DNA DSBs? In this review we will examine primarily studies performed using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system.

  17. Biological effects of compressive forces exerted on particulate bone grafts during socket preservation: animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael; Romanos, Georgios E; Alexandre Gerhke, Sergio; Gomez-Moreno, Gerardo; Maté-Sánchez de Val, José Eduardo; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis

    2016-08-02

    To compare different compressive forces exerted on a particulate graft material during socket preservation and their effects on bone regeneration. Six male dogs were used. The second, third, and fourth premolars, and the first molar were extracted bilaterally at the lower jaws. A particulate synthetic biphasic grafting material (60% HA and 40% β-tricalcium phosphate) was used. Three different standardized compressive forces were applied randomly during the socket preservation. The sample was divided into four experimental groups Test A (10 g), Test B (50 g), Test C (200 g), and Control (empty sockets). Collagen membranes were placed, and primary closure was obtained. Two months after the surgery the animals were sacrificed, and histomorphometric analysis of non-decalcified samples was performed at the coronal, middle, and apical thirds. Grafted sockets resulted in higher bony contour (3 ± 0.43 mm 2 ; P  0.05). Within the limitations of this experimental animal study, it might be concluded that grafted sockets compressed with 200 g force will have higher bony contours; higher compressive forces facilitate the penetration of the particulate graft material into the apical area of the socket and results in more bone formation at the coronal, middle, and apical thirds. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. High frequency of parvovirus B19 DNA in bone marrow samples from rheumatic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Anders; Isa, Adiba; Tolfvenstam, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    analysed and of the immune status of the patient. OBJECTIVES: To analyse the clinical significance of B19 DNA positivity in bone marrow samples from rheumatic patients. STUDY DESIGN: Parvovirus B19 DNA was analysed in paired bone marrow and serum samples by nested PCR technique. Serum was also analysed...... negative group. A high frequency of parvovirus B19 DNA was thus detected in bone marrow samples in rheumatic patients. The clinical data does not support a direct association between B19 PCR positivity and rheumatic disease manifestation. Therefore, the clinical significance of B19 DNA positivity in bone...... marrow samples from rheumatic patients must be interpreted with caution....

  19. A simple and cost-effective protocol for extraction of genomic DNA from ethanol preserved black flies (Simuliidae: Diptera)

    OpenAIRE

    Neelamegam Rameshkumar; Sankarappan Anbalagan; Nagarajan Kayalvizhi; Rasiravuthanahalli Kaveriyappan Govindarajan; Vimalanathan Arun Prasanna; Muthukalingan Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy of extraction methodology for the proposed DNA from the ethanol preserved black flies (Simuliidae: Diptera). Methods: This study addressed a simple and effective protocol for extraction of DNA from black flies stored in the ethanol. The sizes of larval and adult black flies ranged from 1.5 to 2.5 mm and 3 to 7 mm, respectively. To demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology, the DNA was extracted from the ethanol preserved sample ...

  20. Variation in osteocytes morphology vs bone type in turtle shell and their exceptional preservation from the Jurassic to the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Edwin A; Schweitzer, Mary H

    2012-09-01

    Here we describe variations in osteocytes derived from each of the three bone layers that comprise the turtle shell. We examine osteocytes in bone from four extant turtle species to form a morphological 'baseline', and then compare these with morphologies of osteocytes preserved in Cenozoic and Mesozoic fossils. Two different morphotypes of osteocytes are recognized: flattened-oblate osteocytes (FO osteocytes), which are particularly abundant in the internal cortex and lamellae of secondary osteons in cancellous bone, and stellate osteocytes (SO osteocytes), principally present in the interstitial lamellae between secondary osteons and external cortex. We show that the morphology of osteocytes in each of the three bone layers is conserved through ontogeny. We also demonstrate that these morphological variations are phylogenetically independent, as well as independent of the bone origin (intramembranous or endochondral). Preservation of microstructures consistent with osteocytes in the morphology in Cenozoic and Mesozoic fossil turtle bones appears to be common, and occurs in diverse diagenetic environments including marine, freshwater, and terrestrial deposits. These data have potential to illuminate aspects of turtle biology and evolution previously unapproachable, such as estimates of genome size of extinct species, differences in metabolic rates among different bones from a single individual, and potential function of osteocytes as capsules for preservation of ancient biomolecules. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A simple and cost-effective protocol for extraction of genomic DNA from ethanol preserved black flies (Simuliidae: Diptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelamegam Rameshkumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the efficacy of extraction methodology for the proposed DNA from the ethanol preserved black flies (Simuliidae: Diptera. Methods: This study addressed a simple and effective protocol for extraction of DNA from black flies stored in the ethanol. The sizes of larval and adult black flies ranged from 1.5 to 2.5 mm and 3 to 7 mm, respectively. To demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology, the DNA was extracted from the ethanol preserved sample of black flies using the commercial kids. The extracted DNA was further validated in the PCR amplification using internal transcribed spacer-1 rDNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit II rDNA target primers. Results: Interestingly, a minor modification in the proposed methodology yielded a good DNA concentration in comparison with the commercial kids. The extracted DNA sample using the proposed methodology was successfully validated in the PCR amplification using internal transcribed spacer-1 rDNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit II rDNA genes. Conclusions: The proposed DNA extraction procedure yielded good concentration of DNA from the ethanol preserved black flies. The added advantage is that the procedure is suitable for a range of insect species preserved in the ethanol obtained from the various field conditions.

  2. Utility of Filter Paper for Preserving Insects, Bacteria, and Host Reservoir DNA for Molecular Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Karimian

    2011-12-01

    Methods: Total body or haemolymph of individual mosquitoes, sand flies or cockroaches squashed or placed on the paper respectively. Extracted DNA of five different bacteria species as well as blood specimens of human and great gerbil Rhombomys opimus was pipetted directly onto filter paper. The papers were stored in room temperature up to 12 months during 2009 until 2011. At monthly intervals, PCR was conducted using a 1-mm disk from the DNA impregnated filter paper as target DNA. PCR amplification was performed against different target genes of the organisms including the ITS2-rDNA of mosquitoes, mtDNA-COI of the sand flies and cockroaches, 16SrRNA gene of the bacteria, and the mtDNA-CytB of the vertebrates. Results: Successful PCR amplification was observed for all of the specimens regardless of the loci, taxon, or time of storage. The PCR amplification were ranged from 462 to 1500 bp and worked well for the specified target gene/s. Time of storage did not affect the amplification up to one year. Conclusion: The filter paper method is a simple and economical way to store, to preserve, and to distribute DNA samples for PCR analysis.

  3. A comparative analysis of preservation techniques for the optimal molecular detection of hookworm DNA in a human fecal specimen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Papaiakovou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper collection and storage of fecal samples is necessary to guarantee the subsequent reliability of DNA-based soil-transmitted helminth diagnostic procedures. Previous research has examined various methods to preserve fecal samples for subsequent microscopic analysis or for subsequent determination of overall DNA yields obtained following DNA extraction. However, only limited research has focused on the preservation of soil-transmitted helminth DNA in stool samples stored at ambient temperature or maintained in a cold chain for extended periods of time.Quantitative real-time PCR was used in this study as a measure of the effectiveness of seven commercially available products to preserve hookworm DNA over time and at different temperatures. Results were compared against "no preservative" controls and the "gold standard" of rapidly freezing samples at -20°C. The preservation methods were compared at both 4°C and at simulated tropical ambient temperature (32°C over a period of 60 days. Evaluation of the effectiveness of each preservative was based on quantitative real-time PCR detection of target hookworm DNA.At 4°C there were no significant differences in DNA amplification efficiency (as measured by Cq values regardless of the preservation method utilized over the 60-day period. At 32°C, preservation with FTA cards, potassium dichromate, and a silica bead two-step desiccation process proved most advantageous for minimizing Cq value increases, while RNA later, 95% ethanol and Paxgene also demonstrate some protective effect. These results suggest that fecal samples spiked with known concentrations of hookworm-derived egg material can remain at 4°C for 60 days in the absence of preservative, without significant degradation of the DNA target. Likewise, a variety of preservation methods can provide a measure of protection in the absence of a cold chain. As a result, other factors, such as preservative toxicity, inhibitor resistance

  4. Peroxiredoxin 1 Protects Telomeres from Oxidative Damage and Preserves Telomeric DNA for Extension by Telomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Aeby

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage of telomeres can promote cancer, cardiac failure, and muscular dystrophy. Specific mechanisms protecting telomeres from oxidative damage have not been described. We analyzed telomeric chromatin composition during the cell cycle and show that the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1 is enriched at telomeres during S phase. Deletion of the PRDX1 gene leads to damage of telomeric DNA upon oxidative stress, revealing a protective function of PRDX1 against oxidative damage at telomeres. We also show that the oxidized nucleotide 8-oxo-2′deoxyguanosine-5′-triphosphate (8oxodGTP causes premature chain termination when incorporated by telomerase and that some DNA substrates terminating in 8oxoG prevent extension by telomerase. Thus, PRDX1 safeguards telomeres from oxygen radicals to counteract telomere damage and preserve telomeric DNA for elongation by telomerase.

  5. [The construction of rapid amplification of cDNA ends cDNA libraries from human fetal bone and joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, X; Gong, Y; Liu, Q; Li, J; Chen, B; Guo, C

    2001-02-01

    To construct rapid amplification cDNA ends(RACE) cDNA libraries from human fetal bone and joint and provide resources for isolation of bone- and joint-specific development-related genes. Total RNA of bone and joint were extracted with the modified single-step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction. The double-stranded end-blunted cDNA were synthesized using TaKaRa's cDNA synthesis kit and ligated to cassette adaptors. All of the cDNA molecules were amplified by a pair of common primers. A protocol for RACE cDNA library construction from bone and joint was established and two RACE cDNA libraries from human fetal bone and joint were successfully constructed. The protocol of RACE cDNA library construction from limited materials proved to be simple and efficient and the library was suitable for RACE to isolate tissue-specific genes.

  6. Study of the bone behavior around a neck preserving short stem implant: bone densitometric analysis over a span of two years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafy, Tarek Abdel; Sayed, Adel; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Study the bone mineral density (BMD) changes and the remodelling process after implantation of a neck preserving short stem implant over a period of two years. Using specific patients' selection criterion, a prospective study was done including 26 patients. All were operated upon by a single surgeon using the MiniHipTM, (Corin, Cirencester, UK). Mean age was 42.5 years. Clinical and radiological evaluation was done. Periprosthetic bone density was measured by DEXA. First scan was obtained within 10 days after surgery and served as a baseline for comparison. The mean pre-operative Harris Hip score of 37.8 increased to 95.1 points two years post-operatively. BMD in the overall periprosthetic area showed a significant reduction during the first three months. Restoration to the original levels was reached in all zones except the most proximal zones at one year. A net increase was detected (+3%) after two years. The neck preserving MiniHip short stem implant has proven to be a bone-friendly design. Significant bone remodeling process continues after the first year. Although bone resorption in the greater trochanteric region is still a problem, however, it has proven that the BMD in all the other periprosthetic regions including the calcar and the lesser trochanteric regions, are subjected to bone formation process over a period of two years. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2016.

  7. Quantification of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal DNA in roots: how important is material preservation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoušková, Martina; Püschel, David; Hujslová, Martina; Slavíková, Renata; Jansa, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring populations of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in roots is a pre-requisite for improving our understanding of AMF ecology and functioning of the symbiosis in natural conditions. Among other approaches, quantification of fungal DNA in plant tissues by quantitative real-time PCR is one of the advanced techniques with a great potential to process large numbers of samples and to deliver truly quantitative information. Its application potential would greatly increase if the samples could be preserved by drying, but little is currently known about the feasibility and reliability of fungal DNA quantification from dry plant material. We addressed this question by comparing quantification results based on dry root material to those obtained from deep-frozen roots of Medicago truncatula colonized with Rhizophagus sp. The fungal DNA was well conserved in the dry root samples with overall fungal DNA levels in the extracts comparable with those determined in extracts of frozen roots. There was, however, no correlation between the quantitative data sets obtained from the two types of material, and data from dry roots were more variable. Based on these results, we recommend dry material for qualitative screenings but advocate using frozen root materials if precise quantification of fungal DNA is required.

  8. Meta-analysis of walking for preservation of bone mineral density in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyn-St James, Marrissa; Carroll, Sean

    2008-09-01

    . Results were inconsistent (I2=51.4%) in showing a positive effect of walking on BMD at this site [WMD (random-effects) 0.014 g/cm2 95% CI (0.000 to 0.028); P=0.05). Insufficient data were available for meta-analysis of the total hip site. Funnel plots showed some asymmetry for negative lumbar spine BMD outcomes. Trial quality scores ranged from 0 to 3 from the Jadad scale of 0 to 5. We conclude that regular walking has no significant effect on preservation of BMD at the spine in postmenopausal women, whilst significant positive effects at femoral neck are evident. However, diverse methodological and reporting discrepancies are apparent in the published trials on which these conclusions are based. Other forms of exercise that provide greater targeted skeletal loading may be required to preserve bone mineral density in this population.

  9. A clinical and histomorphometric study of calcium sulfate compared with freeze-dried bone allograft for alveolar ridge preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloue, Samira M; Chesnoiu-Matei, Ioana; Blanchard, Steven B

    2012-07-01

    Many materials have been found to be effective in ridge preservation. The purpose of this study is to determine whether calcium sulfate (CS) is as effective as freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) in preserving postextraction ridge dimensions and to evaluate the amount of new bone formation and graft clearance through histologic analysis. Thirty-one extraction sites were selected. Postextraction clinical measurements were made, and sites were divided randomly into the test group (CS) or the control group (FDBA). After graft placement, all individuals received the same postoperative treatment and instructions. Participants were recalled after 3 months, measurements were made, and sites were re-entered. Bone samples were harvested and analyzed with histologic methodology for new bone formation and remaining residual graft. Thirteen test and 15 control sites were evaluated. There was no significant change in vertical ridge height before or after surgery within the test and control groups (P = 0.57, P = 0.68, respectively). There was a significant decrease in bucco-lingual ridge width for both groups (P = 0.0003, P = 0.0075, respectively), but the difference between groups was not significant (P = 0.11). Histologic analysis revealed an average of 32% new bone formation with 2.5% graft remaining for the test group and 16.7% new bone formation with 21% graft remaining for the control. Results indicate that CS is as effective as FDBA in preserving postextraction ridge dimensions in non-molar extraction sites. There is greater clearance of CS with more new bone formation after ≈3 months compared with FDBA in these sites. This paper received the Maynard K. Hine Award for Excellence in Dental Research presented by the Indiana Section of the American Association for Dental Research and supported by Procter & Gamble.

  10. A randomized controlled evaluation of alveolar ridge preservation following tooth extraction using deproteinized bovine bone mineral and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Rokhsareh; Babaei, Maryam; Miremadi, S Asghar; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashadi

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation could be performed immediately following tooth extraction to limit dimensional changes of alveolar process due to bone resorption. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and histologic outcomes of socket preservation using two different graft materials; deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) with absorbable collagen membrane. Twenty extraction sockets in 20 patients were randomly divided into 2 treatment groups: 10 sockets were augmented with DBBM and collagen membrane whereas 10 sockets were filled with DFDBA and covered by collagen membrane. Primary closure was achieved over extraction sockets by flap advancement. Horizontal and vertical ridge dimensional changes were assessed at baseline and after 4-6 months at the time of implant placement. For histological and histomorphometrical analysis, bone samples were harvested from the augmented sites with trephine during implant surgery. All data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 (α=0.05). Clinical measurements revealed that average horizontal reduction was 2.3 ± 0.64 mm for DFDBA and 2.26 ± 0.51 mm for DBBM. Mean vertical ridge resorption at buccal side was 1.29 ± 0.68 mm for DFDBA and 1.1 ± 0.17 mm for DBBM. Moreover, mean vertical ridge reduction at lingual site was 0.41 ± 0.38 mm and 0.35 ± 0.34 mm for DFDBA and DBBM, respectively. No significant differences were seen between two groups in any of those clinical parameters. Histologic analysis showed statistically significant more new bone deposition for DFDBA compared to DBBM (34.49 ± 3.19 vs. 18.76 ± 3.54) (P alveolar ridge preservation after tooth extraction, but there was more new bone formation and less residual graft particles in DFDBA group than in DBBM group.

  11. Single dose of bisphosphonate preserves gains in bone mass following cessation of sclerostin antibody in Brtl/+ osteogenesis imperfecta model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perosky, Joseph E; Khoury, Basma M; Jenks, Terese N; Ward, Ferrous S; Cortright, Kai; Meyer, Bethany; Barton, David K; Sinder, Benjamin P; Marini, Joan C; Caird, Michelle S; Kozloff, Kenneth M

    2016-12-01

    Sclerostin antibody has demonstrated a bone-forming effect in pre-clinical models of osteogenesis imperfecta, where mutations in collagen or collagen-associated proteins often result in high bone fragility in pediatric patients. Cessation studies in osteoporotic patients have demonstrated that sclerostin antibody, like intermittent PTH treatment, requires sequential anti-resorptive therapy to preserve the anabolic effects in adult populations. However, the persistence of anabolic gains from either drug has not been explored clinically in OI, or in any animal model. To determine whether cessation of sclerostin antibody therapy in a growing OI skeleton requires sequential anti-resorptive treatment to preserve anabolic gains in bone mass, we treated 3week old Brtl/+ and wild type mice for 5weeks with SclAb, and then withdrew treatment for an additional 6weeks. Trabecular bone loss was evident following cessation, but was preserved in a dose-dependent manner with single administration of pamidronate at the time of cessation. In vivo longitudinal near-infrared optical imaging of cathepsin K activation in the proximal tibia suggests an anti-resorptive effect of both SclAb and pamidronate which is reversed after three weeks of cessation. Cortical bone was considerably less susceptible to cessation effects, and showed no structural or functional deficits in the absence of pamidronate during this cessation period. In conclusion, while SclAb induces a considerable anabolic gain in the rapidly growing Brtl/+ murine model of OI, a single sequential dose of antiresorptive drug is required to maintain bone mass at trabecular sites for 6weeks following cessation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Novel HA/β-TCP-Collagen Composite Enhanced New Bone Formation for Dental Extraction Socket Preservation in Beagle Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Ning Ho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Past studies in humans have demonstrated horizontal and vertical bone loss after six months following tooth extraction. Many biomaterials have been developed to preserve bone volume after tooth extraction. Type I collagen serves as an excellent delivery system for growth factors and promotes angiogenesis. Calcium phosphate ceramics have also been investigated because their mineral chemistry resembles human bone. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of a novel bioresorbable purified fibrillar collagen and hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP ceramic composite versus collagen alone and a bovine xenograft-collagen composite in beagles. Collagen plugs, bovine graft-collagen composite and HA/β-TCP-collagen composite were implanted into the left and right first, second and third mandibular premolars, and the fourth molar was left empty for natural healing. In total, 20 male beagle dogs were used, and quantitative and histological analyses of the extraction ridge was done. The smallest width reduction was 19.09% ± 8.81% with the HA/β-TCP-collagen composite at Week 8, accompanied by new bone formation at Weeks 4 and 8. The HA/β-TCP-collagen composite performed well, as a new osteoconductive and biomimetic composite biomaterial, for socket bone preservation after tooth extraction.

  13. The development of submucosal injection of platelet rich plasma for accelerating orthodontic tooth movement and preserving pressure side alveolar bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. W. Liou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the surgical-assisted accelerated orthodontic tooth movement has been proved to be the most effective one currently, its disadvantages are it is a bone surgery, and it causes loss of alveolar bone that undermines the periodontal support of the target teeth. The submucosal injection of platelet rich plasma (PRP is a technique developed for accelerating orthodontic tooth movement by simulating the effects of bone insult without surgery and loss of alveolar bone. We have revealed clinically that submucosal injection of PRP accelerated the mandibular or maxillary alignment 1.7 folds faster in average, and the acceleration was dose-dependent when the PRP fold (platelet count in PRP/platelet count in blood was <12.5. The optimal PRP fold for a more than 2-fold acceleration of orthodontic alignment ranged from 9.5 to 12.5 folds. On the other hand, the injection of PRP on the pressure side of en masse anterior retraction decreased 71–77% of alveolar bone loss, and this was dose-dependent. The pressure side of en masse anterior retraction had no alveolar bone loss when the PRP fold was higher than 11.0. In conclusion, the optimal PRP fold for the best performance in acceleration of orthodontic tooth movement and preservation of the pressure side alveolar bone is 11.0–12.5.

  14. Etelcalcetide (AMG 416), a peptide agonist of the calcium-sensing receptor, preserved cortical bone structure and bone strength in subtotal nephrectomized rats with established secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodong; Yu, Longchuan; Asuncion, Frank; Grisanti, Mario; Alexander, Shawn; Hensley, Kelly; Han, Chun-Ya; Niu, Qing-Tian; Dwyer, Denise; Villasenor, Kelly; Stolina, Marina; Dean, Charles; Ominsky, Michael S; Ke, Hua Zhu; Tomlinson, James E; Richards, William G

    2017-12-01

    Sustained elevation of parathyroid hormone (PTH) is catabolic to cortical bone, as evidenced by deterioration in bone structure (cortical porosity), and is a major factor for increased fracture risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Etelcalcetide (AMG 416), a novel peptide agonist of the calcium-sensing receptor, reduces PTH levels in subtotal nephrectomized (Nx) rats and in hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) in clinical studies; however, effects of etelcalcetide on bone have not been determined. In a rat model of established SHPT with renal osteodystrophy, etelcalcetide or vehicle was administered by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection to subtotal Nx rats with elevated PTH (>750pg/mL) once per day for 6weeks. Sham-operated rats receiving vehicle (s.c.) served as non-SHPT controls. Prior to treatment, significant increases in serum creatinine (2-fold), blood urea nitrogen (BUN, 3-fold), PTH (5-fold), fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23; 13-fold) and osteocalcin (12-fold) were observed in SHPT rats compared to non-SHPT controls. Elevations in serum creatinine and BUN were unaffected by treatment with vehicle or etelcalcetide. In contrast, etelcalcetide significantly decreased PTH, FGF23 and osteocalcin, whereas vehicle treatment did not. Cortical bone porosity increased and bone strength decreased in vehicle-treated SHPT rats compared to non-SHPT controls. Cortical bone structure improved and energy to failure was significantly greater in SHPT rats treated with etelcalcetide compared to vehicle. Mineralization lag time and marrow fibrosis were significantly reduced by etelcalcetide. In conclusion, etelcalcetide reduced bone turnover, attenuated mineralization defect and marrow fibrosis, and preserved cortical bone structure and bone strength by lowering PTH in subtotal Nx rats with established SHPT. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of DESS as a DNA Preservation Method for the Detection of Strongyloides spp. in Canine Feces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meruyert Beknazarova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis is a gastrointestinal parasitic nematode with a life cycle that includes free-living and parasitic forms. For both clinical (diagnostic and environmental evaluation, it is important that we can detect Strongyloides spp. in both human and non-human fecal samples. Real-time PCR is the most feasible method for detecting the parasite in both clinical and environmental samples that have been preserved. However, one of the biggest challenges with PCR detection is DNA degradation during the postage time from rural and remote areas to the laboratory. This study included a laboratory assessment and field validation of DESS (dimethyl sulfoxide, disodium EDTA, and saturated NaCl preservation of Strongyloides spp. DNA in fecal samples. The laboratory study investigated the capacity of 1:1 and 1:3 sample to DESS ratios to preserve Strongyloides ratti in spike canine feces. It was found that both ratios of DESS significantly prevented DNA degradation compared to the untreated sample. This method was then validated by applying it to the field-collected canine feces and detecting Strongyloides DNA using PCR. A total of 37 canine feces samples were collected and preserved in the 1:3 ratio (sample: DESS and of these, 17 were positive for Strongyloides spp. The study shows that both 1:1 and 1:3 sample to DESS ratios were able to preserve the Strongyloides spp. DNA in canine feces samples stored at room temperature for up to 56 days. This DESS preservation method presents the most applicable and feasible method for the Strongyloides DNA preservation in field-collected feces.

  16. Preservation and promotion of bone formation in the mandible as a response to a novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial in mineral deficiency induced low bone mass male versus female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Kritika; Naula, Diana P; Mijares, Dindo Q; Janal, Malvin N; LeGeros, Racquel Z; Zhang, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Calcium and other trace mineral supplements have previously demonstrated to safely improve bone quality. We hypothesize that our novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial (SBM) preserves and promotes mandibular bone formation in male and female rats on mineral deficient diet (MD). Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive one of three diets (n = 10): basic diet (BD), MD or mineral deficient diet with 2% SBM. Rats were sacrificed after 6 months. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) was used to evaluate bone volume and 3D-microarchitecture while microradiography (Faxitron) was used to measure bone mineral density from different sections of the mandible. Results showed that bone quality varied with region, gender and diet. MD reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and volume and increased porosity. SBM preserved BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in the alveolar bone and condyle in both genders. In the alveolar crest and mandibular body, while preserving more bone in males, SBM also significantly supplemented female bone. Results indicate that mineral deficiency leads to low bone mass in skeletally immature rats, comparatively more in males. Furthermore, SBM administered as a dietary supplement was effective in preventing mandibular bone loss in all subjects. This study suggests that the SBM preparation has potential use in minimizing low peak bone mass induced by mineral deficiency and related bone loss irrespective of gender. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1622-1632, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cortical Bone Stem Cell Therapy Preserves Cardiac Structure and Function After Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Thomas E; Schena, Giana J; Hobby, Alexander R; Starosta, Timothy; Berretta, Remus M; Wallner, Markus; Borghetti, Giulia; Gross, Polina; Yu, Daohai; Johnson, Jaslyn; Feldsott, Eric; Trappanese, Danielle M; Toib, Amir; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; George, Jon C; Kubo, Hajime; Mohsin, Sadia; Houser, Steven R

    2017-11-10

    Cortical bone stem cells (CBSCs) have been shown to reduce ventricular remodeling and improve cardiac function in a murine myocardial infarction (MI) model. These effects were superior to other stem cell types that have been used in recent early-stage clinical trials. However, CBSC efficacy has not been tested in a preclinical large animal model using approaches that could be applied to patients. To determine whether post-MI transendocardial injection of allogeneic CBSCs reduces pathological structural and functional remodeling and prevents the development of heart failure in a swine MI model. Female Göttingen swine underwent left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion (ischemia-reperfusion MI). Animals received, in a randomized, blinded manner, 1:1 ratio, CBSCs (n=9; 2×10 7 cells total) or placebo (vehicle; n=9) through NOGA-guided transendocardial injections. 5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine (EdU)-a thymidine analog-containing minipumps were inserted at the time of MI induction. At 72 hours (n=8), initial injury and cell retention were assessed. At 3 months post-MI, cardiac structure and function were evaluated by serial echocardiography and terminal invasive hemodynamics. CBSCs were present in the MI border zone and proliferating at 72 hours post-MI but had no effect on initial cardiac injury or structure. At 3 months, CBSC-treated hearts had significantly reduced scar size, smaller myocytes, and increased myocyte nuclear density. Noninvasive echocardiographic measurements showed that left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction were significantly more preserved in CBSC-treated hearts, and invasive hemodynamic measurements documented improved cardiac structure and functional reserve. The number of EdU + cardiac myocytes was increased in CBSC- versus vehicle- treated animals. CBSC administration into the MI border zone reduces pathological cardiac structural and functional remodeling and improves left ventricular functional reserve

  18. Minimally Invasive Alveolar Ridge Preservation Utilizing an In Situ Hardening β-Tricalcium Phosphate Bone Substitute: A Multicenter Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minas D. Leventis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ridge preservation measures, which include the filling of extraction sockets with bone substitutes, have been shown to reduce ridge resorption, while methods that do not require primary soft tissue closure minimize patient morbidity and decrease surgical time and cost. In a case series of 10 patients requiring single extraction, in situ hardening beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP granules coated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA were utilized as a grafting material that does not necessitate primary wound closure. After 4 months, clinical observations revealed excellent soft tissue healing without loss of attached gingiva in all cases. At reentry for implant placement, bone core biopsies were obtained and primary implant stability was measured by final seating torque and resonance frequency analysis. Histological and histomorphometrical analysis revealed pronounced bone regeneration (24.4 ± 7.9% new bone in parallel to the resorption of the grafting material (12.9 ± 7.7% graft material while high levels of primary implant stability were recorded. Within the limits of this case series, the results suggest that β-TCP coated with polylactide can support new bone formation at postextraction sockets, while the properties of the material improve the handling and produce a stable and porous bone substitute scaffold in situ, facilitating the application of noninvasive surgical techniques.

  19. Minimally Invasive Alveolar Ridge Preservation Utilizing an In Situ Hardening β-Tricalcium Phosphate Bone Substitute: A Multicenter Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventis, Minas D.; Fairbairn, Peter; Kakar, Ashish; Leventis, Angelos D.; Margaritis, Vasileios; Lückerath, Walter; Horowitz, Robert A.; Rao, Bappanadu H.; Lindner, Annette; Nagursky, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    Ridge preservation measures, which include the filling of extraction sockets with bone substitutes, have been shown to reduce ridge resorption, while methods that do not require primary soft tissue closure minimize patient morbidity and decrease surgical time and cost. In a case series of 10 patients requiring single extraction, in situ hardening beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules coated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were utilized as a grafting material that does not necessitate primary wound closure. After 4 months, clinical observations revealed excellent soft tissue healing without loss of attached gingiva in all cases. At reentry for implant placement, bone core biopsies were obtained and primary implant stability was measured by final seating torque and resonance frequency analysis. Histological and histomorphometrical analysis revealed pronounced bone regeneration (24.4 ± 7.9% new bone) in parallel to the resorption of the grafting material (12.9 ± 7.7% graft material) while high levels of primary implant stability were recorded. Within the limits of this case series, the results suggest that β-TCP coated with polylactide can support new bone formation at postextraction sockets, while the properties of the material improve the handling and produce a stable and porous bone substitute scaffold in situ, facilitating the application of noninvasive surgical techniques. PMID:27190516

  20. Effects of the bilayer nano-hydroxyapatite/mineralized collagen-guided bone regeneration membrane on site preservation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Wang, Chengyue; Chen, Qixin; Liu, Hai; Deng, Chao; Ling, Peixue; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2017-08-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the effects of the porous mineralized collagen plug with or without the bilayer mineralized collagen-guided bone regeneration membrane on alveolar ridge preservation in dogs. The third premolars in the bilateral maxilla of mongrel dogs ( N = 12) were extracted. Twenty-four alveolar sockets were thus randomly divided into three groups: membrane + collagen plug (MP, n = 8), nonmembrane + collagen plug (NP, n = 8) and blank group without any implantation (BG, n = 8). Radiographic assessment was carried out immediately and in the 2nd, 6th, and 12th week after surgery. The bone-repairing effects of the two grafts were respectively evaluated by clinical observation, X-ray micro-computed tomography examination, and histological analysis in the 8th and 12th week after surgery. Three groups presented excellent osseointegration without any inflammation or dehiscence. X-ray micro-computed tomography and histological assessment indicated that the ratios of new bone formation of MP group were significantly higher than those of NP group and BG group in the 8th and 12th week after surgery ( P guided bone regeneration membrane could reduce the absorption of alveolar ridge compared to BG group, and the combined use of porous mineralized collagen plug and bilayer mineralized collagen-guided bone regeneration could further improve the activity of bone regeneration.

  1. A high volume extraction and purification method for recovering DNA from human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Pamela L; Stoljarova, Monika; Schmedes, Sarah E; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    DNA recovery, purity and overall extraction efficiency of a protocol employing a novel silica-based column, Hi-Flow(®) (Generon Ltd., Maidenhead, UK), were compared with that of a standard organic DNA extraction methodology. The quantities of DNA recovered by each method were compared by real-time PCR and quality of DNA by STR typing using the PowerPlex(®) ESI 17 Pro System (Promega Corporation, Madison, WI) on DNA from 10 human bone samples. Overall, the Hi-Flow method recovered comparable quantities of DNA ranging from 0.8ng±1 to 900ng±159 of DNA compared with the organic method ranging from 0.5ng±0.9 to 855ng±156 of DNA. Complete profiles (17/17 loci tested) were obtained for at least one of three replicates for 3/10 samples using the Hi-Flow method and from 2/10 samples with the organic method. All remaining bone samples yielded partial profiles for all replicates with both methods. Compared with a standard organic DNA isolation method, the results indicated that the Hi-Flow method provided equal or improved recovery and quality of DNA without the harmful effects of organic extraction. Moreover, larger extraction volumes (up to 20mL) can be employed with the Hi-Flow method which enabled more bone sample to be extracted at one time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quality and quantity of extracted deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) from preserved soft tissues of putrefied unidentifiable human corpse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooniya, Shashank; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Raina, Anupuma; Millo, Tabin; Dogra, Tirath Das

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate collection and preservation of soft tissues from putrefied unidentifiable human corpse for the purpose of identification using DNA profiling technique is critically important especially in developing countries like India having different levels of health-care set ups with largely varying facilities and varying climatic conditions. The present study was carried out, mainly focusing on quality and quantity of extracted DNA from the soft tissues of putrefied unidentifiable human corpse stored upto 4 weeks at 4°C and at -80°C for DNA analysis. The present study was conducted on 16 different putrefied unidentifiable human corpses after getting approval from institutional ethical committee. Around 2 g of four different tissues (brain, kidney, heart and muscle) were collected and preserved for one month followed by DNA extraction using the organic method, the quality and quantity of high molecular weight-DNA was estimated using the spectrophotometer and gel electrophoresis. Further, the amplification polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was also performed (AmpFLSTR(®) Indentifiler™ PCR Amplification kit for multiple loci, of Applied Biosystems, Lab India) and was checked using continuous PAGE. The yield of DNA was significantly higher at -80°C for all the four tissues collected and was best for brain followed by heart, kidney and worst for muscles in all cases. It is suggested that the brain tissue preserved at -80°C is the best among soft issues for DNA extraction. Refrigeration or deep freezing facility should be available at all the centers.

  3. A Concentrated Hydrochloric Acid-based Method for Complete Recovery of DNA from Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David M

    2015-11-01

    The successful extraction of DNA from historical or ancient animal bone is important for the analysis of discriminating genetic markers. Methods used currently rely on the digestion of bone with EDTA and proteinase K, followed by purification with phenol/chloroform and silica bed binding. We have developed a simple concentrated hydrochloric acid-based method that precludes the use of phenol/chloroform purification and can lead to a several-fold increase in DNA yield when compared to other commonly used methods. Concentrated hydrochloric acid was shown to dissolve most of the undigested bone and allowed the efficient recovery of DNA fragments <100 bases in length. This method should prove useful for the recovery of DNAs from highly degraded animal bone, such as that found in historical or ancient samples. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Clinical outcome and bone preservation of single TiUnite™ implants installed with flapless or flap surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruyn, Hugo; Atashkadeh, Mandana; Cosyn, Jan; van de Velde, Tommie

    2011-09-01

    Flapless, free-handed implant surgery offers advantages for patient comfort, but studies on long-term clinical success based on marginal bone loss are scarce. The aim of this study was to compare single implants installed with a flap (F) or flapless (FL) surgery with respect to survival and marginal bone preservation after at least 3 years. Fifty-three TiUnite™ Brånemark implants, installed in 49 patients (27 females; 22 males; mean age 53 years) were examined. Then, 25 F and 28 FL were delayed loaded; bone level from the abutment-implant level was measured on intraoral radiographs. From 44 (21 F, 23 FL), 31 (18F, 13 FL), and 36 (18 F, 18 FL) implants, radiographs were available at baseline and after 1 and 3 years of function. The overall survival rate was 100% and the overall mean bone loss after an average of 38 months was 1.35 mm (SD 0.91; range 0-3.7). Both F and FL showed increasing bone loss during the first year with a higher bone loss for FL than for F sites (p .7). On individual implant level, nearly 80% in both F and FL were considered a success showing bone loss between 1.5 and 1.9 mm. Single implants yield an excellent prognosis with stable bone levels irrespective of the surgical technique, and free-handed flapless surgery is a viable alternative to more extensively planned guided surgery. Proper case selection and clinical experience are considered prerequisites for a predictable treatment outcome. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Pulsed electromagnetic fields partially preserve bone mass, microarchitecture, and strength by promoting bone formation in hindlimb-suspended rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Da; Cai, Jing; Wu, Yan; Shen, Guanghao; Li, Feijiang; Xu, Qiaoling; Xie, Kangning; Tang, Chi; Liu, Juan; Guo, Wei; Wu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Maogang; Luo, Erping

    2014-10-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF), as a safe and noninvasive method, could promote in vivo and in vitro osteogenesis. Thus far, the effects and underlying mechanisms of PEMF on disuse osteopenia and/or osteoporosis remain poorly understood. Herein, the efficiency of PEMF on osteoporotic bone microarchitecture, bone strength, and bone metabolism, together with its associated signaling pathway mechanism, was systematically investigated in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty young mature (3-month-old), male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally assigned to control, HU, and HU + PEMF groups. The HU + PEMF group was subjected to daily 2-hour PEMF exposure at 15 Hz, 2.4 mT. After 4 weeks, micro-computed tomography (µCT) results showed that PEMF ameliorated the deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture. Three-point bending test showed that PEMF mitigated HU-induced reduction in femoral mechanical properties, including maximum load, stiffness, and elastic modulus. Moreover, PEMF increased serum bone formation markers, including osteocalcin (OC) and N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP); nevertheless, PEMF exerted minor inhibitory effects on bone resorption markers, including C-terminal crosslinked telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX-I) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAcP5b). Bone histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that PEMF increased mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, and osteoblast numbers in cancellous bone, but PEMF caused no obvious changes on osteoclast numbers. Real-time PCR showed that PEMF promoted tibial gene expressions of Wnt1, LRP5, β-catenin, OPG, and OC, but did not alter RANKL, RANK, or Sost mRNA levels. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of PEMF on disuse-induced osteopenia were further confirmed in 8-month-old mature adult HU rats. Together, these results demonstrate that PEMF alleviated disuse-induced bone loss by promoting skeletal anabolic activities

  6. Quality and Quantity of Extracted Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) from Preserved Soft Tissues of Putrefied Unidentifiable Human Corpse

    OpenAIRE

    Pooniya, Shashank; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Raina, Anupuma; Millo, Tabin; Dogra, Tirath Das

    2014-01-01

    Context: The appropriate collection and preservation of soft tissues from putrefied unidentifiable human corpse for the purpose of identification using DNA profiling technique is critically important especially in developing countries like India having different levels of health-care set ups with largely varying facilities and varying climatic conditions. Aims: The present study was carried out, mainly focusing on quality and quantity of extracted DNA from the soft tissues of putrefied uniden...

  7. Preservation of bone structure and function by Lithothamnion sp. derived minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Bergin, Ingrid; Jepsen, Karl; Kreider, Jaclynn M; Graf, Kristin H; Naik, Madhav; Goldstein, Steven A; Varani, James

    2013-12-01

    Progressive bone mineral loss and increasing bone fragility are hallmarks of osteoporosis. A combination of minerals isolated from the red marine algae, Lithothamnion sp. was examined for ability to inhibit bone mineral loss in female mice maintained on either a standard rodent chow (control) diet or a high-fat western diet (HFWD) for 5, 12, and 18 months. At each time point, femora were subjected to μ-CT analysis and biomechanical testing. A subset of caudal vertebrae was also analyzed. Following this, individual elements were assessed in bones. Serum levels of the 5b isoform of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and procollagen type I propeptide (P1NP) were also measured. Trabecular bone loss occurred in both diets (evident as early as 5 months). Cortical bone increased through month 5 and then declined. Cortical bone loss was primarily in mice on the HFWD. Inclusion of the minerals in the diet reduced bone mineral loss in both diets and improved bone strength. Bone mineral density was also enhanced by these minerals. Of several cationic minerals known to be important to bone health, only strontium was significantly increased in bone tissue from animals fed the mineral diets, but the increase was large (5-10 fold). Serum levels of TRAP were consistently higher in mice receiving the minerals, but levels of P1NP were not. These data suggest that trace minerals derived from marine red algae may be used to prevent progressive bone mineral loss in conjunction with calcium. Mineral supplementation could find use as part of an osteoporosis-prevention strategy.

  8. Preservation of bone structure and function by Lithothamnion sp. – derived minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Bergin, Ingrid; Jepsen, Karl; Kreider, Jaclynn M.; Graf, Kristin H.; Naik, Madhav; Goldstein, Steven A.; Varani, James

    2013-01-01

    Progressive bone mineral loss and increasing bone fragility are hallmarks of osteoporosis. A combination of minerals isolated from the red marine algae, Lithothamnion sp. was examined for ability to inhibit bone mineral loss in female mice maintained on either a standard rodent chow (control) diet or a high-fat western diet (HFWD) for 5-, 12- and 18-months. At each time-point, femora were subjected to μ-CT analysis and biomechanical testing. A subset of caudal vertebrae was also analyzed. Following this, individual elements were assessed in bones. Serum levels of the 5b isoform of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and procollagen type I propeptide (P1NP) were also measured. Trabecular bone loss occurred in both diets (evident as early as 5-months). Cortical bone increased through month-5 and then declined. Cortical bone loss was primarily in mice on the HFWD. Inclusion of the minerals in the diet reduced bone mineral loss in both diets and improved bone strength. Bone mineral density (BMD) was also enhanced by these minerals. Of several cationic minerals known to be important to bone health, only strontium was significantly increased in bone tissue from animals fed the mineral diets, but the increase was large (5–10 fold). Serum levels of TRAP were consistently higher in mice receiving the minerals but levels of P1NP were not. These data suggest that trace minerals derived from marine red algae may be used to prevent progressive bone mineral loss in conjunction with calcium. Mineral supplementation could find use as part of an osteoporosis - prevention strategy. PMID:24096551

  9. Socket preservation using freeze-dried bone allograft with and without plasma rich in growth factors in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Samandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF and freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA are shown to promote bone healing. This study was aimed to histologically and histomorphometrically investigate the effect of combined use of PRGF and FDBA on bone formation, and compare it to FDBA alone and control group. Materials and Methods: The distal roots of the lower premolars were extracted bilaterally in four female dogs. Sockets were randomly divided into FDBA + PRGF, FDBA, and control groups. Two dogs were sacrificed after 2 weeks and two dogs were sacrificed after 4 weeks. Sockets were assessed histologically and histomorphometrically. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Mann-Whitney U-tests utilizing the SPSS software version 20. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: While the difference in density of fibrous tissue in three groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.343, the bone density in grafted groups was significantly higher than the control group (P = 0.021. The least decrease in all socket dimensions was observed in the FDBA group. However, these differences were only significant in coronal portion at week 4. Regarding socket dimensions and bone density, the difference between FDBA and FDBA+PRGF groups was not significant in middle and apical portions. Conclusion: The superiority of PRGF+FDBA overFDBA in socket preservation cannot be concluded from this experiment.

  10. Evaluating ethanol-based sample preservation to facilitate use of DNA barcoding in routine freshwater biomonitoring programs using benthic macroinvertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D Stein

    Full Text Available Molecular methods, such as DNA barcoding, have the potential to enhance biomonitoring programs worldwide. Altering routinely used sample preservation methods to protect DNA from degradation may pose a potential impediment to application of DNA barcoding and metagenomics for biomonitoring using benthic macroinvertebrates. Using higher volumes or concentrations of ethanol, requirements for shorter holding times, or the need to include additional filtering may increase cost and logistical constraints to existing biomonitoring programs. To address this issue we evaluated the efficacy of various ethanol-based sample preservation methods at maintaining DNA integrity. We evaluated a series of methods that were minimally modified from typical field protocols in order to identify an approach that can be readily incorporated into existing monitoring programs. Benthic macroinvertebrates were collected from a minimally disturbed stream in southern California, USA and subjected to one of six preservation treatments. Ten individuals from five taxa were selected from each treatment and processed to produce DNA barcodes from the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI. On average, we obtained successful COI sequences (i.e. either full or partial barcodes for between 93-99% of all specimens across all six treatments. As long as samples were initially preserved in 95% ethanol, successful sequencing of COI barcodes was not affected by a low dilution ratio of 2∶1, transfer to 70% ethanol, presence of abundant organic matter, or holding times of up to six months. Barcoding success varied by taxa, with Leptohyphidae (Ephemeroptera producing the lowest barcode success rate, most likely due to poor PCR primer efficiency. Differential barcoding success rates have the potential to introduce spurious results. However, routine preservation methods can largely be used without adverse effects on DNA integrity.

  11. Evaluating ethanol-based sample preservation to facilitate use of DNA barcoding in routine freshwater biomonitoring programs using benthic macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Eric D; White, Bryan P; Mazor, Raphael D; Miller, Peter E; Pilgrim, Erik M

    2013-01-01

    Molecular methods, such as DNA barcoding, have the potential to enhance biomonitoring programs worldwide. Altering routinely used sample preservation methods to protect DNA from degradation may pose a potential impediment to application of DNA barcoding and metagenomics for biomonitoring using benthic macroinvertebrates. Using higher volumes or concentrations of ethanol, requirements for shorter holding times, or the need to include additional filtering may increase cost and logistical constraints to existing biomonitoring programs. To address this issue we evaluated the efficacy of various ethanol-based sample preservation methods at maintaining DNA integrity. We evaluated a series of methods that were minimally modified from typical field protocols in order to identify an approach that can be readily incorporated into existing monitoring programs. Benthic macroinvertebrates were collected from a minimally disturbed stream in southern California, USA and subjected to one of six preservation treatments. Ten individuals from five taxa were selected from each treatment and processed to produce DNA barcodes from the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI). On average, we obtained successful COI sequences (i.e. either full or partial barcodes) for between 93-99% of all specimens across all six treatments. As long as samples were initially preserved in 95% ethanol, successful sequencing of COI barcodes was not affected by a low dilution ratio of 2∶1, transfer to 70% ethanol, presence of abundant organic matter, or holding times of up to six months. Barcoding success varied by taxa, with Leptohyphidae (Ephemeroptera) producing the lowest barcode success rate, most likely due to poor PCR primer efficiency. Differential barcoding success rates have the potential to introduce spurious results. However, routine preservation methods can largely be used without adverse effects on DNA integrity.

  12. Comparison of two silica-based extraction methods for DNA isolation from bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Jessica; Nagy, Marion

    2016-09-01

    One of the most demanding DNA extractions is from bones and teeth due to the robustness of the material and the relatively low DNA content. The greatest challenge is due to the manifold nature of the material, which is defined by various factors, including age, storage, environmental conditions, and contamination with inhibitors. However, most published protocols do not distinguish between different types or qualities of bone material, but are described as being generally applicable. Our laboratory works with two different extraction methods based on silica membranes or the use of silica beads. We compared the amplification success of the two methods from bone samples with different qualities and in the presence of inhibitors. We found that the DNA extraction using the silica membrane method results an in higher DNA yield but also in a higher risk of co-extracting impurities, which can act as inhibitors. In contrast the silica beads method shows decreased co-extraction of inhibitors but also less DNA yield. Related to our own experiences it has to be considered that each bone material should be reviewed independently regarding the analysis and extraction method. Therefore, the most ambitious task is determining the quality of the bone material, which requires substantial experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of long-term preservation on the mechanical properties of cortical bone in goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaren, Emil H.; van der Zwaard, Babette C.; van der Veen, Albert J.; Heyligers, Ide C.; Wuisman, Paul I. J. M.; Smit, Theo H.

    2008-01-01

    Bones used in mechanical studies are frequently harvested from human cadavers that have been embalmed in a buffered formaldehyde solution. It has been reported that formaldehyde fixation or freezing hardly affects the mechanical properties of bone after a storage period of several weeks. However,

  14. Effect of long-term preservation on the mechanical properties of cortical bone in goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaren, E.H.; van der Zwaard, B.C.; van der Veen, A.J.; Heyligers, I.C.; Wuisman, P.I.J.M.; Smit, T.H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Bones used in mechanical studies are frequently harvested from human cadavers that have been embalmed in a buffered formaldehyde solution. It has been reported that formaldehyde fixation or freezing hardly affects the mechanical properties of bone after a storage period of

  15. Yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) preserve bone strength and microstructure during hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojda, Samantha J; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Gridley, Richard A; Auger, Janene; Black, Hal L; Donahue, Seth W

    2012-01-01

    Reduced skeletal loading typically results in decreased bone strength and increased fracture risk for humans and many other animals. Previous studies have shown bears are able to prevent bone loss during the disuse that occurs during hibernation. Studies with smaller hibernators, which arouse intermittently during hibernation, show that they may lose bone at the microstructural level. These small hibernators, like bats and squirrels, do not utilize intracortical remodeling. However, slightly larger mammals like marmots do. In this study we examined the effects of hibernation on bone structural, mineral, and mechanical properties in yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris). This was done by comparing cortical bone properties in femurs and trabecular bone properties in tibias from marmots killed before hibernation (fall) and after hibernation (spring). Age data were not available for this study; however, based on femur length the post-hibernation marmots were larger than the pre-hibernation marmots. Thus, cross-sectional properties were normalized by allometric functions of bone length for comparisons between pre- and post-hibernation. Cortical thickness and normalized cortical area were higher in post-hibernation samples; no other normalized cross-sectional properties were different. No cortical bone microstructural loss was evident in osteocyte lacunar measurements, intracortical porosity, or intracortical remodeling cavity density. Osteocyte lacunar area, porosity, and density were surprisingly lower in post-hibernation samples. Trabecular bone volume fraction was not different between pre- and post-hibernation. Measures of both trabecular and cortical bone mineral content were higher in post-hibernation samples. Three-point bending failure load, failure energy, elastic energy, ultimate stress, and yield stress were all higher in post-hibernation samples. These results support the idea that, like bears, marmots are able to prevent disuse osteoporosis during

  16. Alveolar ridge preservation with the socket-plug technique utilizing an alloplastic putty bone substitute or a particulate xenograft: a histological pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, Lanka; Venkataraman, Narayan; Shukla, Sagrika; Prasad, Hari; Kotsakis, Georgios A

    2015-04-01

    Following tooth extraction, ridge preservation procedures are employed to regenerate bone in the extraction socket, limit consequent ridge resorption, and provide a stable base for implant placement. The purpose of this study is to histologically evaluate and compare bone regeneration in extraction sockets grafted with either a putty alloplastic bone substitute or particulate anorganic bovine xenograft utilizing the socket-plug technique. Nineteen patients underwent 20 tooth extractions and ridge preservation following a standardized protocol. Ten sites were grafted with calcium phosphosilicate putty (CPS group) and the remaining 10 with anorganic bovine bone substitute (BO group). Patients were recalled after 4-6 months to evaluate the bone regeneration and to proceed with implant placement. A bone core was obtained during the implant procedure from each site and was used for histologic analysis. Histomorphometry revealed that residual graft values were significantly higher in the BO group (25.60% ± 5.89%) compared to the CPS group (17.40% ± 9.39%) (P preservation using a putty calcium phosphosilicate alloplastic bone substitute demonstrates more timely graft substitution and increased bone regeneration when compared to an anorganic bovine bone xenograft.

  17. Part II. Minimizing alveolar bone loss during and after extractions. Protocol and techniques for alveolar bone preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Shankar; Haribabu, Prashanth Konatham; Xing, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge resorption accelerates following extraction of teeth and the residual defect varies from socket to socket. This article proposes a new treatment oriented classification of extraction defects. It also reviews several graft materials and membranes that aid in the decision for selecting an appropriate socket preservation technique. The algorithm developed by the authors helps design a potentially successful treatment plan based on the classification of extraction defects, with choices ranging from no treatment to complex grafting procedures (i.e. allogenic block grafts). In addition, the principles of wound healing and the ideal time points for utilizing the various types of graft materials and implants are discussed. This socket preservation treatment algorithm will guide clinicians to employ surgical procedures using various biomaterials to promote a successful outcome.

  18. Pyrosequencing analysis of the protist communities in a High Arctic meromictic lake: DNA preservation and change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eCharvet

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available High Arctic meromictic lakes are extreme environments characterized by cold temperatures, low nutrient inputs from their polar desert catchments and prolonged periods of low irradiance and darkness. These lakes are permanently stratified with an oxygenated freshwater layer (mixolimnion overlying a saline, anoxic water column (monimolimnion. The physical and chemical properties of the deepest known lake of this type in the circumpolar Arctic, Lake A, on the far northern coast of Ellesmere Island, Canada, have been studied over the last 15 years, but little is known about the lake’s biological communities. We applied high-throughput sequencing of the V4 region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene to investigate the protist communities down the water column at three sampling times: under the ice at the end of winter in 2008, during an unusual period of warming and ice-out the same year, and again under the ice in mid-summer 2009. Sequences of many protist taxa occurred throughout the water column at all sampling times, including in the deep anoxic layer where growth is highly unlikely. Furthermore, there were sequences for taxonomic groups including diatoms and marine taxa, which have never been observed in Lake A by microscopic analysis. However the sequences of other taxa such as ciliates, chrysophytes, Cercozoa and Telonema varied with depth, between years and during the transition to ice-free conditions. These results imply that there are seasonally active taxa in the surface waters of the lake that are sensitive to depth and change with time. DNA from these taxa is superimposed upon background DNA from multiple internal and external sources that is preserved in the deep, cold, largely anoxic water column.

  19. Inhibitory effect of benzene metabolites on nuclear DNA synthesis in bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.W.; Johnson, J.T.; Garner, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of endogenously produced and exogenously added benzene metabolites on the nuclear DNA synthetic activity were investigated using a culture system of mouse bone marrow cells. Effects of the metabolites were evaluated by a 30-min incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA following a 30-min interaction with the cells in McCoy's 5a medium with 10% fetal calf serum. Phenol and muconic acid did not inhibit nuclear DNA synthesis. However, catechol, 1,2,4-benzenetriol, hydroquinone, and p-benzoquinone were able to inhibit 52, 64, 79, and 98% of the nuclear DNA synthetic activity, respectively, at 24 μM. In a cell-free DNA synthetic system, catechol and hydroquinone did not inhibit the incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine triphosphate into DNA up to 24 μM but 1,2,4-benzenetriol and p-benzoquinone did. The effect of the latter two benzene metabolites was completely blocked in the presence of 1,4-dithiothreitol (1 mM) in the cell-free assay system. Furthermore, when DNA polymerase α, which requires a sulfhydryl (SH) group as an active site, was replaced by DNA polymerase 1, which does not require an SH group for its catalytic activity, p-benzoquinone and 1,2,4-benzenetriol were unable to inhibit DNA synthesis. Thus, the data imply the p-benzoquinone and 1,2,4-benzenetriol inhibited DNA polymerase α, consequently resulting in inhibition of DNA synthesis in both cellular and cell-free DNA synthetic systems. The present study identifies catechol, hydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, and 1,2,4-benzenetriol as toxic benzene metabolites in bone marrow cells and also suggests that their inhibitory action on DNA synthesis is mediated by mechanism(s) other than that involving DNA damage as a primary cause

  20. Carnosine attenuates cyclophosphamide-induced bone marrow suppression by reducing oxidative DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Deng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative DNA damage in bone marrow cells is the main side effect of chemotherapy drugs including cyclophosphamide (CTX. However, not all antioxidants are effective in inhibiting oxidative DNA damage. In this study, we report the beneficial effect of carnosine (β-alanyl-l-histidine, a special antioxidant with acrolein-sequestering ability, on CTX-induced bone marrow cell suppression. Our results show that carnosine treatment (100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p. significantly inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG, and decreased chromosomal abnormalities in the bone marrow cells of mice treated with CTX (20 mg/kg, i.v., 24 h. Furthermore, carnosine evidently mitigated CTX-induced G2/M arrest in murine bone marrow cells, accompanied by reduced ratios of p-Chk1/Chk1 and p-p53/p53 as well as decreased p21 expression. In addition, cell apoptosis caused by CTX was also suppressed by carnosine treatment, as assessed by decreased TUNEL-positive cell counts, down-regulated expressions of Bax and Cyt c, and reduced ratios of cleaved Caspase-3/Caspase-3. These results together suggest that carnosine can protect murine bone marrow cells from CTX-induced DNA damage via its antioxidant activity. Keywords: Carnosine, Cyclophosphamide, Oxidative DNA damage, Sister chromatid exchange, Apoptosis, Cell cycle arrest

  1. Comparative investigation of viability, metabolism and osteogenic capability of tissue-engineered bone preserved in sealed osteogenic media at 37 {sup 0}C and 4 {sup 0}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hengjian; Liu Guangpeng; Zhou Guangdong; Cen Lian; Cui Lei; Cao Yilin, E-mail: cuileite@yahoo.com.c, E-mail: yilincao@yahoo.co [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shanghai 9th People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China)

    2010-06-01

    Preservation of tissue-engineered (TE) bone is one of the key problems needed to be solved for its clinic application and industrialization. Traditional cryopreservation has been restricted because of the damages caused by ice formation and solution. Hypothermic preservation at 4 {sup 0}C has been widely used for the preservation of transplanted organ despite potential negative effects on viability of cells and tissue. 37 {sup 0}C is the best temperature for maintaining cellular bioactivities. However, 37 {sup 0}C also has a potential negative effect on preserved cells due to consumption of nutrients and accumulation of by-products. No studies have reported which temperature is more suitable for the preservation of TE bone constructs. The current study explored the feasibility of preservation of TE bone constructs in sealed osteogenic media at 37 {sup 0}C and 4 {sup 0}C. Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) were seeded into partially demineralized bone matrix (pDBM) scaffolds and cultured for 7 days to form TE bone constructs. The constructs were preserved in sealed osteogenic media at either 37 {sup 0}C or 4 {sup 0}C for 5, 7, 9 and 11 days, respectively. Growth kinetics, viability, metabolism and osteogenic capability were evaluated to explore the feasibility of preservation at 37 {sup 0}C and 4 {sup 0}C. The constructs cultured in osteogenic media at humidified 37 {sup 0}C/5%CO{sub 2} served as the positive control. The results demonstrated that all the constructs preserved at 4 {sup 0}C showed negative osteogenic capability at all time points with a much lower level of growth kinetics, viability and metabolism compared to the positive control. However, the constructs preserved at 37 {sup 0}C showed good osteogenic capability within 7 days with a certain level of growth kinetics, viability and metabolism, although an obvious decrease in osteogenic capability was observed in the constructs preserved at 37 {sup 0}C over 9 days. These results indicate that the

  2. The effect of a flapless alveolar ridge preservation procedure with or without a xenograft on buccal bone crest remodeling compared by histomorphometric and microcomputed tomographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Raquel Rezende Martins; Novaes, Arthur Belém; de Carvalho, Jessica Pires; de Almeida, Adriana Luisa Gonçalves

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated buccal bone crest remodeling, socket composition after healing, and dimensional ridge preservation after flapless tooth extraction procedures with or without a xenograft comparing histomorphometric and microcomputed tomographic (micro-CT) data. The mandibular premolars of eight dogs were extracted without flaps. One socket on each side received a grafting material (test group), and the other remained only with a blood clot (control group). Twelve weeks after treatment, buccal bone crest, alveolar ridge dimensions, and composition were analyzed by histomorphometry and micro-CT. Two- and three-dimensional evaluations showed better results for the grafted group when compared to the non-grafted group. The flapless alveolar ridge preservation procedure with deproteinized bovine bone material enhanced buccal bone crest, alveolar ridge dimensions and bone formation when compared to sockets with the blood clot only, as observed by histomorphometric and micro-CT analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Tight regulation of ubiquitin-mediated DNA damage response by USP3 preserves the functional integrity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancini, Cesare; van den Berk, Paul C M; Vissers, Joseph H A; Gargiulo, Gaetano; Song, Ji-Ying; Hulsman, Danielle; Serresi, Michela; Tanger, Ellen; Blom, Marleen; Vens, Conchita; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Jacobs, Heinz; Citterio, Elisabetta

    2014-08-25

    Histone ubiquitination at DNA breaks is required for activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. How the dynamic removal of this modification by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) impacts genome maintenance in vivo is largely unknown. To address this question, we generated mice deficient for Ub-specific protease 3 (USP3; Usp3Δ/Δ), a histone H2A DUB which negatively regulates ubiquitin-dependent DDR signaling. Notably, USP3 deletion increased the levels of histone ubiquitination in adult tissues, reduced the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) reserves over time, and shortened animal life span. Mechanistically, our data show that USP3 is important in HSC homeostasis, preserving HSC self-renewal, and repopulation potential in vivo and proliferation in vitro. A defective DDR and unresolved spontaneous DNA damage contribute to cell cycle restriction of Usp3Δ/Δ HSCs. Beyond the hematopoietic system, Usp3Δ/Δ animals spontaneously developed tumors, and primary Usp3Δ/Δ cells failed to preserve chromosomal integrity. These findings broadly support the regulation of chromatin ubiquitination as a key pathway in preserving tissue function through modulation of the response to genotoxic stress. © 2014 Lancini et al.

  4. Comparison of lyophilization, and freezing in honey as techniques to preserve cortical bone allografts used to repair experimental femoral defects in domestic adult cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Ferreira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cats with orthopedic conditions are a prominent part of the clinical work of veterinary. Conditions such as comminuted fractures, bone tumors and non-unions are often difficult to repair and may require the use of bone grafts for treatment. This study evaluated cortical bone allografts preserved in honey, frozen or lyophilized for correcting long bone defects created in the diaphysis of the right femur of domestic cats (n=24. In the control group (n=6, the defect was repaired using autogenous cortical bone graft. In the remaining animals (n=6/group, the defect was repaired with cortical bone allografts preserved in honey, frozen or lyophilized. Success of graft incorporation and length of time for consolidation were assessed through clinical, radiographic and histological evaluations performed up to 180 days. In the control, frozen, honey and lyophylized groups, respectively, success of graft incorporation was 91.6%, 83.3%, 75%, and 25%, with corresponding mean length of time for consolidation of 83.1, 78, 105 and 120 days. Incorporation percentage in the lyophilized group was significantly lower than in the frozen and control groups. In conclusion, bone grafts preserved in honey or frozen were effective for repairing cortical defects in the femurs of cats as compared to autogenous cortical bone grafts.

  5. A Suitable Method for DNA Extraction from Bones for Forensic Applications: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqeela S. Abuidrees

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human identification techniques are constantly developing. Before the discovery of DNA, anthropology accompanied with odontology was the most applicable technique for human identification. With the new era of molecular biology and the revolution of DNA and PCR techniques, DNA profiling has become the core of the human forensic identification process. Different types of samples can be exploited in forensic DNA analysis. In some extreme cases, bone samples are the only accessible samples of DNA due to the bad conditions of putrefaction or degradation of other biological materials and tissues. Therefore, an appropriate method should be determined to yield a full and clean profile. A case study is presented here in order to identify human remains and conclude the most appropriate method of DNA extraction from human remains. In addition, this study looks at the best part of the skeletal remains to be considered in the extraction of DNA for the purposes of identification. A suspect admitted that he buried his aborted son six months ago. The remains were recovered and DNA analysis was performed in order to determine any genetic link of the remains to the suspect and the female who delivered the baby. Two extraction methods were compared, the standard organic (phenol:chloroform:isoamyl alcohol and automated extraction using magnetic beads coated with silica (Qiagen EZ1 Advanced XL. Two bone parts, femur and clavicle, were also compared in terms of DNA yield. The efficiency of the two methods of DNA extraction from bones is illustrated quantitatively and qualitatively. Paternity testing was performed and the suspect was excluded from being the alleged father.

  6. The effect of radiation-sterilization conditions and preservation procedures on physico-chemical and biological properties of bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goclawska, A.D.; Kaminski, A.; Wasilewska, M.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-sterilization of connective tissue allografts (bone including) with a dose of 35 kGy is routinely used in the Central Tissue Bank in Warsaw since 1963. This method of sterilization offers many advantages: good penetration ability, relatively low temperature rise, and possibility of sterilization of grafts in closed beforehand vials, which protects against secondary contamination. It should be kept in mind, however that high doses of ionizing radiation (in the range of 20-35 kGy) used for sterilization evoke many chemical and physical changes which may influence biological properties of grafts. These changes have been studied using various methodological approaches. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry it has been found that in radiation-sterilized bone two types of paramagnetic entities are generated: i/ coliagen radicals which are unstable and disappear completely in the presence of air oxygen, ii/ very stable at room temperature paramagnetic defects (centers) localized in the crystalline lattice of bone mineral. These stable paramagnetic defects have been treated as a new kind of markers and used for: a/ quantitative evaluation of remodeling process of radiation-sterilized bone allografts preserved by lyophilization or deep freezing; b/ estimation of the dose of ionizing radiation absorbed by living organism in the case of accidental exposure (skeleton serving as a dosimeter) and for control of radiation-sterilization process. The effect of radiation-sterilization and preservation procedures on bone allografts was studied using a model of heterotopically induced osteogenesis and measuring the solubility of bone collagen in vitro. It has been observed that lyophilized bone allografts irradiated at room temp. with doses of 35 and 50 kGy, respectively, were very quickly resorbed in vivo and did not induce osteogenesis, while lyophilized as well as deep-frozen matrices irradiated at -7OoC were slowly resorbed and induced de novo bone fon

  7. Prospective Clinical and Radiographic Study of Alveolar Ridge Preservation Combining Freeze-Dried Bone Allograft With Two Xenogeneic Collagen Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashis, Andreas O; Hawley, Charles E; Stark, Paul C; Ganguly, Rumpa; Hanley, James B; Steffensen, Bjorn

    2016-04-01

    Tooth extractions are followed by significant dimensional changes in the alveolar crest that may preclude implant placement. This randomized, controlled, prospective compares the preservation of soft and hard tissue dimensional changes after alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) using two membranes consisting of collagen matrix (CM) or extracellular matrix (ECM) as barriers over freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA). Standardized clinical and radiographic measurements of soft and hard tissues were recorded by means of a stent before and 4 months after ARP. The surgery entailed sulcular incisions with minimal flap elevation and repositioning without advancement. Of 11 patients in the CM group and 12 in the ECM group who completed the study, gingival thickness (GT) increased from 0.1 to 0.2 mm for both groups along with a 0.5-mm decrease in the width of keratinized tissue after healing. Reductions in ridge width were most pronounced on the coronal aspect, 1.8 mm for CM and 2.0 mm for ECM, whereas vertical reduction was most pronounced on the buccal aspect, 0.7 to 1.0 mm. Differences between groups were not statistically significant. However, significant correlation for changes in GT (P = 0.001) and crestal bone width (P = 0.002) with preoperative buccal plate thickness (BPT) was observed. Both xenogeneic collagen matrices combined with FDBA were effective in maintaining soft tissues and minimizing ridge resorption in all dimensions after ARP. BPT was an important determinant for amount of change in crestal GT and ridge width.

  8. Bone metastasis in prostate cancer: Recurring mitochondrial DNA mutation reveals selective pressure exerted by the bone microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Rebecca S; Fedewa, Stacey A; Goodman, Michael; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Kissick, Haydn T; Morrissey, Colm; True, Lawrence D; Petros, John A

    2015-09-01

    Cancer progression and metastasis occur such that cells with acquired mutations enhancing growth and survival (or inhibiting cell death) increase in number, a concept that has been recognized as analogous to Darwinian evolution of species since Peter C. Nowell's description in 1976. Selective forces include those intrinsic to the host (including metastatic site) as well as those resulting from anti-cancer therapies. By examining the mutational status of multiple tumor sites within an individual patient some insight may be gained into those genetic variants that enhance site-specific metastasis. By comparing these data across multiple individuals, recurrent patterns may identify alterations that are fundamental to successful site-specific metastasis. We sequenced the mitochondrial genome in 10 prostate cancer patients with bone metastases enrolled in a rapid autopsy program. Patients had late stage disease and received androgen ablation and frequently other systemic therapies. For each of 9 patients, 4 separate tissues were sequenced: the primary prostate cancer, a soft tissue metastasis, a bone metastasis and an uninvolved normal tissue that served as the non-cancerous control. An additional (10th) patient had no primary prostate available for sequencing but had both metastatic sites (and control DNA) sequenced. We then examined the number and location of somatically acquired mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in the primary tumor and two metastatic sites in each individual patient. Finally, we compared patients with each other to determine any common patterns of somatic mutation. Somatic mutations were significantly more numerous in the bone compared to either the primary tumor or soft tissue metastases. A missense mutation at nucleotide position (n.p.) 10398 (A10398G; Thr114Ala) in the respiratory complex I gene ND3 was the most common (7 of 10 patients) and was detected only in the bone. Other notable somatic mutations that occurred in more than one patient

  9. Biochemical and physical correlates of DNA contamination in archaeological human bones and teeth excavated at Matera, Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M. T. P.; Rudbeck, L.; Willerslev, E.

    2005-01-01

    The majority of ancient DNA studies on human specimens have utilised teeth and bone as a source of genetic material. In this study the levels of endogenous contamination (i.e. present within the sample prior to sampling for the DNA analysis) are assessed within human bone and teeth specimens samp...

  10. DNA content alterations in Tetrahymena pyriformis macronucleus after exposure to food preservatives sodium nitrate and sodium benzoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutsidou, Ariadni C; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Chasapis, C T; Terzoudi, Georgia I; Spiliopoulou, Chara A; Stefanidou, Maria E

    2012-12-01

    The toxicity, in terms of changes in the DNA content, of two food preservatives, sodium nitrate and sodium benzoate was studied on the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis using DNA image analysis technology. For this purpose, selected doses of both food additives were administered for 2 h to protozoa cultures and DNA image analysis of T. pyriformis nuclei was performed. The analysis was based on the measurement of the Mean Optical Density which represents the cellular DNA content. The results have shown that after exposure of the protozoan cultures to doses equivalent to ADI, a statistically significant increase in the macronuclear DNA content compared to the unexposed control samples was observed. The observed increase in the macronuclear DNA content is indicative of the stimulation of the mitotic process and the observed increase in MOD, accompanied by a stimulation of the protozoan proliferation activity is in consistence with this assumption. Since alterations at the DNA level such as DNA content and uncontrolled mitogenic stimulation have been linked with chemical carcinogenesis, the results of the present study add information on the toxicogenomic profile of the selected chemicals and may potentially lead to reconsideration of the excessive use of nitrates aiming to protect public health.

  11. Simulated Space Radiation and Weightlessness: Vascular-Bone Coupling Mechanisms to Preserve Skeletal Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, R. K.; Alwood, J.; Tahimic, C.; Schreurs, A.-S.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Terada, M.; Zaragoza, J.; Truong, T.; Bruns, K.; Castillo, A.; hide

    2018-01-01

    We examined experimentally the effects of radiation and/or simulated weightlessness by hindlimb unloading on bone and blood vessel function either after a short period or at a later time after transient exposures in adult male, C57Bl6J mice. In sum, recent findings from our studies show that in the short term, ionizing radiation and simulate weightlessness cause greater deficits in blood vessels when combined compared to either challenge alone. In the long term, heavy ion radiation, but not unloading, can lead to persistent, adverse consequences for bone and vessel function, possibly due to oxidative stress-related pathways.

  12. Pilot study of DNA extraction from archival unstained bone marrow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    coagulant whole blood, bloodstains, hairs, tissue samples and buccal epithelial cells. The purpose of this study was to compare yield and quality of DNA samples obtained with the use of three different methods. The ability of these procedures to ...

  13. Detection of hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA in paraffin-embedded and cryo-preserved liver biopsies of chronic hepatitis B patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takkenberg, R. Bart; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Menting, Sandra; Weegink, Christine J.; Terpstra, Valeska; Cornelissen, Marion; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Reesink, Hendrik W.; Beld, Marcel G. H. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) may become an important predictor for treatment outcome or long-term follow-up. Aim To detect cccDNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) and to compare with cryo-preserved liver tissue. Methods Biopsies of 56 chronic

  14. The non-steroidal antiandrogen, bicalutamide ('Casodex'), may preserve bone mineral density as compared with castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrrell, C J; Blake, G M; Iversen, P

    2003-01-01

    The impact of bicalutamide (Casodex) monotherapy on bone mineral density (BMD) was investigated in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. BMD was assessed after treatment with bicalutamide 150 mg daily ( n=21) or by medical castration (goserelin acetate 3.6 mg every 28 days) ( n=8...

  15. [High bone consolidation rates after humeral head-preserving revision surgery in non-unions of the proximal humerus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, S D; Schnetzke, M; Hudel, I; Studier-Fischer, S; Grützner, P A; Gühring, T

    2014-12-01

    showed no bacterial pathogen after 14 days of incubation. DASH score and Constant score were used to evaluate the functional outcome after revision surgery. Bone healing was determined by standard X-rays and evaluated by a modified radiological score. 89% of the patients could be followed for an average of 28 months and the radiological follow-up was at 9 months. The radiological score showed very good (50%), or good results, and a sufficient bone healing was shown in 25 of 27 patients (93%). The pseudarthrosis revision surgery failed in two cases (n = 1 persisting non-union; n = 1 humeral head necrosis after re-operation with angle plate). DASH scores provided a mean of 40 ± 28.8 with a range from 0-97 points, and the results from the Constant score provided 45 ± 25.4. The analysis with variation of age showed a trend for better results in female patients fracture of the iliac bone occurred that healed with conservative treatment. The pseudarthrosis revision surgery with humeral head preserving re-osteosynthesis with bone transplantation is an effective treatment for non-unions of the proximal humerus and the proximal humeral shaft and the current results showed high bone consolidation rates. As the functional results remained limited after revision an individual treatment decision should be made concerning the most appropriate therapy. While a shoulder prosthesis may be considered in the aged patient, a revision strategy with reosteosynthesis should be considered particularly in younger patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Exercise Preserves Physical Function in Prostate Cancer Patients with Bone Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Daniel A; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Cormie, Prue; Joseph, David; Chambers, Suzanne K; Chee, Raphael; Peddle-McIntyre, Carolyn J; Hart, Nicolas H; Baumann, Freerk T; Denham, James; Baker, Michael; Newton, Robert U

    2018-03-01

    The presence of bone metastases has excluded participation of cancer patients in exercise interventions and is a relative contraindication to supervised exercise in the community setting because of concerns of fragility fracture. We examined the efficacy and safety of a modular multimodal exercise program in prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. Between 2012 and 2015, 57 prostate cancer patients (70.0 ± 8.4 yr; body mass index, 28.7 ± 4.0 kg·m) with bone metastases (pelvis, 75.4%; femur, 40.4%; rib/thoracic spine, 66.7%; lumbar spine, 43.9%; humerus, 24.6%; other sites, 70.2%) were randomized to multimodal supervised aerobic, resistance, and flexibility exercises undertaken thrice weekly (EX; n = 28) or usual care (CON; n = 29) for 3 months. Physical function subscale of the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 was the primary end point as an indicator of patient-rated physical functioning. Secondary end points included objective measures of physical function, lower body muscle strength, body composition, and fatigue. Safety was assessed by recording the incidence and severity of any adverse events, skeletal complications, and bone pain throughout the intervention. There was a significant difference between groups for self-reported physical functioning (3.2 points; 95% confidence interval, 0.4-6.0 points; P = 0.028) and lower body muscle strength (6.6 kg; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-12.7; P = 0.033) at 3 months favoring EX. However, there was no difference between groups for lean mass (P = 0.584), fat mass (P = 0.598), or fatigue (P = 0.964). There were no exercise-related adverse events or skeletal fractures and no differences in bone pain between EX and CON (P = 0.507). Multimodal modular exercise in prostate cancer patients with bone metastases led to self-reported improvements in physical function and objectively measured lower body muscle strength with no skeletal complications or increased bone pain. ACTRN12611001158954.

  17. Improved Methods of Carnivore Faecal Sample Preservation, DNA Extraction and Quantification for Accurate Genotyping of Wild Tigers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harika, Katakam; Mahla, Ranjeet Singh; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-invasively collected samples allow a variety of genetic studies on endangered and elusive species. However due to low amplification success and high genotyping error rates fewer samples can be identified up to the individual level. Number of PCRs needed to obtain reliable genotypes also noticeably increase. Methods We developed a quantitative PCR assay to measure and grade amplifiable nuclear DNA in feline faecal extracts. We determined DNA degradation in experimentally aged faecal samples and tested a suite of pre-PCR protocols to considerably improve DNA retrieval. Results Average DNA concentrations of Grade I, II and III extracts were 982pg/µl, 9.5pg/µl and 0.4pg/µl respectively. Nearly 10% of extracts had no amplifiable DNA. Microsatellite PCR success and allelic dropout rates were 92% and 1.5% in Grade I, 79% and 5% in Grade II, and 54% and 16% in Grade III respectively. Our results on experimentally aged faecal samples showed that ageing has a significant effect on quantity and quality of amplifiable DNA (pDNA degradation occurs within 3 days of exposure to direct sunlight. DNA concentrations of Day 1 samples stored by ethanol and silica methods for a month varied significantly from fresh Day 1 extracts (p0.05). DNA concentrations of fresh tiger and leopard faecal extracts without addition of carrier RNA were 816.5pg/µl (±115.5) and 690.1pg/µl (±207.1), while concentrations with addition of carrier RNA were 49414.5pg/µl (±9370.6) and 20982.7pg/µl (±6835.8) respectively. Conclusions Our results indicate that carnivore faecal samples should be collected as freshly as possible, are better preserved by two-step method and should be extracted with addition of carrier RNA. We recommend quantification of template DNA as this facilitates several downstream protocols. PMID:23071624

  18. Long-term hormone replacement therapy preserves bone mineral density in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Line; Hjerrild, Britta E; Lauridsen, Anna L

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and increased risk of fractures are present in many women with Turner syndrome (TS). OBJECTIVE: Examine longitudinal changes in BMD in TS and relate changes to biochemical parameters. DESIGN: Prospective, pragmatic, and observational study. Examinations......-informed women with TS, being encouraged to maintain a healthy lifestyle, including HRT and intake of calcium and vitamin D.......-dominant forearm. Bone formation and resorption markers, sex hormones, IGF1, and maximal oxygen uptake. RESULTS: At follow-up, forearm BMD, radius ultradistal BMD, and hip BMD remained unchanged, radius 1/3 BMD declined (0.601+/-0.059 vs 0.592+/-0.059, P=0.03), while spine BMD increased (0.972+/-0.139 vs 1.......010+/-0.144, Pformation markers did not change over time in TS. Bone resorption markers decreased over time in TS. Testosterone, IGF1, and maximal oxygen uptake was significantly reduced in TS. CONCLUSION: Longitudinal changes in BMD in TS were slight. BMD can be maintained at most sites in well...

  19. Evaluation on the effects of ageing factor, sampling and preservation methods on Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus noninvasive DNA amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chin SHIH

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive genetic sampling allows studying wildlife without having to catch, handle or even observe individuals. In this study, factors which may affect the quality of noninvasive samples of Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus in the subtropical areas were identified. We collected hair and faecal samples from captive Asiatic black bears and quantitatively evaluated the effects of hair age (from fresh to 60 days, faeces age (from fresh to 14 days, faeces sampling locations (i.e. sample collected from either the surface, inside or a mixture of both the surface and inside of faeces, and faeces preservation methods (frozen or kept at room temperature in 95% ethanol on amplification success rates of mitochondrial DNA fragments of different sizes (450bp, 900bp, and 1600bp. The results showed that the amplification success rates decreased with sample age and amplicon size in both hair and faecal DNA. In subtropical environment, there was no significant difference between amplification success of DNA extracted from fresh and 7-day-old samples of either the hair or faeces. The amplification success rates were not influenced by sampling location of faeces. For faeces preserved in 95% ethanol, the amplification success appeared unaffected by frozen at -20 °C or kept at room temperature in shorter mtDNA fragments, but was significantly influenced when amplicon size was 1600bp. The results of this study will reinforce the optimization of noninvasive sampling approaches in Asiatic black bear research, especially in the subtropics.

  20. Teriparatide Versus Alendronate for the Preservation of Bone Mineral Density After Total Hip Arthroplasty - A randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naomi; Inaba, Yutaka; Uchiyama, Makoto; Ike, Hiroyuki; Kubota, So; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of teriparatide for the prevention of bone mineral density (BMD) loss after THA was compared with alendronate in a randomized controlled trial. Forty-eight patients were assigned to three groups, namely, the teriparatide, alendronate, and no medication groups. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was performed at 1 week post-surgery as a baseline reference, followed by subsequent measurements at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. For periprosthetic BMD loss, a significant effect of teriparatide was demonstrated, though its effect was similar to alendronate. On the other hand, higher lumbar BMD was observed in the teriparatide group than in the alendronate group at 48 weeks post-surgery. Teriparatide administration may be one reasonable option for osteoporotic patient to preserve the periprosthetic BMD after THA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Socket preservation using demineralized freezed dried bone allograft with and without plasma rich in growth factor: A canine study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mogharehabed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The accelerating effect of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGFs in the healing of extraction sockets has been demonstrated by some studies. The aim of the present study was to histologically and histomorphometrically evaluate whether bone formation would increase by the combined use of PRGF and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA. Materials and Methods: In four female dogs, the distal root of the second, third and fourth lower premolars were extracted bilaterally and the mesial roots were preserved. The extraction sockets were randomly divided into DFDBA + PRGF, DFDBA + saline or control groups. Two dogs were sacrificed after 2 weeks and two dogs were sacrificed after 6 weeks. The extraction sockets were evaluated from both histological and histomorphometrical aspects. The data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney followed by Kruskal-Wallis tests using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Significant levels were set at 0.05. Results: The least decrease in socket height was observed in the DFDBA + PRGF group (0.73 ± 0.42 mm. The least decrease in the coronal portion was observed in the DFDBA + PRGF group (1.38 ± 1.35 mm². The least decrease in the middle surface was observed in the DFDBA group (0.61 ± 0.80 mm². The least decrease in the apical portion was observed in the DFDBA group (0.34 ± 0.39 mm². Conclusion: The present study showed better socket preservation subsequent to the application of DFDBA and PRGF combination in comparison with the two other groups. However, the difference was not statistically significant.

  2. Non-invasive ancient DNA protocol for fluid-preserved specimens and phylogenetic systematics of the genus Orestias (Teleostei: Cyprinodontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrigos, Yareli Esquer; Hugueny, Bernard; Koerner, Kellie; Ibañez, Carla; Bonillo, Celine; Pruvost, Patrice; Causse, Romain; Cruaud, Corinne; Gaubert, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Specimens stored in museum collections represent a crucial source of morphological and genetic information, notably for taxonomically problematic groups and extinct taxa. Although fluid-preserved specimens of groups such as teleosts may constitute an almost infinite source of DNA, few ancient DNA protocols have been applied to such material. In this study, we describe a non-invasive Guanidine-based (GuSCN) ancient DNA extraction protocol adapted to fluid-preserved specimens that we use to re-assess the systematics of the genus Orestias (Cyprinodontidae: Teleostei). The latter regroups pupfishes endemic to the inter-Andean basin that have been considered as a 'species flock', and for which the morphology-based taxonomic delimitations have been hotly debated. We extracted DNA from the type specimens of Orestias kept at the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle of Paris, France, including the extinct species O. cuvieri. We then built the first molecular (control region [CR] and rhodopsin [RH]) phylogeny including historical and recently collected representatives of all the Orestias complexes as recognized by Parenti (1984a): agassizii, cuvieri, gilsoni and mulleri. Our ancient DNA extraction protocol was validated after PCR amplification through an approach based on fragment-by-fragment chimera detection. After optimization, we were able to amplify Titicaca. We could not recover the reciprocal monophyly of any of the 15 species or morphotypes that were considered in our analyses, possibly due to incomplete lineage sorting and/or hybridization events. As a consequence, our results starkly question the delineation of a series of diagnostic characters listed in the literature for Orestias. Although not included in our phylogenetic analysis, the syntype of O. jussiei could not be assigned to the agassizii complex as newly defined. The CR sequence of the extinct O. cuvieri was recovered within the cuvieri clade (same haplotype as one representative of O. pentlandii), so

  3. Hydrogen gas treatment prolongs replicative lifespan of bone marrow multipotential stromal cells in vitro while preserving differentiation and paracrine potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, Haruhisa [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Guan, Jianjun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Tamama, Kenichi, E-mail: kenichi.tamama@osumc.edu [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2010-07-02

    Cell therapy with bone marrow multipotential stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents a promising approach in the field of regenerative medicine. Low frequency of MSCs in adult bone marrow necessitates ex vivo expansion of MSCs after harvest; however, such a manipulation causes cellular senescence with loss of differentiation, proliferative, and therapeutic potentials of MSCs. Hydrogen molecules have been shown to exert organ protective effects through selective reduction of hydroxyl radicals. As oxidative stress is one of the key insults promoting cell senescence in vivo as well as in vitro, we hypothesized that hydrogen molecules prevent senescent process during MSC expansion. Addition of 3% hydrogen gas enhanced preservation of colony forming early progenitor cells within MSC preparation and prolonged the in vitro replicative lifespan of MSCs without losing differentiation potentials and paracrine capabilities. Interestingly, 3% hydrogen gas treatment did not decrease hydroxyl radical, protein carbonyl, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, suggesting that scavenging hydroxyl radical might not be responsible for these effects of hydrogen gas in this study.

  4. Histologic healing following tooth extraction with ridge preservation using mineralized versus combined mineralized-demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Tyler D; Mealey, Brian L

    2015-03-01

    Mineralized and demineralized freeze-dried bone allografts (FDBAs) are used in alveolar ridge (AR) preservation; however, each material has advantages and disadvantages. Combinations of allografts aimed at capitalizing on the advantages each offers are available. To date, there is no evidence to indicate if a combination allograft is superior in this application. The primary objective of this study is to histologically evaluate and compare healing of non-molar extraction sites grafted with either mineralized FDBA or a 70:30 mineralized:demineralized FDBA combination allograft in AR preservation. The secondary objective is to compare dimensional changes in ridge height and width after grafting with these two materials. Forty-two patients randomized into two equal groups received ridge preservation with either 100% mineralized FDBA (active control group) or the combination 70% mineralized: 30% demineralized allograft (test group). Sites were allowed to heal for 18 to 20 weeks, at which time core biopsies were obtained and dental implants were placed. AR dimensions were evaluated at the time of extraction and at implant placement, including change in ridge width and change in buccal and lingual ridge height. Histomorphometric analysis was performed to determine percentage of vital bone, residual graft, and connective tissue/other non-bone components. There was no significant difference between groups in AR dimensional changes. Combination allograft produced increased vital bone percentage (36.16%) compared to the FDBA group (24.69%; P = 0.0116). The combination allograft also had a significantly lower mean percentage of residual graft particles (18.24%) compared to FDBA (27.04%; P = 0.0350). This study provides the first histologic evidence showing greater new bone formation with a combination mineralized/demineralized allograft compared to 100% mineralized FDBA in AR preservation in humans. Combination allograft results in increased vital bone formation while

  5. An extremely sensitive species-specific ARMs PCR test for the presence of tiger bone DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetton, Jon H; Tsang, Carol S F; Roney, Chris A; Spriggs, Adrian C

    2004-02-10

    The survival of the tiger (Panthera tigris) is seriously threatened by poaching to provide raw materials for Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs). Most highly prized are the tiger's bones, which are used in combination with other animal and plant derivatives in pills and plasters for the treatment of rheumatism and other ailments. Hundreds of patent remedies have been produced which claim to contain tiger bone, but proof of its presence is needed, if legislation prohibiting the trade in endangered species is to be enforced. A highly sensitive tiger-specific real-time PCR assay has been developed to address this problem. Using primers specific to the tiger mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, successful amplification has been reliably achieved from blood, hair and bone as well as from a range of TCMs spiked with 0.5% tiger bone. Although capable of detecting fewer than 10 substrate molecules, the seven varieties of TCM pills and plasters tested showed no detectable trace of tiger DNA before spiking. Furthermore, sequencing several "tiger bone" fragments seized from TCM shops has shown that they actually originated from cattle and pigs. The potential effects of traditional bone preparation methods, evidence that much lower concentrations are used than alleged on TCM packaging, and substitution of bones from other species all suggest a low likelihood of detecting tiger DNA in patent medicines. Despite this, the basic methods have been thoroughly proven and can be readily applied to derivatives from other CITES protected species providing a rapid and highly sensitive forensic test for species of origin. Potential applications to the monitoring of wild populations are demonstrated by the successful identification of shed hairs and faecal samples.

  6. [PrepFiler Express BTATM Lysis Buffer Combined with Silicon Microbeads for Rapid DNA Extraction from Bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, S C; Zhang, H C; Gao, L L

    2017-10-01

    To establish a convenient and rapid method for extracting DNA from bone. Fifteen long bone samples were washed and sterilized. The skeletal fragments were obtained by electric drill, and lysed by PrepFiler Express BTA™ lysis buffer. DNA was then manually extracted by silicon microbeads for further analysis. STR genotyping was successfully obtained in 14 out of the 15 samples, and the detection rate was 93.33%. The method for DNA extraction from bone established in present study is convenient, quick, effective, and with a strong applicability, which is worth spreading and applying. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  7. Use of Moringa oleifera Flower Pod Extract as Natural Preservative and Development of SCAR Marker for Its DNA Based Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, Iram; Javed, Attia; Aslam, Muhammad Shahbaz; Mushtaq, Roohi; Athar, Muhammad Amin

    2016-01-01

    The use of Moringa oleifera as natural food preservative has been evaluated in the present study. In addition, for quality assurance, the study has also been focused on the shelf life of product to authenticate the identification of plant by development of DNA based marker. Among the different extracts prepared from flower pods of Moringa oleifera, methanol and aqueous extract exhibited high antibacterial and antioxidant activity, respectively. The high phenolic contents (53.5 ± 0.169 mg GAE/g) and flavonoid contents (10.9 ± 0.094 mg QE/g) were also recorded in methanol and aqueous extract, respectively. Due to instability of bioactive compounds in aqueous extract, methanol extract is considered as potent natural preservative. The shelf life of methanol extract was observed for two months at 4°C under dark conditions. The developed SCAR primers (MOF217/317/MOR317) specifically amplified a fragment of 317 bp from DNA of Moringa oleifera samples collected from different regions of Punjab province of Pakistan. The methanol extract of Moringa oleifera flower pods has great potential to be used as natural preservative and nutraceutical in food industry.

  8. Use of Moringa oleifera Flower Pod Extract as Natural Preservative and Development of SCAR Marker for Its DNA Based Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iram Gull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Moringa oleifera as natural food preservative has been evaluated in the present study. In addition, for quality assurance, the study has also been focused on the shelf life of product to authenticate the identification of plant by development of DNA based marker. Among the different extracts prepared from flower pods of Moringa oleifera, methanol and aqueous extract exhibited high antibacterial and antioxidant activity, respectively. The high phenolic contents (53.5±0.169 mg GAE/g and flavonoid contents (10.9±0.094 mg QE/g were also recorded in methanol and aqueous extract, respectively. Due to instability of bioactive compounds in aqueous extract, methanol extract is considered as potent natural preservative. The shelf life of methanol extract was observed for two months at 4°C under dark conditions. The developed SCAR primers (MOF217/317/MOR317 specifically amplified a fragment of 317 bp from DNA of Moringa oleifera samples collected from different regions of Punjab province of Pakistan. The methanol extract of Moringa oleifera flower pods has great potential to be used as natural preservative and nutraceutical in food industry.

  9. Quantification of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal DNA in roots: how important is material preservation?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janoušková, Martina; Püschel, David; Hujslová, M.; Slavíková, R.; Jansa, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 3 (2015), s. 205-214 ISSN 0940-6360 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * quantitative real-time PCR * sample preservation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.252, year: 2015

  10. Combining bleach and mild predigestion improves ancient DNA recovery from bones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boessenkool, Sanne; Hanghøj, Kristian Ebbesen; Nistelberger, Heidi M.

    2017-01-01

    aimed to improve ancient DNA recovery before library amplification have recently been developed. Here, we test the effects of combining two of such protocols, a bleach wash and a predigestion step, on 12 bone samples of Atlantic cod and domestic horse aged 750-1350 cal. years before present. Using high......-throughput sequencing, we show that combined together, bleach wash and predigestion consistently yield DNA libraries with higher endogenous content than either of these methods alone. Additionally, the molecular complexity of these libraries is improved and endogenous DNA templates show larger size distributions. Other...... library characteristics, such as DNA damage profiles or the composition of microbial communities, are little affected by the pre-extraction protocols. Application of the combined protocol presented in this study will facilitate the genetic analysis of an increasing number of ancient remains...

  11. Improved methods of carnivore faecal sample preservation, DNA extraction and quantification for accurate genotyping of wild tigers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Patlolla Anuradha; Bhavanishankar, Maradani; Bhagavatula, Jyotsna; Harika, Katakam; Mahla, Ranjeet Singh; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasively collected samples allow a variety of genetic studies on endangered and elusive species. However due to low amplification success and high genotyping error rates fewer samples can be identified up to the individual level. Number of PCRs needed to obtain reliable genotypes also noticeably increase. We developed a quantitative PCR assay to measure and grade amplifiable nuclear DNA in feline faecal extracts. We determined DNA degradation in experimentally aged faecal samples and tested a suite of pre-PCR protocols to considerably improve DNA retrieval. Average DNA concentrations of Grade I, II and III extracts were 982pg/µl, 9.5pg/µl and 0.4pg/µl respectively. Nearly 10% of extracts had no amplifiable DNA. Microsatellite PCR success and allelic dropout rates were 92% and 1.5% in Grade I, 79% and 5% in Grade II, and 54% and 16% in Grade III respectively. Our results on experimentally aged faecal samples showed that ageing has a significant effect on quantity and quality of amplifiable DNA (p0.05). DNA concentrations of fresh tiger and leopard faecal extracts without addition of carrier RNA were 816.5pg/µl (±115.5) and 690.1pg/µl (±207.1), while concentrations with addition of carrier RNA were 49414.5pg/µl (±9370.6) and 20982.7pg/µl (±6835.8) respectively. Our results indicate that carnivore faecal samples should be collected as freshly as possible, are better preserved by two-step method and should be extracted with addition of carrier RNA. We recommend quantification of template DNA as this facilitates several downstream protocols.

  12. Marginal bone preservation in single-tooth replacement: a 5-year prospective clinical multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Mauro; La Scala, Vincenzo; Di Raimondo, Rosario; Speroni, Stefano; Testi, Massimo; Berglundh, Tord

    2015-06-01

    Few long-term studies are available comparing immediate and conventional loading protocols of implant-supported single-tooth replacement. The aim of the present randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate prospectively the 5-year clinical and radiological outcome of immediate functional loading implants used in single-tooth replacement. One hundred fifty-one subjects, who required single-tooth rehabilitation in the area from position 15 to 25 and from 35 to 45, were enrolled in eight private clinics in Italy. A randomization protocol was applied to allocate the implants in three treatment groups: one control group and two test groups. In the control group, implant placement was performed according to a conventional drilling procedure, and the implants were submerged for 3 months before abutment connection and loading. Implants allocated in the test group 1 and 2 followed an immediate functional loading protocol. While in test group 1, implant placement was performed according to conventional drilling procedure, in test group 2, a modified implant installation procedure (osteotome technique) was applied. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed during the 5-year follow-up, and technical and biological complications were registered. Although four implants (three in the test group 2 and one in the test group 1) were lost in the immediate functional loading groups in the first year of follow-up, no further implant loss occurred in any of the treatment groups in the following monitoring period up to 5 years. No significant differences on marginal bone level changes were observed between the treatment groups. About 52% of all implants showed bone gain in the period from 1-year to 5-year follow-up. The percentage of all implants that in the same interval of time showed bone loss was about 28%. Although few technical complications were recorded in the period of time up to 5 years, implants showing biological complication were 5.7%. It is suggested

  13. [Extensive cranioplasty for sagittal synostosis in young children by preserving multiple cranial bone flaps adhered to the dura mater: experience with 63 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao Nan; Chu Jun; Wang Xue; Yang, Bo; Song, Yunhai; Cai, Jinjing

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effort of applying frontal and occipital bones in extensive cranioplasty and preserving multiple cranial bone flaps adhered to the dura mater in the treatment of sagittal synostosis. From April 2008 to June 2013, sixty-three children with sagittal synostosis, aged 5 months to 3 years, were included in the study. The frontal bone flap was removed using an air drill. The occipital and bilateral temporal bone flaps were cut open but not detached from the dura mater or fixed to produce floating bone flaps. The skull bone was cut into palisade-like structures. Brain compression from both sides and the base of the skull was released and the brain expanded bilaterally through the enlarged space. Only a long strip-shaped bone bridge remained in the central parietal bone. Subsequently, the frontal bone flaps and occipital bone flap were pushed towards the midline and fixed with the parietal bone bridge to shorten the anteroposterior diameter of the cranial cavity and allow the brain to expand bilaterally to correct scaphocephaly. The CT images showed that both sides of the parietal bone of artificial sagittal groove gradually merged postoperative 1 year, and skull almost completely normal healing after operation 2 or 3 years, without deformity recurrence within 5 years. Among them all, 61 children's intelligence is normal and 2 children's lagged behind normal level, no further improvement. Patients were followed up 1 - 5 years (an average of 43 months). Skull growth was excellent in all patients, the anteroposterior diameter was shortened by 14.6 mm averagely, the transverse diameter was increased by 12.3 mm averagely, the prominent forehead was corrected, and scaphocephaly improved significantly. There were no complications such as death and skull necrosis. The application of frontal and occipital bones in extensive cranioplasty and preserving multiple cranial bone flaps adhered to the dura mater can be used in the treatment of sagittal

  14. Effect of DNA extraction and sample preservation method on rumen bacterial population

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fliegerová, Kateřina; Tapio, I.; Bonin, A.; Mrázek, Jakub; Callegari, M. L.; Bani, P.; Bayat, A.; Vilkki, J.; Kopečný, Jan; Shingfield, K.; Boyer, F.; Coissac, E.; Taberlet, P.; Wallace, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2014), s. 80-84 ISSN 1075-9964. [International Symposium on Anaerobic Microbiology /8./. Innsbruck, 12.06.2013-15.06.2013] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 289319 - RUMINOMICS Keywords : intracellular DNA * extracellular DNA * storage conditions Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.479, year: 2014

  15. Robust chemical preservation of digital information on DNA in silica with error-correcting codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, Robert N; Heckel, Reinhard; Puddu, Michela; Paunescu, Daniela; Stark, Wendelin J

    2015-02-16

    Information, such as text printed on paper or images projected onto microfilm, can survive for over 500 years. However, the storage of digital information for time frames exceeding 50 years is challenging. Here we show that digital information can be stored on DNA and recovered without errors for considerably longer time frames. To allow for the perfect recovery of the information, we encapsulate the DNA in an inorganic matrix, and employ error-correcting codes to correct storage-related errors. Specifically, we translated 83 kB of information to 4991 DNA segments, each 158 nucleotides long, which were encapsulated in silica. Accelerated aging experiments were performed to measure DNA decay kinetics, which show that data can be archived on DNA for millennia under a wide range of conditions. The original information could be recovered error free, even after treating the DNA in silica at 70 °C for one week. This is thermally equivalent to storing information on DNA in central Europe for 2000 years. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. A Network of Multi-Tasking Proteins at the DNA Replication Fork Preserves Genome Stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the network that maintains high fidelity genome replication, we have introduced two conditional mutant alleles of DNA2, an essential DNA replication gene, into each of the approximately 4,700 viable yeast deletion mutants and determined the fitness of the double mutants. Fifty-six DNA2-interacting genes were identified. Clustering analysis of genomic synthetic lethality profiles of each of 43 of the DNA2-interacting genes defines a network (consisting of 322 genes and 876 interactions whose topology provides clues as to how replication proteins coordinate regulation and repair to protect genome integrity. The results also shed new light on the functions of the query gene DNA2, which, despite many years of study, remain controversial, especially its proposed role in Okazaki fragment processing and the nature of its in vivo substrates. Because of the multifunctional nature of virtually all proteins at the replication fork, the meaning of any single genetic interaction is inherently ambiguous. The multiplexing nature of the current studies, however, combined with follow-up supporting experiments, reveals most if not all of the unique pathways requiring Dna2p. These include not only Okazaki fragment processing and DNA repair but also chromatin dynamics.

  17. Preservation of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius DNA after loss of cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundin, M; Figdor, D; Sundqvist, G; Sjögren, U

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether DNA from two obligate anaerobes, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, is recoverable after loss of cell viability induced by air exposure. Harvested cultures of F. nucleatum and P. anaerobius were killed by exposure to air and stored in phosphate-buffered saline. Dead cells were incubated aerobically for up to 6 months. Every month, the presence of detectable DNA in the cell pellet and supernatant was assessed by conventional and quantitative PCR. Cell staining techniques were used to characterize the cell wall permeability of air-killed cells. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine viable, freshly killed and stored cells. With conventional PCR, amplifiable DNA was detectable over 6 months in all samples. Quantitative PCR showed a progressive fall in DNA concentration in nonviable cell pellets and a concomitant rise in DNA concentration in the supernatant. DNA staining showed that some air-killed cells retained an intact cell wall. After storage, SEM of both air-killed species revealed shrivelling of the cells, but some cells of P. anaerobius retained their initial form. Amplifiable DNA from F. nucleatum and P. anaerobius was detectable 6 months after loss of viability. Air-killed anaerobes initially retained their cell form, but cells gradually shriveled over time. The morphological changes were more pronounced with the gram-negative F. nucleatum than the gram-positive P. anaerobius. Over 6 months, there was a gradual increase in cell wall permeability with progressive leakage of DNA. Bacterial DNA was recoverable long after loss of cell viability. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. High-throughput sequencing of ancient plant and mammal DNA preserved in herbivore middens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Dáithí C.; Pearson, Stuart G.; Fullagar, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The study of arid palaeoenvironments is often frustrated by the poor or non-existent preservation of plant and animal material, yet these environments are of considerable environmental importance. The analysis of pollen and macrofossils isolated from herbivore middens has been an invaluable sourc...

  19. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibit inflammation and preserve vascular endothelial integrity in the lungs after hemorrhagic shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibani Pati

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic shock (HS and trauma is currently the leading cause of death in young adults worldwide. Morbidity and mortality after HS and trauma is often the result of multi-organ failure such as acute lung injury (ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, conditions with few therapeutic options. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a multipotent stem cell population that has shown therapeutic promise in numerous pre-clinical and clinical models of disease. In this paper, in vitro studies with pulmonary endothelial cells (PECs reveal that conditioned media (CM from MSCs and MSC-PEC co-cultures inhibits PEC permeability by preserving adherens junctions (VE-cadherin and β-catenin. Leukocyte adhesion and adhesion molecule expression (VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 are inhibited in PECs treated with CM from MSC-PEC co-cultures. Further support for the modulatory effects of MSCs on pulmonary endothelial function and inflammation is demonstrated in our in vivo studies on HS in the rat. In a rat "fixed volume" model of mild HS, we show that MSCs administered IV potently inhibit systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the serum of treated animals. In vivo MSCs also inhibit pulmonary endothelial permeability and lung edema with concurrent preservation of the vascular endothelial barrier proteins: VE-cadherin, Claudin-1, and Occludin-1. Leukocyte infiltrates (CD68 and MPO positive cells are also decreased in lungs with MSC treatment. Taken together, these data suggest that MSCs, acting directly and through soluble factors, are potent stabilizers of the vascular endothelium and inflammation. These data are the first to demonstrate the therapeutic potential of MSCs in HS and have implications for the potential use of MSCs as a cellular therapy in HS-induced lung injury.

  20. Histologic Evaluation of Wound Healing After Ridge Preservation With Cortical, Cancellous, and Combined Cortico-Cancellous Freeze-Dried Bone Allograft: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetter, Randy S; Calahan, Blaine G; Mealey, Brian L

    2017-09-01

    Cortical and cancellous mineralized freeze-dried bone allografts (FDBA) are available for use in alveolar ridge preservation after tooth extraction. There are currently no data regarding use of a combination 50%/50% cortico-cancellous FDBA compared with a 100% cortical or 100% cancellous FDBA in ridge preservation. The primary objective of this study is to dimensionally and histologically evaluate healing after ridge preservation in non-molar sites using 50%/50% cortico-cancellous FDBA versus 100% cortical and 100% cancellous FDBA. Sixty-six patients requiring extraction of a non-molar tooth were enrolled and randomized into three groups to receive ridge preservation with the following: 1) 100% cortical FDBA; 2) 100% cancellous FDBA; or 3) 50%/50% cortico-cancellous FDBA. After 18 to 20 weeks of healing, a biopsy was harvested, and an implant was placed. The alveolar ridge was measured pre- and postoperatively to evaluate change in ridge height and width. Percentages of vital bone, residual graft, and connective tissue (CT)/other were determined via histomorphometric analysis. Histomorphometric analysis revealed no significant differences among groups regarding percentage of vital bone or CT/other. The 100% cortical FDBA group had significantly greater residual graft material (P = 0.04). Dimensional analysis revealed no significant between-group differences in any parameter measured. To the best knowledge of the authors, this study offers the first histologic evidence demonstrating no significant difference in vital bone formation or dimensional changes among 50%/50% cortico-cancellous FDBA, 100% cortical FDBA, and 100% cancellous FDBA when used in ridge preservation of non-molar tooth sites.

  1. Electron microscopic observations and DNA chain fragmentation studies on apoptosis in bone tumor cells induced by 153Sm-EDTMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Xiao Dong; Han Xiaofeng

    1997-01-01

    The morphological changes observed by electron microscopy indicate that after internal irradiation with 153 Sm-EDTMP bone tumor cells displayed feature of apoptosis, such as margination of condensed chromatin, chromatin fragmentation, as well as the membrane bounded apoptotic bodies formation. The quantification analysis of fragmentation DNA for bone tumor cells induced by 153 Sm-EDTMP shows that the DNA fragmentation is enhanced with the prolongation of internally irradiated time. These characteristics suggest that 153 Sm-EDTMP internal irradiation could induce bone tumor cells to go to apoptosis

  2. CGH and SNP array using DNA extracted from fixed cytogenetic preparations and long-term refrigerated bone marrow specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKinnon Ruth N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of nucleic acids is limited by the availability of archival specimens and the quality and amount of the extracted material. Archived cytogenetic preparations are stored in many laboratories and are a potential source of total genomic DNA for array karyotyping and other applications. Array CGH using DNA from fixed cytogenetic preparations has been described, but it is not known whether it can be used for SNP arrays. Diagnostic bone marrow specimens taken during the assessment of hematological malignancies are also a potential source of DNA, but it is generally assumed that DNA must be extracted, or the specimen frozen, within a day or two of collection, to obtain DNA suitable for further analysis. We have assessed DNA extracted from these materials for both SNP array and array CGH. Results We show that both SNP array and array CGH can be performed on genomic DNA extracted from cytogenetic specimens stored in Carnoy's fixative, and from bone marrow which has been stored unfrozen, at 4°C, for at least 36 days. We describe a procedure for extracting a usable concentration of total genomic DNA from cytogenetic suspensions of low cellularity. Conclusions The ability to use these archival specimens for DNA-based analysis increases the potential for retrospective genetic analysis of clinical specimens. Fixed cytogenetic preparations and long-term refrigerated bone marrow both provide DNA suitable for array karyotyping, and may be suitable for a wider range of analytical procedures.

  3. Insights into the processes behind the contamination of degraded human teeth and bone samples with exogenous sources of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M. T. P.; Hansen, Anders J.; Willerslev, E.

    2006-01-01

    A principal problem facing human DNA studies that use old and degraded remains is contamination from other sources of human DNA. In this study we have attempted to contaminate deliberately bones and teeth sampled from a medieval collection excavated in Trondheim, Norway, in order to investigate t...

  4. Stool sample storage conditions for the preservation of Giardia intestinalis DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Kuk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Stool is chemically complex and the extraction of DNA from stool samples is extremely difficult. Haemoglobin breakdown products, such as bilirubin, bile acids and mineral ions, that are present in the stool samples, can inhibit DNA amplification and cause molecular assays to produce false-negative results. Therefore, stool storage conditions are highly important for the diagnosis of intestinal parasites and other microorganisms through molecular approaches. In the current study, stool samples that were positive for Giardia intestinalis were collected from five different patients. Each sample was stored using one out of six different storage conditions [room temperature (RT, +4ºC, -20ºC, 70% alcohol, 10% formaldehyde or 2.5% potassium dichromate] for DNA extraction procedures at one, two, three and four weeks. A modified QIAamp Stool Mini Kit procedure was used to isolate the DNA from stored samples. After DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification was performed using primers that target the β-giardin gene. A G. intestinalis-specific 384 bp band was obtained from all of the cyst-containing stool samples that were stored at RT, +4ºC and -20ºC and in 70% alcohol and 2.5% potassium dichromate; however, this band was not produced by samples that had been stored in 10% formaldehyde. Moreover, for the stool samples containing trophozoites, the same G. intestinalis-specific band was only obtained from the samples that were stored in 2.5% potassium dichromate for up to one month. As a result, it appears evident that the most suitable storage condition for stool samples to permit the isolation of G. intestinalis DNA is in 2.5% potassium dichromate; under these conditions, stool samples may be stored for one month.

  5. Enzymatic maceration of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhre, Marie-Louise; Eriksen, Anne Marie; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær

    2015-01-01

    This proof of concept study investigates the removal of soft tissue from human ribs with the use of two common methods: boiling with a laundry detergent and using enzymes. Six individuals were autopsied, and one rib from each individual was removed for testing. Each rib was cut into pieces...... and afterwards macerated by one of the two methods. DNA extraction was performed to see the effect of the macerations on DNA preservation. Furthermore, the bone pieces were examined in a stereomicroscope to assess for any bone damage. The results demonstrated that both methods removed all flesh/soft tissue from...

  6. Influence of preservation of the alveolar ridge on delayed implants after extraction of teeth with different defects in the buccal bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chaoyuan; Ding, Yuxiang; Hu, Kaijin; Zhou, Hongzhi; Qin, Ruifeng; Hou, Rui

    2016-02-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the influence of preservation of the alveolar ridge on delayed implants with different defects in the buccal bone. We enrolled 60 patients who had one posterior mandibular tooth extracted. Cone-beam computed tomography (CT) was used to measure the buccal bone defects in the alveolar ridge before the tooth was extracted (level A=3 to 5 mm, and level B=more than 5 mm). After the tooth had been extracted, the socket either had the alveolar ridge preserved (trial group) or it was left to heal spontaneously (control group). The changes in the dimensions of the alveolar ridge from preoperatively to 6 months postoperatively were evaluated by cone-beam CT. Suitable implants were inserted 6 months later, and their length and diameter recorded. The implant stability quotient was evaluated for the following 3 months. The dimensions of the bone in the alveolar ridge in the trial group were significantly less than those in the control groups in both levels. Fifty-seven patients required implants (except 3 in level B in the control group). There were more longer and wider implants in the trial group than in the control group in Level B. 3 months after implantation, there were no significant differences in implant stability quotients between the groups, though in the control group, Level B, the mean (SD) value was 69.50 (1.00) while in the other groups values were all above 70 at 3 months. We conclude that when the defect in the buccal bone was more than 5mm, the alveolar ridge preservation demonstrated a remarkable effect in preserving the alveolar ridge dimension and delayed implantation. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term stability of human genomic and human papillomavirus DNA stored in BD SurePath and Hologic PreservCyt liquid-based cytology media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agreda, Patricia M; Beitman, Gerard H; Gutierrez, Erin C; Harris, James M; Koch, Kristopher R; LaViers, William D; Leitch, Sharon V; Maus, Courtney E; McMillian, Ray A; Nussbaumer, William A; Palmer, Marcus L R; Porter, Michael J; Richart, Gregory A; Schwab, Ryan J; Vaughan, Laurence M

    2013-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of storage at 2 to 8°C on the stability of human genomic and human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA stored in BD SurePath and Hologic PreservCyt liquid-based cytology media. DNA retained the ability to be extracted and PCR amplified for more than 2.5 years in both medium types. Prior inability to detect DNA in archived specimens may have been due to failure of the extraction method to isolate DNA from fixed cells.

  8. Long-Term Stability of Human Genomic and Human Papillomavirus DNA Stored in BD SurePath and Hologic PreservCyt Liquid-Based Cytology Media

    OpenAIRE

    Agreda, Patricia M.; Beitman, Gerard H.; Gutierrez, Erin C.; Harris, James M.; Koch, Kristopher R.; LaViers, William D.; Leitch, Sharon V.; Maus, Courtney E.; McMillian, Ray A.; Nussbaumer, William A.; Palmer, Marcus L. R.; Porter, Michael J.; Richart, Gregory A.; Schwab, Ryan J.; Vaughan, Laurence M.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of storage at 2 to 8°C on the stability of human genomic and human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA stored in BD SurePath and Hologic PreservCyt liquid-based cytology media. DNA retained the ability to be extracted and PCR amplified for more than 2.5 years in both medium types. Prior inability to detect DNA in archived specimens may have been due to failure of the extraction method to isolate DNA from fixed cells.

  9. Bone-preserving total hip arthroplasty in avascular necrosis of the hip-a matched-pairs analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merschin, David; Häne, Richard; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Pufe, Thomas; Drescher, Wolf

    2018-03-22

    Short-stem hip arthroplasty has the potential advantage of femoral bone stock preservation, especially in view of the expected revisions in the often relatively young patients. Despite short-stem hip prosthesis are increasingly used for total hip arthroplasty, there are no sufficient mid- and long-term results especially for patients with avascular femoral head osteonecrosis. The present study investigates mid-term functional results as well as the revision rate following implantation of a short-stem prosthesis. In the period 06/2005 until 12/2013, a total of 351 short-stem hip prostheses were implanted. The study included 331 complete data sets. A retrospective analysis was performed using the Oxford Hip Score. All revisions were registered. In a total of 331 prostheses, the Oxford Hip Score was "excellent" in 66.2%, "good" in 12.7%, "fair" in 13.0%, and "poor" in 8.2% with a mean follow-up of 57.4 months (SD ± 29.8; range 24-115). In 26 cases, aseptic osteonecrosis of the hip was the indication (7.9%). The Oxford Hip Score was "excellent" in 66.7%, "good" in 0.0%, "fair" in 20.8%, and "poor" in 12.5%. The cumulated five year survival rate was 96.7%. In mid-term observation, the Metha® short-stem prosthesis shows no disadvantage in functional outcome and in survival time compared to a standard hip stem. Providing a correct indication, the Metha® short stem is a valuable option in total hip arthroplasty for younger patients with avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Evaluation has shown no significant differences between aseptic osteonecrosis and other indications.

  10. Evaluation of different methods for DNA extraction from human burnt bones and the generation of genetic profiles for identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzair, Anum; Rasool, Nouman; Wasim, Muhammad

    2017-10-01

    Bone exposure to heat in the presence of moisture breaks the phosphodiester bonds of the backbone, leaving sheared DNA in bone cells. This also limits the possibility of generating a complete profile of the victim. With the increasing incidence of fire outbreaks over the past few years, a paradigm shift to establish identity has been observed, from morphological identification of victims to STR profiling. For this study, 10 bone samples were taken from burnt human bodies that were recovered from different fire outbreak scenes. The DNA from these burnt human tissues was isolated using four different extraction methods: the organic extraction method, the total demineralisation method, the Qiagen kit method, and the Chelex extraction method. STR profiles of victims were generated on a genetic analyser using an AmpFlSTR Identifiler® Plus Kit and analysed on Gene Mapper ID-X. DNA isolated from bones using the total demineralisation extraction method and organic extraction method was of the highest quality due to the efficient removal of inhibitors. DNA obtained using these two methods successfully generated the STR profiles of the victims. The quality of isolated DNA obtained through the Qiagen kit was comparatively low, but STR profiles of the victims were successfully generated. The Chelex kit failed to extract good quality DNA of high quantity from the burnt bones, encountering inhibition in all samples at varying degrees. This study concludes that total demineralisation and the Qiagen kit are sophisticated and reliable methods to obtain a good yield of DNA from burnt human bones, which can be used for the identification of victims.

  11. A minimally-invasive method for sampling human petrous bones from the cranial base for ancient DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirak, Kendra A; Fernandes, Daniel M; Cheronet, Olivia; Novak, Mario; Gamarra, Beatriz; Balassa, Tímea; Bernert, Zsolt; Cséki, Andrea; Dani, János; Gallina, József Zsolt; Kocsis-Buruzs, Gábor; Kővári, Ivett; László, Orsolya; Pap, Ildikó; Patay, Róbert; Petkes, Zsolt; Szenthe, Gergely; Szeniczey, Tamás; Hajdu, Tamás; Pinhasi, Ron

    2017-06-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) research involves invasive and destructive sampling procedures that are often incompatible with anthropological, anatomical, and bioarcheological analyses requiring intact skeletal remains. The osseous labyrinth inside the petrous bone has been shown to yield higher amounts of endogenous DNA than any other skeletal element; however, accessing this labyrinth in cases of a complete or reconstructed skull involves causing major structural damage to the cranial vault or base. Here, we describe a novel cranial base drilling method (CBDM) for accessing the osseous labyrinth from the cranial base that prevents damaging the surrounding cranial features, making it highly complementary to morphological analyses. We assessed this method by comparing the aDNA results from one petrous bone processed using our novel method to its pair, which was processed using established protocols for sampling disarticulated petrous bones. We show a decrease in endogenous DNA and molecular copy numbers when the drilling method is used; however, we also show that this method produces more endogenous DNA and higher copy numbers than any postcranial bone. Our results demonstrate that this minimally-invasive method reduces the loss of genetic data associated with the use of other skeletal elements and enables the combined craniometric and genetic study of individuals with archeological, cultural, and evolutionary value.

  12. Administration of DNA Plasmid Coding Protein Aggregating Domain Induces Inflammatory Bone Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agas, Dimitrios; Concetti, Fabio; Capitani, Melania; Lacava, Giovanna; Concetti, Antonio; Marchetti, Luigi; Laus, Fulvio; Marchegiani, Andrea; Azevedo, Vasco; Sabbieti, Maria Giovanna; Venanzi, Franco Maria

    2016-01-01

    Plasmids coding protein aggregation polypeptides from different sources have been proposed as genetic adjuvants for DNA vaccines. We reported that a plasmid (pATRex), encompassing the DNA sequence for the von Willebrand A (vWA/A) domain of the Anthrax Toxin Receptor-1 (ANTXR-1, alias TEM8, Tumor Endothelial Marker 8), acts as strong immune adjuvant by inducing formation of insoluble intracellular aggregates and subsequent cell death. In the present study we addressed the question of whether there is any substantial immunotoxicity associated with the use of self-aggregating proteins as genetic adjuvants. Here we report, by mean of histology, X-ray and molecular examinations of bone specimens, the unexpected finding that intramuscular injection of pATRex in mice triggers, per se, severe bone loss (osteoporosis) independently from the sex and genotype of the treated animals. Even though the study suggests that proteinaceous "sticky " adjuvants are unlikely to find their way into practical vaccination, the information gained is of value as ATRex injections could provide an additional, simplified, mouse model of osteoporosis. Moreover, our results provide experimental support to the hypothesis that proteotoxic aggregates chronically activate the innate immune system in amyloid and aggregosome associated disorders.

  13. Identification of a new hominin bone from Denisova Cave, Siberia using collagen fingerprinting and mitochondrial DNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Samantha; Higham, Thomas; Slon, Viviane; Pääbo, Svante; Meyer, Matthias; Douka, Katerina; Brock, Fiona; Comeskey, Daniel; Procopio, Noemi; Shunkov, Michael; Derevianko, Anatoly; Buckley, Michael

    2016-03-01

    DNA sequencing has revolutionised our understanding of archaic humans during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic. Unfortunately, while many Palaeolithic sites contain large numbers of bones, the majority of these lack the diagnostic features necessary for traditional morphological identification. As a result the recovery of Pleistocene-age human remains is extremely rare. To circumvent this problem we have applied a method of collagen fingerprinting to more than 2000 fragmented bones from the site of Denisova Cave, Russia, in order to facilitate the discovery of human remains. As a result of our analysis a single hominin bone (Denisova 11) was identified, supported through in-depth peptide sequencing analysis, and found to carry mitochondrial DNA of the Neandertal type. Subsequent radiocarbon dating revealed the bone to be >50,000 years old. Here we demonstrate the huge potential collagen fingerprinting has for identifying hominin remains in highly fragmentary archaeological assemblages, improving the resources available for wider studies into human evolution.

  14. Pomegranate extract protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and preserves brain DNA integrity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Maha A E; El Morsy, Engy M; Ahmed, Amany A E

    2014-08-21

    Interruption to blood flow causes ischemia and infarction of brain tissues with consequent neuronal damage and brain dysfunction. Pomegranate extract is well tolerated, and safely consumed all over the world. Interestingly, pomegranate extract has shown remarkable antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models. Many investigators consider natural extracts as novel therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the protective effects of standardized pomegranate extract against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced brain injury in rats. Adult male albino rats were randomly divided into sham-operated control group, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) group, and two other groups that received standardized pomegranate extract at two dose levels (250, 500 mg/kg) for 15 days prior to ischemia/reperfusion (PMG250+I/R, and PMG500+I/R groups). After I/R or sham operation, all rats were sacrificed and brains were harvested for subsequent biochemical analysis. Results showed reduction in brain contents of MDA (malondialdehyde), and NO (nitric oxide), in addition to enhancement of SOD (superoxide dismutase), GPX (glutathione peroxidase), and GRD (glutathione reductase) activities in rats treated with pomegranate extract prior to cerebral I/R. Moreover, pomegranate extract decreased brain levels of NF-κB p65 (nuclear factor kappa B p65), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-alpha), caspase-3 and increased brain levels of IL-10 (interleukin-10), and cerebral ATP (adenosine triphosphate) production. Comet assay showed less brain DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) damage in rats protected with pomegranate extract. The present study showed, for the first time, that pre-administration of pomegranate extract to rats, can offer a significant dose-dependent neuroprotective activity against cerebral I/R brain injury and DNA damage via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and ATP-replenishing effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc

  15. Pulsed electromagnetic fields preserve bone architecture and mechanical properties and stimulate porous implant osseointegration by promoting bone anabolism in type 1 diabetic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J; Li, W; Sun, T; Li, X; Luo, E; Jing, D

    2018-03-09

    The effects of exogenous pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) stimulation on T1DM-associated osteopathy were investigated in alloxan-treated rabbits. We found that PEMF improved bone architecture, mechanical properties, and porous titanium (pTi) osseointegration by promoting bone anabolism through a canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling-associated mechanism, and revealed the clinical potential of PEMF stimulation for the treatment of T1DM-associated bone complications. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with deteriorated bone architecture and impaired osseous healing potential; nonetheless, effective methods for resisting T1DM-associated osteopenia/osteoporosis and promoting bone defect/fracture healing are still lacking. PEMF, as a safe and noninvasive method, have proven to be effective for promoting osteogenesis, whereas the potential effects of PEMF on T1DM osteopathy remain poorly understood. We herein investigated the effects of PEMF stimulation on bone architecture, mechanical properties, bone turnover, and its potential molecular mechanisms in alloxan-treated diabetic rabbits. We also developed novel nontoxic Ti2448 pTi implants with closer elastic modulus with natural bone and investigated the impacts of PEMF on pTi osseointegration for T1DM bone-defect repair. The deteriorations of cancellous and cortical bone architecture and tissue-level mechanical strength were attenuated by 8-week PEMF stimulation. PEMF also promoted osseointegration and stimulated more adequate bone ingrowths into the pore spaces of pTi in T1DM long-bone defects. Moreover, T1DM-associated reduction of bone formation was significantly attenuated by PEMF, whereas PEMF exerted no impacts on bone resorption. We also found PEMF-induced activation of osteoblastogenesis-related Wnt/β-catenin signaling in T1DM skeletons, but PEMF did not alter osteoclastogenesis-associated RANKL/RANK signaling gene expression. We reveal that PEMF improved bone architecture, mechanical properties, and

  16. Extensive cranioplasty for sagittal synostosis in young children by preserving cranial bone flaps adhered to the dura mater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Bao; Bo, Yang; Yun-Hai, Song; Cheng, Chen; Xiong-Zheng, Mu

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate extensive cranioplasty involving the frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal bones without removing the floating bone flaps in the treatment of sagittal synostosis. Sixty-three children with sagittal synostosis, aged 5 months to 3 years, were included in the study. The frontal bone flap was removed using an air drill. The occipital and bilateral temporal bone flaps were cut open but not detached from the dura mater or fixed to produce floating bone flaps. The skull bone was cut into palisade-like structures. Brain compression from both sides and the base of the skull was released and the brain expanded bilaterally through the enlarged space. Only a long strip-shaped bone bridge remained in the central parietal bone. Subsequently, the frontal bone flaps and occipital bone flap were pushed towards the midline and fixed with the parietal bone bridge to shorten the anteroposterior diameter of the cranial cavity and allow the brain to expand bilaterally to correct scaphocephaly. Patients were followed up 1-5 years. Skull growth was excellent in all patients, the anteroposterior diameter was shortened, the transverse diameter was increased, the prominent forehead was corrected, and scaphocephaly improved significantly. There were no complications such as death and skull necrosis. Surgery without removing bone flaps is less traumatic and results in no massive bleeding. It can effectively relieve brain compression and promotes transversal expansion of the brain during surgery and subsequent normal brain development. The skull of young children is relatively thin and early surgery can easily achieve satisfactory bone reshaping. Our surgical technique is not only safe and effective but also can avoid subsequent psychological disorders caused by skull deformity.

  17. Osteomyelitis of the First Metatarsal Head Treated With Joint-Preserving Surgery and a Synthetic Resorbable Bone Graft Substitute: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostakos, Konstantinos; Koch, Katrin

    2018-04-11

    Managing infections of the first metatarsophalangeal joint can be demanding because many patients present with late-stage infection and partial or total amputation of the first ray or the phalanx could be necessary. We describe such a patient who was successfully treated with a calcium-based resorbable bone substitute that preserved the first metatarsophalangeal joint. A 38-year-old female presented to our department with a foot infection. Examination revealed a methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus infection of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. The histopathologic findings confirmed active osteomyelitis of the first metatarsal head. The metatarsophalangeal joint was debrided with open synovectomy, the metatarsal head was curetted, and the bone defect was filled with 2 mL of a synthetic bone graft substitute. Two years later, she reported no problems with function or pain, the joint had full range of motion, and she had no local or systemic signs of infection. The most recent radiographs revealed no damage to the first metatarsophalangeal joint. A synthetic bone graft substitute can be a good alternative for treating forefoot infections when the soft tissues are intact and the bone defect is not so large that partial or full amputation is necessary. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Alveolar process preservation at implants installed immediately into extraction sockets using deproteinized bovine bone mineral - an experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneva, Marco; Botticelli, Daniele; Morelli, Fabrizio; Cesaretti, Gianfranco; Beolchini, Marco; Lang, Niklaus P

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the soft tissue and the dimensional changes of the alveolar bony crest at sites where deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) particles, concomitantly with the placement of a collagen membrane, were used at implants installed into sockets immediately after tooth extraction. The pulp tissue of the mesial roots of (3) P(3) was removed in six Labrador dogs, and the root canals were filled. Flaps were elevated bilaterally, the premolars hemi-sectioned, and the distal roots removed. Recipient sites were prepared in the distal alveolus, and implants were placed. At the test sites, DBBM particles were placed in the residual marginal defects concomitantly with the placement of a collagen membrane. No treatment augmentation was performed at the control sites. A non-submerged healing was allowed. Impressions were obtained at baseline and at the time of sacrifice performed 4 months after surgery. The cast models obtained were analyzed using an optical system to evaluate dimensional variations. Block sections of the implant sites were obtained for histological processing and soft tissue assessments. After 4 months of healing, no differences in soft tissue dimensions were found between the test and control sites based on the histological assessments. The location of the soft tissue at the buccal aspect was, however, more coronal at the test compared with the control sites (1.8 ± 0.8 and 0.9 ± 0.8 mm, respectively). At the three-dimensional evaluation, the margin of the soft tissues at the buccal aspect appeared to be located more apically and lingually. The vertical dislocation was 1 ± 0.6 and 2.7 ± 0.5 mm at the test and control sites, respectively. The area of the buccal shrinkage of the alveolar crest was significantly smaller at the test sites (5.9 ± 2.4 mm(2) ) compared with the control sites (11.5 ± 1.7 mm(2) ). The use of DBBM particles concomitantly with the application of a collagen membrane used at implants placed into sockets immediately after

  19. Extraction Socket Preservation Using Porcine-Derived Collagen Membrane Alone or Associated with Porcine-Derived Bone. Clinical Results of Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Guarnieri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of present randomized controlled clinical trial was to clinically evaluate hard tissue changes after extraction socket preservation procedures compared to natural spontaneous healing. Material and Methods: Thirty patients were enrolled in the present study and underwent single-tooth extraction in the premolar/molar areas. Ten sites were grafted with porcine-derived bone covered by collagen membrane, 10 covered by porcine-derived collagen membrane alone, and 10 underwent natural spontaneous healing. Vertical and horizontal bone changes after 3-month were evaluated at implant placement. Results: The vertical and horizontal bone changes at the extraction sockets treated with collagen membrane alone (vertical: -0.55 [SD 0.11] mm, and horizontal: -1.21 [SD 0.69] mm and collagen membrane plus porcine-derived bone (vertical: -0.37 [SD 0.7] mm, and horizontal: -0.91 [SD 0.53] mm were found significantly lower (P < 0.001, when compared to non-grafted sockets (vertical: -2.09 [SD 0.19] mm, and horizontal: -3.96 [SD 0.87] mm. In type 1 extraction sockets, in premolar sites, and in presence of vestibular bone thicknesses ≥ 1.5 mm, the use of collagen membrane alone revealed similar outcomes to those with additional graft material. Conclusions: At the re-entry surgery, extraction sockets grafted with porcine-derived bone and covered by collagen membrane, and extraction sockets covered by porcine-derived collagen membrane alone, showed significantly lower vertical and horizontal bone changes, compared to extraction sockets sites underwent natural spontaneous healing. However, a complete prevention of remodelling is not achievable, irrespective of the technique used.

  20. Maternal Dietary Supplementation with Oligofructose-Enriched Inulin in Gestating/Lactating Rats Preserves Maternal Bone and Improves Bone Microarchitecture in Their Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Castro, Javier; López-Aliaga, Inmaculada; Rueda, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition during pregnancy and lactation could exert a key role not only on maternal bone, but also could influence the skeletal development of the offspring. This study was performed in rats to assess the relationship between maternal dietary intake of prebiotic oligofructose-enriched inulin and its role in bone turnover during gestation and lactation, as well as its effect on offspring peak bone mass/architecture during early adulthood. Rat dams were fed either with standard rodent diet (CC group), calcium-fortified diet (Ca group), or prebiotic oligofructose-enriched inulin supplemented diet (Pre group), during the second half of gestation and lactation. Bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC), as well as micro-structure of dams and offspring at different stages were analysed. Dams in the Pre group had significantly higher trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and smaller specific bone surface (BS/BV) of the tibia in comparison with CC dams. The Pre group offspring during early adulthood had an increase of the lumbar vertebra BMD when compared with offspring of CC and Ca groups. The Pre group offspring also showed significant increase versus CC in cancellous and cortical structural parameters of the lumbar vertebra 4 such as Tb.Th, cortical BMD and decreased BS/BV. The results indicate that oligofructose-enriched inulin supplementation can be considered as a plausible nutritional option for protecting against maternal bone loss during gestation and lactation preventing bone fragility and for optimizing peak bone mass and architecture of the offspring in order to increase bone strength. PMID:27115490

  1. Evaluating differential nuclear DNA yield rates and osteocyte numbers among human bone tissue types: A synchrotron radiation micro-CT approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronowski, Janna M; Mundorff, Amy Z; Pratt, Isaac V; Davoren, Jon M; Cooper, David M L

    2017-05-01

    Molecular human identification has conventionally focused on DNA sampling from dense, weight-bearing cortical bone tissue, typically from femora or tibiae. A comparison of skeletal elements from three contemporary individuals demonstrated that elements with high quantities of cancellous bone yielded nuclear DNA at the highest rates, suggesting that preferentially sampling cortical bone may be suboptimal (Mundorff & Davoren, 2014). Despite these findings, the reason for the differential DNA yields between cortical and cancellous bone tissues remains unknown. The primary goal of this work is to ascertain whether differences in bone microstructure can be used to explain differential nuclear DNA yield among bone tissue types observed by Mundorff and Davoren (2014), with a focus on osteocytes and the three-dimensional (3D) quantification of their associated lacunae. Osteocytes and other bone cells are recognized to house DNA in bone tissue, thus examining the density of their lacunae may explain why nuclear DNA yield rates differ among bone tissue types. Lacunae were visualized and quantified using synchrotron radiation-based micro-Computed Tomographic imaging (SR micro-CT). Volumes of interest (VOIs) from cortical and cancellous bone tissues (n=129) were comparatively analyzed from the three skeletons sampled for Mundorff and Davoren's (2014) study. Analyses tested the primary hypothesis that the abundance and density of osteocytes (inferred from their lacunar spaces) vary between cortical and cancellous bone tissue types. Results demonstrated that osteocyte lacunar abundance and density vary between cortical and cancellous bone tissue types, with cortical bone VOIs containing a higher lacunar abundance and density. We found that the osteocyte lacunar density values are independent of nuclear DNA yield, suggesting an alternative explanation for the higher nuclear DNA yields from bones with greater quantities of cancellous bone tissue. The use of SR micro-CT allowed for

  2. Bone-preserving prosthesis with a single axis for treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head: midterm results for the thrust plate hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunaga, Yuji; Goto, Toshihiko; Hisatome, Takashi; Tanaka, Ryuji; Yamasaki, Takuma; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    We studied 27 patients (31 joints) who underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) using the thrust plate hip prosthesis (TPP) for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The mean follow-up period was 56 months (range 38-72 months). Clinical evaluation by the Merle d'Aubigne and Postel system showed a significant improvement from a preoperative mean score of 8.1 to a final mean follow-up score of 16.6. Mechanical loosening developed about 1 year postoperatively in one joint with a bone defect. Grade 1 stress shielding was observed in four joints. Although indications for the TPP are restricted to certain cases, unlike the conventional intramedullary stem, much can be expected of TPP. It is an outstanding prosthesis for osteonecrosis of the femoral head of young patients in terms of bone preservation and physiological load transfer.

  3. Testing the Hypothesis of Biofilm as a Source for Soft Tissue and Cell-Like Structures Preserved in Dinosaur Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Recovery of still-soft tissue structures, including blood vessels and osteocytes, from dinosaur bone after demineralization was reported in 2005 and in subsequent publications. Despite multiple lines of evidence supporting an endogenous source, it was proposed that these structures arose from contamination from biofilm-forming organisms. To test the hypothesis that soft tissue structures result from microbial invasion of the fossil bone, we used two different biofilm-forming microorganisms to inoculate modern bone fragments from which organic components had been removed. We show fundamental morphological, chemical and textural differences between the resultant biofilm structures and those derived from dinosaur bone. The data do not support the hypothesis that biofilm-forming microorganisms are the source of these structures. PMID:26926069

  4. Testing the Hypothesis of Biofilm as a Source for Soft Tissue and Cell-Like Structures Preserved in Dinosaur Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Mary Higby; Moyer, Alison E; Zheng, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    Recovery of still-soft tissue structures, including blood vessels and osteocytes, from dinosaur bone after demineralization was reported in 2005 and in subsequent publications. Despite multiple lines of evidence supporting an endogenous source, it was proposed that these structures arose from contamination from biofilm-forming organisms. To test the hypothesis that soft tissue structures result from microbial invasion of the fossil bone, we used two different biofilm-forming microorganisms to inoculate modern bone fragments from which organic components had been removed. We show fundamental morphological, chemical and textural differences between the resultant biofilm structures and those derived from dinosaur bone. The data do not support the hypothesis that biofilm-forming microorganisms are the source of these structures.

  5. Testing the Hypothesis of Biofilm as a Source for Soft Tissue and Cell-Like Structures Preserved in Dinosaur Bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Higby Schweitzer

    Full Text Available Recovery of still-soft tissue structures, including blood vessels and osteocytes, from dinosaur bone after demineralization was reported in 2005 and in subsequent publications. Despite multiple lines of evidence supporting an endogenous source, it was proposed that these structures arose from contamination from biofilm-forming organisms. To test the hypothesis that soft tissue structures result from microbial invasion of the fossil bone, we used two different biofilm-forming microorganisms to inoculate modern bone fragments from which organic components had been removed. We show fundamental morphological, chemical and textural differences between the resultant biofilm structures and those derived from dinosaur bone. The data do not support the hypothesis that biofilm-forming microorganisms are the source of these structures.

  6. Cross-sex testosterone therapy in ovariectomized mice: addition of low-dose estrogen preserves bone architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Laura G; Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; Devlin, Maureen J; Robbins, Amy E; Majidi-Zolbin, Masoumeh; Taylor, Hugh S

    2017-11-01

    Cross-sex hormone therapy (XHT) is widely used by transgender people to alter secondary sex characteristics to match their desired gender presentation. Here, we investigate the long-term effects of XHT on bone health using a murine model. Female mice underwent ovariectomy at either 6 or 10 wk and began weekly testosterone or vehicle injections. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed (20 wk) to measure bone mineral density (BMD), and microcomputed tomography was performed to compare femoral cortical and trabecular bone architecture. The 6-wk testosterone group had comparable BMD with controls by DXA but reduced bone volume fraction, trabecular number, and cortical area fraction and increased trabecular separation by microcomputed tomography. Ten-week ovariectomy/XHT maintained microarchitecture, suggesting that estrogen is critical for bone acquisition during adolescence and that late, but not early, estrogen loss can be sufficiently replaced by testosterone alone. Given these findings, we then compared effects of testosterone with effects of weekly estrogen or combined testosterone/low-dose estrogen treatment after a 6-wk ovariectomy. Estrogen treatment increased spine BMD and microarchitecture, including bone volume fraction, trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and connectivity density, and decreased trabecular separation. Combined testosterone-estrogen therapy caused similar increases in femur and spine BMD and improved architecture (increased bone volume fraction, trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and connectivity density) to estrogen therapy and were superior compared with mice treated with testosterone only. These results demonstrate estradiol is critical for bone acquisition and suggest a new cross-sex hormone therapy adding estrogens to testosterone treatments with potential future clinical implications for treating transgender youth or men with estrogen deficiency. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Testing the Hypothesis of Biofilm as a Source for Soft Tissue and Cell-Like Structures Preserved in Dinosaur Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Schweitzer, Mary Higby; Moyer, Alison E.; Zheng, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    Recovery of still-soft tissue structures, including blood vessels and osteocytes, from dinosaur bone after demineralization was reported in 2005 and in subsequent publications. Despite multiple lines of evidence supporting an endogenous source, it was proposed that these structures arose from contamination from biofilm-forming organisms. To test the hypothesis that soft tissue structures result from microbial invasion of the fossil bone, we used two different biofilm-forming microorganisms to...

  8. Recovery of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in experimentally mummified skin and bones: Prospects for paleoparasitological studies to unveil the origin of toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leles, Daniela; Lobo, Amanda; Rhodes, Taís; Millar, Patrícia Riddell; Amendoeira, Maria Regina Reis; Araújo, Adauto

    2016-09-01

    Paleoparasitology studies parasite infections by finding the parasites' remains in preserved organic remains such as natural or artificial mummy tissues, skeletons, teeth, and coprolites, among others. However, some currently important infections like toxoplasmosis have not been studied by paleoparasitology. The reasons include this parasite's complex life cycle, the resulting difficulties in locating this protozoan in the intermediate host tissues, and the limitation of coprolite studies to felines, the protozoan's definitive host. The current study thus aimed to produce an experimental model for molecular diagnosis of toxoplasmosis, prioritizing its study in bones and skin, the most abundant materials in archeological collections and sites. The study demonstrated the feasibility of recovering Toxoplasma gondii DNA from desiccated material, including bones and skin, in experimental models both with circulating tachyzoites (RH strain), characteristic of acute infection, and with cysts (ME49 cystogenic strain), characteristic of chronic infection. At present, most individuals with T. gondii infection are in the chronic phase, and the same was probably true in the past. The current study thus expands the odds of finding the parasite in archeological material, enhanced by the nature of the material in which the diagnosis was made. Finding the parasite may help answer questions that are widely debated in the literature on this protozoan's origin (Old World versus New World). In addition, when conditions do not allow ideal storage of samples for molecular tests, the methodology creates the possibility of testing oven-dried samples transported at room temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Different configuration of socket shield technique in peri-implant bone preservation: An experimental study in dog mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirado, José Luis Calvo; Troiano, Miguel; López-López, P J; Ramírez-Fernandez, María Piedad; de Val, José Eduardo Maté Sánchez; Marin, Jose Manuel Granero; Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the residual root and peri implant bone dimensions on the clinical success of the socket shield technique. Thirty-six dental implants were installed in 6 dogs. The clinical crowns of teeth P3, P4 and M1 were beheaded. Afterwards, the roots were worn down 2-3mm in apical direction until they were located at crestal level. Posterior implant beds were prepared in the center of the roots passing by 3mm apically forming 6 groups in accordance to the remaining root thickness. Radiography of the crestal bone level was performed on day 0 and after 12 weeks. Histomorphometric analyses of the specimens were carried out to measure the crestal bone level, the bone to implant contact and the buccal and lingual bone thickness at the implant shoulder portion. Correlations between groups were analyzed through nonparametric Friedman test, statistical significance was set as psocket shield technique is more predictable and the bone contours can be maintained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Bone structure and quality preserved by active versus passive muscle exercise in 21 days tail-suspended rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Huiqin; Sun, Lian-wen; Fan, Yu-bo

    2012-07-01

    Humans in Space suffer from microgravity-induced attenuated bone strength that needs to be addressed by on-orbit exercise countermeasures. However, exercise prescriptions so far did not adequately counteract the bone loss of astronauts in spaceflight because even active muscle contractions were converted to passive mode during voluntary bouts. We tested our hypothesis in unloaded rat hind limb following twenty-one days of tail-suspension (TS) combined with exercise using a hind limb stepper device designed by our group. Female Sprague Dawley rats (250g b.wt.) were divided into four groups (n=5, each): TS-only (hind limb unloading), TS plus passive mode exercise (TSP) induced by mechanically-forced passive hind limb lifting, TS plus active mode exercise (TSA) entrained by plantar electrostimulation, and control (CON) group. Standard measures of bone (e.g., mineral density, trabecular microstructure, biomechanics and ash weight) were monitored. Results provided that the attenuated properties of unloaded hind limb bone in TS-rats were more effectively supported by active mode than by passive mode motions. We here propose a modified exercise regimen combined with spontaneous muscle contractions thereby considering the biodynamic demands of both muscle and bone during resistive-load exercise in microgravity. Keywords: rat, BMD, DXA, passive exercise, active exercise, bone loss, tail suspension, spaceflight analogue, exercise countermeasure.

  11. Bone preserving level of osteotomy in short-stem total hip arthroplasty does not influence stress shielding dimensions - a comparing finite elements analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, Rene; Braas, Sabrina; Soost, Christian; Graw, Jan Adriaan; Schmitt, Jan

    2017-08-07

    The main objective of every new development in total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the longest possible survival of the implant. Periprosthetic stress shielding is a scientifically proven phenomenon which leads to inadvertent bone loss. So far, many studies have analysed whether implanting different hip stem prostheses result in significant preservation of bone stock. The aim of this preclinical study was to investigate design-depended differences of the stress shielding effect after implantation of a selection of short-stem THA-prostheses that are currently available. Based on computerised tomography (CT), a finite elements (FE) model was generated and a virtual THA was performed with different stem designs of the implant. Stems were chosen by osteotomy level at the femoral neck (collum, partial collum, trochanter sparing, trochanter harming). Analyses were performed with previously validated FE models to identify changes in the strain energy density (SED). In the trochanteric region, only the collum-type stem demonstrated a biomechanical behaviour similar to the native femur. In contrast, no difference in biomechanical behaviour was found between partial collum, trochanter harming and trochanter sparing models. All of the short stem-prostheses showed lower stress-shielding than a standard stem. Based on the results of this study, we cannot confirm that the design of current short stem THA-implants leads to a different stress shielding effect with regard to the level of osteotomy. Somehow unexpected, we found a bone stock protection in metadiaphyseal bone by simulating a more distal approach for osteotomy. Further clinical and biomechanical research including long-term results is needed to understand the influence of short-stem THA on bone remodelling and to find the optimal stem-design for a reduction of the stress shielding effect.

  12. Construction and identification of subtracted cDNA library in bone marrow cells of radon-exposed mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianxiang; Nie Jihua; Tong Jian; Fu Chunling; Zhou Jianwei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To construct and identify subtracted cDNA library in bone marrow cells of mice exposed to radon inhalation. Methods: Adult male BALB/c mice, weighing 18-22 g, were placed in a multi- functional radon chamber. One group of mice was exposed to radon up to the accumulative dose of 105 work level month (WLM). The control group of mice was housed in a room with an accumulative dose of 1 WLM. To construct a subtracted cDNA library enriched with differentially expressed genes, the SMART technique and the suppression subtractive hybridization were performed. The obtained forward and reverse cDNA fragments were directly inserted into pMD18-T vector and transformed into E. coli JM109. The inserting cDNA fragments were screened by the blue-and-white blot screening and nested PCR of bacterium liquid. Results: The 244 of 285 white bacteria clones obtained randomly were positive clones contained 100-1100 bp inserted cDNA fragments. Conclusions: The forward and reverse subtracted cDNA library in bone marrow cells of mice exposed to radon inhalation is successfully constructed. (authors)

  13. A goodbye letter to alcohol: An alternative method for field preservation of arthropod specimens and DNA suitable for mass collecting methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokluda, Pavel; Čížek, Lukáš; Stříbrná, Eva; Drag, Lukáš; Lukeš, Julius; Novotný, Vojtěch

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 2 (2014), s. 175-179 ISSN 1210-5759 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/12/1952; GA TA ČR TA02021501; GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA ČR GA206/09/0115 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : insects * beetles * DNA preservation Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.975, year: 2014

  14. A comparative evaluation of extraction socket preservation with demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft alone and along with platelet-rich fibrin: A clinical and radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval J Thakkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To investigate clinically and radiographically, the bone fill in extraction sockets using demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft alone and along with platelet-rich fibrin (PRF. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out on 36 nonrestorable single-rooted teeth sites. Sites were randomized into demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA combined with PRF - test and DFDBA - control groups using a coin toss method. After the placement of graft material, collagen membrane was used to cover it. The clinical parameters recorded were ridge width and ridge height. All the parameters were recorded at baseline and at 90 and 180 days. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent t-test and paired t-test. Results: In both groups, there is significant reduction in loss of ridge width and ridge height from baseline to 90 days (P < 0.001, baseline to 180 days (P < 0.001, and 90-180 days (P < 0.001. However, when both the groups were compared the test group favored in the reduction of ridge width while there was no statistical difference in reduction of ridge height among at different intervals. Conclusions: Although DFDBA is considered as an ideal graft material, PRF can be used as an adjunctive with DFDBA for socket preservation.

  15. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of well-preserved Middle Pleistocene bone collagen from Schöningen (Germany) and their paleoecological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuitems, Margot; van der Plicht, Johannes; Drucker, Dorothée G; Van Kolfschoten, Thijs; Palstra, Sanne W L; Bocherens, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in bone collagen can provide valuable information about the diet and habitat of mammal species. However, bone collagen degrades in normal circumstances very rapidly, and isotope analyses are therefore usually restricted to fossil material with a Late Pleistocene or Holocene age. The Middle Pleistocene site of Schöningen, dated to around 300,000 years ago, yielded bones and teeth with an exceptionally good state of collagen preservation. This allowed us to measure reliable biogenic carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios for different herbivorous taxa from the families Elephantidae, Rhinocerotidae, Equidae, Cervidae, and Bovidae. The results provide insights regarding the paleoenvironmental setting in which Middle Pleistocene hominins operated. The vegetation consumed by the herbivores from the famous spear horizon originates from open environments. During the climatic Reinsdorf Interglacial optimum, the landscape seems to have been relatively open as well, but certainly included parts that were forested. The results also indicate some niche partitioning; different herbivore species used different plant resources. For instance, the horses seem to have been predominantly browsers, while the straight-tusked elephants were feeding chiefly on grass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Is there a bone-preserving bone remodelling in short-stem prosthesis? DEXA analysis with the Nanos total hip arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, C; Ehrenbrink, J; Ehrenbrink, H

    2010-08-01

    It has been suggested that the use of a short-stem prosthesis could conserve proximal bone by proximal load transfer. Proximal stress shielding should be reduced, a phenomenon that has been associated with bone resorption around traditional stems. Bone remodelling of a metaphyseal fixed stem (Nanos, Smith & Nephew Int.) was analysed by the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. This study included 36 patients undergoing the total hip replacement using the Nanos short stem in comparison to 36 patients operated by a traditional long-stemmed femoral stem (Alloclassic). In all cases a threaded cup was inserted. Both groups were not different in regard to the BMI or in regard to the quality of bone (BMI). The average age of the group of patients with the short-stem prosthesis was slightly younger (average 54.2 years [range: 29 to 75]) than the patient group with the long-stem prosthesis (average 61.1 years [range: 39 to 71]). A prospective clinical analysis was done by the Harris hip score (HHS) and the Sutherland score to evaluate the social quality of life. With a minimum follow-up of 12 months in all cases, radiological changes in regard to stem subsidence, periprosthetic osteolysis or linear radiolucencies were analysed. The changes of periprosthetic bone density were examined with DEXA in all patients 3 and 12 months postoperatively. No patients required reoperation because of loosening or subsidence of the short-stem prosthesis. The HHS improved from a mean of 43.1 (range: 9 to 51) to 96.5 points (range: 79 to 100) in the short-stem group and to 91.3 points (range: 61 to 100) in the group of patients with long-stemmed femoral component. Radiographic follow-up revealed no evidence of component loosening or migration of the short-stem. Along the greater trochanter an osteolysis of the bone structure was found in two cases. A decrease of the proximal periprosthetic bone density (Gruen zone I, -6.4%) and in zone VII (-7.2%) were measured. An increase of the BMD in the

  17. Evaluation of mutagenic effects of formocresol: detection of DNA-protein cross-links and micronucleus in mouse bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Maria Emília Santos Pereira; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; Lotufo, Letícia Veras Costa; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Cerqueira, Eneida de Moraes Marcílio; Pessoa, Cláudia

    2008-03-01

    The genotoxic potential of formocresol was assessed by comet assay on human peripheral blood lymphocytes and in vivo micronucleus in mice. Peripheral blood lymphocytes, obtained from healthy donors, were exposed directly with different dilutions of formocresol for 45 minutes at 37 degrees C. To verify the possibility of formocresol to induce DNA-protein cross-links, treated lymphocytes were incubated with proteinase K. Micronucleus test was performed on male Swiss mice treated with several dilutions of formocresol by single intraperitoneal injection. After treatment, bone marrow was sampled 24 and 48 hours after formocresol administration. Formocresol did not produce detectable DNA damage as evaluated by comet assay. However, after proteinase K exposure, a dose-dependent increase of DNA migration was observed. Formocresol induced a significant increase in micronucleus frequencies at the highest dilution only at 24 hours after administration. Formocresol induced DNA-protein cross-links and an increased frequency of micronucleus.

  18. Clinical and biometrical evaluation of socket preservation using demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft with and without the palatal connective tissue as a biologic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddas, Hamid; Amjadi, Mohammad Reza; Naghsh, Narges

    2012-11-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation following tooth extraction has the ability to maintain the ridge dimensions and allow the implant placement in an ideal position fulfilling both functional and aesthetic results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the palatal connective tissue as a biological membrane for socket preservation with demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA). Twelve extraction sites were treated with DFDBA with (case group) and without (control group) using autogenous palatal connective tissue membrane before placement of implants. Alveolar width and height, amount of keratinized tissue, and gingival level were measured at pre-determined points using a surgical stent at two times, the time of socket preservation surgery. In both groups a decrease in all socket dimensions was found. The average decrease in socket width, height, keratinized tissue, and gingival level in case group was 1.16, 0.72, 3.58, and 1.27 mm, and in control group was 2.08, 0.86, 4.52, and 1.58 mm respectively. Statistical analysis showed that decrease in socket width (P = 0.012), keratinized tissue (P ≤ 0.001), and gingival level (P = 0.031) in case group was significantly lower than that of the control group. Results showed no meaningful difference in socket height changes when compared with case and control groups (P = 0.148). Under the limits of this study, connective tissue membrane could preserve socket width, amount of keratinized tissue, and the gingival level more effectively than DFDBA alone.

  19. ALP gene expression in cDNA samples from bone tissue engineering using a HA/TCP/Chitosan scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanie, N.; Katarina, H.; Amir, L. R.; Gunawan, H. A.

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the potential use of hydroxyapatite (HA)/tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/Chitosan as a bone tissue engineering scaffold. The potential for using HA/TCP/chitosan as a scaffold was analyzed by measuring expression of the ALP osteogenic gene in cDNA from bone biopsies from four Macaque nemestrina. Experimental conditions included control (untreated), treatment with HA/TCP 70:30, HA/TCP 50:50, and HA/TCP/chitosan. cDNA samples were measured quantitively with Real-Time PCR (qPCR) and semi-quantitively by gel electrophoresis. There were no significant differences in ALP gene expression between treatment subjects after two weeks, but the HA/TCP/chitosan treatment gave the highest level of expression after four weeks. The scaffold using the HA/TCP/chitosan combination induced a higher level of expression of the osteogenic gene ALP than did scaffold without chitosan.

  20. DNA content determination of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes induced by clastogens and spindle poisons in mouse bone marrow and peripheral blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grawe, J.; Amneus, H. (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden) Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)); Zetterberg, G. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden))

    1993-01-01

    The frequencies and DNA distributions of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes from the bone marrow and peripheral blood of mice after four different treatments were determined by flow cytometry. Polychromatic erthrocytes were detected using the fluorescent RNA stain thiazole orange, while micronuclei were detected with the DNA stain Hoechst 33342. The treatments were X-irradiation (1 Gy), cyclophosphamide (30 mg/kg), vincristine sulfphate (0.08 mg/kg), and cochicine (1 mg/kg). All treatments showed increased frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes at 30h after treatment in the bone marrow (colchicine 50h) and at 50h in the peripheral blood. The clostogenic agents X-irradiation and cyclophosphamide and the spindle poisons vincristine sulphate and cochicine could be grouped according to the fluorescent characteristics of the induced micronuclei as well as the relative frequency of small (0.5-2% if the diploid G1 DNA content) and large (2-10%) micronuclei. In the peripheral blood the relative frequency of large micronuclei was lower than in the bone marrow, indicating that they were partly eliminated before entrance into the peripheral circulation. The nature of presumed micronuclei was verified by sorting. The potential of this approach to give information on the mechanism of induction of micronuclei is discussed.

  1. Radiocarbon dating of charred human bone remains preserved in urns excavated from medieval Buddhist cemetery in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshio, E-mail: nakamura@nendai.nagoya-u.ac.j [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Sagawa, Shinichi; Yamada, Tetsuya [Gangoji Institute for Research of Cultural Properties, Nakain, Nara 630-8392 (Japan); Kanehara, Masaaki [School of Science Education, Nara University of Education, Takabatake, Nara 630-8528 (Japan); Tsuchimoto, Norio [Ichinomiya City Museum, Yamato, Ichinomiya 491-0922 (Japan); Minami, Masayo [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Omori, Takayuki [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Okuno, Mitsuru [Faculty of Science, Fukuoka University, Jonan, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Ohta, Tomoko [Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    For a preliminary test of {sup 14}C dating of cremated human remains, we have collected charred bone and wood-charcoal fragments from cremated remains contained in cinerary urns that had been excavated from medieval Buddhist cemetery at the Hoenji temple in Aichi prefecture, central Japan. More than 230 urn vessels were discovered from the excavated area of ca. 14 m wide and 14 m long. The identification of charred bone or charcoal fragments among the remains was performed by observation of surface appearance, inspection of fine structures by a microscope, bubble formation during the HCl treatments in preparing target material for AMS {sup 14}C dating, carbon and nitrogen contents, delta{sup 13}C and delta{sup 15}N values of the fragments. All {sup 14}C ages obtained for the samples that were identified as charred bone remains were almost consistent with the archeological age estimated based on typological analysis of respective urns. On the other hand, some {sup 14}C ages for the remains identified as wood charcoal, which had been produced from firewood or a wooden coffin during the cremation, were not consistent with archeological estimation, shifting toward older {sup 14}C ages, most probably as the result of old wood effect.

  2. Salt drying: a low-cost, simple and efficient method for storing plants in the field and preserving biological repositories for DNA diversity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrió, Elena; Rosselló, Josep A

    2014-03-01

    Although a variety of methods have been optimized for the collection and storage of plant specimens, most of these are not suited for field expeditions for a variety of logistic reasons. Drying specimens with silica gel in polyethylene bags is currently the standard for field-sampling methods that are suitable for subsequent DNA extraction. However, silica-gel repositories are not readily available in remote areas, and its use is not very cost-effective for the long-term storage of collections or in developing countries with limited research budgets. Salting is an ancient and traditional drying process that preserves food samples by dehydrating tissues and inhibiting water-dependent cellular metabolism. We compared salt and silica-gel drying methods with respect to dehydration rates overtime, DNA quality and polymerase chain reaction(PCR) success to assess whether dry salting can be used as an effective plant preservation method for DNA analysis. Specimens from eleven plant species covering a variety of leaf structures, leaf thicknesses and water contents were analysed. Experimental work indicated that (i) levels of dehydration in sodium chloride were usually comparable to those obtained when silica gel was used, (ii) no spoilage, fungal or bacterial growth was observed for any of the species with all drying treatments and (iii) good yields of quality genomic DNA suitable for PCR applications were obtained in the salt-drying treatments. The preservation of plant tissues in commercial table salt appears to be a satisfactory, and versatile method that may be suitable in remote areas where cryogenic resources and silica repositories are not available. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The use of comet assay to assess DNA integrity of boar spermatozoa following liquid preservation at 5 degrees C and 16 degrees C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Strzezek

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The comet assay, under neutral conditions, allows the assessment of DNA integrity influenced by sperm ageing, which is manifested in DNA double-strand breaks. Here, we attempted to use a modified neutral comet assay test (single-cell gel electrophoresis, to our knowledge for the first time, to assess DNA integrity of boar spermatozoa during liquid storage for 96 h at 5 degrees C and 16 degrees C. In this comet assay protocol we used 2% beta-mercaptoethanol prior to the lysis procedure, to aid in removing nuclear proteins. Ejaculates from 3 boars (designated A, C and G were diluted with a standard semen extender, Kortowo-3 (K-3, which was supplemented with lipoprotein fractions extracted from hen egg yolk (LPFh or ostrich egg yolk (LPFo. Irrespective of the extender type, the percentage of comet-detected spermatozoa with damaged DNA increased gradually during prolonged storage at 5 degrees C and 16 degrees C. Spermatozoa stored in K-3 extender exhibited elevated levels of DNA damage at both storage temperatures. Significant differences in DNA damage among the boars were more pronounced during storage in LPF-based extenders at 5 degrees C: spermatozoa of boars A and G were less susceptible to DNA damage. The percent of tail DNA in comets was lower in LPF-based extenders, and there were individual variations among the boars. We observed that changes in DNA integrity were dependent on the extender type and storage temperature. A higher level of DNA instability was observed in K-3 extended semen compared with K-3/LPFh or K-3/LPFo extended semen during storage at 5 degrees C. No significant difference in the level of DNA damage between K-3/LPFh and K-3/LPFo was observed. It seems that a long-term storage can affect genomic integrity of boar spermatozoa. The modified neutral comet assay can be used to detect low levels of DNA damage in boar spermatozoa during liquid preservation. Therefore, screening for sperm DNA damage may be used as an additional

  4. The Impact of Different Preservation Conditions and Freezing-Thawing Cycles on Quality of RNA, DNA, and Proteins in Cancer Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaogeng; Zheng, Hong; Chen, Jie; Zhong, Xiaorong; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhu; Wang, Yanping

    2015-10-01

    High-quality cancer tissues are essential for future research, especially molecular research. For the sake of better quality of tissues, some storage methods are chosen according to lab conditions. But the impact of different storing conditions on the quality of RNA, DNA (especially the degree of DNA methylation), and protein of tissues that have undergone a thawing process, is not clear. We analyzed the influence of different storage conditions including in RNALater solution, normal saline, Opti-mum Cutting Temperature compound (OCT), and snap frozen with no protective reagent (as control) in paired tissue samples on the quality of RNA (RNA Integrity Number value and mRNA expression), DNA quality (DNA amplification and DNA methylation degree of gene RASSF1a), and protein quality. Further, we analyzed the RNA quality of tissues that underwent three freeze-thaw cycles. The RNALater-treated group retained good RNA quality as expected on three repeated freeze-thaw cycles (RIN>8), but the snap-frozen tissues showed relatively poor results after one freeze-thaw cycle (RINRNA from saline- and OCT-treated groups also yielded good results when we repeated freezing and thawing one time (RIN>7) and two times (RIN>6). The impact of different storing conditions on DNA amplification is small. However, DNA methylation and protein quality are different with different storing conditions. OCT seems to be more secure and stable compared with other two experimental groups, and show a similar trend with control group. In consideration of budget and efficiency, we suggest OCT as the best storing method that not only preserves RNA quality during the freezing-thawing process well, but also ensures more secure and stable DNA and protein.

  5. Comparative Alveolar Ridge Preservation Using Allogenous Tooth Graft versus Free-dried Bone Allograft: A Randomized, Controlled, Prospective, Clinical Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chaitanya Pradeep; D'Lima, Cynthia Bernardo; Samat, Urmila Chandrashekhar; Karde, Prerna Ashok; Patil, Agraja Ganpat; Dani, Nitin Hemchandra

    2017-01-01

    For the first time in India, allografts from human extracted teeth were prepared. A randomized, prospective, clinicoradiographical, histological study was conducted to evaluate their efficacy in comparison with freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) in alveolar ridge preservation. Graft preparation: with written consent, teeth were collected from three donors (full mouth extraction cases). Once donors' serums were tested negative for HIV, HBV, HCV, and Venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL), mineralized whole tooth allograft (WTA) and dentin allograft (DA) were prepared using the standard protocol of Tissue Bank at Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India. In this randomized controlled trial, 15 patients undergoing extraction of at least four teeth were selected. In each patient after atraumatic extractions, one socket was grafted with WTA, second with DA, third with FDBA, and fourth was left ungrafted (control site). All the sites were covered with chorion membrane. To estimate three-dimensional alveolar crest changes, cone beam computed tomography scans were taken immediately after grafting and 4 months postoperatively. Bone biopsies using 3 mm trephine bur were obtained from four patients at the time of implant placement and evaluated histologically. Clinically uneventful healing was observed at all sites. Compared to other sites, WTA and DA consistently showed superior results demonstrating least reduction in alveolar crest height and width which was statistically significant ( P < 0.05). Between WTA and DA sites, there was no statistically significant difference. Histological analysis also confirmed more new bone formation at WTA and DA sites. Rather than disposing extracted human teeth as a biomedical waste (common practice), they can be collected from suitable systemically healthy donors. With the help of tissue bank, they can be processed into an allograft, serving as an excellent alternative to conventional allografts.

  6. TGFβ/BMP inhibits the bone marrow transformation capability of Hoxa9 by repressing its DNA-binding ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Kim, Hyung-Gyoong; Cotta, Claudiu V; Wan, Mei; Tang, Yi; Klug, Christopher A; Cao, Xu

    2006-01-01

    Homeobox (Hox) gene mutations and their altered expressions are frequently linked to human leukemia. Here, we report that transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) inhibits the bone marrow transformation capability of Hoxa9 and Nup98-Hoxa9, the chimeric fusion form of Hoxa9 identified in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), through Smad4, the common Smad (Co-Smad) in the TGFβ/BMP signaling pathway. Smad4 interacts directly with the homeodomain of Hoxa9 and blocks the ability of Nup98-Hoxa9 to bind DNA, thereby suppressing its ability to regulate downstream gene transcription. Mapping data revealed that the amino-terminus of Smad4 mediates this interaction and overexpression of the Hoxa9 interaction domain of Smad4 was sufficient to inhibit the enhanced serial replating ability of primary bone marrow cells induced by Nup98-Hoxa9. These studies establish a novel mechanism by which TGFβ/BMP regulates hematopoiesis and suggest that modification of Hox DNA-binding activity may serve as a novel therapeutic intervention for those leukemias that involve deregulation of Hox. PMID:16525506

  7. Preservação da proteína verde fluorescente no tecido ósseo descalcificado Preservation of the green fluorescent protein on decalcified bone tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankerle Neves Boeloni

    2010-10-01

    diseases. However, in the bone, the fluorescence generated by GFP can be lost during the decalcification process, hindering the tracking of stem cells used in the treatment of diseases or bone defects. The aim of this study was to compare different techniques of preservation of GFP in the decalcified bone tissue. Femurs of female Lewis GFP rats were distributed in four groups: 1 decalcified in formic acid and paraffin-embedded; 2 decalcified in formic acid submitted to cryomicrotomy; 3 decalcified in EDTA and paraffin-embedded and 4 decalcified in EDTA with cryomicrotomy. Sections of bone tissue of all the groups were analyzed for identification of the natural fluorescence and subsequently submitted to the immunofluorescence using anti-GFP and Alexa Flúor 555. The images were obtained by confocal microscopy. Osteocytes, osteoblasts and bone marrow cells of GFP rats only had natural fluorescence preserved in the bone tissue decalcified in EDTA and submitted to cryomicrotomy. In others groups there were loss of the natural fluorescence and the GFP cells could be only identified with the use of the immunofluorescence with anti-GFP. In conclusion, the decalcification in EDTA and the cryomicrotomy are the best techniques to preserve the natural fluorescence of the GFP cells in the bone tissue and the GFP cells in bone tissue decalcified in formic acid and paraffin-embedded can be visualized only with the use of the immunofluorescence with anti-GFP.

  8. Protective effect of gingerol on leucocyte and bone marrow DNA of 60Co γ-rays irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Zhenfei; Zhou Yu; Geng Yanyan; Zeng Xianyin

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the effect of gingerol on peripheral leucocyte and bone marrow DNA of 60 Co γ-rays irradiated mice was developed., Twenty-four healthy healthy female Kunming mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: control, gingerol, irradiation and gingerol + irradiation group. Gingerol group and gingerol + irradiation group were given gingerol intragastrically once a day for five days. Irradiation group and gingerol + irradiation group were suffered from 5 Gy 60 Co γ-rays irradiation at the rate of 1.2 Gy/min on the 6 th day. Blood samples, spleens, livers and thigh bones were collected to be measured after 48 h. The results showed that, compared with irradiation group, gingerol + irradiation group had significantly higher spleen index (p 60 Co γ-rays irradiated mice. (authors)

  9. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome. PMID:26262646

  10. A novel flavonoid C-glucoside from Ulmus wallichiana preserves bone mineral density, microarchitecture and biomechanical properties in the presence of glucocorticoid by promoting osteoblast survival: a comparative study with human parathyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M P; Mishra, J S; Sharan, K; Yadav, M; Singh, A K; Srivastava, A; Kumar, S; Bhaduaria, S; Maurya, R; Sanyal, S; Chattopadhyay, N

    2013-11-15

    6-C-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(2S,3S)-(+)-5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxydihydroflavonol (GTDF) is a novel compound isolated from Ulmus wallichiana, reported to have bone anabolic action in ovariectomized rats. Here, we studied the effect of GTDF in glucocorticoid (GC)-induced bone loss and its mode of action. Osteoblasts were cultured from rat calvaria or bone marrow to study apoptosis and differentiation by dexamethasone (Dex), methylprednisolone (MP), GTDF, quercetin and rutin. Female Sprague Dawley rats were treated with Dex or MP with or without GTDF or PTH. Efficacy was evaluated by bone microarchitecture using microcomputed tomography, determination of new bone formation by fluorescent labeling of bone and osteoblast apoptosis by co-labeling bone sections with Runx-2 and TUNEL. Serum osteocalcin was determined by ELISA. GTDF preserved trabecular and cortical bones in the presence of Dex and MP and mitigated the MP-mediated suppression of serum osteocalcin. Co-administration of GTDF to MP rats increased mineral apposition, bone formation rates, bone biomechanical strength, reduced osteoblast apoptosis and increased osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells compared to MP group, suggesting in vivo osteogenic effect of GTDF. These effects of GTDF were to a great extent comparable to PTH. GTDF prevented GC-induced osteoblast apoptosis by inhibiting p53 expression and acetylation, and activation of AKT but did not influence transactivation of GC receptor (GR). GTDF protects against GC-induced bone loss by promoting osteoblast survival through p53 inhibition and activation of AKT pathways but not as a GR antagonist. GTDF has the potential in the management of GC-induced osteopenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative analysis of DNA methylation at all human imprinted regions reveals preservation of epigenetic stability in adult somatic tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodfine Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes subject to genomic imprinting are mono-allelically expressed in a parent-of-origin dependent manner. Each imprinted locus has at least one differentially methylated region (DMR which has allele specific DNA methylation and contributes to imprinted gene expression. Once DMRs are established, they are potentially able to withstand normal genome reprogramming events that occur during cell differentiation and germ-line DMRs are stably maintained throughout development. These DMRs, in addition to being either maternally or paternally methylated, have differences in whether methylation was acquired in the germ-line or post fertilization and are present in a variety of genomic locations with different Cytosine-phosphate guanine (CpG densities and CTCF binding capacities. We therefore examined the stability of maintenance of DNA methylation imprints and determined the normal baseline DNA methylation levels in several adult tissues for all imprinted genes. In order to do this, we first developed and validated 50 highly specific, quantitative DNA methylation pyrosequencing assays for the known DMRs associated with human imprinted genes. Results Remarkable stability of the DNA methylation imprint was observed in all germ-line DMRs and paternally methylated somatic DMRs (which maintained average methylation levels of between 35% - 65% in all somatic tissues, independent of gene expression. Maternally methylated somatic DMRs were found to have more variation with tissue specific methylation patterns. Most DMRs, however, showed some intra-individual variability for DNA methylation levels in peripheral blood, suggesting that more than one DMR needs to be examined in order to get an overall impression of the epigenetic stability in a tissue. The plasticity of DNA methylation at imprinted genes was examined in a panel of normal and cancer cell lines. All cell lines showed changes in DNA methylation, especially at the paternal germ

  12. DNA-based adaptive immunity protect host from infection-associated periodontal bone resorption via recognition of Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaozhe; LaRosa, Karen B; Kawai, Toshihisa; Taubman, Martin A

    2014-01-03

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) is one of a constellation of oral organisms associated with human chronic periodontitis. While adaptive immunity to periodontal pathogen proteins has been investigated and is an important component of periodontal bone resorption, the effect of periodontal pathogen DNA in eliciting systemic and mucosal antibody and modulating immune responses has not been investigated. Rowett rats were locally injected with whole genomic Pg DNA in alum. Escherichia coli (Ec) genomic DNA, Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) genomic DNA, and saline/alum injected rats served as controls. After various time points, serum IgG and salivary IgA antibody to Ec, Fn or Pg were detected by ELISA. Serum and salivary antibody reactions with Pg surface antigens were determined by Western blot analyses and the specific antigen was identified by mass spectrometry. Effects of genomic DNA immunization on Pg bacterial colonization and experimental periodontal bone resorption were also evaluated. Sera from Pg DNA, Ec DNA and Fn DNA-injected rats did not react with Ec or Fn bacteria. Serum IgG antibody levels to Pg and Pg surface extracts were significantly higher in animals immunized with Pg DNA as compared to the control groups. Rats injected with Pg DNA demonstrated a strong serum IgG and salivary IgA antibody reaction solely to Pg fimbrillin (41kDa), the major protein component of Pg fimbriae. In the Pg DNA-immunized group, the numbers of Pg bacteria in oral cavity and the extent of periodontal bone resorption were significantly reduced after Pg infection. This study suggests that infected hosts may select specific genes from whole genomic DNA of the periodontal pathogen for transcription and presentation. The results indicate that the unique gene selected can initiate a host protective immune response to the parent bacterium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Results of a collaborative study on DNA identification of aged bone samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněk, D.; Budowle, B.; Dubská-Votrubová, J.; Ambers, A.; Frolík, Jan; Pospíšek, M.; Al Afeefi, A. A.; Al Hosani, K. I.; Allen, M.; Al Naimi, K. S.; Al Salafi, D.; Al Tayyari, W. A. R.; Arguetaa, W.; Bottinelli, M.; Bus, M. M.; Cemper-Kiesslich, J.; Cepil, O.; De Cock, G.; Desmyter, S.; El Amri, H.; El Ossmani, H.; Galdies, R.; Grün, S.; Guidet, F.; Hoefges, A.; Iancu, C. B.; Lotz, P.; Maresca, A.; Nagy, M.; Novotný, J.; Rachid, H.; Rothe, J.; Stenersen, M.; Stephenson, M.; Stevanovitch, A.; Strien, J.; Sumita, D. R.; Vella, J.; Zander, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2017), s. 203-213 ISSN 0353-9504 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36938G Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : DNA quantitation * STR typing * mtDNA typing Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology OBOR OECD: Archaeology Impact factor: 1.619, year: 2016

  14. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of a human c-fos cDNA into mouse bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, P; Verrier, B; Klein, B; Niccolino, M; Marty, L; Alexandre, C; Piechaczyk, M

    1991-11-01

    A cDNA encoding a complete human c-fos protein was isolated and inserted into two different murine MoMuLV-derived recombinant retroviruses allowing expression of c-fos protein in different cell types. One c-fos-expressing retrovirus, chosen for its ability to express high levels of proteins in fibroblast-like cells, was shown to potentiate long-term cultures of mouse bone marrow stromal cells in vitro and therefore constitutes a potential tool for immortalizing such cells. Moreover, when tested in an in vitro differentiation assay, stromal cells constitutively expressing c-fos favor the granulocyte differentiation of hematopoietic precursors. Interestingly, retroviruses expressing v-src and v-abl oncogenes, included as controls in our experiments, do not produce any detectable effects, whereas those expressing polyoma virus middle T antigen facilitate long-term growth in vitro of stromal cells that favor the macrophage differentiation pathway of bone marrow stem cells. Our observation supports the idea that constitutive expression of some oncogenes, including c-fos and polyoma virus middle T antigen, may influence cytokine production by bone marrow stromal cells.

  15. DNA damage induced in mouse tissues by organic wood preserving waste extracts as assayed by 32P-postlabeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randerath, E.; Zhou, G.D.; Donnelly, K.C.; Safe, S.H.; Randerath, K.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, a mouse bioassay was used in combination with 32 P-postlabeling to determine DNA adduct formation induced by hexane/acetone extracts of two samples from a WPW site. Female ICR mice were treated dermally with extract corresponding to 3 mg residue or vehicle control once per day for 2 days and killed 24 h later. Skin, lung, liver, kidney, and heart DNA preparations were assayed by nuclease P1-enhanced postlabeling. Adduct profiles were tissue-specific and displayed a multitude of non-polar DNA adducts with levels amounting to one adduct in 1.6 x 10 6 DNA nucleotides in skin (both extracts) and one adduct in 3.2 x 10 7 or 1.2 x 10 7 DNA nucleotides in liver (extract 1 or extract 2). Based on their chromatographic properties, these adducts appeared largely derived from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in the extracts. One of the major adducts was identified as the 32 P-labeled derivative of the reaction product of 7β, 8α-dihydroxy-9α, 10α-epoxy-7, 8, 9, 10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE I) with N 2 of deoxyguanosine. Total non-polar DNA adduct levels were highest in skin and lung, amounting to 17.4 and 24.0% of the skin values for extracts 1 and 2, respectively, in lung while the corresponding levels in liver were 5.0 and 12.6%. These results were in accord with the carcinogenic potencies of PAHs in these organs. Extract 2 induced higher adduct levels in internal organs, although its PAH concentrations were lower than those of extract 1, i.e. lung, liver, kidney, and heart had 1.4, 2.5, 1.9, and 1.7 times higher total adduct levels and 1.6, 3.3, 1.6, and 1.9 times higher benzo[a]pyrene adduct levels. With the exception of total adducts in lung, the differences between the two extracts were all significant, suggestive of compound interactions. (orig.) (orig.). With 5 figs., 6 tabs

  16. Pearson bone marrow-pancreas syndrome with insulin-dependent diabetes, progressive renal tubulopathy, organic aciduria and elevated fetal haemoglobin caused by deletion and duplication of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superti-Furga, A; Schoenle, E; Tuchschmid, P; Caduff, R; Sabato, V; DeMattia, D; Gitzelmann, R; Steinmann, B

    1993-01-01

    We report a patient with a clinical picture consisting of small birth weight, connatal hypoplastic anaemia, vacuolised bone marrow precursors, failure to thrive, and, subsequently, by insulin-dependent diabetes, renal Fanconi syndrome, lactic acidosis, complex organic aciduria, and elevation of haemoglobin F and of adenosine deaminase activity. The clinical course was progressive and death occurred at age 19 months. A high proportion of mitochondrial (mt) DNA molecules with a deletion of nucleotides 9238 to 15575 were identified in several tissues; about half of the shortened mtDNA molecules were concatenated to form circular dimers. The clinical and laboratory findings support recent conclusions that Pearson syndrome is not confined to bone marrow and pancreas, as originally described, but is a multi-organ disorder associated with deletions in part of the mtDNA molecules. The tissue distribution and the relative proportions of the abnormal mtDNA molecules apparently determine the phenotype and clinical course.

  17. Disruption of Runx1 and Runx3 Leads to Bone Marrow Failure and Leukemia Predisposition due to Transcriptional and DNA Repair Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsia Qiuxia Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The RUNX genes encode transcription factors involved in development and human disease. RUNX1 and RUNX3 are frequently associated with leukemias, yet the basis for their involvement in leukemogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we show that Runx1;Runx3 double-knockout (DKO mice exhibited lethal phenotypes due to bone marrow failure and myeloproliferative disorder. These contradictory clinical manifestations are reminiscent of human inherited bone marrow failure syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA, caused by defective DNA repair. Indeed, Runx1;Runx3 DKO cells showed mitomycin C hypersensitivity, due to impairment of monoubiquitinated-FANCD2 recruitment to DNA damage foci, although FANCD2 monoubiquitination in the FA pathway was unaffected. RUNX1 and RUNX3 interact with FANCD2 independently of CBFβ, suggesting a nontranscriptional role for RUNX in DNA repair. These findings suggest that RUNX dysfunction causes DNA repair defect, besides transcriptional misregulation, and promotes the development of leukemias and other cancers.

  18. Epigenome-wide association of DNA methylation in whole blood with bone mineral density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, John A; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Joehanes, Roby

    2017-01-01

    Genetic and environmental determinants of skeletal phenotypes such as bone mineral density (BMD) may converge through the epigenome, providing a tool to better understand osteoporosis pathophysiology. As the epigenetics of BMD have been largely unexplored in humans, we performed an epigenome wide...

  19. Surveying the repair of ancient DNA from bones via high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouttham, Nathalie; Klunk, Jennifer; Kuch, Melanie; Fourney, Ron; Poinar, Hendrik

    2015-07-01

    DNA damage in the form of abasic sites, chemically altered nucleotides, and strand fragmentation is the foremost limitation in obtaining genetic information from many ancient samples. Upon cell death, DNA continues to endure various chemical attacks such as hydrolysis and oxidation, but repair pathways found in vivo no longer operate. By incubating degraded DNA with specific enzyme combinations adopted from these pathways, it is possible to reverse some of the post-mortem nucleic acid damage prior to downstream analyses such as library preparation, targeted enrichment, and high-throughput sequencing. Here, we evaluate the performance of two available repair protocols on previously characterized DNA extracts from four mammoths. Both methods use endonucleases and glycosylases along with a DNA polymerase-ligase combination. PreCR Repair Mix increases the number of molecules converted to sequencing libraries, leading to an increase in endogenous content and a decrease in cytosine-to-thymine transitions due to cytosine deamination. However, the effects of Nelson Repair Mix on repair of DNA damage remain inconclusive.

  20. Combination of Bone Graft and Resorbable Membrane for Alveolar Ridge Preservation: a Systematic Review, Meta-analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Giuseppe; Zhurakivska, Khrystyna; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Laino, Luigi; Cicciù, Marco; Lo Russo, Lucio

    2017-09-12

    Alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) techniques are aimed to reduce the resorption after tooth extraction. The combination of a graft material covered with a resorbable membrane represent one of the most common strategies performed in the clinical practice. The aim of this systematic review was to analyse evidence regarding potential benefits of ARP procedures performed with allogenic/xenogenic grafts in combination with a resorbable membrane coverage in comparison to a spontaneous healing. Electronic databases were screened independently by two authors in order to select studies suitable for inclusion in this revision. Horizontal Ridge Width Reduction (HRWR) and Vertical Ridge Height Reduction (VRHR) were investigated as primary outcomes and Volume Changes (VC) as secondary outcome. Meta-analysis was performed using the inverse of variance test with a random effect model. Adjustment for type I and II errors and analysis of the power of evidence was performed with Trial Sequential analysis (TSA). 7 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the quantitative synthesis. Meta-analysis revealed that the combination therapy resulted in a lower rate of resorption for both HRWR (-2.19 mm with 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [-2.67, -1.71]) and VRHR (-1.72 mm with 95% CI [-2.14, -1.30]). For VC no meta-analysis was performed due to insufficient data. Analysis of the power of the evidence performed with TSA, showed that the number of both studies and sockets analyzed is sufficient to validate such findings, despite the high rate of heterogeneity. The use of bone graft covered by a resorbable membrane is able to decrease the rate of alveolar ridge horizontal and vertical resorption after tooth extraction. The power and reliability of the evidences are strong enough to confirm the above-mentioned findings, despite the high rate of heterogeneity of included studies.

  1. Predictive models as screening tools for DNA recovery from baked and burned porcine bones

    OpenAIRE

    Velzen, I. V.; Raveendran, M.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.

    2015-01-01

    Burnt bones and skeletal remnants continue to challenge the proficiency of forensic investigations in human individualization and identification. The various natural disasters and human inflicted crimes involving fire leave the forensic investigators with very little to work on. Thus, demand for practical studies to obtain useful facts for improvisation of current techniques and to overcome the short comings is a prerequisite. In this study Design of Experiments (DOE) as an ...

  2. DNA released by leukemic cells contributes to the disruption of the bone marrow microenvironment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořáková, Marta; Karafiát, Vít; Pajer, Petr; Kluzáková, E.; Jarkovská, Karla; Peková, S.; Krutílková, L.; Dvořák, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 44 (2013), s. 5201-5209 ISSN 0950-9232 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520801; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06061; GA ČR GA204/06/1728; GA ČR GA301/09/1727 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : acute leukemia * tumor microenvironment * extracellular nucleosomes * extracellular DNA * DNA damage response * cell death Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.559, year: 2013

  3. Characterization of the cDNA encoding bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, osteocalcin and two forms of the protein isolated from bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Yoshiko; Tabata, Shiro; Yamaguchi, Minoru; Ohgushi, Hajime; Yonemasu, Kunio

    2004-07-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding osteocalcin from the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana (bone Gla-protein, BGP) has been isolated, and the complete coding sequence for the 100-amino-acid pre-pro-osteocalcin protein was determined. The amino acid sequence of Rana catesbeiana osteocalcin, especially the mature 49-amino acid sequence, is closer to the mammalian than to the fish, Sparus osteocalcin. Rana mature osteocalcin has a similarity of 67% with human or 59% with rat osteocalcin, and only 42% with fish mature osteocalcin. The 51-amino-acid pre-pro-peptide contains the expected hydrophobic leader sequence and the dibasic Arg-Arg sequence preceding the NH2-terminal Ser of the mature 49-amino-acid Rana osteocalcin. The pro-peptide sequence also contains the expected motif of polar and hydrophobic residues, which targets vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylation of three specific Glu residues at positions 17, 21, and 24 in the mature protein. At the native protein expression levels, extraction from Rana cortical bone in the presence of protease inhibitor cocktail resulted in the isolation of two distinct forms of osteocalcin, P-1 and P-2, with a 3:2 distribution. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and amino acid sequence analysis of the N-terminal domain, we confirmed that P-1 is the intact 49-residue osteocalcin with N-terminal SNLRNAVFG., and that P-2 lacks four amino acids from the N-terminus, (NAVFG.). These results demonstrate the existence of a form of osteocalcin lacking four N-terminal amino acids in Rana bone, and that mature Rana osteocalcins remained highly conserved in their molecular evolution, especially with respect to the conservation of the C-terminal domain (residues 14-49).

  4. Isolation and partial characterization of infectious molecular clones of feline immunodeficiency virus obtained directly from bone marrow DNA of a naturally infected cat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); I-H. Chu (I-Hai); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); K. Weijer (Kees); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); M.L. Bosch (Marnix)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractReplication-competent molecular clones of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) were isolated directly from the DNA of bone marrow cells of a naturally FIV-infected cat. After transfection in a feline kidney cell line (CrFK) and subsequent cocultivation with peripheral blood mononuclear

  5. Oxidative DNA damage in bone marrow cells of patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotná, Božena; Bagryantseva, Yana; Šišková, M.; Neuwirtová, R.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 2 (2009), s. 340-343 ISSN 0145-2126 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8265 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Myelodysplastic syndrome * Refractory anemia * Oxidative DNA damage Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.358, year: 2009

  6. Large palindromes in the lambda phage genome are preserved in a rec/sup +/ host by inhibiting lambda DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurvinton, C.E.; Stahl, M.M.; Stahl, F.W.

    1987-03-01

    A large palindrome carried by phage lambda has been shown to prevent growth of the phage on a rec/sup +/ strain of Escherichia coli. The phage do form plaques on recBC sbcB strains, but the palindrome is not stable - deletions that either destroy the palindrome or diminish its size overgrow the original engineered palindrome-containing phage. The authors have prepared stocks of lambda carrying a palindrome that is 2 x 4200 base pairs long. lambda phage were density labeled by UV induction of lysogens grown in minimal medium containing (/sup 13/C) glucose and /sup 15/NH/sub 4/Cl. These phage stocks are produced by induction of a lysogen in which the two halves of the palindrome are stored at opposite ends of the prophage and are of sufficient titer (10/sup 9/ phage per ml) to enable one-step growth experiments with replication-blocked phage. They find that the large palindrome as well as a lesser palindrome of 2 x 265 base pairs are recovered intact among particles carrying unreplicated chromosomes following such an infection of a rec/sup +/ host. they propose that DNA replication drives the extrusion of palindromic sequences in vivo, forming secondary structures that are substrates for the recBC and sbcB gene products.

  7. Alveolar ridge preservation and biologic width management for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alveolar bone atrophy is a chronically progressive, irreversible process which results in bone loss in both the buccal, lingual and apico-coronal region. Without bone preservation measures, bone resorption is experienced and continues for life. Preservation of alveolar ridge is indicated when a tooth-supported fixed partial ...

  8. Ridge preservation with or without an osteoinductive allograft: a clinical, radiographic, micro-computed tomography, and histologic study evaluating dimensional changes and new bone formation of the alveolar ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownfield, Lauren A; Weltman, Robin L

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this randomized, controlled clinical trial is to determine whether ridge preservation using an osteoinductive allograft (test) would prevent ridge resorption and promote bone maturation compared to extraction alone (control). Seventeen patients (20 total sites), in need of a non-molar extraction and delayed implant placement were randomly selected to receive either ridge preservation or extraction alone. A cone-beam computed tomography was completed with a radiographic stent in place before extraction and 10 to 12 weeks postoperatively for dimensional and buccal plate analyses. Bone cores were taken for micro-computed tomography (microCT) and histologic analyses. Resorption of the alveolar ridge occurred at all sites with no statistically significant differences found between test and control sites. A significant correlation was found between the initial buccal plate thickness and the loss of vertical ridge height. microCT and histologic analyses found a mean new bone volume of 44.9% with microCT and 37.4% with histology in test sites and 39% and 35.5%, respectively, in control sites. The residual graft volume was 2.4% with microCT and 4.5% with histology. Test and control sites lost similar amounts of alveolar ridge, with the loss of buccolingual width occurring predominantly at the expense of the buccal bone. A thicker buccal plate was associated with less ridge loss in the vertical dimension. The percentage of new bone was not statistically significant between either the test or control sites, using either microCT or histologic analyses.

  9. Investigation of a Novel PLGA/CaP Scaffold in the Healing of Tooth Extraction Sockets to Alveolar Bone Preservation in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo-Pires, Ana Claudia; Mendes, Vanessa Cristina; Ferreira-Junior, Osny; Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; Guan, Limin; Davies, John Edward

    2016-06-01

    It is expected that 40% to 60% of initial alveolar bone volume will be lost up to 6 months after tooth extraction. OsteoScaf(TM) (TRT, Toronto, ON, Canada) (poly (DL-lactide-co-glycololide/calcium phosphate [PLGA/CaP] scaffold) is a novel bone substitute material and represents a promising alternative for maintaining alveolar bone integrity in this clinical scenario. Here it was hypothesized that OsteoScaf would reduce alveolar bone lost after tooth extraction in patient, acting as a clot-retention device. A total of 10 patients (32 sockets) were included in the study, of which 16 sockets were grafted with OsteoScaf and 16 were used as control (coagulum alone). Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed both immediately following extraction and also at 120 days postoperatively, at which time biopsy samples were also harvested for histological analyses. Quantitative analysis of CBCT showed less bone resorption in the OsteoScaf groups, being 10.5% to 14.4% less bone lost in the center of the socket, 15.4% in the buccal region, and 12.6% in the palatal. Qualitative histological analysis showed new bone tissue in direct apposition to the scaffold - demonstrating its osteoconductive nature. OsteoScaf diminished the expected bone lost during the postextraction remodeling of the alveolar bone ridge at 120 days postextraction. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Integrated analysis of DNA-methylation and gene expression using high-dimensional penalized regression: a cohort study on bone mineral density in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Tonje G; Borgan, Ørnulf; Reppe, Sjur; Gautvik, Kaare; Glad, Ingrid Kristine

    2018-03-07

    Using high-dimensional penalized regression we studied genome-wide DNA-methylation in bone biopsies of 80 postmenopausal women in relation to their bone mineral density (BMD). The women showed BMD varying from severely osteoporotic to normal. Global gene expression data from the same individuals was available, and since DNA-methylation often affects gene expression, the overall aim of this paper was to include both of these omics data sets into an integrated analysis. The classical penalized regression uses one penalty, but we incorporated individual penalties for each of the DNA-methylation sites. These individual penalties were guided by the strength of association between DNA-methylations and gene transcript levels. DNA-methylations that were highly associated to one or more transcripts got lower penalties and were therefore favored compared to DNA-methylations showing less association to expression. Because of the complex pathways and interactions among genes, we investigated both the association between DNA-methylations and their corresponding cis gene, as well as the association between DNA-methylations and trans-located genes. Two integrating penalized methods were used: first, an adaptive group-regularized ridge regression, and secondly, variable selection was performed through a modified version of the weighted lasso. When information from gene expressions was integrated, predictive performance was considerably improved, in terms of predictive mean square error, compared to classical penalized regression without data integration. We found a 14.7% improvement in the ridge regression case and a 17% improvement for the lasso case. Our version of the weighted lasso with data integration found a list of 22 interesting methylation sites. Several corresponded to genes that are known to be important in bone formation. Using BMD as response and these 22 methylation sites as covariates, least square regression analyses resulted in R 2 =0.726, comparable to an

  11. DNA transfection of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells using micro electroporation chips

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Peigang

    2011-02-01

    Experimental study of electroporation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) at the single-cell level was carried out on a micro EP chip by using single electric rectangular pulse. The threshold values of the electrode potential and pulse width for gas bubble generation on the micro electrodes due to electrolysis of water were revealed as 4.5 volt and 100 μs, respectively. Quantitative EP study was performed with various electric field strengths for various pulse widths, ranging from 20μs to 15ms. Over 1,000 single-cell EP results were used to construct an EP "phase diagram", which delineates the boundaries for (1) effective EP of MSCs and (2) electric cell lysis of MSCs. Finally, the micro EP chip showed successful transfection of the pEGFP-C1 plasmid into the MSCs by properly choosing the electric parameters from the EP "phase diagram". © 2011 IEEE.

  12. Função osteoindutora de fragmentos ósseos conservados em glicerina a 98%: estudo experimental em ratos Osteoinduction in bone fragments preserved in 98% glycerin: experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marluce Macedo Cavassani

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho foi o de avaliar a função osteoindutora atribuída aos fragmentos ósseos conservados em glicerina a 98%, por trinta dias, à temperatura ambiente. Esses fragmentos foram obtidos de fêmures e tíbias de ratos doadores. O implante desta matriz óssea foi realizado no tecido subcutâneo e intramuscular de ratos receptores. Análise histopatológica foi realizada no 30º, 60º e 90º dia após o implante. Aos 30 dias, notou-se resposta osteogênica positiva, inclusive com mielogênese, que aos 60 e 90 dias foram efetivamente concluídas. Nesses períodos, observou-se a presença de fragmentos de matriz óssea calcificada, sugerindo que fossem tecido ósseo neoformado a partir da atividade osteoblástica observada aos 30 dias. Diante desses resultados, concluiu-se que a glicerina é um bom meio para conservação de fragmentos ósseos para uso em enxertos, uma vez que a função osteoindutora foi preservada.The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the osteoinduction of 98% glycerin-preserved bone fragments preserved by 30 days, kept at the room temperature. The bone fragments were obtained from femur and tibia of rats. The bone fragments were implanted in the subcutaneous and intramuscular tissues of these. Histological studies were done at 30, 60 and 90 days post-operatively. Positive osteogenic and myelogenic response could be seen 30 days after implantion, and, were concluded 60 and 90 days . Completely calcified bone matrix fragments were observed in these days, suggesting that this newly formed bone tissue was derived from the osteoblastic activity observed on 30 post-operatively day. The results showed that glycerin is a good medium to preserve bone fragments for grafts use because it seems to keep the osteoinduction activity.

  13. The CREB Coactivator CRTC2 Is a Lymphoma Tumor Suppressor that Preserves Genome Integrity through Transcription of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Minggang; Pak, Magnolia L; Chamberlain, Lynn; Xing, Wei; Yu, Hongbo; Green, Michael R

    2015-06-09

    The CREB-regulated transcription coactivator CRTC2 stimulates CREB target gene expression and has a well-established role in modulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Here, we find, unexpectedly, that loss of CRTC2, as well as CREB1 and its coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP), results in a deficiency in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and a resultant increased mutation frequency. We show that CRTC2, CREB1, and CBP are transcriptional activators of well-established MMR genes, including EXO1, MSH6, PMS1, and POLD2. Mining of expression profiling databases and analysis of patient samples reveal that CRTC2 and its target MMR genes are downregulated in specific T cell lymphoma subtypes, which are microsatellite unstable. The levels of acetylated histone H3 on the CRTC2 promoter are significantly reduced in lymphoma in comparison to normal tissue, explaining the decreased CRTC2 expression. Our results establish a role for CRTC2 as a lymphoma tumor suppressor gene that preserves genome integrity by stimulating transcription of MMR genes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrodynamic delivery of human IL-15 cDNA increases murine natural killer cell recovery after syngeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barao, Isabel; Alvarez, Maite; Redelman, Doug; Weiss, Jonathan M; Ortaldo, John R; Wiltrout, Robert H; Murphy, William J

    2011-12-01

    Immune deficiency immediately following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) increases susceptibility to opportunistic infections as well as tumor relapse. Natural Killer (NK) cells play important roles in the resistance to virally infected and transformed cells. Interleukin (IL)-15 has been shown to be essential for NK cell development and survival. We administered human (h) IL-15 cDNA (pIL-15) via hydrodynamic delivery to murine recipients undergoing congenic BMT to determine its effects on NK cell reconstitution. Hydrodynamic pIL-15 delivery resulted in high levels of hIL-15 protein in the serum that lasted for several days and then quickly declined. The appearance of hIL-15 was followed by a significant increase of mature donor-derived NK cells within the bone marrow, spleens, and livers of the treated recipients. No accumulation of immature NK cell progenitors was observed. The NK cells from IL-15-treated recipients displayed an activated phenotype and were lytically active toward tumor targets in vitro to a similar degree as did those cells from recipients treated with control plasmid. This suggests that the predominant effect of IL-15 was a quantitative increase in total NK cell numbers and not qualitative changes in NK cell functions. No toxicities or adverse effects were observed. Studies performed in transplanted mice bearing renal carcinoma tumors demonstrated that this mode of hIL-15 gene delivery resulted in increased antitumor responses. These results support the use of cytokine gene transfer-based regimens as a platform to augment NK cell recovery after BMT. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Wood preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Archer; Stan Lebow

    2006-01-01

    Wood preservation can be interpreted to mean protection from fire, chemical degradation, mechanical wear, weathering, as well as biological attack. In this chapter, the term preservation is applied more restrictively to protection from biological hazards.

  16. An open randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate ridge preservation and repair using SocketKAP(™) and SocketKAGE(™) : part 2 - three-dimensional alveolar bone volumetric analysis of CBCT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Alaa; Omran, Mostafa; Bakhshalian, Neema; Tarnow, Dennis; Zadeh, Homayoun H

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to evaluate the efficacy of ridge preservation and repair procedures involving the application of SocketKAP(™) and SocketKAGE(™) devices following tooth removal and (ii) to evaluate alveolar bone volumetric changes at 6 months post-extraction in intact sockets or those with facial wall dehiscence defects using 3-dimensional pre- and postoperative CBCT data. Thirty-six patients required 61 teeth extracted. Five cohorts were established: Group A: Intact Socket Negative Control Group B: Intact Socket + SocketKAP(™) Group C: Intact Socket Filled with Anorganic Bovine Bone Mineral (ABBM) + SocketKAP(™) Group D: Facial Dehiscence Socket Negative Control Group E: Facial Dehiscence Socket Filled with ABBM + SocketKAP(™) + SocketKAGE(™) . Preoperative CBCT scans were obtained followed by digital subtraction of the test teeth. At 6 months post-extraction, another CBCT scan was obtained. The pre- and postoperative scans were then superimposed, allowing highly accurate quantitative determination of the 3D volumetric alveolar bone volume changes from baseline through 6 months. Significant volumetric bone loss occurred in all sockets, localized mainly in the 0-3 mm zone apical to the ridge crest. For intact sockets, SocketKAP(™) + ABBM treatment led to a statistically significant greater percentage of remaining mineralized tissue volume when compared to negative control group. A significant difference favoring SocketKAP(™) + SocketKAGE(™) + ABBM treatment was observed for sockets with facial dehiscence defects compared to the negative control group. SocketKAP(™) , with ABBM, appears effective in limiting post-extraction volumetric bone loss in intact sockets, while SocketKAP(™) + SocketKAGE + ABBM appears effective in limiting post-extraction bone loss in sockets with dehiscence defects. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effects of anticonvulsant drugs on the synthesis of DNA and protein by human bone marrow cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickramasinghe, S.N.; Saunders, J.; Williams, G.

    1976-01-01

    Suspensions of human bone marrow cells were incubated with various concentrations of phenobarbitone or phenytoin sodium for 2 h, and the effects of this incubation on the subsequent incorporation of 3 H-thymidine and 3 H-leucine into DNA and protein, respectively, were studied. Both drugs caused a depression of 3 H-thymidine incorporation and this phenomenon was not prevented by the addition of 100 μg of pteroylglutamic acid, folinic acid or 5-methyltetrahydrofolate per ml of marrow culture. The lowest concentration of drug which caused a statistically significant depression of 3 H-thymidine incorporation was 200μg per ml for phenobarbitone and 50 μg per ml for phenytoin sodium. Both phenobarbitone and phenytoin sodium also caused an increase in the incorporation of 3 H-leucine at concentrations of 50 and 20 μg per ml., respectively, suggesting the possibility that a stimulation of protein synthesis within erythropoietic cells may play an important role in the development of anticonvulsant-induced macrocytosis. (authod)

  18. A homicide in the Ukraine: DNA-based identification of a boiled, skeletonized, and varnished human skull, and of bone fragments found in a fireplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivolap, Y; Krivda, G; Kozhuhova, N; Chebotar, S; Benecke, M

    2001-12-01

    In an apartment, bone fragments were found in a fireplace. Furthermore, a varnished skull was found elsewhere in the same apartment. The tenant confessed to a murder and stated that the head of a victim, a girl, was boiled for 12 hours. He stated that the soft tissue was then removed and the skull was varnished. Other parts of the body were burned to ashes in an open field. Comparison of loci D19S252, CD4, CYAR04, TII01, F13A01, F13B, and D6S366 from the skull and the bone remains to loci of the mother of a missing girl showed that the skull came from that missing child. Biological maternity was calculated as 99.99%. The bone pieces were DNA typed as male and did not share alleles with the mother in several systems. Therefore, they belonged to a different (human) victim.

  19. The efficacy of 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing in the diagnosis of bacteria from blood, bone and synovial fluid samples of children with musculoskeletal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashavya, S; Gross, I; Michael-Gayego, A; Simanovsky, N; Lamdan, R

    2018-04-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are among the most common bacterial infections in children leading to hospitalization, invasive procedures and prolonged antibiotic administration. Blood, synovial and sometimes tissue cultures are essential for the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal infections; 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing is a novel diagnostic tool for the detection of bacteria.While the yield of 16S rDNA sequencing in synovial fluid was previously assessed, data regarding the efficacy of this method from blood samples or partially treated children with suspected musculoskeletal infections is lacking.In this study we assessed the yield of 16S rDNA sequencing in blood, bone and synovial samples of children with musculoskeletal infections. Blood, synovial and bone samples were collected from children with suspected musculoskeletal infections and analyzed for the presence of 16S rDNA, the results were then compared with the benchmark microbial cultures. During the study period, 41 children (18 boys and 23 girls) with suspected acute musculoskeletal infection were enrolled. A positive blood culture was found in 6/31 cases (19.4%) with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus being the most commonly isolated bacterium. No significant 16S rDNA detection in blood samples was recorded.Synovial fluid culture was positive in 6/28 samples (21%), Kingella kingae being the most common pathogen. When using the 16S rDNA sequencing method, the rate of positive results in synovial fluid was higher with bacterial detection in 12/23 (52%) samples. The 16S rDNA sequencing method was also able to identify pathogens in samples taken from partially treated children where cultures were negative with 16S rDNA detection in 5/5 samples. Although 16S rDNA sequencing may increase the yield of bacterial detection in synovial samples of patients with musculoskeletal infections, there is no benefit from applying this method on blood samples. The 16S rDNA sequencing method may be

  20. Preservation of posterior mandibular extraction site with allogeneic demineralized, freeze-dried bone matrix and calcium sulphate graft binder before eventual implant placement: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasri, Mazen; Camarda, Aldo-Joseph; Ciaburro, Hugo; Chouikh, Fairouz; Dorismond, Sarah-Jane

    2012-01-01

    This case series reports short- and long-term healing, before and after placement of an implant, in posterior mandibular extraction sites grafted with demineralized, freeze-dried bone matrix (DFDBM) allograft mixed with calcium sulphate graft binder. Three patients who underwent surgical extraction of a posterior mandibular molar experienced partial loss of the buccal bone plate at the extraction site. Alveolar bone reconstruction with a DFDBM allograft mixed with calcium sulphate graft binder was performed immediately. The graft was covered with a biodegradable regenerative membrane. For each of the 3 patients, the implant and healing abutment were placed after 6, 9 and 12 months, respectively, followed by crown placement 3, 5 and 5 months later, respectively. The implants were periodically re-evaluated, both clinically and radiographically, between 10 and 39 months after final insertion of the crown. An implant stability device was used to evaluate the long-term biological and functional stability of the implants. Upon exposure and implant placement, the grafted alveolar ridge in all patients presented appropriately sized, dense and well-vascularized bone, wide enough to receive the planned wide-platform implant. The long-term interface stability quotient ranged from 87 to 90. Posterior mandibular extraction sites with compromised buccal alveolar bone may be effectively managed by immediate alveolar augmentation using a mixture of DFDBM allograft and calcium sulphate graft binder. This approach provides ideal alveolar form and consistency for eventual placement of the implant.

  1. The Efficacy of Immediate Implant Placement in Extraction Sockets for Alveolar Bone Preservation: A Clinical Evaluation Using Three-Dimensional Cone Beam Computerized Tomography and Resonance Frequency Analysis Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qabbani, Ali Al; Razak, Noor Hayati A; Kawas, Sausan Al; Sheikh Abdul Hamid, Suzina; Wahbi, Saad; Samsudin, A R

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of immediate implant placement with alveolar bone augmentation on socket preservation following atraumatic tooth extraction and comparing it with a tooth alveolar socket that was allowed to heal in a conventional way.Twenty medically fit patients (8 males and 12 females aged between 18 and 40 years) who needed noncomplicated tooth extraction of mandibular premolar teeth were divided randomly and equally into 2 groups. In Group I, the empty extraction socket was left untreated and allowed to heal in a conventional way. In Group II, the immediate implant was placed and the gap between the implant and the inner buccal plate surface of the socket wall was filled with lyophilized bovine bone granules and the wound was covered with pericardium membrane. The patients were followed up clinically and radiologically for regular reviews at 1 week, 3 months, and 9 months postoperative. Cone beam computerized tomography images of the alveolar ridge and socket were analyzed to determine the structural changes of the alveolar ridge. Resonance frequency analysis was measured at 9 months for Group II to assess the degree of secondary stability of the implants by using Osstell machine.A significant difference of bone resorption of 1.49 mm (confidence interval, CI 95%, 0.63-2.35) was observed within the control group at 3 months, and 1.84 mm (P ≤ 0.05) at 9 months intervals. No significant changes of bone resorption were observed in Group II. Comparison between groups showed a highly significant difference at 3 months; 2.56 mm (CI 95% 4.22-0.90) and at 9 months intervals; 3.2 mm (CI 95%, 4.70-1.62) P ≤ 0.001 between Group I and II. High resonance frequency analysis values were observed at 9 months postoperative in Group II.In conclusion, the insertion of immediate implants in fresh extraction sockets together with grafting the circumferential gap between the bony socket wall and the implant surface with bovine

  2. DNA in a Tunnel: A Comfy Spot for Recognition - or -The Structure of BsoBI Complexed with DNA. What can we Learn about Function via Structure Determination and how can this be Applied to Bone or Muscle Biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The structure and function of a biologically active molecule are related. To understand its function, it is necessary (but not always sufficient) to know the structure of the molecule. There are many ways of relating the molecular function with the structure. Mutation analysis can identify pertinent amino acids of an enzyme, or alternatively structure comparison of the of two similar molecules with different function may lead to understanding which parts are responsible for a functional aspect, or a series of "structural cartoons" - enzyme structure, enzyme plus substrate, enzyme with transition state analog, and enzyme with product - may give insight in the function of a molecule. As an example we will discuss the structure and function of the restriction enzyme BsoBI from Bacillus stearothemzophilus in complex with its cognate DNA. The enzyme forms a unique complex with DNA in that it completely encircles the DNA. The structure reveals the enzyme-DNA contacts, how the DNA is distorted compared with the canonical forms, and elegantly shows how two distinct DNA sequences can be recognized with the same efficiency. Based on the structure we may also propose a hypothesis how the enzymatic mechanism works. The knowledge gained thru studies such as this one can be used to alter the function by changing the molecular structure. Usually this is done by design of inhibitors specifically active against and fitting into an active site of the enzyme of choice. In the case of BsoBI one of the objectives of the study was to alter the enzyme specificity. In bone biology there are many candidates available for molecular study in order to explain, alter, or (temporarily) suspend activity. For example, the understanding of a pathway that negatively regulates bone formation may be a good target for drug design to stimulate bone formation and have good potential as the basis for new countermeasures against bone loss. In principle the same approach may aid muscle atrophy, radiation

  3. The effect of permanent grafting materials on the preservation of the buccal bone plate after tooth extraction: an experimental study in the dog.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bashara, Haitham

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a novel bone substitute system (Natix(®)), consisting of porous titanium granules (PTG) and a bovine-derived xenograft (Bio-Oss(®)), on hard tissue remodelling following their placement into fresh extraction sockets in dogs.

  4. Software preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Vodopivec

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Comtrade Ltd. covers a wide range of activities related to information and communication technologies; its deliverables include web applications, locally installed programs,system software, drivers, embedded software (used e.g. in medical devices, auto parts,communication switchboards. Also the extensive knowledge and practical experience about digital long-term preservation technologies have been acquired. This wide spectrum of activities puts us in the position to discuss the often overlooked aspect of the digital preservation - preservation of software programs. There are many resources dedicated to digital preservation of digital data, documents and multimedia records,but not so many about how to preserve the functionalities and features of computer programs. Exactly these functionalities - dynamic response to inputs - render the computer programs rich compared to documents or linear multimedia. The article opens the questions on the beginning of the way to the permanent digital preservation. The purpose is to find a way in the right direction, where all relevant aspects will be covered in proper balance. The following questions are asked: why at all to preserve computer programs permanently, who should do this and for whom, when we should think about permanent program preservation, what should be persevered (such as source code, screenshots, documentation, and social context of the program - e.g. media response to it ..., where and how? To illustrate the theoretic concepts given the idea of virtual national museum of electronic banking is also presented.

  5. Digital preservation

    CERN Document Server

    Deegan, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Digital preservation is an issue of huge importance to the library and information profession right now. With the widescale adoption of the internet and the rise of the world wide web, the world has been overwhelmed by digital information. Digital data is being produced on a massive scale by individuals and institutions: some of it is born, lives and dies only in digital form, and it is the potential death of this data, with its impact on the preservation of culture, that is the concern of this book. So how can information professionals try to remedy this? Digital preservation is a complex iss

  6. Alveolar ridge preservation after tooth extraction: a Bayesian Network meta-analysis of grafting materials efficacy on prevention of bone height and width reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iocca, Oreste; Farcomeni, Alessio; Pardiñas Lopez, Simon; Talib, Huzefa S

    2017-01-01

    To conduct a traditional meta-analysis and a Bayesian Network meta-analysis to synthesize the information coming from randomized controlled trials on different socket grafting materials and combine the resulting indirect evidence in order to make inferences on treatments that have not been compared directly. RCTs were identified for inclusion in the systematic review and subsequent statistical analysis. Bone height and width remodelling were selected as the chosen summary measures for comparison. First, a series of pairwise meta-analyses were performed and overall mean difference (MD) in mm with 95% CI was calculated between grafted versus non-grafted sockets. Then, a Bayesian Network meta-analysis was performed to draw indirect conclusions on which grafting materials can be considered most likely the best compared to the others. From the six included studies, seven comparisons were obtained. Traditional meta-analysis showed statistically significant results in favour of grafting the socket compared to no-graft both for height (MD 1.02, 95% CI 0.44-1.59, p value meta-analysis allowed to obtain a rank of intervention efficacy. On the basis of the results of the present analysis, socket grafting seems to be more favourable than unassisted socket healing. Moreover, Bayesian Network meta-analysis indicates that freeze-dried bone graft plus membrane is the most likely effective in the reduction of bone height remodelling. Autologous bone marrow resulted the most likely effective when width remodelling was considered. Studies with larger samples and less risk of bias should be conducted in the future in order to further strengthen the results of this analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A prospective, randomized-controlled clinical trial to evaluate bone preservation using implants with different geometry placed into extraction sockets in the maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Mariano; Cecchinato, Denis; Ferrus, Jorge; Pjetursson, E Bjarni; Lang, Niklaus P; Lindhe, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the association between the size of the void established by using two different implant configurations and the amount of buccal/palatal bone loss that occurred during 16 weeks of healing following their installation into extraction sockets. The clinical trial was designed as a prospective, randomized-controlled parallel-group multicenter study. Adults in need of one or more implants replacing teeth to be removed in the maxilla within the region 15-25 were recruited. Following tooth extraction, the site was randomly allocated to receive either a cylindrical (group A) or a tapered implant (group B). After implant installation, a series of measurements were made to determine the dimension of the ridge and the void between the implant and the extraction socket. These measurements were repeated at the re-entry procedure after 16 weeks. The study demonstrated that the removal of single teeth and the immediate placement of an implant resulted in marked alterations of the dimension of the buccal ridge (43% and 30%) and the horizontal (80-63%) as well as the vertical (69-65%) gap between the implant and the bone walls. Although the dimensional changes were not significantly different between the two-implant configurations, both the horizontal and the vertical gap changes were greater in group A than in group B. Implant placement into extraction sockets will result in significant bone reduction of the alveolar ridge.

  8. Bone marrow-derived cells exhibiting lung epithelial cell characteristics are enriched in vivo using methylguanine DNA methyltransferase-mediated drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jane S; Roth, Justin C; Gerson, Stanton L

    2008-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that donor bone marrow-derived cells can differentiate into lung epithelial cells at low frequency. We investigated whether we could enrich the number of donor-derived hematopoietic cells that have type II pneumocyte characteristics by overexpression of the drug resistance gene methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). MGMT encodes O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT), a drug resistance protein for DNA damage induced by N,N'-bis(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosourea (BCNU), and the mutant P140K MGMT confers resistance to BCNU and the AGT inactivator O(6)-benzylguanine (BG). For this study, we used two MGMT selection models: one in which donor cells had a strong selection advantage because the recipient lung lacked MGMT expression, and another in which drug resistance was conferred by gene transfer of P140K MGMT. In both models, we saw an increase in the total number of donor-derived cells in the lung after BCNU treatment. Analysis of single-cell suspensions from 28 mice showed donor-derived cells with characteristics of type II pneumocytes, determined by surfactant protein C (SP-C) expression. Furthermore, an increase in the percentage of donor-derived SP-C cells was noted after BCNU or BG and BCNU treatment. This study demonstrates that bone marrow cells expressing MGMT can engraft in the lung and convert into cells expressing the type II pneumocyte protein SP-C. Furthermore, these cells can be enriched in response to alkylating agent-mediated lung injury. These results suggest that expression of MGMT could enhance the capacity of bone marrow-derived cells to repopulate lung epithelium, and when used in combination with a gene of interest, MGMT could have therapeutic applications.

  9. To assess the efficacy of socket plug technique using platelet rich fibrin with or without the use of bone substitute in alveolar ridge preservation: a prospective randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish Kumar, N; Chaudhary, Rupanzal; Kumar, Ish; Arora, Srimathy S; Kumar, Nilesh; Singh, Hem

    2018-02-06

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF) as a socket plug with or without use of Plaster of Paris (POP) as bone substitute to preserve the alveolar ridge post-extraction. A prospective randomised single blind controlled study, was conducted for 18 months from November 2014 to May 2016 on 48 patients requiring extraction. All teeth were extracted atraumatically using periotomes and luxators without raising mucoperiosteal flap. Sockets were randomly allotted to groups A, B and C. Group A sockets were chosen as control, where figure of eight suture was placed. In group B sockets, PRF obtained by centrifugation was used as a socket plug and stabilised with figure of eight suture. Group C sockets were filled with POP and then covered with PRF. The socket was then closed with a figure of eight suture. Patients were informed of need for 6 months follow-up. Ninety sockets in 48 patients were subjected to our study. We found that results in the sockets where we have grafted POP showed better ridge preservation and post-operative comfort even though the difference in ridge resorption between the three groups was not statistically significant. Powered by Editorial Manager® and ProduXion Manager® from the Aries Systems Corporation. Atraumatic extraction may minimise the post-operative pain and discomfort to patient as well as the post-extraction alveolar height and width changes. The use of PRF and/or bone substitute even though clinically contributes to better post-operative healing and minimal loss of alveolar width and height, the values were not statistically significant.

  10. USO DO ENXERTO ÓSSEO CORTICAL BOVINO CONSERVADO EM GLICERINA A 98% NA OSTEOTOMIA FEMORAL EM GATOS USE BOVINE CORTICAL BONE, PRESERVED IN 98% GLICERIN IN FEMORAL OSTEOTOMY IN CATS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Helena de Carvalho Penha

    2008-12-01

    . The objective of this study was to evaluate clinically and radiographically the efficacy of xenografts as a substitute for methalic implants. Animals were divided into two groups: five young cats and five adult cats. Clinically, the weight-bearing on the operated limb was observed the day after surgery in all animals, with complete remission of lameness at 15 days and bone union in 16.6 weeks. In five young animals, in two of them, the grafts were fractured carrying a serious bone bending without fracture of feline femur. In the last two young cats, remodeling was noted in mean time of 75 days or 10.7 weeks. In five adult cats, all of them suffered overriding of the fragments of osteotomized bone with various degrees, where two cases were considered severe cases dut to fracture of feline femur without bone bending. In the three remaining animals with slightly overriding, one was a case of delayed union, one suffered tow surgical procedures due to graft fracture and one did not show a radiographic exuberant bone callus, with remodeling at 110 days. The use of the bonive xenograft preserved in 98% glycerol in young and adult cats used as intramedularry nails was perfectly employed, offering mechanical support in time of bone consolidation in all of 10 animals.

    KEY WORDS: Cortical bovine graft, cats, femur, fracture, osteotomy.

  11. Fracture generation in human vertebrae under compression loading: The influence of pedicle preservation and bone mineral density on in vitro fracture behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraxenberger, Michael; Schröder, Christian; Geith, Tobias; Büttner, Andreas; von Schulze-Pellengahr, Christoph; Birkenmaier, Christof; Müller, Peter E; Jansson, Volkmar; Wegener, Bernd

    2018-01-01

    Fractured vertebral bodies are a common and wide spread health issue. The purpose of this study was to develop a standardized method to experimentally generate compression fractures in vertebral bodies. The influence of the pedicles has been investigated with regards to the fracture behavior. The correlation between bone mineral density (BMD), the cause of fractures and the fracture behavior was investigated. Twenty-one fresh frozen human lumbar spines were examined for bone mineral density (BMD) by means of quantitative computed tomography (qCT). All soft tissue was removed, vertebrae were carefully separated from each other and the exposed cranial and caudal endplates were covered with a thin layer of resin to generate a plane and homogeneous surface. A total of 80 vertebral bodies were tested until fracture. A good positive correlation was found between BMD, fracture compression force and stiffness of the vertebral body. No significant differences were found between the fractures generated in vertebral bodies with and without pedicles, respectively. Our model represents a consolidation of already existing testing devices. The comparative measurement of the BMD and the fracture behavior shows validity. In contrast to other authors, the force was applied to the whole vertebral body. Furthermore the upper and lower plates were not parallelized and therefore the natural anatomic shape was imitated. Fracture behavior was not altered by removing the pedicles.

  12. Comparative study of cryopreserved bone tissue and tissue preserved in a 98% glycerol solution Estudo comparativo entre o tecido ósseo criopreservado e o conservado em glicerol a 98%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlete Mazzini Miranda Giovani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the bone graft cryopreservation method (at -80ºC with a preservation method using a 98% glycerol solution at room temperature (10ºC-35ºC, by testing the antibacterial and fungal effects of 98% glycerol and comparatively analyzing the observed histological changes resulting from the use of both methods. METHOD: This study was of 30 samples of trabecular bone tissue from 10 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Each femoral head provided 3 samples that were randomized into 3 groups, namely, the control group, the cryopreserved group, and the group preserved in a 98% glycerol at room temperature for 1 year. The samples were submitted to histomorphologic, cell feasibility, and microbiologic analyses. The results were statistically analyzed using the McNemar test, with a statistical significance index of 0.05. RESULTS: Values obtained using the McNemar test to compare probability distributions of histomorphologic variables (mature or lamellar bone, immature bone, and necrosis and cell feasibility (osteoblasts and osteoclasts indicated that there is no difference between the distributions of variables under the 3 experimental conditions. Microbiological analysis of the 98% glycerol solution and bone fragments from samples stored for 1 year at room temperature did not show bacterial or fungal growth. The histological and microbiological investigation were performed at 2 different time points: immediately after the sample processing and after 1 year. CONCLUSION: The method used to preserve bone grafts kept in 98% glycerol at room temperature (10ºC-35ºC was similar to cryopreservation in terms of bone matrix preservation; no bacteria or fungi were found in the samples.OBJETIVO: Comparar o método da criopreservação de enxertos ósseos (- 80º C com o da conservação em glicerol a 98% em temperatura ambiente (10º C a 35º C, testando os efeitos antibacterianos e antifúngicos do glicerol a 98% e analisando

  13. Comparison of short-term and long-term protocols for stabilization and preservation of RNA and DNA of Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Plasmodium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basiye, Frank L.; Schoone, Gerard J.; Beld, Marcel; Minnaar, Rene; Ngeranwa, Joseph N.; Wasunna, Monique K.; Schallig, Henk D. F. H.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular tools continue to be important in the prevention and control of parasitic diseases. However, using these techniques directly in the field remains a major challenge. Therefore, the preservation of clinical samples collected from endemic field areas for later analysis remains an important

  14. Wood preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    2003-01-01

    When wood is exposed to various environmental conditions, many degradation reactions (biological, ultraviolet, mechanical, moisture, and chemical) can occur. To protect wood from biological degradation, chemical preservatives are applied by nonpressure or pressure treatment. Penetration and retention of a chemical depend upon the wood species and the amount of...

  15. A simple procedure for the extraction of DNA from long-term formalin-preserved brain tissues for the detection of EBV by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Asma; Khan, Gulfaraz

    2015-12-01

    Long-term formalin fixed brain tissues are potentially an important source of material for molecular studies. Ironically, very few protocols have been published describing DNA extraction from such material for use in PCR analysis. In our attempt to investigate the role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), extracting PCR quality DNA from brain samples fixed in formalin for 2-22 years, proved to be very difficult and challenging. As expected, DNA extracted from these samples was not only of poor quality and quantity, but more importantly, it was frequently found to be non-amplifiable due to the presence of PCR inhibitors. Here, we describe a simple and reproducible procedure for extracting DNA using a modified proteinase K and phenol-chloroform methodology. Central to this protocol is the thorough pre-digestion washing of the tissues in PBS, extensive digestion with proteinase K in low SDS containing buffer, and using low NaCl concentration during DNA precipitation. The optimized protocol was used in extracting DNA from meninges of 26 MS and 6 non-MS cases. Although the quality of DNA from these samples was generally poor, small size amplicons (100-200 nucleotides) of the house-keeping gene, β-globin could be reliably amplified from all the cases. PCR for EBV revealed positivity in 35% (9/26) MS cases, but 0/6 non-MS cases. These findings indicate that the method described here is suitable for PCR detection of viral sequences in long-term formalin persevered brain tissues. Our findings also support a possible role for EBV in the pathogenesis of MS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Alveolar ridge preservation immediately after tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Bouckaert, M; Lemmer, J

    2013-10-01

    Ridge preservation procedures immediately after tooth extraction, are commonly used with a view to minimising remodelling and shrinkage of the alveolar ridge, associated with socket healing. These procedures may sometimes be effective, but they cannot completely prevent reduction in dimension of the ridge. Certain biomater als used may actually hamper normal deposition of bone within the healing socket, reducing bone trabeculae that can integrate with the implant surface. However, in extraction sockets in alveolar ridges of low bone density, particles of implanted bone substitute incorporated in the healing bone, may enhance the mechanical support for the implant, provided by normal healed bone of low trabecular density alone. This paper reviews biological rationales and procedures for ridge preservation immediately after extraction and comments on their clinical use.

  17. Bone grafting: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Joshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafting is the process by which bone is transferred from a source (donor to site (recipient. Due to trauma from accidents by speedy vehicles, falling down from height or gunshot injury particularly in human being, acquired or developmental diseases like rickets, congenital defects like abnormal bone development, wearing out because of age and overuse; lead to bone loss and to replace the loss we need the bone grafting. Osteogenesis, osteoinduction, osteoconduction, mechanical supports are the four basic mechanisms of bone graft. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. An ideal bone graft material is biologically inert, source of osteogenic, act as a mechanical support, readily available, easily adaptable in terms of size, shape, length and replaced by the host bone. Except blood, bone is grafted with greater frequency. Bone graft indicated for variety of orthopedic abnormalities, comminuted fractures, delayed unions, non-unions, arthrodesis and osteomyelitis. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. By adopting different procedure of graft preservation its antigenicity can be minimized. The concept of bone banking for obtaining bone grafts and implants is very useful for clinical application. Absolute stability require for successful incorporation. Ideal bone graft must possess osteogenic, osteoinductive and osteocon-ductive properties. Cancellous bone graft is superior to cortical bone graft. Usually autologous cancellous bone graft are used as fresh grafts where as allografts are employed as an alloimplant. None of the available type of bone grafts possesses all these properties therefore, a single type of graft cannot be recomm-ended for all types of orthopedic abnormalities. Bone grafts and implants can be selected as per clinical problems, the equipments available and preference of

  18. The Kub5-Hera/RPRD1B interactome: a novel role in preserving genetic stability by regulating DNA mismatch repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Praveen L.; Motea, Edward A.; Fattah, Farjana J.; Zhou, Yunyun; Morales, Julio C.; Xie, Yang; Garner, Harold R.; Boothman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Ku70-binding protein 5 (Kub5)-Hera (K-H)/RPRD1B maintains genetic integrity by concomitantly minimizing persistent R-loops and promoting repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). We used tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, co-immunoprecipitation and gel-filtration chromatography to define higher-order protein complexes containing K-H scaffolding protein to gain insight into its cellular functions. We confirmed known protein partners (Ku70, RNA Pol II, p15RS) and discovered several novel associated proteins that function in RNA metabolism (Topoisomerase 1 and RNA helicases), DNA repair/replication processes (PARP1, MSH2, Ku, DNA-PKcs, MCM proteins, PCNA and DNA Pol δ) and in protein metabolic processes, including translation. Notably, this approach directed us to investigate an unpredicted involvement of K-H in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) where K-H depletion led to concomitant MMR deficiency and compromised global microsatellite stability. Mechanistically, MMR deficiency in K-H-depleted cells was a consequence of reduced stability of the core MMR proteins (MLH1 and PMS2) caused by elevated basal caspase-dependent proteolysis. Pan-caspase inhibitor treatment restored MMR protein loss. These findings represent a novel mechanism to acquire MMR deficiency/microsatellite alterations. A significant proportion of colon, endometrial and ovarian cancers exhibit k-h expression/copy number loss and may have severe mutator phenotypes with enhanced malignancies that are currently overlooked based on sporadic MSI+ screening. PMID:26819409

  19. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  20. Blood and Bones: The Influence of the Mass Media on Australian Primary School Children's Understandings of Genes and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jenny; Venville, Grady

    2012-06-01

    Previous research showed that primary school children held several misconceptions about genetics of concern for their future lives. Included were beliefs that genes and DNA are separate substances, with genes causing family resemblance and DNA identifying suspects at crime scenes. Responses to this work `blamed' the mass media for these misunderstandings. This study aimed to determine whether that blame had any foundation by examining the media habits and conceptions about genes and DNA of Australian children. With little prior research considering the influence of entertainment mass media on children's academically relevant knowledge, this was an exploratory study with a mixed modes design. Data were collected by detailed media questionnaires and face-to-face interviews with 62 children aged 10-12 years, and subjected to content and thematic analysis. Specific mass media examples children reported using were examined for genetics content. Results indicate 5 h/day of media use, mostly television including crime shows, and that children perceived television to be their main source of information about genetics. Most children (89 %) knew DNA, 60 % knew genes, and more was known about uses of DNA outside the body such as crime solving or resolving family relationships than about its biological nature and function. Half believed DNA is only in blood and body parts used for forensics. These concepts paralleled the themes emerging from the media examples. The results indicate that the mass media is a pervasive teacher of children, and that fundamental concepts could be introduced earlier in schools to establish scientific concepts before misconceptions arise.

  1. Evaluation of rapid GeneXpert MTB/RIF method using DNA tissue specimens of vertebral bones in patients with suspected spondylitis TB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massi, Muhammad Nasrum; Biatko, Karya Triko; Handayani, Irda; Pratama, Muhammad Yogi; Septriani, Sari; Nurdin, Gaby Maulida; Ali, Marina B

    2017-03-01

    To detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA and rifampicin resistance in vertebral bone tissue specimens from spondylitis TB suspects. The rapid GeneXpert MTB/RIF and MGIT 960 liquid culture methods have been used in the specimens. Results from 70 suspects with spondylitis TB shown that 31.42% identified positive for spondylitis TB using culture method, while 88.57% shown positive results using rapid GeneXpert MTB/RIF method. The validity of GeneXpert MTB/RIF shown sensitivity value of 100%, specificity value of 16.6%, PPV of 35.48%, and NPV of 100%. GeneXpert has a high sensitivity but low specificity value in this study.

  2. Single dose of glycoengineered anti-CD19 antibody (MEDI551) disrupts experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inhibiting pathogenic adaptive immune responses in the bone marrow and spinal cord while preserving peripheral regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ding; Blazek, Monica; Ireland, Sara; Ortega, Sterling; Kong, Xiangmei; Meeuwissen, Anouk; Stowe, Ann; Carter, Laura; Wang, Yue; Herbst, Ronald; Monson, Nancy L

    2014-11-15

    Plasma cells and the autoreactive Abs they produce are suspected to contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, but recent attempts to target these components of humoral immunity have failed. MEDI551, an anti-CD19 Ab that depletes mature B cells including plasma cells may offer a compelling alternative that reduces pathogenic adaptive immune responses while sparing regulatory mechanisms. Indeed, our data demonstrate that a single dose of MEDI551, given before or during ongoing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, disrupts development of the disease. Leukocyte infiltration into the spinal cord is significantly reduced, as well as short-lived and long-lived autoreactive CD138(+) plasma cells in the spleen and bone marrow, respectively. In addition, potentially protective CD1d(hi)CD5(+) regulatory B cells show resistance to depletion, and myelin-specific Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are expanded. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MEDI551 disrupts experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inhibiting multiple proinflammatory components whereas preserving regulatory populations. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Protective effect of methanolic extracts of Thymus vulgaris L. against cyclophosphamide-induced DNA damage in mouse bone marrow cells using the micronucleus test

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    Abbas Salmani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyclophosphamide is a chemo-therapeutic agent used in the treatment of various cancers and autoimmune diseases. This composition has cytotoxic and clastogenic properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of methanol extracts of Thymus vulgaris L. against DNA damage induced by cyclophosphamide in mouse bone marrow cells by the micronucleus test. The extract concentrations of 375, 750, 1500 mg/kg were injected intraperitoneally (Ip into mice for 7 consecutive days. One hour after the last injection, cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg Ip was injected. 24 hours after cyclophosphamide injection, the animals were killed and the samples of bone marrow were prepared and stained using the standard methods. For each sample, 1000 cells of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE and the same number of normochromatic erythrocyte (NCE and the cells containing their micronucleus were counted. Cyclophosphamide increased the frequency of micronuclei polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCE and decreased cell proliferation (PCE/PCE+NCE. All doses of extracts significantly reduced the micronucleus frequency ratio (P<0.05. The cells proliferation ratio (PCE/PCE+NCE was also increased. The best effect in reducing the micronucleus frequency was at 1500 mg/kg dosage. Thymus extract is able to reduce the clastogenic and cytotoxic effects of cyclophosphamide, due to its antioxidant properties, playing a protective role.

  4. Quantifying murine bone marrow and blood radiation dose response following {sup 18}F-FDG PET with DNA damage biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, Grainne [Biological Effects Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom); Taylor, Kristina [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Finnon, Paul [Biological Effects Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom); Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Badie, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.badie@phe.gov.uk [Biological Effects Department, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Mice received either a range of {sup 18}F-FDG activities or whole body X-ray doses. • Blood samples were collected at 24 and 43 h for MN-RET and QPCR analysis. • Regression analysis showed that both types of exposure produced a linear response. • BM doses of 33 mGy ({sup 18}F-FDG) and 25 mGy X-rays were significantly higher than controls. • No significant difference between internal ({sup 18}F-FDG) and external (X-ray) was found. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to quantify the poorly understood radiation doses to murine bone marrow and blood from whole-body fluorine 18 ({sup 18}F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), by using specific biomarkers and comparing with whole body external low dose exposures. Groups of 3–5 mice were randomly assigned to 10 groups, each receiving either a different activity of {sup 18}F-FDG: 0–37 MBq or whole body irradiated with corresponding doses of 0–300 mGy X-rays. Blood samples were collected at 24 h and at 43 h for reticulocyte micronucleus assays and QPCR analysis of gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes. Blood and bone marrow dose estimates were calculated from injected activities of {sup 18}F-FDG and were based on a recommended ICRP model. Doses to the bone marrow corresponding to 33.43 mGy and above for internal {sup 18}F-FDG exposure and to 25 mGy and above for external X-ray exposure, showed significant increases in radiation-induced MN-RET formation relative to controls (P < 0.05). Regression analysis showed that both types of exposure produced a linear response with linear regression analysis giving R{sup 2} of 0.992 and 0.999 for respectively internal and external exposure. No significant difference between the two data sets was found with a P-value of 0.493. In vivo gene expression dose–responses at 24 h for Bbc3 and Cdkn1 were similar for {sup 18}F-FDG and X-ray exposures, with significant modifications occurring for doses over 300 mGy for Bbc3

  5. Data Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Meghini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Digital information is a vital resource in our knowledge economy, valuable for research and education, science and the humanities, creative and cultural activities, and public policy (The Blue Ribbon Task Force on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access, 2010. New high-throughput instruments, telescopes, satellites, accelerators, supercomputers, sensor networks, and running simulations are generating massive amounts of data (Thanos, 2011. These data are used by decision makers for improving the quality of life of citizens. Moreover, researchers are employing sophisticated technologies to analyse these data to address questions that were unapproachable just a few years ago (Helbing & Balietti, 2011. Digital technologies have fostered a new world of research characterized by immense datasets, unprecedented levels of openness among researchers, and new connections among researchers, policy makers, and the public (The National Academy of Sciences, 2009.

  6. Power Preservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galster, Kjeld

    Power Preservation (Abstract) In the 17th century, just as today, coalitions needed ‘lead nations’. This was assumed to be a power with great military and economic potentials, and Denmark endeavoured to act as such a leader in the Thirty Years War from 1626 to 28. The results were not encouraging...... in the military field and they were disastrous as far as fiscal matters were concerned. Sweden took over the leadership of the protestant side and she took over Denmark’s place amongst the great powers of the Baltic Region. From that time onwards, Danish influence and options on the international stage gradually...... declined. Thus, Denmark of the 17th century is not to be counted amongst the great powers, but since Christian V’s accession to the throne in 1670 Denmark-Norway has developed into one of Europe’s most highly militarised states. Apart from a permanently combat ready navy, the country maintains a standing...

  7. A differential autophagy-dependent response to DNA double-strand breaks in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from sporadic ALS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald-Altman, Shane; Pichinuk, Edward; Kakhlon, Or; Weil, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable motor neurodegenerative disease caused by a diversity of genetic and environmental factors that leads to neuromuscular degeneration and has pathophysiological implications in non-neural systems. Our previous work showed abnormal levels of mRNA expression for biomarker genes in non-neuronal cell samples from ALS patients. The same genes proved to be differentially expressed in the brain, spinal cord and muscle of the SOD1 G93A ALS mouse model. These observations support the idea that there is a pathophysiological relevance for the ALS biomarkers discovered in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) isolated from bone marrow samples of ALS patients (ALS-hMSCs). Here, we demonstrate that ALS-hMSCs are also a useful patient-based model to study intrinsic cell molecular mechanisms of the disease. We investigated the ALS-hMSC response to oxidative DNA damage exerted by neocarzinostatin (NCS)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We found that the ALS-hMSCs responded to this stress differently from cells taken from healthy controls (HC-hMSCs). Interestingly, we found that ALS-hMSC death in response to induction of DSBs was dependent on autophagy, which was initialized by an increase of phosphorylated (p)AMPK, and blocked by the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3MeA). ALS-hMSC death in response to DSBs was not apoptotic as it was caspase independent. This unique ALS-hMSC-specific response to DNA damage emphasizes the possibility that an intrinsic abnormal regulatory mechanism controlling autophagy initiation exists in ALS-patient-derived hMSCs. This mechanism may also be relevant to the most-affected tissues in ALS. Hence, our approach might open avenues for new personalized therapies for ALS. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Bone allografting in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovoy, M. A.; Kirilova, I. A.; Podorognaya, V. T.; Matsuk, S. A.; Novoselov, V. P.; Moskalev, A. V.; Bondarenko, A. V.; Afanasev, L. M.; Gubina, E. V.

    2017-09-01

    A total of 522 patients with benign and intermediate bone tumors of various locations, aged 1 to 15 years, were operated in the period from 1996 to 2016. To diagnose skeleton tumors, we used clinical observation, X-ray, and, if indicated, tomography and tumor site biopsy. In the extensive bone resection, we performed bone reconstruction with the replacement of a defect with an allograft (bone strips, deproteinized and spongy grafts), sometimes in the combination with bone autografting. After segmental resection, the defects were filled with bone strips in the form of matchstick grafts; the allografts were received from the Laboratory for Tissue Preparation and Preservation of the Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics. According to the X-ray data, a complete reorganization of bone grafts occurred within 1.5 to 3 years. The long-term result was assessed as good.

  9. Graft-Versus-Host Disease Amelioration by Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Is Associated with Peripheral Preservation of Naive T Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Sumie; Miura, Yasuo; Fujishiro, Aya; Shindo, Takero; Shimazu, Yutaka; Hirai, Hideyo; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Maekawa, Taira

    2018-03-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) respond to cell therapy with culture-expanded human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (BM-MSCs). However, the mechanisms by which these cells can ameliorate aGVHD-associated complications remain to be clarified. We show here that BM-MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) recapitulated the therapeutic effects of BM-MSCs against aGVHD. Systemic infusion of human BM-MSC-derived EVs prolonged the survival of mice with aGVHD and reduced the pathologic damage in multiple GVHD-targeted organs. In EV-treated GVHD mice, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were suppressed. Importantly, the ratio of CD62L-CD44+ to CD62L + CD44- T cells was decreased, suggesting that BM-MSC-derived EVs suppressed the functional differentiation of T cells from a naive to an effector phenotype. BM-MSC-derived EVs also preserved CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3+ regulatory T cell populations. In a culture of CD3/CD28-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with BM-MSC-derived EVs, CD3+ T cell activation was suppressed. However, these cells were not suppressed in cultures with EVs derived from normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). NHDF-derived EVs did not ameliorate the clinical or pathological characteristics of aGVHD in mice, suggesting an immunoregulatory function unique to BM-MSC-derived EVs. Microarray analysis of microRNAs in BM-MSC-derived EVs versus NHDF-derived EVs showed upregulation of miR-125a-3p and downregulation of cell proliferative processes, as identified by Gene Ontology enrichment analysis. Collectively, our findings provide the first evidence that amelioration of aGVHD by therapeutic infusion of BM-MSC-derived EVs is associated with the preservation of circulating naive T cells, possibly due to the unique microRNA profiles of BM-MSC-derived EVs. Stem Cells 2018;36:434-445. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  10. Hip preserving surgery with concentrated autologous bone marrow aspirate transplantation for the treatment of asymptomatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head: retrospective review of clinical and radiological outcomes at 6 years postoperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaru, Yohei; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Sugaya, Hisashi; Aoto, Katsuya; Wada, Hiroshi; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Masashi; Mishima, Hajime

    2017-07-06

    We had previously established concentrated autologous bone marrow aspirate transplantation (CABMAT), a one-step, low-invasive, joint-preserving surgical technique for treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of CABMAT as a hip preserving surgical approach, preventing femoral head collapse in asymptomatic ONFH. In total, 222 patients (341 hips) with ONFH were treated with CABMAT between April 2003 and March 2013. Based on magnetic resonance imaging, we determined that 119 of these patients had bilateral asymptomatic ONFH (238 hips), and 38 further patients had unilateral asymptomatic ONFH (38 hips). In this series, we retrospectively examined 31 hips in 31 patients with unilateral asymptomatic ONFH treated surgically between 2003 and 2012 and followed up for more than 2 years. Clinical and radiological evaluation were performed immediately before the procedure and at the final follow-up. The two-year follow-up rate among patients with unilateral ONFH was 82% (31/38). Therefore, the present study included 31 patients (19 males and 12 females), with a mean age and follow-up period of 40 and 5.8 years, respectively. Of the 31 asymptomatic hips, 5, 6, 10, and 10 had osteonecrosis of types A, B, C1, and C2, respectively. The diagnosis, classification, and staging of ONFH were based on the 2001 Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) classification. Secondary collapse of the femoral head was observed in 6/10 hips and 5/10 hips with osteonecrosis of types C1 and C2, respectively. Total hip arthroplasty was performed in 9.6% of patients (3/31 hips), at an average of 33 months after surgery. Clinical symptoms improved after surgery, and the secondary collapse rate at a mean of 5.8 years after CABMAT was lower than that reported in several previous studies on the natural course of asymptomatic ONFH. Early diagnosis of ONFH (i.e., before femoral head collapse) and early intervention with CABMAT could improve the

  11. The petrous bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørkov, Marie Louise Schjellerup; Heinemeier, Jan; Lynnerup, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Intraskeletal variation in the composition of carbon (delta(13)C) and nitrogen (delta(15)N) stable isotopes measured in collagen is tested from various human bones and dentine. Samples were taken from the femur, rib, and petrous part of the temporal bone from well-preserved skeletons of both adul...... of this study it is believed the petrous bone may be a new useful bone element and a supplement or a proxy for teeth in the analysis of early dietary patterns as it may reflect diet in fetal stages and early years of life....

  12. Zinc fixation preserves flow cytometry scatter and fluorescence parameters and allows simultaneous analysis of DNA content and synthesis, and intracellular and surface epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Uffe Birk; Owens, David; Pedersen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Zinc salt-based fixation (ZBF) has proved advantageous in histochemical analyses conducted on intact tissues but has not been exploited in flow cytometry procedures that focus on quantitative analysis of individual cells. Here, we show that ZBF performs equally well to paraformaldehyde in the pre......Zinc salt-based fixation (ZBF) has proved advantageous in histochemical analyses conducted on intact tissues but has not been exploited in flow cytometry procedures that focus on quantitative analysis of individual cells. Here, we show that ZBF performs equally well to paraformaldehyde...... allowing subsequent quantitative PCR analysis or labeling for incorporation of the thymidine analog EdU following surface and intracellular epitope staining. Finally, ZBF treatment allows for long-term storage of labeled cells with little change in these parameters. Thus, we present a protocol for zinc...... salt fixation of cells that allows for the simultaneous analysis of DNA and intracellular and cell surface proteins by flow cytometry....

  13. Comparison of DNA yield and STR success rates from different tissues in embalmed bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Amanda; Czado, Natalia; Gangitano, David; Turnbough, Meredith; Hughes-Stamm, Sheree

    2017-01-01

    Formalin fixation is commonly used to preserve tissue sections for pathological testing and embalming cadavers for medical dissection or burial. DNA extracted from formalin-fixed tissues may also provide an alternative source of genetic material for medical diagnosis and forensic casework, such as identifying unknown embalmed human remains. Formaldehyde causes DNA damage, chemical modifications, and degradation, thereby reducing the quantity and quality of DNA available for downstream genetic analyses. By comparing the DNA yield, level of DNA degradation, and short tandem repeat (STR) success of various tissue types, this study is the first of its kind to provide some guidance on which samples from embalmed bodies are likely to generate more complete STR profiles. Tissue samples were dissected from three male embalmed cadavers and included bone, cartilage, hair, muscle, internal organs, skin, teeth, and nail clippings. DNA was purified from all samples using the QIAamp® FFPE Tissue Kit (Qiagen), quantified using the QuantiFiler® Trio DNA Quantification kit (Life Technologies), and genotyped using the GlobalFiler® PCR Amplification Kit (Life Technologies). Results of this study showed variation in DNA quantity and STR success between different types of tissues and some variation between cadavers. Overall, bone marrow samples resulted in the highest DNA yields, the least DNA degradation, and greatest STR success. However, several muscle, hair, and nail samples generated higher STR success rates than traditionally harvested bone and tooth samples. A key advantage to preferentially using these tissue samples over bone (and marrow) and teeth is their comparative ease and speed of collection from the cadaver and processing during DNA extraction. Results also indicate that soft tissues affected by lividity (blood pooling) may experience greater exposure to formalin, resulting in more DNA damage and reduced downstream STR success than tissues under compression. Overall

  14. Digital Astronaut: Bone Remodeling Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Significant progress has been made with regard to the plan outlined in the 2014 report for building in the effects of exercise induced loading on preserving bone...

  15. Arctic cultural heritage and climate change – the preservation of a permafrozen site in a warm future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollesen, Jørgen; Elberling, B.; Matthiesen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Most pre-historical archaeological sites lack well-preserved organic artefacts because organic materials such as wood, bone, and DNA have been decomposed. However, at some archaeological kitchen middens in the Arctic, organic materials have been preserved due to a combination of high deposition...... of organic materials and increase the risk of losing unique information stored in these archaeological sites. Here we present a four year monitoring and research project taking place at Qajaa in the Disko Bay area in West Greenland. Qajaa is a large kitchen midden, containing frozen remains from 4000 years...... of inhabitation, from when the first Paleo-Eskimos entered Greenland, until the site was abandoned in the 18th century. The site is part of the newly established - UNESCO World Heritage area and is considered the best preserved site for the Palaeo-Eskimo Saqqaq and Dorset cultures in all of Greenland....

  16. Tissue Microarray Analysis Applied to Bone Diagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Rafael Barrios; Silva, Maria Regina Regis; Alves, Maria Teresa Seixas; Evison, Martin Paul; Guimarães, Marco Aurelio; Francisco, Rafaella Arrabaca; Astolphi, Rafael Dias; Iwamura, Edna Sadayo Miazato

    2017-01-04

    Taphonomic processes affecting bone post mortem are important in forensic, archaeological and palaeontological investigations. In this study, the application of tissue microarray (TMA) analysis to a sample of femoral bone specimens from 20 exhumed individuals of known period of burial and age at death is described. TMA allows multiplexing of subsamples, permitting standardized comparative analysis of adjacent sections in 3-D and of representative cross-sections of a large number of specimens. Standard hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff and silver methenamine, and picrosirius red staining, and CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemistry were applied to TMA sections. Osteocyte and osteocyte lacuna counts, percent bone matrix loss, and fungal spheroid element counts could be measured and collagen fibre bundles observed in all specimens. Decalcification with 7% nitric acid proceeded more rapidly than with 0.5 M EDTA and may offer better preservation of histological and cellular structure. No endothelial cells could be detected using CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemistry. Correlation between osteocytes per lacuna and age at death may reflect reported age-related responses to microdamage. Methodological limitations and caveats, and results of the TMA analysis of post mortem diagenesis in bone are discussed, and implications for DNA survival and recovery considered.

  17. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bones can also ...

  18. What Is Fertility Preservation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What is fertility preservation? Fertility preservation is the process of saving or protecting ... children in the future. Who can benefit from fertility preservation? People with certain diseases, disorders, and life ...

  19. Teeth as a source of DNA for forensic identification of human remains: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Denice; Austin, Jeremy J

    2013-12-01

    Teeth and bones are frequently the only sources of DNA available for identification of degraded or fragmented human remains. The unique composition of teeth and their location in the jawbone provide additional protection to DNA compared to bones making them a preferred source of DNA in many cases. Despite this, post-mortem changes in the structure and composition of teeth, and the location and diagenesis of DNA within them are poorly understood. This review summarises current knowledge of tooth morphology with respect to DNA content and preservation, and discusses the way in which post-mortem changes will affect the recovery of DNA from teeth under a range of commonly used extraction protocols. We highlight the benefits and pitfalls of using specific tooth tissues for DNA extraction and make recommendations for tooth selection and sampling that will maximise DNA typing success. A comprehensive understanding of tooth structure and an appreciation of the relationship between DNA and mineralized tissues in post-mortem teeth are critical for optimal sample selection. More informed sampling methods that target specific tooth tissues will increase the likelihood of successful genetic analysis and allow for efficient and timely missing persons case work and disaster victim identification response. Copyright © 2013 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Selective Preservation of Fossil Ghost Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacham, Amanda

    2016-04-01

    A unique type of fossil fish preservation has been discovered in the Angelo Member (Fossil Lake) of the Green River Formation. The Angelo Member is a predominately evaporative deposit dominated by dolomite, but contains facies of fossiliferous laminated calcimicrite. Fossil fish occurring in two beds conspicuously lack bones. Fish in the lower bed are only preserved as organic material, including skin, pigments, and eyes. Fish in the upper bed have three-dimensional etching where bones once existed but also contain skin, pigments, and eyes. The top third of the upper bed often contains calcite crystals that are pseudomorphs after trona and possibly halite. Preliminary mineralogical analysis and mapping of evaporate facies suggests that this unique preservation may be related to lake geochemical conditions, such as high pH and alkalinity. To our knowledge, this is the first time this type of preservation has been observed and studied. Fossils and sediments within these beds are being studied both vertically and laterally through the one-meter thick sequence containing the fossil fish using XRD, isotopic, SEM, thin section, and total organic carbon analysis. Nine quarries, 0.5-1 meter square, were excavated for both fossils and rock samples along with 17 additional rock sample locations across an approximately 25-kilometer square region. This investigation has the capability of reconstructing the paleoenvironment and lake chemistry of Fossil Lake during the deposition of the "ghost-fish" beds and solving the mystery of the "missing bones" and the unusual process of preservation.

  1. Inspecting Targeted Deep Sequencing of Whole Genome Amplified DNA Versus Fresh DNA for Somatic Mutation Detection: A Genetic Study in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Laura; Fuster-Tormo, Francisco; Alvira, Daniel; Ademà, Vera; Armengol, María Pilar; Gómez-Marzo, Paula; de Haro, Nuri; Mallo, Mar; Xicoy, Blanca; Zamora, Lurdes; Solé, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Whole genome amplification (WGA) has become an invaluable method for preserving limited samples of precious stock material and has been used during the past years as an alternative tool to increase the amount of DNA before library preparation for next-generation sequencing. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by presenting somatic mutations in several myeloid-related genes. In this work, targeted deep sequencing has been performed on four paired fresh DNA and WGA DNA samples from bone marrow of MDS patients, to assess the feasibility of using WGA DNA for detecting somatic mutations. The results of this study highlighted that, in general, the sequencing and alignment statistics of fresh DNA and WGA DNA samples were similar. However, after variant calling and when considering variants detected at all frequencies, there was a high level of discordance between fresh DNA and WGA DNA (overall, a higher number of variants was detected in WGA DNA). After proper filtering, a total of three somatic mutations were detected in the cohort. All somatic mutations detected in fresh DNA were also identified in WGA DNA and validated by whole exome sequencing.

  2. Treatment with vacuum-assisted closure and cryo-preserved homologous de-epidermalised dermis of complex traumas to the lower limbs with loss of substance, and bones and tendons exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandi, C; Grimaldi, L; Nisi, G; Silvestri, A; Brafa, A; Calabrò, M; D'Aniello, C

    2008-12-01

    Lower-limb injuries with loss of tissue and exposure of bones and tendons are an increasing problem. The condition of the wound locally and the patient in general does not always allow immediate and adequate coverage of the structures exposed by the trauma. Therefore, new therapeutic solutions are needed. A reduction in the time that bones and tendons are exposed is essential to achieve complete healing of bone fractures, with reduced risks of infection and less disabling outcomes. The effectiveness of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in supporting wound healing and of cryopreserved homologous de-epidermalised dermis (DED) in providing an effective template for re-epithelialisation has been previously reported. We carried out a study to evaluate the effectiveness of the synergistic and combined use of the two methodologies. Eighteen patients with traumatic loss of tissue in the lower limbs, involving exposure of bone and tendon structures, were enrolled in the study. All participants had local, general contraindications to first-instance reconstructions, or both. All patients received a combination of VAC therapy and DED implants. Granulation tissue was obtained in all wounds, with complete coverage of exposed structures. No infections were detected in the cohort, and all patients were prepared for further necessary reconstructive treatments. In our experience, the combination of VAC therapy and DED could, in selected cases, constitute an effective treatment for complex lower limb traumatic injuries with bone and tendon exposure.

  3. Biomechanical properties of bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Markham, T.C.

    1983-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of allograft bone can be altered by the methods chosen for its preservation and storage. These effects are minimal with deep-freezing or low-level radiation. Freeze-drying, however, markedly diminishes the torsional and bending strength of bone allografts but does not deleteriously affect the compressive or tensile strength. Irradiation of bone with more than 3.0 megarad or irradiation combined with freeze-drying appears to cause a significant reduction in breaking strength. These factors should be considered when choosing freeze-dried or irradiated allogeneic bone that will be subjected to significant loads following implantation

  4. Alveolar ridge preservation in the esthetic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ronald E; Ioannidis, Alexis; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Thoma, Daniel S

    2018-02-27

    In the esthetic zone, in the case of tooth extraction, the clinician is often confronted with a challenge regarding the optimal decision-making process for providing a solution using dental implants. This is because, after tooth extraction, alveolar bone loss and structural and compositional changes of the covering soft tissues, as well as morphological alterations, can be expected. Ideally, the therapeutic plan starts before tooth extraction and it offers three options: spontaneous healing of the extraction socket; immediate implant placement; and techniques for preserving the alveolar ridge at the site of tooth removal. The decision-making process mainly depends on: (i) the chosen time-point for implant placement and the ability to place a dental implant; (ii) the quality and quantity of soft tissue in the region of the extraction socket; (iii) the remaining height of the buccal bone plate; and (iv) the expected rates of implant survival and success. Based on scientific evidence, three time-periods for alveolar ridge preservation are described in the literature: (i) soft-tissue preservation with 6-8 weeks of healing after tooth extraction (for optimization of the soft tissues); (ii) hard- and soft-tissue preservation with 4-6 months of healing after tooth extraction (for optimization of the hard and soft tissues); and (iii) hard-tissue preservation with > 6 months of healing after tooth extraction (for optimization of the hard tissues). © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Identifying the bacterial community on the surface of Intralox belting in a meat boning room by culture-dependent and culture-independent 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightwell, Gale; Boerema, Jackie; Mills, John; Mowat, Eilidh; Pulford, David

    2006-05-25

    We examined the bacterial community present on an Intralox conveyor belt system in an operating lamb boning room by sequencing the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of bacteria extracted in the presence or absence of cultivation. RFLP patterns for 16S rDNA clone library and cultures were generated using HaeIII and MspI restriction endonucleases. 16S rDNA amplicons produced 8 distinct RFLP pattern groups. RFLP groups I-IV were represented in the clone library and RFLP groups I and V-VIII were represented amongst the cultured isolates. Partial DNA sequences from each RFLP group revealed that all group I, II and VIII representatives were Pseudomonas spp., group III were Sphingomonas spp., group IV clones were most similar to an uncultured alpha proteobacterium, group V was similar to a Serratia spp., group VI with an Alcaligenes spp., and group VII with Microbacterium spp. Sphingomonads were numerically dominant in the culture-independent clone library and along with the group IV alpha proteobacterium were not represented amongst the cultured isolates. Serratia, Alcaligenes and Microbacterium spp. were only represented with cultured isolates. Pseudomonads were detected by both culture-dependent (84% of isolates) and culture-independent (12.5% of clones) methods and their presence at high frequency does pose the risk of product spoilage if transferred onto meat stored under aerobic conditions. The detection of sphingomonads in large numbers by the culture-independent method demands further analysis because sphingomonads may represent a new source of meat spoilage that has not been previously recognised in the meat processing environment. The 16S rDNA collections generated by both methods were important at representing the diversity of the bacterial population associated with an Intralox conveyor belt system.

  6. Blood and Bones: The Influence of the Mass Media on Australian Primary School Children's Understandings of Genes and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jenny; Venville, Grady

    2014-01-01

    Previous research showed that primary school children held several misconceptions about genetics of concern for their future lives. Included were beliefs that genes and DNA are separate substances, with genes causing family resemblance and DNA identifying suspects at crime scenes. Responses to this work "blamed" the mass media for these…

  7. [Fertility preservation in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Laure; Grémeau, Anne-Sophie; Vorilhon, Solène; Pons, Hanae; Chabrot, Cécile; Grèze, Victoria; Pouly, Jean-Luc; Brugnon, Florence

    2018-01-01

    Since the improvement of cancer diagnosis and treatment, survival rates of these patients increase. Gonadal damages are frequent consequences of cancer treatments with different evidence of impaired fertility. In this context, fertility preservation should be proposed to patients exposed to potentially gonadotoxic treatments. Different preservation approaches may be proposed depending on patient age, sex, cancer type and type of treatment. The indications of fertility preservation depend on sexual maturity. In young girls, ovarian cortex cryopreservation is the only technique feasible in order to preserve their reproductive potential. Vitrification of oocytes which needs ovarian stimulation or oocytes in vitro maturation is becoming more commonly performed for pubertal women to preserve their fertility. Ovarian cortex freezing could be offered to emergency fertility preservation of adult female cancer patients. In prepubertal boys, testicular tissue cryopreservation is the only line treatment for fertility preservation. For future use, various approaches are being evaluated such as spermatogonial stem cell injection or in vitro maturation. Cryopreservation of spermatozoa is, today, an established and successful technique for male adults. When there are no spermatozoa in ejaculate, sperm can be retrieved after treatment of testicular biopsy. The French bioethics law clearly indicates that fertility preservation should be proposed to patients exposed to potentially gonadotoxic treatment. Today, many approaches are possible. Fertility preservation indications are based on multidisciplinary consultations within platforms for the fertility preservation in order to optimize the patient care. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  9. The Soy Isoflavones to Reduce Bone Loss (SIRBL) Study: Three Year Effects on pQCT Bone Mineral Density and Strength Measures in Postmenopausal Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soy isoflavones exert inconsistent bone density preserving effects, but the bone strength preserving effects in humans are unknown. Our double-blind randomized controlled trial examined 2 soy isoflavone doses (80 or 120 mg/d) vs placebo tablets on volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and strength ...

  10. Influence of microbial biofilms on the preservation of primary soft tissue in fossil and extant archosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joseph E; Lenczewski, Melissa E; Scherer, Reed P

    2010-10-12

    Mineralized and permineralized bone is the most common form of fossilization in the vertebrate record. Preservation of gross soft tissues is extremely rare, but recent studies have suggested that primary soft tissues and biomolecules are more commonly preserved within preserved bones than had been presumed. Some of these claims have been challenged, with presentation of evidence suggesting that some of the structures are microbial artifacts, not primary soft tissues. The identification of biomolecules in fossil vertebrate extracts from a specimen of Brachylophosaurus canadensis has shown the interpretation of preserved organic remains as microbial biofilm to be highly unlikely. These discussions also propose a variety of potential mechanisms that would permit the preservation of soft-tissues in vertebrate fossils over geologic time. This study experimentally examines the role of microbial biofilms in soft-tissue preservation in vertebrate fossils by quantitatively establishing the growth and morphology of biofilms on extant archosaur bone. These results are microscopically and morphologically compared with soft-tissue extracts from vertebrate fossils from the Hell Creek Formation of southeastern Montana (Latest Maastrichtian) in order to investigate the potential role of microbial biofilms on the preservation of fossil bone and bound organic matter in a variety of taphonomic settings. Based on these analyses, we highlight a mechanism whereby this bound organic matter may be preserved. Results of the study indicate that the crystallization of microbial biofilms on decomposing organic matter within vertebrate bone in early taphonomic stages may contribute to the preservation of primary soft tissues deeper in the bone structure.

  11. Effects on bone geometry, density, and microarchitecture in the distal radius but not the tibia in women with primary hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stinus; Beck Jensen, Jens-Erik; Rasmussen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) have continuously elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) and consequently increased bone turnover with negative effects on cortical (Ct) bone with preservation of trabecular (Tb) bone. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR...

  12. Preserving Digital Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Ross

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a single-volume introduction to the principles, strategies and practices currently applied by librarians and recordkeeping professionals to the critical issue of preservation of digital information. It incorporates practice from both the recordkeeping and the library communities, taking stock of current knowledge about digital preservation and describing recent and current research, to provide a framework for reflecting on the issues that digital preservation raises in professional practice.

  13. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone ... to people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether ...

  14. Fe and Cu stable isotopes in archeological human bones and their relationship to sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Balter, Vincent; Herrscher, Estelle; Lamboux, Aline; Telouk, Philippe; Albarède, Francis

    2012-07-01

    Accurate sex assignment of ancient human remains usually relies on the availability of coxal bones or well-preserved DNA. Iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) stable isotope compositions ((56)Fe/(54)Fe and (65)Cu/(63)Cu, respectively) were recently measured in modern human blood, and an unexpected result was the discovery of a (56)Fe-depletion and a (65)Cu-enrichment in men's blood compared to women's blood. Bones, being pervasively irrigated by blood, are expected to retain the (56)Fe/(54)Fe and (65)Cu/(63)Cu signature of blood, which in turn is useful for determining the sex of ancient bones. Here, we report the (56)Fe/(54)Fe, (65)Cu/(63)Cu, and (66)Zn/(64)Zn ratios from a suite of well-preserved phalanxes (n = 43) belonging to individuals buried in the 17th and 18th centuries at the necropolis of Saint-Laurent de Grenoble, France, and for which the sex was independently estimated from pelvic bone morphology. The metals were purified from the bone matrix by liquid chromatography on ion exchange resin and the isotope compositions were measured by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results show that, as expected from literature data on blood, male bone iron is depleted in (56)Fe and enriched in (65)Cu relative to female. No sex difference is found in the (66)Zn/(64)Zn ratios of bone. The concentration and isotopic data show no evidence of soil contamination. Four samples of five (77%) can be assigned their correct sex, a result comparable to sex assignment using Fe and Cu isotopes in blood (81%). Isotopic analysis of metals may therefore represent a valid method of sex assignment applicable to incomplete human remains. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Environmental education on wood preservatives and preservative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forest products specialists are often asked about the perceived risks and environmental costs of treated wood products. Evidently, the civil society is ignorant of the fact that preservative treated wood products (PTWP) are not as lethal as pesticides. In this paper, a careful review is made of the environmental and health ...

  16. Improving the performance of true single molecule sequencing for ancient DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Second-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to recover genetic information from the past, allowing the characterization of the first complete genomes from past individuals and extinct species. Recently, third generation Helicos sequencing platforms, which perform true Single-Molecule DNA Sequencing (tSMS), have shown great potential for sequencing DNA molecules from Pleistocene fossils. Here, we aim at improving even further the performance of tSMS for ancient DNA by testing two novel tSMS template preparation methods for Pleistocene bone fossils, namely oligonucleotide spiking and treatment with DNA phosphatase. Results We found that a significantly larger fraction of the horse genome could be covered following oligonucleotide spiking however not reproducibly and at the cost of extra post-sequencing filtering procedures and skewed %GC content. In contrast, we showed that treating ancient DNA extracts with DNA phosphatase improved the amount of endogenous sequence information recovered per sequencing channel by up to 3.3-fold, while still providing molecular signatures of endogenous ancient DNA damage, including cytosine deamination and fragmentation by depurination. Additionally, we confirmed the existence of molecular preservation niches in large bone crystals from which DNA could be preferentially extracted. Conclusions We propose DNA phosphatase treatment as a mechanism to increase sequence coverage of ancient genomes when using Helicos tSMS as a sequencing platform. Together with mild denaturation temperatures that favor access to endogenous ancient templates over modern DNA contaminants, this simple preparation procedure can improve overall Helicos tSMS performance when damaged DNA templates are targeted. PMID:22574620

  17. Mass preserving image registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Sporring, Jon; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents results the mass preserving image registration method in the Evaluation of Methods for Pulmonary Image Registration 2010 (EMPIRE10) Challenge. The mass preserving image registration algorithm was applied to the 20 image pairs. Registration was evaluated using four different...

  18. Food preservation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labots, H.; Huis in 't Veld, G.J.P.; Verrips, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    After a review of several methods for the preservation of food and the routes of food infections, the following chapters are devoted to the preservation by irradiation. Applications and legal aspects of food irradiation are described. Special reference is made to the international situation. (Auth.)

  19. Modes of fossil preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The processes of geologic preservation are important for understanding the organisms represented by fossils. Some fossil differences are due to basic differences in organization of animals and plants, but the interpretation of fossils has also tended to be influenced by modes of preservation. Four modes of preservation generally can be distinguished: (1) Cellular permineralization ("petrifaction") preserves anatomical detail, and, occasionally, even cytologic structures. (2) Coalified compression, best illustrated by structures from coal but characteristic of many plant fossils in shale, preserves anatomical details in distorted form and produces surface replicas (impressions) on enclosing matrix. (3) Authigenic preservation replicates surface form or outline (molds and casts) prior to distortion by compression and, depending on cementation and timing, may intergrade with fossils that have been subject to compression. (4) Duripartic (hard part) preservation is characteristic of fossil skeletal remains, predominantly animal. Molds, pseudomorphs, or casts may form as bulk replacements following dissolution of the original fossil material, usually by leaching. Classification of the kinds of preservation in fossils will aid in identifying the processes responsible for modifying the fossil remains of both animals and plants. ?? 1975.

  20. Electromechanical Properties of Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regimbal, Raymond L.

    Discrepancies between calculated and empirical properties of bone are thought to be due to a general lack of consideration for the extent and manner(s) with which bone components interact at the molecular level. For a bone component in physiological fluid or whenever two phases are in contact, there is a region between the bulk phases called the electrical double layer which is marked by a separation of electric charges. For the purpose of studying electrical double layer interactions, the method of particle microelectrophoresis was used to characterize bone and its major constituents on the basis of the net charge they bear when suspended in ionic media of physiological relevance. With the data presented as pH versus zeta (zeta ) potential, the figures reveal an isoelectric point (IEP) for bone mineral near pH 8.6, whereas intact and EDTA demineralized bone tissue both exhibit IEPs near pH 5.1. While these data demonstrate the potential for a significant degree of coulombic interaction between the bone mineral and organic constituent double layers, it was also observed that use of inorganic phosphate buffers, as a specific marker for bone mineral, resulted in (1) an immediate reversal, from positive to negative, of the bone mineral zeta potential (2) rendered the zeta potential of intact bone more negative in a manner linearly dependent on both time and temperature and (3) had no affect on demineralized bone (P load for a 3 day period. While it is thus demonstrated that the major inorganic and organic phases of bone are electromechanically coupled, a thermodynamic consideration of the data suggests that the nature of the bond is to preserve mineral and organic phase electroneutralities by participating in electrical double layer interactions. The results are discussed in terms of bone mechanical modeling, electrokinetic properties, aging, tissue-implant compatibility and the etiologies of bone pathologic conditions.

  1. Biomechanical aspects of bone microstructure in vertebrates ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-10-29

    Oct 29, 2009 ... Bone is an important tissue in paleontological studies as it is a commonly preserved element in most fossil vertebrates, and can often allow its ... of the size of the bone's building blocks (such as osteon or trabecular thickness) to meet the metabolic demand concomitant to minimal expenditure of energy.

  2. DNA Binding Peptide Directed Synthesis of Continuous DNA Nanowires for Analysis of Large DNA Molecules by Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Il; Lee, Seonghyun; Jin, Xuelin; Kim, Su Ji; Jo, Kyubong; Lee, Jung Heon

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis of smooth and continuous DNA nanowires, preserving the original structure of native DNA, and allowing its analysis by scanning electron microscope (SEM), is demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles densely assembled on the DNA backbone via thiol-tagged DNA binding peptides work as seeds for metallization of DNA. This method allows whole analysis of DNA molecules with entangled 3D features. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Evaluation of the radiosensitizing to treatment with 153Sm-EDTMP, of haematopoietic cells of the bone marrow by means of bromodeoxyuridine incorporation into DNA, in a murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales A, E.

    2008-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) has been shown to have a radiosensitizing effect, and its incorporation into DNA prior to administration of a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical could increase the efficiency of bone marrow ablation, and even increase the specificity of radiation exposure for therapeutic purposes. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of BrdU incorporation into DNA on the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of samarium-153 ethylenediaminetetra-methylene phosphonate ( 153 Sm-EDTMP) in murine bone marrow cells. BALB/c male mice (N = 5 in each experiment) were treated with one of the following substances: a) BrdU (0.25 mg/g) b) 153 -EDTMP (11.5 ± 3 MBq) c) BrdU (0.25 mg/g) plus 153 Sm-EDTMP (11.5 ± MBq), there was also an untreated control. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were established by time-response and absorbed dose-response curves of polychromatic erythrocyte (PCE) and micro nucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MN-PCE) frequencies, respectively, in murine peripheral blood samples in vivo. The significance of the differences between groups was determined by a variation of Dunett test for multiple groups and different-sized groups of a student test. Beta-absorbed dose fractions obtained from MNCP4B Monte Carlo computer code were used for mice bone marrow dosimetry calculations. At an average radiation absorbed dose of 0.38 Gy, 0.56 Gy and 0.82 Gy at 24, 40 and 72 h respectively, cells from animals treated with 153 Sm-EDTMP showed a clear and significant induction of MN-PCE after 24 h, with the maximum response at 40 h, however, cells from group treated with BrdU plus 153 Sm-EDTMP paradoxically showed MN-PCE frequencies only slightly higher than the control at the same absorbed dose. Treatment with 153 Sm-EDTMP caused a slight reduction in PCE frequency, but exposure to BrdU or BrdU plus 153 Sm-EDTMP induced a substantial and significant reduction in PCE frequency from 32 h to the end of the experiment (72 h). The PCE frequencies in the Brd

  4. Chronopolis Digital Preservation Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Minor

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Chronopolis Digital Preservation Initiative, one of the Library of Congress’ latest efforts to collect and preserve at-risk digital information, has completed its first year of service as a multi-member partnership to meet the archival needs of a wide range of domains.Chronopolis is a digital preservation data grid framework developed by the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC at UC San Diego, the UC San Diego Libraries (UCSDL, and their partners at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR in Colorado and the University of Maryland's Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS.Chronopolis addresses a critical problem by providing a comprehensive model for the cyberinfrastructure of collection management, in which preserved intellectual capital is easily accessible, and research results, education material, and new knowledge can be incorporated smoothly over the long term. Integrating digital library, data grid, and persistent archive technologies, Chronopolis has created trusted environments that span academic institutions and research projects, with the goal of long-term digital preservation.A key goal of the Chronopolis project is to provide cross-domain collection sharing for long-term preservation. Using existing high-speed educational and research networks and mass-scale storage infrastructure investments, the partnership is leveraging the data storage capabilities at SDSC, NCAR, and UMIACS to provide a preservation data grid that emphasizes heterogeneous and highly redundant data storage systems.In this paper we will explore the major themes within Chronopolis, including:a The philosophy and theory behind a nationally federated data grid for preservation. b The core tools and technologies used in Chronopolis. c The metadata schema that is being developed within Chronopolis for all of the data elements. d Lessons learned from the first year of the project.e Next steps in digital preservation using Chronopolis: how we

  5. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  6. Strategies for alveolar ridge reconstruction and preservation for implant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Chihiro; Nakamoto, Tetsuji; Mukaibo, Taro; Kondo, Yusuke; Hosokawa, Ryuji

    2015-10-01

    In dental implant treatment, ridge preservation and immediate or early implant placement are recommended to minimize bone resorption after tooth extraction and achieve esthetic outcomes. However, there is no consensus concerning the efficacy of this surgical method. There is also no consensus on the efficacy of bone and soft tissue grafts and surgical methods for alveolar ridge reconstruction. This paper reports ridge alteration in the anterior maxilla after tooth extraction, and summarizes the efficacy of various ridge preservation methods and immediate or early implant placement as alveolar ridge preservation methods to minimize bone resorption after tooth extraction. The advantages and complications of alveolar ridge reconstruction methods, and the efficacy and surgical method of soft tissue graft are reviewed. The anterior maxilla is in the esthetic zone, and the thickness of the bone on the labial side around the natural tooth is less than 1mm in many cases. Therefore, it is impossible to prevent bone resorption completely, even if ridge preservation and immediate or early implant placement are performed after tooth extraction. It is necessary to obtain stable and long-term esthetics by combining connective tissue and free gingival grafts, in addition to hard tissue augmentation. It is important to consider the burden and level of satisfaction of patients, such as in terms of donor site morbidity in hard and soft tissue grafting, and to pay attention to appropriate indications to avoid overtreatment. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing screening criteria for the radiocarbon dating of bone mineral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Ricardo, E-mail: ldv1452@gmail.com [Leibniz Labor for Isotopic and Radiometric Dating, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Christian Albrecht University, Kiel (Germany); Huels, Matthias [Leibniz Labor for Isotopic and Radiometric Dating, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Nadeau, Marie-Josee; Grootes, Pieter M. [Leibniz Labor for Isotopic and Radiometric Dating, Max-Eyth-Str. 11-13, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Christian Albrecht University, Kiel (Germany); Garbe-Schoenberg, C.-Dieter [Institute of Geosciences, Marine Climate Research and ICPMS Lab, Kiel University, Ludewig-Meyn-Str. 10, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Christian Albrecht University, Kiel (Germany); Hollund, Hege I. [Institute for Geo- and Bioarchaeology, The VU University, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lotnyk, Andriy [Faculty of Engineering, Institute for Material Science, Synthesis and Real Structure, Kiel University, Kaiserstr. 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification (IOM), Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Kienle, Lorenz [Faculty of Engineering, Institute for Material Science, Synthesis and Real Structure, Kiel University, Kaiserstr. 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Graduate School Human Development in Landscapes, Christian Albrecht University, Kiel (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Radiocarbon dating of bone mineral (carbonate in the apatite lattice) has been the target of sporadic research for the last 40 years. Results obtained by different decontamination protocols have, however, failed to provide a consistent agreement with reference ages. In particular, quality criteria to assess bone mineral radiocarbon dating reliability are still lacking. Systematic research was undertaken to identify optimal preservation criteria for bone mineral in archeological bones. Six human long bones, originating from a single site, were radiocarbon-dated both for collagen and apatite, with the level of agreement between the dates providing an indication of exogenous carbon contamination. Several techniques (Histology, FTIR, TEM, LA-ICP-MS) were employed to determine the preservation status of each sample. Research results highlight the importance of a micro-scale approach in establishing bone preservation, in particular the use of trace element concentration profiles demonstrated its potential use as a viable sample selection criterion for bone carbonate radiocarbon dating.

  8. Disjointness Preserving and Functional Type Disjointness Preserving Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ganesa Moorthy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concept called functional type disjointness preserving operators is introduced and structure of disjointness preserving and functional type disjointness preserving operators on some function spaces are analysed.

  9. Ultrasonic Needles for Bone Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Andrew; Wallace, Robert; Cleary, Rebecca; Li Li; Simpson, Hamish; Lucas, Margaret

    2017-02-01

    Bone biopsy is an invasive clinical procedure, where a bone sample is recovered for analysis during the diagnosis of a medical condition. When the architecture of the bone tissue is required to be preserved, a core-needle biopsy is taken. Although this procedure is performed while the patient is under local anaesthesia, the patient can still experience significant discomfort. Additionally, large haematoma can be induced in the soft tissue surrounding the biopsy site due to the large axial and rotational forces, which are applied through the needle to penetrate bone. It is well documented that power ultrasonic surgical devices offer the advantages of low cutting force, high accuracy, and preservation of soft tissues. This paper reports a study of the design, analysis, and test of two novel power ultrasonic needles for bone biopsy that operate using different configurations to penetrate bone. The first utilizes micrometric vibrations generated at the distil tip of a full-wavelength resonant ultrasonic device, while the second utilizes an ultrasonic-sonic approach, where vibrational energy generated by a resonant ultrasonic horn is transferred to a needle via the chaotic motion of a free-mass. It is shown that the dynamic behavior of the devices identified through experimental techniques closely match the behavior calculated through numerical and finite-element analysis methods, demonstrating that they are effective design tools for these devices. Both devices were able to recover trabecular bone from the metaphysis of an ovine femur, and the biopsy samples were found to be comparable to a sample extracted using a conventional biopsy needle. Furthermore, the resonant needle device was also able to extract a cortical bone sample from the central diaphysis, which is the strongest part of the bone, and the biopsy was found to be superior to the sample recovered by a conventional bone biopsy needle.

  10. Individual and combined effects of ochratoxin A and citrinin on viability and DNA fragmentation in cultured Vero cells and on chromosome aberrations in mice bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouslimi, Amel; Bouaziz, Chayma; Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Hassen, Wafa; Bacha, Hassen

    2008-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) and citrinin (CTN) are two common contaminant mycotoxins which can occur jointly in a wide range of food commodities. Both mycotoxins have several toxic effects but share a significant nephrotoxic and carcinogenic potential since OTA and CTN were reported to be responsible for naturally occurring human and animal kidney diseases and tumors. Considering the concomitant production of OTA and CTN, it is very likely that humans and animals are always exposed to the mixture rather than to individual compounds. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, in vivo and in vitro, whether DNA damage is enhanced by combination of both mycotoxins as compared to their effect separately. To this end, we have assessed their effects individually or combined on cell proliferation and DNA fragmentation in cultured Vero cells and in vivo by monitoring the induction of chromosome aberrations. Our results clearly showed that cultured renal cells respond to OTA and CTN exposure by a moderate and weak inhibition of cell proliferation, respectively. However, when combined, they exert a significant increase in inhibition of cell viability. Similar results were found for the investigated genotoxicity endpoints (DNA fragmentation and chromosome aberrations). Altogether, our study showed that OTA and CTN combination effects are clearly synergistic. The synergistic induction of DNA damage observed with OTA and CTN taken concomitantly could be relevant to explain the molecular basis of the renal diseases and tumorogenesis induced by naturally occurring mycotoxins

  11. Preservation of Built Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Marie Kirstine

    architectural value in preservation work as a matter of maintaining the buildings -as keeping them "alive" and allowing this to continue in the future. The predominantly aesthetic preservation approach will stop the buildings' life process, which is the same as - "letting them die". Finnebyen in Aarhus......When built environments and recently also cultural environments are to be preserved, the historic and architectural values are identified as the key motivations. In Denmark the SAVE system is used as a tool to identify architectural values, but in recent years it has been criticized for having...... is an example of a residential area, where the planning authority currently has presented a preservational district plan, following guidelines from the SAVE method. The purpose is to protect the area's architectural values in the future. The predominantly aesthetic approach is here used coupled to the concept...

  12. VT Historic Preservation Grant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The State-funded Historic Preservation Grant Program helps municipalities and non-profit organizations rehabilitate the historic buildings that are a vital part of...

  13. Digital preservation for heritages

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    ""Digital Preservation for Heritages: Technologies and Applications"" provides a comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of digital technologies in the area of cultural heritage preservation, including digitalization, research aiding, conservation aiding, digital exhibition, and digital utilization. Processes, technical frameworks, key technologies, as well as typical systems and applications are discussed in the book. It is intended for researchers and students in the fields of computer science and technology, museology, and archaeology. Dr. Dongming Lu is a professor at College of Computer Sci

  14. Identifying A Molecular Phenotype for Bone Marrow Stromal Cells With In Vivo Bone Forming Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kenneth H; Frederiksen, Casper M; Burns, Jorge S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The ability of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) to differentiate into osteoblasts is being exploited in cell-based therapy for repair of bone defects. However, the phenotype of ex vivo cultured BMSCs predicting their bone forming capacity is not known. Thus, we employed DNA microarrays...... comparing two human bone marrow stromal cell (hBMSC) populations: one is capable of in vivo heterotopic bone formation (hBMSC-TERT(+Bone)) and the other is not (hBMSC-TERT(-Bone)). Compared to hBMSC-TERT(-Bone), the hBMSC-TERT(+Bone) cells had an increased over-representation of extracellular matrix genes...... (17% versus 5%) and a larger percentage of genes with predicted SP3 transcription factor binding sites in their promoter region (21% versus 8%). On the other hand, hBMSC-TERT(-Bone) cells expressed a larger number of immune-response related genes (26% versus 8%). In order to test for the predictive...

  15. Historic Preservation Information CFM Website

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA Historic Preservation Office keeps information about VA's programs to comply with Federal preservation requirements, and also interesting information about VA...

  16. [Legal regime of preservation of data on identifiers obtained form DNA analysis, in the light of the Decision of the European Tribunal of Human Rights (Large Chamber), of December 4 2008 (S. and Marper vs. United Kingdom)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverón Palenzuela, Benito

    2009-01-01

    The author analyzes the Judgement of the European Court of Human Rights, of 4 December 2008 (case of S. and Marper v. the United Kingdom). It declares that retaining fingerprints and cellular samples and DNA profiles after the criminal proceedings, when the accused has been acquitted, constitutes a violation of Article 8 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. He also deals with the legal regime on data protection contained in the Spanish Law on police DNA databases of (Organic Law 10/2007, of 8 October), as well as its adaptation to the case law of the ECHR.

  17. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... to promote genome integrity during DNA replication. This includes suppressing new replication origin firing, stabilization of replicating forks, and the safe restart of forks to prevent any loss of genetic information. Here, we describe mechanisms by which oncogenes can interfere with DNA replication thereby...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  18. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  19. Mandibular reconstruction using bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Joon Yim

    1999-01-01

    Further understanding of bone healing mechanisms, bone physiology and bone biology, transplantation immunology, and development of Tissue Banking procedures has enabled oral and maxillofacial surgeons to reconstruct even the most difficult bony defects successfully with the preserved allogeneic bone implant. Although it had been known that bone allografts were clinically effective, its application has not been widespread until the reports of Inclan (I 942), Hyatt and Butler (I 950), and Wilson (I 95 1). Tissue Banking provides the surgeon with a readily available, relatively inexpensive, and relatively safe selection of allogeneic bone for clinical use. Now autogenous bone and allogeneic bone implants present a wide variety of surgical options to surgeons, whether used separately or in combination. The surgeons are able to make judicious and fruitful choices, only with a thorough knowledge of the above-mentioned biological principles and skillful techniques. Many kinds of bone grafting techniques have been tried for reconstructing defective osseous tissues of the oral and maxillofacial region, though they have varying degrees of success. The osseous defects which require grafting include those of various size, shape, position, or amount. Unlike autogenous grafts, whose function is to provide osteogenic cells, allografts are purely passive, offering only a matrix for the inductive phase of bone healing. The condition of the recipient bed is of primary importance, because the host must produce all of the essential elements for the bone allograft to become incorporated. Depending on the processing methods of the allogeneic bone, the bone graft materials have different qualities, different healing potentials and different indications. Proper selection of grafts and surgical techniques requires an understanding of graft immunology and the mechanisms of graft healing. The surgeons should know about the biological principles to raise the clinical success rate

  20. PCR amplification of microsatellites from single cells of Karenia brevis preserved in Lugol's iodine solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrichs, D W; Renshaw, M A; Santamaria, C A; Richardson, B; Gold, J R; Campbell, L

    2008-01-01

    A simple and effective protocol is described for multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of single cells of Karenia brevis. The protocol requires minimum processing, avoids additions that might dilute target DNA template, and can be used on cells preserved in Lugol's iodine preservative. Destaining of Lugol's-preserved cells with sodium thiosulfate allowed successful amplification of single-copy, nuclear-encoded microsatellites in single cells of K. brevis that have been preserved for up to 6 years.

  1. Suppressed bone remodeling in black bears conserves energy and bone mass during hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan; Buckendahl, Patricia; Carpenter, Caren; Henriksen, Kim; Vaughan, Michael; Donahue, Seth

    2015-07-01

    Decreased physical activity in mammals increases bone turnover and uncouples bone formation from bone resorption, leading to hypercalcemia, hypercalcuria, bone loss and increased fracture risk. Black bears, however, are physically inactive for up to 6 months annually during hibernation without losing cortical or trabecular bone mass. Bears have been shown to preserve trabecular bone volume and architectural parameters and cortical bone strength, porosity and geometrical properties during hibernation. The mechanisms that prevent disuse osteoporosis in bears are unclear as previous studies using histological and serum markers of bone remodeling show conflicting results. However, previous studies used serum markers of bone remodeling that are known to accumulate with decreased renal function, which bears have during hibernation. Therefore, we measured serum bone remodeling markers (BSALP and TRACP) that do not accumulate with decreased renal function, in addition to the concentrations of serum calcium and hormones involved in regulating bone remodeling in hibernating and active bears. Bone resorption and formation markers were decreased during hibernation compared with when bears were physically active, and these findings were supported by histomorphometric analyses of bone biopsies. The serum concentration of cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), a hormone known to reduce bone resorption, was 15-fold higher during hibernation. Serum calcium concentration was unchanged between hibernation and non-hibernation seasons. Suppressed and balanced bone resorption and formation in hibernating bears contributes to energy conservation, eucalcemia and the preservation of bone mass and strength, allowing bears to survive prolonged periods of extreme environmental conditions, nutritional deprivation and anuria. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of a Middle Pleistocene cave bear reconstructed from ultrashort DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Jesse; Knapp, Michael; Glocke, Isabelle; Gansauge, Marie-Theres; Weihmann, Antje; Nickel, Birgit; Valdiosera, Cristina; García, Nuria; Pääbo, Svante; Arsuaga, Juan-Luis; Meyer, Matthias

    2013-09-24

    Although an inverse relationship is expected in ancient DNA samples between the number of surviving DNA fragments and their length, ancient DNA sequencing libraries are strikingly deficient in molecules shorter than 40 bp. We find that a loss of short molecules can occur during DNA extraction and present an improved silica-based extraction protocol that enables their efficient retrieval. In combination with single-stranded DNA library preparation, this method enabled us to reconstruct the mitochondrial genome sequence from a Middle Pleistocene cave bear (Ursus deningeri) bone excavated at Sima de los Huesos in the Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain. Phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that the U. deningeri sequence forms an early diverging sister lineage to all Western European Late Pleistocene cave bears. Our results prove that authentic ancient DNA can be preserved for hundreds of thousand years outside of permafrost. Moreover, the techniques presented enable the retrieval of phylogenetically informative sequences from samples in which virtually all DNA is diminished to fragments shorter than 50 bp.

  3. Preservation in New Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kitching

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In the United Kingdom (as in many other countries increasing attention is being paid to the importance of each library and archive having a written preservation strategy endorsed by its governing body. So increasingly we are asking: where does „preservation“ begin and what are its top priorities? Some would say preservation begins with the definition of collecting policies to ensure that only relevant items are acquired in the first place, and therefore that no unnecessary costs are incurred on the long-term care of unwanted and unconsulted items. Others might argue that the first priority must be the careful appraisal of existing holdings to determine their preservation and conservation requirements and to prioritise their treatment. Or should preservation begin with damage-limitation: restricting the physical handling of books and documents, on the one hand by providing whenever possible surrogate copies in digital formats or microform, and on the other hand by offering at least basic protection through appropriate boxing and packaging? This, surely, goes hand-in-hand with the education of staff and readers about the importance of treating rare or unique materials with proper respect.

  4. Wood preservative testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca Ibach; Stan T. Lebow

    2012-01-01

    Most wood species used in commercial and residential construction have little natural biological durability and will suffer from biodeterioration when exposed to moisture. Historically, this problem has been overcome by treating wood for outdoor use with toxic wood preservatives. As societal acceptance of chemical use changes, there is continual pressure to develop and...

  5. Preserving the Dnipro River

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    These ideas call for a fundamental change in the structure of our scientific methodology and technological approaches, in addition to a fundamental change in our ...... This is the ideology and the administrative philosophy that is capable of preserving common humanitarian values, or natural values in a time of globalisation, ...

  6. Cancer and fertility preservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertini, Matteo; Del Mastro, Lucia; Pescio, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, thanks to the improvement in the prognosis of cancer patients, a growing attention has been given to the fertility issues. International guidelines on fertility preservation in cancer patients recommend that physicians discuss, as early as possible, with all patients of reprodu......In the last years, thanks to the improvement in the prognosis of cancer patients, a growing attention has been given to the fertility issues. International guidelines on fertility preservation in cancer patients recommend that physicians discuss, as early as possible, with all patients...... data have become available, and several issues in this field are still controversial and should be addressed by both patients and their treating physicians.In April 2015, physicians with expertise in the field of fertility preservation in cancer patients from several European countries were invited...... data was encouraged. On the basis of the data presented, as well as the expertise of the invited speakers, a total of ten recommendations were discussed and prepared with the aim to help physicians in counseling their young patients interested in fertility preservation.Although there is a great...

  7. Monitoring Biodiversity using Environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis

    of mammalian DNA in leech guts is shown to persist for at least 4 months post feeding. Subsequently, it is shown that DNA from wild leeches, collected in tropical rainforest in Vietnam, contains DNA from wild mammals living in the area, representing poorly known, cryptic and threatened species. Finally......, a study tests the applicability of non-destructive DNA extraction from old and ancient insect remains. DNA is successfully retrieved, amplified and equenced from dried museum beetle specimens up to 188 years old, ermafrost-preserved macrofossils up to 26.000 years old and directly from 1800-3000 years old...

  8. Evolution of opercle bone shape along a macrohabitat gradient: species identification using mtDNA and geometric morphometric analyses in neotropical sea catfishes (Ariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Madlen; Aguirre-Fernández, Gabriel; Cooke, Richard G; Barros, Tito; Salzburger, Walter; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2016-08-01

    Transitions between the marine and freshwater macrohabitat have occurred repeatedly in the evolution of teleost fishes. For example, ariid catfishes have moved from freshwater to marine environments, and vice versa. Opercles, a skeletal feature that has been shown to change during such transitions, were subjected to 2D geometric morphometric analyses in order to investigate evolutionary shape changes during habitat transition in ariid catfishes and to test the influence of habitat on shape changes. A mtDNA marker, which proved useful in previous studies, was used to verify species identities. It greatly improved the assignment of specimens to a species, which are difficult to assign by morphology alone. The application of a mtDNA marker confirmed the occurrence of Notarius biffi in Central America, South of El Salvador. Molecular identification together with principal component analysis (PCA) and further morphological inspection of neurocrania indicated the existence of a cryptic species within Bagre pinnimaculatus. Principal component (PC) scores of individual specimens clustered in morphospace by genus rather than by habitat. Strong phylogenetic structure was detected using a permutation test of PC scores of species means on a phylogenetic tree. Calculation of Pagel's λ suggested that opercle shape evolved according to a Brownian model of evolution. Yet canonical variate analysis (CVA) conducted on the habitat groups showed significant differences in opercle shapes among freshwater and marine species. Overall, opercle shape in tropical American Ariidae appears to be phylogenetically constrained. This verifies the application of opercle shape as a taxonomic tool for species identification in fossil ariid catfishes. At the same time, adaptation to freshwater habitats shows characteristic opercle shape trajectories in ariid catfishes, which might be used to detect habitat preferences in fossils.

  9. Effects of alveolar ridge preservation on delayed implant osseointegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shan; Li, Bin; Xue, Hui-Min; Huang, Hai-Yun; Liu, Gang-Li

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of alveolar ridge preservation with Bio-Oss bone substitute (Geistlich Pharma) on delayed implant osseointegration. The 3rd and 4th left and right mandibular premolars were extracted from four adult healthy male and female dogs. For the experimental group, we randomly selected two extraction sockets in each dog to be filled with Bio-Oss bone substitute (Geistlich Pharma). The two remaining extraction sockets remained untreated and served as the control group. Three months after Bio-Oss placement, dental implants were inserted into the alveolar bone of the experimental group and the control group. The osteogenic activity of the bone around the implants was assessed by evaluating the histological morphology and by estimating histomorphometric parameters at 3 and 6 months after delayed implantation. At 3 months, Goldner's trichrome staining analysis showed that the bone-implant contact rate and mineralised bone area around the implant were significantly higher in the experimental group (75.98% ± 8.97% and 69.52% ± 9.63%, respectively) than in the control group (56.13% ± 8.18% and 52.82% ± 7.25%, respectively; P alveolar ridge preservation by using Bio-Oss placement can promote osseointegration of delayed implantation. This may be a promising option for clinical use.

  10. Influence of Microbial Biofilms on the Preservation of Primary Soft Tissue in Fossil and Extant Archosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joseph E.; Lenczewski, Melissa E.; Scherer, Reed P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mineralized and permineralized bone is the most common form of fossilization in the vertebrate record. Preservation of gross soft tissues is extremely rare, but recent studies have suggested that primary soft tissues and biomolecules are more commonly preserved within preserved bones than had been presumed. Some of these claims have been challenged, with presentation of evidence suggesting that some of the structures are microbial artifacts, not primary soft tissues. The identification of biomolecules in fossil vertebrate extracts from a specimen of Brachylophosaurus canadensis has shown the interpretation of preserved organic remains as microbial biofilm to be highly unlikely. These discussions also propose a variety of potential mechanisms that would permit the preservation of soft-tissues in vertebrate fossils over geologic time. Methodology/Principal Findings This study experimentally examines the role of microbial biofilms in soft-tissue preservation in vertebrate fossils by quantitatively establishing the growth and morphology of biofilms on extant archosaur bone. These results are microscopically and morphologically compared with soft-tissue extracts from vertebrate fossils from the Hell Creek Formation of southeastern Montana (Latest Maastrichtian) in order to investigate the potential role of microbial biofilms on the preservation of fossil bone and bound organic matter in a variety of taphonomic settings. Based on these analyses, we highlight a mechanism whereby this bound organic matter may be preserved. Conclusions/Significance Results of the study indicate that the crystallization of microbial biofilms on decomposing organic matter within vertebrate bone in early taphonomic stages may contribute to the preservation of primary soft tissues deeper in the bone structure. PMID:20967227

  11. Influence of microbial biofilms on the preservation of primary soft tissue in fossil and extant archosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Peterson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mineralized and permineralized bone is the most common form of fossilization in the vertebrate record. Preservation of gross soft tissues is extremely rare, but recent studies have suggested that primary soft tissues and biomolecules are more commonly preserved within preserved bones than had been presumed. Some of these claims have been challenged, with presentation of evidence suggesting that some of the structures are microbial artifacts, not primary soft tissues. The identification of biomolecules in fossil vertebrate extracts from a specimen of Brachylophosaurus canadensis has shown the interpretation of preserved organic remains as microbial biofilm to be highly unlikely. These discussions also propose a variety of potential mechanisms that would permit the preservation of soft-tissues in vertebrate fossils over geologic time. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study experimentally examines the role of microbial biofilms in soft-tissue preservation in vertebrate fossils by quantitatively establishing the growth and morphology of biofilms on extant archosaur bone. These results are microscopically and morphologically compared with soft-tissue extracts from vertebrate fossils from the Hell Creek Formation of southeastern Montana (Latest Maastrichtian in order to investigate the potential role of microbial biofilms on the preservation of fossil bone and bound organic matter in a variety of taphonomic settings. Based on these analyses, we highlight a mechanism whereby this bound organic matter may be preserved. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results of the study indicate that the crystallization of microbial biofilms on decomposing organic matter within vertebrate bone in early taphonomic stages may contribute to the preservation of primary soft tissues deeper in the bone structure.

  12. Food preservation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oztasiran, I.

    1984-01-01

    Irradiation is a physical process for treating food and as such it is comparable to other processing techniques such as heating or freezing foods for preservation. The energy level used in food irradiation is always below that producing radioactivity in the treated food, hence this aspect can be totally excluded in wholesomeness evaluations. Water is readily ionized and may be the primary source of ionization in foods with secondary effects on other molecules, possibly more a result of water ionization than of direct hits. In the presence of oxygen, highly reactive compounds may be produced, such as H, H 3 0+ and H 2 O 2 . Radiation at the energy flux levels used for food (<2 MeV) does not induce radioactivity. Food irradiation applications are already technically and economically feasible and that food so treated is suitable for consumption. Food irradiation techniques can play an important role for an improved preservation, storage and distribution of food products. (author)

  13. Educating for preserving biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Méndez, I. E.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of “culture of diversity” is presented in a new dimension. “That of educating for preserving biodiversity” is advanced together with its main challenges. The need of educating the masses for preserving biodiversity is perhaps the most outstanding to be faced, particularly if pedagogic requirements and the diversity of population is to be met. Likewise, it should help to put individuals in contact with the many elements conforming biodiversity and lead them to recognize its value ethically and esthetically. The research presents the framework for designing educating programs enhancing the genetic level, the ecosystem and the qualitative dimension and including materials and energy flood and its meaning for the homeostasis and autopoiesis of the system, together with its interactions with other components for achieving an equilibrium and stability. The importance of the natural evolution tendency is highlighted.

  14. Food preservation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooij, J. van

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-five years of development work on the preservation of food by irradiation have shown that this technology has the potential to reduce post-harvest losses and to produce safe foods. The technological feasibility has been established but general acceptance of food irradiation by national regulatory bodies and consumers requires attention. The positive aspects of food preservation by irradiation include: the food keeps its freshness and its physical state, agents which cause spoilage (bacteria, etc.) are eliminated, recontamination does not take place, provided packaging materials are impermeable to bacteria and insects. It inhibits sprouting of root crops, kills insects and parasites, inactivates bacteria, spores and moulds, delays ripening of fruit, improves the technological properties of food. It makes foods biologically safe, allows the production of shelf-stable foods and is excellent for quarantine treatment, and generally improves food hygiene. The dose ranges needed for effective treatment are given

  15. Beneficial bread without preservatives

    OpenAIRE

    Denkova, Zapryana; Denkova, Rositsa

    2014-01-01

    Besides their inherent nutritional value functional foods contain substances that have beneficial impact on the functioning of organs and systems in the human body and reduce the risk of disease. Bread and bakery goods are basic foods in the diet of contemporary people. Preservatives are added to the composition of foods in order to ensure their microbiological safety, but these substances affect directly the balance of microflora in the tract. A great problem is mold and bacterial spoilage (...

  16. How to preserve foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.; Vadassova, J.

    1979-01-01

    The use of gamma and fast electron radiations for food preservation is described. Examples are given of the application of ionizing radiation for retarding potato germination, onion growth, and fruit ripening, for limiting the action of microorganisms, and removing salmonella from meat products. The method has remarkable prospects although it may not be considered to be a general-purpose method. Geographic and economic conditions should always be taken into consideration. (J.P.)

  17. Natural Preservatives: An Alternative for Chemical Preservative Used in Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Zerrin Erginkaya; Gözde Konuray

    2017-01-01

    Microbial degradation of foods is defined as a decrease of food safety due to microorganism activity. Organic acids, sulfur dioxide, sulfide, nitrate, nitrite, dimethyl dicarbonate and several preservative gases have been used as chemical preservatives in foods as well as natural preservatives which are indigenous in foods. It is determined that usage of herbal preservatives such as blueberry, dried grape, prune, garlic, mustard, spices inhibited several microorganisms. Moreover, it is determ...

  18. Grain preservation in SSSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trisviatski, L.A.

    1973-01-01

    First the importance of cereals collected in the S.S.S.R., the reason why the government had to put in practice a storage chain, composed of large capacity store houses (200 000 metric tonnes, or more) is reminded. When climatic conditions result in wet harvested grains, cereals are dried either in state enterprise dryers (32 to 50 tonnes/hour) or in kolkhozes' dryers (2 to 16 tonnes/hour). A new type of drying with recycling, has been developped, economizing 10 to 15 p. 100. Then the possibilities offered by the technique of partial drying of very wet grains are studied and the preservation processes using fresh ventilation, or hot ventilation with drying effect are described. The question of silage of wet grains destined to animal consumption is then examined as well as preservation by sodium pyrosulfide; the use of propionic acid, little developped in SSSR, is studied now, just as storage with inert gas. The struggle technics against insects, either with chemical agents, or with irradiation are described. Finally the modalities of technicians formation, specialized in preservation, are discussed [fr

  19. Reconstrucción craneofacial compleja: malla de titanio, hueso autólogo preservado en óxido de etileno y reconstrucciones tridimensionales en polimetilmetacrilato (HTR-PMI Complex craneofacial reconstruction: titanium mesh, autologous bone preserved in ethylene oxide and tridimensional polimetilmetacrilate implants (HTR-PMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Flores-Lima

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available La evolución de la Cirugía Craneofacial se inicio con Jean Paul Tessier, quien en 1967 preconizó el uso de injertos autólogos de hueso fresco en gran cantidad para cubrir extensas brechas óseas en la corrección de disóstosis craneofacial. Recientemente, diferentes tipos de reconstrucción utilizando hueso autólogo preservado en oxido de etileno y materiales como el polimetilmetacrilato poroso confeccionado a medida, han permitido también la corrección de grandes defectos óseos craneofaciales. Presentamos nuestra experiencia inicial en el uso de estas técnicas a través de un análisis retrospectivo sobre 21 pacientes operados por un equipo multidisciplinario entre Enero del 2007 y Marzo del 2009 en el Hospital Militar, Centro Panamericano de Ojos y Hospital de Diagnóstico de El Salvador, en los que se utilizaron formas alternativas pera reconstrucción de calota craneana, piso de órbita, fosa craneal anterior, área órbito-cigomática y maxilar superior. No registramos casos de infección o retirada de material de osteosíntesis aloplástico o de los injertos autólogos, ni hubo fístulas. Si se presentó una úlcera postraumática en una zona de unión de tejido desvitalizado, que se resolvió con tratamiento conservador. Los resultados estéticos obtenidos fueron de aceptables a buenos. Como conclusión, el equipo multidisciplinario, la combinación de técnicas quirúrgicas y el uso de material protésico para la reconstrucción craneofacial compleja ha dado como resultado avances significativos desde el punto de vista funcional y estético ante lesiones que involucran esta compleja área anatómica.The evolution of craniofacial surgery began with Jean Paul Tessier, who in 1967 supported the use of fresh autologous bone to cover bone defects in the craniofacial area. Recently different types of reconstructions using autologous bone preserved in ethylene oxide and advanced custom-made polimetacrilate implants that have allowed

  20. Centuries-old DNA from an extinct population of Aesculapian snake (Zamenis longissimus) offers new phylogeographic insight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allentoft, Morten; Redsted Rasmussen, Arne; Kristensen, Hans Viborg

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: The Aesculapian snake (Zamenis longissimus) is distributed in Central and Southern Europe, the Balkans, Anatolia, and Iran, but had a wider mid-Holocene distribution into Northern Europe. To investigate the genetic affinity of a Danish population that went extinct in historical times, we...... analysed three ethanol-preserved individuals dating back to 1810 using a silica-in-solution ancient DNA extraction method, combined with next-generation sequencing. Bioinformatic mapping of the reads against the published genome of a related colubrid snake revealed that two of the three specimens contained...... endogenous snake DNA (up to 8.6% of the reads), and this was evident for tooth, bone, and soft tissue samples. The DNA was highly degraded, observed by very short average sequence lengths (

  1. Broken bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Broken bone URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ... following steps to reduce your risk of a broken bone: Wear protective ... pads. Create a safe home for young children. Place a gate at stairways ...

  2. Dimensional Ridge Preservation with a Novel Highly Porous TiO 2 Scaffold: An Experimental Study in Minipigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Tiainen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being considered noncritical size defects, extraction sockets often require the use of bone grafts or bone graft substitutes in order to facilitate a stable implant site with an aesthetically pleasing mucosal architecture and prosthetic reconstruction. In the present study, the effect of novel TiO2 scaffolds on dimensional ridge preservation was evaluated following their placement into surgically modified extraction sockets in the premolar region of minipig mandibles. After six weeks of healing, the scaffolds were wellintegrated in the alveolar bone, and the convex shape of the alveolar crest was preserved. The scaffolds were found to partially preserve the dimensions of the native buccal and lingual bone walls adjacent to the defect site. A tendency towards more pronounced vertical ridge resorption, particularly in the buccal bone wall of the nongrafted alveoli, indicates that the TiO2 scaffold may be used for suppressing the loss of bone that normally follows tooth extraction.

  3. Training development for pavement preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    This research project strives to help the Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) fully achieve the full benefits of pavement : preservation through training on proper selection, design, and application of pavement preservation treatments. In some ca...

  4. Preserving the Manhattan Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Cynthia

    2014-03-01

    When future generations look back on the 20th century, few events will rival the harnessing of nuclear energy as a turning point in world history, science and society. Yet, the Department of Energy has not always embraced its Manhattan Project origins. The presentation will focus on the progress made over the last 20 years to preserve the properties and first-hand accounts that for decades have been threatened with demolition and indifference. Since the mid-1950s, most remaining Manhattan Project properties at the Los Alamos National Laboratory had been abandoned. Among them was a cluster of wooden buildings called the ``V Site.'' This is where scientists assembled the ``Gadget,'' the world's first atomic device tested on July 16, 1945. Regardless of its significance, the ``V Site'' buildings like all the rest were slated for demolition. The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) toured the properties in November 1998. Most could not believe that the world's first atomic bomb was designed in such humble structures. The properties were declared to be ``monumental in their lack of monumentality.'' A Save America's Treasures grant for 700,000 was awarded to restore the properties. To raise the required matching funds, I left the Federal government and soon founded the Atomic Heritage Foundation. The presentation will trace the progress made over the last decade to generate interest and support nationwide to preserve the Manhattan Project heritage. Saving both the physical properties and first-hand accounts of the men and women have been a priority. Perhaps our most significant achievement may be legislation now under consideration by Congress to create a Manhattan Project National Historical Park. Seventy years later, the Manhattan Project is finally getting the recognition it deserves.

  5. ATLAS Data Preservation

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Roger; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Complementary to parallel open access and analysis preservation initiatives, ATLAS is taking steps to ensure that the data taken by the experiment during run-1 remain accessible and available for future analysis by the collaboration. An evaluation of what is required to achieve this is underway, examining the ATLAS data production chain to establish the effort required and potential problems. Several alternatives are explored, but the favoured solution is to bring the run 1 data and software in line with the equivalent to that which will be used for run 2. This will result in a coherent ATLAS dataset for the data already taken and that to come in the future.

  6. Radiation preservation of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badshah, A.; Tasnim, A.; Khan, M.; Sattar, A.; Khan, I.

    1989-01-01

    The use of gamma irradiation for preservation of red hot pepper has been explained in report, as it can kill the harmful organisms without altering the organolpetic properties. The sample were dried and reduced to pass through 20 mesh. The samples were irradiated at different dose levels of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0 KGy and results have been shown after different time intervals. Radiation and packaging treatments resulted normaly no effect on the color of dry fruits. (A.B)

  7. POLARISATION PRESERVING OPTICAL FIBRE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    A micro-structured optical fibre having a cladding comprising a number of elements having a non-circular cross-section. Each element has at least one part extending outside a circle having the same cross-sectional area as the element. These extending parts are directed in the same direction....... This cladding structure provides polarisation preserving properties to the optical fibre. Optical fibres using this technology may have claddings with elements placed non-periodically as well as in a two-dimensional periodic lattice - such as cladding providing Photonic Band Gap (PBG) effects....

  8. Effects of radiation on bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Rafael; Stock, Harlan

    2013-12-01

    Ionizing radiation produces its deleterious biologic effects by both direct (DNA strand breaks) and indirect processes (formation of free oxygen radicals). Mitotically active cells are more susceptible to the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. These effects are most severe locally within the treatment field but can also occur systemically, possibly reflecting hormonal influences and inflammatory cytokine mediators. Specific bone complications of radiation include osteopenia, growth arrest, fracture and malignancy. Some of these complications, such as osteopenia, are reversible and severity is dose dependent. Insufficiency fractures are a common complication after radiation therapy and generally affect those bones under most physiologic stress and with the highest ratio of trabecular to cortical bone. Familiarity with the radiographic appearance of irradiated bone, including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), will improve image interpretation and facilitate accurate diagnosis.

  9. DNA repair and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, Shakuntla; Joshi, Pankaj Kumar; Gaur, Sudha

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair refers to a collection of processes by which a cell identifies and corrects damage to the DNA molecule that encode it's genome. In human cells, both normal metabolic activities and environmental factors such as UV light and radiation can cause DNA damage, resulting in as many one million individual molecular lesions per day. Many of these lesions cause structural damage to the DNA molecule and can alter or eliminate the cell's ability to transcribe the gene that the affected DNA encodes. Other lesions include potentially harmful mutation in cell's genome which affect the survival of it's daughter cells after it undergoes mitosis. As a consequence, the DNA repair process is constantly active as it responds to damage in the DNA structure. Inherited mutation that affect DNA repair genes are strongly associated with high cancer risks in humans. Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is strongly associated with specific mutation in the DNA mismatch repair pathway. BRCA1, BRCA2 two famous mutation conferring a hugely increased risk of breast cancer on carrier, are both associated with a large number of DNA repair pathway, especially NHEJ and homologous recombination. Cancer therapy procedures such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy work by overwhelming the capacity of the cell to repair DNA damage, resulting in cell death. Cells that are most rapidly dividing most typically cancer cells are preferentially affected. The side effect is that other non-cancerous but rapidly dividing cells such as stem cells in the bone marrow are also affected. Modern cancer treatment attempt to localize the DNA damage to cells and tissue only associated with cancer, either by physical means (concentrating the therapeutic agent in the region of the tumor) or by biochemical means (exploiting a feature unique to cancer cells in the body). (author)

  10. Effective methods of preserving SCWL-diseased sugarcane leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diseased leaf tissues were preserved by air-drying and stored at room temperature or stored fresh at 4 or -20°C in two types of bags: brown paper bags and plastic bags with punctured holes. Leaf materials were stored for up to 32 days prior to DNA extraction. The best storage condition was placing fresh leaves at -20°C ...

  11. Recent approaches in food bio-preservation - a review | Singh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apart from LAB metabolites, bacteriophages and endolysins has promising role in food processing, preservation and safety. Bacteriocins and endolysins are more suitable for DNA shuffling and protein engineering to generate highly potent variants with expanded activity spectrum. Genetically modified bacteriophages may ...

  12. Preserving Perishables (Dormavac)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    A new commercial product that can preserve perishable commodities for weeks without freezing, so that they can be shipped fresh without the cost of air freight, has been developed by Grumman Corporation, Bethpage, Long Island, New York. The development benefited from the company's experience in developing the environmental control system for the Lunar Module, which delivered Apollo astronauts to the surface of the moon. Called Dormavac, the system provides a commodity-preserving environment within an aluminum container that can be transported by truck, rail or ship. Dormavac creates a cold-but above freezing-environment with high relative humidity and very low air pressure. The saturated air minimizes commodity weight loss and the air is automatically changed several times an hour to flush away odors and harmful gases released by the commodities. According to company literature, Dormavac significantly extends the transportation life of perishables. For example, pork has a normal cold storage life of about seven days, beef two weeks and tomatoes three weeks; with Dormavac, pork remains fresh for three weeks, beef more than six weeks and tomatoes seven weeks or more. Dormavac is manufactured and marketed by Grumman Allied Industries, Woodbury, New York. In developing the system, Grumman Allied drew upon the technological resources of another company subsidiary, Grumman Aerospace. Engineers who had earlier worked on Lunar Module environmental control brought their know-how and experience to the Dormavac development.

  13. The Histological effects of microwave oven on bone decalcification ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates the histological preservation of bone tissue architecture at varying temperatures and concentrations of Gooding and Stewart (GS) decalcifying fluid as the preservation of tissue architecture depends on the quality and velocity of the decalcification processes. In the present study, a decalcification ...

  14. Profiling the dead: generating microsatellite data from fossil bones of extinct megafauna--protocols, problems, and prospects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten E Allentoft

    Full Text Available We present the first set of microsatellite markers developed exclusively for an extinct taxon. Microsatellite data have been analysed in thousands of genetic studies on extant species but the technology can be problematic when applied to low copy number (LCN DNA. It is therefore rarely used on substrates more than a few decades old. Now, with the primers and protocols presented here, microsatellite markers are available to study the extinct New Zealand moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes and, as with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP technology, the markers represent a means by which the field of ancient DNA can (preservation allowing move on from its reliance on mitochondrial DNA. Candidate markers were identified using high throughput sequencing technology (GS-FLX on DNA extracted from fossil moa bone and eggshell. From the 'shotgun' reads, >60 primer pairs were designed and tested on DNA from bones of the South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus. Six polymorphic loci were characterised and used to assess measures of genetic diversity. Because of low template numbers, typical of ancient DNA, allelic dropout was observed in 36-70% of the PCR reactions at each microsatellite marker. However, a comprehensive survey of allelic dropout, combined with supporting quantitative PCR data, allowed us to establish a set of criteria that maximised data fidelity. Finally, we demonstrated the viability of the primers and the protocols, by compiling a full Dinornis microsatellite dataset representing fossils of c. 600-5000 years of age. A multi-locus genotype was obtained from 74 individuals (84% success rate, and the data showed no signs of being compromised by allelic dropout. The methodology presented here provides a framework by which to generate and evaluate microsatellite data from samples of much greater antiquity than attempted before, and opens new opportunities for ancient DNA research.

  15. Profiling the dead: generating microsatellite data from fossil bones of extinct megafauna--protocols, problems, and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allentoft, Morten E; Oskam, Charlotte; Houston, Jayne; Hale, Marie L; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Rasmussen, Morten; Spencer, Peter; Jacomb, Christopher; Willerslev, Eske; Holdaway, Richard N; Bunce, Michael

    2011-01-31

    We present the first set of microsatellite markers developed exclusively for an extinct taxon. Microsatellite data have been analysed in thousands of genetic studies on extant species but the technology can be problematic when applied to low copy number (LCN) DNA. It is therefore rarely used on substrates more than a few decades old. Now, with the primers and protocols presented here, microsatellite markers are available to study the extinct New Zealand moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) and, as with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) technology, the markers represent a means by which the field of ancient DNA can (preservation allowing) move on from its reliance on mitochondrial DNA. Candidate markers were identified using high throughput sequencing technology (GS-FLX) on DNA extracted from fossil moa bone and eggshell. From the 'shotgun' reads, >60 primer pairs were designed and tested on DNA from bones of the South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus). Six polymorphic loci were characterised and used to assess measures of genetic diversity. Because of low template numbers, typical of ancient DNA, allelic dropout was observed in 36-70% of the PCR reactions at each microsatellite marker. However, a comprehensive survey of allelic dropout, combined with supporting quantitative PCR data, allowed us to establish a set of criteria that maximised data fidelity. Finally, we demonstrated the viability of the primers and the protocols, by compiling a full Dinornis microsatellite dataset representing fossils of c. 600-5000 years of age. A multi-locus genotype was obtained from 74 individuals (84% success rate), and the data showed no signs of being compromised by allelic dropout. The methodology presented here provides a framework by which to generate and evaluate microsatellite data from samples of much greater antiquity than attempted before, and opens new opportunities for ancient DNA research.

  16. 4D Shape-Preserving Modelling of Bone Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Per Rønsholt; Nielsen, Mads; Kreiborg, Sven

    1998-01-01

    From a set of temporally separated scannings of the same anatomical structure we wish to identify and analyze the growth in terms of a metamorphosis. That is, we study the tempral change of shape which may prowide an understanding of the biological processes which govern the growth process. We...... subdivide the growth analysis into growth simulation, growth modelling, and finally the growth analysis. In this paper, we present results of growth simulation of the mandible from 3 scannings of the same patient in the age of 9 months, 21 months, and 7 years. We also present the first growth models...... and growth analyzes. The ultimative goal is to predict/simulate human growth which would be extremely useful in many surgical procedures....

  17. Bone Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... posts Join Mayo Clinic Connect Bone scan About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  18. Bone Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Body X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Bone Biopsy Sponsored by Please note ...

  19. Bone sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudry, P.

    2008-01-01

    Bone sarcomas are malignancies with peak incidence in adolescents and young adults. The most frequent are osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma/PNET, in an older adults are seen chondrosarcomas, other ones are rare. In general, biology of sarcomas is closely related to pediatric malignancies with fast growth, local aggressiveness, tendency to early hematogenic dissemination and chemo sensitivity. Diagnostics and treatment of bone sarcomas should be done in well experienced centres due to low incidence and broad issue of this topic. An interdisciplinary approach and staff education is essential in due care of patients with bone sarcoma. If these criteria are achieved, the cure rate is contemporary at 65 - 70 %, while some subpopulation of patients has chance for cure up to 90 %. Osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma/PNET are discussed below as types of most frequent bone sarcoma. (author)

  20. Bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Charlotte Ørsted; Hansen, Rikke Rie; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal conditions are common causes of chronic pain and there is an unmet medical need for improved treatment options. Bone pain is currently managed with disease modifying agents and/or analgesics depending on the condition. Disease modifying agents affect the underlying pathophysiology...... of the disease and reduce as a secondary effect bone pain. Antiresorptive and anabolic agents, such as bisphosphonates and intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34), respectively, have proven effective as pain relieving agents. Cathepsin K inhibitors and anti-sclerostin antibodies hold, due to their disease...... modifying effects, promise of a pain relieving effect. NSAIDs and opioids are widely employed in the treatment of bone pain. However, recent preclinical findings demonstrating a unique neuronal innervation of bone tissue and sprouting of sensory nerve fibers open for new treatment possibilities....

  1. Evaluation of radiation-sterilized bone in clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komender, J.

    1978-01-01

    The clinical results of preserved bone transplantation are presented. Analysis is based on the activity of the Central Tissue Bank at Warsaw. Radiation sterilization of grafts is a routine method used in this Bank. The clinical evaluation of biostatic bone grafts is discussed. (author)

  2. The role of radiation therapy in bone metastases management

    OpenAIRE

    Felice, Francesca De; Piccioli, Andrea; Musio, Daniela; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Bone metastases represent an important complication of malignant tumours. Despite improvement in surgical techniques and advances in systemic therapies, management of patients with bone metastatic disease remains a powerful cornerstone for the radiation oncologist. The primary goal of radiation therapy is to provide pain relief, preserving patients quality of life.

  3. Ancient DNA from marine mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foote, Andrew David; Hofreiter, Michael; Morin, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    discuss studies recon- structing inter- and intra-specific phylogenies from aDNA sequences and discuss how aDNA sequences could be used to estimate mutation rates. Finally, we highlight some of the problems of aDNA studies on marine mammals, such as obtaining sufficient sample sizes and calibrating...... such as bone, tooth, baleen, skin, fur, whiskers and scrimshaw using ancient DNA (aDNA) approaches provide an oppor- tunity for investigating such changes over evolutionary and ecological timescales. Here, we review the application of aDNA techniques to the study of marine mammals. Most of the studies have...... focused on detecting changes in genetic diversity following periods of exploitation and environmental change. To date, these studies have shown that even small sample sizes can provide useful information on historical genetic diversity. Ancient DNA has also been used in investigations of changes...

  4. Preserving reptiles for research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotte, Steve W.; Jacobs, Jeremy F.; Zug, George R.; Dodd, C. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    What are voucher specimens and why do we collect them? Voucher specimens are animals and/or their parts that are deposited in a research museum to document the occurrence of a taxon at a specific location in space and time (Pleijel et al., 2008; Reynolds and McDiarmid, 2012). For field biologists, vouchers are the repeatable element of a field study as they allow other biologists, now and in the future, to confirm the identity of species that were studied. The scientific importance of a voucher specimen or series of specimens is that other people are afforded the opportunity to examine the entire animal and confirm or correct identifications. A photographic record is somewhat useful for recording the occurrence of a species, but such records can be insufficient for reliable confirmation of specific identity. Even if a photo shows diagnostic characters of currently recognized taxa, it may not show characters that separate taxa that may be described in the future. Substantial cryptic biodiversity is being found in even relatively well-known herpetofaunas (Crawford et al., 2010), and specimens allow researchers to retroactively evaluate the true diversity in a study as understanding of taxonomy evolves. They enable biologists to study the systematic relationships of populations by quantifying variation in different traits. Specimens are also a source of biological data such as behaviour, ecology, epidemiology, and reproduction through examination of their anatomy, reproductive and digestive tracts, and parasites (Suarez and Tsutsui, 2004). Preserving reptiles as vouchers is not difficult, although doing it properly requires care, effort, and time. Poorly preserved vouchers can invalidate the results and conclusions of your study because of the inability to confirm the identity of your study animals. Good science requires repeatability of observations, and the absence of vouchers or poorly preserved ones prevents such confirmation. Due to space restrictions, we are

  5. Quantification and presence of human ancient DNA in burial place ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For reliable and sensitive DNA quantitation, the application of real time PCR is described. A published real-time PCR assay, which allows for the combined analysis of nuclear or ancient DNA and mitochondrial DNA, was modified. This approach can be used for recovering DNA from the surface of fossil bone remains in ...

  6. The Pontic-Shield: Partial Extraction Therapy for Ridge Preservation and Pontic Site Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckman, Howard; Du Toit, Jonathan; Salama, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Augmentive ridge preservation techniques aim to manage the postextraction ridge. The partial extraction of teeth may better preserve the ridge form by maintaining the bundle bone-periodontal ligament apparatus. Root submergence has been demonstrated to retain the periodontal tissues and preserve the ridge beneath dentures or fixed prostheses. The socket-shield technique entails preparing a tooth root section simultaneous to immediate implant placement and has demonstrated histologic and clinical results contributory to esthetic implant treatment. A retrospective 10-patient case series treating 14 partial extraction sites demonstrates how a modification of the socket-shield technique can successfully develop pontic sites and preserve the ridge.

  7. Plant cytoplasm preserved by lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X

    2004-10-01

    Usually only an organism with hard parts may be preserved in the fossil record. Cytoplasm, which is a physiologically active part of a plant, is rarely seen in the fossil record. Two Cretaceous plant fossils older than 100 million years with exceptional preservation of cytoplasm are reported here. Some cytoplasm is well preserved with subcellular details while other cytoplasm is highly hydrolyzed in the cortex of the same fossil even though both of preservations may be less than 2 microm away. The unique preservation pattern, sharp contrast of preservation in adjacent cells and the exceptional preservation of cytoplasm in the cortex suggest that lightning should play an important role in the preservation of cytoplasm and that cytoplasmic membranes may be more stable than the cell contents. Interpreting the preservation needs knowledge scattering in several formerly unrelated fields of science, including geophysics, botany, biophysics, cytology and microwave fixation technology. This new interpretation of fossilization will shed new light on preservation of cytoplasm and promote cytoplasm fossils from a position of rarity to a position of common research objects available for biological research. The importance of the identification of cytoplasm in fossil lies not in itself but in how much it influences the future research in paleobotany.

  8. Preservation of Built Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Marie Kirstine

    When built environments and recently also cultural environments are to be preserved, the historic and architectural values are identified as the key motivations. In Denmark the SAVE system is used as a tool to identify architectural values, but in recent years it has been criticized for having...... a too narrow aesthetic goal, especially when it comes to the evaluation of built environments as a whole. Architectural value has therefore been perceived as a different concept than aesthetic value, primarily related to a static and unchanging expression. This fact creates problems in relation...... to current conservation tasks, which today include more and more untraditionally built environments, including cultural environments. Architectural value must in this case rather be associated with development, ongoing processes, and allow room for future change. The Danish architect Johannes Exner, defines...

  9. Food preservation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, M.

    1978-01-01

    In November, 1977, an International Symposium on Food Preservation by Irradiation was held at Wageningen, the Netherlands. About 200 participants attended the Symposium which was organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization; a reflection of the active interest which is being shown in food irradiation processing, particularly among developing countries. The 75 papers presented provided an excellent review of the current status of food irradiation on a wide range of different topics, and the Symposium also afforded the valuable opportunity for informal discussion among the participants and for developing personal contacts. A brief survey of the salient aspects discussed during the course of the meeting are reported on. (orig.) [de

  10. Medicines and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Medici a ne n s d Bone Loss Some types of medicines can cause bone loss, making your bones weak, if used for a long time. Use over a short time ... old bone and replaces it with new bone. Bone loss occurs when old bone breaks down faster than ...

  11. Sperm Preservation using Freeze-Drying Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAKDIR SAILI

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of cryopreservation method for bull semen, cryopreservation become an alternative method for maintaining gamet resources of certain animal which is threatened or near extinction. This technology was then applied to the preservation of embryo, oocyte, ovary and testis. The application of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI for which sperm motility is unnecessary had supported the effort to create simplified method such as freeze-drying for sperm preservation. Due to the benefit of ICSI over the conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF the spermatozoon could be mechanically driven to pass through the zona pellucida and entering the cytoplasm of oocytes prior to fertilization. The freeze-drying method is an alternative method in sperm preservation which ignored the motility of sperm. The sperm resulted from this technique is in drying state, therefore, it might be stored in room temperature or in refrigerator. Many reports have claimed that freeze-dried sperm which is not motile but has an intact DNA was able to fertilize oocytes, even produced offspring in mouse.

  12. Establishing a temporal bone laboratory: considerations for ENT specialist training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fennessy, B G

    2012-02-01

    Cadaveric temporal bone dissection in a temporal bone laboratory is a vital component in training safe, competent otorhinolaryngologists. Recent controversies pertaining to organ retention have resulted in a more limited supply of temporal bones. Consequently, current trainees are dissecting far fewer bones than their consultants. We discuss the establishment of a temporal bone laboratory in the Department of Anatomy in the University College Cork, from the timely preparation and preservation of the tissue to its disposal. Comparisons are drawn between our experience and that of the United States training schemes. The temporal bone laboratory in Cork is the only one in existence in Ireland. The exposure and experience obtained by registrars rotating through Cork, has resulted in noticeable improvements in their operative abilities. The temporal bone laboratory remains a core component to training. It is hoped that this article may facilitate other units overcoming obstacles to establish a temporal bone laboratory.

  13. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Women Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Men Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed ... for Women Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Men Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed ...

  14. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Provider Pocket Guides Provider Guides Fertility Preservation for Women Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Men Diagnosed ... Patient Pocket Guides Patient Guides Fertility Preservation for Women Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Men Diagnosed ...

  15. Soft-tissue vessels and cellular preservation in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Mary H; Wittmeyer, Jennifer L; Horner, John R; Toporski, Jan K

    2005-03-25

    Soft tissues are preserved within hindlimb elements of Tyrannosaurus rex (Museum of the Rockies specimen 1125). Removal of the mineral phase reveals transparent, flexible, hollow blood vessels containing small round microstructures that can be expressed from the vessels into solution. Some regions of the demineralized bone matrix are highly fibrous, and the matrix possesses elasticity and resilience. Three populations of microstructures have cell-like morphology. Thus, some dinosaurian soft tissues may retain some of their original flexibility, elasticity, and resilience.

  16. Postextraction Alveolar Ridge Preservation: Biological Basis and Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Pagni, Giorgio; Pellegrini, Gaia; Giannobile, William V.; Rasperini, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Following tooth extraction, the alveolar ridge undergoes an inevitable remodeling process that influences implant therapy of the edentulous area. Socket grafting is a commonly adopted therapy for the preservation of alveolar bone structures in combination or not with immediate implant placement although the biological bases lying behind this treatment modality are not fully understood and often misinterpreted. This review is intended to clarify the literature support to socket grafting in ord...

  17. Biomechanical aspects of bone microstructure in vertebrates ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2009-10-29

    Oct 29, 2009 ... Bone is an important tissue in paleontological studies as it is a commonly preserved element in most fossil vertebrates, and can often allow its ... biomechanical studies now tend to use FEA. However, despite its use in .... the cross sectional area of each concentric annular region,. i.e. lamella, increases with ...

  18. Biomechanical aspects of bone microstructure in vertebrates ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2009-10-29

    Oct 29, 2009 ... Bone is an important tissue in paleontological studies as it is a commonly preserved element in most fossil vertebrates, and can often ... Application of the principle of minimal expenditure of energy to this analysis shows that the path ... brief discussion of the some of the vertebrate fossils with considerable ...

  19. Bone diagenesis in the European Holocene II: taphonomic and environmental considerations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen-Marsh, C.M.; Smith, C.I.; Jans, M.M.E.; Nord, A.; Kars, H.; Collins, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    We have applied cluster analysis to mercury intrusion porosimetry data from 219 archaeological bones (121 human and 98 animal) and soil chemistry data from 219 accompanying soil samples (1 per bone sample), to investigate the influence of soil chemistry on bone preservation. The samples chosen for

  20. Repair of large segmental bone defects: BMP-2 gene activated muscle grafts vs. autologous bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Oliver B; Betz, Volker M; Schröder, Christian; Penzkofer, Rainer; Göttlinger, Michael; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Augat, Peter; Jansson, Volkmar; Müller, Peter E

    2013-08-08

    Common cell based strategies for the treatment of osseous defects require the isolation and expansion of autologous cells. Since this makes such approaches time-consuming and expensive, we developed a novel expedited technology creating gene activated muscle grafts. We have previously shown that large segmental bone defects in rats can be regenerated by implantation of muscle tissue fragments activated by BMP-2 gene transfer. In the present study, we compared the bone healing capacities of such gene activated muscle grafts with bone isografts, mimicking autologous bone grafting, the clinical gold standard for treatment of bone defects in patients. Two of 14 male, syngeneic Fischer 344 rats used for this experiment served as donors for muscle and bone. Muscle tissue was harvested from both hind limbs and incubated with an adenoviral vector carrying the cDNA encoding BMP-2. Bone was harvested from the iliac crest and long bone epiphyses. Bone defects (5 mm) were created in the right femora of 12 rats and were filled with either BMP-2 activated muscle tissue or bone grafts. After eight weeks, femora were evaluated by radiographs, micro-computed tomography (μCT), and biomechanical testing. In the group receiving BMP-2 activated muscle grafts as well as in the bone-grafting group, 100% of the bone defects were healed, as documented by radiographs and μCT-imaging. Bone volume was similar in both groups and biomechanical stability of the two groups was statistically indistinguishable. This study demonstrates that treatment of large bone defects by implantation of BMP-2 gene activated muscle tissue leads to similar bone volume and stability as bone isografts, mimicking autologous bone grafting.

  1. Contributions to Exceptional Fossil Preservation

    OpenAIRE

    Muscente, Anthony Drew

    2016-01-01

    Exceptionally preserved fossils—or fossils preserved with remains of originally non-biomineralized (i.e. soft) tissues—constitute a key resource for investigating the history of the biosphere. In comparison to fossils of biomineralized skeletal elements, which represent the majority of the fossil record but only a fraction of the total diversity that existed in the past, exceptionally preserved fossils are comparatively rare because soft tissues are rapidly destroyed in typical...

  2. Age-Related Loss in Bone Mineral Density of Rats Fed Lifelong on a Fish Oil-Based Diet Is Avoided by Coenzyme Q10 Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Varela-López

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available During aging, bone mass declines increasing osteoporosis and fracture risks. Oxidative stress has been related to this bone loss, making dietary compounds with antioxidant properties a promising weapon. Male Wistar rats were maintained for 6 or 24 months on diets with fish oil as unique fat source, supplemented or not with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, to evaluate the potential of adding this molecule to the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA-based diet for bone mineral density (BMD preservation. BMD was evaluated in the femur. Serum osteocalcin, osteopontin, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand, ostroprotegerin, parathyroid hormone, urinary F2-isoprostanes, and lymphocytes DNA strand breaks were also measured. BMD was lower in aged rats fed a diet without CoQ10 respect than their younger counterparts, whereas older animals receiving CoQ10 showed the highest BMD. F2-isoprostanes and DNA strand breaks showed that oxidative stress was higher during aging. Supplementation with CoQ10 prevented oxidative damage to lipid and DNA, in young and old animals, respectively. Reduced oxidative stress associated to CoQ10 supplementation of this n-3 PUFA-rich diet might explain the higher BMD found in aged rats in this group of animals.

  3. Papilla Preservation Flap as Aesthetic Consideration in Periodontal Flap Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Olivia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Flap surgery is treatment for periodontal disease with alveolar bone destruction. Surgical periodontal flap with conventional incision will result in gingival recession and loss of interdental papillae after treatment. Dilemma arises in areas required high aesthetic value or regions with a fixed denture. It is challenging to perform periodontal flap with good aesthetic results and minimal gingival recession. This case report aimed to inform and to explain the work procedures, clinical and radiographic outcomes of surgical papilla preservation flap in the area that requires aesthetic. Case 1 was a surgical incision flap with preservation of papillae on the anterior region of teeth 11 and 12, with a full veneer crown on tooth 12. Case 2 was a surgical incision flap with preservation of papillae on the posterior region of tooth 46 with inlay restoration. Evaluation for both cases were obtained by incision papilla preservation of primary closure was perfect, good aesthetic results, minimal gingival recession and the interdental papillae can be maintained properly. In conclusion, periodontal flap surgery on the anterior region or regions that require high aesthetic value could be addressed with papilla preservation incision. Incision papilla preservation should be the primary consideration in periodontal flap surgery if possible.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v19i3.144

  4. Preserving Employee Privacy in Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Paul E

    2017-07-01

    The proposed "Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act" states that the collection of information about the manifested disease or disorder of a family member shall not be considered an unlawful acquisition of genetic information. The bill recognizes employee privacy protections that are already in place and includes specific language relating to nondiscrimination based on illness. Why did legislation expressly intending to "preserve wellness programs" generate such antipathy about wellness among journalists? This article argues that those who are committed to preserving employee wellness must be equally committed to preserving employee privacy. Related to this, we should better parse between discussions and rules about commonplace health screenings versus much less common genetic testing.

  5. Management of digital preservation repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Márdero Arellano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The object of this work are the international experiences of implementation of digital preservation practices in repositories. It based on bibliographical survey about the beginning of digital preservation practices in digital repositories, identifying important aspects of how to manage the practices of digital preservation on repositories. Most repositories analyzed showed a double function of access and preservation, but few could be considered to be "dark archives" used only for preservation matters. The application of digital preservation standards showed that large institutions possessed detailed definitions of what stored materials could be filed and used. Repositories managers had some kind of operating budget to carry on preservation activities. Most repositories cited in the bibliography used a combination of commercial tools and free software. As a conclusion, the records analyzed reinforce the need today of the application of digital preservation strategies using the OAIS Reference Model and official audit certification actions  on the design of digital preservation repositories, to keep the integration flexibility of  functions and services that go beyond the repository.

  6. Cross-correlative 3D micro-structural investigation of human bone processed into bone allografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Atul Kumar [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Gajiwala, Astrid Lobo [Tissue Bank, Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400012 (India); Rai, Ratan Kumar [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Khan, Mohd Parvez [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Singh, Chandan [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Barbhuyan, Tarun [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Vijayalakshmi, S. [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Chattopadhyay, Naibedya [Division of Endocrinology, Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI) CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Sinha, Neeraj, E-mail: neerajcbmr@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research, SGPGIMS Campus, Lucknow 226014 (India); Kumar, Ashutosh, E-mail: ashutoshk@iitb.ac.in [Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bellare, Jayesh R., E-mail: jb@iitb.ac.in [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology & Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-05-01

    Bone allografts (BA) are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative in orthopedic practice as they provide a permanent solution for preserving skeletal architecture and function. Such BA however, must be processed to be disease free and immunologically safe as well as biologically and clinically useful. Here, we have demonstrated a processing protocol for bone allografts and investigated the micro-structural properties of bone collected from osteoporotic and normal human donor samples. In order to characterize BA at different microscopic levels, a combination of techniques such as Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used for delineating the ultra-structural property of bone. ssNMR revealed the extent of water, collagen fine structure and crystalline order in the bone. These were greatly perturbed in the bone taken from osteoporotic bone donor. Among the processing methods analyzed, pasteurization at 60 °C and radiation treatment appeared to substantially alter the bone integrity. SEM study showed a reduction in Ca/P ratio and non-uniform distribution of elements in osteoporotic bones. μ-CT and MIMICS® (Materialize Interactive Medical Image Control System) demonstrated that pasteurization and radiation treatment affects the BA morphology and cause a shift in the HU unit. However, the combination of all these processes restored all-important parameters that are critical for BA integrity and sustainability. Cross-correlation between the various probes we used quantitatively demonstrated differences in morphological and micro-structural properties between BA taken from normal and osteoporotic human donor. Such details could also be instrumental in designing an appropriate bone scaffold. For the best restoration of bone microstructure and to be used as a biomaterial allograft, a step-wise processing method is recommended that preserves all

  7. Modelling Organizational Preservation Goals to Guide Digital Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Dappert

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an extended and updated version of the work reported at iPres 2008. Digital preservation activities can only succeed if they go beyond the technical properties of digital objects. They must consider the strategy, policy, goals, and constraints of the institution that undertakes them and take into account the cultural and institutional framework in which data, documents and records are preserved. Furthermore, because organizations differ in many ways, a one-size-fits-all approach cannot be appropriate. Fortunately, organizations involved in digital preservation have created documents describing their policies, strategies, work-flows, plans, and goals to provide guidance. They also have skilled staff who are aware of sometimes unwritten considerations. Within Planets (Farquhar & Hockx-Yu, 2007, a four-year project co-funded by the European Union to address core digital preservation challenges, we have analyzed preservation guiding documents and interviewed staff from libraries, archives, and data centres that are actively engaged in digital preservation. This paper introduces a conceptual model for expressing the core concepts and requirements that appear in preservation guiding documents. It defines a specific vocabulary that institutions can reuse for expressing their own policies and strategies. In addition to providing a conceptual framework, the model and vocabulary support automated preservation planning tools through an XML representation.

  8. Allograft in bone tumour surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, S.

    1999-01-01

    In the last twenty years, there has been a vast improvement in the prognosis of primary malignant tumours of bone. This is due to many factors including early detection, staging and classification of tumours as a result of better staining and imaging techniques, better surgical technology, e.g. endoprosthesis and most importantly adjuvant treatment with cytotoxic drugs. As a result of long term survival, amputation of limb has more or less been replaced by limb salvage surgery. This procedure consists of two parts. Primary objective is of course complete removal of the tumour by adequate soft tissue cover and secondarily by reconstruction of the locomotor system, If possible with retention of the function of the limb. These procedures include endo-prosthetic replacement or arthroplasty and arthrodesis using autologus grafts, allograft or combination. With the development of bone banks and assured safety of preserved bones, reconstructive limb salvage surgery using massive allograft is gradually replacing prosthetic implants. The advantages include replacement of articular surfaces, incorporation of the graft to the host bone, attachment of bone tissue and increased probably permanent survival. Allograft can be used for intercalary replacement, osteo-articular arthroplasty arthrodesis or filling large cavities. Inherent complication of massive allograft are disease transmission, infection, delayed and non-union, pathological fractures, mechanical failure and joint destruction. Several limb salvage procedures using allografts have been carried out in our institution with one failure due to infection. Paucity of available allograft has restricted more such procedures to be carried out

  9. Effect of Alveolar Ridge Preservation after Tooth Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Ortiz, G.; Elangovan, S.; Kramer, K.W.O.; Blanchette, D.; Dawson, D.V.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation strategies are indicated to minimize the loss of ridge volume that typically follows tooth extraction. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effect that socket filling with a bone grafting material has on the prevention of postextraction alveolar ridge volume loss as compared with tooth extraction alone in nonmolar teeth. Five electronic databases were searched to identify randomized clinical trials that fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Literature screening and article selection were conducted by 3 independent reviewers, while data extraction was performed by 2 independent reviewers. Outcome measures were mean horizontal ridge changes (buccolingual) and vertical ridge changes (midbuccal, midlingual, mesial, and distal). The influence of several variables of interest (i.e., flap elevation, membrane usage, and type of bone substitute employed) on the outcomes of ridge preservation therapy was explored via subgroup analyses. We found that alveolar ridge preservation is effective in limiting physiologic ridge reduction as compared with tooth extraction alone. The clinical magnitude of the effect was 1.89 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.41, 2.36; p preservation. PMID:24966231

  10. Retrospective success and survival rates of dental implants placed after a ridge preservation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulos, Peter; Darby, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Ridge preservation is any procedure that takes place at the time of, or shortly after an extraction, to minimise resorption of the ridge and maximise bone formation within the socket. The aim of this project is to investigate the outcome of implant treatment following ridge preservation and compare it to an ungrafted implant control group. Following ethics approval, an electronic and manual search of patient records was conducted, and appropriate cases of implant placement following a ridge preservation procedure were identified. Forty-two patients with 51 implants at ridge-preserved sites were examined by one author (PA) with the following parameters assessed at each implant: pocket probing depth, bleeding on probing, presence/absence of plaque and radiographic bone loss. Clinical and radiographic findings were compared to an ungrafted implant control group and analysed by years in function. There was a 100% survival rate of implants in ridge-preserved sites. In the majority of cases, ridge preservation was performed in the anterior maxilla with a flap raised and the use of deproteinised bovine bone mineral and collagen membrane materials. The mean time in function was 31 (±24) months with a range of 2-102 months. Differences in the mean PPD, BOP, plaque index and radiographic bone loss were not statistically significant between implants at ridge-preserved or ungrafted sites. The overall success rate was around 58% for ungrafted implants and around 51% for implants in ridge-preserved sites. However, this difference was not statistically significant. In this retrospective study, implant placement at ridge-preserved sites was a predictable procedure that led to very high survival rates and similar success rates to implant placement at ungrafted sites. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. From bone biology to bone analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenau, E.; Saggese, G.; Peter, F.; Baroncelli, G.I.; Shaw, N.J.; Crabtree, N.J.; Zadik, Z.; Neu, C.M.; Noordam, C.; Radetti, G.; Hochberg, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Bone development is one of the key processes characterizing childhood and adolescence. Understanding this process is not only important for physicians treating pediatric bone disorders, but also for clinicians and researchers dealing with postmenopausal and senile osteoporosis. Bone densitometry has

  12. Nuclear knowledge preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettencourt, Marcia Pires da Luz

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear technology has encouraged the world development and brought a number of benefits to society. These benefits occurred in important social sectors such as Agriculture, Industry, Health Sciences, Environmental Sciences and the production of energy. The research in the nuclear area is justified, accordingly, as an important factor for science development, technology and innovation. Despite the importance of nuclear energy, there is a collapse in the generation, transmission and sharing of nuclear knowledge. The threat of regression in this area is evidenced by the difficulty of generating new knowledge and practices regarding the maintenance of some critical areas. This project focuses its attention on studying, specifically, the lack of young engineers and technical professionals to replace the older, considered this, an alarming situation. Therefore, it is necessary to identify and record the key skills of experienced workers, through a set of tools to elicitation (capture) this knowledge, as expertise is mainly with people, and is lost when they leave the organization. Against, the Knowledge Management provides methodologies for the process of stimulating the creation, collection and knowledge dissemination process, in order to achieve strategic objectives. This study aims to contribute to the building of a model for the Brazilian nuclear knowledge preservation and, therefore, contributes to the maintenance and innovation of activities in this area. (author)

  13. Bone mineral content and bone metabolism in young adults with severe periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wowern von, N.; Westergaard, J.; Kollerup, G.

    2001-01-01

    Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis......Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis...

  14. Influence of liver radiation on the bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Takashi; Kiga, Masami

    1975-01-01

    The purine requiring nature of bone marrow cells was responsible for a decrease in the DNA synthesis by liver irradiated rabbits. De novo purine, measured by glycine 2- 14 C incorporation, was also decreased in bone marrow. Administration of purine after liver irradiation improved the DNA synthesis rate in bone marrow. These results claimed the role of indirect effect and hepatic factor in radiation leukopenia. It is possible that indirect and slight damage to the liver may cancel the purine supply to the bone marrow. (author)

  15. Facts about Broken Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Broken Bones KidsHealth / For Kids / Broken Bones What's in this ... sticking through the skin . What Happens When a Bone Breaks? It hurts to break a bone! It's ...

  16. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... the cut, then pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  17. Alveolar Ridge Preservation After Tooth Extraction with DFDBA and Platelet Concentrates: A Radiographic Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniasadi, Behrang; Evrard, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate vertical alveolar bone loss 3 months after tooth extraction when a technique of ridge preservation was applied using a particulate demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft 300 - 500 µm associated with platelet concentrates (platelet-rich-fibrin) in the form of gel and membranes. A retrospective radiological clinical study was conducted on 56 patients for whom 95 extractions had been performed immediately followed by alveolar filling. Among the patients, 17 were smokers and 16 were provided with an immediate removable temporary prosthesis after extractions. Vertical bone loss was measured radiologically by panoramic X-ray before extractions and by a computed tomography scan 3 months after, at the level of mid-buccal bone wall, by two independent observers. For statistical analysis, Student's t-test was performed to compare the mean bone loss between mono- and pluri-radicular teeth and to compare the mean bone loss between tobacco users versus non users and finally to compare the mean bone loss between individuals that had provisional removable prosthesis and those that had not. Three months after tooth extraction, the mean of vertical loss of the mid-buccal bone wall was 0.72 (SD 0.71) mm (5.53% SD 5.19). No significant difference between bone loss at mono-radicular and pluri-radicular teeth (P = 0.982) was observed. There was no significant correlation between tobacco habits and bone loss (P = 0.2), nor between provisional removable prosthesis and bone loss (P = 0.786). These results indicate a good potential for the technique using Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bone Allograft 300 - 500 µm and platelet concentrates in alveolar bone preservation.

  18. User Experience and Heritage Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Steven J.; Chapman, J. Wesley; Davis, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    In considering the heritage preservation of higher education campus buildings, much of the attention gravitates toward issues of selection, cost, accuracy, and value, but the model for most preservation projects does not have a clear method of achieving the best solutions for meeting these targets. Instead, it simply relies on the design team and…

  19. Preserving Dignity in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    São José, José Manuel

    2016-09-01

    This article examines how elders who receive social care in the community experience loss of dignity and how they preserve their dignity. Qualitative research revealed that loss of dignity is a major concern for these elders and that they preserve their dignity differently, ranging from actively engaging with life to detaching themselves from life. We conclude that, in later life, preserving dignity while receiving social care differs from preserving dignity in the context of health care, especially health care provided in institutional settings. Furthermore, preserving dignity in later life, while receiving social care, is a complex process, depending not only on performing activities and individual action and responsibility, but also on other actions, some of them involving a certain inactivity/passivity, and interactions with others, especially caregivers. This article offers some insights to developing better policies and care practices for promoting dignity in the context of community-based social care.

  20. Ancient DNA and the tropics: a rodent's tale

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez-García, Tania A.; Vázquez-Domínguez, Ella; Arroyo-Cabrales, Joaquín; Kuch, Melanie; Enk, Jacob; King, Christine; Poinar, Hendrik N.

    2014-01-01

    Most genetic studies of Holocene fauna have been performed with ancient samples from dry and cold regions, in which preservation of fossils is facilitated and molecular damage is reduced. Ancient DNA work from tropical regions has been precluded owing to factors that limit DNA preservation (e.g. temperature, hydrolytic damage). We analysed ancient DNA from rodent jawbones identified as Ototylomys phyllotis, found in Holocene and Late Pleistocene stratigraphic layers from Loltún, a humid tropi...

  1. Osteoclasts prefer aged bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, K; Leeming, Diana Julie; Byrjalsen, I

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the age of the bones endogenously exerts control over the bone resorption ability of the osteoclasts, and found that osteoclasts preferentially develop and resorb bone on aged bone. These findings indicate that the bone matrix itself plays a role in targeted remodeling...... of aged bones....

  2. Microspectroscopic evidence of cretaceous bone proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Lindgren

    Full Text Available Low concentrations of the structural protein collagen have recently been reported in dinosaur fossils based primarily on mass spectrometric analyses of whole bone extracts. However, direct spectroscopic characterization of isolated fibrous bone tissues, a crucial test of hypotheses of biomolecular preservation over deep time, has not been performed. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous proteinaceous molecules are retained in a humerus from a Late Cretaceous mosasaur (an extinct giant marine lizard. In situ immunofluorescence of demineralized bone extracts shows reactivity to antibodies raised against type I collagen, and amino acid analyses of soluble proteins extracted from the bone exhibit a composition indicative of structural proteins or their breakdown products. These data are corroborated by synchrotron radiation-based infrared microspectroscopic studies demonstrating that amino acid containing matter is located in bone matrix fibrils that express imprints of the characteristic 67 nm D-periodicity typical of collagen. Moreover, the fibrils differ significantly in spectral signature from those of potential modern bacterial contaminants, such as biofilms and collagen-like proteins. Thus, the preservation of primary soft tissues and biomolecules is not limited to large-sized bones buried in fluvial sandstone environments, but also occurs in relatively small-sized skeletal elements deposited in marine sediments.

  3. Bone marker gene expression in calvarial bones: different bone microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amer, Osama

    2017-12-01

    In calvarial mice, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into osteoprogenitor cells and then differentiate into osteoblasts that differentiate into osteocytes, which become embedded within the bone matrix. In this case, the cells participating in bone formation include MSCs, osteoprogenitor cells, osteoblasts and osteocytes. The calvariae of C57BL/KaLwRijHsD mice consist of the following five bones: two frontal bones, two parietal bones and one interparietal bone. This study aimed to analyse some bone marker genes and bone related genes to determine whether these calvarial bones have different bone microenvironments. C57BL/KaLwRijHsD calvariae were carefully excised from five male mice that were 4-6 weeks of age. Frontal, parietal, and interparietal bones were dissected to determine the bone microenvironment in calvariae. Haematoxylin and eosin staining was used to determine the morphology of different calvarial bones under microscopy. TaqMan was used to analyse the relative expression of Runx2, OC, OSX, RANK, RANKL, OPG, N-cadherin, E-cadherin, FGF2 and FGFR1 genes in different parts of the calvariae. Histological analysis demonstrated different bone marrow (BM) areas between the different parts of the calvariae. The data show that parietal bones have the smallest BM area compared to frontal and interparietal bones. TaqMan data show a significant increase in the expression level of Runx2, OC, OSX, RANKL, OPG, FGF2 and FGFR1 genes in the parietal bones compared with the frontal and interparietal bones of calvariae. This study provides evidence that different calvarial bones, frontal, parietal and interparietal, contain different bone microenvironments.

  4. Towards a Theory of Digital Preservation

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Reagan

    2008-01-01

    A preservation environment manages communication from the past while communicating with the future. Information generated in the past is sent into the future by the current preservation environment. The proof that the preservation environment preserves authenticity and integrity while performing the communication constitutes a theory of digital preservation. We examine the representation information that is needed about the preservation environment for a theory of digital preservation. The re...

  5. Chromatin dynamics coupled to DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Dori; Sendra, Ramon; Muñoz, Purificación

    2009-01-01

    In order to protect and preserve the integrity of the genome, eukaryotic cells have developed accurate DNA repair pathways involving a coordinated network of DNA repair and epigenetic factors. The DNA damage response has to proceed in the context of chromatin, a packaged and compact structure that is flexible enough to regulate the accession of the DNA repair machinery to DNA-damaged sites. Chromatin modifications and ATP-remodeling activities are both necessary to ensure efficient DNA repair. Here we review the current progress of research into the importance of chromatin modifications and the ATP-remodeling complex to the DNA damage response, with respect to the sensing and signaling of DNA lesions, DNA repair and the processes that restore chromatin structure.

  6. Epigenetic Regulation of Bone Remodeling and Its Impacts in Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chafik Ghayor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics describes mechanisms which control gene expression and cellular processes without changing the DNA sequence. The main mechanisms in epigenetics are DNA methylation in CpG-rich promoters, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. DNA methylation modifies the function of the DNA and correlates with gene silencing. Histone modifications including acetylation/deacetylation and phosphorylation act in diverse biological processes such as transcriptional activation/inactivation and DNA repair. Non-coding RNAs play a large part in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in addition to their roles at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Osteoporosis is the most common skeletal disorder, characterized by compromised bone strength and bone micro-architectural deterioration that predisposes the bones to an increased risk of fracture. It is most often caused by an increase in bone resorption that is not sufficiently compensated by a corresponding increase in bone formation. Nowadays it is well accepted that osteoporosis is a multifactorial disorder and there are genetic risk factors for osteoporosis and bone fractures. Here we review emerging evidence that epigenetics contributes to the machinery that can alter DNA structure, gene expression, and cellular differentiation during physiological and pathological bone remodeling.

  7. Food preservation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    As shortages of food and energy still continue to constitute the major threats to the well-being of the human race, all actions aiming at overcoming these problems must be assigned vital importance. Of the two complementary ways of solving the food problem (i.e., increasing the production of food and decreasing the spoilage of food) a novel method designed to contribute to the latter purpose has been discussed at this symposium hosted by The Netherlands and held under the aegis of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization. Progress made since the last symposium of this kind (Bombay, India, 1972) was reviewed from the technological, economic and wholesomeness points of view by participants from 39 countries (60% of the latter were of the developing world). From the reports presented on the use of radiations to control physiological changes in plants, feasibility of radiation preservation of potatoes, onions, garlic, as well as of some tropical and subtropical fruits (mangoes, papayas, litchis and avocado) was confirmed. For potatoes, onions and mangoes, optimal conditions of treatment and storage were established on a larger scale, combined with sizeable consumer trials. Combinations of ionizing radiation with chemicals (salycilic acid, for potatoes), and physical agents (ultraviolet rays, for papayas) have been reported to be successful against the incidence of rot. A considerable number of papers dealt with the control of microbiological spoilage of foods. Work since 1972 has shown that radurization of fruits and vegetables (bananas, mangoes, dried dates, endive, chickory, onions, soup-greens), meat, poultry, marine products (mackerel, cod and plaice fillets, shrimps), decontamination of food ingredients and food technology aids (enzyme preparations, proteins, starch, spices), radappertization of meat and animal feedstuffs as well as combination treatments with salt, heat

  8. Abaloparatide, a novel PTH receptor agonist, increased bone mass and strength in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys by increasing bone formation without increasing bone resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, N; Varela, A; Haile, S; Guldberg, R; Kostenuik, P J; Ominsky, M S; Smith, S Y; Hattersley, G

    2018-03-01

    Abaloparatide, a novel PTH1 receptor agonist, increased bone formation in osteopenic ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys while increasing cortical and trabecular bone mass. Abaloparatide increased bone strength and maintained or enhanced bone mass-strength relationships, indicating preserved or improved bone quality. Abaloparatide is a selective PTH1R activator that is approved for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The effects of 16 months of abaloparatide administration on bone formation, resorption, density, and strength were assessed in adult ovariectomized (OVX) cynomolgus monkeys (cynos). Sixty-five 9-18-year-old female cynos underwent OVX surgery, and 15 similar cynos underwent sham surgery. After a 9-month period without treatments, OVX cynos were allocated to four groups that received 16 months of daily s.c. injections with either vehicle (n = 17) or abaloparatide (0.2, 1, or 5 μg/kg/day; n = 16/dose level), while Sham controls received s.c. vehicle (n = 15). Bone densitometry (DXA, pQCT, micro-CT), qualitative bone histology, serum calcium, bone turnover markers, bone histomorphometry, and bone strength were among the key measures assessed. At the end of the 9-month post-surgical bone depletion period, just prior to the treatment phase, the OVX groups exhibited increased bone turnover markers and decreased bone mass compared with sham controls. Abaloparatide administration to OVX cynos led to increased bone formation parameters, including serum P1NP and endocortical bone formation rate. Abaloparatide administration did not influence serum calcium levels, bone resorption markers, cortical porosity, or eroded surfaces. Abaloparatide increased bone mass at the whole body, lumbar spine, tibial diaphysis, femoral neck, and femoral trochanter. Abaloparatide administration was associated with greater lumbar vertebral strength, and had no adverse effects on bone mass-strength relationships for the vertebrae, femoral neck, femoral

  9. Simultaneous elimination of carryover contamination and detection of DNA with uracil-DNA-glycosylase-supplemented loop-mediated isothermal amplification (UDG-LAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Kuangwen; Mage, Peter L; Csordas, Andrew T; Eisenstein, Michael; Soh, H Tom

    2014-04-11

    We report a one-pot, closed-vessel enzymatic assay that eliminates carryover contamination while preserving robust DNA amplification in loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), providing reliable and rapid detection of target DNA in contaminated samples.

  10. [Frontier in bone biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Bone is an active organ in which bone mass is maintained by the balance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption, i.e., coupling of bone formation and bone resorption. Recent advances in molecular bone biology uncovered the molecular mechanism of the coupling. A fundamental role of osteocyte in the maintenance of bone mass and whole body metabolism has also been revealed recently. Moreover, neurons and neuropeptides have been shown to be intimately involved in bone homeostasis though inter-organ network, in addition to "traditional" regulators of bone metabolism such as soluble factors and cytokines

  11. The effect of bone marrow aspirate, bone graft and collagen composites on fixation of bone implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan; Ding, Ming; Overgaard, Søren

    2007-01-01

     Introduction: Replacement of extensive local bone loss especially in revision joint arthroplasties is a significant clinical challenge. Autogenous and allogenic cancellous bone grafts have been the gold standard in reconstructive orthopaedic surgery, but it is well known that there is morbidity...... to be sought. Hydroxyapatite and collagen composites have the potential in mimicking and replacing skeletal bones. Aim: This study attempted to determine the effect of hydroxyapatite/collagen composites in the fixation of bone implants. The composites used in this study is produced by Institute of Science...... part of the implant. Specimens are preserving now at - 20°C and wait for the push-out test which is destructive and will be performed on an 858 Bionex MTS hydraulic material testing machine (MTS system cooperation, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA). The specimens for histological analysis were taken from...

  12. (PCR) amplification of DNA from formalin preserved tissue sampl

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    root

    snow leopard is restricted to the alpine and sub-alpine ecological zones, and the major threats it faces are rela- ted to degradation and fragmentation of its habitat, a lack of effective implementation and enforcement of laws and poaching of its natural prey for illegal trade across snow leopard range. In addition, snow ...

  13. Beringian paleoecology inferred from permafrost-preserved fungal DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lydolph, Magnus C; Jacobsen, Jonas; Arctander, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The diversity of fungi in permanently frozen soil from northeastern Siberia was studied by culture-independent PCR amplification of diverse environmental 18S rRNA genes. Elaborate protocols to avoid contamination during drilling, sampling, and amplification were used. A broad diversity of eukaryo...

  14. Non-destructive sampling of ancient insect DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis; Elias, Scott; Gilbert, Tom

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A major challenge for ancient DNA (aDNA) studies on insect remains is that sampling procedures involve at least partial destruction of the specimens. A recent extraction protocol reveals the possibility of obtaining DNA from past insect remains without causing visual morphological......-preserved insect fossil remains tested, where DNA was obtained from samples up to ca. 26,000 years old. The non-frozen sediment DNA approach appears to have great potential for recording the former presence of insect taxa not normally preserved as macrofossils and opens new frontiers in research on ancient...

  15. Removal of bone in CT angiography of the cervical arteries by piecewise matched mask bone elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straten, Marcel van; Venema, Henk W.; Streekstra, Geert J.; Majoie, Charles B.L.M.; Heeten, Gerard J. den; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.

    2004-01-01

    In maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of CT angiography (CTA) scans, the arteries are often obscured by bone. A bone removal method is presented that uses an additional, nonenhanced scan to create a mask of the bone by thresholding and dilation. After registration of the CTA scan and the additional scan, the bone in the CTA scan is masked. As the cervical area contains bones that can move with respect to each other, these bones are separated first using a watershed algorithm, and then registered individually. A phantom study was performed to evaluate and quantify the tradeoff between the removal of the bone and the preservation of the arteries contiguous to the bone. The influence of algorithm parameters and scan parameters was studied. The method was clinically evaluated with data sets of 35 patients. Best results were obtained with a threshold of 150 HU and a dilation of 8 in-plane voxels and two out-of-plane voxels. The mean width of the soft tissue layer, which is also masked, was approximately 1 mm. The mAs value of the nonenhanced scan could be reduced from 250 mAs to 65 mAs without a loss of quality. In 32 cases the bones were registered correctly and removed completely. In three cases the bone separation was not completely successful, and consequently the bone was not completely removed. The piecewise matched mask bone elimination method proved to be able to obtain MIP images of the cervical arteries free from overprojecting bone in a fully automatic way and with only a slight increase of radiation dose

  16. Structural bone allograft fractures in oncological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Coiradas, Javier; Garcia-Maroto, Roberto; Cebrian, Juan Luis; Lopez-Duran, Luis

    2015-11-01

    We report our experience analysing the risk of fracture amongst allografts in limb-preserving surgery for bone tumours. We retrospectively reviewed our experience with bone allograft and its major complications when used for limb -preserving operations for bone tumours. Forty-one structural allografts were performed in 39 patients between 1992 and 2012. Minimum follow-up was 20 months. Massive allografts have a high complication rate. Excluding infection and nonunion, five acute fractures were found. All fractures occurred after the graft-host junction was united. Local factors-such as graft preservation, weight bearing, fixation to the host or systemic factors such as adjuvant treatments (chemotherapy or radiotherapy)-influence fracture rate. In our study, four patients achieved consolidation with internal fixation and autologous iliac-crest graft, whilst only one required graft exchange. There is no general consensus as to when to treat fractures using open reduction and internal fixation or by exchanging the allograft. Higher fracture rate in relation to systemic treatment was found. Massive structural allograft reconstruction still has a place in limb-preserving surgery, with an acceptable fracture rate and a durable solution.

  17. Determinants of alveolar ridge preservation differ by anatomic location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblebicioglu, Binnaz; Salas, Mabel; Ort, Yirae; Johnson, Ashley; Yildiz, Vedat O; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Agarwal, Sudha; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2013-04-01

    To investigate and compare outcomes following alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) in posterior maxilla and mandible. Twenty-four patients (54 ± 3 years) with single posterior tooth extraction were included. ARP was performed with freeze-dried bone allograft and collagen membrane. Clinical parameters were recorded at extraction and re-entry. Harvested bone cores were analysed by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry. In both jaws, ARP prevented ridge height loss, but ridge width was significantly reduced by approximately 2.5 mm. Healing time, initial clinical attachment loss and amount of keratinized tissue at extraction site were identified as determinants of ridge height outcome. Buccal plate thickness and tooth root length were identified as determinants of ridge width outcome. In addition, initial ridge width was positively correlated with ridge width loss. Micro-CT revealed greater mineralization per unit volume in new bone compared with existing bone in mandible (p < 0.001). Distributions of residual graft, new cellular bone and immature tissue were similar in both jaws. Within the limitations of this study, the results indicate that in different anatomic locations different factors may determine ARP outcomes. Further studies are needed to better understand determinants of ARP outcomes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Deviating T-DNA transfer from Agrobacterium tumefaciens to plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Graaff, Eric; den Dulk-Ras, A; Hooykaas, P J

    1996-01-01

    We analyzed 29 T-DNA inserts in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants for the junction of the right border sequences and the flanking plant DNA. DNA sequencing showed that in most lines the right border sequences transferred had been preserved during integration, corroborating literature data. S...

  19. Deviating T-DNA transfer from Agrobacterium tumefaciens to plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Graaff, Eric; den Dulk-Ras, A; Hooykaas, P J

    1996-01-01

    We analyzed 29 T-DNA inserts in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants for the junction of the right border sequences and the flanking plant DNA. DNA sequencing showed that in most lines the right border sequences transferred had been preserved during integration, corroborating literature data...

  20. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... website. Skip to main content SaveMyFertility An Online Fertility Preservation Toolkit for Patients and Their Providers Open ... Diagnosed with Cancer You are here Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation ...

  1. Surgical techniques for alveolar socket preservation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittorini Orgeas, Gianluca; Clementini, Marco; De Risi, Valeria; de Sanctis, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate, through a systematic review of the literature, the efficacy of different surgical techniques in maintaining residual bone in the alveolar process following tooth extractions. MEDLINE/PubMed was searched through January 2010 and papers were selected according to the CONSORT statement and an independent three-stage screening process. The selected outcome variables were clinical width and height changes of the socket, and means and standard deviations were calculated from the included studies. For those studies that were randomized controlled trials, six meta-analyses were performed by dividing studies into three groups with regard to the use of barriers and grafting (barriers alone, graft alone, or both). Thirteen papers met the eligibility criteria and were included in the analyses. Statistically significant ridge preservation was found for studies that used barriers alone; the pooled weighted mean was 0.909 mm (95% confidence interval, 0.497554 to 1.320732 mm) for bone height, while the mean for bone width was 2.966 mm (95% confidence interval, 2.334770 to 3.598300 mm). Socket preservation procedures are effective in limiting horizontal and vertical ridge alterations in postextraction sites. The meta-analysis indicates that the use of barrier membranes alone might improve normal wound healing in extraction sites.

  2. Dating of cremated bones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanting, JN; Aerts-Bijma, AT; van der Plicht, J; Boaretto, E.; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    When dating unburnt bone, bone collagen, the organic fraction of the bone, is used. Collagen does not survive the heat of the cremation pyre, so dating of cremated bone has been considered impossible. Structural carbonate in the mineral fraction of the bone, however, survives the cremation process.

  3. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You are here Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Ask Your Doctor Information for ...

  4. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer Ask Your Doctor Information for Patients Many adult ...

  5. Incorporation of T4 phage DNA into a specific DNA fraction from the higher plant Matthiola incana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradmann-Rebel, W; Hemleben, V

    1976-01-01

    Isolated T4 phage DNA (sigma=1.694 g/ml) is applied to seedlings of the crucifer Matthiola incana (DNA density sigma=1.698 g/ml). The phage DNA can partly be reextracted from the plants in a specific DNA fraction, which is predominantly characterized by its unusual high density (high density complex=HDC; sigma=1.724 g/ml). DNA:DNA hybridization studies show that phage specific DNA sequences are preserved in the HDC. Results of BrdUrd labeling of the plant DNA before and during incubation with T4DNA suggest that the HDC is composed of T4DNA and a plant DNA component of high density. The analysis of ultrasonicated HDC confirms this suggestion. The ability of plant cells to recognize and handle T4 DNA specifically is discussed.

  6. Evaluation of DNA typing as a positive identification method for soft and hard tissues immersed in strong acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robino, C; Pazzi, M; Di Vella, G; Martinelli, D; Mazzola, L; Ricci, U; Testi, R; Vincenti, M

    2015-11-01

    Identification of human remains can be hindered by several factors (e.g., traumatic mutilation, carbonization or decomposition). Moreover, in some criminal cases, offenders may purposely adopt various expedients to thwart the victim's identification, including the dissolution of body tissues by the use of corrosive reagents, as repeatedly reported in the past for Mafia-related murders. By means of an animal model, namely porcine samples, we evaluated standard DNA typing as a method for identifying soft (muscle) and hard (bone and teeth) tissues immersed in strong acids (hydrochloric, nitric and sulfuric acid) or in mixtures of acids (aqua regia). Samples were tested at different time intervals, ranging between 2 and 6h (soft tissues) and 2-28 days (hard tissues). It was shown that, in every type of acid, complete degradation of the DNA extracted from soft tissues preceded tissue dissolution and could be observed within 4h of immersion. Conversely, high molecular weight DNA amenable to STR analysis could be isolated from hard tissues as long as cortical bone fragments were still present (28 days for sulfuric acid, 7 days for nitric acid, 2 days for hydrochloric acid and aqua regia), or the integrity of the dental pulp chamber was preserved (7 days, in sulfuric acid only). The results indicate that DNA profiling of acid-treated body parts (in particular, cortical bone) is still feasible at advanced stages of corrosion, even when the morphological methods used in forensic anthropology and odontology can no longer be applied for identification purposes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. From the field to the lab: best practices for field preservation of bat specimens for molecular analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelique Corthals

    Full Text Available Studies in molecular ecology depend on field-collected samples for genetic information, and the tissue sampled and preservation conditions strongly affect the quality of the DNA obtained. DNA yields from different tissue types have seldom been compared, and the relative performance of storage media has never been directly tested, even though these media may influence DNA degradation under field conditions. We analyzed DNA yield from buccal swabs and wing punches harvested from live bats using nucleic acid quantification as well as quantitative PCR for a single-copy nuclear locus. We also compared DNA yields from wing tissue preserved in three media: ethanol, NaCl-saturated dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, and silica desiccant. Wing punches yielded more total DNA than did buccal swabs, and wing tissues preserved in silica beads yielded significantly more total and nuclear DNA than those preserved in DMSO or ethanol. These results show that tissue type and preservation media strongly influence the quantity of DNA obtained from non-lethal genetic samples, and based on these effects we provide recommendations for field collection of tissues for genetic analyses.

  8. Recent approaches in food bio-preservation - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veer Pal Singh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bio-preservation is a technique of extending the shelf life of food by using natural or controlled microbiota or antimicrobials. The fermentation products as well as beneficial bacteria are generally selected in this process to control spoilage and render pathogen inactive. The special interest organism or central organism used for this purpose is lactic acid bacteria (LAB and their metabolites. They are capable to exhibit antimicrobial properties and helpful in imparting unique flavour and texture to the food products. The major compounds produced by LAB are bacteriocin, organic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Bacteriocin is peptides or proteins with antimicrobial activity. On the basis of size, structure and post-translational modification, bacteriocin is divided into four different classes. Due to non-toxic, non-immunogenic, thermo-resistance characteristics and broad bactericidal activity, LAB bacteriocins are considered good bio-preservative agents. The most common LAB bactriocin is nisin which has wider applications in food industry and has been Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved. Nisin and other bacteriocin are being used in vegetables products, dairy and meat industries. Apart from LAB metabolites, bacteriophages and endolysins has promising role in food processing, preservation and safety. Bacteriocins and endolysins are more suitable for DNA shuffling and protein engineering to generate highly potent variants with expanded activity spectrum. Genetically modified bacteriophages may also be helpful in bio-preservation, however; their safety issues must be addressed properly before selection as bio-preservative agent.

  9. Fertility preservation in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynberg, Michaël; Bidet, Maud; Benard, Julie; Poulain, Marine; Sonigo, Charlotte; Cédrin-Durnerin, Isabelle; Polak, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency is a relatively rare condition that can appear early in life. In a non-negligible number of cases the ovarian dysfunction results from genetic diseases. Turner syndrome (TS), the most common sex chromosome abnormality in females, is associated with an inevitable premature exhaustion of the follicular stockpile. The possible or probable infertility is a major concern for TS patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The severely reduced follicle pool even during prepubertal life represents the major limit for fertility preservation and is the root of numerous questions regarding the competence of gametes or ovarian tissue crybanked. In addition, patients suffering from TS show higher than usual rates of spontaneous abortion, fetal anomaly, and maternal morbidity and mortality, which should be considered at the time of fertility preservation and before reutilization of the cryopreserved gametes. Apart from fulfillment of the desire of becoming genetic parents, TS patients may be potential candidates for egg donation, gestational surrogacy, and adoption. The present review discusses the different options for preserving female fertility in TS and the ethical questions raised by these approaches. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  11. Effect of preservative solutions on preservation of Calliphora augur and Lucilia cuprina larvae (Diptera: Calliphoridae) with implications for post-mortem interval estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Donnah M; Wallman, James F

    2008-07-18

    A major role of forensic entomology is to estimate the post-mortem interval. An entomologist's estimate of post-mortem interval is based on a series of generally valid assumptions, error in any of which can alter the accuracy of an estimate. The initial process of collecting and preserving maggots can itself lead to error, as can the method of killing and preservation. Since circumstances exist where it is not possible to rear maggots, methods of killing and preservation can be vital to preserving the integrity of entomological evidence. In this study, a number of preservation techniques used at crime scenes and in mortuaries were examined, and their effect on feeding third-instar larvae of Calliphora augur and Lucilia cuprina evaluated. The preservatives used were 70, 75, 80, 90 and 100% EtOH, Kahle's solution and 10% formalin. Each treatment was replicated three times. The effect of handling on first- and second-instar, feeding and post-feeding third-instar larvae of C. augur was also examined and compared to unhandled controls. Finally, the effects of preservatives were noted when larvae of C. augur and L. cuprina were placed into preservatives alive. It was found that continued handling is detrimental to specimens because preservative evaporates from both the vial and the specimens. No single preservative type was found to be entirely suitable for both species if DNA retrieval is desired. Specimens placed into most preservatives alive exhibited adverse colour changes, desiccation, sunkeness and agglomeration. It is concluded that the reaction to preservative type might be species specific and that different instars of the same species might also react differently.

  12. Status, Antimicrobial Mechanism, and Regulation of Natural Preservatives in Livestock Food Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses the status, antimicrobial mechanisms, application, and regulation of natural preservatives in livestock food systems. Conventional preservatives are synthetic chemical substances including nitrates/nitrites, sulfites, sodium benzoate, propyl gallate, and potassium sorbate. The use of artificial preservatives is being reconsidered because of concerns relating to headache, allergies, and cancer. As the demand for biopreservation in food systems has increased, new natural antimicrobial compounds of various origins are being developed, including plant-derived products (polyphenolics, essential oils, plant antimicrobial peptides (pAMPs)), animal-derived products (lysozymes, lactoperoxidase, lactoferrin, ovotransferrin, antimicrobial peptide (AMP), chitosan and others), and microbial metabolites (nisin, natamycin, pullulan, ε-polylysine, organic acid, and others). These natural preservatives act by inhibiting microbial cell walls/membranes, DNA/RNA replication and transcription, protein synthesis, and metabolism. Natural preservatives have been recognized for their safety; however, these substances can influence color, smell, and toxicity in large amounts while being effective as a food preservative. Therefore, to evaluate the safety and toxicity of natural preservatives, various trials including combinations of other substances or different food preservation systems, and capsulation have been performed. Natamycin and nisin are currently the only natural preservatives being regulated, and other natural preservatives will have to be legally regulated before their widespread use.

  13. Second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen in ancient bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B; McIntosh, D; Fildes, T; Smith, L; Hargrave, F; Islam, M; Thompson, T; Layfield, R; Scott, D; Shaw, B; Burrell, C L; Gonzalez, S; Taylor, S

    2017-12-01

    Second-harmonic generation imaging (SHG) captures triple helical collagen molecules near tissue surfaces. Biomedical research routinely utilizes various imaging software packages to quantify SHG signals for collagen content and distribution estimates in modern tissue samples including bone. For the first time using SHG, samples of modern, medieval, and ice age bones were imaged to test the applicability of SHG to ancient bone from a variety of ages, settings, and taxa. Four independent techniques including Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, radiocarbon dating protocols, and mass spectrometry-based protein sequencing, confirm the presence of protein, consistent with the hypothesis that SHG imaging detects ancient bone collagen. These results suggest that future studies have the potential to use SHG imaging to provide new insights into the composition of ancient bone, to characterize ancient bone disorders, to investigate collagen preservation within and between various taxa, and to monitor collagen decay regimes in different depositional environments.

  14. Second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen in ancient bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Second-harmonic generation imaging (SHG captures triple helical collagen molecules near tissue surfaces. Biomedical research routinely utilizes various imaging software packages to quantify SHG signals for collagen content and distribution estimates in modern tissue samples including bone. For the first time using SHG, samples of modern, medieval, and ice age bones were imaged to test the applicability of SHG to ancient bone from a variety of ages, settings, and taxa. Four independent techniques including Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, radiocarbon dating protocols, and mass spectrometry-based protein sequencing, confirm the presence of protein, consistent with the hypothesis that SHG imaging detects ancient bone collagen. These results suggest that future studies have the potential to use SHG imaging to provide new insights into the composition of ancient bone, to characterize ancient bone disorders, to investigate collagen preservation within and between various taxa, and to monitor collagen decay regimes in different depositional environments.

  15. The effect of radiation sterilization on human transplantable bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantafyllou, N.; Karatzas, P.

    1974-11-01

    In order to study the effect of radiation sterilization on human transplantable bones, work was carried out on human and bovine bone tissue samples. Factors causing possible alterations in the mechanical structures of the preserved bone allografts were considered to be deep freezing (-35degC), lyophylization, irradiation, or a combination of lyophylization and irradiation. The latter could be shown to lower the mechanical strength of the bone. Crystal lattice of the bone did not show any alterations in x-ray diffraction pattern, following freeze drying and/or irradiation with doses up to 10 Mrad of gamma radiation. Deterioration in mechanical properties is probably due to damage to the organic phase of the bone matrix

  16. Dating of cremated bones

    OpenAIRE

    Lanting, JN; Aerts-Bijma, AT; van der Plicht, J; Boaretto, E.; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    When dating unburnt bone, bone collagen, the organic fraction of the bone, is used. Collagen does not survive the heat of the cremation pyre, so dating of cremated bone has been considered impossible. Structural carbonate in the mineral fraction of the bone, however, survives the cremation process. We developed a method of dating cremated bone by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), using this carbonate fraction. Here we present results for a variety of prehistoric sites and ages, showing a r...

  17. Modeling DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is life's most amazing molecule. It carries the genetic instructions that almost every organism needs to develop and reproduce. In the human genome alone, there are some three billion DNA base pairs. The most difficult part of teaching DNA structure, however, may be getting students to visualize something as small as a…

  18. Preservation and restoration of works-of-art via nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeure, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the techniques using gamma rays for preservation and restoration of our cultural patrimony. Developed at CEA and by ARC-Nucleart, these techniques, which use mainly Cobalt 60 and Americium 241 sources, allow disinfection and strengthening of the various materials which make up the objects (wood, paper, bone, stone, plaster, etc), together with radiography of wood and stone. (author)

  19. Modified technique for preservation of inferior alveolar nerve during mandibulectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Jie; Yang, Chi; Huang, Dong; He, Dong-Mei; Wang, Yi-Wen; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the modified technique of preservation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) during mandibulectomy for a benign lesion. Five cases of osteofibrous hyperplasia and 3 cases of centricity osteomyelitis were included. During surgery, the IAN was marked using a planned cutting guide. Using an oscillating saw, the depth of the osteotomy along the IAN was controlled until the bone cortex was cut through. After splitting, the bony section was removed, leaving the neurovascular bundle intact. The sensation of the lower lip was evaluated using current perceptive threshold testing during follow-up. After follow-up for 6-27 months, no recurrence or secondary deformity was found. One patient had severe sensory disturbance. With the use of a cutting guide and osteotomy tricks, mandibulectomy with preservation of the IAN can be accurately performed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Active preservation - otherwise no archives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norberg, E.

    1996-01-01

    The role and history of national and regional archives in Sweden is discussed. It is noted that large portions of our cultural heritage can not be set aside for long-term preservation due to several facts: Some events are never documented, Important records are never set aside, Important information is stored on media that are not suitable for long-term preservation, Information can not be accessed due to inadequate search aids, Eliminations are made due to lack of space. Strategies for an action plan to save valuable material are briefly outlined, and the importance of international cooperation is stressed

  1. Active preservation - otherwise no archives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norberg, E. [National Swedish Archives, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    The role and history of national and regional archives in Sweden is discussed. It is noted that large portions of our cultural heritage can not be set aside for long-term preservation due to several facts: Some events are never documented, Important records are never set aside, Important information is stored on media that are not suitable for long-term preservation, Information can not be accessed due to inadequate search aids, Eliminations are made due to lack of space. Strategies for an action plan to save valuable material are briefly outlined, and the importance of international cooperation is stressed.

  2. Cost Model for Digital Preservation: Cost of Digital Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Bøgvad Kejser

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Danish Ministry of Culture has funded a project to set up a model for costing preservation of digital materials held by national cultural heritage institutions. The overall objective of the project was to increase cost effectiveness of digital preservation activities and to provide a basis for comparing and estimating future cost requirements for digital preservation. In this study we describe an activity-based costing methodology for digital preservation based on the Open Archice Information System (OAIS Reference Model. Within this framework, which we denote the Cost Model for Digital Preservation (CMDP, the focus is on costing the functional entity Preservation Planning from the OAIS and digital migration activities. In order to estimate these costs we have identified cost-critical activities by analysing the functions in the OAIS model and the flows between them. The analysis has been supplemented with findings from the literature, and our own knowledge and experience. The identified cost-critical activities have subsequently been deconstructed into measurable components, cost dependencies have been examined, and the resulting equations expressed in a spreadsheet. Currently the model can calculate the cost of different migration scenarios for a series of preservation formats for text, images, sound, video, geodata, and spreadsheets. In order to verify the model it has been tested on cost data from two different migration projects at the Danish National Archives (DNA. The study found that the OAIS model provides a sound overall framework for the cost breakdown, but that some functions need additional detailing in order to cost activities accurately. Running the two sets of empirical data showed among other things that the model underestimates the cost of manpower-intensive migration projects, while it reinstates an often underestimated cost, which is the cost of developing migration software. The model has proven useful for estimating the

  3. Postextraction alveolar ridge preservation: biological basis and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagni, Giorgio; Pellegrini, Gaia; Giannobile, William V; Rasperini, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Following tooth extraction, the alveolar ridge undergoes an inevitable remodeling process that influences implant therapy of the edentulous area. Socket grafting is a commonly adopted therapy for the preservation of alveolar bone structures in combination or not with immediate implant placement although the biological bases lying behind this treatment modality are not fully understood and often misinterpreted. This review is intended to clarify the literature support to socket grafting in order to provide practitioners with valid tools to make a conscious decision of when and why to recommend this therapy.

  4. Bone development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatara, M.R.; Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Sawa-Wojtanowicz, B.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the long-term effect of alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) administration during early neonatal life on skeletal development and function, with emphasis on bone exposed to regular stress and used to serve for systemic changes monitoring, the rib. Shropshire ram...... at 146 days of life and five left and right ribs (fourth to eighth) were removed for analysis. The influence of AKG on skeletal system development was evaluated in relation to both geometrical and mechanical properties, as well as quantitative computed tomography (QCT). No significant differences between...... has a long-term effect on skeletal development when given early in neonatal life, and that changes in rib properties serve to improve chest mechanics and functioning in young animals. Moreover, neonatal administration of AKG may be considered as an effective factor enhancing proper development...

  5. Dna Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  6. Ridge Preservation with Modified “Socket-Shield” Technique: A Methodological Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Glocker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After tooth extraction, the alveolar bone undergoes a remodeling process, which leads to horizontal and vertical bone loss. These resorption processes complicate dental rehabilitation, particularly in connection with implants. Various methods of guided bone regeneration (GBR have been described to retain the original dimension of the bone after extraction. Most procedures use filler materials and membranes to support the buccal plate and soft tissue, to stabilize the coagulum and to prevent epithelial ingrowth. It has also been suggested that resorption of the buccal bundle bone can be avoided by leaving a buccal root segment (socket shield technique in place, because the biological integrity of the buccal periodontium (bundle bone remains untouched. This method has also been described in connection with immediate implant placement. The present case report describes three consecutive cases in which a modified method was applied as part of a delayed implantation. The latter was carried out after six months, and during re-entry the new bone formation in the alveolar bone and the residual ridge was clinically evaluated as proof of principle. It was demonstrated that the bone was clinically preserved with this method. Possibilities and limitations are discussed and directions for future research are disclosed.

  7. Molecular Genetic Studies of Bone Mechanical Strain and of Pedigrees with Very High Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    homolog.) M89798 2.414296 Mouse WNT-5a U51001 2.398422 DLX-1 gene SU78076 2.394921 Mouse sepiaterin reductase gene SJ00357 2.394785 Mouse alpha amylase -2...mRNA; cDNA DKFZp566J151 (from clone DKFZp566J151); complete cds SJ00357 2.00887 Mouse alpha amylase -2 gene TC159122 2.007755 Homo sapiens clone RP11...function 37,831 Procollagen, Type I, alpha Bone formation 32,419 Lactotransferrin Bone marrow 29,700 CD24a antigen Bone marrow and liver Principal

  8. Genomic and post-genomic effects of anti-glaucoma drugs preservatives in trabecular meshwork

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzotti, Alberto, E-mail: izzotti@unige.it [Mutagenesis Unit, IRCCS AOU San Martino – IST, Genova (Italy); Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via A. Pastore 1, 16132 Genoa (Italy); La Maestra, Sebastiano; Micale, Rosanna Tindara; Longobardi, Maria Grazia [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via A. Pastore 1, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Saccà, Sergio Claudio [Ophthalmology Unit, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genova (Italy)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Glaucoma drug preservatives induce DNA damage in trabecular meshwork cells. • Cellular alteration is related with the occurrence of activation of apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway. • Drug preservatives unable to induce cell damage are ineffective in killing bacteria. • Anti glaucoma drugs should be formulated as single-dose usage devoid of genotoxic preservatives. - Abstract: Oxidative stress plays an important role in glaucoma. Some preservatives of anti-glaucoma drugs, commonly used in glaucoma therapy, can prevent or induce oxidative stress in the trabecular meshwork. The aim of this study is to evaluate cellular and molecular damage induced in trabecular meshwork by preservatives contained in anti-glaucoma drugs. Cell viability (MTT test), DNA fragmentation (Comet test), oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-dG), and gene expression (cDNA microarray) have been evaluated in trabecular meshwork specimens and in human trabecular meshwork cells treated with benzalkonium chloride, polyQuad, purite, and sofzia-like mixture. Moreover, antimicrobial effectiveness and safety of preservative contents in drugs was tested. In ex vivo experiments, benzalkonium chloride and polyQuad induced high level of DNA damage in trabecular meshwork specimens, while the effect of purite and sofzia were more attenuated. The level of DNA fragmentation induced by benzalkonium chloride was 2.4-fold higher in subjects older than 50 years than in younger subjects. Benzalkonium chloride, and polyQuad significantly increased oxidative DNA damage as compared to sham-treated specimens. Gene expression was altered by benzalkonium chloride, polyQuad, and purite but not by sofzia. In in vitro experiments, benzalkonium chloride and polyQuad dramatically decreased trabecular meshwork cell viability, increased DNA fragmentation, and altered gene expression. A lesser effect was also exerted by purite and sofzia. Genes targeted by these alterations included Fas and effector caspase-3

  9. Influence of platelet-rich fibrin on alveolar ridge preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttapreyasri, Srisurang; Leepong, Narit

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) on early wound healing and preservation of the alveolar ridge shape following tooth extraction. In this clinical trial, 20 symmetrical, premolar extraction sockets using split-mouth design were randomly selected with PRF or blood clot. The evaluations of wound healing, alveolar ridge contour changes, and crestal bone resorption were performed in dental casts and periapical radiographs (T0, initial; T1, 1 week; T2, 2 weeks; T4, 4 weeks; T6, 6 weeks; T8, 8 weeks). Platelet-rich fibrin clinically showed early healing of soft tissue covering socket orifices in the first 4 weeks. At the first week, the horizontal resorption on buccal aspect of PRF (1.07 ± 0.31 mm) was significantly less than that of the control (1.81 ± 0.88 mm). Platelet-rich fibrin demonstrated the tendency to enter the steady stage after the fourth week following tooth extraction, whereas in the control group the progression of buccal contour contraction was still detected through the eighth week. Radiographically, the overall resorption of marginal bone levels at mesial and distal to the extraction site in PRF (0.70, 1.23 mm) was comparable to that of the control (1.33, 1.14 mm). Although the PRF group demonstrated faster bone healing compared with the control, no statistically significant difference was detected. This preliminary result demonstrated neither better alveolar ridge preservation nor enhanced bone formation of PRF in the extraction socket. The use of PRF revealed limited effectiveness by accelerated soft-tissue healing on the first 4 weeks.

  10. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  11. Highly efficient DNA extraction method from skeletal remains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Zupanič Pajnič

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This paper precisely describes the method of DNA extraction developed to acquire high quality DNA from the Second World War skeletal remains. The same method is also used for molecular genetic identification of unknown decomposed bodies in routine forensic casework where only bones and teeth are suitable for DNA typing. We analysed 109 bones and two teeth from WWII mass graves in Slovenia. Methods: We cleaned the bones and teeth, removed surface contaminants and ground the bones into powder, using liquid nitrogen . Prior to isolating the DNA in parallel using the BioRobot EZ1 (Qiagen, the powder was decalcified for three days. The nuclear DNA of the samples were quantified by real-time PCR method. We acquired autosomal genetic profiles and Y-chromosome haplotypes of the bones and teeth with PCR amplification of microsatellites, and mtDNA haplotypes 99. For the purpose of traceability in the event of contamination, we prepared elimination data bases including genetic profiles of the nuclear and mtDNA of all persons who have been in touch with the skeletal remains in any way. Results: We extracted up to 55 ng DNA/g of the teeth, up to 100 ng DNA/g of the femurs, up to 30 ng DNA/g of the tibias and up to 0.5 ng DNA/g of the humerus. The typing of autosomal and YSTR loci was successful in all of the teeth, in 98 % dekalof the femurs, and in 75 % to 81 % of the tibias and humerus. The typing of mtDNA was successful in all of the teeth, and in 96 % to 98 % of the bones. Conclusions: We managed to obtain nuclear DNA for successful STR typing from skeletal remains that were over 60 years old . The method of DNA extraction described here has proved to be highly efficient. We obtained 0.8 to 100 ng DNA/g of teeth or bones and complete genetic profiles of autosomal DNA, Y-STR haplotypes, and mtDNA haplotypes from only 0.5g bone and teeth samples.

  12. A revolution in food preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    A brief consumer guide to food irradiation is presented. Aspects covered include some of the advantages of food irradiation compared to other methods of food preservation, the type of radiation used, the mechanism of action, some practical applications, safety and future benefits. (UK)

  13. Hardcore Heritage: imagination for preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, E.; Rietveld, R.

    2017-01-01

    Should the practice of the historic preservation of built and landscape heritage necessarily be based on conservation? Monuments, listed buildings, landscapes, and other forms of built heritage, are typically regarded as immutable and untouchable—objects to be “conserved”—and as a result tend to

  14. Symmetry preservation during radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, S.V.; Abdel-Gawad, M.M.H.

    1991-01-01

    An examination of radiation-damage processes consequent to high-energy irradiation in certain ammonium salts studied using ESR of free radicals together with the structural information available from neutron diffraction studies shows that, other factors being equal/nearly equal, symmetry-related bonds are preserved in preference to those unrelated to one another by any symmetry. (author). 23 refs., 3 tabs

  15. Polarization-preserving holey fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Mogilevtsev, Dmitri; Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2001-01-01

    In this work we suggest and discuss a microstructure of air capillaries with elliptical cross-section in a tread of glass that gives opportunity for Creation of polarization-preserving fiber with very small beat length between the fundamental modes of different polarization...

  16. Decreased bone turnover with balanced resorption and formation prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation) in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Meghan E; Maki, Aaron J; Johnson, Steven E; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Donahue, Seth W

    2008-02-01

    Disuse uncouples bone formation from resorption, leading to increased porosity, decreased bone geometrical properties, and decreased bone mineral content which compromises bone mechanical properties and increases fracture risk. However, black bear bone properties are not adversely affected by aging despite annual periods of disuse (i.e., hibernation), which suggests that bears either prevent bone loss during disuse or lose bone and subsequently recover it at a faster rate than other animals. Here we show decreased cortical bone turnover during hibernation with balanced formation and resorption in grizzly bear femurs. Hibernating grizzly bear femurs were less porous and more mineralized, and did not demonstrate any changes in cortical bone geometry or whole bone mechanical properties compared to active grizzly bear femurs. The activation frequency of intracortical remodeling was 75% lower during hibernation than during periods of physical activity, but the normalized mineral apposition rate was unchanged. These data indicate that bone turnover decreases during hibernation, but osteons continue to refill at normal rates. There were no changes in regional variation of porosity, geometry, or remodeling indices in femurs from hibernating bears, indicating that hibernation did not preferentially affect one region of the cortex. Thus, grizzly bears prevent bone loss during disuse by decreasing bone turnover and maintaining balanced formation and resorption, which preserves bone structure and strength. These results support the idea that bears possess a biological mechanism to prevent disuse osteoporosis.

  17. Hybrid Food Preservation Program Improves Food Preservation and Food Safety Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    The growing trend in home food preservation raises concerns about whether the resulting food products will be safe to eat. The increased public demand for food preservation information led to the development of the comprehensive food preservation program, Preserve the Taste of Summer (PTTS). PTTS is a comprehensive hybrid food preservation program…

  18. Correlative microscopy of the constituents of a dinosaur rib fossil and hosting mudstone: Implications on diagenesis and fossil preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Kyun; Kwon, Yong-Eun; Lee, Sang-Gil; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Huh, Min; Lee, Eunji; Kim, Youn-Joong

    2017-01-01

    We have applied correlative microscopy to identify the key constituents of a dorsal rib fossil from Koreanosaurus boseongensis and its hosting mudstone discovered at the rich fossil site in Boseong, South Korea, to investigate the factors that likely contributed to diagenesis and the preservation of fossil bone. Calcite and illite were the commonly occurring phases in the rib bone, hosting mudstone, and the boundary region in-between. The boundary region may have contributed to bone preservation once it fully formed by acting as a protective shell. Fluorapatite crystals in the rib bone matrix signified diagenetic alteration of the original bioapatite crystals. While calcite predominantly occupied vascular channels and cracks, platy illite crystals widely occupied miniscule pores throughout the bone matrix. Thorough transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of illite within the bone matrix indicated the solid-state transformation of 1M to 2M without composition change, which was more evident from the lateral variation of 1M to 2M within the same layer. The high level of lattice disordering of 2M illite suggested an early stage of 1M to 2M transformation. Thus, the diagenetic alteration of both apatite and illite crystals within the bone matrix may have increased its overall density, as the preferred orientation of apatite crystals from moderate to strong degrees was evident despite the poor preservation of osteohistological features. The combined effects of rapid burial, formation of a boundary region, and diagenesis of illite and apatite within the bone matrix may have contributed to the rib bone preservation.

  19. Bone grafts in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation.

  20. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales G, R.; Cano P, R.; Mendoza P, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  1. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a ...

  2. Scarpa Fascia Preservation in Abdominoplasty: Does It Preserve the Lymphatics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourani, Saam S; Taylor, G Ian; Ashton, Mark W

    2015-08-01

    The course of the cutaneous lymphatic collectors of the abdominal wall in relation to the Scarpa fascia is unclear in the literature. Preserving the Scarpa fascia in the lower abdomen to reduce the seroma rate following abdominoplasty has been suggested based on the assumption that the lower abdominal lymphatics run deep to this layer along their entire course. Using the previously described technique, the superficial lymphatic drainage of eight hemiabdomen specimens from four fresh human cadavers was investigated. The upper and lower abdominal collectors originated at the umbilical and midline watershed areas in a subdermal plane by the union of precollectors draining the dermis. In the lower abdomen, the depth of the collectors gradually increased in the subcutaneous fat as they coursed toward the groin. They eventually pierced the Scarpa fascia before draining into the superficial inguinal nodes located deep to this layer. The transition from the supra- to the infra-Scarpa fascia plane occurred within 2 to 3 cm of the inguinal ligament in 95 percent of the collectors. In the four cadavers studied, preserving the Scarpa fascia during abdominoplasty would not preserve the lower abdominal collectors.

  3. Comparison of alveolar ridge preservation method using three dimensional micro-computed tomographic analysis and two dimensional histometric evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Seok; Kim, Sung Tae; Oh, Seung Hee; Park, Hee Jung; Lee, Sophia; Kim, Taeil; Lee, Young Kyu; Heo, Min Suk [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    This study evaluated the efficacy of alveolar ridge preservation methods with and without primary wound closure and the relationship between histometric and micro-computed tomographic (CT) data. Porcine hydroxyapatite with polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was implanted into a canine extraction socket. The density of the total mineralized tissue, remaining hydroxyapatite, and new bone was analyzed by histometry and micro-CT. The statistical association between these methods was evaluated. Histometry and micro-CT showed that the group which underwent alveolar preservation without primary wound closure had significantly higher new bone density than the group with primary wound closure (P<0.05). However, there was no significant association between the data from histometry and micro-CT analysis. These results suggest that alveolar ridge preservation without primary wound closure enhanced new bone formation more effectively than that with primary wound closure. Further investigation is needed with respect to the comparison of histometry and micro-CT analysis.

  4. Alveolar ridge preservation with autologous particulated dentin-a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdec, Silvio; Pasic, Pavla; Soltermann, Alex; Thoma, Daniel; Stadlinger, Bernd; Rücker, Martin

    2017-12-01

    Ridge preservation can be performed with autologous bone, alloplastic bone substitute material or a combination of both. Dentin is similar to bone in its chemical composition. In its use as bone substitute material, it undergoes a remodelling process and transforms to bone. The presented case report introduces a technique in which the extraction socket is augmented with autologous, particulated dentin. The fractured, non-savable mesial incisor of the upper jaw was carefully extracted in axial direction. After the extraction, the tooth was cleared from remaining periodontal tissue. The vital pulp tissue or a root canal filling, enamel and cementum were also removed. Following the particulation of the remaining dentin in a bone mill, the dentin particles were immediately filled orthotope into the alveolar socket. The soft tissue closure was performed with a free gingival graft of the palate. After an observation period of 4 months, an implant was placed in the augmented area, which osseointegrated successfully and could be restored prosthodontically in the following. The results of this method showed a functional and aesthetic success. The pre-implantological, autologous ridge preservation with dentin could be performed successfully. For the establishment of dentin as augmentation material for jaw augmentation procedures, a prospective, clinical trial is now necessary.

  5. Bone mineral density of the femoral neck in resurfacing hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Ovesen, Ole; Brixen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Resurfacing total hip arthroplasty (RTHA) may preserve the femoral neck bone stock postoperatively. Bone mineral density (BMD) may be affected by the hip position, which might bias longitudinal studies. We investigated the dependency of BMD precision on type of ROI and hip position....

  6. NGF blockade at early times during bone cancer development attenuates bone destruction and increases limb use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Gwen; Thompson, Michelle L; Majuta, Lisa; Fealk, Michelle N; Chartier, Stephane; Longo, Geraldine; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2014-12-01

    Studies in animals and humans show that blockade of nerve growth factor (NGF) attenuates both malignant and nonmalignant skeletal pain. While reduction of pain is important, a largely unanswered question is what other benefits NGF blockade might confer in patients with bone cancer. Using a mouse graft model of bone sarcoma, we demonstrate that early treatment with an NGF antibody reduced tumor-induced bone destruction, delayed time to bone fracture, and increased the use of the tumor-bearing limb. Consistent with animal studies in osteoarthritis and head and neck cancer, early blockade of NGF reduced weight loss in mice with bone sarcoma. In terms of the extent and time course of pain relief, NGF blockade also reduced pain 40% to 70%, depending on the metric assessed. Importantly, this analgesic effect was maintained even in animals with late-stage disease. Our results suggest that NGF blockade immediately upon detection of tumor metastasis to bone may help preserve the integrity and use, delay the time to tumor-induced bone fracture, and maintain body weight. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Anorexia Nervosa and Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk., Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising addition concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors contribute to impaired bone metabolism in AN. The best strategy to improve bone density is to regain weight and menstrual function. Oral estrogen-progesterone combinations are not effective in increasing bone density in adults or adolescents with AN, and transdermal testosterone replacement is not effective in increasing bone density in adult women with AN. However, physiologic estrogen replacement as transdermal estradiol with cyclic progesterone does increase bone accrual rates in adolescents with AN to approximate that in normal-weight controls, leading to a maintenance of bone density Z-scores. A recent study has shown that risedronate increases bone density at the spine and hip in adult women with AN. However, bisphosphonates should be used with great caution in women of reproductive age given their long half-life and potential for teratogenicity, and should be considered only in patients with low bone density and clinically significant fractures when non-pharmacological therapies for weight gain are ineffective. Further studies are necessary to determine the best therapeutic strategies for low bone density in AN. PMID:24898127

  8. INCORRECT PRESERVATION OF AMPUTATED DIGITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uroš Ahčan

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. A decision to replant is critically dependent on the condition of the amputated digit and the way it was preserved during transport. The most common error is exposing the amputated digit to very low temperatures. Preservation directly on ice, on cooling devices in portable refrigerators, or on top of packets of frozen meat often result in a frozen and therefore unusable body digit.Methods. An inquiry questionnaire on correct methods of preservation of amputated digits was conducted on a sample of 30 lay persons, 30 medical students, and 15 physicians.Three simulations of most frequently used methods of preservation of amputated digit were conducted (the correct method; directly on ice; on cooling devices of portable refrigerators. Environment temperature of the (simulated amputated digits stored was measured.In a retrospective study, hospital records of patients treated at the Clinical department of plastic surgery and burns in Ljubljana between 1998 and 2002 were examined. We determined the number of replantations performed, gender of the patients, their age, the mechanism of the injury, the success rate of the replantation, and the duration of hospitalisation. In five case described in detail, we present an inadequate treatment of the amputated digits.Results. The results of the questionnaire survey show that no less than 86.7% of lay person respondents would have treated the injuries in an incorrect way; same holds for 43.4% students of medicine, and 33.3% of practicing physicians.The temperature of the simulated amputated digit remained above 5°C throughout the simulated correct treatment. When preserved directly on ice on or coolant bodies, the temperature dropped below the freezing point and never climbed above 0°C throughout the duration of the simulation (150 minutes.Between years 1998 and 2002, Clinical department of plastic surgery and burns at the University clinical centre Ljubljana admitted 124 injured persons with

  9. Radiation microbiology in food preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    The lethal effect of ionizing energy on micro-organisms and the influence of species, growth phase, gaseous atmosphere, temperature, water activity, chemical sensitizers and physical agents on microbial resistance are described briefly. Concern has often been expressed that the use of low doses of ionizing energy for processing food might result in mutants with increased resistance, virulence or toxin production capacity, that diagnostic characteristics of pathogens may alter, or that alterations in normal food spoilage patterns could cause storage problems. These fears are examined in a food preservation context and found to be unwarranted. The rationale for quantitative estimates of the dose of ionizing energy needed for specific food preservation applications is given and comparison made between the ionizing energy sensitivities of food pathogens and spoilage organisms

  10. Preservation of food and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasamatsu, Tomomichi

    1975-01-01

    In the application of radiation to preservation of food, there are some methods; sterilization, elimination of noxious insects, prevention of germination and control of maturation. The former two utilize the lethal effect of radiation to the living things and the latter two utilize the injurious effect on the metabolism of the living things. At present, irradiation to potato is most widely permitted for the purpose of prevention of germination, and the irradiation with 15 Krad (maximum) is allowed to preserve potato for 8 months in Japan. In the other hand, a large quantity of doses, such as 4.5 to 5.6 Mrad, is necessary to sterilize completely for industrial use, degeneration of food component and high cost come into question. In addition, food is directly taken into the mouth of human being, therefore, wholesomeness, legal permission and determination of dose must be examined. (Tsukamoto, Y.)

  11. Nuclear Knowledge Preservation in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleslic, S.; Novosel, N.

    2006-01-01

    Since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, Vienna, Austria) was founded in 1957 as an autonomous intergovernmental organization, it was authorized for exchange of technical and scientific information on peaceful uses of atomic energy. 35 years ago the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) was established from IAEA as an international bibliographic database in the nuclear field and in nuclear related areas. INIS as an instrument for a comprehensive and systematic dissemination of all information and knowledge becomes a big technological and science information system with 134 Members (114 countries and 20 international organizations). In INIS Membership Arrangements all Members are responsible for the collection, selection, description of information and providing the Agency with the full text of each item of non-conventional literature. Participation of each Member is important because decentralized information management is an operational philosophy of INIS. During all these years status of nuclear power changed significantly in the world. Some developing countries started to develop nuclear power programme and some developed countries showed tendency to decrease use of nuclear power. Anyway, expert knowledge accumulated over decades and the achievements in the field of nuclear science and technology have to be preserved and later transferred to future generations. It became obvious that the INIS is practically a pioneer in the area of nuclear knowledge preservation with well defined goals of knowledge preservation: selection of the most valuable information to convey to the future, ensuring that it remains accessible, readable and understandable and management of technological change. Main components of knowledge preservation are: selection of information for preservation including evaluation and prioritisation by value, use and risk, information capture (purchasing, copy, digitise, web links), describing, classifying, store and access

  12. Preserved entropy and fragile magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Paul C; Bud'ko, Sergey L

    2016-08-01

    A large swath of quantum critical and strongly correlated electron systems can be associated with the phenomena of preserved entropy and fragile magnetism. In this overview we present our thoughts and plans for the discovery and development of lanthanide and transition metal based, strongly correlated systems that are revealed by suppressed, fragile magnetism, quantum criticality, or grow out of preserved entropy. We will present and discuss current examples such as YbBiPt, YbAgGe, YbFe2Zn20, PrAg2In, BaFe2As2, CaFe2As2, LaCrSb3 and LaCrGe3 as part of our motivation and to provide illustrative examples.

  13. Esthetic consideration for alveolar socket preservation prior to implant placement: description of a technique and 80-case series report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutkut, Ahmad; Andreana, Sebastiano; Monaco, Edward

    2012-01-01

    An esthetic restoration supported by dental implant rehabilitation is a major challenge to restorative dentists. The ultimate goal of a dental implant is to restore missing or extracted teeth by placing implants in anatomically, esthetically, and long-term functional restorations. Alveolar ridge preservation and site enhancement following tooth extraction has a major impact on the hard and soft tissue volume. Extraction socket preservation is technique sensitive, not 100% successful, and at times unpredictable. Current techniques may delay surgical implant placement for a few months, and the quality of new bone regeneration is questionable. The aim of this report was to describe a minimally traumatic extraction socket preservation technique using different types of bone graft as a preserver prior to implant placement applied for 80 consecutive cases.

  14. Food Preservation by Irradiation (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urrows, Grace M.

    1968-01-01

    Up to 30% of food harvests are lost in some parts of the world because of animal pests and microorganisms. Nuclear techniques can help reduce and extend the shelf life of these foods. Around 55 countries now have food irradiation programs. The use of radiation is the most recent step in man's attempts to preserve some of his harvest for the lean part of the year.

  15. Technical Information/Website Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    PintoRey, Christian R.

    2010-01-01

    This document reviews the work of the author in NASA's Motivating Undergraduates in Science and Technology (MUST) internship. The intern worked on the Space Shuttles hydraulic systems (i.e., Auxiliary Power Units (APU's) and Hydraulic Pump Units (HPU's)), and website preservation of the hydraulic technology captured in websites relating to the coming.the Space Shuttle Retirement. Several figures and pictures show an overview of the orbiter's hydraulic systems

  16. Post traumatic immediate GBR: alveolar ridge preservation after a comminuted fracture of the anterior maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsoo; Leem, Dae Ho

    2015-04-01

    Without a proper intervention, a crushed alveolar process fracture can cause significant dimensional changes on affected hard and soft tissue that lead to difficult circumstances for post traumatic bone augmentation and dental implant placement. We present herein the cases of immediate guided bone regeneration (GBR) for the maxillary anterior alveolar process with comminuted fracture. Shortly after the hospital visit, guided bone regeneration was conducted for three patients using only xenograft material and bone fragments from traumatic site, without an additional donor site. Resorbable collagen membrane was used on the bone graft site, and titanium mesh was also used if significant bone loss were expected. Radiographic evaluation 6 months after GBR confirmed that all three cases had sufficiently preserved alveolar bone which is clinically required for implant placement. Dental implant installation was carried out for two patients and no specific findings were noted in follow-up after the placement. In this method, additional operation sites for bone collection are not necessary and the number of surgical steps before implant placement can be reduced. Furthermore, this immediate intervention can effectively minimize the alveolar ridge shrinkage of anterior maxilla after injury. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. PREDON Scientific Data Preservation 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconu, C.; Kraml, S.; Surace, C.; Chateigner, D.; Libourel, T.; Laurent, A.; Lin, Y.; Schaming, M.; Benbernou, S.; Lebbah, M.; Boucon, D.; Cérin, C.; Azzag, H.; Mouron, P.; Nief, J.-Y.; Coutin, S.; Beckmann, V.

    Scientific data collected with modern sensors or dedicated detectors exceed very often the perimeter of the initial scientific design. These data are obtained more and more frequently with large material and human efforts. A large class of scientific experiments are in fact unique because of their large scale, with very small chances to be repeated and to superseded by new experiments in the same domain: for instance high energy physics and astrophysics experiments involve multi-annual developments and a simple duplication of efforts in order to reproduce old data is simply not affordable. Other scientific experiments are in fact unique by nature: earth science, medical sciences etc. since the collected data is "time-stamped" and thereby non-reproducible by new experiments or observations. In addition, scientific data collection increased dramatically in the recent years, participating to the so-called "data deluge" and inviting for common reflection in the context of "big data" investigations. The new knowledge obtained using these data should be preserved long term such that the access and the re-use are made possible and lead to an enhancement of the initial investment. Data observatories, based on open access policies and coupled with multi-disciplinary techniques for indexing and mining may lead to truly new paradigms in science. It is therefore of outmost importance to pursue a coherent and vigorous approach to preserve the scientific data at long term. The preservation remains nevertheless a challenge due to the complexity of the data structure, the fragility of the custom-made software environments as well as the lack of rigorous approaches in workflows and algorithms. To address this challenge, the PREDON project has been initiated in France in 2012 within the MASTODONS program: a Big Data scientific challenge, initiated and supported by the Interdisciplinary Mission of the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). PREDON is a study group formed by

  18. More on contamination: the use of asymmetric molecular behavior to identify authentic ancient human DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Helena; Svensson, Emma M; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2007-01-01

    so, we also produce data that describes the efficiency of bleach incubation of bone powder and its relative detrimental effects on contaminant and authentic ancient DNA. We note that bleach treatment is significantly more detrimental to contaminant than to authentic aDNA in the bleached bone powder...

  19. Bone Substitutes for Peri-Implant Defects of Postextraction Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pâmela Letícia Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Placement of implants in fresh sockets is an alternative to try to reduce physiological resorption of alveolar ridge after tooth extraction. This surgery can be used to preserve the bone architecture and also accelerate the restorative procedure. However, the diastasis observed between bone and implant may influence osseointegration. So, autogenous bone graft and/or biomaterials have been used to fill this gap. Considering the importance of bone repair for treatment with implants placed immediately after tooth extraction, this study aimed to present a literature review about biomaterials surrounding immediate dental implants. The search included 56 articles published from 1969 to 2012. The results were based on data analysis and discussion. It was observed that implant fixation immediately after extraction is a reliable alternative to reduce the treatment length of prosthetic restoration. In general, the biomaterial should be used to increase bone/implant contact and enhance osseointegration.

  20. Isolation and preservation of schistosome eggs and larvae in RNAlater ? facilitates genetic profiling of individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Bonnie L

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Although field-sampling procedures to capture gDNA from individual schistosome larval stages directly from their natural hosts exist, they do pose some technical and logistical challenges hampering certain epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to develop, refine and evaluate an alternative methodology, which enables better preservation of large numbers of individual schistosome larval stages and eggs collected in low resource endemic areas, to provide PCR-quality DNA for...

  1. DNA glue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Astakhova, Irina V.; Malakhov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Significant alterations in thermal stability of parallel DNA triplexes and antiparallel duplexes were observed upon changing the attachment of ethynylpyrenes from para to ortho in the structure of phenylmethylglycerol inserted as a bulge into DNA (TINA). Insertions of two ortho-TINAs as a pseudo...

  2. DNA Vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA vaccine, immune response, antibodies, infectious diseases. GENERAL I ARTICLE. DNA Vaccines. P N Rangarajan. History of Vaccine Development. The year 1996 marked the 200th anniversary of the first vaccine developed against smallpox by Edward Jenner. In the now- famous 1796 experiment, Jenner scratched ...

  3. Hyperstretching DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakenraad, Koen; Biebricher, Andreas S.; Sebregts, Maarten; Ten Bensel, Brian; Peterman, Erwin J.G.; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heller, Iddo; Storm, Cornelis; Van Der Schoot, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of DNA is highly susceptible to changes by mechanical and biochemical cues in vivo and in vitro. In particular, large increases in base pair spacing compared to regular B-DNA are effected by mechanical (over)stretching and by intercalation of compounds that are widely

  4. A staged approach of implant placement in immediate extraction sockets for preservation of peri-implant soft and hard tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Vinnakota, Dileep Nag; Akula, Sreenivasa Rao; Krishna Reddy, V. Vamsi; Sankar, V. Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Esthetic zone restoration is a challenging aspect in implant dentistry because of two critical factors such as level of bone support and soft tissue dimensions. Preservation of healthy peri-implant tissues is of primary importance for ensuring better esthetics over an extended period. The aim of the present case-series was to evaluate a new staged approach of implant placement in immediate extraction sockets for preservation of peri-implant soft and hard tissues. Four subjects scheduled for e...

  5. Regulation of Bone Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Shahi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone is formed through the processes of endochondral and intramembranous ossification. In endochondral ossification primary mesenchymal cells differentiate to chondrocytes and then are progressively substituted by bone, while in intramembranous ossification mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiate directly into osteoblasts to form bone. The steps of osteogenic proliferation, differentiation, and bone homeostasis are controlled by various markers and signaling pathways. Bone needs to be remodeled to maintain integrity with osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, which are bone-degrading cells. In this review we considered the major factors and signaling pathways in bone formation; these include fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs, wingless-type (Wnt genes, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2 and osteoblast-specific transcription factor (osterix or OSX.

  6. Bone disease in hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Bart L

    2014-07-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is a rare disorder that may be acquired or inherited. Postsurgical hypoparathyroidism is responsible for the majority of acquired hypoparathyroidism. Bone disease occurs in hypoparathyroidism due to markedly reduced bone remodeling due to the absence or low levels of parathyroid hormone. Chronically reduced bone turnover in patients with hypoparathyroidism typically leads to higher bone mass than in age- and sex-matched controls. Whether this increased bone density reduces fracture risk is less certain, because while increased bone mineralization may be associated with increased brittleness of bone, this does not appear to be the case in hypoparathyroidism. Treatment of hypoparathyroidism with recombinant parathyroid hormone may reduce bone mineral density but simultaneously strengthen the mechanical properties of bone.

  7. Effect of preservation method on spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) fecal microbiota over 8 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Vanessa L; Tan, Chia L; Knight, Rob; Amato, Katherine R

    2015-06-01

    Studies of the gut microbiome have become increasingly common with recent technological advances. Gut microbes play an important role in human and animal health, and gut microbiome analysis holds great potential for evaluating health in wildlife, as microbiota can be assessed from non-invasively collected fecal samples. However, many common fecal preservation protocols (e.g. freezing at -80 °C) are not suitable for field conditions, or have not been tested for long-term (greater than 2 weeks) storage. In this study, we collected fresh fecal samples from captive spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) at the Columbian Park Zoo (Lafayette, IN, USA). The samples were pooled, homogenized, and preserved for up to 8 weeks prior to DNA extraction and sequencing. Preservation methods included: freezing at -20 °C, freezing at -80 °C, immersion in 100% ethanol, application to FTA cards, and immersion in RNAlater. At 0 (fresh), 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks from fecal collection, DNA was extracted and microbial DNA was amplified and sequenced. DNA concentration, purity, microbial diversity, and microbial composition were compared across all methods and time points. DNA concentration and purity did not correlate with microbial diversity or composition. Microbial composition of frozen and ethanol samples were most similar to fresh samples. FTA card and RNAlater-preserved samples had the least similar microbial composition and abundance compared to fresh samples. Microbial composition and diversity were relatively stable over time within each preservation method. Based on these results, if freezers are not available, we recommend preserving fecal samples in ethanol (for up to 8weeks) prior to microbial extraction and analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bone fragments a body can make

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, S.D.; Ross, L.M. Jr. (Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri, Columbia (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Data obtained from various analytical techniques applied to a number of small bone fragments recovered from a crime scene were used to provide evidence for the occurrence of a fatality. Microscopic and histomorphometric analyses confirmed that the fragments were from a human skull. X-ray microanalysis of darkened areas on the bone fragments revealed a chemical signature that matched the chemical signature of a shotgun pellet recovered at the scene of the crime. The above findings supported the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fingerprint evidence which, along with other evidence, was used to convict a man for the murder of his wife, even though her body was never recovered.

  9. Treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis using bone impaction grafting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnen, W.H.C.; Gardeniers, J.W.M.; Buma, P.; Yamano, K.; Slooff, T.J.J.H.; Schreurs, B.W.

    2003-01-01

    Even in extensive osteonecrosis of the femoral head in younger patients, a femoral head-preserving method is preferable. We developed a new technique using the lateral approach as used in traditional core biopsy; the osteonecrotic lesion was removed and impacted bone grafts were used to regain

  10. Molecular genetic diversity and maternal origin of Chinese black-bone chicken breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W Q; Li, H F; Wang, J Y; Shu, J T; Zhu, C H; Song, W T; Song, C; Ji, G G; Liu, H X

    2014-04-29

    Chinese black-bone chickens are valued for the medicinal properties of their meat in traditional Chinese medicine. We investigated the genetic diversity and systematic evolution of Chinese black-bone chicken breeds. We sequenced the DNA of 520 bp of the mitochondrial cyt b gene of nine Chinese black-bone chicken breeds, including Silky chicken, Jinhu black-bone chicken, Jiangshan black-bone chicken, Yugan black-bone chicken, Wumeng black-bone chicken, Muchuan black-bone chicken, Xingwen black-bone chicken, Dehua black-bone chicken, and Yanjin black-bone chicken. We found 13 haplotypes. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity of the nine black-bone chicken breeds ranged from 0 to 0.78571 and 0.00081 to 0.00399, respectively. Genetic diversity was the richest in Jinhu black-bone chickens and the lowest in Yanjin black-bone chickens. Analysis of phylogenetic trees for all birds constructed based on hyplotypes indicated that the maternal origin of black-bone chickens is predominantly from three subspecies of red jungle fowl. These results provide basic data useful for protection of black-bone chickens and help determine the origin of domestic chickens.

  11. Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Children Diagnosed with Cancer You are here Home » Patients Fertility Preservation for Children Diagnosed with Cancer ... SJ, et al. Incorporating fertility preservation into the care of young oncology patients. Cancer. 2010;117:4- ...

  12. A holistic approach to bit preservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierau, Eld

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to point out the importance of taking a holistic approach to bit preservation when setting out to find an optimal bit preservation solution for specific digital materials. In the last decade there has been an increasing awareness that bit preservation, which...... is to keep bits intact and readable, is far more complex than first anticipated, even in this narrow definition. This paper takes a more holistic approach to bit preservation, and looks at how an optimal bit preservation strategy can be found, when requirements like confidentiality, availability and costs...... are taken into account. Design/methodology/approach: The paper describes