WorldWideScience

Sample records for bone-anchored hearing aid

  1. The bone-anchored hearing aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) was introduced in 1977 by Tjellström and colleagues and has now been used clinically for over 30 years. Generally, the outcomes are good, and several studies have shown improved audiological- and quality of life outcomes. The principle of the Baha is, that sound...... vibrations are led directly to the inner ear via the mastoid bone, bypassing the middle ear. This is achieved via an osseointegrated implant and a skin-penetrating abutment. Studies report high success rates and a majority of complications as typically minor in nature....

  2. Hearing rehabilitation in Treacher Collins Syndrome with bone anchored hearing aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando Polanski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe a case of hearing rehabilitation with bone anchored hearing aid in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome. Case description: 3 years old patient, male, with Treacher Collins syndrome and severe complications due to the syndrome, mostly related to the upper airway and hearing. He had bilateral atresia of external auditory canals, and malformation of the pinna. The initial hearing rehabilitation was with bone vibration arch, but there was poor acceptance due the discomfort caused by skull compression. It was prescribed a model of bone-anchored hearing aid, in soft band format. The results were evaluated through behavioral hearing tests and questionnaires Meaningful Use of Speech Scale (MUSS and Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS. Comments: The patient had a higher acceptance of the bone-anchored hearing aid compared to the traditional bone vibration arch. Audiological tests and the speech and auditory skills assessments also showed better communication and hearing outcomes. The bone-anchored hearing aid is a good option in hearing rehabilitation in this syndrome.

  3. Hearing rehabilitation in Treacher Collins Syndrome with bone anchored hearing aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanski, José Fernando; Plawiak, Anna Clara; Ribas, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe a case of hearing rehabilitation with bone anchored hearing aid in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome. Case description: 3 years old patient, male, with Treacher Collins syndrome and severe complications due to the syndrome, mostly related to the upper airway and hearing. He had bilateral atresia of external auditory canals, and malformation of the pinna. The initial hearing rehabilitation was with bone vibration arch, but there was poor acceptance due the discomfort caused by skull compression. It was prescribed a model of bone-anchored hearing aid, in soft band format. The results were evaluated through behavioral hearing tests and questionnaires Meaningful Use of Speech Scale (MUSS) and Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS). Comments: The patient had a higher acceptance of the bone-anchored hearing aid compared to the traditional bone vibration arch. Audiological tests and the speech and auditory skills assessments also showed better communication and hearing outcomes. The bone-anchored hearing aid is a good option in hearing rehabilitation in this syndrome. PMID:26298651

  4. Hearing rehabilitation in Treacher Collins Syndrome with bone anchored hearing aid

    OpenAIRE

    José Fernando Polanski; Anna Clara Plawiak; Angela Ribas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe a case of hearing rehabilitation with bone anchored hearing aid in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome. Case description: 3 years old patient, male, with Treacher Collins syndrome and severe complications due to the syndrome, mostly related to the upper airway and hearing. He had bilateral atresia of external auditory canals, and malformation of the pinna. The initial hearing rehabilitation was with bone vibration arch, but there was poor acceptance due the discom...

  5. Bone-anchored hearing aids are effective and associated with a high degree of satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardell, Ida Sofie Kristina; Andresen, Kathrine; Faber, Christian Emil;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to evaluate patients' satisfaction with bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHA). METHODS: This study was retrospective and based on a postal questionnaire. The study sample consisted of patients undergoing surgery at Odense University Hospital in the 1992...... database. RESULTS: The response rate was 80% and the user percentage 88. The majority of the patients used their BAHA seven days a week and most of the day. 88% reported that it was in their best interest that they had received a BAHA. 80% of the respondents were able to communicate better using their BAHA...... in one-on-one conversations. CONCLUSION: BAHA is helpful in one-on-one conversations in quiet surroundings. Sound quality in group situations seems to be the main problem associated with BAHA. However, this study showed that BAHA is an effective hearing aid that is associated with a high degree of...

  6. [Audiological analysis and peri-and postoperative complications in bone-anchored hearing aid surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masatoki; Kitamura, Ken

    2011-07-01

    The bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) has advantages over conventional hearing aids in sound quality and speech reception in silence, but requires surgery and may have peri-and postoperative complications. We evaluated audiological findings and complications in 12 subjects (13 ears)-8 men and 4 women aged 20-71--undergoing BAHA surgery from September 2001 to October 2005. Surgery was for single-sided deafness in one subject. Mean warble tone thresholds with BAHA were 29.9dB and 65.2dB without. Functional gains ranged from 16 to 52dB (mean: 35.3dB). Dural exposure or venous hemorrhage was seen in 4 ears, and mastoid cells opened and a skin flap was damaged in 1 ear each. No severe complications occurred perioperatively. Skin reactions categorized into grade 1 or more were recognized in nearly 70% of ears during the first postoperative year but most were a grade 1 reaction and skin reactions decreased with time. Skin overgrowth occurred in 1 ear immediately after an abutment separated accidentally from the fixture. All complications were treated in outpatient clinics. No fixture extrusion occurred. The decision to proceed with BAHA surgery thus required fully informed consent based on knowledge of peri-and postoperative complications. PMID:21838056

  7. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... one because she has experience with how hearing aids in general affect tinnitus. Tinnitus is, again, that ... want to talk about your experience with hearing aids and how people respond with their tinnitus? 00: ...

  8. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Baha system consists of a bone-anchored titanium fixture that is implanted in the mastoid bone, ... the -- great. I'm going to grab the titanium implant. And what I want you to notice ...

  9. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... has experience with how hearing aids in general affect tinnitus. Tinnitus is, again, that sensation of sound ... difficult issue to deal with because it does affect people differently. One of the things that I ...

  10. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... quiet environments. And when you're going to sleep, when you're just sitting and reading, but ... 00:47:35 ANNOUNCER: Unhappy with conventional hearing aids, Jessica consulted with specialists at Hartford Hospital in ...

  11. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... experience with how hearing aids in general affect tinnitus. Tinnitus is, again, that sensation of sound even though ... can have character of roaring or pulsatile. But tinnitus is a tough thing, and Sue, do you ...

  12. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... up the sound, a processor, which is a computer inside the hearing aid which is correcting for ... getting more powerful, smaller, more sophisticated, just like computers. The good news is that the abutment stays ...

  13. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... among other injuries, lost her hearing on the right side. And she has lived the last nearly 30 years without having any hearing on the right and normal hearing on the left. And as ...

  14. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... near-normal hearing in one ear and no functional hearing on the other side. There are several ... surgery that can leave a patient with no functional hearing on one side. And there are cases ...

  15. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hearing on the other side. There are several causes for this condition. It can be a congenital ... with sudden onset hearing loss with no known cause. In cases where there is deafness on one ...

  16. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deafness, live from Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut. Ear, nose and throat specialist Dr. Marc Eisen will ... is normal or near-normal hearing in one ear and no functional hearing on the other side. ...

  17. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... real challenge. Listening to speech in a noisy environment is also significantly impaired because hearing in a group or in a noisy environment requires hearing in stereo. The end result is ...

  18. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as the bone conduction thresholds, which is the test of the sensory ability of the inner ear, ... and also responses to pure tones, which would test their hearing throughout the hearing range from low, ...

  19. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... where one minute you may be hearing very well because the sound is being presented to the ... where you're not able to hear as well, or background noise may suddenly start up and ...

  20. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... not able to hear as well, or background noise may suddenly start up and then be an ... It allows for localization and improved hearing and noise. This device also lacks some of the disadvantages ...

  1. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be able to get the sound from the right side to the left side and in that way give her -- help her get over the challenges that single-sided deafness presents. But important to remember that she will not hear in the right ear. She will hear from the right side, ...

  2. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... implanted, the Baha device will allow sound to travel through bone and restore close-to-normal hearing ... through the abutment so the sound can then travel through the head to the functional cochlea, or ...

  3. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... failing to respond, and that's as the hearing levels dropped to that threshold point. And we can ... that would show her on a very really level for her just how much benefit would be ...

  4. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... talking or speaking but still not have successful communication because they did not get the words clearly ... aware of those sounds, both for safety and communication purposes. It allows for localization and improved hearing ...

  5. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... my right ear because he thought I was deaf, and I couldn't hear anything. I kept ... that's when we found out that I was deaf. 00:47:05 ANNOUNCER: Doctors diagnosed Jessica with ...

  6. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and restore close-to-normal hearing for the patient. During the webcast you may email questions to ... now let me first tell you about the patient today. This is Jessica, who is in her ...

  7. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... life so brilliant and so clear. All the colors are beautiful. At least that's what my grandma ... been a surgical implantation of the Baha hearing treatment for single-sided deafness performed live from Hartford ...

  8. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... then obviously hearing is still present. However, in real life day- to-day conditions, there can be ... sound is coming from, that can be a real challenge. Listening to speech in a noisy environment ...

  9. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a motor vehicle accident where we, among other injuries, lost her hearing on the right side. And ... in Jessica's case, there can be a traumatic injury following an acoustic neuroma surgery that can leave ...

  10. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to return to after this, regarding sports, swimming, risk of infection, and those kinds of things, Marc, ... the ear itself, so there really is no risk of further hearing loss with the procedure. And ...

  11. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Baha is indicated. A cochlear implant involves the implantation of an electrode array into the cochlea, and ... BONAIUTO, MD: Sure. This has been a surgical implantation of the Baha hearing treatment for single-sided ...

  12. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... obviously hearing is still present. However, in real life day- to-day conditions, there can be a ... get your cataracts fixed, and you can see life so brilliant and so clear. All the colors ...

  13. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... her thirties. And as a 5-year-old child she was involved in a motor vehicle accident where we, among other injuries, lost her hearing on the right side. And she has lived the last nearly ...

  14. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... all, your hearing is limited to that one good side. If someone's on the opposite side of you, ... changed, the person may have moved from the good side to the other side of you where you' ...

  15. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and basically is indicated to restore functional hearing sensitivity to a patient who has very, very limited ... a cochlear implant. What I can do -- in fact, what we haven't talked about is how ...

  16. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can restore close-to- normal hearing without invasive surgery to the middle ear. 00:48:28 JESSICA FETT: I think it's like somebody who has cataracts. You can't really see clear. And then ...

  17. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be sufficient to provide adequate functional hearing for communication purposes. 00:33:53 MARC D. EISEN, MD: Sue, that's an important point that gets confusing. We think a lot ...

  18. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normal hearing side. That is called the head shadow from that blockage. Particularly affected are the high- ... removed. You can see one piece there, a second piece, and a third piece. And the important ...

  19. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... implanted, the Baha device will allow sound to travel through bone and restore close-to-normal hearing for the patient. During the webcast you may email questions to the surgeon by clicking the MDirectAccess button at any time. This program represents Hartford Hospital's ongoing efforts to ...

  20. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of sound and has difficulty hearing in noisy environments. 00:47:17 JESSICA FETT: And even the simple things, like driving in the car with my kids, they're all in the back. I can't, you know. And the window's right here, so no matter how quiet your car ...

  1. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... difficult issue to deal with because it does affect people differently. One of the things that I hear all the time is that tinnitus is much more noticeable in quiet environments. And when you're going to sleep, when you're just sitting and reading, but ...

  2. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... helpful to the patient in reducing the annoying effects of that tinnitus. 00:45:59 GREGORY S. BONAIUTO, MD: But its primary thrust is not to address tinnitus in a patient. 00:46:04 SUSAN M. MEISSNER, AuD: This is relating to improving communication by improved hearing. 00:46:07 GREGORY S. BONAIUTO, ...

  3. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the screwlike fixture is permanently in place and well-healed, the device can be utilized. That actually takes about three to four ... is would this device address the ringing as well as the hearing problem. ... is no sound. It tends to be ringing but can have character of roaring or ...

  4. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hearing is still present. However, in real life day- to-day conditions, there can be a significant impairment with ... coming from, but it also can occur in day-to-day situations, both socially or in a ...

  5. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Baha device uses sound vibrations, and those vibrations then are passed from the side with no functional hearing to the functioning ear internally on the opposite side. That happens very efficiently, with no loss of energy, because the placement of the device is surgically ...

  6. Are open-fit hearing aids a possible alternative to bone-anchored hearing devices in patients with mild to severe hearing loss? A preliminary trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amberley V. Ostevik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Open-fit hearing aids (OFHAs may be of benefit for some individuals with chronic outer and middle ear conditions for which boneanchored hearing devices (BAHDs are normally recommended. The purpose of this study was to compare performance between OFHAs and BAHDs. A Starkey Destiny 800 OFHA was fit on eight adult BAHD users and speech perception measures in quiet and in background noise were compared under two different test conditions: i BAHD only and ii OFHA only. Equivalent outcome measure performance between these two conditions suggests that the OFHA was able to provide sufficient amplification for mild to moderate degrees of hearing loss (pure-tone averages (PTAs less than 47 dB HL. The improved speech perception performances and increased loudness ratings observed for several of the participants with moderately-severe to severe degrees of hearing loss (PTAs of 47 dB HL or greater in the BAHD only condition suggest that the OFHA did not provide sufficient amplification for these individuals. Therefore, OFHAs may be a successful alternative to the BAHD for individuals with no more than a moderate conductive hearing loss who are unable or unwilling to undergo implant surgery or unable to wear conventional hearing aids due to allergies, irritation, or chronic infection associated with the ear being blocked with a shell or earmold.

  7. Wireless and acoustic hearing with bone-anchored hearing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Arjan J.; Mylanus, Emmanuel A.M.; Hol, Myrthe K.S.; Snik, Ad F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The efficacy of wireless connectivity in bone-anchored hearing was studied by comparing the wireless and acoustic performance of the Ponto Plus sound processor from Oticon Medical relative to the acoustic performance of its predecessor, the Ponto Pro. Study sample: Nineteen subjects with more than two years' experience with a bone-anchored hearing device were included. Thirteen subjects were fitted unilaterally and six bilaterally. Design: Subjects served as their own control. First, subjects were tested with the Ponto Pro processor. After a four-week acclimatization period performance the Ponto Plus processor was measured. In the laboratory wireless and acoustic input levels were made equal. In daily life equal settings of wireless and acoustic input were used when watching TV, however when using the telephone the acoustic input was reduced by 9 dB relative to the wireless input. Results: Speech scores for microphone with Ponto Pro and for both input modes of the Ponto Plus processor were essentially equal when equal input levels of wireless and microphone inputs were used. Only the TV-condition showed a statistically significant (p <5%) lower speech reception threshold for wireless relative to microphone input. In real life, evaluation of speech quality, speech intelligibility in quiet and noise, and annoyance by ambient noise, when using landline phone, mobile telephone, and watching TV showed a clear preference (p <1%) for the Ponto Plus system with streamer over the microphone input. Due to the small number of respondents with landline phone (N = 7) the result for noise annoyance was only significant at the 5% level. Conclusion: Equal input levels for acoustic and wireless inputs results in equal speech scores, showing a (near) equivalence for acoustic and wireless sound transmission with Ponto Pro and Ponto Plus. The default 9-dB difference between microphone and wireless input when using the telephone results in a substantial

  8. Comparison of two bone anchored hearing instruments: BP100 and Ponto Pro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Glad, Henrik; Nielsen, Lars Holme

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating if there were differences in auditory performance, operation, or user preference between the Ponto Pro or the BP100, two bone anchored hearing instruments (BAHI) with modern sound processing technology....

  9. A Retrospective Cohort Study on the Influence of Comorbidity on Soft Tissue Reactions, Revision Surgery, and Implant Loss in Bone-anchored Hearing Implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besten, C.A. den; Nelissen, R.C.; Peer, P.G.M.; Faber, H.T.; Dun, C.A.; Wolf, M.J.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Hol, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for complications after bone-anchored hearing implant (BAHI) surgery. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: All adult patients who received titanium bone-anchored hearing implants at our clinic between September 1,

  10. Development of cartilage conduction hearing aid

    OpenAIRE

    Hosoi, H; S. Yanai; Nishimura, T; Sakaguchi, T.; T. Iwakura; Yoshino, K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The potential demand for hearing aids is increasing in accordance with aging of populations in many developed countries. Because certain patients cannot use air conduction hearing aids, they usually use bone conduction hearing aids. However, bone does not transmit sound as efficiently as air, and bone conduction hearing aids require surgery (bone anchored hearing aid) or great pressure to the skull. The first purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of a new sound conduction ...

  11. A new bone-anchored hearing implant: short-term retrospective data on implant survival and subjective benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelissen, R.C.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Snik, A.F.M.; Hol, M.K.S.

    2013-01-01

    This report provides the first short-term follow-up data on the Ponto bone-anchored hearing implant from our tertiary referral centre. Thirty-one consecutive patients with a mean age of 51 years who received the implant between October 2010 and December 2011 were included retrospectively in this stu

  12. Influence of directionality and maximal power output on speech understanding with bone anchored hearing implants in single sided deafness

    OpenAIRE

    Krempaska, Silvia; Koval, Juraj; Schmid, Christoph; Pfiffner, Flurin; Kurz, Anja; Kompis, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Bone-anchored hearing implants (BAHI) are routinely used to alleviate the effects of the acoustic head shadow in single-sided sensorineural deafness (SSD). In this study, the influence of the directional microphone setting and the maximum power output of the BAHI sound processor on speech understanding in noise in a laboratory setting were investigated. Eight adult BAHI users with SSD participated in this pilot study. Speech understanding in noise was measured using a new Slovak speech-in-noi...

  13. Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  14. Clinical Outcome of a Wide-diameter Bone-anchored Hearing Implant and a Surgical Technique With Tissue Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowinckel, Marius S.; Møller, Martin N.; Wielandt, Kirsten N.; Foghsgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical outcome of a surgical technique with tissue preservation for a wide bone-anchored hearing implant concerning postoperative complications, skin reactions, implant loss, and implant stability. Study Design: Consecutive, prospective case series. Setting: Tertiary referral center. Patients: Twenty-four adult patients with normal skin quality were enrolled. Intervention(s): Implantation of bone-anchored implant was performed using a one-stage linear-incision technique with tissue preservation surgery. Main Outcome Measures(s): Skin and soft tissue reactions according to Holgers grading system. Pain and numbness measured according to visual analogue scale. Implant stability quotient values were recorded using resonance frequency analysis. Follow-up at 10 days, 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. Results: Primary implant stability was good and a significant increase in implant stability quotient occurred during the first 10 days and continued to be stable throughout the 1-year observation period. No implants were lost. Skin and soft tissue reactions were few, no reaction (Holger grade 0) was observed in 88% of the follow-up examinations and no grade 4 reactions occurred. Pain and numbness were minimal. Conclusion: The wide implant showed good stability initially and throughout the observation period. Skin and soft tissue reactions were rare and minor. No implants were lost. PMID:26954348

  15. Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... electrical nerve impulses and send them to the auditory nerve, which connects the inner ear to the ... prefer. Cleaning makes a difference in hearing aid comfort. A perfectly comfortable hearing aid can become pretty ...

  16. Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prefer the open-fit hearing aid because their perception of their voice does not sound “plugged up.” ... My voice sounds too loud. The “plugged-up” sensation that causes a hearing aid user’s voice to ...

  17. Types of Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices Consumer Products Hearing Aids Types of Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... some features for hearing aids? What are hearing aids? Hearing aids are sound-amplifying devices designed to ...

  18. Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Food and Drug Administration Staff FDA permits marketing of new laser-based hearing aid with potential ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  19. Influence of directionality and maximal power output on speech understanding with bone anchored hearing implants in single sided deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krempaska, Silvia; Koval, Juraj; Schmid, Christoph; Pfiffner, Flurin; Kurz, Anja; Kompis, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Bone-anchored hearing implants (BAHI) are routinely used to alleviate the effects of the acoustic head shadow in single-sided sensorineural deafness (SSD). In this study, the influence of the directional microphone setting and the maximum power output of the BAHI sound processor on speech understanding in noise in a laboratory setting were investigated. Eight adult BAHI users with SSD participated in this pilot study. Speech understanding in noise was measured using a new Slovak speech-in-noise test in two different spatial settings, either with noise coming from the front and noise from the side of the BAHI (S90N0) or vice versa (S0N90). In both spatial settings, speech understanding was measured without a BAHI, with a Baha BP100 in omnidirectional mode, with a BP100 in directional mode, with a BP110 power in omnidirectional and with a BP110 power in directional mode. In spatial setting S90N0, speech understanding in noise with either sound processor and in either directional mode was improved by 2.2-2.8 dB (p = 0.004-0.016). In spatial setting S0N90, speech understanding in noise was reduced by either BAHI, but was significantly better by 1.0-1.8 dB, if the directional microphone system was activated (p = 0.046), when compared to the omnidirectional setting. With the limited number of subjects in this study, no statistically significant differences were found between the two sound processors. PMID:23700268

  20. A new wide-diameter bone-anchored hearing implant-prospective 1-year data on complications, implant stability, and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2014-01-01

    . No implants were lost. Skin and soft tissue reactions were rare and minor, as no reaction was seen in 93% of the follow-up examinations and no grade 4 reactions occurred. CONCLUSION: The new wide implant showed good stability at surgery. Osseointegration was fast, and implant stability increased......OBJECTIVE: To investigate a new wide bone-anchored hearing implant considering initial stability, stability over time, implant loss, and skin reaction. STUDY DESIGN: Consecutive, prospective case series. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Twenty adult patients were enrolled. All...... operations were 1-stage, single-incision technique with subcutaneous reduction. INTERVENTION(S): Measurement of implant stability. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Implant stability quotient (ISQ) values were recorded using resonance frequency analysis at the time of implantation and at 10 days, 6 weeks, 6 months...

  1. How to Get Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Products Hearing Aids How to get Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... my hearing aids? How do I get hearing aids? To get hearing aids, you should first have ...

  2. Development of cartilage conduction hearing aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hosoi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The potential demand for hearing aids is increasing in accordance with aging of populations in many developed countries. Because certain patients cannot use air conduction hearing aids, they usually use bone conduction hearing aids. However, bone does not transmit sound as efficiently as air, and bone conduction hearing aids require surgery (bone anchored hearing aid or great pressure to the skull. The first purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of a new sound conduction pathway via the cartilage. The second purpose is to develop a hearing aid with a cartilage conduction transducer for patients who cannot use regular air conduction hearing aids.Design/methodology/approach: We examined the hearing ability of a patient with atresia of both external auditory meatuses via three kinds of conduction pathways (air, bone, and cartilage. After the best position for the cartilage conduction transducer was found, audiometric evaluation was performed for his left ear with an insertion earphone (air conduction, a bone conduction transducer, and a cartilage conduction transducer. Then we made a new hearing aid using cartilage conduction and got subjective data from the patients.Findings: The tragal cartilage was the best position for the cartilage conduction transducer. The patient’s mean hearing levels were 58.3 dBHL, 6.7 dBHL, and 3.3 dBHL for air conduction, bone conduction, and cartilage conduction respectively. The hearing ability of the patients obtained from the cartilage conduction hearing aid was comparable to those from the bone conduction hearing aid.Practical implications: Hearing levels using cartilage conduction are very similar to those via bone conduction. Cartilage conduction hearing aids may overcome the practical disadvantages of bone conduction hearing aids such as pain and the need for surgery.Originality/value: We have clarified the efficacy of the cartilage conduction pathway and developed a prototype

  3. Music and hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Sara M K; Moore, Brian C J

    2014-01-01

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. PMID:25361601

  4. Hearing Aids and Music

    OpenAIRE

    Chasin, Marshall; Russo, Frank A.

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the primary concern for hearing aid design and fitting is optimization for speech inputs. However, increasingly other types of inputs are being investigated and this is certainly the case for music. Whether the hearing aid wearer is a musician or merely someone who likes to listen to music, the electronic and electro-acoustic parameters described can be optimized for music as well as for speech. That is, a hearing aid optimally set for music can be optimally set for speech, even...

  5. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... m going to -- Greg, I'm going to let you go to some questions. This is a good time ... a problem. 00:30:14 GREGORY S. BONAIUTO, MD: Let's see if there are any ... I'll do now, as you're getting ready to go to the next question, is I'm going ...

  6. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... skin to allow removal of some of the soft tissue where the screwlike fixture will be anchored. The ... screen, acting as a hinge. Beneath that the soft tissue consisting of fat and some muscle is removed. ...

  7. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... what challenges that creates for her. But the bottom line is, what we're offering today is ... And you can see how that's going to fit nicely over the abutment. And at this point ...

  8. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... and out. It's important that we don't heat the bone up too much. And you can ... way give her -- help her get over the challenges that single-sided deafness presents. But important to ...

  9. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... always changing. And technology even with the Baha system has changed recently. It's always getting more powerful, smaller, more sophisticated, just like computers. The good news is that the abutment stays ...

  10. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... there can be a traumatic injury following an acoustic neuroma surgery that can leave a patient with ... D. EISEN, MD: Yes, frequently -- this is probably acoustic neuroma surgery. And the titanium mesh that's used ...

  11. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... appropriately. The way the device works is it uses the fact that sound is transmitted very efficiently ... the head using bone conduction. The Baha device uses sound vibrations, and those vibrations then are passed ...

  12. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... can expect to return to after this, regarding sports, swimming, risk of infection, and those kinds of ... off. And likewise, for some of the contact sports, you can wear a helmet, and if the ...

  13. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cochlea, or inner ear. Let me show you what that device looks like. On your screen you will see the placement of the ... as we're drilling. 00:20:51 Now, what you can see here is that ... our drill. This is useful for orienting your pilot hole such that it's straight up and ...

  14. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the device is surgically implanted. The sound quality is very high-quality and it exceeds results that you can get ... is correcting for the sound for the highest quality. And then that is then changed from a ...

  15. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... been placed and not have to have a new fixture. Is that your general impression? 00:43:39 MARC D. EISEN, MD: That's a good point too, because technology is always changing. And technology even with the ...

  16. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for participating in this webcast. To receive CME credit, just click the CME button at the conclusion ... to return to after this, regarding sports, swimming, risk of infection, and those kinds of things, Marc, ...

  17. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MD: One other true advantage of the Baha system is that we're not operating on the ear itself, so there really is ... webcast. On behalf of my colleagues and the operating room staff at Hartford Hospital, ... of the Baha system surgery for the treatment of single-sided deafness. ...

  18. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... year-old child she was involved in a motor vehicle accident where we, among other injuries, lost ... re doing today. So why don't we start off by going to Sue Meissner, our audiologist, ...

  19. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgeon by clicking the MDirectAccess button at any time. This program represents Hartford Hospital's ongoing efforts to ... send us your question now or at any time during the program, just click the MDirectAccess button ...

  20. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... together. Now, that can be both a safety issue in terms of knowing where some hazard is ... problem. Tinnitus can be a very, very difficult issue to deal with because it does affect people ...

  1. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or family member. Finally, CME is available to physicians for participating in this webcast. To receive CME ... that I was deaf. 00:47:05 ANNOUNCER: Doctors diagnosed Jessica with a condition called single-sided ...

  2. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on with the program, you'll see what challenges that creates for her. But the bottom line ... implication of single-sided deafness is and the challenges that it creates. Then we'll take you ...

  3. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... Hartford Hospital's ongoing efforts to bring the latest developments in healthcare to the community. And now we ... her thirties. And as a 5-year-old child she was involved in a motor vehicle accident ...

  4. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... Single-sided deafness has been underestimated in the impact on a patient for many years because the ... a candidate at all for any of this technology. So what I'm going to have next ...

  5. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... transmitted very efficiently through the head using bone conduction. The Baha device uses sound vibrations, and those ... changed from a normal soundwave into a bone conduction vibration, and that is what is passed then ...

  6. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that can be a real challenge. Listening to speech in a noisy environment is also significantly impaired ... in an audiologic sound booth and consists of speech testing, both to determine the thresholds, or point ...

  7. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... see bone beneath with no soft tissue. And something I notice sometimes is that the skull is ... of how I'm just finishing up. But something else I want to emphasize that's important is -- ...

  8. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... the high-frequency sounds which are contributing to word understanding and clarity. So there may be cases ... successful communication because they did not get the words clearly enough to respond appropriately. The way the ...

  9. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... to allow removal of some of the soft tissue where the screwlike fixture will be anchored. The ... series of slides demonstrates the removal of the tissue beneath the skin flap. You can see in ...

  10. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... slide not shown here, where a small pilot hole is drilled into the bone and a small ... fixture. This is done by creating a small hole in the skin flap and stretching it over ...

  11. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deafness, live from Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut. I'm Dr. Gregory Bonaiuto. I'm your host for the program. Next to ... who is an audiologist practicing at Hartford Hospital. I'm joined in the OR by Dr. Marc ...

  12. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you're seeing with Dr. Eisen operating today, firm bone in the vicinity where the implant will ... approximately 45 decibels or less. So the critical factors there is how the inner ear is functioning ...

  13. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Single-sided deafness has been underestimated in the impact on a patient for many years because the ... video plays] ANNOUNCER: After sustaining a traumatic head injury in a car accident at age five, Jessica ...

  14. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... That happens very efficiently, with no loss of energy, because the placement of the device is surgically ... superficial on the skin, the transference of that energy is less efficient, and therefore the sound quality ...

  15. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to-day situations, both socially or in a work situation, for example, a meeting where you may ... enough to respond appropriately. The way the device works is it uses the fact that sound is ...

  16. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... her thirties. And as a 5-year-old child she was involved in a motor vehicle accident ... question is, has this procedure been done on children? And the response is that the FDA has ...

  17. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abutment free during their contact sport activity. 00:42:22 GREGORY S. BONAIUTO, MD: And this, Marc, all ... this initial healing phase of several months. 00:42:26 MARC D. EISEN, MD: Yeah, that's another ...

  18. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... slides showing that undermining. The next series, please. These two slides demonstrate the fact that once the ... if you'd like to address any of these. 00:27:35 SUSAN M. MEISSNER, AuD: Yes. ...

  19. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Marc, all applies to after this initial healing phase of several months. 00:42:26 MARC D. ... that the abutment stays and the device can change. So you can get an updated processor when ...

  20. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... clips onto that securely. In most cases the hair can then cover that up so that it ... Subsequent to that, the region is shaved of hair and the side is marked with a surgical ...

  1. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... going to have you take us through the process of determining who is a good candidate for ... connection, and time does that. So the healing process is mainly dictated by the integration of the ...

  2. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... working together. Now, that can be both a safety issue in terms of knowing where some hazard ... and be aware of those sounds, both for safety and communication purposes. It allows for localization and ...

  3. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... This slide serves to demonstrate that there is care needed for the surgical wound postoperatively. And that ... week later, and then Jessica has to take care of her abutment a little by just making ...

  4. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for the patient. During the webcast you may email questions to the surgeon by clicking the MDirectAccess ... for our audience. First, we will answer your email questions later in the program. To send us ...

  5. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... approximately 45 decibels or less. So the critical factors there is how the inner ear is functioning ... to return to after this, regarding sports, swimming, risk of infection, and those kinds of things, Marc, ...

  6. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... webcast. Over the next hour, we will demonstrate a Baha surgery for single-sided deafness, live from ... we go to Dr. Eisen, I have just a few reminders for our audience. First, we will ...

  7. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... And the purpose of this is to provide access beneath the skin to allow removal of some ... request information" button on your webcast screen and open the door to informed medical care. 00:51: ...

  8. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... One patient writes in that they have a history of a previous tumor resection, brain tumor resection, ... patient comes in is I take the case history and find out whether or not it sounds ...

  9. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... a candidate at all for any of this technology. So what I'm going to have next ... whether the fixture can accommodate the ever-shrinking technology in today's world. Obviously if the device becomes ...

  10. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... noise. This device also lacks some of the disadvantages of more conventional treatments for that. It used ... snaps on to the abutment. And then we wind a little gauze around, the whole idea being ...

  11. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... After sustaining a traumatic head injury in a car accident at age five, Jessica Fett's parents noticed ... even the simple things, like driving in the car with my kids, they're all in the ...

  12. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... ongoing efforts to bring the latest developments in healthcare to the community. And now we go to ... traumatic head injury in a car accident at age five, Jessica Fett's parents noticed she had lost ...

  13. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... skin, the transference of that energy is less efficient, and therefore the sound quality is poorer, less ... that transference of those sound vibrations is very efficient because it's directly into the bone itself. I' ...

  14. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the details as it is live. And my goal would be, by reviewing some slides, to show ... to see, in the middle. And that's the goal location of the fixture placement at the end. ...

  15. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on and maybe take the next question. 00:40:54 GREGORY S. BONAIUTO, MD: Well, there are a ... know Jessica a little bit better. 00:46:40 [video plays] ANNOUNCER: After sustaining a traumatic head ...

  16. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the bone oscillator is superficial on the skin, the transference of that energy is less efficient, ... slides, is to mark the location in the skin where the screwlike fixture will be anchored. Subsequent ...

  17. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an interference. 00:06:33 One of the problems with single-sided deafness is the head is ... would be transmitted to the better side. The problem with that type of a device is that ...

  18. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... after the webcast, should you wish to share it with a friend or family member. Finally, CME ... single-sided deafness is and the challenges that it creates. Then we'll take you through the ...

  19. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Baha system procedure to treat single-sided deafness, live from Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut. Ear, ... will demonstrate a Baha surgery for single-sided deafness, live from Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut. I' ...

  20. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... we remove a little bit of what we call the periosteum, which is the soft tissue that ... indicating candidacy for the Baha. Many times patients call and are asking about that because they've ...

  1. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

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    Full Text Available ... And that consists, again, of the microphone, a volume control, and as the audiologist, I can also ... This has a microphone inside. And then the volume was increased until she indicated that she was ...

  2. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... we remove a little bit of what we call the periosteum, which is the soft tissue that is directly adherent to the bone of the skull. Again, we have our mark in the center, which is the goal of where we're ...

  3. Hearing Aids Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Globally, hearing loss is the second most frequent disability. About 80% of the persons affected by hearing loss do not use hearing aids. The goal of this edited volume is to present a theoretically founded, interdisciplinary approach geared at understanding and improving social interaction impac...

  4. Hearing aid and Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Reza Nazeri

    1999-01-01

    Prescription of hearing aid is an extensive special category of knowledge in the field of audiology. This article is aimed at discussing the function of hearing aid and also management of patients in the noisy environments and presenting solutions to overcome problems regarding to this issue along with taking a look to the equipments prepared nowadays to cope with noisy situations.

  5. Hearing aid adjustment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemann, Trine; Matthews, Ben; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2012-01-01

    to the interaction during hearing aid fitting. This report of a Danish pilot study describes two such problems. The first problem arises from the requirement that the audiologist needs to ‘translate’ the patient’s subjective hearing description for making technological decisions. The second problem...... is the way in which the hearing aid user’s implicit and often unrealistic expectations are handled. This kind of research has potential application for developing a model of best practices....

  6. Buying a Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatments & Cures Buying a Hearing Aid Cancer Treatment Scams Cancer Treatment Scams CURE-ious Bookmark Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests ... Money Privacy, Identity & Online Security Blog Video & Media Scam Alerts Get health and fitness updates by email ...

  7. Hearing Aid Personalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Nielsen, Jakob; Jensen, Bjørn Sand;

    2013-01-01

    Modern digital hearing aids require and offer a great level of personalization. Today, this personalization is not performed based directly on what the user actually perceives, but on a hearing-care professional’s interpretation of what the user explains about what is perceived. In this paper, an...... interactive personalization system based on Gaussian process regression and active learning is proposed, which personalize the hearing aids based directly on what the user perceives. Preliminary results demonstrate a significant difference between a truly personalized setting obtained with the proposed system...

  8. Contralateral routing of signal hearing aid versus transcutaneous bone conduction in single-sided deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterme, Gaëlle; Bernardeschi, Daniele; Bensemman, Anissa; Coudert, Cyrille; Portal, Jean-Jacques; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier; Vicaut, Eric; Frachet, Bruno; Bozorg Grayeli, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a contralateral routing of signal (CROS) hearing aid to a transcutaneous bone-anchored device in the same conditions. This prospective crossover study included 18 adult patients with a single-sided deafness (SSD). After a trial period of 60 days with CROS and 7 days with a transcutaneous bone-anchored device (Alpha 1®, Sophono, Boulder, Colo., USA) on a headband, 13 (72%) patients opted for Alpha 1, 2 patients for CROS, and 3 rejected both rehabilitation methods. Clinical tolerance, satisfaction, hearing performances (pure-tone audiometry, speech test in quiet and in noise, stereo audiometry, sound localization, and Hearing in Noise Test), and quality of life (Glasgow Benefit Inventory, Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit and Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit questionnaires) were measured at 3 and 12 months after the implantation. Both devices improved equally the hearing in noise and the quality of life. Transcutaneous devices represent an effective option in SSD. PMID:26021779

  9. Influence of Implantable Hearing Aids and Neuroprosthesison Music Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Rahne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification and discrimination of timbre are essential features of music perception. One dominating parameter within the multidimensional timbre space is the spectral shape of complex sounds. As hearing loss interferes with the perception and enjoyment of music, we approach the individual timbre discrimination skills in individuals with severe to profound hearing loss using a cochlear implant (CI and normal hearing individuals using a bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha. With a recent developed behavioral test relying on synthetically sounds forming a spectral continuum, the timbre difference was changed adaptively to measure the individual just noticeable difference (JND in a forced-choice paradigm. To explore the differences in timbre perception abilities caused by the hearing mode, the sound stimuli were varied in their fundamental frequency, thus generating different spectra which are not completely covered by a CI or Baha system. The resulting JNDs demonstrate differences in timbre perception between normal hearing individuals, Baha users, and CI users. Beside the physiological reasons, also technical limitations appear as the main contributing factors.

  10. Influence of implantable hearing aids and neuroprosthesison music perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahne, Torsten; Böhme, Lars; Götze, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    The identification and discrimination of timbre are essential features of music perception. One dominating parameter within the multidimensional timbre space is the spectral shape of complex sounds. As hearing loss interferes with the perception and enjoyment of music, we approach the individual timbre discrimination skills in individuals with severe to profound hearing loss using a cochlear implant (CI) and normal hearing individuals using a bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha). With a recent developed behavioral test relying on synthetically sounds forming a spectral continuum, the timbre difference was changed adaptively to measure the individual just noticeable difference (JND) in a forced-choice paradigm. To explore the differences in timbre perception abilities caused by the hearing mode, the sound stimuli were varied in their fundamental frequency, thus generating different spectra which are not completely covered by a CI or Baha system. The resulting JNDs demonstrate differences in timbre perception between normal hearing individuals, Baha users, and CI users. Beside the physiological reasons, also technical limitations appear as the main contributing factors. PMID:22645422

  11. Self-Fitting Hearing Aids

    OpenAIRE

    Keidser, Gitte; Convery, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    A self-contained, self-fitting hearing aid (SFHA) is a device that enables the user to perform both threshold measurements leading to a prescribed hearing aid setting and fine-tuning, without the need for audiological support or access to other equipment. The SFHA has been proposed as a potential solution to address unmet hearing health care in developing countries and remote locations in the developed world and is considered a means to lower cost and increase uptake of hearing aids in develo...

  12. Comparing Analog and Digital Hearing Aids in Reducing Hearing Disability

    OpenAIRE

    Ghassem Mohammad Khani; Mohammad Hassan Khalesi; Soghrat Faghih Zadeh; Bahieh Kohansal; Zahra Jafari

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Comparing analog and digital hearing aids reducing disability caused by hearing deficiency among moderate to severe sensorineural hearing-impaired persons. Method and Material: This descriptive-analytic study was carried out on two groups of subjects participated in this study in some audiology clinics of hearing aid since May 2002 to October 2003. Twenty subjects wore analog hearing aids and twenty one subjects wore digital hearing aids. In this study , no subject had previous mid...

  13. Hearing aid and Hair cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jafari

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available We expect some people benefit more from their hearing aids, but after a while they complain of inappropriate loudness growth.  Currently fitting hearing aids based on their loudness growth curves one of the best and most acceptable ways of fitting hearing aids; we should study this curve based on the disturbed function of inner and outer hair cells. We should also know that based on which curves can make the growth curve of the damaged cells to normal ones.

  14. Signal processing algorithms for digital hearing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Pérez, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    Hearing loss is a problem that severely affects the speech communication and disqualify most hearing-impaired people from holding a normal life. Although the vast majority of hearing loss cases could be corrected by using hearing aids, however, only a scarce of hearing-impaired people who could be benefited from hearing aids purchase one. This irregular use of hearing aids arises from the existence of a problem that, to date, has not been solved effectively and comfortably: the automatic adap...

  15. A Hearing Aid Primer 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetter, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    This hearing aid primer is designed to define the differences among the three levels of hearing instrument technology: conventional analog circuit technology (most basic), digitally programmable/analog circuit technology (moderately advanced), and fully digital technology (most advanced). Both moderate and advanced technologies mean that hearing…

  16. Hearing Aid Fitting & Electrophysiologic Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Jalaei

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of deaf individual is one of the important subjects that has attracted attention of many researchers during past centuries. Different opinions have been established in this direction. Electrophysiologic tests were established and developed parallel to developments in rehabilitation. Therefore, opinion of using electrophysiologic test for evaluation and fitting of hearing aid became gradually popular. Ultimately, the electrophysiologic tests are used in evaluation and fitting of hearing aid in two ways: 1-Direct way 2- Indirect way "nIn direct way aided ABR is obtained and special attention is paid to wave V. This technique has many difficulties. Inindirect way, electrophysiologic tests such, ECochG, OAE and ABR, AMLR, ALR and P300 and other objective tests are used, especially in infants and neonates for evaluating the state of hearing. Researches are continuing in this field. It is probable to have aided electrophysiologic responses with speech stimuli in near future.

  17. Comparing Analog and Digital Hearing Aids in Reducing Hearing Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassem Mohammad Khani

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Comparing analog and digital hearing aids reducing disability caused by hearing deficiency among moderate to severe sensorineural hearing-impaired persons. Method and Material: This descriptive-analytic study was carried out on two groups of subjects participated in this study in some audiology clinics of hearing aid since May 2002 to October 2003. Twenty subjects wore analog hearing aids and twenty one subjects wore digital hearing aids. In this study , no subject had previous middle ear or psychological problems. APHAB questionnaire was completed before using hearing aid and 2 months after to determine benefit of hearing aid use. Results: Total score mean of APHAB inventory before and after use of analoge hearing aids were 52.215+6.420 and 32.300+3.443 respectively. Also total score mean of APHAB inventory before and after use of digital hearing aids were 54.9252+9.028 and 26.321+10.916 respectively. There was no significant difference between total mean score of APHAB inventory before and after using analog and digital hearing aids (P=0.058.While there was significant difference between total mean score of APHAB questionnaire before and after use of analog hearing aids (P<0.001 and also before and after use of digital hearing aids (P<0.001. Moreover age, gender , litracy level , occupation , degree of hearing loss and manner of hearing aid usage did not have significant effect on APHAB results. Configuration of loss had siginficant effect on aversiveness subscale before and after use of analog hearing aids (P=0.008. Previous experience and duration of hearing aid usage had significant effect on aversiveness subscale before and after use of digital hearing aids (P=0.043 and (P=0.024, respectively , while all of these three items did not have significant effect on total mean score of APHAB inventory and also total mean scores of three subscales of ease of communication , reverberation and background noise. Conclusion: Comparing to

  18. The Future of Hearing Aid Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Hearing aids have advanced significantly over the past decade, primarily due to the maturing of digital technology. The next decade should see an even greater number of innovations to hearing aid technology, and this article attempts to predict in which areas the new developments will occur. Both incremental and radical innovations in digital hearing aids will be driven by research advances in the following fields: (1) wireless technology, (2) digital chip technology, (3) hearing science, and...

  19. Self-Fitting Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convery, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    A self-contained, self-fitting hearing aid (SFHA) is a device that enables the user to perform both threshold measurements leading to a prescribed hearing aid setting and fine-tuning, without the need for audiological support or access to other equipment. The SFHA has been proposed as a potential solution to address unmet hearing health care in developing countries and remote locations in the developed world and is considered a means to lower cost and increase uptake of hearing aids in developed countries. This article reviews the status of the SFHA and the evidence for its feasibility and challenges and predicts where it is heading. Devices that can be considered partly or fully self-fitting without audiological support were identified in the direct-to-consumer market. None of these devices are considered self-contained as they require access to other hardware such as a proprietary interface, computer, smartphone, or tablet for manipulation. While there is evidence that self-administered fitting processes can provide valid and reliable results, their success relies on user-friendly device designs and interfaces and easy-to-interpret instructions. Until these issues have been sufficiently addressed, optional assistance with the self-fitting process and on-going use of SFHAs is recommended. Affordability and a sustainable delivery system remain additional challenges for the SFHA in developing countries. Future predictions include a growth in self-fitting products, with most future SFHAs consisting of earpieces that connect wirelessly with a smartphone and providers offering assistance through a telehealth infrastructure, and the integration of SFHAs into the traditional hearing health-care model. PMID:27072929

  20. Challenges in IC design for hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2012-01-01

    Designing modern hearing aids is a formidable challenge. The size of hearing aids is constantly decreasing, making them virtually invisible today. Still, as in all other modern electronics, more and more features are added to these devices driven by the development in modern IC technology. The...... demands for performance and features at very low supply voltage and power consumption constantly prove a challenge to the physical design of hearing aids and not at least the design of the ICs for these. As a result of this all large hearing aid manufacturers use fully customized ASICs in their products...... to produce a competitive advantage. This presentation will give a brief insight into the hearing aid market and industry, a brief view of the historic development of hearing aids and an introduction to how a modern hearing is constructed showing the amplifier as the key component in the modern...

  1. Noise-induced hearing loss and hearing aids requirement

    OpenAIRE

    C. Giordano; Garzaro, M; Nadalin, J; Pecorari, G; Boggero, R; ARGENTERO, P.; Albera, R

    2008-01-01

    Subjective disturbances, due to hearing loss, are auditory disability and handicap which can be evaluated with a questionnaire. The present study refers to a population of industrial workers affected by noise-induced hearing loss. Aim of the study is to identify the minimal level of hearing loss over which the patient felt changes in his quality of life, and the average auditory threshold at which the patient considered the application of a hearing aid useful or necessary. The sample comprise...

  2. General Framework of Hearing Aid Fitting Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Soo Hee

    2016-01-01

    Hearing aids are one of the most widely used treatment options for the hearing impaired and optimal outcomes of hearing aids are supported by comprehensive hearing aid fitting protocols. Currently, the term 'hearing aid fitting' is prevalently used among service and industry sectors with its comprehensive procedures not systematically explicated. In addition, a variety of non-normalized guidelines for hearing aid fitting has led to non-uniform care, outcome variability, and dissatisfaction of the use of hearing aids. The main purpose of the present study is to suggest a general framework of standardized practice for hearing aid fitting management including its pre- and post-fitting stages. The management framework centers on its fitting process with its prior steps of assessment as well as its posterior steps of follow-up, thereby eliminating diverging interpretations and non-uniform practices. Outcomes of this study are also expected to improve potential benefits such as quality of hearing aid fitting, user satisfaction, and cost effectiveness across relevant stakeholders. PMID:27144226

  3. Hearing Aids May Help Keep Seniors' Minds Sharp

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158532.html Hearing Aids May Help Keep Seniors' Minds Sharp Ability to ... people with hearing loss. "We know that hearing aids can keep older adults with hearing loss more ...

  4. Hearing Aids and Personal Sound Amplifiers: Know the Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Hearing Aids and Personal Sound Amplifiers: Know the Difference Share ... or use them as substitutes—for approved hearing aids. "Hearing aids and personal sound amplification products (PSAPS) ...

  5. Using a Shape Model in the Design of Hearing Aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Nielsen, Claus; Laugesen, Søren;

    2004-01-01

    Today the design of custom completely-in-the-canal hearing aids is a manual process and therefore there is a variation in the quality of the finished hearing aids. Especially the placement of the so-called faceplate on the hearing aid strongly influences the size and shape of the hearing aid. Since...

  6. Benefit of Analog, Programmable and Digital Hearing Aids

    OpenAIRE

    Jamileh Fatahi; Mansoureh Adel Ghahraman; Azadeh Ebrahimi; Faranak Ehsani; Samaneh Pourhadi

    2006-01-01

    Background and Aims: As the hearing aid technology progressively promotes toward replacing analog hearing aids with digital and programmable ones, comparison of the patient satisfaction of those kinds of hearing aids by means of a valuable tool seems so necessary. So, the aim of this study was to compare self-reported benefit of analog, digitally controlled programmable and digital hearing aids for reducing disability caused by hearing impairment in mild to severe sensorineural hearing impair...

  7. Measurement of hearing aid internal noise1

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, James D.; Goodman, Shawn S.; Bentler, Ruth A.

    2010-01-01

    Hearing aid equivalent input noise (EIN) measures assume the primary source of internal noise to be located prior to amplification and to be constant regardless of input level. EIN will underestimate internal noise in the case that noise is generated following amplification. The present study investigated the internal noise levels of six hearing aids (HAs). Concurrent with HA processing of a speech-like stimulus with both adaptive features (acoustic feedback cancellation, digital noise reduct...

  8. Distributed signal processing for binaural hearing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Over the last centuries, hearing aids have evolved from crude and bulky horn-shaped instruments to lightweight and almost invisible digital signal processing devices. While most of the research has focused on the design of monaural apparatus, the use of a wireless link has been recently advocated to enable data transfer between hearing aids such as to obtain a binaural system. The availability of a wireless link offers brand new perspectives but also poses great technical challenges. It requi...

  9. Stethoscopes with hearing aid use: Case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob, Regina Tangerino de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Description for using stethoscopes adapted to hearing aids. Aim: To describe the adaptation of HAs to stethoscopes used by 2 students in the health field with bilateral hearing impairment. Case reports: Two subjects with hearing loss had their stethoscopes coupled to HAs because of the individual requirements of their professions (healthcare to perform auscultation. Conclusion: The improvement was measured in situ, and satisfaction was evaluated using a subjective questionnaire. The use of a stethoscope coupled to an HA allowed students with hearing loss to perform auscultation.

  10. Cognitive hearing aids? Insights and possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Eline Borch; Lunner, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The working memory plays an important role in successfully overcoming adverse listening conditions and should consequently be considered when designing and testing hearing aids. A number of studies have established the relationship between hearing in noise and working memory involvement, but with the Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall (SWIRL) test, it is possible to show that working memory is also involved in listening under favorable conditions and that noise reduction has a positive influence in situation with very little noise. Although the capacity of the working memory is a finite individual size, its involvement can differ with fatigue and other factors and individualization of hearing aids should take this into account to obtain the best performance. A way of individually adapting hearing aids is based on changes in the electrical activity of the brain (EEG). Here we present the possibilities that arise from using EEG and show that ear-mounted electrodes is able to record useful EEG that can be explored for individualization of hearing aids. Such an adaptation could be done based on changes in the electrical activity of the brain (EEG). Here we present the possibilities that arise from using EEG and show that ear-mounted electrodes is able to record useful EEG that can be explored for individualization of hearing aids.

  11. Young Adolescents' Perception of Their Peers Who Wear Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Donna J.; Hood, Stephen B.

    1986-01-01

    Reactions of 87 normal hearing and 30 severely hearing impaired junior high school students to videotapes of two students (one hearing impaired and one normal) speaking when either wearing a postauricular hearing aid, wearing a body aid, or not wearing an aid were examined. (Author/DB)

  12. Signal Processing for Hearing Aids

    OpenAIRE

    Bijleveld, C.; Hendriks, R.C.; Heusdens, R.; Taal, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    A pair of properly functioning ears is of great importance for various common daily tasks. While the perception of speech is perhaps one of the most obvious examples, being notified by certain sounds like (fire-) alarms or traffic sounds can even be lifesaving. Therefore it is not surprising that hearing impairment may have a strong (social) impact. Typically, hearing problems will occur mostly with elderly people. However, due to the upcoming popularity of portable music-players, like the iP...

  13. Different Styles of Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aids available and offer some cosmetic and listening advantages. Photo courtesy of Phonak Click for larger image ... in place. These aids offer cosmetic and listening advantages and are used typically for adults. Photo courtesy ...

  14. Physiological modeling for hearing aid design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Ian C.; Young, Eric D.; Sachs, Murray B.

    2002-05-01

    Physiological data from hearing-impaired cats suggest that conventional hearing aid signal-processing schemes do not restore normal auditory-nerve responses to a vowel [Miller et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 101, 3602 (1997)] and can even produce anomalous and potentially confounding patterns of activity [Schilling et al., Hear. Res. 117, 57 (1998)]. These deficits in the neural representation may account at least partially for poor speech perception in some hearing aid users. An amplification scheme has been developed that produces neural responses to a vowel more like those seen in normal cats and that reduces confounding responses [Miller et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 106, 2693 (1999)]. A physiologically accurate model of the normal and impaired auditory periphery would provide simpler and quicker testing of such potential hearing aid designs. Details of such a model, based on that of Zhang et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 648 (2001)], will be presented. Model predictions suggest that impairment of both outer- and inner-hair cells contribute to the degraded representation of vowels in hearing-impaired cats. The model is currently being used to develop and test a generalization of the Miller et al. speech-processing algorithm described above to running speech. [Work supported by NIDCD Grants DC00109 and DC00023.] a)Now with the Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster Univ., 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada.

  15. Wireless communication for hearing aid system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nour, Baqer

    This thesis focuses on the wireless coupling between hearing aids close to a human head. Hearing aids constitute devices withadvanced technology and the wireless communication enables the introduction of a range of completely new functionalities. Such devices are small and the available power is...... limited, it is therefore important to characterize the wireless link-budget and tounderstand the mechanisms that control propagation of waves inside and outside the head. For this purpose, different approaches have been used. There are two objectives for this thesis. The first objective is to characterize...

  16. Localisation with bilateral hearing aids: without is better than with

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Bogaert, Tim; Moonen, Marc; Wouters, Jan

    2004-01-01

    By using two ears normal hearing people are able to localize sounds correctly in the horizontal plane, and are able to understand speech better in noisy scenario’s where noise and target are spatially separated. Although a lot of studies have been done on normal hearing and hearing impaired persons, little research has been done on directional hearing in bilateral hearing aid users. A person with bilateral hearing aids is wearing two independent digital signal processors with microphones ...

  17. Acceptance of Noise Growth Patterns in Hearing Aid Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyaldenhoven, Melinda C.; Plyler, Patrick N.; Thelin, James W.; Muenchen, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether the effects of speech presentation level on acceptance of noise could differentiate full-time, part-time, and nonusers of hearing aids and whether these effects could predict hearing aid use. Method: Participants were separated into 3 groups on the basis of hearing aid use: (a) full-time use, (b) part-time use, or (c)…

  18. Prevalence of hearing problems, and use of hearing aids among a sample of elderly patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Liston, R.; Solomon, S.; Banerjee, A K

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Deterioration of hearing with advancing age is well documented. However, the proportion of elderly people with hearing problems who wear hearing aids is low. AIM. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of hearing disability in a group of elderly patients in hospital and to determine their attitudes to hearing difficulties and the wearing of hearing aids. METHOD. A random sample of patients who were convalescing were interviewed. A detailed questionnaire was administere...

  19. Assisting Older Persons With Adjusting to Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Kari R; Clark, M Kathleen

    2016-02-01

    This intervention study tested the feasibility and initial effect of Hearing Aid Reintroduction (HEAR) to assist persons aged 70 to 85 years adjust to hearing aids. Following this 30-day intervention, hearing aid use increased between 1 and 8 hr per day with 50% of participants able to wear them for at least 4 hr. Hearing aid satisfaction improved from not satisfied to satisfied overall. The study demonstrated that HEAR is feasible and could improve hearing aid use of a substantial number of older persons who had previously failed to adjust to their hearing aids and had given up. However, further testing among a larger and more diverse population is needed to better understand the effectiveness and sustainability of the intervention. PMID:25520326

  20. Hearing Aid Use and Associated Factors in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Il Joon; Baek, Sun Young; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2015-10-01

    Despite the high prevalence of hearing impairment in the elderly, the rate of hearing aid use is still low. The objectives of this study were to report the nation-wide prevalence of hearing aid use in the Korean population and to determine the associated factors with hearing aid use utilizing a nationally representative data set.We obtained data from the 2010 to 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which were cross-sectional surveys of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the Republic of Korea at age ≥40 years (N = 12,709). A field survey team performed interviews as well as physical examinations. Hearing aid use was assessed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire and pure-tone audiometry was administered for all participants in a sound-attenuating booth. Prevalence of hearing aid acquisition and regular use were calculated in participants who reported perceived hearing loss and who have bilateral hearing thresholds exceeding the 40 dB hearing level. Multivariable analyses were used to examine the associated factors with hearing aid use.The prevalence of hearing aid acquisition and regular use was 17.4% and 12.6%, respectively, in South Korea. Increased hearing threshold (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.03-1.07), severe perceived hearing loss (OR 10.73, 95% CI 4.52-25.46), annoying tinnitus (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.61-6.74), balance problems (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.18-0.86), and myopia (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.12-0.76) were associated factors of regular use of hearing aids.The prevalence of hearing aid use in Korea is relatively low. Finding relevant factors of hearing aid use could provide further insight in setting up hearing-rehabilitation strategy for the elderly with significant hearing loss. PMID:26496259

  1. Prelingual deafness: Benefits from cochlear implants versus conventional hearing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Torre, Ana Adelina Giantomassi Della; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Brito, Rubens de

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The majority of patients with hearing loss, including those with severe hearing loss, benefits from the use of hearing aids. The cochlear implant is believed to achieve better results in a child with hearing loss in cases where the severity of disability renders hearing aids incapable of providing adequate sound information, as they require sufficient cochlear reserve so that acoustic detention occurs. Objective: To assess if cochlear implants provide more benefit than c...

  2. Benefit of Analog, Programmable and Digital Hearing Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamileh Fatahi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: As the hearing aid technology progressively promotes toward replacing analog hearing aids with digital and programmable ones, comparison of the patient satisfaction of those kinds of hearing aids by means of a valuable tool seems so necessary. So, the aim of this study was to compare self-reported benefit of analog, digitally controlled programmable and digital hearing aids for reducing disability caused by hearing impairment in mild to severe sensorineural hearing impaired persons. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 90 persons with mild to severe sensorineural hearing loss dividing into three groups: 43 subjects were fitted with digital, 15 with programmable, 32 with analog hearing aids. After pure tone audiometry, Abbreviated profile of hearing aid benefit (APHAB was completed before and one month after using hearing aids to determine the benefit of them. Results: Global APHAB mean scores for digital, programmable and analog hearing aids were 49.05, 33.19 and 39.53, respectively. Ease of Communication subscale mean scores were 53.46 for digitals, 37.66 for programmables and 39.09 for analogs. Background noise subscale mean scores for digital programmable and analog hearing aids were 46.36, 25.53 and 35.31, respectively. Global and also both subscale mean scores showed significant difference between digital hearing aids and programmable and analog ones. There was no significant difference between reverberation subscale mean scores of three groups. Conclusion: It seems digital hearing aids may be more beneficial to reduce disability caused by hearing loss than analog and programmable hearing aids are.

  3. The Modern Hearing Aid – an Extreme System Integration Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2013-01-01

    People with reduced hearing generally want to hide this disability and thus the size of hearing aids is constantly decreasing in the effort to make them virtually invisible. However, as for all other modern electrical devices more and more features are constantly added to hearing aids driven by the development in modern IC technology. This has resulted in the modern hearing aid being highly advanced devices where the demands for performance and features at very low supply voltage and power co...

  4. Preserving binaural hearing of hearing impaired subjects with binaural noise reduction systems for hearing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Bogaert, Tim; Wouters, Jan; Moonen, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Hearing aid users experience great difficulty in understanding speech in noisy environments. This has led to the introduction of noise reduction algorithms in hearing aids. The development of these algorithms is typically done monaurally. However, the human auditory system is a binaural system, which compares and combines the signals received by both ears to perceive a sound source as a single entity in space. Providing two monaural, independently operating, noise reduction sys...

  5. Music and hearing aids--an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasin, Marshall

    2012-09-01

    Modern digital hearing aids have provided improved fidelity over those of earlier decades for speech. The same however cannot be said for music. Most modern hearing aids have a limitation of their "front end," which comprises the analog-to-digital (A/D) converter. For a number of reasons, the spectral nature of music as an input to a hearing aid is beyond the optimal operating conditions of the "front end" components. Amplified music tends to be of rather poor fidelity. Once the music signal is distorted, no amount of software manipulation that occurs later in the circuitry can improve things. The solution is not a software issue. Some characteristics of music that make it difficult to be transduced without significant distortion include an increased sound level relative to that of speech, and the crest factor- the difference in dB between the instantaneous peak of a signal and its RMS value. Clinical strategies and technical innovations have helped to improve the fidelity of amplified music and these include a reduction of the level of the input that is presented to the A/D converter. PMID:23258616

  6. 47 CFR 68.112 - Hearing aid-compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., except headsets, in places where a person with a hearing disability might be isolated in an emergency... disability for use by that employee in his or her employment duty, shall, however, be hearing aid...

  7. Hearing Aids: A Review for the Family Physician

    OpenAIRE

    Gaudry, Florent

    1987-01-01

    Hearing impairment is a common disability which can often be minimized by the use of hearing aids. Various types of hearing aids have been developed which are appropriate for most hearing losses that are not medically or surgically treatable, and these devices have been variously applied. Potential benefits and limitations of amplification need to be considered for each patient. Changes in technology, assistive devices, and the development of the cochlear implant have improved the ability of ...

  8. Hearing Screening in the Elderly and Evaluating the Need for Hearing Aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Jalilvand Karimi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions affecting the elderly. The impacts of hearing loss are depression, social isolation, and functional disability, particularly for those who have not yet been evaluated or treated for hearing loss. The aim of this study was audiologic screening and assessing candidacy for hearing aid in the elderly people.Materials and Methods: This analytic-cross sectional study was performed on 52 older adults aged from 51 to 97. Subjects were evaluated according to ASHA guidelines for audiologic screening in adults (1997. Using HHIE-S as hearing disability screening instrument, the need for hearing aid use was evaluated.Results: About 86 percent of subjects had some degree of hearing loss. There were significant correlation between PTA(0.5, 1, 2 KHz>26 and HHIE-S>10. According to these two factors 21.2 percent of subjects needed to use hearing aid while 18 percent of this group had hearing aids.Conclusion: There is high prevalence of hearing loss among older adults, thus it's necessary to evaluate the need for hearing aid in this rapidly growing population. Among different factors affecting hearing aid candidacy the most correlated were PTA(0.5, 1, 2KHz>26 and HHIE-S>10. Therefore according to this study by combination of these two evaluation of hearing aid candidacy would be more appropriate.

  9. Hearing aids' electromagnetic immunity to environmental RF fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the electromagnetic interference on hearing aids was evaluated. Electromagnetic (EM) immunity tests on different types of hearing aids were carried out, using signals of intensity and modulation comparable to those present in the environment. The purpose of this work is to characterise the interference, establishing the immunity threshold for different frequencies and finding out which types of hearing aids are more susceptible, and in which frequency range. The tests were carried out in a GTEM cell on seven hearing aids, using AM and GSM signals in the radiofrequency (RF) range. (authors)

  10. Is Cognitive Function in Adults with Hearing Impairment Improved by the Use of Hearing Aids?

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, A Young; Shim, Hyun Joon; Lee, Sung Hee; Yoon, Sang Won; Joo, Eun-Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Objectives In the present study, we investigated whether speech-related cognitive function and speech recognition ability under background noise in adults with hearing impairment are improved with the use of hearing aids. Methods Participants were recruited from the ENT Department of Eulji Hospital from September 2008 to July 2009. The study group comprised 18 participants (mean age, 69.5±8.3 years) with sensorineural hearing loss who were fitted with hearing aids, and the control group compr...

  11. Hearing aid effectiveness after aural rehabilitation - individual versus group (HEARING) trial: RCT design and baseline characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Heagerty Patrick J; Liu Chuan-Fen; Souza Pamela E; Collins Margaret P; Amtmann Dagmar; Yueh Bevan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Hearing impairment is the most common body system disability in veterans. In 2008, nearly 520,000 veterans had a disability for hearing loss through the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Changes in eligibility for hearing aid services, along with the aging population, contributed to a greater than 300% increase in the number of hearing aids dispensed from 1996 to 2006. In 2006, the VA committed to having no wait times for patient visits while providing quality clinicall...

  12. Stability Testing of a Wide Bone-Anchored Device after Surgery without Skin Thinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malou Hultcrantz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To longitudinally follow the osseointegration using Resonance Frequency Analysis (RFA for different lengths of abutment on a new wide bone-anchored implant, introduced with the non-skin thinning surgical technique. Study Design. A single-center, prospective 1 year study following adults with bone-anchored hearing implants. Materials and Methods. Implantation was performed and followed for a minimum of 1 year. All patients were operated on according to the tissue preserving technique. A 4.5 mm wide fixture (Oticon Medical with varying abutments (9 to 12 mm was used and RFA was tested 1 week, 7 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months later. Implant Stability Quotient (ISQ, was measured from 1 to 100. Stability was compared to a group of patients (N=7 implanted with another brand (Cochlear BI400 of 4.5 mm fixtures. Results. All 10 adults concluded the study. None of the participants lost their implant during the test period indicating a good anchoring of abutments to the wide fixture tested. Stability testing was shown to vary depending on abutment length and time after surgery and with higher values for shorter abutments and increasing values over the first period of time. One patient changed the abutment from 12 to 9 mm and another from a 9 to a 12 during the year. No severe skin problems, numbness around the implant, or cosmetic problems arose. Conclusion. After 1 year of follow-up, combination of a wide fixture implant and the non-skin thinning surgical technique indicates a safe procedure with good stability and no abutment losses.

  13. Horizontal localization with bilateral hearing aids: without is better than with

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Bogaert, Tim; Klasen, Thomas; Moonen, Marc; Van Deun, Lieselot; Wouters, Jan

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of bilateral hearing aids on directional hearing in the frontal horizontal plane. Localization tests evaluated bilateral hearing aid users using different stimuli and different noise scenarios. Normal hearing subjects were used as a reference. The main research questions raised in this paper are: (i) How do bilateral hearing aid users perform on a localization task, relative to normal hearing subjects? (ii) Do bilateral hearing aids preserve localization cues, an...

  14. Formal auditory training in adult hearing aid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss are often able to regain some lost auditory function with the help of hearing aids. However, hearing aids are not able to overcome auditory distortions such as impaired frequency resolution and speech understanding in noisy environments. The coexistence of peripheral hearing loss and a central auditory deficit may contribute to patient dissatisfaction with amplification, even when audiological tests indicate nearly normal hearing thresholds. OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to validate the effects of a formal auditory training program in adult hearing aid users with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. METHODS: Fourteen bilateral hearing aid users were divided into two groups: seven who received auditory training and seven who did not. The training program was designed to improve auditory closure, figure-to-ground for verbal and nonverbal sounds and temporal processing (frequency and duration of sounds. Pre- and post-training evaluations included measuring electrophysiological and behavioral auditory processing and administration of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB self-report scale. RESULTS: The post-training evaluation of the experimental group demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in P3 latency, improved performance in some of the behavioral auditory processing tests and higher hearing aid benefit in noisy situations (p-value < 0,05. No changes were noted for the control group (p-value <0,05. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrated that auditory training in adult hearing aid users can lead to a reduction in P3 latency, improvements in sound localization, memory for nonverbal sounds in sequence, auditory closure, figure-to-ground for verbal sounds and greater benefits in reverberant and noisy environments.

  15. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Hearing Loss Using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids Compared to Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Shina-August, Ella; Meilijson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the profile of pragmatic abilities among 24 children with hearing loss (HL) aged 6.3-9.4 years, 13 using hearing aids (HAs) and 11 using cochlear implants (CIs), in comparison to those of 13 hearing children with similar chronological and language ages. All the children with HL used spoken language, attended regular…

  16. Hearing Screening in the Elderly and Evaluating the Need for Hearing Aid

    OpenAIRE

    Leyla Jalilvand Karimi; Majid Ashrafi; Elham Khosravi; Zahra Shahidipour; Fatemeh Vafaee

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aim: Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions affecting the elderly. The impacts of hearing loss are depression, social isolation, and functional disability, particularly for those who have not yet been evaluated or treated for hearing loss. The aim of this study was audiologic screening and assessing candidacy for hearing aid in the elderly people.Materials and Methods: This analytic-cross sectional study was performed on 52 older adults aged from 51 to 97...

  17. Acceptability of binaural hearing aids: a cross-over study.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, S D; Callaghan, D E; Hogan, S.; Meredith, R.; Rayment, A; Davis, A

    1991-01-01

    Using screening questionnaires we were able to detect individuals aged 50-65 years with hearing disability in a general practice population. Those who had better ear hearing levels of 30 dB or worse were invited to take place in a cross-over study comparing the acceptability of a monaural or binaural hearing-aid fitting. Fifty-five per cent ultimately opted for a binaural fitting and had greater hearing disability and worse mean hearing levels than those who opted for a monaural fitting. They...

  18. Auditory and language skills of children using hearing aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Macedo Penna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hearing loss may impair the development of a child. The rehabilitation process for individuals with hearing loss depends on effective interventions.OBJECTIVE: To describe the linguistic profile and the hearing skills of children using hearing aids, to characterize the rehabilitation process and to analyze its association with the children's degree of hearing loss.METHODS: Cross-sectional study with a non-probabilistic sample of 110 children using hearing aids (6-10 years of age for mild to profound hearing loss. Tests of language, speech perception, phonemic discrimination, and school performance were performed. The associations were verified by the following tests: chi-squared for linear trend and Kruskal-Wallis.RESULTS: About 65% of the children had altered vocabulary, whereas 89% and 94% had altered phonology and inferior school performance, respectively. The degree of hearing loss was associated with differences in the median age of diagnosis; the age at which the hearing aids were adapted and at which speech therapy was started; and the performance on auditory tests and the type of communication used.CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of hearing loss and the clinical interventions occurred late, contributing to impairments in auditory and language development.

  19. 21 CFR 874.3950 - Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system... Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid... occluding the ear canal. The device consists of an air conduction hearing aid attached to a...

  20. Beamforming under Quantization Errors in Wireless Binaural Hearing Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees Janse

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Improving the intelligibility of speech in different environments is one of the main objectives of hearing aid signal processing algorithms. Hearing aids typically employ beamforming techniques using multiple microphones for this task. In this paper, we discuss a binaural beamforming scheme that uses signals from the hearing aids worn on both the left and right ears. Specifically, we analyze the effect of a low bit rate wireless communication link between the left and right hearing aids on the performance of the beamformer. The scheme is comprised of a generalized sidelobe canceller (GSC that has two inputs: observations from one ear, and quantized observations from the other ear, and whose output is an estimate of the desired signal. We analyze the performance of this scheme in the presence of a localized interferer as a function of the communication bit rate using the resultant mean-squared error as the signal distortion measure.

  1. Beamforming under Quantization Errors in Wireless Binaural Hearing Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Sriram

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the intelligibility of speech in different environments is one of the main objectives of hearing aid signal processing algorithms. Hearing aids typically employ beamforming techniques using multiple microphones for this task. In this paper, we discuss a binaural beamforming scheme that uses signals from the hearing aids worn on both the left and right ears. Specifically, we analyze the effect of a low bit rate wireless communication link between the left and right hearing aids on the performance of the beamformer. The scheme is comprised of a generalized sidelobe canceller (GSC that has two inputs: observations from one ear, and quantized observations from the other ear, and whose output is an estimate of the desired signal. We analyze the performance of this scheme in the presence of a localized interferer as a function of the communication bit rate using the resultant mean-squared error as the signal distortion measure.

  2. Prelingual deafness: Benefits from cochlear implants versus conventional hearing aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Torre, Ana Adelina Giantomassi Della; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Brito, Rubens de

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The majority of patients with hearing loss, including those with severe hearing loss, benefits from the use of hearing aids. The cochlear implant is believed to achieve better results in a child with hearing loss in cases where the severity of disability renders hearing aids incapable of providing adequate sound information, as they require sufficient cochlear reserve so that acoustic detention occurs. Objective: To assess if cochlear implants provide more benefit than conventional hearing aids in prelingually deaf patients. Summary of the findings: The study was a systematic review of scientific papers selected by a search of the SciELO, Cochrane, MEDLINE, and LILACS-BIREME databases. Among the 2169 articles found, 12 studies proved relevant to the issue and presented an evidence strength rating of B. No publications rated evidence strength A. Seven of the studies analyzed were prospective cohorts and 5 were cross-sectional studies. Conclusion: Based on several studies, cochlear implants were demonstrated to be the best current alternative for bilateral severe or profound hearing loss, achieving better results in speech perception and development in prelingual children when compared to conventional hearing aids. PMID:25991962

  3. Hearing Aids May Help Keep Seniors' Minds Sharp

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if they could also slow the effects of aging on cognitive function," he added. The study included 100 adults, aged 80 to 99, with hearing loss. The 34 who regularly used a hearing aid had much better scores on tests of mental function than those who didn't ...

  4. Hearing aids: Quality of life and socio-economic aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Tsakiropoulou, E; Konstantinidis, I; Vital, I.; Konstantinidou, S; Kotsani, A

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Hearing loss can significantly impair patient's quality of life, affecting communicative behavior, emotional and social function. This study assesses the impact of hearing aids on the quality of life of patients in a rural area and its correlation with socio-economic factors.

  5. Hearing aid-related satisfaction based on type and degree of hearing loss in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad FarajiKhiavi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the elderly; using a hearing aid to alleviate auditory impairment can positively affect their quality of life. This research aimed to determine the level of satisfaction concerning hearing aids in elderly people with hearing impairment based on the type and degree of hearing loss.Methods: An analytic cross-sectional research design was used ; the sample included 40 elderly people who used hearing aids. According to the World Health Organization (WHO age classification, participants were divided into two age groups: 65-74 years (n=20 and 75-90 years (n=20. Satisfaction levels were assessed using a standard satisfaction with amplification in daily life (SADL questionnaire.Results: Satisfaction levels in the 65-74 age group were significantly higher than that in the 75-90 age group (p=0.02. Participants with mixed hearing loss revealed higher satisfaction levels than participants with sensorineural hearing loss (p=0.02. On the negative effects dimension, participants with severe hearing loss exhibited significantly higher satisfaction levels than participants with moderate or moderate to severe hearing loss (p=0.01.Conclusion: Total satisfaction mean scores were relatively high in the elderly participants . Negative features could be reduced via careful consultation regarding the aids’ amplifying capabilities and limitations in groups with moderate or moderate to severe hearing loss.

  6. Hearing aid measurements with speech and noise signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrlund, Ole; Ludvigsen, Carl; Olofsson, Åke;

    1994-01-01

    An increasing number of hearing aid types include one or more features which are intentionally non-linear. In such devices measurement of frequency response and distortion using sweep tone measurements are typically of little relevance. Five different non-linear hearing aid types were used to eva...... signal modifications: memoryless non-linearity like peak clipping, time-varying gain from AGC and additive internal noise....

  7. Extrusion of bone anchor suture following flexor digitorum profundus tendon avulsion injury repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2011-09-01

    Flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) zone I tendon avulsion injury is traditionally repaired with a pullout suture technique. More recently, bone anchor sutures have been used as a viable alternative and have largely replaced areas in hand surgery where pullout suture technique was once required. To date, there have been very few complications reported related to bone anchor suture use in FDP tendon reattachment to the bone. We report a very unusual case of extrusion of bone anchor through the nailbed, 6 years after zone I FDP tendon avulsion injury repair and a brief review of literature.

  8. Self-reported disability and handicap after hearing-aid fitting and benefit of hearing aids: comparison of fitting procedures, degree of hearing loss, experience with hearing aids and uni- and bilateral fittings

    OpenAIRE

    Metselaar, M.; Maat, B; Krijnen, P.; Verschuure, H.; Dreschler, W.A.; Feenstra, L.

    2009-01-01

    Self-reported outcome on hearing disability and handicap as well as overall health-related quality of life were measured after hearing-aid fitting in a large-scale clinical population. Fitting was performed according to two different procedures in a double-blind study design. We used a comparative procedure based on optimizing speech intelligibility scores and a strictly implemented fitting formula. Hearing disability and handicap were assessed with the hearing handicap and disability invento...

  9. The Influence of Hearing Aid Use on Outcomes of Children with Mild Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Holte, Lenore; McCreery, Ryan W.; Spratford, Meredith; Page, Thomas; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of consistent hearing aid (HA) use on outcomes in children with mild hearing loss (HL). Method: Five- or 7-year-old children with mild HL were separated into 3 groups on the basis of patterns of daily HA use. Using analyses of variance, we compared outcomes between groups on speech and language tests and a…

  10. Case Factors Affecting Hearing Aid Recommendations by Hearing Care Professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gioia, Carmine; Ben-Akiva, Moshe; Jørgensen, Ole;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Professional recommendations to patients concerning hearing instrument (HI) technology levels are not currently evidence-based. Pre-fitting parameters have not been proven to be the primary indicators for optimal patient outcome with different HI technology levels. This results in sub...

  11. Quality of life in bimodal hearing users (unilateral cochlear implants and contralateral hearing aids).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinetti, A; Roman, S; Mancini, J; Baumstarck-Barrau, K; Meller, R; Lavieille, J P; Triglia, J M

    2015-11-01

    The main objective was to evaluate the bimodal self-rated benefits on auditory performance under real conditions and the quality of life in two groups of cochlear-implanted adults, with or without a contralateral hearing aid. The secondary objective was to investigate correlations between the use of a hearing aid and residual hearing on the non-implanted ear. This retrospective study was realized between 2000 and 2010 in two referral centers. A population of 183 postlingually deaf adults, implanted with a cochlear experience superior to 6 months, was selected. The Speech, Spatial, and other Qualities of Hearing Scale were administered to evaluate the auditory performances, and the Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire to evaluate the quality of life. The population was divided into two groups: a group with unilateral cochlear implants (Cochlear Implant-alone, n = 54), and a bimodal group with a cochlear implant and a contralateral hearing aid (n = 62). Both groups were similar in terms of auditory deprivation duration, duration of cochlear implant use, and pure-tone average on the implanted ear. There was a significant difference in terms of pure-tone average on low and low-to-mid frequencies on the non-implanted ear. The scores on both questionnaires showed an improvement in the basic sound perception and quality of social activities for the bimodal group. The results suggest that the bimodal stimulation (cochlear implant and contralateral hearing aid) improved auditory perception in quiet and the quality of life domain of social activities. PMID:25373837

  12. Localization ability with bimodal hearing aids and bilateral cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Bernhard U.; Baumann, Uwe; Fastl, Hugo

    2004-09-01

    After successful cochlear implantation in one ear, some patients continue to use a hearing aid at the contralateral ear. They report an improved reception of speech, especially in noise, as well as a better perception of music when the hearing aid and cochlear implant are used in this bimodal combination. Some individuals in this bimodal patient group also report the impression of an improved localization ability. Similar experiences are reported by the group of bilateral cochlear implantees. In this study, a survey of 11 bimodally and 4 bilaterally equipped cochlear implant users was carried out to assess localization ability. Individuals in the bimodal implant group were all provided with the same type of hearing aid in the opposite ear, and subjects in the bilateral implant group used cochlear implants of the same manufacturer on each ear. Subjects adjusted the spot of a computer-controlled laser-pointer to the perceived direction of sound incidence in the frontal horizontal plane by rotating a trackball. Two subjects of the bimodal group who had substantial residual hearing showed localization ability in the bimodal configuration, whereas using each single device only the subject with better residual hearing was able to discriminate the side of sound origin. Five other subjects with more pronounced hearing loss displayed an ability for side discrimination through the use of bimodal aids, while four of them were already able to discriminate the side with a single device. Of the bilateral cochlear implant group one subject showed localization accuracy close to that of normal hearing subjects. This subject was also able to discriminate the side of sound origin using the first implanted device alone. The other three bilaterally equipped subjects showed limited localization ability using both devices. Among them one subject demonstrated a side-discrimination ability using only the first implanted device.

  13. Speech intelligibility of children with cochlear implants, tactile aids, or hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osberger, M J; Maso, M; Sam, L K

    1993-02-01

    Speech intelligibility was measured in 31 children who used the 3M/House single-channel implant (n = 12), the Nucleus 22-Channel Cochlear Implant System (n = 15), or the Tactaid II + two-channel vibrotactile aid (n = 4). The subjects were divided into subgroups based on age at onset of deafness (early or late). The speech intelligibility of the experimental subjects was compared to that of children who were profoundly hearing impaired who used conventional hearing aids (n = 12) or no sensory aid (n = 2). The subjects with early onset of deafness who received their single- or multichannel cochlear implant before age 10 demonstrated the highest speech intelligibility, whereas subjects who did not receive their device until after age 10 had the poorest speech intelligibility. There was no obvious difference in the speech intelligibility scores of these subjects as a function of type of device (implant or tactile aid). On the average, the postimplant or tactile aid speech intelligibility of the subjects with early onset of deafness was similar to that of hearing aid users with hearing levels between 100 and 110 dB HL and limited hearing in the high frequencies. The speech intelligibility of subjects with late onset of deafness showed marked deterioration after the onset of deafness with relatively large improvements by most subjects after they received a single- or multichannel implant. The one subject with late onset of deafness who used a tactile aid showed no improvement in speech intelligibility. PMID:8450658

  14. Efficient individualization of hearing aid processed sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Nielsen, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    conscious of his own preferences while the system itself learns the user’s preference. Since the learning is based on probabilistic modeling concepts, the system handles inconsistent user feedback efficiently. Experiments with hearing impaired subjects show that the system quickly discovers individual...

  15. NIST System for Measuring the Directivity Index of Hearing Aids under Simulated Real-Ear Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Randall P.

    2013-01-01

    The directivity index is a parameter that is commonly used to characterize the performance of directional hearing aids, and is determined from the measured directional response. Since this response is different for a hearing aid worn on a person as compared to when it is in a free field, directivity index measurements of hearing aids are usually done under simulated real-ear conditions. Details are provided regarding the NIST system for measuring the hearing aid directivity index under these ...

  16. Oral Language Comprehension Using Hearing Aids and Tactile Aids: Three Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Adele

    1990-01-01

    Three prelinguistic, profoundly deaf children (aged three to four) used a wearable, single channel, vibrotactile communication aid in conjunction with hearing aids during individual speech and language therapy at school. Subjects exhibited a faster than average rate of learning to understand spoken language after the onset of vibrotactile…

  17. Towards Cognizant Hearing Aids: Modeling of Content, Affect and Attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karadogan, Seliz

    Hearing aids improved significantly after the integration of advanced digital signal processing applications. This improvement will continue and evolve through obtaining intelligent, individualized hearing aids integrating top-down (knowledge-based) and bottom-up (signal-based) approaches by making...... use of research done within cognitive science that is the interdisciplinary study of mind and intelligence bringing together various disciplines including Artificial Intelligence, Cognitive Psychology, and Neuroscience. This thesis focuses on three subjects within cognitive science related to hearing...... attention is studied. A computational top-down attention model is presented and behavioral experiments are carried out to investigate the role of top-down task driven attention in the cocktail party problem. Finally, automatic emotion recognition from speech is studied using a dimensional approach and with...

  18. An Introduction to Neural Networks for Hearing Aid Noise Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun W.; Tyler, Richard S.

    1995-01-01

    This article introduces the use of multilayered artificial neural networks in hearing aid noise recognition. It reviews basic principles of neural networks, and offers an example of an application in which a neural network is used to identify the presence or absence of noise in speech. The ability of neural networks to "learn" the characteristics…

  19. The Modern Hearing Aid – an Extreme System Integration Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    the ICs for these. This leads to very large demands for system integration at the packing level, SiP (System-in-Package), and not at least at the IC level, SoC (System-on-Chip). As a result of this all large hearing aid manufactures use custom package technology which again uses fully customized ASICs...

  20. 47 CFR 68.415 - Hearing aid-compatibility and volume control informal complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatibility and volume control... Procedures § 68.415 Hearing aid-compatibility and volume control informal complaints. Persons with complaints... complaints regarding rules in this part pertaining to hearing aid compatibility and volume control, may...

  1. 21 CFR 874.3320 - Group hearing aid or group auditory trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Group hearing aid or group auditory trainer. 874.3320 Section 874.3320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... hearing aid or group auditory trainer. (a) Identification. A group hearing aid or group auditory...

  2. Wind noise in hearing aids with directional and omnidirectional microphones: Polar characteristics of custom-made hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King; McKibben, Nicholas; Mongeau, Luc

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of wind noise at the output of in-the-ear, in-the-canal, and completely-in-the-canal hearing aids. The hearing aids were programed to have linear amplification with matching flat frequency responses for directional (DIR) and omnidirectional (OMNI) microphones. The microphone output was then recorded in a quiet wind tunnel when the Knowles electronic manikin for acoustic research (KEMAR) head was turned from 0 degrees to 360 degrees . The overall, 125, 500, and 2000 Hz one-third octave band flow noise levels were calculated and plotted in polar patterns. Correlation coefficients, average differences, and level differences between DIR and OMNI were also calculated. Flow noise levels were the highest when KEMAR was facing the direction of the flow and angles between 190 degrees and 250 degrees . The noise levels were the lowest when the hearing aids were facing the direction of the flow. The polar patterns of DIR and OMNI had similar shapes and DIR generally had higher levels than OMNI. DIR, however, could have lower levels than OMNI in some angles because of its capability to reduce noise in the far field. Comparisons of polar characteristics with behind-the-ear hearing aids, and clinical and engineering design applications of current results are discussed. PMID:20370035

  3. Interventions after screening for hearing difficulties: a retrospective investigation of interventions other than hearing aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafydd Stephens

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been a number of studies on screening of hearing in adult populations. Despite the high importance of interventions following screening for hearing (Wilson and Jungner, 1968 there is a dearth of information on the nature of interventions following such screening, other than hearing aid fitting (HA or referral to audiology/ENT departments (Pronk et al., 2011. In the late 1980s and early 1990s four studies were performed in Wales, which offered such other interventions to those individuals indicating hearing disabilities in screening questionnaires (eg Stephens et al., 1990; Davis et al., 1992. The majority of the patient notes from these studies were still accessible and have been examined to extract the following information: - what interventions were used other than hearing aids? - who received these interventions? - would they have been more appropriate than HAs for some of those fitted? The aim of this paper is to list the interventions provided in these studies and relate them to the initial complaints of those indicating hearing problems.

  4. Introduction to audiology: Some basics about hearing loss, hearing technologies and barriers to hearing aid use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtou, Eleni; Meis, Markus

    2012-01-01

    loss and their various effects on communication, (3) the different degrees of hearing loss as defined by different national and international organizations, (4) statistics on the preva- lence of hearing loss worldwide, (5) some technological aspects of hearing instruments, (6) sta- tistics on non...

  5. Using hearing aid directional microphones and noise reduction algorithms to enhance cochlear implant performance

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, K; Zeng, F G; Waltzman, S

    2004-01-01

    Hearing aids and cochlear implants are two major hearing enhancement technologies but yet share little in research and development. The purpose of this study was to determine whether hearing aid directional microphones and noise reduction technologies could enhance cochlear implant users' speech understanding and ease of listening. Digital hearing aids serving as preprocessors were programmed to omni-directional microphone, directional microphone, and directional microphone plus noise reducti...

  6. Self-Fitting Hearing Aids: Status Quo and Future Predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidser, Gitte; Convery, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    A self-contained, self-fitting hearing aid (SFHA) is a device that enables the user to perform both threshold measurements leading to a prescribed hearing aid setting and fine-tuning, without the need for audiological support or access to other equipment. The SFHA has been proposed as a potential solution to address unmet hearing health care in developing countries and remote locations in the developed world and is considered a means to lower cost and increase uptake of hearing aids in developed countries. This article reviews the status of the SFHA and the evidence for its feasibility and challenges and predicts where it is heading. Devices that can be considered partly or fully self-fitting without audiological support were identified in the direct-to-consumer market. None of these devices are considered self-contained as they require access to other hardware such as a proprietary interface, computer, smartphone, or tablet for manipulation. While there is evidence that self-administered fitting processes can provide valid and reliable results, their success relies on user-friendly device designs and interfaces and easy-to-interpret instructions. Until these issues have been sufficiently addressed, optional assistance with the self-fitting process and on-going use of SFHAs is recommended. Affordability and a sustainable delivery system remain additional challenges for the SFHA in developing countries. Future predictions include a growth in self-fitting products, with most future SFHAs consisting of earpieces that connect wirelessly with a smartphone and providers offering assistance through a telehealth infrastructure, and the integration of SFHAs into the traditional hearing health-care model. PMID:27072929

  7. Evaluation of feedback-reduction algorithms for hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J E; Zurek, P M; Brantley, M

    2000-11-01

    Three adaptive feedback-reduction algorithms were implemented in a laboratory-based digital hearing aid system and evaluated with dynamic feedback paths and hearing-impaired subjects. The evaluation included measurements of maximum stable gain and subjective quality ratings. The continuously adapting CNN algorithm (Closed-loop processing with No probe Noise) provided the best performance: 8.5 dB of added stable gain (ASG) relative to a reference algorithm averaged over all subjects, ears, and vent conditions. Two intermittently adapting algorithms, ONO (Open-loop with Noise when Oscillation detected) and ONQ (Open-loop with Noise when Quiet detected), provided an average of 5 dB of ASG. Subjects with more severe hearing losses received greater benefits: 13 dB average ASG for the CNN algorithm and 7-8 dB average ASG for the ONO and ONQ algorithms. These values are conservative estimates of ASG because the fitting procedure produced a frequency-gain characteristic that already included precautions against feedback. Speech quality ratings showed no substantial algorithm effect on pleasantness or intelligibility, although subjects informally expressed strong objections to the probe noise used by the ONO and ONQ algorithms. This objection was not reflected in the speech quality ratings because of limitations of the experimental procedure. The results clearly indicate that the CNN algorithm is the most promising choice for adaptive feedback reduction in hearing aids. PMID:11108377

  8. Detection of Emergency Signal in Hearing Aids using Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lakum, Vamshi Krishna; Gubbala, Arshini

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The detection of an emergency signal can be estimated by the cancellation of surrounding noise and achieving the desired signal in order to alert the automobilist. The aim of the thesis is to detect the emergency signal arriving nearer to the automobilist carrying hearing aids. Recent studies show that this can be achieved by designing various kinds of fixed and adaptive beam formers. A beam former does spatial filtering in the sense that it separates two signals with overlapping fre...

  9. Less is more? Loudness aspects of prescriptive methods for nonlinear hearing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Smeds, Karolina

    2004-01-01

    In Sweden, about 10% of the adult population experienceshearing problems that cause them difficulties in everydaycommunication, and approximately 60 000 people are providedwith hearing aids each year. Despite the fact that modernhearing aids can facilitate speech communication in a widerange of listening environments, many hearing-aid users aredissatisfied with their hearing aids. It is likely that theclinical methods used for individual fitting of the hearingaids are not optimal. The current...

  10. Perception-Based Personalization of Hearing Aids Using Gaussian Processes and Active Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Nielsen, Jakob; Larsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    . This article proposes an interactive hearing-aid personalization system that obtains an optimal individual setting of the hearing aids from direct perceptual user feedback. Results obtained with ten hearing-impaired subjects show that ten to twenty pairwise user assessments between different settings...

  11. Mechanical characterization of bone anchors used with a bone-attached, parallel robot for skull surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobler, Jan-Philipp; Prielozny, Lenka; Lexow, G Jakob; Rau, Thomas S; Majdani, Omid; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Bone-attached robots and microstereotactic frames, intended for deep brain stimulation and minimally invasive cochlear implantation, typically attach to a patient's skull via bone anchors. A rigid and reliable link between such devices and the skull is mandatory in order to fulfill the high accuracy demands of minimally invasive procedures while maintaining patient safety. In this paper, a method is presented to experimentally characterize the mechanical properties of the anchor-bone linkage. A custom-built universal testing machine is used to measure the pullout strength as well as the spring constants of bone anchors seated in four different bone substitutes as well as in human cranial bone. Furthermore, the angles at which forces act on the bone anchors are varied to simulate realistic conditions. Based on the experimental results, a substitute material that has mechanical properties similar to those of cranial bone is identified. The results further reveal that the pullout strength of the investigated anchor design is sufficient with respect to the proposed application. However, both the measured load capacity as well as the spring constants vary depending on the load angles. Based on these findings, an alternative bone anchor design is presented and experimentally validated. Furthermore, the results serve as a basis for stiffness simulation and optimization of bone-attached microstereotactic frames. PMID:25771430

  12. Hearing Aid-Induced Plasticity in the Auditory System of Older Adults: Evidence from Speech Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Limor; Banai, Karen; Karni, Avi; Attias, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We tested whether using hearing aids can improve unaided performance in speech perception tasks in older adults with hearing impairment. Method: Unaided performance was evaluated in dichotic listening and speech-­in-­noise tests in 47 older adults with hearing impairment; 36 participants in 3 study groups were tested before hearing aid…

  13. Development of a music perception test for adult hearing-aid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinda Uys

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was two-fold. Firstly to develop a music perception test for hearing aid users and secondly to evaluate the influence of non-linear frequency compression (NFC on music perception with the use of the self-compiled test. This article focuses on the description of the development and validation of a music perception test. To date, the main direction in frequency lowering hearing aid studies has been in relation to speech perception abilities. With improvements in hearing aid technology, interest in musical perception as a dimension that could improve hearing aid users’ quality of life grew. The Music Perception Test (MPT was designed to evaluate different aspects of rhythm, timbre, pitch and melody. The development of the MPT could be described as design based. Phase 1 of the study included test development and recording while Phase 2 entailed presentation of stimuli to normal hearing listeners (n=15 and hearing aid users (n=4. Based on the findings of Phase 2, item analysis was performed to eliminate or change stimuli that resulted in high error rates. During Phase 3 the adapted version of the test was performed on a smaller group of normal hearing listeners (n=4 and twenty hearing aid users. Results proved that normal hearing adults as well as adults using hearing aids were able to complete all the sub-tests of the MPT although hearing aid users scored less on the various sub-tests than normal hearing listeners. For the rhythm section of the MPT normal hearing listeners scored on average 93.8% versus 75.5% of hearing aid users and 83% for the timbre section compared to 62.3% by hearing aid users. Normal hearing listeners obtained an average score of 86.3% for the pitch section and 88.2% for the melody section compared to the 70.8% and 61.9% respectively obtained by hearing aid users. This implicates that the MPT can be used successfully for assessment of music perception in hearing aid users within the South African

  14. The Personal Hearing System—A Software Hearing Aid for a Personal Communication System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giso Grimm

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept and architecture of a personal communication system (PCS is introduced that integrates audio communication and hearing support for the elderly and hearing-impaired through a personal hearing system (PHS. The concept envisions a central processor connected to audio headsets via a wireless body area network (WBAN. To demonstrate the concept, a prototype PCS is presented that is implemented on a netbook computer with a dedicated audio interface in combination with a mobile phone. The prototype can be used for field-testing possible applications and to reveal possibilities and limitations of the concept of integrating hearing support in consumer audio communication devices. It is shown that the prototype PCS can integrate hearing aid functionality, telephony, public announcement systems, and home entertainment. An exemplary binaural speech enhancement scheme that represents a large class of possible PHS processing schemes is shown to be compatible with the general concept. However, an analysis of hardware and software architectures shows that the implementation of a PCS on future advanced cell phone-like devices is challenging. Because of limitations in processing power, recoding of prototype implementations into fixed point arithmetic will be required and WBAN performance is still a limiting factor in terms of data rate and delay.

  15. The Personal Hearing System—A Software Hearing Aid for a Personal Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Giso; Guilmin, Gwénaël; Poppen, Frank; Vlaming, Marcel S. M. G.; Hohmann, Volker

    2009-12-01

    A concept and architecture of a personal communication system (PCS) is introduced that integrates audio communication and hearing support for the elderly and hearing-impaired through a personal hearing system (PHS). The concept envisions a central processor connected to audio headsets via a wireless body area network (WBAN). To demonstrate the concept, a prototype PCS is presented that is implemented on a netbook computer with a dedicated audio interface in combination with a mobile phone. The prototype can be used for field-testing possible applications and to reveal possibilities and limitations of the concept of integrating hearing support in consumer audio communication devices. It is shown that the prototype PCS can integrate hearing aid functionality, telephony, public announcement systems, and home entertainment. An exemplary binaural speech enhancement scheme that represents a large class of possible PHS processing schemes is shown to be compatible with the general concept. However, an analysis of hardware and software architectures shows that the implementation of a PCS on future advanced cell phone-like devices is challenging. Because of limitations in processing power, recoding of prototype implementations into fixed point arithmetic will be required and WBAN performance is still a limiting factor in terms of data rate and delay.

  16. Direct hearing aid referral: the effect upon outpatient waiting times in a district general hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, G C; Sharp, J F

    1994-01-01

    One hundred elderly patients referred for hearing aids have been assessed with a view to setting up a direct hearing aid referral system, based upon the criteria laid down by the liaison group for Technicians, Therapists and Scientists in Audiology (TTSA). Sixty-three per cent of the patients could have been fitted with a hearing aid directly. Adequate prior wax removal, could increase this figure to 84%, with a reduction in the waiting time for a hearing aid of 6.1 months.

  17. Development of a music perception test for adult hearing-aid users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uys, Marinda; van Dijk, Catherine

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this research was twofold: firstly, to develop a music perception test (MPT) for hearing-aid users, and secondly, to evaluate the influence of non-linear frequency compression (NFC) on music perception with the use of the self-compiled test. This article focuses on the description of the development and validation of the MPT. To date, the main direction in frequency-lowering hearing-aid studies has been in relation to speech perception abilities. As hearing-aid technology has improved, interest has grown in musical perception as a dimension that could improve hearing-aid users' quality of life. The MPT was designed to evaluate different aspects of rhythm, timbre, pitch and melody. The development of the MPT could be described as design-based. Phase 1 of the study included test development and recording, while phase 2 entailed presentation of stimuli to normal hearing listeners (n = 15) and hearing-aid users (n = 4). Based on the findings of phase 2, item analysis was performed to eliminate or change stimuli that resulted in high error rates. During phase 3 the adapted version of the test was performed on a smaller group of normal hearing listeners (n = 4) and 20 hearing-aid users. Results proved that adults with normal hearing as well as adults using hearing aids were able to complete all the sub-tests of the MPT, although hearing-aid users scored lower on the various sub-tests than normal hearing listeners. For the rhythm section of the MPT normal hearing listeners scored on average 93.8% versus 75.5% of hearing-aid users; for the timbre section the scores were 83% versus 62.3% respectively. Normal hearing listeners obtained an average score of 86.3% for the pitch section and 88.2% for the melody section, compared with the 70.8% and 61.9% respectively obtained by hearing-aid users. This implies that the MPT can be used successfully for assessment of music perception in hearing-aid users within the South African context and may therefore result in

  18. Audiological results using single-channel intracochlear implant, vibrotactile aid or acoustic hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihkanen, H; Jauhiainen, T; Linkola, H; Palva, T

    1989-01-01

    Users of a single-channel intracochlear implant (CI, n = 10) (3M/House), a single-channel vibrotactile aid (V, n = 8) (Minivib 3/Special Instrument Ab) and acoustic hearing aids (HA, n = 9) were tested. The comparison was made after training and a minimum of 11 months' use of the devices. All subjects were considered profoundly deaf, but the HA group had some residual hearing. The HA group achieved the best mean test scores in all the tests given. The difference between the CI group and V group increased, in favour to the CI users, as the auditory task was changed from the level of simple signal analysis to the level of linguistic interpretation. PMID:2816334

  19. Implantation of a polycaprolactone scaffold with subchondral bone anchoring ameliorates nodules formation and other tissue alterations

    OpenAIRE

    Vikingsson, Line; Sancho-Tello, Mar??a; Ruiz-Saur??, Amparo; Martinez-Diaz, Santos; G??mez-Tejedor, Jos?? Antonio; Gallego Ferrer, Gloria; Carda, Carmen; Monllau Garc??a, Juan Carlos; G??mez Ribelles, Jos?? Luis

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Articular cartilage has limited repair capacity. Two different implant devices for articular cartilage regeneration were tested in vivo in a sheep model to evaluate the effect of subchondral bone anchoring for tissue repair. METHODS: The implants were placed with press-fit technique in a cartilage defect after microfracture surgery in the femoral condyle of the knee joint of the sheep and histologic and mechanical evaluation was done 4.5 months later. The first group consisted of a b...

  20. Morphometric analysis of treatment effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction in growing Class III patients

    OpenAIRE

    Baccetti, T.; Clerck, H.J. de; Cevidanes, L. H.; Franchi, L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present morphometric investigation was to evaluate the effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) in the treatment of growing patients with Class III malocclusion. The shape and size changes in the craniofacial configuration of a sample of 26 children with Class III malocclusions consecutively treated with the BAMP protocol were compared with a matched sample of 15 children with untreated Class III malocclusions. All subjects in the two groups were at a prepubertal s...

  1. Surgical repair of central slip avulsion injuries with Mitek bone anchor--retrospective analysis of a case series.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Jeffrey C Y

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe our technique of central slip repair using the Mitek bone anchor and to evaluate the treatment outcome. Eight digits in eight patients were reconstructed using the bone anchor: three little fingers, two middle fingers, two index fingers and one ring finger. There were two immediate and six delayed repairs (range from one day to eight months). Four patients had pre-operative intensive splinting and physiotherapy to restore passive extension of the proximal interphalangeal joint prior to central slip reconstruction. All patients have made good progress since surgery. No patient requires a second procedure and none of the bone anchors have dislodged or loosened. We conclude that the Mitek bone anchor is a reliable technique to achieve soft tissue to bone fixation in central slip avulsion injuries. We recommend that this technique be considered as a treatment option for patients requiring surgical repair.

  2. Low Delay Noise Reduction and Dereverberation for Hearing Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich W. Löllmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new system for single-channel speech enhancement is proposed which achieves a joint suppression of late reverberant speech and background noise with a low signal delay and low computational complexity. It is based on a generalized spectral subtraction rule which depends on the variances of the late reverberant speech and background noise. The calculation of the spectral variances of the late reverberant speech requires an estimate of the reverberation time (RT which is accomplished by a maximum likelihood (ML approach. The enhancement with this blind RT estimation achieves almost the same speech quality as by using the actual RT. In comparison to commonly used post-filters in hearing aids which only perform a noise reduction, a significantly better objective and subjective speech quality is achieved. The proposed system performs time-domain filtering with coefficients adapted in the non-uniform (Bark-scaled frequency-domain. This allows to achieve a high speech quality with low signal delay which is important for speech enhancement in hearing aids or related applications such as hands-free communication systems.

  3. Ormiaochracea as a Model Organism in Sound Localization Experiments and in Inventing Hearing Aids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - -

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Hearing aid prescription for patients suffering hearing loss has always been one of the main concerns of the audiologists. Thanks to technology that has provided Hearing aids with digital and computerized systems which has improved the quality of sound heard by hearing aids. Though we can learn from nature in inventing such instruments as in the current article that has been channeled to a kind of fruit fly. Ormiaochracea is a small yellow nocturnal fly, a parasitoid of crickets. It is notable because of its exceptionally acute directional hearing. In the current article we will discuss how it has become a model organism in sound localization experiments and in inventing hearing aids.

  4. 47 CFR 68.317 - Hearing aid compatibility volume control: technical standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing aid compatibility volume control... for Terminal Equipment Approval § 68.317 Hearing aid compatibility volume control: technical standards. (a) An analog telephone complies with the Commission's volume control requirements if the...

  5. Acoustical and Perceptual Comparison of Noise Reduction and Compression in Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brons, Inge; Houben, Rolph; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Noise reduction and dynamic-range compression are generally applied together in hearing aids but may have opposite effects on amplification. This study evaluated the acoustical and perceptual effects of separate and combined processing of noise reduction and compression. Design: Recordings of the output of 4 hearing aids for speech in…

  6. Remote hearing aid fitting: Tele-audiology in the context of Brazilian Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, Silvio Pires; Ramos, Sueli de Lima; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo; Marone, Silvio Antonio Monteiro; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Currently, the Brazilian government has certificated nearly 140 specialized centers in hearing aid fittings through the Brazilian National Health System (SUS). Remote fitting through the Internet can allow a broader and more efficient coverage with a higher likelihood of success for patients covered by the SUS, as they can receive fittings from their own homes instead of going to the few and distant specialized centers. Aim: To describe a case of remote fitting between 2 cities, with revision of the literature. Method: Computer gears, a universal interface, and hearing aids were used. Case study: An audiologist located in a specialized center introduced a new hearing aid and its fitting procedure to a remote center (200 km away). The specialized center helped the remote center in fitting a hearing aid in 2 patients, and performed fitting in one of its own patients. The whole process was done through the Internet with audio and video in real time. Results: Three patients were fitted remotely. Three audiologists were remotely trained on how to fit the hearing aids. Conclusions: Remote fitting of hearing aids is possible through the Internet, as well as further supplying technical training to a remote center about the fitting procedures. Such a technological approach can help the government advance public policies on hearing rehabilitation, as patients can be motivated about maintaining their use of hearing aids with the option to ask for help in the comfort of their own homes. PMID:25991960

  7. Remote hearing aid fitting: Tele-audiology in the context of Brazilian Public Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penteado, Silvio Pires

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Currently, the Brazilian government has certificated nearly 140 specialized centers in hearing aid fittings through the Brazilian National Health System (SUS. Remote fitting through the Internet can allow a broader and more efficient coverage with a higher likelihood of success for patients covered by the SUS, as they can receive fittings from their own homes instead of going to the few and distant specialized centers. Aim: To describe a case of remote fitting between 2 cities, with revision of the literature. Method: Computer gears, a universal interface, and hearing aids were used. Case study: An audiologist located in a specialized center introduced a new hearing aid and its fitting procedure to a remote center (200 km away. The specialized center helped the remote center in fitting a hearing aid in 2 patients, and performed fitting in one of its own patients. The whole process was done through the Internet with audio and video in real time. Results: Three patients were fitted remotely. Three audiologists were remotely trained on how to fit the hearing aids. Conclusions: Remote fitting of hearing aids is possible through the Internet, as well as further supplying technical training to a remote center about the fitting procedures. Such a technological approach can help the government advance public policies on hearing rehabilitation, as patients can be motivated about maintaining their use of hearing aids with the option to ask for help in the comfort of their own homes.

  8. Sound Classification in Hearing Aids Inspired by Auditory Scene Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allegro Silvia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A sound classification system for the automatic recognition of the acoustic environment in a hearing aid is discussed. The system distinguishes the four sound classes "clean speech," "speech in noise," "noise," and "music." A number of features that are inspired by auditory scene analysis are extracted from the sound signal. These features describe amplitude modulations, spectral profile, harmonicity, amplitude onsets, and rhythm. They are evaluated together with different pattern classifiers. Simple classifiers, such as rule-based and minimum-distance classifiers, are compared with more complex approaches, such as Bayes classifier, neural network, and hidden Markov model. Sounds from a large database are employed for both training and testing of the system. The achieved recognition rates are very high except for the class "speech in noise." Problems arise in the classification of compressed pop music, strongly reverberated speech, and tonal or fluctuating noises.

  9. Optical sensing in a directional hearing aid microphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuang

    This thesis describes the simulation and analysis of the use of optical sensing for a MEMS directional microphone. Diffraction gratings integrated with micro-electromechanical-systems (MEMS) offer an optical sensing scheme with high detection sensitivity, low noise level and compact device structure. An optical sensing method is applied in a hearing aid microphone to detect the movement of the diaphragm due to sound. Diffraction grating fingers are fabricated on both sides of the diaphragm with a gold mirror on top. Two photo detectors are placed on the substrate symmetrically to detect the positive and negative first order diffraction of 850 nm VCSEL light. A finite element analysis model is built in COMSOL to study the light distribution and energy loss. The signal output, predicted using an analytical model is shown to agree well with those obtained using the finite element model.

  10. The Frequency of Hearing Loss and Hearing Aid Prescription in the Clients of the Avesina Education and Health Center, Audiometry Clinic, 1377

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bastani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Determining the frequency of hearing disorders and hearing aid using in the clients referring to the Avesina education and health center, audiometry clinic, 1377. Method and Material: This is an assesive-descriptive survey that conducted on more than 2053 (1234 males and 819 females who referred for audiometry after examination by a physician. Case history, otoscopy, PTA, speech and immittance audiometry were conducted for all the clients. The findings were expressed in tables and diagrams of frequency. The age and sex relationship. All types of hearing losses and the number of the hearing-impaired clients need a hearing aid were assessed. Findings: 56% of this population were hearing-impaired and 44% had normal hearing were hearing. 60% were males and 40% females. Of the hearing-impaired, 44% had SNHL, 35.6% CHL and 8.2% mixed hearing loss. The hearing aid was prescribed for 204 (83 females and121 males if they need that only 20 females and 32 males wear it. Conclusion: It this sample, SNHL is of higher frequency. According to this survey, the more the age, the more the hearing aid is accepted (85% of wearer are more than 49 the prevalence of the hearing impaired males are more than females (60% versus 40%. Only 25% of the hearing-impaired wear hearing aids.

  11. Configuration of Digital Hearing Aid Easily Handled over Warped Frequency Axis in Fitting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Kenzo; Mori, Mikio; Taniguchi, Shuji; Kato, Shozo; Araki, Chikahiro

    Recently, the digital and LSI based miniaturization technologies drastically have changed the hearing aids from the conventional single function of amplification to multiple functions. However, since the conventional hearing aids mostly control the flat gain at the center of a frequency band divided every octave to recover the auditory loss of users, so that the discontinuous gain tends to deteriorate the hearing quality due to the unnatural saw-teeth figured error. This paper proposes a solution of digital hearing aid which can be independently controlled at each audiogram test frequency and provide superb voice quality with less noise due to continuous variable gain characteristics in a wide dynamic range. The simulation results show the outstanding effect of the proposed scheme in the voice quality improvement which potential hearing aid users have considered to be a key to satisfy them.

  12. Vibrant Soundbridge and Bone Conduction Hearing Aid in Patients with Bilateral Malformation of External Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia; Mariano, Thais Cristina Barbosa; Honório, Heitor Marques; Brito, Rubens Vuono de

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hearing loss is the most common clinical finding in patients with malformation of the external ear canal. Among the possibilities of treatment, there is the adaptation of hearing aids by bone conduction and the adaptation of implantable hearing aids. Objective To assess speech perception with the use of Vibrant Soundbridge (VBS - MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) associated with additional amplification in patients with bilateral craniofacial malformation. Method We evaluated 11 patients with bilateral malformation over 12 years with mixed hearing loss or bilateral conductive. They were using the Softband (Oticon Medical, Sweden) and bone conduction hearing aid in the ear opposite the one with the VSB. We performed the evaluation of speech perception using the Hearing in Noise Test. Results Participants were eight men and three women with a mean of 19.5 years. The signal / noise ratio presented significant results in patients fitted with VSB and bone conduction hearing aid. Conclusion The results of speech perception were significantly better with use of VBS combined with bone conduction hearing aids. PMID:26722343

  13. Factors that influence intent to adopt a hearing aid among older people in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobelli, Nicola; Gill, Liz; Cassia, Fabio; Ugolini, Marta

    2014-11-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent health impairments associated with ageing in developed countries, and it can result in social, emotional and communication dysfunction. Hearing loss in Italy is increasing, yet, despite the availability of free hearing aids and access to qualified community-based health professionals specialising in audiology services, their uptake remains low (about 15%-20%). This paper presents an investigation of the possible reasons why older people in Italy resist adopting a hearing aid. We used the literature to identify factors influencing people with hearing loss's decision-making, and drew on the theory of reasoned action to create an explanatory model. To test our hypotheses, we applied a cross-sectional design. We developed a questionnaire including 13 items related to adopting a hearing aid. Health professionals identified 400 persons aged 60-90 who were candidates for a free hearing aid. Those willing to participate were sent a copy of the questionnaire and telephoned between August and September 2009; a total of 243 responded (response rate of 60.8%). Linear regression analysis highlighted that a person's intention to adopt a hearing aid was positively related to their attitude towards its adoption, but negatively linked to their perceived subjective norms. It was found that trust in the health professional does not moderate the relationship between a person's attitude and their intention to adopt a hearing aid, but trust mitigates the relationship between a person's perceived subjective norms and their intentions. These findings underline the importance of the potential role that the healthcare professional could play in reducing the uncertainty created by external social pressures. For this purpose, stronger collaboration between the various health professionals involved in hearing aid provision, from diagnosis to fitting, is recommended. PMID:25251979

  14. Hearing aid processing of loud speech and noise signals: Consequences for loudness perception and listening comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Erik

    2007-01-01

    experiment, subjects rated the signals in regard to loudness, speech clarity, noisiness and overall acceptance. Based on the results, a criterion for selecting compression parameters that yield some level-variation in the output signal, while still keeping the overall user-acceptance at a tolerable level, is...... they become audible again for the hearing impaired person. The general goal is to place all sounds within the hearing aid users’ audible range, such that speech intelligibility and listening comfort become as good as possible. Amplification strategies in hearing aids are in many cases based on...... empirical research -for example investigations of loudness perception in hearing impaired listeners. Most research has been focused on speech and sounds at medium input-levels (e.g., 60-65 dB SPL). It is well documented that for speech at conversational levels, hearing aid-users prefer the signal to be...

  15. A New Probe Noise Approach For Acoustic Feedback Cancellation In Hearing Aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    systems is the biased adaptive filter estimation problem, especially when tonal signals such as music and alarm tones enter the hearing aid microphones. The consequences of this biased estimation might be significant sound distortion or even worse, howling. In principle, unbiased adaptive filter...... is not possible with the tradi-tional probe noise approach. We show simulation results of a challenging situation for AFC sys-tems, where the acoustic feedback path changes momentarily while the hearing aid user is listen-ing to music. The traditional AFC system fails completely with significant......Acoustic feedback is a big challenge in hearing aids. If not appropriately treated, the feedback limits the maximum possible amplification and may lead to significant sound distortions. In a state-of-the-art hearing aid, an acoustic feedback cancellation (AFC) system is used to compensate the...

  16. The Reliability and Validity of the Comfort Level Method of Setting Hearing Aid Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Brian E.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Investigated in a series of experiments with 40 adults (20- to 70-years-old) having bilateral sensorineural hearing impairments was the test-retest reliability of the comfort level method for setting the acoustic gain of hearing aids, and the relationship between the comfort settings utilized in more realistic daily listening situations.…

  17. Hearing Aids: Expectations and Satisfaction of People with an Intellectual Disability, a Descriptive Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwese-Jongejeugd, A.; Verschuure, H.; Evenhuis, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: In spite of an increased risk of hearing impairment in persons with an intellectual disability (ID), rehabilitation with hearing aids often fails. We performed a descriptive pilot study with the following study questions: (1) Do comparable elements as in the general population contribute to expectations of and satisfaction with hearing…

  18. Sensitivity to temporal fine structure and hearing-aid outcomes in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElviraPerez Vallejos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the effect of sensitivity to temporal fine structure on subjective measures of hearing aid outcome.Design: Prior to receiving hearing aids, participants completed a test to assess sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS, the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile (GHABP, and the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of hearing (SSQ-A. Follow-up appointments, comprised the GHABP, the SSQ-B , and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aid Outcomes (IOI-HA.Study sample: 75 adults were recruited from direct referral clinics. Results: Two thirds of participants were found to have good sensitivity to TFS; listeners with good sensitivity to TFS rated their hearing abilities higher at pre-fitting (SSQ-A than those with poor sensitivity to TFS. At follow-up, participants with good sensitivity to TFS showed a small improvement on SSQ-B over listeners with poor sensitivity to TFS. Conclusions: The clinical identification of a patient’s ability to process TFS information at an early stage in the treatment pathway could prove useful in managing expectations about hearing aid outcomes.

  19. Initial Development of a Temporal-Envelope-Preserving Nonlinear Hearing Aid Prescription Using a Genetic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Sabin, Andrew T.; Souza, Pamela E.

    2013-01-01

    Most hearing aid prescriptions focus on the optimization of a metric derived from the long-term average spectrum of speech, and do not consider how the prescribed values might distort the temporal envelope shape. A growing body of evidence suggests that such distortions can lead to systematic errors in speech perception, and therefore hearing aid prescriptions might benefit by including preservation of the temporal envelope shape in their rationale. To begin to explore this possibility, we de...

  20. Advantages of Binaural Amplification to Acceptable Noise Level of Directional Hearing Aid Users

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ja-Hee; Lee, Jae Hee; Lee, Ho-Ki

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The goal of the present study was to examine whether Acceptable Noise Levels (ANLs) would be lower (greater acceptance of noise) in binaural listening than in monaural listening condition and also whether meaningfulness of background speech noise would affect ANLs for directional microphone hearing aid users. In addition, any relationships between the individual binaural benefits on ANLs and the individuals' demographic information were investigated. Methods Fourteen hearing aid us...

  1. Using a reflection model for modeling the dynamic feedback path of digital hearing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Guilin; Gran, Fredrik; Jacobsen, Finn; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2010-01-01

    Feedback whistling is one of the severe problems with hearing aids, especially in dynamic situations when the users hug, pick up a telephone, etc. This paper investigates the properties of the dynamic feedback paths of digital hearing aids and proposes a model based on a reflection assumption. The model is compared with two existing models: a direct model and an initialization model, using the measured dynamic feedback paths. The comparison shows that the proposed approach is able to model th...

  2. Data mining of audiology patient records: factors influencing the choice of hearing aid type

    OpenAIRE

    Anwar Muhammad N; Oakes Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background This paper describes the analysis of a database of over 180,000 patient records, collected from over 23,000 patients, by the hearing aid clinic at James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough, UK. These records consist of audiograms (graphs of the faintest sounds audible to the patient at six different pitches), categorical data (such as age, gender, diagnosis and hearing aid type) and brief free text notes made by the technicians. This data is mined to determine which ...

  3. Long-Term Tinnitus Suppression with Linear Octave Frequency Transposition Hearing Aids

    OpenAIRE

    Peltier, Elisabeth; Peltier, Cedric; Tahar, Stephanie; Alliot-Lugaz, Evelyne; Cazals, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Over the last three years of hearing aid dispensing, it was observed that among 74 subjects fitted with a linear octave frequency transposition (LOFT) hearing aid, 60 reported partial or complete tinnitus suppression during day and night, an effect still lasting after several months or years of daily use. We report in more details on 38 subjects from whom we obtained quantified measures of tinnitus suppression through visual analog scaling and several additional psychoacoustic and audiometric...

  4. Open Versus Closed Hearing-Aid Fittings: A Literature Review of Both Fitting Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzel, Matthias; Holube, Inga

    2016-01-01

    One of the main issues in hearing-aid fittings is the abnormal perception of the user’s own voice as too loud, “boomy,” or “hollow.” This phenomenon known as the occlusion effect be reduced by large vents in the earmolds or by open-fit hearing aids. This review provides an overview of publications related to open and closed hearing-aid fittings. First, the occlusion effect and its consequences for perception while using hearing aids are described. Then, the advantages and disadvantages of open compared with closed fittings and their impact on the fitting process are addressed. The advantages include less occlusion, improved own-voice perception and sound quality, and increased localization performance. The disadvantages associated with open-fit hearing aids include reduced benefits of directional microphones and noise reduction, as well as less compression and less available gain before feedback. The final part of this review addresses the need for new approaches to combine the advantages of open and closed hearing-aid fittings. PMID:26879562

  5. Measuring real-ear signal-to-noise ratio: application to directional hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Steven L; Creeke, Sarah A; Lutman, Mark E

    2010-03-01

    Due to individual characteristics such as head size, earmould type, and earmould venting, the directional benefit that an individual will obtain from a hearing aid cannot be predicted from average data. It is therefore desirable to measure real ear directional benefit. This paper demonstrates a method to measure real ear hearing aid directivity based on a general approach to measure the broadband output signal-to-noise ratio of a hearing aid. Errors arising from non-linearity were tested in simulation and found to be low for typical hearing aid compression ratios. Next, the efficacy of the method to estimate directional benefit was demonstrated on KEMAR. Finally the variability of directional benefit was explored in real-ears. Significant differences in signal-to-noise ratio between directional and omnidirectional microphone settings were demonstrated at most azimuths. Articulation-Index-weighted directional benefit varied by more than 7 dB across ears at some azimuths. Such individual variation in directional benefit has implications when fitting hearing aids: it should not be assumed that all users will receive similar directional benefit from the same hearing aid. PMID:20151932

  6. Dual Language versus English-Only Support for Bilingual Children with Hearing Loss Who Use Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunta, Ferenc; Douglas, Michael; Dickson, Hanna; Cantu, Amy; Wickesberg, Jennifer; Gifford, René H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a critical need to understand better speech and language development in bilingual children learning two spoken languages who use cochlear implants (CIs) and hearing aids (HAs). The paucity of knowledge in this area poses a significant barrier to providing maximal communicative outcomes to a growing number of children who have…

  7. Self-reported outcomes of aural rehabilitation for adult hearing aid users in a developing South African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Pienaar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impairment has far reaching consequences for affected individuals, in terms of quality of life indicators. In a developing South African context the hearing impaired population is faced with limited aural rehabilitation services. This study evaluated self-reported outcomes of aural rehabilitation in a group of adults in the public healthcare sector with a standardized outcomes measurement tool (IOI-HA. Sixty-one respondents participated (44% males; 56% females, with a mean age of 69.7 years. Results revealed that the majority of respondents experienced favourable outcomes in all domains of the inventory comprising of: daily use of hearing aids, benefits provided by hearing aids, residual activity limitation, satisfaction with hearing aids, residual participation restriction, impact of hearing difficulties on others, and changes in quality of life. Statistically significant relationships were obtained between the daily use of hearing aids, the degree of hearing loss, and the type of hearing aids fitted, as well as the benefits received from hearing aids in difficult listening environments (p < 0.05. Despite challenges of developing contexts, the mean scores distribution compared positively to similar reports from developed countries. Outcomes of improved quality of life emphasize the importance of providing affordable hearing aids and services to all hearing impaired individuals in South Africa.

  8. Signal Processing in High-End Hearing Aids: State of the Art, Challenges, and Future Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, V.; Chalupper, J.; Eggers, J.; Fischer, E.; Kornagel, U.; Puder, H.; Rass, U.

    2005-12-01

    The development of hearing aids incorporates two aspects, namely, the audiological and the technical point of view. The former focuses on items like the recruitment phenomenon, the speech intelligibility of hearing-impaired persons, or just on the question of hearing comfort. Concerning these subjects, different algorithms intending to improve the hearing ability are presented in this paper. These are automatic gain controls, directional microphones, and noise reduction algorithms. Besides the audiological point of view, there are several purely technical problems which have to be solved. An important one is the acoustic feedback. Another instance is the proper automatic control of all hearing aid components by means of a classification unit. In addition to an overview of state-of-the-art algorithms, this paper focuses on future trends.

  9. Signal Processing in High-End Hearing Aids: State of the Art, Challenges, and Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Rass

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of hearing aids incorporates two aspects, namely, the audiological and the technical point of view. The former focuses on items like the recruitment phenomenon, the speech intelligibility of hearing-impaired persons, or just on the question of hearing comfort. Concerning these subjects, different algorithms intending to improve the hearing ability are presented in this paper. These are automatic gain controls, directional microphones, and noise reduction algorithms. Besides the audiological point of view, there are several purely technical problems which have to be solved. An important one is the acoustic feedback. Another instance is the proper automatic control of all hearing aid components by means of a classification unit. In addition to an overview of state-of-the-art algorithms, this paper focuses on future trends.

  10. Digital signal processing (DSP) applications for multiband loudness correction digital hearing aids and cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillier, N; Frölich, T; Kompis, M; Bögli, H; Lai, W K

    1993-01-01

    Single-chip digital signal processors (DSPs) allow the flexible implementation of a large variety of speech analysis, synthesis, and processing algorithms for the hearing impaired. A series of experiments was carried out to optimize parameters of the adaptive beamformer noise reduction algorithm and to evaluate its performance in realistic environments with normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects. An experimental DSP system has been used to implement a multiband loudness correction (MLC) algorithm for a digital hearing aid. Speech tests in quiet and noise with 13 users of conventional hearing aids demonstrated significant improvements in discrimination scores with the MLC algorithm. Various speech coding strategies for cochlear implants were implemented in real time on a DSP laboratory speech processor. Improved speech discrimination performance was achieved with high-rate stimulation. Hybrid strategies incorporating speech feature detectors and complex decision algorithms are currently being investigated. PMID:8263833

  11. Validation of a Virtual Sound Environment System for Testing Hearing Aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cubick, Jens; Dau, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    reverberation, background noise, and multiple interfering talkers. Loudspeaker-based sound field reproduction techniques, such as higher-order Ambisonics, allow for the simulation of such complex sound environments and can be used for realistic listening experiments with hearing aids. However, to successfully...... employ such systems, it is crucial to know how experimental results from a virtual environment translate to the corresponding real environment. In this study, speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured with normal-hearing listeners wearing hearing aids, both in a real room and in a simulation of...... that room auralized via a spherical array of 29 loudspeakers, using either Ambisonics or a nearest loudspeaker method. The benefit from a static beamforming algorithm was considered in comparison to a hearing aid setting with omnidirectional microphones. The measured SRTs were about 2-4 dB higher, and...

  12. Prevalence of Contralateral Hearing Aid Use in Adults with Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi, Cintia Tizue

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The exclusive use of a cochlear implant (CI in one ear allows patients to effectively hear speech in a quiet environment. However, in environments with competing noise, the processing of multiple sounds becomes complex. In an attempt to promote binaural hearing in a noninvasive manner, the use of a hearing aid in the nonimplanted ear is suggested for patients with a unilateral CI. Aims: To identify the prevalence of hearing aid use in the contralateral ear in adults who already have a CI; to determine the reasons why some patients do not use contralateral hearing aids (CHAs; and to analyze the effects of residual hearing in CHA users. Materials and Methods: This is a clinical study in 82 adult patients with CI implants who responded to a questionnaire designed to determine current use of CHA. Results: In our patient sample, 70 CHA nonusers were identified. The prevalence of CHA users was determined to be 12% with a 95% confidence interval of 11 to 13%. About 58.2% of the CHA nonusers reported a lack of noticeable benefit even after wearing hearing aids, and 23.6% reported not having received the option to use a CHA. CHA users had a pure tone average of 107-dB hearing level, whereas CHA nonusers had a pure tone average of 117-dB hearing level. Conclusion: The prevalence of the use of a CHA is low in our study. We attribute the low use of a CHA to either a lack of residual hearing or to a lack of benefit from the amplification.

  13. A Simplified Technique for Orientation of a Bone Anchored Auricular Prostheses: a Clinical Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein G. El Charkawi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: A simple technique was presented in this clinical report for orientation of a bone anchored auricular prosthesis.Methods: The proposed technique includes drawing the intact ear on a transparent celluloid paper or radiographic film and flipping it to the opposite side and relating it to the fixed anatomical features on the face of patient.Results: The drawing, by this way provides a simple and easy way to duplicate and transfer the exact size and position of the intact ear to the defect side.Conclusions: This technique provides a simple, safe, inexpensive and time saving yet, an accurate and effective surgical template that orients the craniofacial implants to the confines of the definitive auricular prosthesis. It is indicated for restoration of single missing external ear either in aplasia, injuries and total resection.

  14. A novel method of improving sound quality and reducing acoustic feedback in hearing aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killion, Mead; French, John; Viranyi, Steve; Preves, David

    2002-05-01

    Most current hearing aids have relatively narrow bandwidths, when compared to high-fidelity equipment, and exhibit undamped peaks because the peaks are considered less troublesome than the problem of wax-clogged dampers. Attempting to make hearing aids wider band has typically resulted in increased acoustic feedback problems. The recent availability of an off-the-shelf digital hearing aid integrated circuit amplifier, which contains several biquad filters, when used with special software, automatically detects and suppresses peaks. The filters then further flatten and extend the hearing aid frequency response to 16 kHz, while the appropriate CORFIG correction is added to the frequency response, producing a transparent sound. Open ear versus aided KEMAR recordings were produced using a live jazz trio and a string quartet. The sound quality ratings for eight commercially available digital hearing aids were obtained from several different listening panels. The new response equalization proved advantageous in all cases. The effects of eliminating the peaks in the response on maximum real ear gain achievable before onset of acoustic feedback oscillation will be reported.

  15. Decision support system for the selection of an ITE or a BTE hearing aid

    OpenAIRE

    Anwar, Naveed; Oakes, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to mine a large set of heterogeneous audiology data to create a decision support system (DSS) to choose between two hearing aid types (ITE and BTE aid). This research is based on the data analysis of audiology data using various statistical and data mining techniques. It uses the data of a large NHS (National Health Services, UK) facility. It uses 180,000 records (covering more than 23,000 different patients) from a hearing aid clinic. The developed system u...

  16. Pilot Study to Evaluate Hearing Aid Service Delivery Model and Measure Benefit Using Self-Report Outcome Measures Using Community Hearing Workers in a Developing Country

    OpenAIRE

    Emerson, Lingamdenne Paul; Job, Anand; Abraham, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss is a major handicap in developing countries with paucity of trained audiologists and limited resources. In this pilot study trained community health workers were used to provide comprehensive hearing aid services in the community. One hundred and eleven patients were fitted with semi-digital hearing aid and were evaluated over a period of six months. They were assessed using self-report outcome measure APHAB. Results show that trained CHWs are effective in detecting disabling hea...

  17. Rethinking Sound : Computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for deaf and hard of hearing children using cochlear implants or hearing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    In the present thesis, computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach was examined in deaf and hard of hearing children (DHH) aged 5, 6 or 7 years old using cochlear implants, hearing aids or a combination of both. Children with normal hearing (NH), matched for non-verbal intelligence and age, served as a reference group. Deaf and hard of hearing children constitute a heterogenetic population regarding cognitive and academic achievement. Many of them do not reach age appropria...

  18. Objective assessment of listening effort in the oscillatory EEG: comparison of different hearing aid configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernarding, Corinna; Strauss, Daniel J; Hannemann, Ronny; Seidler, Harald; Corona-Strauss, Farah I

    2014-01-01

    An objective estimate of listening effort could support the hearing aid fitting procedure. Most of the digital hearing aids have already hearing aid settings which are supposed to reduce the listening effort, but the effects of these settings on the individual's listening effort remain unclear. In this study, we propose an objective estimate of listening effort using electroencephalographic data. The new method is based on the phase distribution of the ongoing oscillatory EEG activity. We hypothesize that for a non-effortful listening environment the phase is rather uniformly distributed on the unit circle than for a demanding condition. To prove if the phase is uniformly distributed around the unit circle, the Rayleigh Test was applied to the phase of the EEG. This method was tested in 14 hearing impaired subjects (moderate hearing loss, 65.64 ±7.93 yrs, 7 female). The tested hearing aid settings were a directional microphone combined with a noise reduction algorithm in a medium and a strong setting, the noise reduction setting turned off as well as a setting using omnidirectional microphones. Noise embedded sentences (Oldenburg Sentence Test, OlSa) were used as test materials. The task of the subject was to repeat each sentence. The results indicate that the objective estimate of listening effort maps the subjectively rated effort and for a listening situation like the presented one, the strong setting of the directional microphone requires the smallest effort. PMID:25570536

  19. Development and assessment of two fixed-array microphones for use with hearing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Bilsen, F.A.; Soede, W.; Berkhout, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Hearing-impaired listeners often have great difficulty understanding speech in situations with background noise (e.g., meetings, parties) . Conventional hearing aids offer insufficient directivity to significantly reduce background noise relative to the desired speech signal . Based on array techniques, microphone prototypes have been developed with strongly directional characteristics to be incorporated into the frame and the "temples" of a pair of eyeglasses. Particular emphasis was on opti...

  20. Improvements in speech perception and sound localization in hearing aids using binaural multichannel Wiener filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Bogaert, Tim; Doclo, Simon; Wouters, Jan; Moonen, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Multi-microphone noise reduction algorithms are commonly implemented in modern hearing aids to improve speech intelligibility in noisy environments. The development of these algorithms has mostly focused on monaural systems. The human auditory system is a binaural system which compares and combines the signals received by both ears to perceive and localize a single sound source. Providing two monaural, independently operating, noise reduction systems (a bilateral configuration) to the hearing...

  1. Effects of Hearing Aid Amplification on Robust Neural Coding of Speech

    OpenAIRE

    Boley, Jonathan Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Hearing aids are able to restore some hearing abilities for people with auditory impairments, but background noise remains a significant problem. Unfortunately, we know very little about how speech is encoded in the auditory system, particularly in impaired systems with prosthetic amplifiers. There is growing evidence that relative timing in the neural signals (known as spatiotemporal coding) is important for speech perception, but there is little research that relates spatiotemporal coding a...

  2. Using a reflection model for modeling the dynamic feedback path of digital hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Guilin; Gran, Fredrik; Jacobsen, Finn;

    2010-01-01

    model is compared with two existing models: a direct model and an initialization model, using the measured dynamic feedback paths. The comparison shows that the proposed approach is able to model the dynamic feedback paths more efficiently and accurately in terms of mean-square error and maximum stable......Feedback whistling is one of the severe problems with hearing aids, especially in dynamic situations when the users hug, pick up a telephone, etc. This paper investigates the properties of the dynamic feedback paths of digital hearing aids and proposes a model based on a reflection assumption. The...... gain. The method is also extended to dual-microphone hearing aids to assess the possibility of relating the two dynamic feedback paths through the reflection model. However, it is found that in a complicated acoustic environment, the relation between the two feedback paths can be very intricate and...

  3. Interpolation Filter Design for Hearing-Aid Audio Class-D Output Stage Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pracný, Peter; Bruun, Erik; Muntal, Pere Llimós

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with a design of a digital interpolation filter for a 3rd order multi-bit ΣΔ modulator with over-sampling ratio OSR = 64. The interpolation filter and the ΣΔ modulator are part of the back-end of an audio signal processing system in a hearing-aid application. The aim in this paper...... is to compare this design to designs presented in other state-of-the-art works ranging from hi-fi audio to hearing-aids. By performing comparison, trends and tradeoffs in interpolation filter design are indentified and hearing-aid specifications are derived. The possibilities for hardware reduction...... in the interpolation filter are investigated. Proposed design simplifications presented here result in the least hardware demanding combination of oversampling ratio, number of stages and number of filter taps among a number of filters reported for audio applications....

  4. Extracting the invariant model from the feedback paths of digital hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Guilin; Gran, Fredrik; Jacobsen, Finn;

    2011-01-01

    Feedback whistling is a severe problem with hearing aids. A typical acoustical feedback path represents a wave propagation path from the receiver to the microphone and includes many complicated effects among which some are invariant or nearly invariant for all users and in all acoustical environm......Feedback whistling is a severe problem with hearing aids. A typical acoustical feedback path represents a wave propagation path from the receiver to the microphone and includes many complicated effects among which some are invariant or nearly invariant for all users and in all acoustical...... environments given a specific type of hearing aids. Based on this observation, a feedback path model that consists of an invariant model and a variant model is proposed. A common-acoustical-pole and zero model-based approach and an iterative least-square search-based approach are used to extract the invariant...

  5. Bone-conduction hearing aids in an elderly population: complications and quality of life assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Simon D; Moraleda, Javier; Baldwin, Alice; Ray, Jaydip

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether an elderly population with hearing impairment can be adequately rehabilitated with a bone-conduction hearing aid and whether the putative relationship between the elderly and an increased complication rate is justified. The study design was a retrospective case note review with a postal and telephone questionnaire, which was carried out in a tertiary centre. All patients aged 60 or over underwent implantation with a bone-conduction aid between 2009 and 2013 for conductive, SSD or mixed hearing loss. Outcome measures were complication rates and quality of life assessment using the Glasgow Benefit Inventory. The influence of patient and surgical factors on the complication rate was assessed. Fifty-one patients were implanted. Mean age was 67 years (range 60-89 years). The mean benefit, satisfaction and global GBI scores were 70 % (range 0-100 %), 70 % (0-100 %) and 82 % (83-100 %), respectively. The residual disability was 18 % (0-25 %). The adverse skin reaction rate was 16 % and the fixture loss rate was 2 %. There was a demonstrable increase in the complication rate with the dermatome (45 %; 5 patients) compared to the Sheffield 'S' (13 %; 2 patients) or linear incision techniques (29 %; 7 patients). The bone-conduction hearing aids are ideal method of hearing rehabilitation in the elderly for all forms of hearing loss. It provides significant benefit with no increased complication rate, which is imperative if social isolation is to be avoided and cognition preserved in this growing elderly population. PMID:25736468

  6. The Phonics Approach in Swedish Children using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids: Inspecting Phonological Gain

    OpenAIRE

    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia; Lyxell, Björn; Sahlén, Birgitta; Dahlström, Örjan; Lindgren, Magnus; Ors, Marianne; Kallioinen, Petter; Uhlén, Inger

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated cognitive abilities (i.e. Phonological Processing Skills (PhPS), lexical access, complex and visual Working Memory (WM), and letter knowledge) in Deaf and Hard of Hearing children (DHH) 5, 6 and 7 years of age using cochlear implants or hearing aids. Children with Normal Hearing (NH) served as a reference group. All children took part of a computer-assisted intervention with a phonics approach for 4 weeks aimed to support PhPS. The first aim of the study was to ...

  7. ADAPTIVE EXPERT SYSTEM FOR CALCULATION OF REAL EAR INSERTION GAIN FOR DIGITAL HEARING AID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadagopan Rajkumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The various gain calculating formulae for digital hearing aids is analyzed for different subjects to find out suitable adaptive gain formula for most successful gain recommendations. The object of the work is to design and develop an adaptive expert system, which could be effectively used to perform screening tests to identify the level of hearing impairment and recommend suitable gain suggestions for frequency bands of digital hearing aid. Initially, the design requirements for a digital hearing aid are being arrived by using the standard gain formulae followed such as National Acoustic Laboratory Revised (NAL-R and Prescription of Gain Output (POGO II. The test is carried with 272 subjects aging from 25 to 72 and 221 male and 51 female. Of which gain is recommended for 127 subjects with the standard gain formula. When the recommendations are verified for satisfaction among the hearing aid users only 28 received satisfaction with NAL-R and 25 received satisfactions with POGO II. Remaining subjects received satisfaction only after fine tuning the gain value and recommended gains are stored in adaptive expert system. Subsequently, based on the suggested value of gains and additional data from expert audiologists, gain formula could be made distinct for every language.

  8. Contribution of a Contralateral Hearing Aid to Perception of Consonant Voicing, Intonation, and Emotional State in Adult Cochlear Implantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Gaon-Sivan, Gal; Shpak, Talma; Luntz, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Binaural hearing in cochlear implant (CI) users can be achieved either by bilateral implantation or bimodally with a contralateral hearing aid (HA). Binaural-bimodal hearing has the advantage of complementing the high-frequency electric information from the CI by low-frequency acoustic information from the HA. We examined the contribution of a…

  9. Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Speech Perception by Individuals with Cochlear Implants versus Individuals with Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Rothem, Hilla; Luntz, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The researchers evaluated the contribution of cochlear implants (CIs) to speech perception by a sample of prelingually deaf individuals implanted after age 8 years. This group was compared with a group with profound hearing impairment (HA-P), and with a group with severe hearing impairment (HA-S), both of which used hearing aids. Words and…

  10. Analysis of Beamformer Directed Single-Channel Noise Reduction System for Hearing Aid Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Pedersen, Michael Syskind

    We study multi-microphone noise reduction systems consisting of a beamformer and a single-channel (SC) noise reduction stage. In particular, we present and analyse a maximum likelihood (ML) method for jointly estimating the target and noise power spectral densities (psd's) entering the SC filter....... locations. In a hearing aid context, we analyze the performance of the estimators as a function of target angle-of-arrival and frequency. Finally, we demonstrate the advantage of the proposed method in a hearing aid situation with a target speaker in large-crowd noise....

  11. Biomimetic direction of arrival estimation for resolving front-back confusions in hearing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Archer-Boyd, Alan W.; Whitmer, William M.; Brimijoin, W. Owen; Soraghan, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Sound sources at the same angle in front or behind a two-microphone array (e.g., bilateral hearing aids) produce the same time delay and two estimates for the direction of arrival: A front-back confusion. The auditory system can resolve this issue using head movements. To resolve front-back confusion for hearing-aid algorithms, head movement was measured using an inertial sensor. Successive time-delay estimates between the microphones are shifted clockwise and counterclockwise by the head mov...

  12. Decision support system to help choose between an ITE or a BTE hearing aid

    OpenAIRE

    Anwar, Naveed; Oakes, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A decision support system (DSS) is used for analysing a situation and making decisions. The goal of this research is to mine a large set of heterogeneous audiology data and create a DSS to help audiology technicians to choose between an ITE or BTE hearing aid. Although, in many cases such a choice is clear cut, but at other times this system could be used as a second opinion to predict the hearing aid type. A number of data mining techniques, such as clustering of audiograms, association anal...

  13. A Link Loss Model for the On-body Propagation Channel for Binaural Hearing Aids

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra, Rohit; Johansson, Anders J.

    2013-01-01

    Binaural hearing aids communicate with each other through a wireless link for synchronization. A propagation model is needed to estimate the ear-to-ear link loss for such binaural hearing aids. The link loss is a critical parameter in a link budget to decide the sensitivity of the transceiver. In this paper, we have presented a model for the deterministic component of the ear-to-ear link loss. The model takes into account the dominant paths having most of the power of the creeping wave from t...

  14. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials Reveal Changes in Audibility with Nonlinear Frequency Compression in Hearing Aids for Children: Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Teresa Y C; Zhang, Vicky W; Hou, Sanna; Van Buynder, Patricia

    2016-02-01

    Hearing loss in children is detected soon after birth via newborn hearing screening. Procedures for early hearing assessment and hearing aid fitting are well established, but methods for evaluating the effectiveness of amplification for young children are limited. One promising approach to validating hearing aid fittings is to measure cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs). This article provides first a brief overview of reports on the use of CAEPs for evaluation of hearing aids. Second, a study that measured CAEPs to evaluate nonlinear frequency compression (NLFC) in hearing aids for 27 children (between 6.1 and 16.8 years old) who have mild to severe hearing loss is reported. There was no significant difference in aided sensation level or the detection of CAEPs for /g/ between NLFC on and off conditions. The activation of NLFC was associated with a significant increase in aided sensation levels for /t/ and /s/. It also was associated with an increase in detection of CAEPs for /t/ and /s/. The findings support the use of CAEPs for checking audibility provided by hearing aids. Based on the current data, a clinical protocol for using CAEPs to validate audibility with amplification is presented. PMID:27587920

  15. Vocabulary and Working Memory in Children Fit with Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Derek J.; McGregor, Karla K.; Bentler, Ruth A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether children with mild-to-moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss (CHL) present with disturbances in working memory and whether these disturbances relate to the size of their receptive vocabularies. Method: Children 6 to 9 years of age participated. Aspects of working memory were tapped by articulation rate, forward…

  16. Hearing aid fitting results in a case of a patient with auditory neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell´Aringa, Ana Helena Bannwart

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Auditory Neuropathy is described recently as a hearing loss characterized by the preservation of outer hair cells and absence of auditory brainstem responses. Objective: To present a case report of hearing aid fitting in a patient with Auditory Neuropathy. Case Report: S.A.P., male, 32 years old, sought the Otorhinolaryngology Service after five years of Guillain-Barré syndrome, complaining of progressive and bilateral tinnitus auditory loss in both ears. The audiological evaluation resulted in: severe sensorioneural hearing deficiency with bilateral irregular configuration; speech recognition rate of 0% and speech detection rate in 35dB in both ears; type A tympanometric curve and absent ipsilateral, bilateral and contralateral reflexes; absence of waves and presence of cochlear microphonics in both ears in the auditory evoked potential and present bilateral distortion product-evoked otoacoustic emissions. The speech perception test was performed with polysyllabic words and lip reading, and presented 44% of hit with hearing aid and 12% without it. Final Comments: Despite the differences in the process of hearing aid habilitation and rehabilitation, we conclude that sound amplification brought benefits to the patient with auditory neuropathy.

  17. Theory-of-Mind Development in Oral Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants or Conventional Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Candida C.

    2004-01-01

    Background: In the context of the established finding that theory-of-mind (ToM) growth is seriously delayed in late-signing deaf children, and some evidence of equivalent delays in those learning speech with conventional hearing aids, this study's novel contribution was to explore ToM development in deaf children with cochlear implants. Implants…

  18. Self-Resonant Electrically Small Loop Antennas for Hearing-Aids Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiaying; Breinbjerg, Olav

    Two novel self-resonant electrically small antennas are proposed in this paper, which are designed for hearing aids applications. They are miniaturized by using the capacitive and inductive coupling mechanism between two loops, and the antenna impedance can be matched to a specific value without...

  19. 76 FR 2625 - Comment Sought on 2010 Review of Hearing Aid Compatibility Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (1998). Electronic Filers: Comments may... FR 54508 and 75 FR 54546 (Sept. 8, 2010), the ] Commission reiterated its intention, first stated in... create special issues for hearing aid compatibility? Consumers are increasingly using Bluetooth and...

  20. Filtering to match hearing aid insertion gain to individual ear acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Steven L

    2009-09-01

    When hearing aid gain is prescribed by software, gain is calculated based on the average acoustics for the age of patient, gender, mold type, and so on. The acoustics of the individual's ear often vary from the average values, so there will be a mismatch between the prescribed gain and the real-ear gain. Real-ear measurement can be used to verify the gain and adjust it to meet targets, but the quality of the match will be limited by the number of channels and the flexibility of the hearing aid. A potential way to improve this process is to generate a filter that compensates for variations in real-ear insertion gain due to individual ear acoustics. Such a filter could be included in the processing path of a digital hearing aid. This article describes how such a filter can be generated using the windowing method, and the principle is demonstrated in a real ear. The approach requires communication between the real-ear measurement and hearing aid programming software. A finite impulse response filter with group delay just over 2 ms matched insertion gain to target values within the acceptable tolerance defined by British Society of Audiology guidelines. PMID:19713209

  1. 21 CFR 801.421 - Hearing aid devices; conditions for sale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hearing aid devices; conditions for sale. 801.421 Section 801.421 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...; conditions for sale. (a) Medical evaluation requirements—(1) General. Except as provided in paragraph...

  2. Distortion of interaural time cues by directional noise reduction systems in modern digital hearing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Bogaert, Tim; Wouters, Jan; Klasen, Thomas James; Moonen, Marc

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the distortion of interaural time information by modern digital hearing aids. It is shown that two popular noise reduction techniques, namely a directional microphone and an adaptive directional microphone, are very sensitive to intermicrophone mismatch which results in the distortion of interaural time information. This interaural information is crucial for sound localization and speech perception in noise.

  3. Using a signal cancellation technique involving impulse response to assess directivity of hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Bentler, Ruth A

    2009-12-01

    The directional microphone systems of modern digital hearing aids are capable of changing their spatial directivity pattern and/or the microphone mode in response to changes in the properties of environmental sounds. These adaptive/automatic features make measurement of a hearing aid's directivity in a given test environment very difficult. Assessing the directivity of such systems requires a signal that can record the system's response while not changing the system's directivity. This paper proposes a method using a signal cancellation technique involving impulse responses to acoustically assess a hearing aid's directivity (referred to as the IR method). The impulse is presumed to be undetectable to the adaptive/automatic system because it contains little energy and a short response could be recorded before the system actually reacts. In the current study, the IR method was evaluated by testing five adaptive/automatic directional hearing aids in noise of various intensities. The results revealed that the IR method was an accurate and repeatable way to assess slow-acting directional systems in noise of varying intensities and fast-acting systems in noise of high intensities. PMID:20000935

  4. 47 CFR 20.19 - Hearing aid-compatible mobile handsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. These materials are incorporated as they...” its offerings of hearing aid-compatible handset models by offering a mix of new and existing models..., consistent with its own marketing practices. However, if a manufacturer assigns different model...

  5. 75 FR 54508 - Amendment of the Commission's Rules Governing Hearing Aid-Compatible Mobile Handsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... years to continue offering its iPhone without full hearing aid compatibility. However, Apple's stated... example, Apple introduced its third iPhone model within approximately two years after bringing the original iPhone to market. While the interest in innovation counsels in favor of permitting any company...

  6. Maximum likelihood based multi-channel isotropic reverberation reduction for hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuklasiński, Adam; Doclo, Simon; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    We propose a multi-channel Wiener filter for speech dereverberation in hearing aids. The proposed algorithm uses joint maximum likelihood estimation of the speech and late reverberation spectral variances, under the assumption that the late reverberant sound field is cylindrically isotropic. The...

  7. 77 FR 70407 - Updated Information and Comment Sought on Review of Hearing Aid Compatibility Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... Comment Filing System (ECFS). See Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121... Wireless Telecommunications Bureau (Bureau) seeks updated comment on the operation and effectiveness of the Commission's rules relating to hearing aid compatibility of wireless handsets. The Bureau seeks...

  8. 75 FR 63764 - Hearing Aid Compatibility Proceeding; Request That Comments Address Effects of New Legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... to the rules governing hearing aid compatibility of mobile handsets. 75 FR 54546 (Sept. 8, 2010... of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (1998). Electronic Filers: Comments may be filed... Legislation AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Request for comments. SUMMARY: In this...

  9. Selecting Appropriate Tests to Assess the Benefits of Bilateral Amplification With Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schoonhoven, Jelmer; Schulte, Michael; Boymans, Monique; Wagener, Kirsten C; Dreschler, Wouter A; Kollmeier, Birger

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bilateral hearing aids (HA) in subjects with mild and moderate-to-severe hearing loss. This study was designed as a within-subject feasibility study. Bilateral HA use was assessed using different laboratory tests on speech reception, listening effort, noise tolerance, and localization. All data were evaluated with bilateral and unilateral HA fittings. Forty experienced bilateral HA users were included with hearing impairment ranging from mild to moderate-to-severe. Subjects were stratified into two groups based on the degree of hearing loss. Speech reception in noise, listening effort, and localization tests showed a bilateral benefit for the moderate-to-severely hearing-impaired subjects. A bilateral benefit was also observed for listening effort in the mildly hearing-impaired group. The assessment of listening effort shows promise as a measure of bilateral HA benefit for mild hearing impairment. Localization and speech reception in noise tests provide additional value for larger losses. The next step is to compare experienced unilateral with bilateral HA users. PMID:27460871

  10. Inadvertent insertion of hearing aid impression material into the middle ear: Case report and implications for future community hearing services ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Algudkar, Ashwin; Maden, Belma; Singh, Arvind; Tatla, Taran

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The creation of ear moulds for hearing aids is generally considered a safe and routine procedure for trained professionals. In the literature there are reports of otological complications caused by hearing aid mould impression material in the middle ear cavity but such complications are considered rare. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a patient in whom impression material entered the middle ear through a perforation of the tympanic membrane during the process of makin...

  11. Designing of a digital behind-the-ear hearing aid to meet the World Health Organization requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Penteado, Silvio Pires

    2010-06-01

    Hearing loss is a common health issue that affects nearly 10% of the world population as indicated by many international studies. The hearing impaired typically experience more frustration, anxiety, irritability, depression, and disorientation than those with normal hearing levels. The standard rehabilitation tool for hearing impairment is an electronic hearing aid whose main components are transducers (microphone and receiver) and a digital signal processor. These electronic components are manufactured by supply chain rather than by hearing aid manufacturers. Manufacturers can use custom-designed components or generic off-the-shelf components. These electronic components are available as application-specific or off-the-shelf products, with the former designed for a specific manufacturer and the latter for a generic approach. The choice of custom or generic components will affect the product specifications, pricing, manufacturing, life cycle, and marketing strategies of the product. The World Health Organization is interested in making available to developing countries hearing aids that are inexpensive to purchase and maintain. The hearing aid presented in this article was developed with these specifications in mind together with additional contemporary features such as four channels with wide dynamic range compression, an adjustable compression rate for each channel, four comfort programs, an adaptive feedback manager, and full volume control. This digital hearing aid is fitted using a personal computer with minimal hardware requirements in intuitive three-step fitting software. A trimmer-adjusted version can be developed where human and material resources are scarce. PMID:20724354

  12. Application of the Consumer Decision-Making Model to Hearing Aid Adoption in First-Time Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlani, Amyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Since 1980, hearing aid adoption rates have remained essentially the same, increasing at a rate equal to the organic growth of the population. Researchers have used theoretical models from psychology and sociology to determine those factors or constructs that lead to the adoption of hearing aids by first-time impaired listeners entering the market. In this article, a theoretical model, the Consumer Decision-Making Model (CDM), premised on the neobehavioral approach that considers an individual's psychological and cognitive emphasis toward a product or service, is described. Three theoretical models (i.e., transtheoretical, social model of disability, Health Belief Model), and their relevant findings to the hearing aid market, are initially described. The CDM is then presented, along with supporting evidence of the model's various factors from the hearing aid literature. Future applications of the CDM to hearing health care also are discussed.

  13. Incisionless Pubovaginal Fascial Sling Using Transvaginal Bone Anchors for the Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip P. Vasavada

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bladder neck suspension (BNS for stress urinary incontinence (SUI can have significant morbidity, including bleeding, infection and pain. In an effort to reduce this potential morbidity, we have devised a technique which provides the same suburethral support as a standard anterior vaginal wall sling (AVWS, but without a vaginal or suprapubic incision. We describe this minimally invasive technique. Methods: From April 1998 to February 1999, 85 women underwent an incisionless suburethral fascial sling procedure. A transvaginal bone drill was used to place a bone anchor loaded with #1 prolene suture into the inferior aspect of the pubic bone on either side of the urethra. A subepithelial tunnel was created at the level of the bladder neck. A 2 x 7 cm segment of cadaveric fascia lata was placed through the subepithelial tunnel. The sutures were passed through the fascia 5mm from either edge, effectively creating a 6.0 cm sling. Finally, the sutures are tied up to the pubic symphysis.Results: Follow-up was via a self-administered questionnaire and patient interview. Recurrent SUI was noted in 2/85 (3%. New onset urge incontinence was present in 4/85 (5%. Permanent urinary retention has not occurred in either group. All procedures were performed on an outpatient basis and no operative complications occurred.Conclusions: Early results for the incisionless sling compare favorably with the long term results for the AVWS. This minimally invasive approach has thus far not been associated with any significant complications. Elimination of the vaginal and suprapubic incisions has not compromised efficacy, and appears to reduce the incidence of urge incontinence. Long term follow-up will establish the lasting efficacy of this novel surgical technique.

  14. Load bearing capacity of bone anchored fiber-reinforced composite device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballo, Ahmed Mansour; Lassila, Lippo V; Vallittu, Pekka K; Närhi, Timo O

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the push-out load-bearing capacity of threaded fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) devices for use as bone-anchored devices. The purpose was also to evaluate the possibility to use bioactive glass (BAG) granules on the experimental FRC devices in terms the mechanical behavior. Three experimental FRC devices (n = 15) were fabricated for the study: (a) threaded device with smooth surface; (b) threaded device with BAG granules (S53P4, Vivoxid Ltd, Turku, Finland) and supplementary retention grooves, and (c) unthreaded device with BAG granules. Threaded titanium devices were used as controls. The FRC devices were prepared from a light-polymerized dimethacrylate resin reinforced with preimpregnated unidirectional and bidirectional E-glass fibers (EverStick, StickTech Ltd, Turku, Finland). Experimental and control devices were embedded into dental plaster to simulate bone before the mechanical push-out test was carried out. ANOVA and Weibull analysis were used for the statistical evaluation. Threaded FRC devices had significantly higher push-out strength than the threaded titanium device (p < .001). The push-out forces exceeding 2,500 N were measured for threaded FRC devices with supplementary grooves and BAG coating. No thread failures were observed in any FRC devices. The unthreaded FRC devices with BAG lost 70% of glass particles during the test, while no BAG particles were lost from threaded FRC devices. It can be concluded that threaded FRC devices can withstand high push-out forces in the dental plaster without a risk of thread failure under physiological load. PMID:17558473

  15. Long-term tinnitus suppression with linear octave frequency transposition hearing AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Elisabeth; Peltier, Cedric; Tahar, Stephanie; Alliot-Lugaz, Evelyne; Cazals, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Over the last three years of hearing aid dispensing, it was observed that among 74 subjects fitted with a linear octave frequency transposition (LOFT) hearing aid, 60 reported partial or complete tinnitus suppression during day and night, an effect still lasting after several months or years of daily use. We report in more details on 38 subjects from whom we obtained quantified measures of tinnitus suppression through visual analog scaling and several additional psychoacoustic and audiometric measures. The long-term suppression seems independent of subject age, and of duration and subjective localization of tinnitus. A small but significant correlation was found with audiogram losses but not with high frequency loss slope. Long-term tinnitus suppression was observed for different etiologies, but with a low success rate for sudden deafness. It should be noted that a majority of subjects (23) had a history of noise exposure. Tinnitus suppression started after a few days of LOFT hearing aid use and reached a maximum after a few weeks of daily use. For nine subjects different amounts of frequency shifting were tried and found more or less successful for long-term tinnitus suppression, no correlation was found with tinnitus pitch. When the use of the LOFT hearing aid was stopped tinnitus reappeared within a day, and after re-using the LOFT aid it disappeared again within a day. For about one third of the 38 subjects a classical amplification or a non linear frequency compression aid was also tried, and no such tinnitus suppression was observed. Besides improvements in audiometric sensitivity to high frequencies and in speech discrimination scores, LOFT can be considered as a remarkable opportunity to suppress tinnitus over a long time scale. From a pathophysiological viewpoint these observations seem to fit with a possible re-attribution of activity to previously deprived cerebral areas corresponding to high frequency coding. PMID:23284815

  16. Long-term tinnitus suppression with linear octave frequency transposition hearing AIDS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Peltier

    Full Text Available Over the last three years of hearing aid dispensing, it was observed that among 74 subjects fitted with a linear octave frequency transposition (LOFT hearing aid, 60 reported partial or complete tinnitus suppression during day and night, an effect still lasting after several months or years of daily use. We report in more details on 38 subjects from whom we obtained quantified measures of tinnitus suppression through visual analog scaling and several additional psychoacoustic and audiometric measures. The long-term suppression seems independent of subject age, and of duration and subjective localization of tinnitus. A small but significant correlation was found with audiogram losses but not with high frequency loss slope. Long-term tinnitus suppression was observed for different etiologies, but with a low success rate for sudden deafness. It should be noted that a majority of subjects (23 had a history of noise exposure. Tinnitus suppression started after a few days of LOFT hearing aid use and reached a maximum after a few weeks of daily use. For nine subjects different amounts of frequency shifting were tried and found more or less successful for long-term tinnitus suppression, no correlation was found with tinnitus pitch. When the use of the LOFT hearing aid was stopped tinnitus reappeared within a day, and after re-using the LOFT aid it disappeared again within a day. For about one third of the 38 subjects a classical amplification or a non linear frequency compression aid was also tried, and no such tinnitus suppression was observed. Besides improvements in audiometric sensitivity to high frequencies and in speech discrimination scores, LOFT can be considered as a remarkable opportunity to suppress tinnitus over a long time scale. From a pathophysiological viewpoint these observations seem to fit with a possible re-attribution of activity to previously deprived cerebral areas corresponding to high frequency coding.

  17. Intention to use hearing aids: a survey based on the theory of planned behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meister H

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hartmut Meister,1 Linda Grugel,1 Markus Meis2 1Jean Uhrmacher Institute for Clinical ENT Research, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Hoerzentrum Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany Objective: To determine the intention to use hearing aids (HAs by applying the theory of planned behavior (TPB. Design: The TPB is a widely used decision-making model based on three constructs hypothesized to influence the intention to perform a specific behavior; namely, “attitude toward the behavior”, “subjective norm”, and “behavioral control”. The survey was based on a TPB-specific questionnaire addressing factors relevant to HA provision. Study sample: Data from 204 individuals reporting hearing problems were analyzed. Different subgroups were established according to the stage of their hearing help-seeking. Results: The TPB models’ outcome depended on the subgroup. The intention of those participants who had recognized their hearing problems but had not yet consulted an ear, nose, and throat specialist was largely dominated by the “subjective norm” construct, whereas those who had already consulted an ear, nose, and throat specialist or had already tried out HAs were significantly influenced by all constructs. The intention of participants who already owned HAs was clearly less affected by the “subjective norm” construct but was largely dominated by their “attitude toward HAs”. Conclusion: The intention to use HAs can be modeled on the basis of the constructs “attitude toward the behavior”, “subjective norm”, and “behavioral control”. Individual contribution of the constructs to the model depends on the patient’s stage of hearing help-seeking. The results speak well for counseling strategies that explicitly consider the individual trajectory of hearing help-seeking. Keywords: hearing aid uptake, motivation, attitude, subjective norm, behavioral control

  18. Costs and health effects of screening and delivery of hearing aids in Tamil Nadu, India: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Job Anand

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of disease of hearing disorders among adults is high, but a significant part goes undetected. Screening programs in combination with the delivery of hearing aids can alleviate this situation, but the economic attractiveness of such programs is unknown. This study aims to evaluate the population-level costs, effects and cost-effectiveness of alternative delivering hearing aids models in Tamil Nadu, India Methods In an observational study design, we estimated total costs and effects of two active screening programs in the community in combination with the provision of hearing aids at secondary care level, and the costs and effects of the provision of hearing aids at tertiary care level. Screening and hearing aid delivery costs were estimated on the basis of program records and an empirical assessment of health personnel time input. Household costs for seeking and undergoing hearing health care were collected with a questionnaire (see Additional file 2. Health effects were estimated on the basis of compliance with the hearing aid, and associated changes in disability, and were expressed in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs averted. Results Active screening and provision of hearing aids at the secondary care level costs around Rs.7,000 (US$152 per patient, whereas provision of hearing aids at the tertiary care level costs Rs 5,693 (US$122 per patient. The cost per DALY averted was around RS 42,200 (US$900 at secondary care level and Rs 33,900 (US$720 at tertiary care level. The majority of people did consult other providers before being screened in the community. Costs of food and transport ranged between Rs. 2 (US$0,04 and Rs. 39 (US$0,83. Conclusion Active screening and provision of hearing aids at the secondary care level is slightly more costly than passive screening and fitting of hearing aids at the tertiary care level, but seems also able to reach a higher coverage of hearing aids services. Although crude

  19. Dual-microphone and binaural noise reduction techniques for improved speech intelligibility by hearing aid users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefian Jazi, Nima

    Spatial filtering and directional discrimination has been shown to be an effective pre-processing approach for noise reduction in microphone array systems. In dual-microphone hearing aids, fixed and adaptive beamforming techniques are the most common solutions for enhancing the desired speech and rejecting unwanted signals captured by the microphones. In fact, beamformers are widely utilized in systems where spatial properties of target source (usually in front of the listener) is assumed to be known. In this dissertation, some dual-microphone coherence-based speech enhancement techniques applicable to hearing aids are proposed. All proposed algorithms operate in the frequency domain and (like traditional beamforming techniques) are purely based on the spatial properties of the desired speech source and does not require any knowledge of noise statistics for calculating the noise reduction filter. This benefit gives our algorithms the ability to address adverse noise conditions, such as situations where interfering talker(s) speaks simultaneously with the target speaker. In such cases, the (adaptive) beamformers lose their effectiveness in suppressing interference, since the noise channel (reference) cannot be built and updated accordingly. This difference is the main advantage of the proposed techniques in the dissertation over traditional adaptive beamformers. Furthermore, since the suggested algorithms are independent of noise estimation, they offer significant improvement in scenarios that the power level of interfering sources are much more than that of target speech. The dissertation also shows the premise behind the proposed algorithms can be extended and employed to binaural hearing aids. The main purpose of the investigated techniques is to enhance the intelligibility level of speech, measured through subjective listening tests with normal hearing and cochlear implant listeners. However, the improvement in quality of the output speech achieved by the

  20. Acceptable noise level as a deciding factor for prescribing hearing aids for older adults with cochlear hearing loss e A scoping review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hemanth Narayan Shetty; Swathi Subbanna

    2015-01-01

    Older adults often find it difficult to perceive speech, especially in noisy conditions. Though hearing aid is one of the rehabilitative devices available to older adults to alleviate hearing loss, some of them may experience annoyance through hearing aid and hence reject it, may be due to circuitry noise and/or background noise. Acceptable noise level is a direct behavioural measure to estimate the extent of how much a person is able to put up with noise while simultaneously listening to speech. Acceptable noise level is a central auditory measure and it is not influenced by age, gender, presentation level or speaker. Using this measure, we can quantify the annoyance level experienced by an individual. This in-formation is of utmost importance and caution should be paid before setting the parameters in hearing aid, especially for those who are unable to accept noise. In this review article, an attempt has been made to document how to optimize the hearing aid program by setting parameters such as noise reduction circuit, microphone sensitivity and gain. These adjustments of parameters might help to reduce rejection rate of hearing aids, especially in those individuals who are annoyed by background noise. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production & hosting by Elsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd On behalf of PLA General Hospital Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  1. Changes in intensity discrimination following monaural long-term use of a hearing aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, K; Gatehouse, S

    1995-02-01

    Previous work has shown that a normally aided ear tested without the hearing aid is better able to identify speech-in-noise than the unaided ear at high sound levels, while performance for the unaided ear is superior at lower sound levels [S. Gatehouse, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 2103-6 (1989); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 92, 1258-68 (1992)]. This effect was further explored using intensity discrimination for complex stimuli. Stimuli were half-octave bandpass-filtered tone complexes centered at 0.25 and 3 kHz. Four bilateral, symmetric hearing-impaired listeners with mean HL of 24 dB at 0.25 kHz, and 58 dB at 3 kHz were tested. Intensity discrimination was performed across the dynamic range of the listeners. At sound-pressure levels greater than 85 dB, the normally aided ear tested without the aid was more sensitive to changes in intensity than the unaided ear, whereas at lower levels, the converse occurred. This pattern was observed only for the 3-kHz center frequency, and not for the 0.25-kHz center frequency. Insertion gain measurements using the aids at normal volume showed an average of 20 dB gain at 3 kHz, and -2 dB gain at 0.25 kHz. The changes in intensity discrimination in the normally aided ear are consistent with the frequency-gain characteristics of the hearing aid, and suggest that a change in intensity coding occurred. PMID:7876440

  2. Indication criteria for cochlear implants and hearing aids: impact of audiological and non-audiological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Haumann

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Owing to technological progress and a growing body of clinical experience, indication criteria for cochlear implants (CI are being extended to less severe hearing impairments. It is, therefore, worth reconsidering these indication criteria by introducing novel testing procedures. The diagnostic evidence collected will be evaluated. The investigation includes postlingually deafened adults seeking a CI. Prior to surgery, speech perception tests [Freiburg Speech Test and Oldenburg sentence (OLSA test] were performed unaided and aided using the Oldenburg Master Hearing Aid (MHA system. Linguistic skills were assessed with the visual Text Reception Threshold (TRT test, and general state of health, socio-economic status (SES and subjective hearing were evaluated through questionnaires. After surgery, the speech tests were repeated aided with a CI. To date, 97 complete data sets are available for evaluation. Statistical analyses showed significant correlations between postsurgical speech reception threshold (SRT measured with the adaptive OLSA test and pre-surgical data such as the TRT test (r=-0.29, SES (r=-0.22 and (if available aided SRT (r=0.53. The results suggest that new measures and setups such as the TRT test, SES and speech perception with the MHA provide valuable extra information regarding indication for CI.

  3. New developments in speech pattern element hearing aids for the profoundly deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, A; Walliker, J R; Howard, I S; Ball, V; Fourcin, A J

    1993-01-01

    Two new developments in speech pattern processing hearing aids will be described. The first development is the use of compound speech pattern coding. Speech information which is invisible to the lipreader was encoded in terms of three acoustic speech factors; the voice fundamental frequency pattern, coded as a sinusoid, the presence of aperiodic excitation, coded as a low-frequency noise, and the wide-band amplitude envelope, coded by amplitude modulation of the sinusoid and noise signals. Each element of the compound stimulus was individually matched in frequency and intensity to the listener's receptive range. Audio-visual speech receptive assessments in five profoundly hearing-impaired listeners were performed to examine the contributions of adding voiceless and amplitude information to the voice fundamental frequency pattern, and to compare these codings to amplified speech. In both consonant recognition and connected discourse tracking (CDT), all five subjects showed an advantage from the addition of amplitude information to the fundamental frequency pattern. In consonant identification, all five subjects showed further improvements in performance when voiceless speech excitation was additionally encoded together with amplitude information, but this effect was not found in CDT. The addition of voiceless information to voice fundamental frequency information did not improve performance in the absence of amplitude information. Three of the subjects performed significantly better in at least one of the compound speech pattern conditions than with amplified speech, while the other two performed similarly with amplified speech and the best compound speech pattern condition. The three speech pattern elements encoded here may represent a near-optimal basis for an acoustic aid to lipreading for this group of listeners. The second development is the use of a trained multi-layer-perceptron (MLP) pattern classification algorithm as the basis for a robust real-time voice

  4. Opening the Market for Lower Cost Hearing Aids: Regulatory Change Can Improve the Health of Older Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Barbara E.

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is a leading cause of disability among older people. Yet only one in seven US adults who could benefit from a hearing aid uses one. This fraction has not increased over the past 30 years, nor have hearing aid prices dropped, despite trends of steady improvements and price reductions in the consumer electronics industry. The President’s Council on Science and Technology has proposed changes in the regulation of hearing aids, including the creation of a “basic” low-cost over-the-counter category of devices. We discuss the potential to reduce disability as well as to improve public health, stakeholder responses to the president’s council’s proposal, and public health efforts to further mitigate the burden of disability stemming from age-related hearing loss. PMID:27077339

  5. Opening the Market for Lower Cost Hearing Aids: Regulatory Change Can Improve the Health of Older Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blustein, Jan; Weinstein, Barbara E

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is a leading cause of disability among older people. Yet only one in seven US adults who could benefit from a hearing aid uses one. This fraction has not increased over the past 30 years, nor have hearing aid prices dropped, despite trends of steady improvements and price reductions in the consumer electronics industry. The President's Council on Science and Technology has proposed changes in the regulation of hearing aids, including the creation of a "basic" low-cost over-the-counter category of devices. We discuss the potential to reduce disability as well as to improve public health, stakeholder responses to the president's council's proposal, and public health efforts to further mitigate the burden of disability stemming from age-related hearing loss. PMID:27077339

  6. Evaluation of a clinical auditory profile in hearing-aid candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Nicoline; Santurette, Sébastien; Jørgensen, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    default. However, this does not necessary lead to the same HA benefit. This study aimed at identifying clinically relevant tests that may be informative in addition to the audiogram and relate more directly to HA benefit. Twenty-nine HI listeners performed fast tests of loudness perception, spectral and...... correlated to pure-tone hearing thresholds. Moreover, HI listeners who took the least advantage from fluctuations in background noise in terms of speech intelligibility experienced greater HA benefit. Further analysis of whether specific outcomes are directly related to speech intelligibility in fluctuating......Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often complain about communicating in the presence of background noise, although audibility may be restored by a hearing-aid (HA). The audiogram typically forms the basis for HA fitting, such that people with similar audiograms are given the same prescription by...

  7. Bone Anchor Fixation in Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: A Useful Adjunct in Suprapubic and Para-iliac Hernia Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Laurel J; Cox, Tiffany C; Huntington, Ciara R; Ross, Samuel W; Kneisl, Jeffrey S; Augenstein, Vedra A; Heniford, B Todd

    2015-07-01

    Suprapubic hernias, parailiac or flank hernias, and lumbar hernias are difficult to repair and are associated with high-recurrence rates owing to difficulty in obtaining substantive overlap and especially mesh fixation due to bone being a margin of the hernia. Orthopedic suture anchors used for ligament reconstruction have been used to attach prosthetic material to bony surfaces and can be used in the repair of these hernias where suture fixation was impossible. A prospective, single institution study of ventral hernia repairs involving bone anchor mesh fixation was performed. Demographics, operative details, and outcomes data were collected. Twenty patients were identified, with a mean age 53 (range: 35-70 years) and mean body mass index 28.4 kg/m(2) (range 21-38). Ten lumbar, seven suprapubic, and three parailiac hernias were studied. The majority were recurrent hernias (n = 13), with one to seven previously failed repairs. The mean hernia defect size was very large (270 cm(2); range: 56-832 cm(2)) with average mesh size of 1090 cm(2) (range 224-3640 cm(2)). Both Mitek GII (Depuy, Raynham, MA) and JuggerKnot 2.9-mm (Biomet, Biomedical Instruments, Warsaw, IN) anchors were used, with an average of four anchors/case (range: 1-16). Mean operative time was 218 minutes (120-495). There were three minor complications, no operative mortality, and no recurrences during an average follow-up of 24 months. Pelvic bone anchors permit mesh fixation in high-recurrence areas not amenable to traditional suture fixation. The ability to safely and effectively use bone anchor fixation is an essential tool in complex open ventral hernia repair. PMID:26140889

  8. Knowledge on adaptation process of users of hearing aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sant'Anna, Leandro Machado

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Professionals that work in this area know how important the orientation to the use of auditory device is, which involves the care required to handle and use the equipment and aspects aiming at the adaptation. Objective: To compare the knowledge of both long-term and new users about the adaptation process to the use of auditory device, so as to provide speech and language pathologists with a greater knowledge about the aspects that most influence the adaptation process. Method: This research is an observational, descriptive, cross-sectional, contemporary, retrospective study. The new and old users answered a questionnaire with information on the auditory device conservation and the adaptation process. The results were compared quantitatively through statistical review and qualitatively. Results: The age of the individuals in this study varied between 28 and 90 years. In some aspects, old and new users presented the same knowledge level. Conclusion: New users of auditory devices have been looking for hearing (re habilitation increasingly later. The action of phonoaudiology in the process of selection and adaptation to auditory devices among experienced and new users is extremely important to an effective acclimatization.

  9. Modern prescription theory and application: realistic expectations for speech recognition with hearing AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Earl E

    2013-01-01

    A major decision at the time of hearing aid fitting and dispensing is the amount of amplification to provide listeners (both adult and pediatric populations) for the appropriate compensation of sensorineural hearing impairment across a range of frequencies (e.g., 160-10000 Hz) and input levels (e.g., 50-75 dB sound pressure level). This article describes modern prescription theory for hearing aids within the context of a risk versus return trade-off and efficient frontier analyses. The expected return of amplification recommendations (i.e., generic prescriptions such as National Acoustic Laboratories-Non-Linear 2, NAL-NL2, and Desired Sensation Level Multiple Input/Output, DSL m[i/o]) for the Speech Intelligibility Index (SII) and high-frequency audibility were traded against a potential risk (i.e., loudness). The modeled performance of each prescription was compared one with another and with the efficient frontier of normal hearing sensitivity (i.e., a reference point for the most return with the least risk). For the pediatric population, NAL-NL2 was more efficient for SII, while DSL m[i/o] was more efficient for high-frequency audibility. For the adult population, NAL-NL2 was more efficient for SII, while the two prescriptions were similar with regard to high-frequency audibility. In terms of absolute return (i.e., not considering the risk of loudness), however, DSL m[i/o] prescribed more outright high-frequency audibility than NAL-NL2 for either aged population, particularly, as hearing loss increased. Given the principles and demonstrated accuracy of desensitization (reduced utility of audibility with increasing hearing loss) observed at the group level, additional high-frequency audibility beyond that of NAL-NL2 is not expected to make further contributions to speech intelligibility (recognition) for the average listener. PMID:24253361

  10. Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Systems for Hearing Aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic feedback problems occur when the output loudspeaker signal of an audio system is partly returned to the input microphone via an acoustic coupling through the air. This problem often causes significant performance degradations in applications such as public address systems and hearing aids....... In the worst case, the audio system becomes unstable and howling occurs. In this work, first we analyze a general multiple microphone audio processing system, where a cancellation system using adaptive filters is used to cancel the effect of acoustic feedback. We introduce and derive an accurate...... estimation problem in acoustic feedback cancellation for hearing aids. It utilizes a probe noise signal which is generated with a specific characteristic so that it can facilitate an unbiased adaptive filter estimation with fast tracking of feedback path variations/changes despite its low signal level. We...

  11. Biomimetic direction of arrival estimation for resolving front-back confusions in hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer-Boyd, Alan W; Whitmer, William M; Brimijoin, W Owen; Soraghan, John J

    2015-05-01

    Sound sources at the same angle in front or behind a two-microphone array (e.g., bilateral hearing aids) produce the same time delay and two estimates for the direction of arrival: A front-back confusion. The auditory system can resolve this issue using head movements. To resolve front-back confusion for hearing-aid algorithms, head movement was measured using an inertial sensor. Successive time-delay estimates between the microphones are shifted clockwise and counterclockwise by the head movement between estimates and aggregated in two histograms. The histogram with the largest peak after multiple estimates predicted the correct hemifield for the source, eliminating the front-back confusions. PMID:25994734

  12. A sub-milliwatt audio-processing platform for digital hearing aids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a novel audio-processing platform, FlexEngine, which is composed of a 24-bit application-specific instruction-set processor (ASIP) and five dedicated accelerators. Acceleration instructions, compact instructions and repeat instruction are added into the ASIP's instruction set to deal with some core tasks of hearing aid algorithms. The five configurable accelerators are used to execute several of the most common functions of hearing aids. Moreover, several low power strategies, such as clock gating, data isolation, memory partition, bypass mode, sleep mode, are also applied in this platform for power reduction. The proposed platform is implemented in CMOS 130 nm technology, and test results show that power consumption of FlexEngine is 0.863 mW with the clock frequency of 8 MHz at Vdd = 1.0 V. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  13. Evaluation of frequency-lowering algorithms for intelligibility of Chinese speech in hearing-aid users

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianbo Xiao; Hui Zhang; Guangshu Hu; Chunhong Liu; Jia Liu

    2009-01-01

    Despite the attention being given to and the knowledge of the benefits of evaluating frequency-lowering algorithms for hearing-impaired people, the causality between these algorithms and their benefits is still not clear. This is aggravated by the fact that comparative research on the methodologies and skills required for fitting an appropriate algorithm to individual patients is lacking. Against this back-drop, the current study has attempted to make progress in this area. In this experiment, six experienced traditional hearing-aid users with severe impairments in the high frequencies were fitted with two different frequency-lowering methods, and weekly hearing tests were con-ducted to track the benefits of such methods. After the experiment, five of the listeners accepted the frequency-lowering algorithms. Both methods showed superior results when compared with the listeners' own hearing aids in most of the tests, and the segmented compression algorithm was indicated to have better "anti-noise" quality and speech intelligibility improvement capabilities. A preference for the appli-cation of proportional compression to unvoiced speech was also found in this algorithm. Unlike in previous studies, all speech materials here are recorded in Chinese. Therefore, the results could also be used to evaluate the benefits of frequency-lowering to the intelligibility of Chinese speech for patients. As a result, an improvement was found, especially in the recognition of consonants. Moreover, no adverse effect was found in intonation recognition.

  14. Intention to use hearing aids: a survey based on the theory of planned behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Meister H; Grugel L; Meis M

    2014-01-01

    Hartmut Meister,1 Linda Grugel,1 Markus Meis2 1Jean Uhrmacher Institute for Clinical ENT Research, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Hoerzentrum Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany Objective: To determine the intention to use hearing aids (HAs) by applying the theory of planned behavior (TPB). Design: The TPB is a widely used decision-making model based on three constructs hypothesized to influence the intention to perform a specific behavior; namely, “attitude toward the behav...

  15. Remote hearing aid fitting: Tele-audiology in the context of Brazilian Public Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Penteado, Silvio Pires; Ramos, Sueli de Lima; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo; Marone, Silvio Antonio Monteiro; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Currently, the Brazilian government has certificated nearly 140 specialized centers in hearing aid fittings through the Brazilian National Health System (SUS). Remote fitting through the Internet can allow a broader and more efficient coverage with a higher likelihood of success for patients covered by the SUS, as they can receive fittings from their own homes instead of going to the few and distant specialized centers. Aim: To describe a case of remote fitting between 2...

  16. Adaptive Feedback Cancellation With Band-Limited LPC Vocoder in Digital Hearing Aids

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Guilin; Gran, Fredrik; Jacobsen, Finn; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2011-01-01

    Feedback oscillation is one of the major issues with hearing aids. An effective way of feedback suppression is adaptive feedback cancellation, which uses an adaptive filter to estimate the feedback path. However, when the external input signal is correlated with the receiver input signal, the estimate of the feedback path is biased. This so-called “bias problem” results in a large modeling error and a cancellation of the desired signal. This paper proposes a band-limited linear predictive cod...

  17. [Selected marketing aspects in the hearing aids fitting and their distribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojkin, Bogdan; Pruszewicz, Antoni; Swidzińska, Anna; Swidziński, Piotr

    2002-01-01

    The developing of free market in Poland gives medical firms of opportunities but also necessity of adoption for more and more individual needs of customers. This article presents some aspects of marketing on the hearing aids market. The conclusions are based on long observation and empirical research. Problems mentioned in it are connected with principles like distribution channels, specific customers services and promotion. It also shows relations between medical firms, specialists, doctors, audiologists and real customers. PMID:12094647

  18. Perception of Suprasegmental Speech Features via Bimodal Stimulation: Cochlear Implant on One Ear and Hearing Aid on the Other

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Harel, Tamar; Shpak, Talma; Luntz, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the contribution of acoustic hearing to the perception of suprasegmental features by adults who use a cochlear implant (CI) and a hearing aid (HA) in opposite ears. Method: 23 adults participated in this study. Perception of suprasegmental features--intonation, syllable stress, and word…

  19. EVALUATION OF SOUND CLASSIFICATION USING MODIFIED CLASSIFIER AND SPEECH ENHANCEMENT USING ICA ALGORITHM FOR HEARING AID APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    N. Shanmugapriya; E. Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Hearing aid users are exposed to diversified vocal scenarios. The necessity for sound classification algorithms becomes a vital factor to yield good listening experience. In this work, an approach is proposed to improve the speech quality in the hearing aids based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm with modified speech signal classification methods. The proposed algorithm has better results on speech intelligibility than other existing algorithm and this result has been proved ...

  20. Medical Devices; Ear, Nose, and Throat Devices; Classification of the Tympanic Membrane Contact Hearing Aid. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-21

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the tympanic membrane contact hearing aid into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the tympanic membrane contact hearing aid's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:26803881

  1. Evaluation of Speech-Perception Training for Hearing Aid Users: A Multisite Study in Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James D; Watson, Charles S; Dubno, Judy R; Leek, Marjorie R

    2015-11-01

    Following an overview of theoretical issues in speech-perception training and of previous efforts to enhance hearing aid use through training, a multisite study, designed to evaluate the efficacy of two types of computerized speech-perception training for adults who use hearing aids, is described. One training method focuses on the identification of 109 syllable constituents (45 onsets, 28 nuclei, and 36 codas) in quiet and in noise, and on the perception of words in sentences presented in various levels of noise. In a second type of training, participants listen to 6- to 7-minute narratives in noise and are asked several questions about each narrative. Two groups of listeners are trained, each using one of these types of training, performed in a laboratory setting. The training for both groups is preceded and followed by a series of speech-perception tests. Subjects listen in a sound field while wearing their hearing aids at their usual settings. The training continues over 15 to 20 visits, with subjects completing at least 30 hours of focused training with one of the two methods. The two types of training are described in detail, together with a summary of other perceptual and cognitive measures obtained from all participants. PMID:27587914

  2. A Link Loss Model for the On-body Propagation Channel for Binaural Hearing Aids

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Binaural hearing aids communicate with each other through a wireless link for synchronization. A propagation model is needed to estimate the ear-to-ear link loss for such binaural hearing aids. The link loss is a critical parameter in a link budget to decide the sensitivity of the transceiver. In this paper, we have presented a model for the deterministic component of the ear-to-ear link loss. The model takes into account the dominant paths having most of the power of the creeping wave from the transceiver in one ear to the transceiver in other ear and the effect of the protruding part of the outer ear called pinna. Simulations are done to validate the model using in-the-ear (ITE) placement of antennas at 2.45 GHz on two heterogeneous phantoms of different age-group and body size. The model agrees with the simulations. The ear-to-ear link loss between the antennas for the binaural hearing aids in the homogeneous SAM phantom is compared with a heterogeneous phantom. It is found that the absence of the pinna an...

  3. Atitudes frente às próteses auditivas Attitudes towards hearing aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Guimarães Bastos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: avaliar as atitudes frente à deficiência auditiva e o aparelho de amplificação sonora individual (AASI em candidatos e usuários destes dispositivos. Verificar se existe relação entre tais atitudes e os dados demográficos, audiométricos e características do AASI. MÉTODOS: 63 indivíduos (35 homens e 28 mulheres, idade média de 64,3 anos com deficiência auditiva neurossensorial bilateral de diferentes graus, candidatos e usuários de AASI responderam o "Questionário de Atitudes Frente à Deficiência Auditiva" (ALHQ v3.0. Foi analisada a distribuição da pontuação das subescalas do ALHQ e realizada a correlação entre estas e os dados demográficos, audiológicos e da adaptação do AASI dos participantes. Foram também realizadas comparações da pontuação do ALHQ entre os grupos de candidatos e usuários, entre homens e mulheres. RESULTADOS: não houve distribuição normal das respostas nas subescalas do ALHQ. Não houve correlações entre a pontuação do ALHQ com os dados demográficos e audiológicos. Foram verificadas correlações fracas e significativas entre as subescalas do questionário: "estratégias negativas" e "estima" (rho=-0,39, "negação" e "estima" (rho=-0,27, "estratégias negativas" e "associações negativas" (rho=0,25 e "negação" e "estratégias negativas" (rho=-0,30. Houve diferença significativa nas subescalas estratégias negativas (p=0,02 e associações negativas (p=0,00 entre o grupo de candidatos e usuários. Não houve diferença na pontuação entre homens e mulheres. CONCLUSÃO: a existência de atitudes negativas frente à deficiência auditiva e ao uso do AASI reforça a necessidade do aconselhamento de ajuste pessoal incluído no processo de adaptação do AASI em adultos e idosos. É necessário validar o questionário traduzido para o português brasileiro.PURPOSE: to evaluate the attitudes towards hearing loss and hearing aids in a group of hearing aid candidates and users

  4. Childrens' social functioning and the use of hearing aids : a case study of hard of hearing children in an ordinary primary school in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The phenomena of social functioning of hard of hearing children using hearing aids in an ordinary school were studied. The study specifically explored challenges, effects and coping strategies children used to gain social functioning. Qualitative case study design was used to study two children, each with a teacher and one education audiologist. Through non participant observation strategy their communication skills, social interactions, and social relationships and class part...

  5. A comparison of behind-the-ear high-fidelity linear hearing aids and two-channel compression aids, in the laboratory and in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, R F; Moore, B C; Glasberg, B R

    1983-02-01

    Eight patients suffering from sensorineural hearing losses with recruitment took part in a trial comparing their own hearing aids (or no aid if they did not normally wear one) with 'high-fidelity' linear aids and with aids incorporating two-channel syllabic compression. All aids were worn behind the ear. Speech intelligibility was measured both in quiet and in noise, and the patients were given questionnaires enquiring about the effectiveness of the aids in everyday situations. Both the intelligibility tests and the questionnaires indicated that the linear aids were substantially better than own/no aid, and the compressor aids were substantially better than the linear aids, allowing good speech discrimination over a wide range of sound levels. Six out of the eight patients derived significant benefit from being fitted with two aids rather than one. The use of directional microphones in the linear and compressor aids allowed a significant improvement for speech intelligibility in noise when the speech and noise were spatially separated. PMID:6860821

  6. A Practical Tablet-Based Hearing Aid Configuration as an Exemplar Project for Students of Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeoni, Ricardo

    2015-06-11

    This paper presents the configuration and digital signal processing details of a tablet-based hearing aid transmitting wirelessly to standard earphones, whereby the tablet performs full sound processing rather than solely providing a means of setting adjustment by streaming to conventional digital hearing aids. The presented device confirms the recognized advantages of this tablet-based approach (e.g., in relation to cost, frequency domain processing, amplification range, versatility of functionality, component battery rechargeability), and flags the future wider-spread availability of such hearing solutions within mainstream healthcare. The use of a relatively high sampling frequency was found to be beneficial for device performance, while the use of optional off-the-shelf add-on components (e.g., data acquisition device, high fidelity microphone, compact wireless transmitter/receiver, wired headphones) are also discussed in relation to performance optimization. The easy-to-follow configuration utilized is well suited to student learning/research instrumentation projects within the health and biomedical sciences. In this latter regard, the presented device was pedagogically integrated into a flipped classroom approach for the teaching of bioinstrumentation within an Allied Health Sciences School, with the subsequent establishment of positive student engagement outcomes. PMID:26779329

  7. A practical tablet-based hearing aid configuration as an exemplar project for students of instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Simeoni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the configuration and digital signal processing details of a tablet-based hearing aid transmitting wirelessly to standard earphones, whereby the tablet performs full sound processing rather than solely providing a means of setting adjustment by streaming to conventional digital hearing aids. The presented device confirms the recognized advantages of this tablet-based approach (e.g., in relation to cost, frequency domain processing, amplification range, versatility of functionality, component battery rechargeability, and flags the future wider-spread availability of such hearing solutions within mainstream healthcare. The use of a relatively high sampling frequency was found to be beneficial for device performance, while the use of optional off-the-shelf add-on components (e.g., data acquisition device, high fidelity microphone, compact wireless transmitter/ receiver, wired headphones are also discussed in relation to performance optimization. The easy-to-follow configuration utilized is well suited to student learning/research instrumentation projects within the health and biomedical sciences. In this latter regard, the presented device was pedagogically integrated into a flipped classroom approach for the teaching of bioinstrumentation within an Allied Health Sciences School, with the subsequent establishment of positive student engagement outcomes.

  8. Self-report outcome in new hearing-aid users: Longitudinal trends and relationships between subjective measures of benefit and satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin David

    2006-01-01

    This study focussed on self-report outcome in new hearing-aid users. The objectives of the experiment were changes in self-report outcome over time, and relationships between different subjective measures of benefit and satisfaction. Four outcome inventories and a questionnaire on auditory...... lifestyle were administered to 25 hearing-aid users repeatedly after hearing-aid fitting, and assessments took place one week, four weeks, and 13 weeks after hearing-aid provision. The results showed that, for first-time users who used their hearing aids more than four hours per day, self-reported outcome...... increased over 13 weeks in some scales, although there was no change in amplification during this time. Furthermore, it was found that, for data collected immediately post-fitting, some subscales were much less face valid than for data collected later. This result indicates that the way in which hearing-aid...

  9. In situ tuning of omnidirectional microelectromechanical-systems microphones to improve performance fit in hearing aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Sang-Soo; Kim, Jeonghwan; Harrison, Jere C.; Kozicki, Michael N.; Chae, Junseok

    2008-09-01

    Hearing aids are not a one-size-fits-all solution to hearing problems; they must be uniquely tuned for each wearer. There are currently no low-cost and/or effective methods for in situ tuning. This paper describes a microelectromechanical-systems (MEMS)-based dual omnidirectional microphone that can be tuned by growing metallic nanostructures. The nanostructures are grown on integrated solid electrolyte layers on a suspended parylene diaphragm using an external bias and tune the MEMS microphones in situ thereby limiting mismatch. In our tests, this tuning improved the directivity index from 3.5 (fair directionality) to 4.6 dB (excellent directionality) in normal (room temperature) operating environments.

  10. From Hearing Aids, Prostheses and Cochlear Implants to "Bionic" Feedback Phonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Stagiopoulos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In Otorhinolaryngological medical practice therapeutic devices are used that are highly invasive and immersive. For aural and oral communication these could be hearing aids, prosthetics, implants or radio-electronic appliances that build up a bionic environment with apparent tendencies for virtualization. The popularization of such devices promotes the extensive use of Brain Computer Interfaces to both the scientific community and the consumer market. The use of bionic devices clinched with synapses of the nerves does not merely mingle input activity to brain activity, but also it provides a virtual channel for augmenting and manipulating speech communication, language communication and even further musical communication. The effects of bionic aural and oral communication when learning practices for the impaired in hearing are applied is encountered in terms of ability for speech perception and linguistic competence

  11. Social representation of hearing aids: cross-cultural study in India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchaiah V

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vinaya Manchaiah,1 Berth Danermark,2 Vinay,3 Tayebeh Ahmadi,4 David Tomé,5 Rajalakshmi Krishna,6 Per Germundsson7 1Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas, USA; 2Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; 3Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; 4Department of Audiology, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Department of Audiology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal; 6All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, University of Mysore, Mysore, India; 7The Department of Health and Welfare Studies, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden Background: The current study was aimed at understanding the social representation of hearing aids in India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. We also compared these results to explore the cross-cultural differences and similarities among these countries. Methods: The study involved a cross-sectional design, and the data were collected from four different countries using the snowball sampling method. Data were analyzed using a content analysis to identify the most-similar categories of responses reported, a co-occurrences analysis to see which of these categories are reported commonly, and a chi-square analysis to study if there was any association between positive, neutral, and negative connotations among participants in different countries. Results: The current study revealed four different social representations of hearing aids from India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom, and also a global index. Conclusion: The study results provide very useful insights into how hearing aids are represented in the society. These findings may have important implications for public education and also for manufacturers from the viewpoint of designing and marketing hearing aids in different countries. Keywords: hearing aids

  12. Clinical results with a hearing aid and a single-channel vibrotactile device for profoundly deaf adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamey, P J; Dowell, R C; Brown, A M; Clark, G M

    1985-08-01

    The speech perception of a group of 19 adults with post-lingual profound to total hearing loss was tested with nine closed-set speech tests without lipreading, two open-set tests without lipreading and two open-set speech tests with lipreading. The subjects were all prospective cochlear implant patients participating in a clinical trial of the implant and the results reported here were obtained as part of the pre-operative assessment. They were divided into groups on the basis of their prior experience with the aid(s), their speech detection thresholds with the two aids and their personal preferences. Seven of the subjects used a hand-held single-channel vibrotactile device and the other 12 used a powerful conventional hearing aid. Subjects from each group scored significantly better than chance on the closed set tests without lipreading. Training or regular hearing aid use was correlated with good performance on the closed-set tests. No subject showed a significant improvement of the lipreading score when the aid was used as a supplement. The use of sophisticated wearable tactile devices and extensive training may allow a better result, but in this clinical program, neither a hearing aid nor a single-channel vibrotactile device greatly benefited the postlingually profoundly deaf adults. PMID:4063556

  13. A Flexible Speech Distortion Weighted Multi-Channel Wiener Filter for Noise Reduction in Hearing Aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, K.; Moonen, M.; Jensen, Søren Holdt;

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a multi-channel noise reduction algorithm is presented based on a Speech Distortion Weighted Multi-channel Wiener Filter (SDW-MWF) approach that incorporates a flexible weighting factor. A typical SDW-MWF uses a fixed weighting factor to trade-off between noise reduction and speech......-only and a speech+noise state, a solution is introduced that allows for a more flexible trade-off between noise reduction and speech distortion. Experimental results with hearing aid scenarios demonstrate that the proposed SDW-MWF incorporating the flexible weighting factor improves the signal...

  14. Does the acceptable noise level (ANL) predict hearing-aid use?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Brännström, K Jonas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that individuals have an inherent acceptance of noise in the presence of speech, and that different acceptance of noise results in different hearing-aid (HA) use. The acceptable noise level (ANL) has been proposed for measurement of this property. It has been...... reviewed journals as well as a number of papers from trade journals, posters and oral presentations from audiologyconventions. CONCLUSIONS: An inherent acceptance of noise in the presence of speech may exist, but no method for precise measurement of ANL is available. The ANL model for prediction of HA use...

  15. The Effect of Hearing Aid Microphone Mode on Performance in an Auditory Orienting Task

    OpenAIRE

    Brimijoin, W. Owen; Whitmer, William M.; McShefferty, David; Akeroyd, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Although directional microphones on a hearing aid provide a signal-to-noise ratio benefit in a noisy background, the amount of benefit is dependent on how close the signal of interest is to the front of the user. It is assumed that when the signal of interest is off-axis, users can reorient themselves to the signal to make use of the directional microphones to improve signal-to-noise ratio. The present study tested this assumption by measuring the head-orienting behavior of bilate...

  16. EVALUATION OF SOUND CLASSIFICATION USING MODIFIED CLASSIFIER AND SPEECH ENHANCEMENT USING ICA ALGORITHM FOR HEARING AID APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Shanmugapriya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hearing aid users are exposed to diversified vocal scenarios. The necessity for sound classification algorithms becomes a vital factor to yield good listening experience. In this work, an approach is proposed to improve the speech quality in the hearing aids based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA algorithm with modified speech signal classification methods. The proposed algorithm has better results on speech intelligibility than other existing algorithm and this result has been proved by the intelligibility experiments. The ICA algorithm and modified Bayesian with Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Interference System (ANFIS is to effectiveness of the strategies of speech quality, thus this classification increases noise resistance of the new speech processing algorithm that proposed in this present work. This proposed work indicates that the new Modified classifier can be feasible in hearing aid applications.

  17. Individualized directional microphone optimization in hearing aids based on reconstructing the 3D geometry of the head and ear from 2D images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Stine

    The goal of this thesis is to improve intelligibility for hearing-aid users by individualizing the directional microphone in a hearing aid. The general idea is a three step pipeline for easy acquisition of individually optimized directional filters. The first step is to estimate an individual 3D...... aid. We verify the directional filters optimized from simulated HRTFs based on a listener-specific head model against two set of optimal filters. The first set of optimal filters is calculated from HRTFs measured on a 3D printed version of the head model. The second set of optimal filters is...... 3:6 dB between an average filter and an optimal filter. This suggests that hearing-aid users with ITE hearing aids could benefit more from having individualized directional filters than what was shown for a BTE hearing aid. This thesis is a step towards individualizing the directional microphone in...

  18. Psychophysics, fitting, and signal processing for combined hearing aid and cochlear implant stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francart, Tom; McDermott, Hugh J

    2013-01-01

    The addition of acoustic stimulation to electric stimulation via a cochlear implant has been shown to be advantageous for speech perception in noise, sound quality, music perception, and sound source localization. However, the signal processing and fitting procedures of current cochlear implants and hearing aids were developed independently, precluding several potential advantages of bimodal stimulation, such as improved sound source localization and binaural unmasking of speech in noise. While there is a large and increasing population of implantees who use a hearing aid, there are currently no generally accepted fitting methods for this configuration. It is not practical to fit current commercial devices to achieve optimal binaural loudness balance or optimal binaural cue transmission for arbitrary signals and levels. There are several promising experimental signal processing systems specifically designed for bimodal stimulation. In this article, basic psychophysical studies with electric acoustic stimulation are reviewed, along with the current state of the art in fitting, and experimental signal processing techniques for electric acoustic stimulation. PMID:24165299

  19. Cochlear implants, vibrators and hearing aids in the rehabilitation of postlingual deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihkanen, H; Jauhiainen, T; Linkola, H; Palva, T

    1990-01-01

    Three groups of postlingually deaf adults were formed by non-random selection. The subjects with some residual hearing were fitted with a powerful hearing aid (HA group, n = 10). The others received either a single-channel vibrotactile aid (V group, n = 8) or a single-channel intracochlear implant (CI group, n = 10). Training containing individual counselling and rehearsal in small groups was arranged. During the follow-up (CI group 2.0 yrs, V group 1.8 yrs, HA group 2.6 yrs), the subject's achievement was assessed by a repetition of audiological testing and written questionnaires. Whereas the HA group obtained the highest scores in the audiological tests, the CI group found the implant most beneficial in everyday life. No significant improvement in the test scores was observed during the follow-up. The extent of personal training, after an initial training period and motivation of the user, did not affect the test scores or the subjective evaluation. PMID:2371535

  20. Using hearing aid adaptive directional microphones to enhance cochlear implant performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether adaptive microphone directionality could enhance cochlear implant performance. Speech stimuli were created by fitting a digital hearing aid with programmable omnidirectional (OM), fixed directional (FDM), or adaptive directional (ADM) microphones to KEMAR, and recording the hearing aid output in three noise conditions. The first condition simulated a diffused field with noise sources from five stationary locations, whereas the second and third condition represented one or three non-stationary locations in the back hemifield of KEMAR. Speech was always presented to 0 degrees azimuth and the overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was +5 dB in the sound field. Eighteen postlingually deafened cochlear implant users listened to the recorded test materials via the direct audio input of their speech processors. Their speech recognition ability and overall sound quality preferences were assessed and the correlation between the amount of noise reduction and the improvement in speech recognition were calculated. The results indicated that ADM yielded significantly better speech recognition scores and overall sound quality preference than FDM and OM in all three noise conditions and the improvement in speech recognition scores was highly correlated with the amount of noise reduction. Factors influencing the noise level are discussed. PMID:19450437

  1. Working memory and hearing aid processing: Literature findings, future directions, and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eSouza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Working memory—the ability to process and store information—has been identified as an important aspect of speech perception in difficult listening environments. Working memory can be envisioned as a limited-capacity system which is engaged when an input signal cannot be readily matched to a stored representation or template. This mismatch is expected to occur more frequently when the signal is degraded. Because working memory capacity varies among individuals, those with smaller capacity are expected to demonstrate poorer speech understanding when speech is degraded, such as in background noise. However, it is less clear whether (and how working memory should influence practical decisions, such as hearing treatment. Here, we consider the relationship between working memory capacity and response to specific hearing aid processing strategies. Three types of signal processing are considered, each of which will alter the acoustic signal: fast-acting wide-dynamic range compression, which smooths the amplitude envelope of the input signal; digital noise reduction, which may inadvertently remove speech signal components as it suppresses noise; and frequency compression, which alters the relationship between spectral peaks. For fast-acting wide-dynamic range compression, a growing body of data suggests that individuals with smaller working memory capacity may be more susceptible to such signal alterations, and may receive greater amplification benefit with low alteration processing. While the evidence for a relationship between wide-dynamic range compression and working memory appears robust, the effects of working memory on perceptual response to other forms of hearing aid signal processing are less clear cut. We conclude our review with a discussion of the opportunities (and challenges in translating information on individual working memory into clinical treatment, including clinically-feasible measures of working memory.

  2. Horizontal sound localization in cochlear implant users with a contralateral hearing aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veugen, Lidwien C E; Hendrikse, Maartje M E; van Wanrooij, Marc M; Agterberg, Martijn J H; Chalupper, Josef; Mens, Lucas H M; Snik, Ad F M; John van Opstal, A

    2016-06-01

    Interaural differences in sound arrival time (ITD) and in level (ILD) enable us to localize sounds in the horizontal plane, and can support source segregation and speech understanding in noisy environments. It is uncertain whether these cues are also available to hearing-impaired listeners who are bimodally fitted, i.e. with a cochlear implant (CI) and a contralateral hearing aid (HA). Here, we assessed sound localization behavior of fourteen bimodal listeners, all using the same Phonak HA and an Advanced Bionics CI processor, matched with respect to loudness growth. We aimed to determine the availability and contribution of binaural (ILDs, temporal fine structure and envelope ITDs) and monaural (loudness, spectral) cues to horizontal sound localization in bimodal listeners, by systematically varying the frequency band, level and envelope of the stimuli. The sound bandwidth had a strong effect on the localization bias of bimodal listeners, although localization performance was typically poor for all conditions. Responses could be systematically changed by adjusting the frequency range of the stimulus, or by simply switching the HA and CI on and off. Localization responses were largely biased to one side, typically the CI side for broadband and high-pass filtered sounds, and occasionally to the HA side for low-pass filtered sounds. HA-aided thresholds better than 45 dB HL in the frequency range of the stimulus appeared to be a prerequisite, but not a guarantee, for the ability to indicate sound source direction. We argue that bimodal sound localization is likely based on ILD cues, even at frequencies below 1500 Hz for which the natural ILDs are small. These cues are typically perturbed in bimodal listeners, leading to a biased localization percept of sounds. The high accuracy of some listeners could result from a combination of sufficient spectral overlap and loudness balance in bimodal hearing. PMID:27178443

  3. Three-dimensional laser scanning and reconstruction of ear canal impressions for optimal design of hearing aid shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognola, Gabriella; Parazzini, Marta; Svelto, Cesare; Ravazzani, Paolo; Grandori, Ferdinando

    2003-05-01

    The hearing aid shell (or earmold) couples the hearing aid with the user ear. Proper fitting of the earmold to the subject ear canal is required to achieve satisfactory wearing comfort, reduction in acoustic feedback, and unwanted changes in the electroacoustic characteristics of the aid. To date, the hearing aid shell manufacturing process is fully manual: the shell is fabricated as a replica of the impression of the subject ear canal. The typical post-impression processes made on the ear impression modify the physical dimensions and the shape of the final shell thus affecting the overall performance of the hearing aid. In the proposed approach, the surface of the original ear impression is 3D laser scanned by a prototype equipment consisting of a pair of CCD cameras and a commercial He-Ne laser. The digitized surface is reconstructed by means of iterative deformations of a geometrical model of simple and regular shape. The triangular mesh thus obtained is smoothed by a non-shrinking low-pass spatial filter. With this approach, post-impression processes are no more needed because the digitally reconstructed impression can be directly fed to rapid prototyping equipments, thus achieving a better accuracy in obtaining an exact replica of the ear impression. Furthermore, digital reconstruction of the impression allows for simple and reliable storage and transmission of the model without handling a physical object.

  4. Feasibility of a pre-implantation fitting test for an implantable hearing aid using a VR (virtual reality) software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prove the feasibility of a preoperative fitting test for an implantable hearing aid using a VR environment. Methods: A high-resolution spiral CT was performed after mastoidectomy in 10 temporal bone specimens. The bony structures were segmented and merged with the computer-aided design (CAD) data of the hearing aid in a VR environment. For each specimen a three-dimensional fitting test was carried out by three examiners determining the implantability of the hearing aid. The implantation simulation was compared with the real implantation procedure performed by an experienced ENT surgeon. Results: The used VR system enabled real-time 3D-visualisation and manipulation of CT- and CAD-data. All objects could be independently moved in all three dimensions. The VR fitting test corresponded closely with the real implantation. The implantability of the hearing aid was properly predicted by all three examiners. Conclusion: Merging CT and CAD data in a virtual reality environment bears high potential for the presurgical determination of the fit and mountability of medical implants in complex anatomical regions. (orig.)

  5. Dilemmatic group memberships of hard-of-hearing employees during the process of acquiring and adapting to the use of hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Inka; Ruusuvuori, Johanna; Juvonen-Posti, Pirjo; Nevala, Nina; Husman, Päivi; Aaltonen, Tarja; Lonka, Eila; Laakso, Minna

    2016-09-01

    We describe how hard-of-hearing (HOH) employees renegotiate both their existing and new group memberships when they acquire and begin to use hearing aids (HAs). Our research setting was longitudinal and we carried out a theory-informed qualitative analysis of multiple qualitative data. When an individual discovers that they have a hearing problem and acquire a HA, their group memberships undergo change. First, HOH employees need to start negotiating their relationship with the HOH group. Second, they need to consider whether they see themselves as members of the disabled or the nondisabled employee group. This negotiation tends to be context-bound, situational, and nonlinear as a process, involving a back-and-forth movement in the way in which HOH employees value different group memberships. The dilemmatic negotiation of new group memberships and the other social aspects involved in HA rehabilitation tend to remain invisible to rehabilitation professionals, occupational healthcare, and employers. PMID:27128825

  6. 34 CFR 300.113 - Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices. 300.113 Section 300.113 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO...

  7. Should a hearing aid in the contralateral ear be recommended for children with a unilateral cochlear implant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijen, J.W.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Leeuw, A.R.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To predict bimodal benefit before cochlear implantation, we compared the performances of participants with bimodal fitting and with a cochlear implant alone on speech perception tests. METHODS: Twenty-two children with a cochlear implant in one ear and a hearing aid in the other (bimodal

  8. Acceptable noise level (ANL) with Danish and non-semantic speech materials in adult hearing-aid users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Lantz, Johannes; Nielsen, Lars Holme;

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is used for quantification of the amount of background noise subjects accept when listening to speech. This study investigates Danish hearing-aid users' ANL performance using Danish and non-semantic speech signals, the repeatability of ANL, and the associatio...

  9. Multi-Bit Sigma-Delta Modulators with Enhanced Dynamic Range using Non-Linear DAC for Hearing Aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Custòdio, José; Paulino, Nuno; Goes, João; Bruun, Erik

    This paper presents the possibility of employing non-linear low-resolution DACs in the feedback paths of multi-bit second-order Sigma-Delta modulators. The proposed technique is particularly attractive in applications such as hearing aids, requiring a very large dynamic range and medium signal...

  10. Acceptable noise level (ANL) with Danish and non-semantic speech materials in adult hearing-aid users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Lantz, Johannes; Nielsen, Lars Holme;

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is used for quantification of the amount of background noise subjects accept when listening to speech. This study investigates Danish hearing-aid users' ANL performance using Danish and non-semantic speech signals, the repeatability of ANL, and the association...

  11. Robust Distributed Noise Reduction in Hearing Aids with External Acoustic Sensor Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Alexander; Moonen, Marc

    2009-12-01

    The benefit of using external acoustic sensor nodes for noise reduction in hearing aids is demonstrated in a simulated acoustic scenario with multiple sound sources. A distributed adaptive node-specific signal estimation (DANSE) algorithm, that has a reduced communication bandwidth and computational load, is evaluated. Batch-mode simulations compare the noise reduction performance of a centralized multi-channel Wiener filter (MWF) with DANSE. In the simulated scenario, DANSE is observed not to be able to achieve the same performance as its centralized MWF equivalent, although in theory both should generate the same set of filters. A modification to DANSE is proposed to increase its robustness, yielding smaller discrepancy between the performance of DANSE and the centralized MWF. Furthermore, the influence of several parameters such as the DFT size used for frequency domain processing and possible delays in the communication link between nodes is investigated.

  12. Robust Distributed Noise Reduction in Hearing Aids with External Acoustic Sensor Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Moonen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The benefit of using external acoustic sensor nodes for noise reduction in hearing aids is demonstrated in a simulated acoustic scenario with multiple sound sources. A distributed adaptive node-specific signal estimation (DANSE algorithm, that has a reduced communication bandwidth and computational load, is evaluated. Batch-mode simulations compare the noise reduction performance of a centralized multi-channel Wiener filter (MWF with DANSE. In the simulated scenario, DANSE is observed not to be able to achieve the same performance as its centralized MWF equivalent, although in theory both should generate the same set of filters. A modification to DANSE is proposed to increase its robustness, yielding smaller discrepancy between the performance of DANSE and the centralized MWF. Furthermore, the influence of several parameters such as the DFT size used for frequency domain processing and possible delays in the communication link between nodes is investigated.

  13. A hyper elasticity method for interactive virtual design of hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Erleben, Kenny

    We present a computational efficient method for isotropic hyper elasticity based on functional analysis. By selecting a class of shape functions, we arrive at a computational scheme which yields very sparse tensors. This enables fast computations of the hyper elastic energy potential and its...... derivatives. We achieve efficiency and performance through the use of shape functions that are linear in their parameters and through rotation into the eigenspace of the right Cauchy–Green strain tensor. This makes near real time evaluation of hyper elasticity of complex meshes on CPU relatively easy to...... by insertion of hearing aid domes into the ear canal. We validate the method for tetrahedral meshes with linear shape functions with an Ogden material model by comparing simulations to deformations of real material. We illustrate the use of other shape functions and models using uniform cubic B...

  14. Novel Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Approaches In Hearing Aid Applications Using Probe Noise and Probe Noise Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    . In many cases, this bias problem causes the cancellation system to fail. The traditional probe noise approach, where a noise signal is added to the loudspeaker signal can, in theory, prevent the bias. However, in practice, the probe noise level must often be so high that the noise is clearly audible...... and annoying; this makes the traditional probe noise approach less useful in practical applications. In this work, we explain theoretically the decreased convergence rate when using low-level probe noise in the traditional approach, before we propose and study analytically two new probe noise....... This makes the proposed approaches much more attractive in practical applications. We demonstrate this through a simulation experiment with audio signals in a hearing aid acoustic feedback cancellation system, where the convergence rate is improved by as much as a factor of 10....

  15. Monitor, a Vibrotactile Aid for Environmental Perception: A Field Evaluation by Four People with Severe Hearing and Vision Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Parivash Ranjbar; Ingeborg Stenström

    2013-01-01

    Monitor is a portable vibrotactile aid to improve the ability of people with severe hearing impairment or deafblindness to detect, identify, and recognize the direction of sound-producing events. It transforms and adapts sounds to the frequency sensitivity range of the skin. The aid was evaluated in the field. Four females (44–54 years) with Usher Syndrome I (three with tunnel vision and one with only light perception) tested the aid at home and in traffic in three different field studies: wi...

  16. Prótese auditiva: satisfação do usuário com sua prótese e com seu meio ambiente Hearing aid: user satisfaction with their hearing aid and with their environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleide Fernandes Teixeira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o nível de satisfação dos usuários com sua prótese auditiva e com seu meio ambiente. MÉTODOS: estudo descritivo de corte transversal, com 256 indivíduos (m= 48,33%; f= 51,67%, com idade média de 50 anos, recém protetizados, com perda auditiva do tipo sensorioneural (n= 268 e mista (n=32, através do questionário de auto-avaliação International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids - IOI-HA para determinar o grau do benefício e a satisfação dada pela amplificação sonora. RESULTADOS: para 68% o uso da prótese melhorou a qualidade de vida, evidenciado pela alta pontuação (média=26,45. A relação do usuário com sua prótese foi significativamente melhor (pPURPOSE: to evaluate the level of user satisfaction with the hearing aids and with their environment. METHODS: cross study of a group, with 256 subjects (m= 48.33%; f= 51.67%, average age of 50 years, just fitted with their hearing aid, with sensorioneural (n=268 and mixed (n=32 hearing impairment, through the Questionnaire International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids Outcome Inventory - IOI-HA to determine the degree of the benefit and the satisfaction brought by the sound amplification. RESULTS: for 68% the use of the hearing aids improved their quality of life, revealed by their high punctuation (mean= 26.45. The relationship of the user with its hearing aid was significantly better (p<0.001* than that related to the environment. In the subjective evaluation of the auditory problems, 78.5% have stated to have auditory problem of light to moderate degree and 21.5% problems of moderately severe to severe. CONCLUSION: the IOI-HA is a tool, simple and easy to apply and it is used as an instrument in helping us during the period of acclimatization with the hearing aid. The improvement in the quality of life of the men that were most referred was about the satisfaction level with the hearing aid and with less impact concerning the others. The level of

  17. [Direct hearing aid provision by ENT specialists: Recommendations for prevention and treatment of complications after taking ear impressions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffier, Ph P; Sedlmaier, B; Hölzl, M

    2009-07-01

    In times of budgeting, rising costs and monetary losses, an increasing number of ENT specialists considers the hearing system sector due to the distinct undersupply and the expected demographic development to be a market of the future and appropriate to enlarge their field of competence. Exact prevalence of direct hearing aid provision by German otorhinolaryngologists as well as its complication rate are not well-known. Retrospectively, all patients were evaluated who presented at our department with complications in the context of outpatient direct hearing aid supply within the last 3 years. Inappropriate fitting contains the danger of malformed or displaced ear impressions with various injury patterns comprising the external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and ossicular chain. Practical advices for prevention of complications include the accurate modeling and placement of sufficient impression pads behind the second bend of the auditory canal, using an adequate type of impression material as well as performing the correct application procedures. Recommendations for diagnostic patterns and treatment of complications after taking ear impressions are presented, the differences between German "traditional" and "direct" hearing aid provision are critically discussed. PMID:19579285

  18. Influence of Acoustic Feedback on the Learning Strategies of Neural Network-Based Sound Classifiers in Digital Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadra, Lucas; Alexandre, Enrique; Gil-Pita, Roberto; Vicen-Bueno, Raúl; Álvarez, Lorena

    2009-12-01

    Sound classifiers embedded in digital hearing aids are usually designed by using sound databases that do not include the distortions associated to the feedback that often occurs when these devices have to work at high gain and low gain margin to oscillation. The consequence is that the classifier learns inappropriate sound patterns. In this paper we explore the feasibility of using different sound databases (generated according to 18 configurations of real patients), and a variety of learning strategies for neural networks in the effort of reducing the probability of erroneous classification. The experimental work basically points out that the proposed methods assist the neural network-based classifier in reducing its error probability in more than 18%. This helps enhance the elderly user's comfort: the hearing aid automatically selects, with higher success probability, the program that is best adapted to the changing acoustic environment the user is facing.

  19. Influence of Acoustic Feedback on the Learning Strategies of Neural Network-Based Sound Classifiers in Digital Hearing Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Álvarez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound classifiers embedded in digital hearing aids are usually designed by using sound databases that do not include the distortions associated to the feedback that often occurs when these devices have to work at high gain and low gain margin to oscillation. The consequence is that the classifier learns inappropriate sound patterns. In this paper we explore the feasibility of using different sound databases (generated according to 18 configurations of real patients, and a variety of learning strategies for neural networks in the effort of reducing the probability of erroneous classification. The experimental work basically points out that the proposed methods assist the neural network-based classifier in reducing its error probability in more than 18%. This helps enhance the elderly user's comfort: the hearing aid automatically selects, with higher success probability, the program that is best adapted to the changing acoustic environment the user is facing.

  20. Statistical Shape Analysis of the Human Ear Canal with Application to In-the-Ear Hearing Aid Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2004-01-01

    This thesis is about the statistical shape analysis of the human ear canal with application to the mechanical design of in-the-ear hearing aids. Initially, it is described how a statistical shape model of the human ear canal is built based on a training set of laser-scanned ear impressions. A thin......-the-ear hearing aids. In addition, the idea of one-size-fits-most shells is explored. In Danish: Denne afhandling beskriver brugen af statistisk formanalyse af den menneskelige hørekanal i det mekaniske design af i-øret høreapparater. Først beskrives det hvordan en statistisk formmodel af den menneskelige øre...

  1. Predictors of auditory performance in hearing-aid users: The role of cognitive function and auditory lifestyle (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin David

    2006-01-01

    auditory lifestyle was correlated with self-report outcome. However, overall the predictive leverage of the various measures was moderate, with single predictors explaining only up to 19 percent of the variance in the auditory-performance measures. a)Now at CNBH, Department of Physiology, Development and...... no objective benefit can be measured. It has been suggested that lack of agreement between various hearing-aid outcome components can be explained by individual differences in cognitive function and auditory lifestyle. We measured speech identification, self-report outcome, spectral and temporal...... correlation exists between objective and subjective hearing-aid outcome. Different self-report outcome measures showed a different amount of correlation with objective auditory performance. Cognitive skills were found to play a role in explaining speech performance and spectral and temporal abilities, and...

  2. An application of boundary element method calculations to hearing aid systems: The influence of the human head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Karsten B.; Juhl, Peter

    2001-05-01

    Boundary element method (BEM) calculations are used for the purpose of predicting the acoustic influence of the human head in two cases. In the first case the sound source is the mouth and in the second case the sound is plane waves arriving from different directions in the horizontal plane. In both cases the sound field is studied in relation to two positions above the right ear being representative of hearing aid microphone positions. Both cases are relevant for hearing aid development. The calculations are based upon a direct BEM implementation in Matlab. The meshing is based on the original geometrical data files describing the B&K Head and Torso Simulator 4128 combined with a 3D scan of the pinna.

  3. Challenges and Recent Developments in Hearing Aids: Part I. Speech Understanding in Noise, Microphone Technologies and Noise Reduction Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, King

    2004-01-01

    This review discusses the challenges in hearing aid design and fitting and the recent developments in advanced signal processing technologies to meet these challenges. The first part of the review discusses the basic concepts and the building blocks of digital signal processing algorithms, namely, the signal detection and analysis unit, the decision rules, and the time constants involved in the execution of the decision. In addition, mechanisms and the differences in the implementation of var...

  4. Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids: A Lost Decade for Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Yee Ting Chan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hearing aids sold directly to consumers in retail stores or through the internet, without individual prescription by audiological professionals, are termed over-the-counter (OTC devices. This study aimed to determine whether there was any change in the electroacoustic characteristics of OTC devices compared to research carried out a decade earlier. The previous results indicated that most OTC devices were low-frequency-emphasis devices and were unsuitable for elderly people with presbycusis, who were likely to be the major consumers of these products. Methods. Ten OTC devices were selected and their electroacoustic performance was measured. Appropriate clients for the OTC devices were derived, using four linear prescription formulae, and OTC suitability for elderly persons with presbycusis was investigated. Results. OTC electroacoustic characteristics were similar to those in the earlier study. Most OTC devices were not acoustically appropriate for potential consumers with presbycusis. Although several of the devices could match prescriptive targets for individuals with presbycusis, their poor electroacoustic performance—including ineffective volume control function, high equivalent input noise, and irregular frequency response—may override their potential benefit. Conclusion. The low-cost OTC devices were generally not suitable for the main consumers of these products, and there has been little improvement in the appropriateness of these devices over the past decade.

  5. Informed TDoA-based Direction of Arrival Estimation for Hearing Aid Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmani, Mojtaba; Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Tan, Zheng-Hua;

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with estimation of the target sound Direction of Arrival (DoA) or a Hearing Aid System (HAS) which can connect to a wireless microphone worn by target talker. In this setup, the HAS is "informed" about the almost noise-free content of the target sound via the wireless microphone...... and can use this information for the DoA estimation. Here, we propose an "informed'' DoA estimator based on the Time Difference of Arrival (TDoA) of the target sound at two microphones mounted on the ears of the HAS user---one microphone on each ear. To estimate the TDoA and the DoA, we propose a...... maximum likelihood framework relying on the noise-free target sound and estimation of the ambient noise characteristics. We show how the proposed ML framework allows us to estimate the TDoA and the DoA jointly or consecutively. Further, to evaluate the likelihood function efficiently, we resort to an...

  6. A hearing aid on-chip system based on accuracy optimized front- and back-end blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hearing aid on-chip system based on accuracy optimized front- and back-end blocks is presented for enhancing the signal processing accuracy of the hearing aid. Compared with the conventional system, the accuracy optimized system is characterized by the dual feedback network and the gain compensation technique used in the front- and back-end blocks, respectively, so as to alleviate the nonlinearity distortion caused by the output swing. By using the technique, the accuracy of the whole hearing aid system can be significantly improved. The prototype chip has been designed with a 0.13 μm standard CMOS process and tested with 1 V supply voltage. The measurement results show that, for driving a 16 Ω loudspeaker with a normalized output level of 300 mVp-p, the total harmonic distortion reached about −60 dB, achieving at least three times reduction compared to the previously reported works. In addition, the typical input referred noise is only about 5 μVrms. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  7. 感音神经性听力损失患者助听后言语感知能力的评价%Speech perception performance in patients with sensorineural hearing impairment aided with hearing aids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王硕; 董瑞娟; Solveig Christina Voss; 钱金宇; 吴燕君; 张华

    2015-01-01

    目的:本研究对感音神经性听力损失患者助听器选配后的言语识别能力进行评价,并分析听力损失程度与年龄对助听后言语康复效果的影响。方法30名感音神经性听力损失受试者,男13名,女17名,年龄26-86岁,双侧听力损失程度对称,双耳0.5-4 kHz频率下纯音听力阈值(PTA0.5-4 kHz)平均值40~75 dB HL。所有受试者均选配Phonak Bolero Q50系列耳背式助听器。使用汉语普通话言语测试软件(Mandarin Speech Test Materials, MSTMs)进行裸耳和助听后安静与噪声环境下言语识别能力测试。结果(1)助听后,安静环境下的双音节识别率平均提高35.1±19.5%;噪声环境下语句识别率平均提高32.8±22.8%;(2)助听后言语识别能力与听力损失程度呈显著负相关关系;(3)助听优势高于平均水平的受试者纯音听阈均大于50 dB HL,但存在个体差异大的特点。结论助听器选配可以有效帮助感音神经性听力损失患者提高言语识别能力,但听力损失程度不是唯一影响助听效果的因素,助听后言语识别能力的改善存在较大个体差异。%Objective This study was aimed at evaluating the speech perception performance in sensorineural hear-ing-impaired listeners with hearing aids. Methods Thirty subjects with sensorineural hearing loss were recruited, including 13 males and 17 females with the age ranging from 26 to 86 years. They had bilaterally symmetric hearing loss with the av-eraged 0.5-4 kHz PTA ranging from 40 to 75 dB HL. They were fitted with Phonak Bolero Q50 BTE hearing aids unilaterally. The Mandarin Speech Test Materials (MSTMs) software was used to test speech perception performance under four condi-tions, including unaided quiet, aided quiet, unaided noisy and aided noisy environments. Results (1) After fitting hearing aids, the speech perception score in quiet using bisyllabic materials improved by 35.1±19.5%in average

  8. Comparison of hearing thresholds obtained with Baha preoperative assessment tools and those obtained with the osseointegrated implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Rebecca L; Patel, Parag M; Jonathan, David A

    2011-05-01

    We conducted a study of the Baha bone-anchored hearing aid system to quantify the difference between (1) hearing thresholds obtained through preoperative testing methods with the Baha sound processor attached to three different bone-conduction testing devices and (2) thresholds obtained postoperatively with the sound processor attached to a surgically placed osseointegrated titanium implant. Twenty-three patients underwent free-field testing in four situations: with the Baha sound processor attached to (1) the Baha Testband (transcutaneous transmission), (2) the Baha Softband (transcutaneous transmission), (3) a test rod (bone conduction via the teeth), and (4) the osseointegrated implant (percutaneous transmission). The main outcome measure was the result of a comparison of the thresholds obtained with the three preoperative test methods and those obtained with the osseointegrated implant. We found that aided thresholds obtained with the osseointegrated implant were significantly better (p damping effect of sound transmission via the teeth or transcutaneously must be accounted for in making predictions of postoperative outcome. PMID:21563076

  9. Audio-visual speechreading in a group of hearing aid users. The effects of onset age, handicap age, and degree of hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillberg, I; Rönnberg, J; Svärd, I; Ahlner, B

    1996-01-01

    Speechreading ability was investigated among hearing aid users with different time of onset and different degree of hearing loss. Audio-visual and visual-only performance were assessed. One group of subjects had been hearing-impaired for a large part of their lives, and the impairments appeared early in life. The other group of subjects had been impaired for a fewer number of years, and the impairments appeared later in life. Differences between the groups were obtained. There was no significant difference on the audio-visual test between the groups in spite of the fact that the early onset group scored very poorly auditorily. However, the early-onset group performed significantly better on the visual test. It was concluded that the visual information constituted the dominant coding strategy for the early onset group. An interpretation chiefly in terms of early onset may be the most appropriate, since dB loss variations as such are not related to speechreading skill. PMID:8976000

  10. Development and Evaluation of Computer-Aided Music-Learning System for the Hearing Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.-J.; Lay, Y.-L.; Liou, Y.-C.; Tsao, W.-Y.; Lin, C.-K.

    2007-01-01

    A computer-assisted music-learning system (CAMLS) has been developed to help the hearing impaired practice playing a musical melody. The music-learning performance is evaluated to test the usability of the system. This system can be a computer-supported learning tool for the hearing impaired to help them understand what pitch and tempo are, and…

  11. Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing loss. Here are the most common ones: Styles of hearing aids Source: NIH/NIDCD Hearing aids ... list of organizations, contact: NIDCD Information Clearinghouse 1 Communication Avenue Bethesda, MD 20892-3456 Toll-free Voice: ( ...

  12. System-Level Power Optimization for a ΣΔ D/A Converter for Hearing-Aid Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pracný, Peter; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bruun, Erik

    2013-01-01

    for audio applications we take the maximum gain of the modulator noise transfer function (NTF) as a design parameter. By increasing the maximum NTF gain the cutoff frequency of modulator loop filter is increased which lowers the in-band quantization noise but also lowers the maximum stable amplitude...... entire hearing-aid audio back-end system resulting in less hardware and power consumption in the interpolation filter, in the sigma-delta modulator and reduced switching rate of the Class D output stage....

  13. The effect of using integrated signal processing hearing aids on the speech recognition abilities of hearing impaired Arabic-speaking children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaia Tawfik

    2014-11-01

    Results and conclusions: Significant improvement in aided sound field threshold levels and speech recognition in noise tests was recorded using ISP HAs over time. As regards consonant manner, glides and stop consonants showed the highest improvement. Though voiced and voiceless consonants were equally transmitted through digital HAs, voiced consonants were easier to perceive using ISP HAs. Middle and back consonants were easier to perceive compared to front consonants using both HAs. Application of WILSI self assessment questionnaire revealed that parents reported better performance in different listening situations. In conclusion, results of the present study support the use of ISP HAs in children with moderate to severe hearing loss due to the significant improvement recorded in both subjective and objective measures.

  14. A Descriptive Study of the Audiograms and Hearing Aid Prescription Papers of Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosro Gourabi

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the current investigation we gathered information about the hearing thresholds, types of hearing loss, types of tinnitus, and also the prescribed tinnitus maskers for the veterans. We were aimed at determining the percentage of tinnitus, audiogram shape and its relationship with tinnitus, and the percentages of veterans using tinnitus maskers. The needed information was prepared by studying the audiograms and file of the patients. The results of the investigation have been prepared here in details.

  15. A laboratory study on a capacitive displacement sensor as an implant microphone in totally implant cochlear hearing aid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Guo, Jun; Megerian, Cliff A; Young, Darrin J; Ko, Wen H

    2007-01-01

    A totally implant cochlear hearing aids system, integrating an implant microphone, interface electronics, a speech processor, a stimulator, and cochlear electrodes, can overcome the uncomfortable, inconvenient, and stigma problems associated with the conventional and semi-implantable hearing aids. This paper presents a laboratory feasibility study on the use of an electret condenser microphone (ECM) displacement sensor, serving as an implant microphone, and combined with a spring coupler to directly sense the umbo acoustic vibration. The umbo vibration characteristics were extracted from literature to determine the coupler and sensor requirements. A laboratory model was built to simulate the vibration source and experimentally study the transmission coefficient. Experimental data demonstrate that by using a 5 N/m stiffness spring, the umbo vibration amplitude as high as 67% can be transmitted to the sensor. Measurement of the sensor system on the temporal bone was also made. The minimum detectable sound pressure level (SPL) at 1 kHz is 41 and 67 dB for laboratory and 38 and 64 dB for temporal bone measurement for 1 and 388 Hz bandwidth, respectively. Better performance was achieved in a higher frequency. Results and analysis of this study can be used as a guideline for the future design of displacement sensors as implant microphones. PMID:18003304

  16. Hearing aid for vertebrates via multiple episodic adaptive events on prestin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei; Murphy, Robert W; Shi, Peng

    2012-09-01

    Auditory detection is essential for survival and reproduction of vertebrates, yet the genetic changes underlying the evolution and diversity of hearing are poorly documented. Recent discoveries concerning prestin, which is responsible for cochlear amplification by electromotility, provide an opportunity to redress this situation. We identify prestin genes from the genomes of 14 vertebrates, including three fishes, one amphibian, one lizard, one bird, and eight mammals. An evolutionary analysis of these sequences and 34 previously known prestin genes reveals for the first time that this hearing gene was under positive selection in the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of tetrapods. This discovery might document the genetic basis of enhanced high sound sensibility in tetrapods. An investigation of the adaptive gain and evolution of electromotility, an important evolutionary innovation for the highest hearing ability of mammals, detects evidence for positive selections on the MRCA of mammals, therians, and placentals, respectively. It is suggested that electromotility determined by prestin might initially appear in the MRCA of mammals, and its functional improvements might occur in the MRCA of therian and placental mammals. Our patch clamp experiments further support this hypothesis, revealing the functional divergence of voltage-dependent nonlinear capacitance of prestin from platypus, opossum, and gerbil. Moreover, structure-based cdocking analyses detect positively selected amino acids in the MRCA of placental mammals that are key residues in sulfate anion transport. This study provides new insights into the adaptation and functional diversity of hearing sensitivity in vertebrates by evolutionary and functional analysis of the hearing gene prestin. PMID:22416033

  17. Individualized directional microphone optimization in hearing aids based on reconstructing the 3D geometry of the head and ear from 2D images

    OpenAIRE

    Harder, Stine; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to improve intelligibility for hearing-aid users by individualizing the directional microphone in a hearing aid. The general idea is a three step pipeline for easy acquisition of individually optimized directional filters. The first step is to estimate an individual 3D head model based on 2D images, the second step is to simulate individual head related transfer functions (HRTFs) based on the estimated 3D head model and the final step is to calculate optimal directi...

  18. Development of a voice database to aid children with hearing impairments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the development of software for voice analysis or training, for people with hearing impairments, a database having sounds of properly pronounced words is of paramount importance. This paper shows the advantage that will be obtained from getting an own voice database, rather than using those coming from other countries, even having the same language, in the development of speech training software aimed to people with hearing impairments. This database will be used by software developers at the School of Engineering of Mar del Plata National University.

  19. Development of a voice database to aid children with hearing impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzman, M. G.; Agüero, P. D.; Tulli, J. C.; Gonzalez, E. L.; Uriz, A. J.; Cervellini, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    In the development of software for voice analysis or training, for people with hearing impairments, a database having sounds of properly pronounced words is of paramount importance. This paper shows the advantage that will be obtained from getting an own voice database, rather than using those coming from other countries, even having the same language, in the development of speech training software aimed to people with hearing impairments. This database will be used by software developers at the School of Engineering of Mar del Plata National University.

  20. 75 FR 54546 - Amendment of the Commission's Rules Governing Hearing Aid-Compatible Mobile Handsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... growth of new channels of distribution, extension of the in-store testing requirement would help to... Commission initiates this proceeding to ensure that consumers with hearing loss are able to access wireless... with continuing access to the most advanced and innovative communications technologies as they...

  1. Relating hearing loss and executive functions to hearing aid users’ preference for, and speech recognition with, different combinations of binaural noise reduction and microphone directionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eNeher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of how executive functions relate to preferred hearing aid (HA processing is sparse and seemingly inconsistent with related knowledge for speech recognition outcomes. This study thus aimed to find out if (1 performance on a measure of reading span (RS is related to preferred binaural noise reduction (NR strength, (2 similar relations exist for two different, nonverbal measures of executive function, (3 pure-tone average hearing loss (PTA, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, and microphone directionality (DIR also influence preferred NR strength, and (4 preference and speech recognition outcomes are similar. Sixty elderly HA users took part. Six HA conditions consisting of omnidirectional or cardioid microphones followed by inactive, moderate, or strong binaural NR as well as linear amplification were tested. Outcome was assessed at fixed SNRs using headphone simulations of a frontal target talker in a busy cafeteria. Analyses showed positive effects of active NR and DIR on preference, and negative and positive effects of, respectively, strong NR and DIR on speech recognition. Also, while moderate NR was the most preferred NR setting overall, preference for strong NR increased with SNR. No relation between RS and preference was found. However, larger PTA was related to weaker preference for inactive NR and stronger preference for strong NR for both microphone modes. Equivalent (but weaker relations between worse performance on one nonverbal measure of executive function and the HA conditions without DIR were found. For speech recognition, there were relations between HA condition, PTA, and RS, but their pattern differed from that for preference. Altogether, these results indicate that, while moderate NR works well in general, a notable proportion of HA users prefer stronger NR. Furthermore, PTA and executive functions can account for some of the variability in preference for, and speech recognition with, different binaural NR and DIR settings.

  2. Monitor, a vibrotactile aid for environmental perception: a field evaluation by four people with severe hearing and vision impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Parivash; Stenström, Ingeborg

    2013-01-01

    Monitor is a portable vibrotactile aid to improve the ability of people with severe hearing impairment or deafblindness to detect, identify, and recognize the direction of sound-producing events. It transforms and adapts sounds to the frequency sensitivity range of the skin. The aid was evaluated in the field. Four females (44-54 years) with Usher Syndrome I (three with tunnel vision and one with only light perception) tested the aid at home and in traffic in three different field studies: without Monitor, with Monitor with an omnidirectional microphone, and with Monitor with a directional microphone. The tests were video-documented, and the two field studies with Monitor were initiated after five weeks of training. The detection scores with omnidirectional and directional microphones were 100% for three participants and above 57% for one, both in their home and traffic environments. In the home environment the identification scores with the omnidirectional microphone were 70%-97% and 58%-95% with the directional microphone. The corresponding values in traffic were 29%-100% and 65%-100%, respectively. Their direction perception was improved to some extent by both microphones. Monitor improved the ability of people with deafblindness to detect, identify, and recognize the direction of events producing sounds. PMID:23861651

  3. Unilateral hearing loss: benefits and satisfaction from the use of hearing aids Perda auditiva unilateral: benefício e satisfação com o uso do AASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Renata José

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A unilateral hearing loss is characterized by reduced hearing in one ear. The problems caused by sensory deprivation can be minimized with the use of hearing aids (HA. AIM: To analyze the correlation between the prescribed grain and the insertion gain difference and with the results obtained regarding the benefit and satisfaction with the use of hearing aids in unilateral hearing impaired patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective study with 15 subjects, mean age of 41.6 years, of both genders, users of hearing aids effectively. We used the International Questionnaire Results for hearing aids (International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids - IOI-HA, measured with a probe microphone. RESULTS: The mean values in the analyses of the IOI-HA per item were positive and higher than four points. In relation to the objective measures, the frequencies in which we obtained the gain values which were closer to the target were: 1K Hz, 2K Hz and 500 Hz, respectively. CONCLUSION: The satisfaction of individuals using hearing aid unilaterally is not completely correlated to the prescribed gain, because even if the target is not being reached in some frequencies, the individuals were pleased as to the use of their hearing aids.Aperda auditiva unilateral é caracterizada pela diminuição da audição em apenas uma orelha. Os problemas acometidos pela privação sensorial podem ser minimizados com o uso do Aparelho de Amplificação Sonora individual (AASI. OBJETIVO: Analisar a correlação entre a diferença do ganho prescrito e ganho de inserção com os resultados obtidos em relação ao benefício e a satisfação quanto ao uso do AASI por pacientes deficientes auditivos unilaterais. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo, com 15 indivíduos, com média de idade de 41,6 anos, de ambos os gêneros, usuários de AASI de maneira efetiva. Foi utilizado o Questionário internacional de Resultados para Aparelhos de Amplificação Sonora (International Outcome

  4. Promoting vision and hearing aids use in an intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    ZHOU, QIAOLING; Faure Walker, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Vision and hearing impairments have long been recognised as modifiable risk factors for delirium.[1,2,3] Delirium in critically ill patients is a frequent complication (reported as high as 60% to 80% of intensive care patients), and is associated with a three-fold increase in mortality and prolonged hospital stay.[1] Guidelines by the UK Clinical Pharmacy Association recommend minimising risk factors to prevent delirium, rather than to treat it with pharmacological agents which may themselves...

  5. Multi-channel Wiener Filter for Speech Dereverberation in Hearing Aids - Sensitivity to DoA Errors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuklasinski, Adam; Doclo, Simon; Jensen, Søren Holdt;

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the robustness of a recently proposed Multi-channel Wiener Filter-based speech dereverberation algorithm to errors in the assumed direction of arrival (DoA) of the target speech. Different subsets of microphones of a pair of behind-the-ear hearing aids are used to construct...... various monaural and binaural configurations of the algorithm. Via a simulation experiment with frontally positioned target it is shown, that when correct DoA is assumed binaural configurations of the algorithm almost double the improvement of PESQ measure over monaural configurations. However, in...... conditions where the assumed DoA is increasingly incorrect, the performance of the binaural configurations is shown to deteriorate more quickly than that of the monaural configurations. In effect, for large DoA errors it is the simpler, monaural configurations that perform better....

  6. Measuring Levels of Stress and Depression in Mothers of Children Using Hearing Aids and Cochlear Implants: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Santhi S; Prakash, S. G. R.; Ravichandran, Aparna; Susan, K. Y.; Alex, Winnie

    2013-01-01

    Hearing impairment is an exceptional circumstance that restricts the child's ability to communicate verbally. Depression is a common stress-related response for hearing parents of children with hearing loss. Evidence suggests that mothers are more inclined than fathers to experience depression in response to their child's hearing loss…

  7. Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Infographic: Hearing Loss and Hearing Aid ... Into Health ® National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 31 Center Drive, MSC 2320, Bethesda, MD ...

  8. A new wide-diameter bone-anchored hearing implant-prospective 1-year data on complications, implant stability, and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2014-01-01

    . No implants were lost. Skin and soft tissue reactions were rare and minor, as no reaction was seen in 93% of the follow-up examinations and no grade 4 reactions occurred. CONCLUSION: The new wide implant showed good stability at surgery. Osseointegration was fast, and implant stability increased......, and 1 year after surgery. Skin and soft tissue reactions according to Holgers grading system. RESULTS: Implant stability quotient measurements revealed a significant increase in ISQ during the first 10 days after operation, and the ISQ values continued to rise throughout the 1-year observation period...

  9. AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000594.htm HIV/AIDS To use the sharing features on this page, ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. When a person becomes infected with HIV, the ...

  10. Study of the Ability of Articulation Index (Al for Predicting the Unaided and Aided Speech Recognition Performance of 25 to 65 Years Old Hearing-Impaired Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Mohammad Khani

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years there has been increased interest in the use of Al for assessing hearing handicap and for measuring the potential effectiveness of amplification system. AI is an expression of proportion of average speech signal that is audible to a given patient, and it can vary between 0.0 to 1.0. Method and Materials: This cross-sectional analytical study was carried out in department of audiology, rehabilitation, faculty, IUMS form 31 Oct 98 to 7 March 1999, on 40 normal hearing persons (80 ears; 19 males and 21 females and 40 hearing impaired persons (61 ears; 36 males and 25 females, 25-65 years old with moderate to moderately severe SNI-IL The pavlovic procedure (1988 for calculating Al, open set taped standard mono syllabic word lists, and the real -ear probe- tube microphone system to measure insertion gain were used, through test-retest. Results: 1/A significant correlation was shown between the Al scores and the speech recognition scores of normal hearing and hearing-impaired group with and without the hearing aid (P<0.05 2/ There was no significant differences in age group & sex: also 3 In test-retest measures of the insertion gain in each test and 4/No significant in test-retest of speech recognition test score. Conclusion: According to these results the Al can predict the unaided and aided monosyllabic recognition test scores very well, and age and sex variables have no effect on its ability. Therefore with respect to high reliability of the Al results and its simplicity, easy -to- use, cost effective, and little time consuming for calculation, its recommended the wide use of the Al, especially in clinical situation.

  11. Development of Bone-Conducted Ultrasonic Hearing Aid for the Profoundly Deaf: Assessments of the Modulation Type with Regard to Intelligibility and Sound Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Seiji; Fujiyuki, Chika; Kagomiya, Takayuki

    2012-07-01

    Bone-conducted ultrasound (BCU) is perceived even by the profoundly sensorineural deaf. A novel hearing aid using the perception of amplitude-modulated BCU (BCU hearing aid: BCUHA) has been developed; however, further improvements are needed, especially in terms of articulation and sound quality. In this study, the intelligibility and sound quality of BCU speech with several types of amplitude modulation [double-sideband with transmitted carrier (DSB-TC), double-sideband with suppressed carrier (DSB-SC), and transposed modulation] were evaluated. The results showed that DSB-TC and transposed speech were more intelligible than DSB-SC speech, and transposed speech was closer than the other types of BCU speech to air-conducted speech in terms of sound quality. These results provide useful information for further development of the BCUHA.

  12. Ranking Hearing Aid Input-Output Functions for Understanding Low-, Conversational-, and High-Level Speech in Multitalker Babble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King; Killion, Mead C.; Christensen, Laurel A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rankings of 6 input-output functions for understanding low-level, conversational, and high-level speech in multitalker babble without manipulating volume control for listeners with normal hearing, flat sensorineural hearing loss, and mildly sloping sensorineural hearing loss. Method: Peak clipping, compression limiting,…

  13. Eldercare at Home: Hearing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... members and friends to comment on how much communication has improved when your mother is wearing the hearing aid. If your mother is concerned about the appearance of a hearing aid, tell her that most women can style their hair to cover the hearing aids. Problem " ...

  14. Auditory-model based assessment of the effects of hearing loss and hearing-aid compression on spectral and temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalewski, Borys; MacDonald, Ewen; Strelcyk, Olaf;

    2016-01-01

    auditory modeling. Inspired by the work of Edwards (2002), we studied the effects of DRC on a set of relatively basic outcome measures, such as forward masking functions (Glasberg and Moore, 1987) and spectral masking patterns (Moore et al., 1998), obtained at several masker levels and frequencies....... Outcomes were simulated using the auditory processing model of Jepsen et al. (2008) with the front end modified to include effects of hearing impairment and DRC. The results were compared to experimental data from normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners....

  15. Hearing aid gain prescriptions balance restoration of auditory nerve mean-rate and spike-timing representations of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinath, Faheem; Bruce, Ian C

    2008-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear amplification schemes for hearing aids have thus far been developed and evaluated based on perceptual criteria such as speech intelligibility, sound comfort, and loudness equalization. Finding amplification schemes that optimize all of these perceptual metrics has proven difficult. Using a physiological model, Bruce et al. [1] investigated the effects of single-band gain adjustments to linear amplification prescriptions. Optimal gain adjustments for model auditory-nerve fiber responses to speech sentences from the TIMIT database were dependent on whether the error metric included the spike timing information (i.e., a time-resolution of several microseconds) or the mean firing rates (i.e., a time-resolution of several milliseconds). Results showed that positive gain adjustments are required to optimize the mean firing rate responses, whereas negative gain adjustments tend to optimize spike timing information responses. In this paper we examine the results in more depth using a similar optimization scheme applied to a synthetic vowel /E/. It is found that negative gain adjustments (i.e., below the linear gain prescriptions) minimize the spread of synchrony and deviation of the phase response to vowel formants in responses containing spike-timing information. In contrast, positive gain adjustments (i.e., above the linear gain prescriptions) normalize the distribution of mean discharge rates in the auditory nerve responses. Thus, linear amplification prescriptions appear to find a balance between restoring the spike-timing and mean-rate information in auditory-nerve responses. PMID:19163029

  16. A current mode feed-forward gain control system for a 0.8 V CMOS hearing aid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A current mode feed-forward gain control (CMFGC) technique is presented, which is applied in the front-end system of a hearing aid chip. Compared with conventional automatic gain control (AGC), CMFGC significantly improves the total harmonic distortion (THD) by digital gain control. To attain the digital gain control codes according to the extremely weak output signal from the microphone, a rectifier and a state controller implemented in current mode are proposed. A prototype chip has been designed based on a 0.13 μm standard CMOS process. The measurement results show that the supply voltage can be as low as 0.6 V. And with the 0.8 V supply voltage, the THD is improved and below 0.06% (-64 dB) at the output level of 500 mVp-p, yet the power consumption is limited to 40 μW. In addition, the input referred noise is only 4 μVrms and the maximum gain is maintained at 33 dB. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  17. A current mode feed-forward gain control system for a 0.8 V CMOS hearing aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanyang, Li; Haigang, Yang; Fei, Liu; Tao, Yin

    2011-06-01

    A current mode feed-forward gain control (CMFGC) technique is presented, which is applied in the front-end system of a hearing aid chip. Compared with conventional automatic gain control (AGC), CMFGC significantly improves the total harmonic distortion (THD) by digital gain control. To attain the digital gain control codes according to the extremely weak output signal from the microphone, a rectifier and a state controller implemented in current mode are proposed. A prototype chip has been designed based on a 0.13 μm standard CMOS process. The measurement results show that the supply voltage can be as low as 0.6 V. And with the 0.8 V supply voltage, the THD is improved and below 0.06% (-64 dB) at the output level of 500 mVp-p, yet the power consumption is limited to 40 μW. In addition, the input referred noise is only 4 μVrms and the maximum gain is maintained at 33 dB.

  18. O autoconceito do adolescente deficiente auditivo e sua relação com o uso do aparelho de amplificação sonora individual Hearing impaired adolescents' self-concept and their relations to hearing aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Zugliani

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Para o adolescente com deficiência auditiva, o processo de formação da identidade tem nuances próprias. Além do conflito específico da fase, ele tem que formar sua identidade como pessoa que possui uma perda auditiva e que necessita usar aparelho de amplificação sonora individual (AASI. Considerando que os fatores que influenciam o uso desse recurso são inúmeros, este trabalho teve por objetivo verificar a relação do autoconceito do adolescente deficiente auditivo (DA com o uso do AASI, a partir da percepção do próprio adolescente e de seus pais. A Escala de Autoconceito - EACIJ - e questionários foram aplicados a 30 adolescentes deficientes auditivos, com idades de 12 a 16 anos, em tratamento no Centro de Distúrbios da Audição, Linguagem e Visão (CEDALVI do HRAC/USP e a seus pais. Os resultados mostraram que a maioria dos adolescentes estudados faz uso efetivo de seu AASI e tem autoconceito positivo. Concluiu-se que o uso constante desse recurso está associado às boas condições do autoconceito e ao suporte psicossocial da equipe multi / interdisciplinar.For adolescents who have hearing impairment, the identity formation process has its own subtleties. Besides the conflicts which are a part of being a teenager, he/she has to form his/her identity as someone who has a hearing loss and needs a hearing aid. Taking into account the countless factors influencing the use of this resource, this study aimed to undercover the relations between self-concepts of deaf adolescents to the use of hearing aid, looking at the adolescents' own perceptions and those of his parents. The Self-concept Scale - EACIJ - and questionnaires were applied to 30 hearing impaired adolescents, aged 12-16 years, undergoing treatment at the Centro de Distúrbios da Audição, Linguagem e Visão (CEDALVI, a service center within the HRAC/USP, and to their parents. The results showed that most of the subjects involved in the study actually use their hearing

  19. Aparelho de amplificação sonora individual: melhora a sensação de zumbido? Hearing aid: does it reduce the sensation of tinnitus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Caique Ferreira da Silva

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: observar se o uso da amplificação sonora além de garantir melhora na inteligibilidade de fala pode proporcionar alívio na sensação de zumbido. MÉTODOS: participaram do presente estudo 21 indivíduos, usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual (AASI que referiam sensação de zumbido, além da perda auditiva sensorioneural, sendo 13 (61,9% indivíduos do sexo feminino e oito (38,1% do sexo masculino. A idade dos participantes variou entre 35 a 88 anos, com idade média de 61 anos. Para a avaliação dos participantes foi utilizado um questionário específico. Os dados foram analisados por meio de análise estatística descritiva e para tanto foram utilizados os testes não paramétricos: qui-quadrado e Kruskal-Wallis H. RESULTADOS: Entre os 21 participantes, 17 (80,9% apresentaram melhora do zumbido, enquanto quatro (19,1% referiram que o aparelho de amplificação não gerou nenhum efeito sobre o sintoma apresentado. CONCLUSÃO: este estudo verificou que a utilização do AASI reduziu imediatamente a sensação de zumbido apresentada na população estudada.PURPOSE: to observe if the use of hearing aid may provide relief in tinnitus sensation besides guarantying the improvement of speech intelligibility. METHODS: a sample was made up by 21 hearing aid users and a specific questionnaire was used for the evaluation of the participants. The ages ranged from 35 to 88-year old, with an average of 61-year old. The tinnitus sensation was mentioned by 13 (61.9% female beings and eight (38.1% male beings beyond sensory neural hearing loss. The results were obtained through a descriptive statistical analysis, and furthermore, non-parametric tests were used, such as chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis H. RESULTS: among the participants 17 (80.9% showed recovery from tinnitus, while four (19.1% said that the hearing aid device did not cause any effect on the evidenced symptoms. CONCLUSION: this study found out that the usage of

  20. Localização sonora em usuários de aparelhos de amplificação sonora individual Sound localization by hearing aid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cristina Rodrigues

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar o desempenho, no teste de localização de fontes sonoras, de usuários de aparelhos de amplificação sonora individual (AASI do tipo retroauricular e intracanal, com o desempenho de ouvintes normais, nos planos espaciais horizontal e sagital mediano, para as frequências de 500, 2.000 e 4.500 Hz; e correlacionar os acertos no teste de localização sonora com o tempo de uso dos AASI. MÉTODOS: foram testados oito ouvintes normais e 20 usuários de próteses auditivas, subdivididos em dois grupos. Um formado por 10 indivíduos usuários de próteses auditivas do tipo intracanal e o outro grupo formado por 10 usuários de próteses auditivas do tipo retroauricular. Todos foram submetidos ao teste de localização de fontes sonoras, no qual foram apresentados, aleatoriamente, três tipos de ondas quadradas, com frequências fundamentais em 0,5 kHz, 2 kHz e 4,5 kHz, na intensidade de 70 dBA. RESULTADOS: encontrou-se percentuais de acertos médios de 78,4%, 72,2% e 72,9% para os ouvintes normais, em 0,5 kHz, 2 kHz e 4,5 kHz, respectivamente e 40,1%, 39,4% e 41,7% para os usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual. Quanto aos tipos de aparelhos, os usuários do modelo intracanal acertaram a origem da fonte sonora em 47,2% das vezes e os usuários do modelo retroauricular em 37,4% das vezes. Não foi observada correlação entre o percentual de acertos no teste de localização sonora e o tempo de uso da prótese auditiva. CONCLUSÃO: ouvintes normais localizam as fontes sonoras de maneira mais eficiente que os usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual e, dentre estes, os que utilizam o modelo intracanal obtiveram melhor desempenho. Além disso, o tempo de uso não interferiu no desempenho para localizar a origem das fontes sonoras.PURPOSE: to compare the sound localization performance of hearing aids users, with the performance of normal hearing in the horizontal and sagittal planes, at 0.5, 2 and 4

  1. AIDS and Young Children in South Florida. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, First Session (Miami, FL, August 7, 1989).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    This document is a record of a hearing on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and young children in South Florida. Opening statements are provided by Congressmen George Miller, William Lehman, and Richard Durbin; a fact sheet on AIDS and young children in South Florida is also presented. Testimony is presented by the following: (1) Ana…

  2. Acompanhamento da adaptação de próteses auditivas em crianças surdas Evaluating the adaptation of hearing aids for hearing impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Pinheiro Lanzetta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: descrever as características audiológicas e sociais de crianças surdas e avaliar a incidência de retornos para acompanhamento no Programa de Saúde Auditiva. MÉTODOS: foram analisados os prontuários de crianças que receberam as próteses auditivas pelo Programa de Saúde Auditiva, em Vila Velha - Espírito Santo. A população estudada foi constituída por 50 crianças, na faixa etária de zero a oito anos, de ambos os sexos, com diagnóstico de perda auditiva sensorioneural de grau leve a profundo. O protocolo de pesquisa foi preenchido a partir dos dados de prontuários para a obtenção das informações desejadas. RESULTADOS: a solicitação de retorno pelo Serviço Social propiciou o comparecimento de quase da metade da população (44%; os demais achados foram indicativos da associação entre o retorno para acompanhamento e a rotina escolar. CONCLUSÕES: o referido programa atinge predominantemente famílias com rendimento mensal entre um e dois salários mínimos; o diagnóstico da surdez ocorre entre dois e três anos de idade cronológica neste estudo; a época da primeira adaptação de próteses auditivas, aos seis anos de idade, é bastante tardia; o contato com os pais, por meio do Serviço Social, viabiliza o acompanhamento proposto, influenciado positivamente também pela rotina escolar.PURPOSE: to describe the compliance and attitudes of hearing-impaired children towards the treatment and support offered by the Hearing Health Program, a public health endeavor, and assessing patients’ returns for follow-ups. METHODS: participants consisted of fifty children aged from 0 to 8 years, with a diagnosis of mild to severe sensorineural hearing loss. The children received the hearing aids from the Hearing Health Program, in Vila Velha, in the state of Espírito Santo, Brazil. The research protocol was completed using both medical records and a socio-economical profile survey of the affected children, including the

  3. Adaptação de próteses auditivas no candidato ao implante coclear Fitting hearing aid in patients candidate for cochlear implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tereza de Matos Magalhães

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: caracterizar o perfil audiométrico e demográfico de pacientes candidatos ao implante coclear encaminhados ao setor de prótese auditiva e entre esses, a frequência de indivíduos que se beneficiaram da amplificação sonora. MÉTODOS: foram estudados os pacientes atendidos no período de maio de 2007 a dezembro 2008. Foi realizado o levantamento do perfil da população segundo sexo, idade, escolaridade e etiologia. Foi calculada a média da melhor e pior orelha e classificada segundo Frota (2003. A média dos limiares auditivos com as próteses auditivas indicadas foi calculada e considerada como benefício quando permitia acesso aos sons da fala do português brasileiro (Russo e Behlau, 1993. RESULTADOS: foram avaliados nesse período 194 prontuários. 108 pacientes já eram usuários de próteses auditivas (55,6%, 100 do sexo masculino (52%, 94 do sexo feminino (48%, 109 eram crianças (56% e 85 eram adultos (44%. A média de idade foi 4,8 anos (crianças e 41,9 anos (adultos. Entre os adultos, 24 possuíam ensino fundamental incompleto (33%. A etiologia mais frequente foi a desconhecida (33%. Dezenove pacientes se beneficiaram do uso da prótese auditiva (10%. No grupo de pacientes que se beneficiaram da prótese auditiva, a média dos limiares em campo livre com amplificação foi de 47 dBNA e 48 dBNA, na melhor e na pior orelha, respectivamente, nas crianças e 50 dBNA e 45 dBNA, respectivamente, nos adultos. CONCLUSÃO: o perfil dos pacientes foi: na maioria criança, sexo masculino, etiologia desconhecida, já usuários de próteses auditivas com média de idade 4,8 anos (crianças e 41,9 anos (adultos, audiometria com perda auditiva neurossensorial profunda bilateral, sendo que a prótese beneficiou 10% dos pacientes.PURPOSE: to characterize the audiometric and demographic profile of cochlear implant candidates who were referred to hearing aid sector, and if they benefit from the amplification of the hearing aid. METHODS

  4. Reliability of real ear insertion gain in behind-the-ear hearing aids with different coupling systems to the ear canal

    OpenAIRE

    Jespersen, Charlotte Thunberg; Møller, Kimi Nina

    2013-01-01

    Objective The last decade has offered a multitude of instant fit coupling systems to be fitted with behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aids. The impact of these designs on the reliability of real ear measurements (REMs) has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to obtain REM reliability data for instant fit coupling systems. Design REM reliability data was obtained for four different instant-fit coupling systems and for standard size 13 tubing and custom earmolds. REMs were performed for...

  5. Self-reported outcomes of aural rehabilitation for adult hearing aid users in a developing South African context

    OpenAIRE

    Elaine Pienaar; Natalie Stearn; De Wet Swanepoel

    2010-01-01

    Hearing impairment has far reaching consequences for affected individuals, in terms of quality of life indicators. In a developing South African context the hearing impaired population is faced with limited aural rehabilitation services. This study evaluated self-reported outcomes of aural rehabilitation in a group of adults in the public healthcare sector with a standardized outcomes measurement tool (IOI-HA). Sixty-one respondents participated (44% males; 56% females), with a mean age of 69...

  6. The Why and How of Hearing /s/.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmin, Floyd

    1983-01-01

    The sound /s/ is a problem for hearing-impaired children because most ear-level hearing aids and earmolds are not efficient in amplifying and transmitting high-frequency acoustic energy. With appropriate wideband hearing aids and wideband earmolds, fricatives such as /s/ should be audible to children with even a severe hearing loss. (Author/CL)

  7. Negotiating hearing disability and hearing disabled identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke Hindhede, Anette

    2012-01-01

        Using disability theory as a framework and social science theories of identity to strengthen the arguments, this paper explores empirically how working-age adults confront the medical diagnosis of hearing impairment. For most participants hearing impairment threatens the stability of social...... interaction and the construction of hearing disabled identities is seen as shaped in the interaction with the hearing impaired person‟s surroundings. In order to overcome the potential stigmatisation the „passing‟ as normal becomes predominant. For many the diagnosis provokes radical redefinitions of the self....... The discursively produced categorisation and subjectivity of senescence mean that rehabilitation technologies such as hearing aids identify a particular life-style (disabled) which determines their social significance. Thus wearing a hearing aid works against the contemporary attempt to create socially ideal...

  8. A low-power high-performance configurable auto-gain control loop for a digital hearing aid SoC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low-power, configurable auto-gain control loop for a digital hearing aid system on a chip (SoC) is presented. By adopting a mixed-signal feedback control structure and peak detection and judgment, it can work in automatic gain or variable gain control modes through a digital signal processing unit. A noise-reduction and dynamic range (DR) improvement technique is also used to ensure the DR of the circuit in a low-voltage supply. The circuit is implemented in an SMIC 0.13 μm 1P8M CMOS process. The measurement results show that in a 1 V power supply, 1.6 kHz input frequency and 200 mVp—p, the SFDR is 74.3 dB, the THD is 66.1 dB, and the total power is 89 μW, meeting the application requirements of hearing aid SoCs. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  9. Opportunistic hearing screening in elderly inpatients

    OpenAIRE

    Ramdoo, Krishan; Bowen, Jordan; Dale, Oliver T; Corbridge, Rogan; Chatterjee, Apurba; Gosney, Margot A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of occult hearing loss in elderly inpatients, to evaluate feasibility of opportunistic hearing screening and to determine subsequent provision of hearing aids. Materials and methods: Subjects (>65 years) were recruited from five elderly care wards. Hearing loss was detected by a ward-based hearing screen comprising patient-reported assessment of hearing disability and a whisper test. Subjects failing the whisper test or reporting hearing difficulties wer...

  10. Opportunistic assessment of hearing in elderly inpatients

    OpenAIRE

    Ramdoo, Krishan; Bowen, Jordan; Dale, Oliver T; Corbridge, Rogan; Chatterjee, Apurba; Gosney, Margot A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of occult hearing loss in elderly inpatients, to evaluate feasibility of opportunistic hearing screening and to determine subsequent provision of hearing aids. Materials and methods: Subjects (>65 years) were recruited from five elderly care wards. Hearing loss was detected by a ward-based hearing screen comprising patient-reported assessment of hearing disability and a whisper test. Subjects failing the whisper test or reporting hearing difficulti...

  11. Social representation of hearing aids: Cross-cultural study in India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Manchaiah V; Danermark B; Vinay; Ahmadi T; Tomé D; Krishna R; Germundsson P

    2015-01-01

    Vinaya Manchaiah,1 Berth Danermark,2 Vinay,3 Tayebeh Ahmadi,4 David Tomé,5 Rajalakshmi Krishna,6 Per Germundsson7 1Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas, USA; 2Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; 3Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; 4Department of Audiology, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Department of Audi...

  12. Preface to the publication of the Chinese Version of the WHO Guidelines for Hearing Aids and Services for Developing Countries (2nd Edition) in the January 2005 issue of the Journal of Audiology and Speech Pathology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hearing Aids Working Group

    2005-01-01

    @@ It is a great pleasure to be given this opportunity to write a preface for the publication of the first Chinese version of the World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines for Hearing Aids and Services for Developing Countries (2nd Edition) in this issue of the Journal of Audiology and Speech Pathology.

  13. Próteses auditivas e tempos de recuperação: estudo segundo status cognitivo Hearing aids and recovery times: a study according to cognitive status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Ghiringhelli

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Estudos demonstram que idosos com dificuldades cognitivas apresentam maior benefício com próteses auditivas com tempos lentos de recuperação. OBJETIVO: Estudar as restrições de participação e reconhecimento de sentenças no ruído em idosos com próteses auditivas com diferentes tempos de recuperação segundo o status cognitivo. MÉTODO: Foram selecionados, avaliados e acompanhados por quatro meses 50 idosos, 60-80 anos, que inicialmente formaram os grupos-estudo sem (G1-24 idosos e com (G2-26 participantes alteração cognitiva conforme resultados do teste "Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale". Metade de cada grupo recebeu próteses auditivas com tempo de recuperação mais rápido e metade lento, formando-se quatro grupos: dois sem alteração cognitiva (tempos mais rápido G1R/lento-G1L e dois sugestivos de alteração cognitiva (tempos mais rápido G2R/lento-G2L. Todos os grupos, após a avaliação inicial que constou de anamnese e avaliação audiológica básica, foram submetidos ao Protocolo: questionário de autoavaliação "Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Eldery" e teste Listas de Sentenças em Português. Aplicou-se Análise de Variância (ANOVA, Mc Nemar e Qui-quadrado com nível de significância de 0,05. RESULTADOS: Houve melhora significante na restrição de participação e reconhecimento de sentenças no ruído apenas com amplificação sonora. O subgrupo G2R necessita de relações sinal-ruído mais favoráveis para reconhecer 50% das sentenças no ruído. CONCLUSÃO: Há melhora na restrição de participação e reconhecimento de fala no ruído independentemente dos tempos de recuperação e status cognitivo.Studies have shown that elderly people with cognitive impairments benefit more from hearing aids with slower recovery times. OBJECTIVE: To study participation constraints and speech recognition in noise of elderly subjects equipped with hearing aids of different recovery times according to

  14. Achados vestibulares em usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual Vestibular findings in hearing aid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Paulin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar os achados vestibulares em pacientes com perda auditiva neurossenssorial usuários de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual. MÉTODOS: vinte pacientes, 11 do sexo feminino e nove do sexo masculino, com idades entre 39 e 85 anos, com perda auditiva neurossenssorial bilateral de grau moderado e severo foram atendidos em uma Instituição de Ensino Superior e submetidos a uma anamnese, inspeção otológica, avaliação audiológica, imitanciometria e ao exame vestibular por meio da vectoeletronistagmografia. RESULTADOS: a dos 20 pacientes avaliados, 18 (90% apresentaram queixa de zumbido, 15 (75% queixa de tontura e oito (40% queixa de cefaléia; b houve predomínio de alteração na prova calórica e no sistema vestibular periférico; c o resultado do exame vestibular esteve alterado em 14 pacientes (70%, sendo, oito casos (40% de síndrome vestibular periférica irritativa e seis casos (30% de síndrome vestibular periférica deficitária; d verificou-se diferença significativa entre o resultado do exame vestibular e o tempo de uso do aparelho de amplificação sonora individual; e dos cinco pacientes que não referiram nenhum sintoma vestibular, quatro (80% apresentaram alteração no exame. CONCLUSÃO: ressalta-se a sensibilidade e importância do estudo funcional do sistema do equilíbrio neste tipo de população, uma vez que podem ocorrer alterações na avaliação labiríntica independente da presença de sintomas.PURPOSE: to check vestibular findings in patients with sensoneural hearing loss, hearing aid users. METHODS: 20 patients (eleven females and nine males aging from 39 to 85-year-old with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, from moderate to severe degrees, were attended in a higher education institution evaluated by medical history, otological inspections, complete basic conventional audiological evaluations, acoustic impedance tests and vectoeletronystagmography. RESULTS: a from the 20 evaluated

  15. Percepção de idosos sobre o uso de AASI concedido pelo Sistema Único de Saúde Elderly perception on the use of hearing aids given by the health ystem (SUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indiara de Mesquita Fialho

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: conhecer a percepção de idosos sobre o uso de aparelhos de amplificação sonora individuais (AASI concedidos pelo Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS. MÉTODOS: estudo de caráter qualitativo. Foram realizadas entrevistas semi-estruturadas com 19 idosos, entre 60 e 86 anos, com adaptação binaural e tempo de uso de AASI entre seis meses e um ano. As entrevistas foram gravadas e transcritas para posterior leitura e análise temática. As categorias estabelecidas foram: dificuldades de comunicação sem AASI; o acesso ao AASI e o processo de adaptação ao uso; o impacto do uso do AASI na comunicação. RESULTADOS: a dificuldade para se comunicar foi maior em situações em que há várias pessoas conversando; a dificuldade está em entender e não em ouvir, demonstrando uma preocupação em ressaltar o que sentem em ser surdo. A maioria dos participantes não realizou a adaptação do AASI anteriormente por não ter condições financeiras e revela que o que possibilitou o acesso foi a implantação do Serviço de Atenção à Saúde Auditiva. As dificuldades encontradas no processo de adaptação foram: mudança na percepção da própria voz, dificuldade de percepção de fala em ambiente ruidoso e no telefone. Relataram benefício com o uso de AASI na comunicação com familiares e com estranhos. CONCLUSÃO: destaca-se a importância do processo de acompanhamento para que as dificuldades de adaptação possam ser detectadas e minimizadas, para que efetivamente o sujeito obtenha benefício e satisfação com este tratamento.PURPOSE: to know elderly perception of hearing aids use given by the health system (SUS. METHODS: qualitative study. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 19 subjects with age ranging from 60 to 86 years, with binaural adaptation and using hearing aids from six months to one year. The interviews were recorded and transcribed for further reading and thematic analysis. The settled categories were

  16. 影响老年性聋患者助听效果的相关因素分析%The Factors Affecting the Effects of Hearing Aids on Presbycusis Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王翠霞; 陈贤明; 罗萍; 杨帆; 黄少华; 陈十燕; 李建忠

    2014-01-01

    目的:调查老年感音神经性聋患者配戴助听器后的助听效果,分析其影响因素。方法采用日常生活助听满意度量表对120例验配了助听器的老年性聋患者进行调查,统计每例患者的各项得分及总均分,并根据患者年龄、性别、教育程度、平均听阈、助听器类型、佩戴方式、佩戴时长、每日使用时长、自感听力下降时长等9个因素进行分组,采用单因素分析及逐步多元回归分析进行统计处理,筛选影响助听效果的主要因素。结果教育程度高、每日佩戴时间长、双耳佩戴者得分高于教育程度低、每日佩戴时间短、单耳佩戴者(P<0.01);年长者得分优于年少者(P<0.01);自感听力下降时长短者得分高于自感听力下降时长长者(P<0.01);总体满意度方面,教育程度高、每日佩戴时间长者得分高于教育程度低、每日佩戴时间短者(P<0.01),性别因素对助听效果无影响。结论影响老年性聋患者助听效果的因素较多,其中教育程度、每日佩戴时长是主要因素,双耳佩戴、自感听力下降时间短、年长者助听效果满意度高,而性别对助听效果无明显影响。%Objective To analyze the factors affecting the effects of hearing aids in presbycusis patients . Methods One hundred and twenty cases with presbycusis were investigated by using general data and the Satisfac-tion with Amplification in Daily Life questionnaire(SADL) .The individual scores and total scores of all the subjects were collected together with the personal information ,including age ,gender ,degree of education ,pure-tone aver-age ,hearing aid type ,monaural/binaural status ,total hearing aid experience ,daily use time ,the time of perceived hearing difficulty .A single factor analysis and multiple stepwise regression analysis were used to filter out main fac-tors influencing the effect of hearing aids .Results The

  17. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Salem, NC, 3/11/2010) Hearing Disorders and Deafness Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure (Hartford Hospital, Hartford, ... Birmingham, AL, 3/17/2014) Hearing Disorders and Deafness Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure (Hartford Hospital, Hartford, ...

  18. Methodological aspects of an adaptive multidirectional pattern search to optimize speech perception using three hearing-aid algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Bas A. M.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Lyzenga, Johannes

    2004-12-01

    In this study we investigated the reliability and convergence characteristics of an adaptive multidirectional pattern search procedure, relative to a nonadaptive multidirectional pattern search procedure. The procedure was designed to optimize three speech-processing strategies. These comprise noise reduction, spectral enhancement, and spectral lift. The search is based on a paired-comparison paradigm, in which subjects evaluated the listening comfort of speech-in-noise fragments. The procedural and nonprocedural factors that influence the reliability and convergence of the procedure are studied using various test conditions. The test conditions combine different tests, initial settings, background noise types, and step size configurations. Seven normal hearing subjects participated in this study. The results indicate that the reliability of the optimization strategy may benefit from the use of an adaptive step size. Decreasing the step size increases accuracy, while increasing the step size can be beneficial to create clear perceptual differences in the comparisons. The reliability also depends on starting point, stop criterion, step size constraints, background noise, algorithms used, as well as the presence of drifting cues and suboptimal settings. There appears to be a trade-off between reliability and convergence, i.e., when the step size is enlarged the reliability improves, but the convergence deteriorates. .

  19. Student Financial Assistance (Student Loan Programs, Graduate Programs, State Programs, Grants, and Institutional Aid); Hearings Before the Special Subcommittee on Education of the Committee on Labor and Education, House of Representatives, Ninety-third Congress, Second Session. Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, and Part 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    These documents contain the hearings before the Special Subcommittee on Education of the House of Representatives dealing with student financial assistance. Separate hearings were conducted for the areas of: student loan programs; graduate programs, grants, and institutional aid. Legislative histories of the five areas were presented along with…

  20. Effect of low-frequency gain and venting effects on the benefit derived from directionality and noise reduction in hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidser, Gitte; Carter, Lyndal; Chalupper, Josef; Dillon, Harvey

    2007-10-01

    When the frequency range over which vent-transmitted sound dominates amplification increases, the potential benefit from directional microphones and noise reduction decreases. Fitted with clinically appropriate vent sizes, 23 aided listeners with varying low-frequency hearing thresholds evaluated six schemes comprising three levels of gain at 250 Hz (0, 6, and 12 dB) combined with two features (directional microphone and noise reduction) enabled or disabled in the field. The low-frequency gain was 0 dB for vent-dominated sound, while the higher gains were achieved by amplifier-dominated sounds. A majority of listeners preferred 0-dB gain at 250 Hz and the features enabled. While the amount of low-frequency gain had no significant effect on speech recognition in noise or horizontal localization, speech recognition and front/back discrimination were significantly improved when the features were enabled, even when vent-transmitted sound dominated the low frequencies. The clinical implication is that there is no need to increase low-frequency gain to compensate for vent effects to achieve benefit from directionality and noise reduction over a wider frequency range. PMID:17922345

  1. Investigation of symphony orchestra musicians' use of hearing protectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben; Koskinen, Heli

    2010-01-01

    that musicians are aware of the dangers of loud music, that they only use hearing protectors to some extent, and that hearing protector is sometimes used only in one ear. Musicians are concerned about their hearing and musicians that experience hearing problems use hearing protectors more frequently....... At present an investigation is performed about the use of hearing aids as hearing protectors by symphony orchestra musicians. Preliminary results from this investigation will be presented at the conference....

  2. A current mode feed-forward gain control system for a 0.8 V CMOS hearing aid*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fanyang; Yang Haigang; Liu Fei; Yin Tao

    2011-01-01

    A current mode feed-forward gain control (CMFGC) technique is presented, which is applied in the front-end system of a heating aid chip. Compared with conventional automatic gain control (AGC), CMFGC significantly improves the total harmonic distortion (THD) by digital gain control. To attain the digital gain control codes according to the extremely weak output signal from the microphone, a rectifier and a state controller implemented in current mode are proposed. A prototype chip has been designed based on a 0.13μm standard CMOS process. The measurement results show that the supply voltage can be as low as 0.6 V. And with the 0.8 V supply voltage, the THD is improved and below 0.06% (-64 dB) at the output level of 500 mVp-p, yet the power consumption is limited to 40μW. In addition, the input referred noise is only 4μVrms and the maximum gain is maintained at 33 dB.

  3. The Benefits of Using RONDO and an In-the-Ear Hearing Aid in Patients Using a Combined Electric-Acoustic System

    OpenAIRE

    Dayse Távora-Vieira; Stuart Miller

    2015-01-01

    People with residual hearing in the low frequencies and profound hearing loss in the high frequencies often do not benefit from acoustic amplification. Focus on this group of patients led to the development of the combined electric-acoustic stimulation (EAS) systems which can provide users with greater speech perception than can cochlear implant (CI) alone or acoustic hearing alone. EAS users wear a combined speech processor that incorporates a behind-the-ear audio processor that sits with an...

  4. A satisfação e o desempenho de usuários de próteses auditivas atendidos em um programa de atenção à saúde auditiva Satisfaction and performance of hearing aids users assisted in a Hearing Health Care Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline da Silva Lopes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o desempenho e a satisfação com o uso das próteses auditivas nos pacientes atendidos no convênio APAC-UFSM, após um ano de adaptação. MÉTODOS: analisou-se 49 sujeitos, com perda auditiva do tipo neurossensorial ou mista, de grau leve a severo na melhor orelha, divididos em adultos e idosos. Realizou-se a pesquisa dos Limiares e Índices Percentuais de Reconhecimento de Sentenças no Silêncio e no Ruído, em campo livre, por meio do teste Listas de Sentenças em Português; e aplicou-se o questionário de satisfação, International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids. Realizaram-se os testes na mesma sessão, em dois momentos distintos, sendo o primeiro, sem o uso das próteses auditivas e o segundo, usando as mesmas. RESULTADOS: houve diferença significante no desempenho dos indivíduos em ambos os grupos, no procedimento realizado no silêncio. Apesar de o desempenho com próteses auditivas não ter apresentado melhora significante no ruído, os pacientes apresentaram respostas satisfatórias no questionário. Na comparação entre os grupos, não se observou diferença significante quanto ao desempenho e satisfação. CONCLUSÃO: a melhora significante do desempenho no silêncio vai ao encontro do relato dos pacientes. O questionário evidenciou que a maioria referiu fazer uso efetivo das próteses auditivas e considerou ter um benefício muito satisfatório. Apesar de uma parcela significativa referir moderada ou bastante dificuldade residual, a maioria considerou que o uso das próteses auditivas vale muito ou bastante a pena.PURPOSE: to assess the performance and satisfaction using hearing aids in patients assisted in the APAC-UFSM partnership, after a one-year fitting. METHODS: 49 subjects having mild to severe sensorineural or mixed hearing loss in the better ear were analyzed. They were divided into adults and elderly groups. The research of Sentence Recognition Threshold and Percent Indexes in Quiet and in

  5. The Usage of Mandarin Acceptable Noise Level Test in Outcome Measurements of Hearing Aids%可接受噪声级测试在助听器效果评估中的初步应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建勇; 张华; 陈雪清; 吴燕君; 孔颖; 郭连生; 李靖; 李玉玲

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨可接受噪声级(acceptable noise level,ANL)测试在普通话听障人群助听器效果评估中的应用.方法 选取佩带助听器3个月~3年的中度到中重度听障者37例,根据助听器使用情况将其分为全天使用助听器组、部分时间使用组和拒绝使用组;利用前期经过等价性评估的普通话可接受噪声级测试材料,对三组人群依次进行裸耳和助听下的ANL测试,日常生活助听器满意度问卷(the satisfaction with amplification in daily life,SADL)评估,分析三组ANL值和SADL得分的差异.结果 ①37例听障者个体自身裸耳和助听下最舒适响度级(most comfortable level,MCL)、背景噪声级(background noise level,BNL)值差异有统计学意义(P0.05);②全天使用助听器组裸耳下ANL值明显低于部分时间和拒绝使用助听器组(P0.05);④Pearson相关分析显示:裸耳ANL值与听障者性别、年龄均无相关性(P>0.05),与气导平均听阈存在较弱相关性(r=0.460,P=0.004).结论 可接受噪声级测试可反映个体耐受噪声能力的大小,可初步利用其来预估助听器选配效果.%Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the difference of ANL value among the full -time hearing aid users, part-time users, and nonusers,and then to determine the relationship between the hearing aid outcomes of the three groups and ANL values. Methods 37 hearing aid users for 3 months to 3 years were selected for this research. Listeners were assigned to one of the three groups based on patterns of hearing aid use:full-time use (whenever hearing aids are needed), part-time use (occasional use), and non use. ANL test was measured for the three groups using the mandarin acceptable noise level test material. The mandarin ANL test was measured in aided and unaided conditions for each group; and the outiones were evaluated by SADL. The results were analyzed statistically with SPSS13.0 to determine the differences of the ANL value for the

  6. Perfil dos usuários de AASI com vistas à amplificação, cognição e processamento auditivo Profile of hearing aid users with a view to amplification, cognition and auditory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Nunes Alves Viacelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: estabelecer o perfil dos usuários de AASI atendidos no Centro de Saúde Auditiva com vistas à amplificação, cognição e processamento auditivo (PA. MÉTODO: participaram do estudo 59 sujeitos com idades entre 41 e 92 anos. Na primeira etapa, realizou-se a coleta dos dados dos prontuários: dados das avaliações audiológica e otorrinolaringológica, anamnese, teste de fala com o AASI em uso, dados do molde e do AASI, orientações recebidas e resultados do treinamento auditivo. Na segunda etapa, foram realizados os testes de Dicótico de Dígitos (DD e Teste de Padrão de Frequência (TPF, Avaliação da Doença de Alzheimer-Cognitiva (ADAS-Cog e a Escala de Depressão Geriátrica (EDG-15. Nessa etapa, participaram 47 sujeitos. RESULTADOS: em relação à idade, 67,80% tem 60 anos ou mais. Os aspectos mais relatados na anamnese foram tontura e zumbido e exposição ao ruído. Na avaliação audiológica, identificou-se perda auditiva neurossensorial de grau moderado e curva descendente como os mais frequentes, coincidindo com os achados imitanciométricos: curva tipo A com reflexos ausentes. No treinamento auditivo, as habilidades que mais apresentaram alterações foram identificação e compreensão. Nos testes DD e TPF, as médias de acertos ficaram abaixo dos padrões de normalidade. No ADAS-Cog, os maiores escores foram palavra evocada, reconhecimento de palavra e compreensão. No EDG, 20 sujeitos apresentam características sugestivas de depressão. CONCLUSÃO: foi possível estabelecer o perfil dos usuários de AASI com vistas à amplificação, cognição e ao PA.PURPOSE: to establish the hearing aid users' profile attended in the Hearing Health Center with a view to amplification, cognition and auditory processing (AP. Method: 59 individuals participated in this study aged between 41 and 92 years old. In the first stage, it was realized the data assortment through the audiology and otolaryngologist evaluations, first

  7. Correlação entre as restrições de participação em atividades de vida diária e o benefício do uso de próteses auditivas em adultos e idosos Correlation between the handicap and the benefit of hearing aid use in adults and elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vívian Baptista da Luz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar o benefício obtido com o uso de próteses auditivas em ambientes acusticamente favoráveis à comunicação, reverberantes, ruidosos e com sons aversivos e correlacioná-lo com as restrições de participação e limitações de atividades de adultos e idosos deficientes auditivos. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 42 indivíduos atendidos na instituição em que o estudo foi realizado. Estes responderam aos questionários Hearing Handicap Inventory for Elderly ou for Adults e Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit, no momento da dispensação das próteses auditivas e após três meses de uso efetivo destas. Foram estudadas as restrições de participação, limitações auditivas e o benefício com o uso de próteses auditivas. Os resultados foram analisados estatisticamente. RESULTADOS: Houve diferenças entre os escores dos questionários Hearing Handicap Inventory for Elderly e for Adults e entre os das subescalas Facilidade de Comunicação, Ambientes Reverberantes e Ruído Ambiental do questionário Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit, comparando as condições sem e com próteses auditivas. Houve correlação positiva entre o benefício mensurado na subescala Facilidade de Comunicação, nos idosos, e Ruído Ambiental, nos adultos, com a redução da restrição de participação. CONCLUSÃO: Houve redução das limitações de atividades e da restrição de participação em atividades de vida diária em adultos e idosos com o uso de próteses auditivas. Quanto maior o benefício obtido na subescala Facilidade de Comunicação em idosos e o benefício na subescala Ruído Ambiental nos adultos, maior a redução da restrição de participação.PURPOSE: To study the benefit obtained by the use of hearing aids in environments acoustically favorable to communication, reverberant, noisy and with aversive sounds, and to correlate the benefit with the handicap of adults and elderly with hearing loss. METHODS

  8. Solid state silicon based condenser microphone for hearing aid, has transducer chip and IC chip between intermediate chip and openings on both sides of intermediate chip, to allow sound towards diaphragm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    NOVELTY - A silicon transducer chip (1) has parallel backplate and movable diaphragm (12) and forms an electrical capacitor. The chip and electronic circuit chip (3) are provided on either sides of intermediate chip (2). The chip (2) has openings (4,10) between two sides of the chip, to allow sound...... towards diaphragm. Surface of the chip (2) has electrical conductors (14) to connect chip with IC chip (3). USE - For use in miniature electroacoustic devices such as hearing aid. ADVANTAGE - Since sound inlet is covered by filter, dust, moisture and other impurities do not obstruct interior and sound...

  9. Hearing aids with no batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    , Miettenin & Punamaki 1999), the notion of communities of practice (Wenger 1999), and most importantly for my concerns here, Ethnomethodology (Garfinkel 1967). Currently, the recommendation is that Ethnomethodology, with its focus on the detailed, empirical analysis of people as skilled practitioners...... of social life, and design, at least those varieties which prioritize ethnographically derived design materials and user involvement, be coupled into a 'hybrid' program (Button & Dourish 1996; Crabtree 2004; Garfinkel (2002). In line with this, I wish here to delineate one way in which this recommendation...

  10. Feedback suppression in digital hearing instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Guilin

    canceller with filtered-X adaptation by injecting nearly inaudible noise. The second approach uses a linear predicative coding based vocoder to synthesize the hearing-aid output in order to decorrelate the hearing-aid output signal and the desired input signal. In the end, a discussion about the use of the...

  11. Human computer interaction and communication aids for hearing-impaired, deaf and deaf-blind people: Introduction to the special thematic session

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothe, Hans-Heinrich

    This paper gives ail overview and extends the Special Thematic Session (STS) oil research and development of technologies for hearing-impaired, deaf, and deaf-blind people. The topics of the session focus oil special equipment or services to improve communication and human computer interaction. The...... papers are related to visual communication using captions, sign language, speech-reading, to vibro-tactile stimulation, or to general services for hearing-impaired persons....

  12. [Progressive hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, M; Reiss, G

    2000-01-01

    Progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is defined as hearing loss of unknown etiology with fairly high-speed progression. Its diagnostic criteria consist of the following: that it is 1) progressive, 2) with bilateral involvement, and 3) of unknown etiology. Due to recent advances in diagnostics, imaging and management, SNHL has gained much interest from otologists in the last few years. They provide new insight into the physiology and pathophysiology of hearing. SNHL which is sudden in onset, fluctuating, and/or progressive complicates medical management, hearing aid selection, and individualized educational planning for a hearing-impaired patient. Existing hypotheses on the etiology of SNHL are judged on experimental, clinical, laboratory and radiological evidence. Cardiovascular and rheologic diseases, hereditary disorders, immunological phenomena, infections, environmental causes like noise, ototoxic drugs and industrial substances and systemic maladies must be included in the diagnostic reflections. Potential concepts of treatment include rheologic medications and corticosteroids. Hearing aids and timely cochlear implant operation are further possible forms of treatment. PMID:10893764

  13. Hearing Loss: Diagnosis and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazove, Philip; Atcherson, Samuel R; Moreland, Christopher; McKee, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    Hearing loss is a common disability in the United States, most frequent among men, elderly individuals, and veterans but is increasingly affecting other younger adults. Types of hearing loss include sensorineural, conductive, and mixed. Hearing loss in children often is related to infections, time spent in a neonatal intensive care unit, and genetic etiologies. Presbycusis (ie, age-related hearing loss) is the most common etiology in adults. Adverse effects of untreated hearing loss include isolation, depression, lower income, and higher unemployment. Hearing aid use reduces levels of disability, cognitive impairment, and psychosocial distress while improving quality of life. At least 75% of individuals with hearing loss are not receiving treatment for it. All infants should be screened for hearing loss, as should children and adults with risk factors. The Joint Commission on Infant Hearing Screening has a 1-3-6 goal for screening: identification by age 1 month, confirmation by age 3 months, and intervention by age 6 months. The presence of an ongoing physician-patient relationship increases the likelihood that a patient will admit to having a hearing loss. Adults can be screened using single-question or standardized instrument screens. All patients with suspected hearing loss should undergo audiometry by an audiology subspecialist. PMID:26161523

  14. Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing loss is present at birth. Acquired hearing loss happens later in life — during childhood, the teen years, or in adulthood — ... for your ears to avoid a permanent hearing loss. See your doctor right away ... basis. What's Life Like for People Who Are Hearing Impaired? For ...

  15. Hearing Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Hearing levels are threatened by modern life--headsets for music, rock concerts, traffic noises, etc. It is crucial we know our hearing levels so that we can draw attention to potential problems. This exercise requires that students receive a hearing screening for their benefit as well as for making the connection of hearing to listening.

  16. Surdez pós-lingual: benefícios do implante coclear versus prótese auditiva convencional Post-lingual deafness: benefits of cochlear implants vs. conventional hearing aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Gomes Bittencourt

    2012-04-01

    hearing aids. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Review the literature available on databases SciELO, Cochrane, MEDLINE, and LILACS-BIREME. The publications selected for review were rated as A or B on evidence strength on the day of the review. Their authors analyzed and compared hearing aids and cochlear implants in populations of post-lingually deaf patients. Study Design: Systematic review. RESULTS: Eleven out of the 2,169 papers searched were found to be pertinent to the topic and were rated B for evidence strength. Six studies were prospective cohort trials, four were cross-sectional studies and one was a clinical trial. CONCLUSION: The assessment done on the benefits yielded by post-lingually deaf subjects from cochlear implants showed that they are effective and provide for better results than conventional hearing aids.

  17. Human computer interaction and communication aids for hearing-impaired, deaf and deaf-blind people: Introduction to the special thematic session

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothe, Hans-Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    This paper gives ail overview and extends the Special Thematic Session (STS) oil research and development of technologies for hearing-impaired, deaf, and deaf-blind people. The topics of the session focus oil special equipment or services to improve communication and human computer interaction. The...

  18. Low Empathy in Deaf and Hard of Hearing (Pre)Adolescents Compared to Normal Hearing Controls

    OpenAIRE

    Netten, Anouk P.; Rieffe, Carolien; Theunissen, Stephanie C. P. M.; Soede, Wim; Dirks, Evelien; Briaire, Jeroen J; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the level of empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (pre)adolescents compared to normal hearing controls and to define the influence of language and various hearing loss characteristics on the development of empathy. Methods The study group (mean age 11.9 years) consisted of 122 deaf and hard of hearing children (52 children with cochlear implants and 70 children with conventional hearing aids) and 162 normal hearing children. The two groups wer...

  19. Low empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (preadolescents compared to normal hearing controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk P Netten

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the level of empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (preadolescents compared to normal hearing controls and to define the influence of language and various hearing loss characteristics on the development of empathy.The study group (mean age 11.9 years consisted of 122 deaf and hard of hearing children (52 children with cochlear implants and 70 children with conventional hearing aids and 162 normal hearing children. The two groups were compared using self-reports, a parent-report and observation tasks to rate the children's level of empathy, their attendance to others' emotions, emotion recognition, and supportive behavior.Deaf and hard of hearing children reported lower levels of cognitive empathy and prosocial motivation than normal hearing children, regardless of their type of hearing device. The level of emotion recognition was equal in both groups. During observations, deaf and hard of hearing children showed more attention to the emotion evoking events but less supportive behavior compared to their normal hearing peers. Deaf and hard of hearing children attending mainstream education or using oral language show higher levels of cognitive empathy and prosocial motivation than deaf and hard of hearing children who use sign (supported language or attend special education. However, they are still outperformed by normal hearing children.Deaf and hard of hearing children, especially those in special education, show lower levels of empathy than normal hearing children, which can have consequences for initiating and maintaining relationships.

  20. Aceitação de protetores auditivos pelos componentes de banda instrumental e vocal Acceptance of hearing protection aids in members of an instrumental and voice music band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Mendes

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Existem barreiras para a efetiva proteção auditiva entre músicos. OBJETIVO: Verificar a aceitação de protetor auditivo pelos componentes de banda instrumental e vocal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo realizado com a Banda Municipal de Indaial, em 2005. O grupo de estudo consistiu de 34 componentes. Os níveis de pressão sonora foram mensurados durante um ensaio. Os sujeitos responderam questionários e realizaram audiometria tonal. Os limiares tonais dos componentes da banda foram comparados a um grupo controle. Ministrado palestra e distribuído protetores auditivos por 3 meses. RESULTADOS: Os níveis de pressão sonora variaram de 96,4 dB(A a 106,9 dB(A. As maiores queixas foram: incômodo a sons 58,8% e zumbido 47%. Ao compararmos a mediana dos limiares auditivos dos músicos com o grupo controle observou-se diferença significativa à direita nas freqüências de 4 e 6 kHz, e à esquerda nas freqüências de 3, 4 e 6 kHz. 77,1% referiram que a música pode ocasionar prejuízo auditivo. 56,2% referiram não ter gostado do protetor, 43,7% referiram ter gostado. CONCLUSÃO: Os sujeitos têm a informação sobre o risco, mas não há prevenção em relação aos efeitos auditivos, sugerindo a necessidade de campanhas periódicas e legislação específica aos profissionais ligados à música.There are barriers to effective hearing protection among musicians. AIM: To investigate the acceptance of hearing protection aids in members of an instrumental and voice music band. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A prospective study of 34 members of the Municipal Indaial Band. Sound pressure levels were measured during a rehearsal, indicating mean levels ranging from 96.4 dB(A to 106.9 dB(A. Subjects answered questionnaires and underwent audiometry. They attended a lecture in which folders and hearing protection aids were provided; subjects were asked to try using the protectors for 3 months. RESULTS: At the end of the study period, 56.2% reported not

  1. Tactile Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohtaramossadat Homayuni

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Tactile aids, which translate sound waves into vibrations that can be felt by the skin, have been used for decades by people with severe/profound hearing loss to enhance speech/language development and improve speechreading.The development of tactile aids dates from the efforts of Goults and his co-workers in the 1920s; Although The power supply was too voluminous and it was difficult to carry specially by children, it was too huge and heavy to be carried outside the laboratories and its application was restricted to the experimental usage. Nowadays great advances have been performed in producing this instrument and its numerous models is available in markets around the world.

  2. Evaluation of the subjective effect of middle ear implantation in hearing-impaired patients with severe external otitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Snik, A.F.M.; van Duijnhoven, N. T. L.; Mulder, J.J.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The subjective benefit of middle ear implantation was studied in a group of 23 hearing-impaired patients who could not use conventional hearing aids owing to severe chronic external otitis. Changes in hearing disability (Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit [APHAB]) and changes in quality of life (Glasgow Benefit Inventory [GBI]) were determined. Mean benefit value on the APHAB for the subscale Ease of Communication was close to the mean reference value for conventional hearing aids. Fo...

  3. Evaluation of long-term patient satisfaction and experience with the Baha(®) bone conduction implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jacob; Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate long-term patient satisfaction with bone-anchored hearing aids (the Baha(R), now referred to by Cochlear as a 'bone conduction implant') in our hospital clinic spanning the eighteen-year period from the inception of our Baha program. The researchers further wished to analyse t...

  4. Recent concepts and challenges in hearing research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Torsten

    In everyday life, the speech we listen to is often mixed with many other sound sources as well as reverberation. In such a situation, normal-hearing listeners are able to effortlessly segregate a single voice out of the background, which is commonly known as the 'cocktail party effect'. Conversel...... technical applications, in digital hearing aids, cochlear implants, speech and audio coding, and automatic speech recognition......., hearing-impaired people have great difficulty understanding speech when more than one person is talking, even when reduced audibility has been fully compensated for by a hearing aid. As with the hearing impaired, the performance of automatic speech recognition systems deteriorates dramatically with......In everyday life, the speech we listen to is often mixed with many other sound sources as well as reverberation. In such a situation, normal-hearing listeners are able to effortlessly segregate a single voice out of the background, which is commonly known as the 'cocktail party effect'. Conversely...

  5. Hearing speech in music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth-Reino Ekström

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The masking effect of a piano composition, played at different speeds and in different octaves, on speech-perception thresholds was investigated in 15 normal-hearing and 14 moderately-hearing-impaired subjects. Running speech (just follow conversation, JFC testing and use of hearing aids increased the everyday validity of the findings. A comparison was made with standard audiometric noises [International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA noise and speech spectrum-filtered noise (SPN]. All masking sounds, music or noise, were presented at the same equivalent sound level (50 dBA. The results showed a significant effect of piano performance speed and octave (P<.01. Low octave and fast tempo had the largest effect; and high octave and slow tempo, the smallest. Music had a lower masking effect than did ICRA noise with two or six speakers at normal vocal effort (P<.01 and SPN (P<.05. Subjects with hearing loss had higher masked thresholds than the normal-hearing subjects (P<.01, but there were smaller differences between masking conditions (P<.01. It is pointed out that music offers an interesting opportunity for studying masking under realistic conditions, where spectral and temporal features can be varied independently. The results have implications for composing music with vocal parts, designing acoustic environments and creating a balance between speech perception and privacy in social settings.

  6. Hearing is Believing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion on the cochlear implant. This device was developed by Adam Kissiah, who suffers from hearing loss. Driven by his own hearing problem and three failed corrective surgeries, Kissiah started working in the mid-1970s on this surgically implantable device that provides hearing sensation to persons with severe-to-profound hearing loss who receive little or no benefit from hearing aids. Uniquely, the cochlear implant concept was not based on theories of medicine, as Kissiah had no medical background whatsoever. Instead, he utilized the technical expertise he learned while working as an electronics instrumentation engineer at NASA s Kennedy Space Center for the basis of his invention. This took place over 3 years, when Kissiah would spend his lunch breaks and evenings in Kennedy s technical library, studying the impact of engineering principles on the inner ear. In April of 2003, Kissiah was inducted into the Space Foundation's U.S. Space Technology Hall of Fame for his invention

  7. Avaliação dos benefícios proporcionados pelo AASI em crianças e jovens da faixa etária de 7 a 14 anos Assessment of benefit of hearing AIDS in children and young people from ages 7 to 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Cristina Boscolo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A presença de perda auditiva pode acarretar sérias conseqüências no desenvolvimento de fala e aprendizagem. Um recurso importante para a reabilitação do deficiente auditivo é o AASI. Para estar bem adaptado, o AASI deve fornecer benefícios para os usuários. A avaliação do benefício proporcionado pelo AASI, por meio de questionários de auto-avaliação, é fundamental. O presente estudo procurou verificar os benefícios proporcionados pelo AASI por meio de um questionário aplicado às crianças e adolescentes usuários de AASI, na faixa etária de 7 a 14 anos. Foram avaliados 19 deficientes auditivos, de ambos os sexos. Verificamos que em relação ao uso do AASI, 12 (63% deficientes auditivos utilizam o AASI em todos os lugares que vão, retirando-os apenas para tomar banho e dormir, 5 (23% referem utilizar o AASI somente em casa e na terapia fonoaudiológica Em relação ao benefício proporcionado pelo AASI na rotina caseira, 14 (73% ouvem melhor a televisão, 15 (78% ouvem melhor o telefone ou campainha, 12 (63% ouvem melhor os pais chamarem pelo nome. No ambiente escolar, verificou-se que o AASI promove uma melhor recepção da fala do professor estando ele próximo ao aluno. Em situações sociais, 15 sujeitos (78% relataram que com o AASI brincam melhor com seus amigos, 12 (63% ouvem melhor os amigos , 16 (84% conseguem ouvir os carros na rua, e 9 (47% referiram que conseguem ouvir uma pessoa falando em local de ruído. O uso desse instrumento possibilitou verificar os benefícios oferecidos pelo AASI às crianças e jovens deficientes auditivos.The presence of hearing loss can have serious consequences on speech development and learning. Personal sound amplification devices (hearing aids are an important resource for hearing rehabilitation of the deaf are. To be well adapted, aids should supply benefits for users. It is essential to assess the benefits provided by the devices, by means of self-evaluation questionnaires. The

  8. Hearing Loss Signals Need for Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... set to a low volume that won’t disturb someone sleeping nearby. FDA regulates hearing aids as ... Advisory Committees Regulatory Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, ...

  9. 22 CFR 216.8 - Public hearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public hearings. 216.8 Section 216.8 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL PROCEDURES § 216.8 Public hearings. (a) In most instances AID will be able to gain the benefit of public participation in the impact statement...

  10. [Rehabilitative measures in hearing-impaired children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wedel, H; von Wedel, U C; Zorowka, P

    1991-12-01

    On the basis of certain fundamental data on the maturation processes of the central auditory pathways in early childhood the importance of early intervention with hearing aids is discussed and emphasized. Pathological hearing, that is acoustical deprivation in early childhood will influence the maturation process. Very often speech development is delayed if diagnosis and therapy or rehabilitation are not early enough. Anamnesis, early diagnosis and clinical differential diagnosis are required before a hearing aid can be fitted. Selection criteria and adjustment parameters are discussed, showing that the hearing aid fitting procedure must be embedded in a complex matrix of requirements related to the development of speech as well as to the cognitive, emotional and social development of the child. As a rule, finding and preparing the "best" hearing aids (binaural fitting is obligatory) for a child is a long and often difficult process, which can only be performed by specialists who are pedo-audiologists. After the binaural fitting of hearing aids an intensive hearing and speech education in close cooperation between parents, pedo-audiologist and teacher must support the whole development of the child. PMID:1770955

  11. Adaptação de prótese auditiva e a privação da audição unilateral: avaliação comportamental e eletrofisiológica Hearing aid fitting and unilateral auditory deprivation: behavioral and electrophysiologic assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Bernal Wieselberg

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O fenômeno da Privação Auditiva Unilateral de Início Tardio foi reportado em 1984. No entanto, ainda se observa um expressivo número de adaptações de próteses auditivas unilaterais, nos casos de perdas auditivas bilaterais, justificadas por fatores não auditivos, tais como custo, vaidade, desinformação ou políticas públicas de saúde. OBJETIVO: Investigar, por meio de avaliação comportamental e eletrofisiológica, o desempenho auditivo de adultos que fazem uso de amplificação unilateral, comparados àqueles expostos à estimulação auditiva simétrica bilateral. MÉTODO: Participaram deste estudo 35 indivíduos adultos com perda auditiva sensorioneural bilateral simétrica, usuários regulares de prótese auditiva unilateral, bilateral e não usuários de prótese auditiva por meio de testes de avaliação comportamental e eletrofisiológica. RESULTADOS: A análise de variância revelou que, no grupo usuário de amplificação unilateral, a latência do P300 foi significantemente maior na orelha que sofreu a privação auditiva comparada a orelha com prótese auditiva (p The phenomenon of Late-Onset Unilateral Auditory Deprivation was first reported in 1984. However, a high number of unilateral hearing aid fittings are still carried out in cases of bilateral hearing loss, justified by non-auditory factors such as cost, vanity, misinformation and public health policies. OBJECTIVE: To carry out behavioral and electrophysiological assessment of the auditory performance of adults using unilateral amplification compared with individuals exposed to bilateral symmetric auditory stimulation. METHOD: Thirty five adults, all with symmetric bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, regular users of unilateral hearing aid, bilateral hearing aids and not users of hearing aids, were assessed on behavioral and electrophysiological tests. RESULTS: Variance analysis revealed that in the unilaterally fitted group, P300 latency was significantly

  12. Adult hearing screening: the Cyprus Pilot Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Thodi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is the third most common condition affecting adults over 65 (Cruickshanks et al., 1998. It can affect quality of life, limiting the ability to communicate efficiently, and leading to isolation, psychological strain, and functional decline (LaForge, Spector, Sternberg, 1992; Yueh, Shapiro, MacLean, Shekelle, 2003. Communication limitations impinge on the person directly, as well as the family, friends, and social circle. Reports on hearing loss among adults indicate that less than 25% of people who can benefit from amplification are actually using hearing aids, and that people diagnosed with a hearing loss delay seeking amplification by about seven years (Kochkin, 1997. Often, family members are the driving force behind a person with a hearing loss who decides to seek help. Adult hearing screening programs might have a positive effect on raising public awareness on hearing loss and its implications, and shortening delay time for intervention. There is no routine hearing screening for the adult population in Cyprus. The health system provides hearing tests for beneficiaries upon physician recommendation or self-referral. The Cyprus pilot adult hearing screening program (ΑΠΑΣ- EVERYONE- Greek acronym for Screening- Intervention-Hearing-Participation to Life screened hearing in retired adults.

  13. Hearing Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the Public / Hearing and Balance Hearing Assistive Technology Hearing Assistive Technology: FM Systems | Infrared Systems | Induction ... Assistive Technology Systems Solutions What are hearing assistive technology systems (HATS)? Hearing assistive technology systems (HATS) are ...

  14. 人工耳蜗植入者对侧耳佩戴助听器的效果评价%Effectiveness evaluation of contralateral hearing aid for cochlear implant users

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱宇虹; 郭梦和

    2004-01-01

    背景:双耳聆听能够更好地进行声源定位,感受立体声,提高听阈5~10dB及增强噪声环境中的言语辨别能力.目的:探讨人工耳蜗植入者对侧耳佩戴助听器的意义和作用.设计:自身和相互对照研究.地点和对象:实验在第一军医大学珠江医院耳鼻咽喉科全军听力中心完成,对象为本科收治的语前聋患者6例,男4例,女2例,年龄7~18岁.方法:均为单耳使用Nucleus24人工耳蜗系统,采用ACE编码策略.于术后开机半年时在不同助听方式下(人工耳蜗+助听器和单独使用人工耳蜗)分别进行声场(啭音)测听、言语功能评估和问卷调查,将结果进行统计分析.主要观察指标:①两种助听方式下测试125,250,500,1 000,2 000,4 000和8 000 Hz的啭音听阈.②言语功能评估.③问卷调查.结果:人工耳蜗+助听器各频率听阈均值(18.89 Hz)较单独使用人工耳蜗声场(啭音)测试的各频率听阈均值(24.17 Hz)为低(t=4.647,P<0.01),频率特性好.50个常用词汇及音节复述得分,人工耳蜗+助听器平均86分,单用人工耳蜗平均84分,说明患者利用两种助听方式均能获得较好的聆听效果.问卷调查显示使用人工耳蜗+助听器比单独使用人工耳蜗在辨别方向,噪声环境中聆听具有更好的效果,但在安静环境下聆听,两者无明显差异.结论:使用人工耳蜗者对侧耳佩戴助听器有助于更好地聆听.%BACKGROUND: Binaural hearing can localize sound, perceive stereo,and help to improve auditory threshold by 5 - 10 dB and the ability to distinguish sounds in noisy environment.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of contralateral hearing aid for cochlear implant users.DESIGN: Auto-control and mutual control study.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: The experiment was conducted at the PLA Hlearing Center of Department of Otorhinolarynagology, Zhujiang Hospital, First Military Medical University. The subjects were 6 prelingually deafened patients (4 males

  15. Personal Sound Amplifiers for Adults with Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Sara K; Reed, Nicholas S; Nieman, Carrie L; Oh, Esther S; Lin, Frank R

    2016-03-01

    Age-related hearing loss is highly prevalent and often untreated. Use of hearing aids has been associated with improvements in communication and quality of life, but such treatment is unaffordable or inaccessible for many adults. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical guide for physicians who work with older adults who are experiencing hearing and communication difficulties. Specifically, we review direct-to-consumer amplification products that can be used to address hearing loss in adults. Helping adults with hearing loss navigate hearing loss treatment options ranging from being professionally fitted with hearing aids to using direct-to-consumer amplification options is important for primary care clinicians to understand given our increasing understanding of the impact of hearing loss on cognitive, social, and physical functioning. PMID:26498713

  16. Sensitivity in Interactions between Hearing Mothers and their Toddlers with Hearing Loss: The Effect of Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, Zaharah Abu; Brown, P. Margaret; Remine, Maria D.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the potential effects of cochlear implantation and age at implantation on maternal interactional sensitivity. Three groups of dyads were studied at two points over 1 year. The hearing aid (HA) group wore hearing aids throughout the study, the early cochlear implanted (ECI) group were implanted prior to 22 months of age, and…

  17. Limitação de atividades em idosos: estudo em novos usuários de próteses auditivas por meio do questionário APHAB Activity limitations in the elderly: a study of new hearing aid users using the APHAB questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyara Glícia Calheiros Flores

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar limitações auditivas de idosos com perda auditiva sensorioneural de grau moderado a severo segundo variáveis escolaridade e grau da perda auditiva, por meio do questionário de auto-avaliação Abbreviate Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB. MÉTODOS: Foi aplicado o questionário em 30 idosos antes e após três meses de uso da amplificação. A amostra foi composta por 60% mulheres e 40% homens, com média de idade de 71,6 anos. O grau de escolaridade foi distribuído em três categorias: não-alfabetizado, ensino fundamental e ensino médio. Os dados foram analisados estatisticamente. Os escores foram comparados por sub-escala, e a avaliação geral pela subtração desses escores. Além disso, foi calculada a associação entre benefício e grau de escolaridade e grau de perda auditiva. RESULTADOS: O estudo comparativo entre os escores obtidos na aplicação do questionário sem e com prótese auditiva revelou diferença nas sub-escalas Facilidade de Comunicação, Reverberação e Ruído Ambiental, com valores de pPURPOSE: To evaluate hearing limitations among elderly individuals with moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss according to the variables educational level and degree of hearing loss, using the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit self-assessment questionnaire. METHODS: The questionnaire was applied to 30 elderly subjects before and after three months of use of amplification. The sample was composed of 60% females and 40% males, with mean age of 71.6 years. Educational level was divided into three categories: illiterate, elementary school, and high school education. Data were analyzed statistically. Scores were compared by subscale and an overall assessment was conducted by subtracting these scores. Moreover, it was calculated the association between benefit and educational level and degree of hearing loss. RESULTS: The comparative study between scores obtained in the questionnaire with and

  18. Verbal and Spatial Analogical Reasoning in Deaf and Hearing Children: The Role of Grammar and Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lindsey; Figueras, Berta; Mellanby, Jane; Langdon, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which cognitive development and abilities are dependent on language remains controversial. In this study, the analogical reasoning skills of deaf and hard of hearing children are explored. Two groups of children (deaf and hard of hearing children with either cochlear implants or hearing aids and hearing children) completed tests of…

  19. Online Personalization of Hearing Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert de Vries

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Online personalization of hearing instruments refers to learning preferred tuning parameter values from user feedback through a control wheel (or remote control, during normal operation of the hearing aid. We perform hearing aid parameter steering by applying a linear map from acoustic features to tuning parameters. We formulate personalization of the steering parameters as the maximization of an expected utility function. A sparse Bayesian approach is then investigated for its suitability to find efficient feature representations. The feasibility of our approach is demonstrated in an application to online personalization of a noise reduction algorithm. A patient trial indicates that the acoustic features chosen for learning noise control are meaningful, that environmental steering of noise reduction makes sense, and that our personalization algorithm learns proper values for tuning parameters.

  20. Online Personalization of Hearing Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ypma Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Online personalization of hearing instruments refers to learning preferred tuning parameter values from user feedback through a control wheel (or remote control, during normal operation of the hearing aid. We perform hearing aid parameter steering by applying a linear map from acoustic features to tuning parameters. We formulate personalization of the steering parameters as the maximization of an expected utility function. A sparse Bayesian approach is then investigated for its suitability to find efficient feature representations. The feasibility of our approach is demonstrated in an application to online personalization of a noise reduction algorithm. A patient trial indicates that the acoustic features chosen for learning noise control are meaningful, that environmental steering of noise reduction makes sense, and that our personalization algorithm learns proper values for tuning parameters.

  1. A Review of Hearing Loss in Cleft Palate Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal Gani; Kinshuck, A. J.; Sharma, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cleft palate is associated with recurrent otitis media with effusion and hearing loss. This study analysed the way these patients' hearing is managed in Alder Hey Children's Hospital. Method. A retrospective audit was carried out on cleft palate patients in Alder Hey Children's Hospital. Audiology assessment and treatment options were reviewed. Comparisons were made between the use of ventilation tubes (VTs) and hearing aids (HAs). The types of cleft, types of hearing loss, and th...

  2. Active noise cancellation in hearing devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a hearing device system comprising at least one hearing aid circuitry and at least one active noise cancellation unit, the at least one hearing aid circuitry comprises at least one input transducer adapted to convert a first audio signal to an electric audio signal; a signal processor...... connected to the at least one input transducer and adapted to process said electric audio signal by at least partially correcting for a hearing loss of a user; an output transducer adapted to generate from at least said processed electric audio signal a sound pressure in an ear canal of the user, whereby...... addition to said generated sound pressure, wherein the hearing device system further comprises a combiner unit adapted to combine the processed electric audio signal with the active noise cancellation signal, to obtain a combined signal and to provide the combined signal to the output transducer....

  3. Hearing loss in the elderly : Consequences of hearing loss and considerations for audiological rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Presbyacusis is the most common cause of hearing loss and is considered to be among the three most commonly reported chronic health problems of the elderly. In future years, the problem is predicted to be aggravated as the expected life span of the population increases. The psychological and social consequences of hearing impairment have been the subject of several texts. Numerous articles have been published expressing concerns involving the considerable number of hearing aids that are not b...

  4. Comparison of Speech Perception in Background Noise with Acceptance of Background Noise in Aided and Unaided Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabelek, Anna K.; Tampas, Joanna W.; Burchfield, Samuel B.

    2004-01-01

    l, speech perception in noiseBackground noise is a significant factor influencing hearing-aid satisfaction and is a major reason for rejection of hearing aids. Attempts have been made by previous researchers to relate the use of hearing aids to speech perception in noise (SPIN), with an expectation of improved speech perception followed by an…

  5. The influence of non-linear frequency compression on the perception of music by adults with a moderate to severe hearing loss: Subjective impressions

    OpenAIRE

    Marinda Uys; Lidia Pottas; Bart Vinck; Catherine van Dijk

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To date, the main direction in frequency-lowering hearing aid studies has been in relation to speech perception abilities. With improvements in hearing aid technology, interest in musical perception as a dimension that could improve hearing aid users’ quality of life has grown. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of non-linear frequency compression (NFC) on hearing aid users’ subjective impressions of listening to music. Design & sample: A survey research ...

  6. Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the choices that can help people with hearing problems. home | health topics A-Z | videos A-Z | training | about us | contact us | site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. National Library of Medicine | National Institutes of ...

  7. Effects of hearing loss on the subcortical representation of speech cues

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Samira; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; White-Schwoch, Travis; Drehobl, Sarah; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss often report frustration with speech being loud but not clear, especially in background noise. Despite advanced digital technology, hearing aid users may resort to removing their hearing aids in noisy environments due to the perception of excessive loudness. In an animal model, sensorineural hearing loss results in greater auditory nerve coding of the stimulus envelope, leading to a relative deficit of stimulus fine structure. Based on the hypothesi...

  8. Processo de adaptação de próteses auditivas em usuários atendidos em uma instituição pública federal: parte II: resultados dos questionários de auto-avaliação Hearing aid fitting process in users fitted in a federal public institution: part II - self-assessment questionnaire results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Dias de Freitas

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Uma reabilitação eficiente deve reduzir os efeitos da deficiência sobre as habilidades auditivas e comunicativas do indivíduo e aumentar o bem-estar psicossocial. OBJETIVOS:Verificar a viabilidade do uso de questionários de auto-avaliação e comparar os resultados da protetização em usuários de uma instituição pública federal, com e sem queixas relacionadas às características da amplificação. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS:25 indivíduos, de 13 a 77 anos de idade, usuários de próteses auditivas. Foram aplicados os questionários de auto-avaliação HHIE-S/HHIA (Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly Screening Version ou for Adult e APHAB (Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit, nos indivíduos sem (Grupo 1 e com queixas relacionados às características da amplificação (Grupo 2. RESULTADOS: Diferenças significantes não foram encontradas entre os grupos nos protocolos HHIE-S/HHIA e APHAB, exceto na subescala facilidade de comunicação do APHAB, onde o Grupo 1 obteve melhor benefício. Também evidenciou-se redução significativa da incapacidade auditiva com o uso das próteses em situações favoráveis de comunicação, ambientes reverberantes e na presença de ruído ambiental para ambos os grupos. CONCLUSÃO: Os questionários revelaram ser excelentes preditores das dificuldades enfrentadas pelos usuários, e diferenças significantes foram encontradas em situações favoráveis de comunicação, onde o grupo sem queixas obteve melhor benefício.An efficient rehabilitation must be able to reduce impairment effects over the auditory and communication skills of individuals and promote psychosocial well being. AIMS: check the feasibility of using self-assessment questionnaires and compare the results achieved by hearing aid fitting in users from a federal public institution, with and without complaints related to hearing amplification characteristics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 25 individuals, from 13 to 77 years of age, users of

  9. An economic model of adult hearing screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Morris

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Populations are ageing and older adults make an increasing contribution to society, yet uncorrected hearing loss is common over the age of 50 years, increasing in prevalence and severity with age. The consequences of uncorrected hearing loss can be profound for hearing-impaired individuals and their communication partners but there is evidence that adults commonly delay 10-15 years before seeking help for hearing difficulty (Stephens et al., 1990; Davis et al., 2007 and the most common reason is the belief that their hearing is not bad enough (Ipsos-Mori/RNID survey, 2005. Hearing aids are currently the mainstay of intervention for hearing loss; evidence shows benefit to social functioning and quality of life even for mild hearing loss (Mulrow et al., 1990; Chisolm et al., 2007 and long term outcomes are better when they are obtained early (Davis et al., 2007. Screening adults for hearing loss would expedite intervention and reduce unmet need, leading to improved quality of life for many older adults. Previous work suggests adult hearing screening (AHS should target adults aged 50-65 years, old enough for prevalence to justify screening but young enough to gain from early intervention...

  10. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchberger, Martin; Russo, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an a...

  11. Hearing Preservation after Cochlear Implantation: UNICAMP Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Machado de Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Electric-acoustic stimulation (EAS is an excellent choice for people with residual hearing in low frequencies but not high frequencies and who derive insufficient benefit from hearing aids. For EAS to be effective, subjects' residual hearing must be preserved during cochlear implant (CI surgery. Methods. We implanted 6 subjects with a CI. We used a special surgical technique and an electrode designed to be atraumatic. Subjects' rates of residual hearing preservation were measured 3 times postoperatively, lastly after at least a year of implant experience. Subjects' aided speech perception was tested pre- and postoperatively with a sentence test in quiet. Subjects' subjective responses assessed after a year of EAS or CI experience. Results. 4 subjects had total or partial residual hearing preservation; 2 subjects had total residual hearing loss. All subjects' hearing and speech perception benefited from cochlear implantation. CI diminished or eliminated tinnitus in all 4 subjects who had it preoperatively. 5 subjects reported great satisfaction with their new device. Conclusions. When we have more experience with our surgical technique we are confident we will be able to report increased rates of residual hearing preservation. Hopefully, our study will raise the profile of EAS in Brazil and Latin/South America.

  12. Hearing speech in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Seth-Reino; Borg, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The masking effect of a piano composition, played at different speeds and in different octaves, on speech-perception thresholds was investigated in 15 normal-hearing and 14 moderately-hearing-impaired subjects. Running speech (just follow conversation, JFC) testing and use of hearing aids increased the everyday validity of the findings. A comparison was made with standard audiometric noises [International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA) noise and speech spectrum-filtered noise (SPN)]. All masking sounds, music or noise, were presented at the same equivalent sound level (50 dBA). The results showed a significant effect of piano performance speed and octave (PMusic had a lower masking effect than did ICRA noise with two or six speakers at normal vocal effort (Pmusic offers an interesting opportunity for studying masking under realistic conditions, where spectral and temporal features can be varied independently. The results have implications for composing music with vocal parts, designing acoustic environments and creating a balance between speech perception and privacy in social settings. PMID:21768731

  13. 语前聋患儿一侧人工耳蜗植入对侧佩戴助听器聆听效果分析%Speech Perception in Patients with Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids in Opposite Ears

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玲; 叶放蕾; 王乐; 白险峰; 朱丽雅

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability to perceive syllables phrases ,mono-syllabic words ,disyllabic words ,when using a CI and an HA in non -implanted ears (bimodal fitting) ,and the relationship be-tween aided thresholds in the HA ear and bimodal effectiveness .Methods Eighteen children who consistently used a bimodal fitting participated in the study .The loudness of speech in the HA ear matched that with implanted ear ,and the aided thresh-olds in the HA ear were obtained .The recognition rate of syllables phrases ,monosyllabic words ,and disyllabic words was tested under the aforementioned two modes in both the quiet and noisy backgrounds .Results The speech performance of children for monosyllabic words were 82 .67% ± 12 .23% ,83 .61% ± 12 .22% ,for disyllabic words 76 .00% ± 16 .13% ,78 .11% ± 14 .84% , for syllables phrases 60 .11% ± 17 .18% ,65 .43% ± 16 .76% ,with a CI alone or with bimodal fitting in a quiet environment ,re-spectively .In a noisy environment ,monosyllabic words were 75 .50% ± 14 .12% ,76 .83% ± 14 .15% ,and disyllabic words were 68 .22% ± 17 .15% ,77 .18% ± 16 .83% ,and syllables phrases were 49 .39% ± 19 .26% ,56 .33% ± 19 .55% .The results sug-gested that speech performance in a quiet or a noisy environment was significantly better with bimodal hearing than with a CI a-lone .All were statistically significant except the recognition rate of monosyllabic words in quiet background (P<0 .05) .Signifi-cant negative correlations were found between aided thresholds at 250 and 500 Hz ,and the bimodal advantages were noticeable for the some speeching perception .Conclusion Bimodal hearing enhances speech performance for deaf patients .The low -fre-quency residual hearing in the HA ear may play a major role in enhancing auditory and speech performance .%目的:分析语前聋患儿一侧人工耳蜗植入(cochlear implant ,CI)对侧佩戴助听器模式下的聆听效果,以及非植入耳

  14. A eficácia da adaptação de prótese auditiva na redução ou eliminação do zumbido The efficacy of hearing aids on diminishing or eliminating tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Oliveira Salgueiro de Moura

    2004-10-01

    tinnitus have great benefits with the hearing aid because it helps out the comprehension of conversation while relieves tinnitus. AIM: In this work, we have studied the efficacy of hearing aids on diminishing or eliminating tinnitus in patients with hearing loss. STUDY DESIGN: Series study. MATERIAL AND METHOD: We evaluated 47 patients (32 women and 15 men with ages ranging from 32 to 88 years old and medical indication for fitting a hearing aid. We subjectively investigated the sensation of tinnitus matching frequency (Hz and loudness (dB through the technic of acuphenometry and we have attended the patients for one year aiming to verify if there was a relief of tinnitus after the hearing aid fitting. RESULTS: The majority of patients (87,2% refered relief of tinnitus with the use of the hearing aid. In 51% of these patients tinnitus has completely desapeared. It was necessary to use the hearing aid for some months (3-8 to obtain the relief of tinnitus in the majority of patients. The characteristics of the hearing aids, as model, tecnology and vent, had no influence on the relief of tinnitus. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the hearing aid was effective in reducing or eliminating tinnitus in patients with hearing loss and tinnitus.

  15. Hearing Preservation in Cochlear Implant Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Carvalho Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past, it was thought that hearing loss patients with residual low-frequency hearing would not be good candidates for cochlear implantation since insertion was expected to induce inner ear trauma. Recent advances in electrode design and surgical techniques have made the preservation of residual low-frequency hearing achievable and desirable. The importance of preserving residual low-frequency hearing cannot be underestimated in light of the added benefit of hearing in noisy atmospheres and in music quality. The concept of electrical and acoustic stimulation involves electrically stimulating the nonfunctional, high-frequency region of the cochlea with a cochlear implant and applying a hearing aid in the low-frequency range. The principle of preserving low-frequency hearing by a “soft surgery” cochlear implantation could also be useful to the population of children who might profit from regenerative hair cell therapy in the future. Main aspects of low-frequency hearing preservation surgery are discussed in this review: its brief history, electrode design, principles and advantages of electric-acoustic stimulation, surgical technique, and further implications of this new treatment possibility for hearing impaired patients.

  16. Bringing Hearing to the Deaf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipsey, Ian (Purdue)

    2006-06-12

    In his talk, Shipsey will discuss the cochlear implant, the first device to successfully allow the profoundly deaf to regain some sense of hearing. A cochlear implant is a small electronic apparatus. Unlike a normal hearing aid, which amplifies sound, a cochlear implant is surgically implanted behind the ear where it converts sound waves into electrical impulses. These implants have instigated a popular but controversial revolution in the treatment of deafness, and they serve as a model for research in neuroscience and biomedical engineering. Shipsey will discuss the physiology of natural hearing from the perspective of a physicist. He will also touch on the function of cochlear implants in the context of historical treatments, electrical engineering, psychophysics, clinical evaluation of efficacy and personal experience. Finally, Shipsey will address the social implications of cochlear implantation and the future outlook for auditory prostheses.

  17. Cochlear implant: Speech and language development in deaf and hard of hearing children following implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Almost 200 cochlear implantations were done in the four centers (two in Belgrade, per one in Novi Sad and Niš in Serbia from 2002 to 2009. Less than 10% of implantees were postlingually deaf adults. The vast majority, i.e. 90% were pre- and perilingually profoundly deaf children. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of improved auditory perception due to cochlear implantation on comprehension of abstract words in children as compared with hearing impaired children with conventional hearing aids and normal hearing children. Methods. Thirty children were enrolled in this study: 20 hearing impaired and 10 normal hearing. The vocabulary test was used. Results. The overall results for the whole test (100 words showed a significant difference in favor of the normal hearing as compared with hearing impaired children. The normal hearing children successfully described or defined 77.93% of a total of 100 words. Success rate for the cochlear implanted children was 26.87% and for the hearing impaired children with conventional hearing aids 20.32%. Conclusion. Testing for abstract words showed a statistically significant difference between the cochlear implanted and the hearing impaired children with hearing aids (Mann- Whitney U-test, p = 0.019 implying considerable advantage of cochlear implants over hearing aids regarding successful speech development in prelingually deaf children.

  18. Some linguistic observations on testing hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonner, Maria

    2012-01-01

    exclusively, it is more difficult to restrict language-based testing to hearing alone. Two central issues observable in current language-based testing for hearing loss may render the test results inaccurate, namely the selection of language materials and the differences between standard and regional varieties......Diagnostic testing of a person’s hearing is central to the selection and fitting of hearing aids. In addition to the pure tone audiogram based on sounds, hearing loss can also be diagnosed by speech perception tests. While the audiogram does not use language and thus tests auditory perception...... of the test’s language. These problems need to be addressed in test development by integrating more detailed linguistic knowledge and by considering cross-linguistic differences of the sound inventories of different languages....

  19. Use of Hearing Aids by Adults with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the number of people with a pure-tone average (PTA) of thresholds at frequencies of 1000, ... NIH… Turning Discovery Into Health ® National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 31 Center Drive, MSC ...

  20. Hearing and hearing loss: Causes, effects, and treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedt, Richard A.

    2003-04-01

    Hearing loss can have multiple causes. The outer and middle ears are conductive pathways for acoustic energy to the inner ear (cochlea) and help shape our spectral sensitivity. Conductive hearing loss is mechanical in nature such that the energy transfer to the cochlea is impeded, often from eardrum perforations or middle ear fluid buildup. Beyond the middle ear, the cochlea comprises three interdependent systems necessary for normal hearing. The first is that of basilar-membrane micromechanics including the outer hair cells. This system forms the basis of the cochlear amplifier and is the most vulnerable to noise and drug exposure. The second system comprises the ion pumps in the lateral wall tissues of the cochlea. These highly metabolic cells provide energy to the cochlear amplifier in the form of electrochemical potentials. This second system is particularly vulnerable to the effects of aging. The third system comprises the inner hair cells and their associated sensory nerve fibers. This system is the transduction stage, changing mechanical vibrations to nerve impulses. New treatments for hearing loss are on the horizon; however, at present the best strategy is avoidance of cochlear trauma and the proper use of hearing aids. [Work supported by NIA and MUSC.

  1. Fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookhouser, Patrick E

    2002-08-01

    Childhood sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) that fluctuates or is progressive enhances parental concern and complicates medical management, hearing aid selection, and individualized educational planning for the affected child. Despite intensive multidisciplinary evaluation and intervention, continued threshold fluctuation or a gradual decline in auditory acuity may proceed unabated in a significant percentage of these youngsters. With the adoption of universal newborn hearing screening mandates by an increasing number of states, any challenges to the accurate determination of auditory thresholds must be addressed within the first few months of life. PMID:12487089

  2. Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D; Loy, Betty A; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t = 2.38, p = .02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r = .42, p = .002) and attention (r = .45, p = .001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r = - .60, p self-esteem and demographic factors, communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population. PMID:25755025

  3. Evasão dos pacientes nos acompanhamentos nos serviços de saúde auditiva: identificação sobre o motivo e resultados pós-adaptação de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual Evasion of patients in hearing health services: research on the reason and outcomes after adaptation of hearing aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pricila Reis Jokura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: identificar o motivo da ausência no acompanhamento audiológico dos usuários de aparelhos de amplificação sonora individual do Sistema Único de Saúde e analisar o resultado da adaptação do dispositivo nesta população. MÉTODO: entrevista com 27 pacientes faltosos, realizando questões abertas sobre o motivo da ausência no atendimento e aplicação do Questionário Internacional de Aparelho de Amplificação Sonora Individual, para avaliação dos resultados pós-adaptação. A comparação dos resultados pós-adaptação dos pacientes faltosos foi realizada a partir da seleção aleatória de 30 questionários, de pacientes que compareceram no acompanhamento audiológico da Instituição, cadastrados em um banco de dados. Para análise dos resultados foi aplicada estatística descritiva e inferencial. RESULTADOS: a maioria dos faltosos (25,92% refere não ter lembrado da data do retorno. Os resultados comparativos do questionário entre os grupos de faltosos e não faltosos evidenciam diferenças estatisticamente significantes em quase todos os domínios do questionário de auto-avaliação, exceto nos itens benefício, restrição da participação e qualidade de vida. CONCLUSÃO: dentre os motivos do não comparecimento ao serviço, destacam-se: esquecimento do atendimento, problemas de saúde e motivos de trabalho. Foi observado que os pacientes que não compareceram ao acompanhamento audiológico apresentam resultados pós-adaptação de aparelho de amplificação sonora individual aquém aos resultados dos pacientes que compareceram ao acompanhamento, de forma estatisticamente significante.PURPOSE: to identify the reason for absence of the patients from the Unified Health System who use hearing aids at the audiology follow up and analyze the the device adaptation in this population. METHOD: 27 absent patients were interviewed with opened questions about their absence and the implementation of the International Outcome

  4. 34 CFR 222.153 - How must a local educational agency request an administrative hearing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Director, Impact Aid Program, 600 Independence Ave., SW, Portals 4200, Washington, DC 20202-6244; or (2) If it hand-delivers the hearing request, deliver it to the Director, Impact Aid Program,...

  5. Desempenho nas habilidades auditivas de atenção seletiva e memória auditiva em um grupo de idosos protetizados: influência de perda auditiva, idade e gênero Performance in the auditory abilities of selective attention and hearing memory in a group of elderly with hearing aids: Influence of hearing loss, age and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Henrique Buss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: verificar o desempenho nas habilidades auditivas de atenção seletiva e memória auditiva de idosos protetizados e relacioná-lo com o grau e configuração de perda auditiva, o gênero e a idade. MÉTODO: foram avaliados 29 idosos de 60 a 84 anos, sendo 17 (58,62% do gênero feminino e 12 (41,38% do gênero masculino. As avaliações realizadas incluíram meatoscopia, audiometria tonal liminar e aplicação do teste SSW em português. RESULTADOS: a análise dos dados permitiu verificar que, neste grupo de indivíduos, a idade e o grau de perda auditiva influenciaram significantemente nos escores obtidos na avaliação do processamento auditivo, diferentemente das demais variáveis. Os idosos que apresentaram perda auditiva de grau leve com configuração horizontal obtiveram escores significantemente superiores na avaliação do processamento auditivo comparados com os portadores de perda auditiva de grau moderado com configuração horizontal ou grau moderado com configuração descendente. Idosos pertencentes a faixa etária de 60-69 obtiveram desempenho superiormente significante comparado com idosos na faixa etária de 80-89 CONCLUSÃO: concluiu-se que o grau de perda auditiva e a idade influenciam nos resultados da avaliação do processamento auditivo. O gênero e a configuração de perda auditiva não foram fatores determinantes na avaliação do processamento auditivo.PURPOSE: to verify the performance in the auditory abilities of selective attention and hearing memory of elderly with prosthesis and relate it to the degree and the configuration of hearing loss, the gender and the age. METHOD: 29 elderly people from 60 to 84 years old were evaluated, 17 of them (58,62% females and 12 (41,38% males. The evaluations carried out included meatoscopy, audiometry evaluation and the use of the SSW test in Portuguese. RESULTS: the analysis of the data showed that, in this group of individuals, the age and the degree of auditory loss

  6. Verificação da prótese auditiva realizada face a face e via teleconsulta: medidas repetidas Telecounselling and face to face hearing aid verification: repeated measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Viviane Ferrari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar as medidas repetidas da resposta de ressonância da orelha externa sem (REUR e com uso de amplificação (REAR e o ganho de inserção (REIG, realizados face a face e via teleconsulta. MÉTODO: estudo prospectivo longitudinal. Foram realizadas quatro repetições da REUR, REAR e REIG (com estímulo speech noise apresentado em 65 dB NPS e 0º azimute em 19 orelhas de adultos ouvintes normais, via face a face (F e teleconsulta síncrona por controle remoto de aplicativo (T e vídeo interativo. O software Polycom PVX foi utilizado para compartilhamento e transmissão de áudio e vídeo. A conexão foi realizada via LAN (Local Area Network USP na velocidade de 384 kbps Foi calculado o erro causal (Dalhberg entre as quatro medidas para frequências de 250 a 8000 Hz. RESULTADOS: os erros casuais entre as medidas F e T foram muito semelhantes, sendo maiores nas frequências acima de 4 kHz. As diferenças e variações entre as medidas F e T estavam dentro da magnitude de variabilidade do procedimento de medidas com microfone sonda. CONCLUSÃO: as medidas com microfone sonda via teleconsulta fornece resultados confiáveis e similares aos obtidos pelo procedimento padrão.PURPOSE: to evaluate the repeated measurements of the real ear unaided response (REUR, real ear aided response (REAR and insertion gain (REIG conducted as face to face (F and via telecounselling (T. METHOD: longitudinal prospective study. Four measures of REUR, REAR and REIG (carried out with speech noise stimulus presented at 65 dB SPL at 0° azimuth were obtained in 19 ears in normal hearing adults, face to face and via synchronous telecounsellings with remote control of the real ear equipment and interactive video. Polycom PVX software was used for desktop sharing and video and audio transmission. The Loca Area Network (LAN USP was used for the connection (transmission rate: 384 kbps. Dahlberg’s casual errors were calculated for obtaining the measures for

  7. Bimodal Hearing and Speech Perception with a Competing Talker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyschny, Verena; Landwehr, Markus; Hahn, Moritz; Walger, Martin; von Wedel, Hasso; Meister, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to investigate the influence of bimodal stimulation upon hearing ability for speech recognition in the presence of a single competing talker. Method: Speech recognition was measured in 3 listening conditions: hearing aid (HA) alone, cochlear implant (CI) alone, and both devices together (CI + HA). To examine…

  8. Cutaneous sensory nerve as a substitute for auditory nerve in solving deaf-mutes’ hearing problem: an innovation in multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jianwen; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Ma, Weifang; Ma, Xuezong

    2014-01-01

    The current use of hearing aids and artificial cochleas for deaf-mute individuals depends on their auditory nerve. Skin-hearing technology, a patented system developed by our group, uses a cutaneous sensory nerve to substitute for the auditory nerve to help deaf-mutes to hear sound. This paper introduces a new solution, multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology, to solve the problem of speech discrimination. Based on the filtering principle of hair cells, external voice signals at different...

  9. Investigation of internal feedback in hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Lars

    2009-01-01

    the microphone output voltages and the receiver driving voltage when the receiver and microphones are electrically disconnected. The main scientific part of the thesis consists in the study and extension of a relatively recent method. This method is the “Theory of fuzzy structures” and it is intended...

  10. Assessing Speech Intelligibility in Children with Hearing Loss: Toward Revitalizing a Valuable Clinical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertmer, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Newborn hearing screening, early intervention programs, and advancements in cochlear implant and hearing aid technology have greatly increased opportunities for children with hearing loss to become intelligible talkers. Optimizing speech intelligibility requires that progress be monitored closely. Although direct assessment of…

  11. Protecting Your Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... everywhere. But how do you know if loud noise has affected your hearing? A. Julianna Gulya, M.D.: Well, the hearing loss that's just occurred very rapidly -- sometimes like a sudden hearing loss, when you've been ...

  12. Help with Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing. This problem can make it more diffi- cult to learn speech sounds and language correctly. Take ... how your child is hearing. See how diffi- cult it is to hear words correctly? Some children ...

  13. Protecting Your Hearing

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... noise. [loud electric motors] A. Julianna Gulya, M.D.: Loud noise is an important cause of hearing ... has affected your hearing? A. Julianna Gulya, M.D.: Well, the hearing loss that's just occurred very ...

  14. Protecting Your Hearing

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have problems with our hearing. There are many causes of hearing loss. Hearing can get worse as we age. Other causes include certain prescription drugs, heredity, head injury, infection, ...

  15. Protecting Your Hearing

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affected your hearing? A. Julianna Gulya, M.D.: Well, the hearing loss that's just occurred very rapidly -- ... not that lucky and that hearing loss may be permanent. Narrator: There are two general types of ...

  16. Measurements on Hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    1996-01-01

    Background material for measurements of hearing for grammar school pupils. The note gives the necessary background for the exercise 'Measurement on Hearing'. The topics comprise sound and decibel, the ear, basic psychoacoustics, hearing threshold, audiometric measurement methods, speech and speech...

  17. Aging and Hearing Health: The Life-course Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Adrian; McMahon, Catherine M; Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen M; Russ, Shirley; Lin, Frank; Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Chadha, Shelly; Tremblay, Kelly L

    2016-04-01

    Sensory abilities decline with age. More than 5% of the world's population, approximately 360 million people, have disabling hearing loss. In adults, disabling hearing loss is defined by thresholds greater than 40 dBHL in the better hearing ear.Hearing disability is an important issue in geriatric medicine because it is associated with numerous health issues, including accelerated cognitive decline, depression, increased risk of dementia, poorer balance, falls, hospitalizations, and early mortality. There are also social implications, such as reduced communication function, social isolation, loss of autonomy, impaired driving ability, and financial decline. Furthermore, the onset of hearing loss is gradual and subtle, first affecting the detection of high-pitched sounds and with difficulty understanding speech in noisy but not in quiet environments. Consequently, delays in recognizing and seeking help for hearing difficulties are common. Age-related hearing loss has no known cure, and technologies (hearing aids, cochlear implants, and assistive devices) improve thresholds but do not restore hearing to normal. Therefore, health care for persons with hearing loss and people within their communication circles requires education and counseling (e.g., increasing knowledge, changing attitudes, and reducing stigma), behavior change (e.g., adapting communication strategies), and environmental modifications (e.g., reducing noise). In this article, we consider the causes, consequences, and magnitude of hearing loss from a life-course perspective. We examine the concept of "hearing health," how to achieve it, and implications for policy and practice. PMID:26994265

  18. Predictors of Psychosocial Outcomes in Hard-of-Hearing Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugen, Nina J; Jacobsen, Karl H; Rieffe, Carolien; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for developing psychosocial problems. Children with mild to severe hearing loss are less frequently subject to research, in particular in preschool, and we therefore know less about the risk in this particular group. To address this, we compared psychosocial functioning in thirty-five 4-5-year olds with hearing aids to that of 180 typically hearing children. Parent ratings of psychosocial functioning and social skills, as well as scores of receptive vocabulary, were obtained. Children with hearing loss evidenced more psychosocial problems than hearing agemates. Female gender and early detection of hearing loss predicted better psychosocial functioning among children with hearing loss, whereas vocabulary and degree of hearing loss did not. Early intervention addressing psychosocial functioning is warranted for children with all degrees of hearing loss, including mild and moderate. Gender differences should be investigated in future research. PMID:26921612

  19. Music: A Tool for Expressive and Receptive Vocabulary for Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Children with congenital hearing loss are at risk for speech, language, and academic delays. Early identification of hearing loss provides the opportunity for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) to obtain appropriate technology, such as hearing aids or cochlear implants, and to receive early intervention services to optimize development of listening and spoken language. Almost all industrialized countries have adopted policies for universal newborn hearing screening (National Cente...

  20. Systems for Personalization of Hearing Instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Brehm

    the user himself or, in case of hearing aids, by a hearing-care professional based on typically ambiguous oral feedback from the user. This often results in sub-optimal or even inappropriate settings of multi-parameter devices. This dissertation presents research on a machine-learning based...... interactive personalization system to improve the personalization of devices and, in particular, of hearing-aid devices. The proposed personalization system iteratively learns a non-parametric probabilistic model of a user’s assumed internal response function over all possible settings of a multi......-parameter device based directly on sequential perceptual feedback from the user. A sequential design based on active learning is used to obtain the maximum of the user’s unknown internal response function in as few iterations as possible. Experiments were conducted where the proposed personalization system...