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Sample records for bone-anchored hearing aid

  1. Bone Anchored Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in improving the hearing of people with conduction or mixed hearing loss. The Technology The (BAHA) is a bone conduction hearing device that includes a titanium fixture permanently implanted into the mastoid bone of the skull and an external percutaneous sound processor. The sound processor is attached to the fixture by means of a skin penetrating abutment. Because the device bypasses the middle ear and directly stimulates the cochlea, it has been recommended for individuals with conduction hearing loss or discharging middle ear infection. The titanium implant is expected to last a lifetime while the external sound processor is expected to last 5 years. The total initial device cost is approximately $5,300 and the external sound processor costs approximately $3,500. Review of BAHA by the Medical Advisory Secretariat The Medical Advisory Secretariat’s review is a descriptive synthesis of findings from 36 research articles published between January 1990 and May 2002. Summary of Findings No randomized controlled studies were found. The evidence was derived from level 4 case series with relative small sample sizes (ranging from 30-188). The majority of the studies have follow-up periods of eight years or longer. All except one study were based on monaural BAHA implant on the side with the best bone conduction threshold. Safety Level 4 evidence showed that BAHA has been be implanted safely in adults and children with success rates of 90% or higher in most studies. No mortality or life threatening morbidity has been reported. Revision rates for tissue reduction or resiting were generally under 10% for adults but have been reported to be as high as 25% in pediatric studies. Adverse skin reaction around the skin penetration site was the most common complication reported. Most of these

  2. The bone-anchored hearing aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) was introduced in 1977 by Tjellström and colleagues and has now been used clinically for over 30 years. Generally, the outcomes are good, and several studies have shown improved audiological- and quality of life outcomes. The principle of the Baha is, that sound...

  3. BAHA: Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagr, Abdulrahman

    2007-01-01

    Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) has proven performance and advantages for patients with aural atresia or chronic ear drainage who cannot wear air-conduction hearing aids. The BAHA has both cosmetic and acoustic advantages over most conventional hearing aids and hence is becoming increasingly popular. Moreover, BAHA improves the quality of life and has also significantly reduces ear discharge. This extensive review of the literature pertaining to BAHA discus the history, the indications, the advantages, the prediction of the outcome and the complications of this device as well as comparing it to the conventional hearing aids. PMID:21475438

  4. [The bone-anchored hearing aid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foghsgaard, Søren

    2014-08-11

    The bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) was introduced in 1977 by Tjellström and colleagues and has now been used clinically for over 30 years. Generally, the outcomes are good, and several studies have shown improved audiological- and quality of life outcomes. The principle of the Baha is, that sound vibrations are led directly to the inner ear via the mastoid bone, bypassing the middle ear. This is achieved via an osseointegrated implant and a skin-penetrating abutment. Studies report high success rates and a majority of complications as typically minor in nature.

  5. [Development and application of bone-anchored hearing aid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yupeng; Yang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aid is a hearing assisting technology that raise the hearing level via bone conduct and is also the only implantable hearing assisting device working by bone conduct. Because of the superior performance and simple process of implantation, it brings gospel to the patients who are not fitting the air conducting hearing devices. This article is a review of bone-anchored hearing aid from 6 aspects, including history, principle, indication, consulting, surgery and complication.

  6. Bone-anchored hearing aids in unilateral inner ear deafness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, A.J.; Hol, M.K.S.; Snik, A.F.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2003-01-01

    In nine patients with unilateral deafness and normal hearing in the contralateral ear, measurements of sound localization and speech perception were obtained before intervention, with a conventional contralateral routing of sound (CROS) hearing aid and later with a bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA)

  7. Candidacy for the bone-anchored hearing aid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snik, A.F.M.; Bosman, A.J.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2004-01-01

    The BAHA (bone-anchored hearing aid) is a bone conduction hearing aid with percutaneous transmission of sound vibrations to the skull. The device has been thoroughly evaluated by various implant groups. These studies showed that, in audiological terms, the BAHA is superior to conventional bone

  8. Complications of bone-anchored hearing aid implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, J C; Roper, A J; Andrew, R; Rothera, M P; Hill, P; Green, K M

    2010-02-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aid implantations have been performed in Manchester for over 20 years. This study examined a range of variables that can occur during the implantation process, and the effect they may have on successful outcome. Retrospective study and literature review. Tertiary referral centre in central Manchester. Details of 602 bone-anchored hearing aid implantation procedures were retrieved from the departmental database. The overall complication rate was 23.9 per cent. The rate of revision surgery was 12.1 per cent. This study involved a significantly larger number of patients than any previously reported, similar study. Possible reasons for differences in outcomes, and recommendations for best practice, are discussed.

  9. Clinical experience of bone anchored hearing aid: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Muneo; Akamatsu, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Akihisa; Tanaka, Rica

    2008-04-20

    To improve conventional bone conduction hearing aids, Tjellstrom, Branemark, developed an implant system consisting of a maxillofacial implant that derived from dental implants and a bone conduction hearing aid that was attached directly to the implant. This system has been commercially available as a bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA). More than 10,000 patients have benefited from BAHA in Scandinavia, North America, and many other regions. BAHA first became available in 1977 in Sweden but has not been used in Japan as widely as expected. This paper reports a case of a 8-year use of BAHA for hearing loss caused by microtia and external auditory canal atresia, with a review of literature. The patient has been followed up for 9 years after implant placement. Play audiometry with a loudspeaker showed a hearing loss of 25 dB. The patient says that BAHA is superior to conventional transcutaneous bone conduction hearing aids in easiness of attachment, esthetics, and speech recognition and music recognition. The skin and the bone around the implants remain in favorable condition. She has been free from the use of a headband for a conventional hearing aid.

  10. The bone-anchored hearing aid for children: recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snik, Ad; Leijendeckers, Joop; Hol, Myrthe; Mylanus, Emmanuel; Cremers, Cor

    2008-09-01

    In 1984 the Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid, or BAHA, system was introduced. Its transducer is coupled directly to the skull percutaneously to form a highly effective bone-conduction hearing device. Clinical studies on adults with conductive hearing loss have shown that the BAHA system outperforms conventional bone-conduction hearing aids. Therefore, the next step was to apply the BAHA system in children with congenital or acquired conductive hearing loss. Reviewed data showed that, on average, such children benefited significantly more from the BAHA than from reconstructive surgery. Thus, BAHA application appears to be the best option to achieve normal communication and speech and language development in children with bilateral conductive hearing loss. However, in children under the age of three to four years, a conventional solution must be applied, e.g. a bone conductor with a transcutaneous coupling, because they are too young to undergo BAHA implant surgery. In the case of unilateral congenital conductive hearing loss, there is no convincing evidence in the clinical literature for early intervention. In summary, the BAHA system can be considered a new, indispensable tool for children with bilateral conductive hearing loss.

  11. Benefit and quality of life in older bone-anchored hearing aid users.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, M.J.F. de; Shival, M.L.; Hol, M.K.S.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Benefit and quality-of-life analysis in the older adult bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) users. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective evaluation. METHODS: Four questionnaires (Glasgow Benefit Inventory, Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit [APHAB], Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire

  12. Can audiometric results predict qualitative hearing improvements in bone-anchored hearing aid recipients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, M L; Gulliver, M; Morris, D P; Makki, F M; Bance, M

    2014-01-01

    Patients receiving a bone-anchored hearing aid have well-documented improvements in their quality of life and audiometric performance. However, the relationship between audiometric measurements and subjective improvement is not well understood. Adult patients enrolled in the Nova Scotia bone-anchored hearing aid programme were identified. The pure tone average for fitting the sound-field threshold, as well as the better and worse hearing ear bone conduction and air conduction levels, were collected pre-operatively. Recipients were asked to complete the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing questionnaire; their partners were asked to complete a pre- and post-bone anchored hearing aid fitting Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults questionnaire. Forty-eight patients who completed and returned the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing questionnaire had partners who completed the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults questionnaire. The results from the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing questionnaire correlated with the sound-field hearing threshold post-bone-anchored hearing aid fitting and the pure tone average of the better hearing ear bone conduction (total Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale to the pre-operative better hearing ear air curve (r = 0.3); worse hearing ear air curve (r = 0.27); post-operative, bone-anchored hearing aid-aided sound-field thresholds (r = 0.35)). An improvement in sound-field threshold correlated only with spatial abilities. In the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults questionnaire, there was no correlation between the subjective evaluation of each patient and their partner. The subjective impressions of hearing aid recipients with regards to speech reception and the spatial qualities of hearing correlate well with pre-operative audiometric results. However, the overall magnitude of sound-field improvement predicts an improvement of spatial perception, but not other aspects of hearing, resulting in hearing aid

  13. [Clinical application of bone-anchored hearing aid implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yin; Zhang, Hua; Gong, Shu-sheng; Wang, Dan-ni; Zheng, Ya-li; Li, Yu-ling; Dong, Bo-ya; Han, De-min

    2013-08-01

    To discuss the indications, surgery methods and effects of the BAHA implantation by analyzing the patients' medical records of bone-anchored hearing aids(BAHA). Retrospective analyzed the records of 16 patients of BAHA implantation, including nine males and seven females. Their average age was 31 years old (8-53ys). Nine of them were congenital ear malformation, two were chronic suppurative otitis media, two were otosclerosis and three were unilateral severe sensorineural deafness. We evaluated their pure tone audiometry (PTA), speech audiometry and temporal CT before the surgery, and evaluated the aided PTA in soundfield and speech audiometry in sound field. These patients received BAHA implantation and installed the speech processor their months later. The average preoperative PTA measurements (PTA at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz) was (63.2 ± 19.0) dB HL and postoperative aided PTA in sound field was (35.5 ± 10.9)dB HL. The average improvement in Hearing In Noise Test (HINT) was 37.0% ± 31.7%. The average improvement in Mandarin Speech Test was 76.0% ± 19.7%. After 4-16 months' follow-up, no significant complications were recorded. BAHA is a safe and effective bone implantable hearing device.

  14. Surgery for the bone-anchored hearing aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Andreas; Caversaccio, Marco-Domenico; Mudry, Albert

    2011-01-01

    This review covers the surgery for the bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha(®)). PREOPERATIVE WORKUP: A review of the indications and preoperative diagnostics shows that best results are generally obtained in patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss rehabilitation when surgery is not applicable or has failed and in patients that suffer from single-sided deafness. An audiogram must confirm that the bone conduction hearing is within the inclusion criteria. A computed tomography scan is performed in cases of malformation to assure sufficient bone thickness at the site of screw implantation. The steps of the Baha implantation are described step by step including the setting and anesthesia, skin work with regard to different techniques, correct resection of subcutaneous tissue, preparation of the implant site, drilling and placement of the fixture and wound closure. After wound healing (6-8 weeks), the bone conduction aid is fitted on the abutment. Regular cleaning of the fixture is important to avoid irritations and infections. If performed carefully, the surgery for the Baha has a favorable outcome, regardless of the technique used. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Hearing rehabilitation in Treacher Collins Syndrome with bone anchored hearing aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando Polanski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe a case of hearing rehabilitation with bone anchored hearing aid in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome. Case description: 3 years old patient, male, with Treacher Collins syndrome and severe complications due to the syndrome, mostly related to the upper airway and hearing. He had bilateral atresia of external auditory canals, and malformation of the pinna. The initial hearing rehabilitation was with bone vibration arch, but there was poor acceptance due the discomfort caused by skull compression. It was prescribed a model of bone-anchored hearing aid, in soft band format. The results were evaluated through behavioral hearing tests and questionnaires Meaningful Use of Speech Scale (MUSS and Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS. Comments: The patient had a higher acceptance of the bone-anchored hearing aid compared to the traditional bone vibration arch. Audiological tests and the speech and auditory skills assessments also showed better communication and hearing outcomes. The bone-anchored hearing aid is a good option in hearing rehabilitation in this syndrome.

  16. Hearing rehabilitation in Treacher Collins Syndrome with bone anchored hearing aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanski, José Fernando; Plawiak, Anna Clara; Ribas, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe a case of hearing rehabilitation with bone anchored hearing aid in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome. Case description: 3 years old patient, male, with Treacher Collins syndrome and severe complications due to the syndrome, mostly related to the upper airway and hearing. He had bilateral atresia of external auditory canals, and malformation of the pinna. The initial hearing rehabilitation was with bone vibration arch, but there was poor acceptance due the discomfort caused by skull compression. It was prescribed a model of bone-anchored hearing aid, in soft band format. The results were evaluated through behavioral hearing tests and questionnaires Meaningful Use of Speech Scale (MUSS) and Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS). Comments: The patient had a higher acceptance of the bone-anchored hearing aid compared to the traditional bone vibration arch. Audiological tests and the speech and auditory skills assessments also showed better communication and hearing outcomes. The bone-anchored hearing aid is a good option in hearing rehabilitation in this syndrome. PMID:26298651

  17. [Hearing rehabilitation in Treacher Collins Syndrome with bone anchored hearing aid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanski, José Fernando; Plawiak, Anna Clara; Ribas, Angela

    2015-12-01

    To describe a case of hearing rehabilitation with bone anchored hearing aid in a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome. 3 years old patient, male, with Treacher Collins syndrome and severe complications due to the syndrome, mostly related to the upper airway and hearing. He had bilateral atresia of external auditory canals, and malformation of the pinna. The initial hearing rehabilitation was with bone vibration arch, but there was poor acceptance due the discomfort caused by skull compression. It was prescribed a model of bone-anchored hearing aid, in soft band format. The results were evaluated through behavioral hearing tests and questionnaires Meaningful Use of Speech Scale (Muss) and Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-Mais). The patient had a higher acceptance of the bone-anchored hearing aid compared to the traditional bone vibration arch. Audiological tests and the speech and auditory skills assessments also showed better communication and hearing outcomes. The bone-anchored hearing aid is a good option in hearing rehabilitation in this syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Management of repeated trauma to bone-anchored hearing aids in a paediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamil, E; Topsakal, V; Grolman, W

    2013-02-01

    To outline the management options and neurological complications associated with repeated traumatic falls that cause intrusion of bone-anchored hearing aid abutments. A three-year-old boy with coloboma, heart defects, atresia of nasal choanae, retarded growth, genital abnormalities, ear defects and deafness was fitted with a bone-anchored hearing aid for severe conductive hearing loss and congenital ear malformations. Six months later, a traumatic fall caused an intrusion injury which rendered the bone-anchored hearing aid abutment unusable. Without removing the original abutment, a second abutment was inserted on the same side to aid his hearing. Two years later, the child fell again and damaged his second bone-anchored hearing aid abutment. Having been offered a surgical option to repair the area, the parents opted to keep the abutments in situ. Direct trauma to the fixture of a bone-anchored hearing aid is a relatively common long-term complication in children which can disrupt osseointegration and disable the implant. For young children who are either prone to falling or have behavioural problems, a bone-anchored hearing aid Softband may be more appropriate to non-invasively aid hearing.

  19. Quality of life improvement for bone-anchored hearing aid users and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, M L; Gulliver, M; Morris, D P; Bance, M

    2011-06-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aid recipients experience well documented improvements in their audiometric performance and quality of life. While hearing aid recipients may understate their functional improvement, their partners may be more aware of such improvement. We sought to investigate patients' partners' perceptions of functional improvement following bone-anchored hearing aid fitting. Surveys were sent to 153 patients who had received a bone-anchored hearing aid through the Nova Scotia bone-anchored hearing aid programme. The validated survey asked patients' partners to give their subjective impression of the bone-anchored hearing aid recipient's functional status. Surveys were completed by 90 patients (58.8 per cent), of whom 72 reported having a partner. Partners reported a significant improvement in hearing (p ≤ 0.0001). Partners reported improvement in 87.0 per cent of functional scenarios, no change in 12.6 per cent, and a decline in 0.4 per cent. These findings demonstrate a significant improvement in the emotional and social effects of hearing impairment, as perceived by bone-anchored hearing aid recipients' partners.

  20. Bone-anchored hearing aids in children and young adults: the Freeman Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Y; Marley, S; Leese, D; Davison, T; Johnson, I J M

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the utilisation of bone-anchored hearing aids and Softband, as well as the effects on quality of life, amongst the paediatric and young adult population of Freeman Hospital, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK. Retrospective, anonymised, cross-sectional survey using the Glasgow Benefit Inventory and Listening Situation Questionnaire (parent version), administered at least three months following the start of bone-anchored hearing aid or Softband use. One hundred and nine patients were included, of whom syndromic children made up a significant proportion (22 of 109). Patients using bone-anchored hearing aids obtained significant educational and social benefit from their aids. The mean Listening Situation Questionnaire difficulty score was 17 (15 patients), which is below the trigger score of 22+ at which further reassessment and rehabilitation is required. 87% (of 15 patients) did not require further intervention. The overall mean GBI score for the 22 patients (syndromic and non-syndromic) was +29. The use of bone-anchored hearing aids and Softband results in significant improvements in quality of life for children and young adults with hearing impairment. There is significant under-utilisation of bone-anchored hearing aids in children with skull and congenital abnormalities, and we would advocate bone-anchored hearing aid implantation for these patients.

  1. Patient quality of life with bone-anchored hearing aid: 10-year experience in Glasgow, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, A T M; Isa, A; Cooke, L D

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to ascertain the usefulness of the bone-anchored hearing aid and its impact on the quality of life of patients fitted in Glasgow between 1996 and 2006. The Entific Medical Systems questionnaire and the Glasgow Benefit Inventory were posted to patients in order to assess their satisfaction and quality of life changes. Sixty adult patients were identified, with a questionnaire response rate of 63 per cent. Thirty-two respondents (85 per cent) reported using their bone-anchored hearing aid for more than eight hours per day. Twenty-nine respondents (75 per cent) found their bone-anchored hearing aid to be generally better than their previous, conventional aid. Twenty-seven respondents (71 per cent) reported that their bone-anchored hearing aid improved their quality of life. The median total Glasgow Benefit Inventory score was +33.3. Bone-anchored hearing aid usage rates and satisfaction levels were high amongst patients in Glasgow. Glasgow Benefit Inventory indices were comparable to published findings from other centres. Despite this, bone-anchored hearing aid funding is still not universally available within the National Health Service in Scotland.

  2. Implant survival rate in bone-anchored hearing aid users: long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallberg, E; Granström, G; Tjellström, A; Stalfors, J

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the long-term survival rate of bone-anchored hearing aid implants, and to assess the number of patients who stop using their bone-anchored hearing aid. Patients who underwent bone-anchored hearing aid surgery between September 1977 and December 1986 were identified from a prospective database. Data were collected from patient records. During the study period, 143 patients were fitted with a bone-anchored hearing aid. Records from 132 patients were found, with a mean follow up of nine years. A total of 150 implants were installed in these patients. A total of 41 implants (27 per cent) were lost during follow up: 17 lost osseointegration, 16 were removed and eight were lost due to direct trauma. At the end of follow up, 119/132 (90 per cent) patients were still using their bone-anchored hearing aid. Despite a high incidence of implant loss over time, a large number of patients still continued to use their bone-anchored hearing aid.

  3. Bone-anchored hearing aids and unilateral sensorineural hearing loss: why do patients reject them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, D; Dhillon, B; Andrews, R; Green, K M J

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to report the bone-anchored hearing aid uptake and the reasons for their rejection by unilateral sensorineural deafness patients. A retrospective review of 90 consecutive unilateral sensorineural deafness patients referred to the Greater Manchester Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Programme between September 2008 and August 2011 was performed. In all, 79 (87.8 per cent) were deemed audiologically suitable: 24 (30.3 per cent) eventually had a bone-anchored hearing aid implanted and 55 (69.6 per cent) patients declined. Of those who declined, 26 (47.3 per cent) cited perceived limited benefits, 18 (32.7 per cent) cited reservations regarding surgery, 13 (23.6 per cent) preferred a wireless contralateral routing of sound device and 12 (21.8 per cent) cited cosmetic reasons. In all, 32 (40.5 per cent) suitable patients eventually chose the wireless contralateral routing of sound device. The uptake rate was 30 per cent for audiologically suitable patients. Almost half of suitable patients did not perceive a sufficient benefit to proceed to device implantation and a significant proportion rejected it. It is therefore important that clinicians do not to rush to implant all unilateral sensorineural hearing loss patients with a bone-anchored hearing aid.

  4. Functional benefit of the bone-anchored hearing aid with different auditory profiles: objective and subjective measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wieringen, A; De Voecht, K; Bosman, A J; Wouters, J

    2011-04-01

    To examine sentence recognition and self-report outcomes in hearing-impaired persons with different auditory profiles and who were fitted unilaterally with a bone-anchored hearing aid. Prospective cohort study. Tertiary referral unit. Data were collected of six patients with single-sided deafness (SSD), seven with a mild to severe hearing loss at the bone-anchored hearing aid side and (near-)normal hearing at the other side and six with a severe bilateral hearing loss. Sound field thresholds, and sentence recognition in noise (presented from different angles) with bone-anchored hearing aid, without bone-anchored hearing aid and with bone-anchored hearing aid and other ear occluded. In addition, the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of hearing scale and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit questionnaire were administered as self-report measures. Patients with single-sided deafness listened mainly with their non-bone-anchored hearing aid ear, although the bone-anchored hearing aid lifted the head shadow effect. Patients with mild to severe hearing loss at the bone-anchored hearing aid side and (near-)normal hearing at the other side performed significantly differently in aided and unaided conditions and even regained limited binaural sensitivity with the device. The latter was also true for the patients with severe bilateral hearing loss. However, their hearing loss at the non-bone-anchored hearing aid side was too great to contribute to hearing and they listened predominantly with their bone-anchored hearing aid. Self-report outcomes provided useful information on hearing disability, although this information was not significantly differently for the 3 groups of patients. The bone-anchored hearing aid enhanced performance in different hearing configurations, albeit to different extents. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Bone-anchored hearing aids in conductive and mixed hearing losses: why do patients reject them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, Richard T K; Dhillon, Baljeet; Siau, Derrick; Green, Kevin M J

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to report the bone-anchored hearing aid uptake rate and the reasons for their rejection by patients with conductive and mixed hearing losses. A retrospective review was performed of 113 consecutive patients with unilateral or bilateral conductive or mixed hearing loss referred to the Greater Manchester bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) programme between September 2008 and August 2011. 98 (86.7 %) patients were deemed audiologically suitable for BAHA implantation. Of these, 38 (38.8 %) had BAHA implanted; 60 (61.2 %) patients declined. Of those who declined, 27 (45 %) cited anxiety over surgery, 18 (30 %) cited cosmetic reasons, 16 (26.7 %) perceived limited benefit from the device and six (10 %) preferred conventional hearing aids. Our study highlights a 38.8 % BAHA uptake rate in audiologically suitable patients. The main reasons cited for rejection of BAHA were anxiety over surgery and cosmetic concerns. It is important that clinicians address these early during consultation with prospective BAHA recipients and avoid rushing to implant these patients with a bone-anchored hearing aid.

  6. The bone-anchored hearing aid in patients with a unilateral air-bone gap.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snik, A.F.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the benefit of the application of a bone-anchored hearing aid in patients with a unilateral air-bone gap. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective evaluation in eight patients. METHODS: Binaural hearing was assessed in the sound field by comparing aided and unaided scores obtained with a sound

  7. Successful bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, M B; Marques, C; Mendes, G J; Gonçalves, C

    2015-11-01

    To report a case of successful bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in an adult patient with type III osteogenesis imperfecta, which is commonly regarded as a contraindication to this procedure. A 45-year-old man with type III osteogenesis imperfecta presented with mixed hearing loss. There was a mild sensorineural component in both ears, with an air-bone gap between 45 and 50 dB HL. He was implanted with a bone-anchored hearing aid. The audiological outcome was good, with no complications and good implant stability (as measured by resonance frequency analysis). To our knowledge, this is the first recorded case of bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

  8. Z-plasty for skin complications of bone-anchored hearing aid implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, M S; Rios, M N

    2015-06-01

    The bone-anchored hearing aid implantation technique is associated with post-operative skin reactions, which require conservative therapy and, in some cases, replacement of the abutment. Z-plasty is a technique that allows resection of the granulation tissue, thus ensuring that disease-free skin will be in contact with the abutment. Use of the Z-plasty technique for resection of the peri-abutment granulation tissue is described. In the case presented herein, the episodes of skin reaction became very frequent and the patient was unable to use his bone-anchored hearing aid for 2 to 3 days a week. We opted for surgical treatment with Z-plasty for management of the skin complications. Use of the Z-plasty technique is recommended for the management of skin reactions associated with bone-anchored hearing aid implantation.

  9. Intralesional triamcinolone acetonide injection in hypertrophic skin surrounding the percutaneous titanium implant of a bone-anchored hearing aid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijswijk, JB Van; Mylanus, E.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We present a patient with persistent hypertrophic skin surrounding the percutaneous implant of a bone-anchored hearing aid system, successfully treated with intralesional applied corticosteroids. METHOD: Case report and review of the world literature concerning bone-anchored hearing aid

  10. Unusual complication following trauma to a bone-anchored hearing aid: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, A-L; Barraclough, J; Reid, A P

    2009-03-01

    We report the second published case of a child with a serious traumatic injury involving the fixture and abutment of their bone-anchored hearing aid. Case reports and review of the world literature concerning unusual complications following trauma to bone-anchored hearing aids. A nine-year-old girl with Dubowitz syndrome sustained an intrusion injury of her bone-anchored hearing aid fixture and abutment following a fall. No other injury was sustained, and there was no neurological complication. The patient underwent immediate removal of the implant and subsequently made a full recovery. Such serious and unusual complications are fortunately very rare. On review of the literature, four cases of similar complications were identified. Only one involved a traumatic injury in a child. Provision of bone-anchored hearing aids involves many clinicians. All clinicians involved in this procedure must be aware of the need to monitor their patients carefully, and to remember that unusual and unexpected complications, although rare, do happen. The patient's need for care continues long after the surgery is complete.

  11. The bone-anchored hearing aid in the rehabilitation of single-sided deafness: experience with 58 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T P C; Lowther, R; Cooper, H; Holder, R L; Irving, R M; Reid, A P; Proops, D W

    2010-08-01

    To assess the efficacy of the bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in the rehabilitation of single-sided deafness (SSD). Retrospective case-control series review. Tertiary referral unit. Fifty-eight consecutive patients that had a bone-anchored hearing aid for single-sided deafness completed outcome questionnaires, building upon earlier audiological assessment of 19 patients. Single-sided deafness controls (n = 49) were mainly acoustic neuroma patients. speech discrimination testing in directional noise, speech and spatial qualities of hearing questionnaire and the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI). The mean follow-up time was 28.4 months. Five (13%) of the bone-anchored hearing aid patients were non-users because of lack of benefit. The audiometric testing confirmed that when noise was on the bone-anchored hearing aid side speech perception was reduced but benefited when noise was on the side of the hearing ear. There was no difference between the Speech and Spatial Qualities of Hearing Scores in bone-anchored hearing aid users and controls. In particular there was no difference in the spatial subscores. In the bone-anchored hearing aid users the median Glasgow Benefit Inventory score was 11. If the non-users are included then 13 (22%) patients had no or detrimental (negative) Benefit scores. No or negative benefit scores were more frequent in those deaf for bone-anchored hearing aid was most useful in small groups or in 'one-to-one' conversation. Bone-anchored hearing aid rehabilitation for single-sided deafness is less successful than for other indications, reflected here by relatively low median Glasgow Benefit Inventory scores. There was also no significant difference between controls and bone-anchored hearing aid users in the Speech and Spatial Qualities of Hearing Questionnaire. Patients with a longer duration of deafness report greater subjective benefit than those more recently deafened, perhaps due to differing expectations.

  12. The Birmingham bone anchored hearing aid programme: paediatric experience and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, R H; Burrell, S P; Cooper, H R; Proops, D W

    1996-01-01

    Over a five-year period, 34 patients have been referred to the Birmingham bone anchored hearing aid programme, paediatric section, of who 21 are now wearing the bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA) and four are awaiting surgery for fitting of the BAHA. Of the patients assessed, found to be suitable and who proceeded to surgery for the BAHA, 44 per cent had Treacher Collins syndrome, 28 per cent had bilateral atresia or microtia, 16 per cent had Goldenhaar's syndrome, four per cent (one patient) had branchio-otorenal syndrome and eight per cent had chronic suppurative otitis media. This paper presents objective and subjective data collected from these patients. It is shown that the BAHA is a very effective hearing aid for children with congenital hearing loss.

  13. Is there loss of vibration amplitude across the snap coupling of the bone-anchored hearing aid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdalawieh, Osama; Van Wijhe, Rene G; Bance, Manohar

    2006-04-01

    There is loss of vibration transmission across the snap coupling connecting the Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid transducer to the implanted abutment on the head. The only nonrigid part of the Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid system is the connection between the output of the transducer and the abutment. Vibration losses across the coupling have not been previously measured. If a loss is found, a change in design could improve the efficiency of the Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid. This would be very helpful in borderline cases in which the Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid does not have enough power to achieve adequate hearing threshold levels. A laser Doppler vibrometer was used to measure vibrations on the output stem and four points on the abutment of the Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid. The Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid was coupled to a dry skull through a plexiglas bite bar screwed to the skull. The impedance load was varied by fixing the skull. A control loose coupling was measured. Five Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Compacts were measured. There was little loss across the Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid snap coupling. At frequencies above 500 Hz, there was no more than 5-dB loss at any frequency. Changing the impedance load by fixing the skull did not change the loss across the coupling. The snap coupling is an efficient means of transmitting vibrations to the skull. There is little loss of vibration attenuation across it. Increases in functional Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid amplification gain cannot be achieved by further optimizing this interface.

  14. Outcome of the bone-anchored hearing aid procedure without skin thinning: a prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultcrantz, Malou

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the outcome of Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid surgery without skin thinning, a test group with direct implantation without such thinning was compared with a control group that underwent the traditional procedure. This was a single-center, prospective clinical trial designed to evaluate a novel approach to Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid implantation. Eligible patients were enrolled consecutively in the test group or selected to be age-matched controls. University Hospital. Eighteen adult patients, suffering from hearing loss, suitable for implantable hearing aid. Single-step surgery was performed on 18 patients under local anesthesia. In 9 of these, a linear incision was made, a hole was punched through the skin above the bone-anchored implant, and a longer abutment (8.5-12 mm) was introduced, whereas the other 9 were subjected to the standard protocol, using a dermatome and skin thinning. All of the patients were followed for 12 months. The test group exhibited good preservation of the tissue, no increasing skin reactions and no adverse events. The time required for this surgery was reduced, as was their healing time. These patients also experienced less numbness and pain in the surrounding area and had an improved cosmetic outcome. MAIN OUTCOME AND CONCLUSION: This clinical trial indicates that introduction of the abutment to the osseointegrated screw directly through the skin, without skin thinning, could be beneficial. This approach had fewer negative effects than the conventional procedure during the 12- month follow-up period.

  15. Peri-operative cerebrospinal fluid leak during single-stage bone-anchored hearing aid implantation: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimbleby, G; Mitchell-Innes, A; Murphy, J

    2014-12-01

    A bone-anchored hearing aid uses the principle of bone conduction and osseointegration to transfer sound vibrations to a functioning inner ear. It consists of a permanent titanium implant, and removable abutment and sound processor. Informed consent requires discussion of the procedural benefits, alternatives and complications. The risks of bone-anchored hearing aid surgery include infection, soft tissue hypertrophy, skin graft or flap failure, osseointegration failure, and the need for further surgery. A case of cerebrospinal fluid leak in a patient undergoing bone-anchored hearing aid surgery is reported and discussed. Bone-anchored hearing aid surgery poses a risk of breaching the inner table of the temporal bone and dura, resulting in a cerebrospinal fluid leak; the risk of meningitis is rare but serious. The surgeon should discuss the possibility of cerebrospinal fluid leak when consenting patients. Pre-operative computerised tomography scanning should be considered in certain individuals to aid implant placement.

  16. Bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in a patient with Goldenhar syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarelli, Griffin; Redfern, Roberta E; Benson, Aaron G

    2015-12-01

    Patients with Goldenhar syndrome exhibit a number of characteristic symptoms, including middle and internal ear malformations that may cause profound hearing loss. Bone-anchored hearing aids have been used to treat these patients in the past, although complications may arise due to the nature of the disease. Herein we present the case of a pediatric patient with Goldenhar syndrome whose hearing aid abutment extruded spontaneously because of poor bone quality, despite adequate thickness. We provide a brief review of the literature and suggest a flexible surgical plan for any syndromic pediatric patient.

  17. Simplified bone-anchored hearing aid insertion using a linear incision without soft tissue reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husseman, J; Szudek, J; Monksfield, P; Power, D; O'Leary, S; Briggs, R

    2013-07-01

    Numerous techniques have been described to manage the skin and other soft tissues during bone-anchored hearing aid insertion. Previously, generally accepted techniques have sometimes led to distressing alopecia and soft tissue defects. Now, some surgeons are rejecting the originally described split skin flap in favour of a less invasive approach. To investigate bone-anchored hearing aid placement utilising a single, linear incision with either no or minimal underlying soft tissue reduction. Thirty-four adults were prospectively enrolled to undergo single-stage bone-anchored hearing aid placement with this modified technique. A small, linear incision was used at the standard position and carried down through the periosteum. Standard technique was then followed with placement of an extended length abutment. Patients were reviewed regularly to assess wound healing, including evaluation with Holgers' scale. Only 14.7 per cent of patients had a reaction score of 2 or higher. Most complications were limited to minor skin reactions that settled with silver nitrate cautery and/or antibiotics. None required revision surgery for tissue overgrowth, and there were no implant failures. Our results suggest this to be a simple and effective insertion technique with favourable cosmesis and patient satisfaction.

  18. Ethnic disparity in skin complications following bone-anchored hearing aid implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, Daniel M; Herman, Bjorn S; Snapp, Hillary A; Telischi, Fred F; Angeli, Simon I

    2012-08-01

    Sound processor loading after implantation of a bone-anchored hearing aid is often delayed by skin-site complications. This study examined the frequency of skin-site complications in various ethnic groups and determined factors that may lead to higher rates of skin-site complications resulting in delayed processor loading. Adult, English-speaking patients who underwent implantation of a bone-anchored hearing aid between 2007 and 2010 were reviewed. Demographic data including ethnicity, tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression, and long-term steroid use were determined. Major and minor skin-site complications and the time to processor loading were recorded. The mean time to processor loading was 9.5 weeks, and the mean follow-up time was 23 months. There were no cases of osseointegration failure. African American patients had a significantly higher rate of major skin-site complications (p bone-anchored hearing aid. There is a higher rate of major skin-site complications in African American patients, and these often delay processor loading. The risk of skin-site complications is not correlated with smoking, diabetes mellitus, or immunosuppression. An increased risk of skin-site complications is an important consideration for preoperative counseling.

  19. Benefit and quality of life after bone-anchored hearing aid fitting in children with unilateral or bilateral hearing impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, M.J. de; Hol, M.K.S.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Snik, A.F.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the benefits of a bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in the daily lives of hearing-impaired children. DESIGN: Retrospective questionnaire study. SETTING: Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. PATIENTS: Thirty-eight BAHA users with a minimum age of 4 years at BAHA

  20. Rehabilitation of patients with conductive hearing loss and moderate mental retardation by means of a bone-anchored hearing aid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, S.J.W.; Hol, M.K.S.; Snik, A.F.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) can be applied successfully to patients with conductive hearing loss and moderate mental retardation. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective clinical evaluation. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Twenty-two patients with congenital

  1. Digital processing technology for bone-anchored hearing aids: randomised comparison of two devices in hearing aid users with mixed or conductive hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Feltham, P; Roberts, S A; Gladdis, R

    2014-02-01

    This study compared the performance of two new bone-anchored hearing aids with older bone-anchored hearing aids that were not fully digital. Fourteen experienced bone-anchored hearing aid users participated in this cross-over study. Performance of their existing bone-anchored hearing aid was assessed using speech-in-noise testing and questionnaires. Participants were then fitted with either a Ponto Pro or a BP100 device. After four weeks of use with each new device, the same assessments were repeated. Speech-in-noise testing for the 50 per cent signal-to-noise ratio (the ratio at which 50 per cent of responses were correct) showed no significant differences between the Ponto Pro and the BP100 devices (p = 0.1) However, both devices showed significant improvement compared with the participants' previous bone-anchored hearing aid devices (p bone-anchored hearing aids demonstrated superior speech processing compared with the previous generation of devices. There were no substantial differences between the two digital devices in either objective or subjective tests.

  2. Soft tissue overgrowth in bone-anchored hearing aid patients: use of 8.5 mm abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, S; Chandrasekhar, S S

    2011-06-01

    To review outcomes following implantation of an 8.5 mm bone-anchored hearing aid abutment, as regards post-operative management of scalp soft tissue overgrowth. Retrospective chart review of paediatric and adult patients implanted with bone-anchored hearing aids between 2003 and 2008 who subsequently underwent revision surgery for excessive soft tissue growth. A tertiary referral centre and a private otology and neurotology clinic. A total of 80 patients underwent bone-anchored hearing aid placement between 2003 and 2008. Of these patients, 14 had significant scalp soft tissue overgrowth unresponsive to first-line, nonsurgical local wound care. Fourteen patients underwent an average of 2.1 surgical procedures each for soft tissue overgrowth around their bone-anchored hearing aid abutment. The mean time between initial implantation and revision surgery was 13.6 months. Of these 14 patients, 11 were eventually fitted with an 8.5 mm abutment. Following placement of the longer abutment, only one patient required additional surgical reduction of soft tissue overgrowth (mean follow-up time 11.8 months). All patients were able to use their bone-anchored hearing aid. The 8.5 mm bone-anchored hearing aid abutment is successful in preventing the need for additional surgical intervention in the small but significant number of patients with post-implantation soft tissue overgrowth. Early consideration should be given to this option when first-line soft tissue care is inadequate.

  3. The role of bone anchored hearing aids in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Ann-Louise; Williams, Jo; Kuo, Michael J; Reid, Andrew P; Proops, David W

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate complication rates and outcomes of children with Down syndrome fitted with a Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (Baha). To evaluate whether the Bone Anchored Hearing Aid is a successful form of aural rehabilitation in children with Down syndrome from a patients' perspective. Retrospective case analysis and postal questionnaire study. The Birmingham Children's Hospital, UK. A total of 15 children were fitted with a Baha between February 1992 and February 2007. The age range was 2-15 years. A postal questionnaire was sent to each family. The Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory (GCBI) was used in this study. Implantation results, skin reactions and other complications were recorded. Quality of life after receiving a Baha was assessed with the GCBI. All 15 patients are using their Baha 7 days a week for more than 8h a day after a follow-up of 14 months with continuing audiological benefit. No fixtures were lost, and skin problems were encountered in 3 (20%). Regarding quality of life, all 15 patients had improved social and physical functioning as a result of better hearing. Baha has an important role in the overall management of individuals with Down syndrome after conventional hearing aids and/or ventilation tubes have been considered or already failed. This study has shown a 20% rate of soft tissue reaction and there were no fixture losses in this group. No significant increase in complication rates was identified in children with Down syndrome. Finally, there was a significantly improved quality of life in children with Down syndrome after receiving their Baha. There was a high patient/carer satisfaction with Baha. Two of our series had bilateral two stage fixture procedures without any complications. More consideration should be given to bilateral bone anchored hearing aids in this group.

  4. An approach to bilateral bone-anchored hearing aid surgery in children: contralateral placement of sleeper fixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, J M; Sheehan, P Z

    2009-05-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aid surgery in younger children is a two-stage procedure, with a titanium fixture being allowed to osseointegrate for several months before an abutment is fitted through a skin graft. In the first procedure, it has been usual to place a reserve or sleeper fixture approximately 5 mm from the primary fixture as a backup in case the primary fixture fails to osseointegrate. This ipsilateral sleeper fixture is expensive, is often not used, and is placed in thinner calvarial bone where it is less likely to osseointegrate successfully. The authors have implanted the sleeper fixture on the contralateral side, with the additional objective of reducing the number of procedures for bilateral bone-anchored hearing aid implantation, providing a cost-effective use for the sleeper. The authors implanted the bone-anchored hearing aid sleeper fixture in the contralateral temporal bone instead of on the ipsilateral side in seven successive paediatric cases with bilateral conductive hearing loss requiring two-stage bone-anchored hearing aids, treated at the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, UK. The seven patients ranged in age from five to 15 years, with a mean age of 10 years; in addition, a 20-year-old with learning disability was also treated. In each case, the contralateral sleeper fixture was not needed as a backup fixture, but was used in four patients (57 per cent) as the basis for a second-side bone-anchored hearing aid. In children with bilateral conductive hearing loss, in whom a bilateral bone-anchored hearing aid is being considered and the second side is to be operated upon at a later date, we recommend placing the sleeper fixture on the contralateral side at the time of primary first-side surgery. Our technique provides a sleeper fixture located in an optimal position, where it also offers the option of use for a second-side bone-anchored hearing aid and reduces the number of procedures needed.

  5. Better performance with bone-anchored hearing aid than acoustic devices in patients with severe air-bone gap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, M.J. de; Hendrix, S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: A study performed in the 1990s with analogue linear hearing aids showed that in patients with mixed hearing loss and an air-bone gap that exceeded 25 to 30 dB, speech perception was better with a bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) than with a conventional behind-the-ear (BTE)

  6. Bone-anchored hearing aids are effective and associated with a high degree of satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardell, Ida Sofie Kristina; Andresen, Kathrine; Faber, Christian Emil

    2015-01-01

    -2013-period. The questionnaire was a combination of Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life questions from the Hearing Aid Research Lab at the University of Memphis and questions used in a previous Danish study. We also used data from each patient's medical records. All information was collected......INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to evaluate patients' satisfaction with bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHA). METHODS: This study was retrospective and based on a postal questionnaire. The study sample consisted of patients undergoing surgery at Odense University Hospital in the 1992...... in one-on-one conversations. CONCLUSION: BAHA is helpful in one-on-one conversations in quiet surroundings. Sound quality in group situations seems to be the main problem associated with BAHA. However, this study showed that BAHA is an effective hearing aid that is associated with a high degree...

  7. Subdural Hematoma: A Rare Adverse Complication From Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nikul; Aymat-Torrente, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHA) are bone conduction hearing aids commonly implantated by Ear, Nose, and Throat surgeons. We present the first documented case of a subdural hematoma secondary to primary fixation of a BAHA. We present a 65-year-old male patient undergoing a left sided BAHA for bilateral chronic ear infections and difficulty wearing conventional hearing aids. The procedure was uneventful, however, the patient developed a postoperative large acute left temporoparietal intracerebral hematoma associated with an ipsilateral acute subdural hematoma. This required emergency transfer to the local tertiary neurosurgical center for a left decompressive craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. The patient required a prolonged stay on an intensive care unit and was eventually discharged to the community for on-going neurological rehabilitation. This is a rare and devastating complication BAHA surgery. Otologist, general ENT surgeons, and neurosurgeons should be aware of this life-threatening complication of BAHA surgery.

  8. [Self-rated efficacy in bilateral aural atresia patients using bone-anchored hearing aid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Fan; Yibei, Wang; Zhen, Wang; Pu, Wang; Xiaowei, Chen

    2015-03-01

    Using questionnaires to evaluate the audiological benefit and satisfaction of bilateral aural atresia patients with bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha). Implanted Baha user questionnaire was applied to 19 patients suffering bilateral aural atresia, and 15 of the patients were evaluated with abbreviated profile of hearing aid benefit (APHAB). Glasgow children's benefit inventory (GCBI) was used to measure subjective benefit of patients under the age of 18. The Baha user questionnaire demonstrated great satisfaction. The mean Baha scores for the subdomains of ease of communication (EC), backgroud noise (BN) and revereration (RV) were decreased by 54.6 ± 10.2 (t = 20.6, P hearing ability and quality of life of patients with bilateral aural atresia.

  9. Outcomes of Bone Anchored Hearing Aids (BAHA) for Single Sided Deafness in Nontraditional Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Seth R; Kobylk, Deborah

    2016-12-01

    To assess both quality of life (QOL) and hearing outcomes in bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA) users for single sided deafness with 1) less than total hearing loss in the deaf ear, or 2) some degree of hearing loss in the better ear and compare them to traditional candidates. Prospective comparative cohort study. Tertiary referral center. Patients with a BAHA for single sided deafness were assigned into groups based on hearing thresholds in the deaf ear (> or or hearing including Quick SIN and HINT in quiet and noise, and a localization task. Differences in QOL, hearing performance in noise, and localization ability. Nineteen patients were tested. Patients with residual hearing in the BAHA ear showed nonsignificant trends toward improved performance in noise localization compared with those without residual hearing. There were no statistically significant differences in QOL between groups. Patients with hearing loss in the control ear had equivalent QOL scores to those with normal hearing in the control ear despite performing worse on speech in noise tasks. BAHA patients with hearing loss in the better ear seem to perform worse in noise relative to those without but have equivalent perceived benefit. Residual hearing in the implanted ear may improve performance. A larger sample size is needed to confirm these trends.

  10. Auditory brainstem and cortical potentials following bone-anchored hearing aid stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahne, Torsten; Ehelebe, Thomas; Rasinski, Christine; Götze, Gerrit

    2010-11-30

    Patients suffering from conductive or mixed hearing loss and Single-Sided Deafness may benefit from implantable hearing devices relying on bone conducted auditory stimulation. However, with only passively cooperative patients, objective methods are needed to estimate the aided and unaided pure-tone audiogram. This study focuses on the feasibility aspect of an electrophysiological determination of the hearing thresholds with bone-anchored hearing aid stimulation. Therefore, 10 normal-hearing subjects were provided with a Baha Intenso (Cochlear Ltd.) which was temporarily connected to the Baha Softband (Cochlear Ltd.). Auditory evoked potentials were measured by auditory stimulation paradigm used in clinical routine. The amplitudes, latencies, and thresholds of the resulting auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and the cortically evoked responses (CAEP) were correlated with the respective responses without the use of the Baha Intenso. The recording of ABR and CAEP by delivering the stimuli to the Baha results in response waveforms which are comparable to those evoked by earphone stimulation and appears appropriate to be measured using the Baha Intenso as stimulator. At the ABR recordings a stimulus artifact at higher stimulation levels and a constant latency shift caused by the Baha Intenso has to be considered. The CAEP recording appeared promising as a frequency specific objective method to approve the fitting of bone-anchored hearing aids. At all measurements, the ABR and CAEP thresholds seem to be consistent with the normal hearing of the investigated participants. Thus, a recording of auditory evoked potentials using a Baha is in general possible if specific limitations are considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Benefit and quality of life in older bone-anchored hearing aid users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolf, Maarten J F; Shival, My-Linh C; Hol, Myrthe K S; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Cremers, Cor W R J; Snik, Ad F M

    2010-07-01

    Benefit and quality-of-life analysis in the older adult bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) users. Retrospective evaluation. Four questionnaires (Glasgow Benefit Inventory, Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit [APHAB], Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire [NCIQ], and the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly screening version [HHIE-S]) were used. The response rate was 80%, mean age was 75 years (range, 62-93 yr), and mean pure-tone average at frequencies of 500, 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 Hz for bone conduction was 42 +/- 13 dBHL. More than 80% of the patients were using their BAHA for more than 8 hours a day. To obtain a "snapshot" of current BAHA use, the NCIQ, HHIE-S, and the APHAB were used. The NCIQ showed good disability and handicap results (score range, 49-64). The HHIE-S showed that 60% of the patients had a mild to moderate handicap. The APHAB aided scores ranged from 39 to 58%. Mean benefit scores of the Glasgow Benefit Inventory were positive in 112 of the 134 patients (84%). The APHAB showed clinically significantly more benefit with the BAHA than with the previous aided or unaided situation. A trend could be seen-the higher the pure-tone average at frequencies of 500, 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 Hz for bone conduction, the smaller the mean benefit scores on the questionnaires. Bone-anchored hearing aid users aged 60 years or older were able to place and handle the device very adequately and clean the skin around the implant. Most patients reported comparable or increased general benefit and good quality of life with the BAHA.

  12. Bone-anchored hearing aid implant location in relation to skin reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Hubert T; de Wolf, Maarten J F; de Rooy, Jacky W J; Hol, Myrthe K S; Cremers, Cor W R J; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of implant location and skin thickness on the frequency and degree of adverse skin reactions around the abutment. Retrospective multivariate analysis of implant position related to skin thickness and clinical variables. Tertiary referral center. Random sample of 248 patients with bone-anchored hearing aids. Bone-anchored hearing aid implant placement by means of the linear incision technique. Type and number of skin reactions and implant loss. The mean (SD) distance from the external auditory ear canal to implant was 48.8 (8.0) mm (range, 29-84 mm). The mean skin thickness was 5.5 (1.9) mm. Severe skin reactions (Holgers classification, 2-4) were seen in 46 of the 248 patients (18.5%). Implant loss occurred in 4 patients (1.6%). Three implants were lost owing to failed osseointegration (1.3%), and another implant was removed because of deterioration of cochlear function (0.9%). No implant was lost as a result of infection. Implant location and skin thickness were not correlated with implant loss or the frequency or degree of adverse skin reactions around the abutment.

  13. Efficacy of Bone-Anchored Hearing Aids in Single-Sided Deafness: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gaeun; Ju, Hyun Mi; Lee, Sun Hee; Kim, Hee-Soon; Kwon, Jeong A; Seo, Young Joon

    2017-04-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs) have been known to partially restore some of the functions lost in subjects with single-sided deafness (SSD). Our aims in this systemic review were to analyze the present capabilities of BAHAs in the context of SSD, and to evaluate the efficacy of BAHAs in improving speech recognition in noisy conditions, sound localization, and subjective outcomes. A systematic search was undertaken until August 2015 by two independent reviewers, with disagreements resolved by consensus. Among 286 references, we analyzed 14 studies that used both subjective and objective indicators to assess the capabilities of a total of 296 patients in the unaided and aided situations. Although there was "no benefit" of BAHA implantation for sound localization, BAHAs certainly improved subjects' speech discrimination in noisy circumstances. In the six studies that dealt with sound localization, no significant difference was found after the implantation. Twelve studies showed the benefits of BAHAs for speech discrimination in noise. Regarding subjective outcomes of using the prosthesis in patients with SSD (abbreviated profile of hearing aid benefit [APHAB] and the Glasgow hearing aid benefit profile [GHABP], etc.), we noticed an improvement in the quality of life. This systematic review has indicated that BAHAs may successfully rehabilitate patients with SSD by alleviating the hearing handicap to a certain degree, which could improve patients' quality of life. This report has presented additional evidence of effective auditory rehabilitation for SSD and will be helpful to clinicians counseling patients regarding treatment options for SSD.

  14. A Retrospective Review of Temporal Bone Imaging With Respect to Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Aaron R; Fanelli, David G; Kanekar, Sangam; Isildak, Huseyin

    2017-01-01

    Current bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) guidelines recommend placement of the titanium implant 5 to 7 cm posterior to the ear canal. Previous studies show that bone conducted hearing is maximized the closer the transducer is to the cochlea. We aim to investigate the position of the sigmoid sinus with respect to BAHA implants to determine whether they may be safely placed closer to the ear canal in patients with chronic ear disease, enhancing the amplification available to the patient. We performed a retrospective review of high-resolution temporal bone computed tomographies (CTs), comparing multiple measurements between ears with chronic ear disease and normal controls. Images were obtained at a single academic medical center. Eighty patients (160 ears) with temporal bone CTs performed between 2006 and 2009 were measured. Patients with chronic ear disease were identified by international statistical classification of diseases and related health problems, revision 9 code and confirmation by review of the imaging. Measurements were made on axial CT slices from a point 1 cm posterior to the sigmoid sinus to the posterior margin of the external canal. The squamous temporal bone thickness was also measured at this point. Forty-seven patients (55 ears) had chronic ear disease. Distance from the posterior canal was significantly different between normal and diseased ears (36.3 mm versus 33.5 mm, p bone thickness varied widely, and was similar between groups (6.9 mm versus 6.8 mm, p = 0.76). According to our data, titanium implants for bone-anchored hearing aids may be safely placed closer to the external canal than the current recommendations. This could allow for better transduction as well as sound localization in BAHA patients.

  15. Transcutaneous Bone-anchored Hearing Aids Versus Percutaneous Ones: Multicenter Comparative Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseri, Mete; Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Tuncer, Ulku; Kara, Ahmet; Durgut, Merve; Guldiken, Yahya; Surmelioglu, Ozgur

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the clinical audiological outcomes as well as patient satisfaction of bone-anchored, hearing aid surgery between the percutaneous Dermalock and the transcutaneous Attract systems. This is a multicenter, retrospective clinical study. The patients who underwent Baha Dermalock and Baha Attract surgery were analyzed for hearing results, surgical complications, and postoperative follow-up specifications for both systems. Speech reception thresholds and bone conduction thresholds with and without aided conditions were evaluated. Patient satisfactions were also determined for both groups by Glasgow Benefit Inventory questionnaire. Both of the groups had some minor complications such as skin irritations around the abutment and skin erythema over the magnet. Both of the groups benefit from the devices audiologically; however, when the groups were compared, better results were observed in the percutaneous, bone-conduction group. We can confirm that both transcutaneous and percutaneous techniques are effective in the rehabilitation of conductive hearing loss when conventional hearing aids cannot be used. However, both of the systems have some advantages and limitations in terms of audiological and surgical perspectives.

  16. Bone-anchored hearing aid and skin graft removal with subsequent cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Christopher J; Coughlin, Adam R; Gubbels, Samuel P

    2016-11-01

    We describe a novel technique of scalp flap rearrangement for cochlear implant (CI) candidates who have previously undergone ipsilateral bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) placement. One patient with single-sided deafness (SSD) underwent removal of a BAHA with subsequent scalp rearrangement for coverage of the implant site. After adequate healing of the scalp rotational flap, he underwent uncomplicated cochlear implantation without soft tissue complications. With increasing utilization of CIs in SSD, there will be more patients undergoing cochlear implantation who have previously had a BAHA. We present a novel method for accomplishing this goal while minimizing the risk of soft tissue complications. Laryngoscope, 126:2601-2604, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. An overview of different systems: the bone-anchored hearing aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dun, Catharina A J; Faber, Hubert T; de Wolf, Maarten J F; Cremers, Cor W R J; Hol, Myrthe K S

    2011-01-01

    In the past 30 years, a large amount of clinical and audiological research on bone conduction hearing devices has been performed. In this review, we give a brief history of the developments in indications, surgical techniques and sound processors with respect to implantable bone conduction devices like the bone-anchored hearing aid or Baha. Starting with the use of Baha in patients with bilateral conductive or mixed hearing loss (HL), the indications for such devices have been extended to patients with unilateral HL, children and moderate mentally retarded patients. Bilateral fitting has been shown to be beneficial in restoring binaural hearing in patients with bilateral acquired or congenital conductive HL. In addition, the surgical techniques used to implant the titanium fixture for Baha application have been modified and further developed to reach two main goals: (a) optimal osseointegration, and (b) preparation of the implant site to minimize the occurrence of soft tissue reactions. Currently, the most used techniques are the pedicled skin flap, dermatome and linear incision techniques. Several generations of the Baha(®) sound processor have been developed by Cochlear(TM) to provide sufficient amplification in different hearing situations. Improvements in sound quality, aesthetics and handling have been major points of interest. The Baha sound processors most often used today are the Baha(®) Divino, the Baha(®) Intenso and the Baha(®) Cordelle. Recently, the more flexible Baha(®) BP100 sound processor was launched. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Bone-anchored hearing aids are effective and associated with a high degree of satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardell, Ida Sofie Kristina; Andresen, Kathrine; Faber, Christian Emil; Wanscher, Jens Højberg

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate patients' satisfaction with bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHA). This study was retrospective and based on a postal questionnaire. The study sample consisted of patients undergoing surgery at Odense University Hospital in the 1992-2013-period. The questionnaire was a combination of Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life questions from the Hearing Aid Research Lab at the University of Memphis and questions used in a previous Danish study. We also used data from each patient's medical records. All information was collected in a database. The response rate was 80% and the user percentage 88. The majority of the patients used their BAHA seven days a week and most of the day. 88% reported that it was in their best interest that they had received a BAHA. 80% of the respondents were able to communicate better using their BAHA in one-on-one conversations. BAHA is helpful in one-on-one conversations in quiet surroundings. Sound quality in group situations seems to be the main problem associated with BAHA. However, this study showed that BAHA is an effective hearing aid that is associated with a high degree of satisfaction. not relevant. not relevant.

  19. Results of the implantation of bone-anchored hearing aids in patients with treacher-collins syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Alexandra Kolontai de Sousa; Ferro,Lília Pereira Abreu; Silva,Jaiede Nicacio da; Okada,Daniel Mochida

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction:?Treacher-Collins syndrome is characterized by craniofacial malformations, narrowing of the external auditory canal (EAC), and, in 30% of cases, agenesis of the canal and ossicular chain defects. The use of hearing aids (HA) is not possible in cases in which agenesis or stenosis of the EAC accompanies conductive deafness. In contrast, bone conduction implants such as the Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA?) allow direct stimulation of the cochlea and are thus superior to con...

  20. UK and Ireland experience of bone anchored hearing aids (BAHA) in individuals with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Patrick Z; Hans, Paul S

    2006-06-01

    To evaluate the indications, surgical techniques and post-operative problems seen in children with Down syndrome fitted with bone anchored hearing aids (BAHA). A postal survey of all registered United Kingdom and Ireland BAHA centres. There was a 98% response rate to the survey. Eighty-one centres in the United Kingdom and Ireland undertake BAHA surgery. Eighteen centres were identified to have undertaken BAHA surgery on individuals with Down syndrome. A total of 43 individuals were implanted. Twenty-four cases were under the age of 16. Soft tissue complications were encountered in 21 patients (49%). Osseointegration failures were encountered in four cases (9%). There was a high level of satisfaction with the BAHA system amongst patients, parents and carers. BAHA is a valuable method of hearing amplification in children with Down syndrome. It should be considered not as a primary method of amplification, but in the overall management of individuals with Down syndrome after conventional hearing aids and/or ventilation tubes have been considered or already failed. The survey shows a high patient and carer satisfaction with the system, despite short term early soft tissue complications.

  1. The bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in children with auricular malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granström, G; Tjellström, A

    1997-04-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the outcome of the use of the bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in children. All patients included in the study had bilateral auricular malformations. Previous alternatives had been conventional hearing aids or surgical middle ear reconstruction. Thirty-seven patients under 16 years of age were studied. The most common syndrome in the group was Treacher Collins. Sixteen of the patients had earlier middle ear reconstruction, the results of which did not produce social hearing. Of 40 inserted fixtures to anchor the BAHA, three were lost during the follow-up period because of failed osseointegration. Skin reactions were graded according to a clinical scoring system and were determined to be comparable in number and severity to those of an adult population. All patients in the study considered the BAHA to be superior to earlier bone-conduction devices. It is concluded that the BAHA is an excellent alternative to bone-conduction devices in children with auricular malformations. Middle ear surgery can be postponed until adulthood or abandoned, especially in syndromic patients in whom it is known to be difficult and unpredictable.

  2. Bone-anchored hearing aid: why do some patients refuse it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, Faisal; Kabbach, Ghassan; Lallemand, Marie; Daniel, Sam J

    2014-02-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA™) is a proven tool to improve hearing. Nevertheless, there are patients who are candidates for BAHA™ implants that end up refusing the surgery. The objective of this study is to review our BAHA™ experience with particular emphasis on reasons behind the refusal of some candidates. A prospective cohort of 100 consecutive new candidates referred to The BAHA™ program in a tertiary health care center. Candidates' demographics, hearing status, Co-morbidities and audiometeric tests were all recorded. Patients' acceptance or refusal was noted alongside the reasons to refuse BAHA™. 100 new candidates were seen for BAHA™ assessment, 10 patients were excluded due to incomplete data. There were 68 children and 22 adults. Unilateral Conductive Hearing Loss was the most common reason for consultation (40%), followed by unilateral SNHL (23.3%). Aural Atresia was the commonest clinical finding (36.6%). The commonest reason for refusal was social acceptance by the parents due to concern with cosmesis. The main reason of BAHA™ surgery refusal, in otherwise eligible candidates, is related to cosmesis. Patients with congenital anomalies were the most likely candidates to accept BAHA™ implants. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Comparison of the bone anchored hearing aid implantable hearing device with contralateral routing of offside signal amplification in the rehabilitation of unilateral deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niparko, John K; Cox, Kenneth M; Lustig, Lawrence R

    2003-01-01

    Monaural hearing imposes constraints under many listening conditions. The authors compared the effects of a semi-implantable bone conductor, the Entific bone anchored hearing aid, with conventional contralateral routing of offside signal amplification to assess rehabilitative benefit in adults with unilateral deafness. Prospective trials of subjects with unilateral deafness using benefit surveys, source identification testing, and hearing in noise testing. Tertiary referral center, outpatient surgical and audiologic services. Adults with unilateral deafness (pure tone average >90 dB, SD hearing loss (n = 1), and sudden sensorineural hearing loss with chronic suppurative otitis media (n = 1). Entry criteria included normal hearing in the contralateral ear (pure tone average 80%). Subjects were fitted with contralateral routing of offside signal amplification devices for 1 month and tested with contralateral routing of offside signal before mastoid implantation of the deaf ear, fitting, and testing for bone anchored hearing aid. Subjects' assessment of experience with their devices and patterns of use, 2) source azimuth identification in noise test, and 3) speech discrimination in quiet and in noise under conditions of noise-front, noise-to-normal-ear, and noise-to-deaf-ear. There was consistent satisfaction with bone anchored hearing aid implantation and amplification, and poor acceptance of contralateral routing of offside signal amplification. Sound localization was poor at baseline and with both bone anchored hearing aid and contralateral routing of offside signal. Relative to baseline, contralateral routing of offside signal and bone anchored hearing aid produced significantly better speech recognition in noise under most conditions. The bone anchored hearing aid enabled significantly better speech recognition than contralateral routing of offside signal in quiet and in a composite of noise conditions. The advantages may relate to averting the interference of

  4. Patient satisfaction and functional results with the bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroul, N; Gilain, L; Montalban, A; Giraudet, F; Avan, P; Mom, T

    2011-06-01

    To assess patient satisfaction with bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHA) and the role of preoperative audiometric testing. A telephone satisfaction survey was conducted on all patients implanted between June 1, 2005 and February 1, 2008. Patients with unilateral total deafness underwent preoperative audiometric tests in quiet and in noise and stereoaudiometry with and without BAHA. Patients with a conductive hearing loss underwent preoperative audiometric tests in quiet and in noise and real-life testing at home using a headband. A standardized satisfaction questionnaire derived from the Entific BAHA questionnaire was used. Twenty-two out of 26 patients responded to the questionnaire. Ten patients were implanted for conductive hearing loss (CHL) and 12 for unilateral total deafness (UTD). Mean follow-up was 19 months in the UTD group and 21 months in the CHL group. Sixty-seven percent of UTD and 80% of CHL patients reported improved quality of life. The BAHA was worn for more than 4hours per day by 83% of UTD and 100% of CHL patients, and at least 5 days per week by 67% of UTD and 80% of CHL patients. BAHAs provided real benefit in all situations for CHL patients. In UTD, its benefit basically related to noisy environments. In UTD, satisfaction on preoperative stereoaudiometric testing in noise with and without BAHA was predictive of postimplantation satisfaction. In response to the question "Would you do it again?", 81% of patients answered "Yes". Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Rehabilitation in Franceschetti syndrome: an interdisciplinary approach using bone-anchored hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, W F; Marks, C; Jovanovic, S; Gross, M

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of a concept of combined interdisciplinary rehabilitation for children with mandibulofacial dysostosis, developed at the Center for Facial Malformations. It consists of binaural implantation of bone-anchored hearing aids and gradual distraction of the mandible. After audiological testing and mandibular distraction on a phantom head designed with data from a spiral CT, the surgery was done in three steps: implanting the fixtures for BAHA and the bone-lengthening device, removing the device after six weeks and completing the BAHA implantation two months later. The distraction procedure and orthodontic treatment were performed on an outpatient basis. The results (six patients, ages 6-19 years) were excellent: after implantation of the BAHA system speech perception increased from approximately 85% with the conventional BCHA to 95-100% with the BAHA. Quality of life was reported to be much better because of the general cosmetic improvement as well as the good acoustic orientation and sound quality with the new hearing devices. We conclude that the interdisciplinary approach provides favorable conditions for rehabilitation in cases of complex malformations of the head and neck.

  6. Congenital aural atresia: bone-anchored hearing aid vs. external auditory canal reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhabel, Sarah; Arcand, Pierre; Saliba, Issam

    2012-02-01

    To compare the audiologic outcome and feasibility of bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) and external auditory canal reconstruction (EACR) surgeries in pediatric patients presenting a congenital aural atresia (CAA). A retrospective chart review of 40 patients operated in our tertiary pediatric care center between 2002 and 2010 was performed. 20 patients underwent EACR, whereas another 20 patients were implanted with a BAHA device. Air conduction (AC), bone conduction (BC), pure tone average (PTA) and speech discrimination score (SDS) were compared preoperatively, and hearing gain (HG) postoperatively at 6 and at 12 months at frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz. Operative time, complications and associated microtia were documented as well. EACR patients were graded retrospectively upon Jahrsdoerfer's classification. Preoperative AC were significantly different between groups, at 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz but not at 4000 Hz. BAHA group compared postoperatively to EACR group showed significantly a superior HG of 46.9 ± 7.0 dB (paided air thresholds from the EACR group revealed an audiologic status similar to those of the BAHA group patients, at 6 months and one year postoperatively. Both groups had a similar evolution of their BC, as well as of the incidence of complications. We report one case of transient facial paralysis in the EACR group. Total operative time is significantly lower (p0.05) was found between patient's Jahrsdoerfer's score and their audiologic outcome. HG does not seem to be influenced by the presence of microtia. EACR, although constituting an attractive option, does not give acceptable results alone. It can however, when combined to conventional air conduction hearing aids, provide excellent audiologic outcomes comparable to BAHA. BAHA implantation is a reliable, safe and efficient therapeutic option that allows a significantly better audiologic outcome when compared to unaided EACR for patients with CAA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  7. Benefit and quality of life after bone-anchored hearing aid fitting in children with unilateral or bilateral hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolf, Maarten J F; Hol, Myrthe K S; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Snik, Ad F M; Cremers, Cor W R J

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the benefits of a bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in the daily lives of hearing-impaired children. Retrospective questionnaire study. Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Thirty-eight BAHA users with a minimum age of 4 years at BAHA fitting and 1 to 4 years of use, divided into groups with bilateral conductive or mixed hearing loss and either normal cognition or mental disability and a group with unilateral conductive hearing loss. Scores on the Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory, Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit, and Health Utilities Index Mark 3. The Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory showed a subjective overall benefit of +32, +16, and +26 in the 3 groups (on a scale of -100 to +100). The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit also showed an overall mean benefit in the groups. On an individual level, a clinically significant benefit was reported by more children in the group with bilateral hearing loss and normal cognition (7 patients [70%]) than in the unilateral hearing loss group (4 patients [27%]). Overall mean health utility scores and disability index scores on the Health Utility Index Mark 3 were comparable among the 3 groups. Overall, BAHA fitting can be considered effective and beneficial in children with bilateral or unilateral hearing loss.

  8. Has the use of the linear incision reduced skin complications in bone-anchored hearing aid implantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roplekar, R; Lim, A; Hussain, S S M

    2016-06-01

    To compare the skin-related complications of the traditional skin flap method with a linear incision method of implantation. All cases of bone-anchored hearing aid surgery performed by a single surgeon (n = 117) were compared over two periods: 1999-2011, when the traditional method of skin flap and soft tissue removal was used (group 1; n = 86), and 2012-2013, when linear incision without soft tissue removal was used (group 2; n = 31). All patients were followed up for one year and complications were recorded for that period. There were 21 (24.4 per cent) skin-related complications in group 1 (skin overgrowth = 12, wound infection = 8 and numbness = 1) and 3 (9.7 per cent) complications in group 2 (wound infection = 3). Analysis using independent t-tests showed the results to be significant (p bone-anchored hearing aid implantation reduces skin complication rates.

  9. Adult bone anchored hearing aid services in the United Kingdom: building a consensus for development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Penny; Norman, Gary; Davison, Tom; Andrew, Rachel; Shanks, Mary; Johnson, Ian; Burrell, Stuart; Reid, Andrew; Archbold, Sue

    2012-11-01

    In October 2009, a multi-disciplinary group of UK clinicians met to review issues relating to bone-anchored hearing-aid (BAHA) development. The aim was to help define a model for BAHA services and service development via a process of widespread consultation with UK BAHA professionals. A modified Delphi technique was used. Statements were proposed by the lead group and sent out for consultation. Those with ≥90% agreement were approved without further discussion. Statements with 50-89% agreement were discussed by the lead group to determine whether they should be included in the final document. Any statement with 75% agreement, with only six statements having <90% agreement. When these statements were presented to the UK BAHA Professionals group at their annual conference there was 89% agreement from the group for the consensus statements to be accepted. The levels of agreement for the final questionnaire show that the mandate for the consensus statements was exceptionally high. Implementation of the consensus is discussed, as are each of the key areas of the consensus, such as funding and minimum assessment standards.

  10. Two Different Percutaneous Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Abutment Systems: Comparative Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Beldan; İşeri, Mete; Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Yılmazer, Ayça Başkadem; Enver, Necati; Ceylan, Didem; Kara, Ahmet; Güldiken, Yahya; Çomoğlu, Şenol

    2016-04-01

    To compare two different percutaneous bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) abutment systems regarding operation time, scar healing, quality of life, implant stability, audiologic results, and complications. The study involves a prospective multi-center clinical evaluation. Thirty-two consecutive patients who had undergone BAHA surgery from January 2011 to January 2013 in two tertiary centers were included in the study. The Glasgow Inventory Benefit Score was used to assess the patients at least 6 months after surgery. The operation time and complications were recorded. Implant stability quotient (ISQ) values were recorded using resonance frequency analysis. Holger's classification was used to evaluate skin reactions. The mean length of the operation was 39.2±4 min for standard abutment and 18.3±5.7 min for hydroxyapatite-coated abutment. ISQ scores were significantly better for standard abutment in all tests. The mean total Glasgow Inventory Benefit Score was 39.3±19 for the standard abutment and 46.3±24.5 for the hydroxyapatite-coated abutment groups, but there was no statistical significance between the two groups. There was no difference in audiological improvement between the two groups after surgery. Hydroxyapatite-coated abutment provided a shorter operation time that was significantly different from standard abutment. There were no significant differences between standard abutment and hydroxyapatite-coated abutment regarding audiologic improvement, quality of life, loading time, and complications.

  11. Surgical outcome of bone anchored hearing aid (baha) implant surgery: a 10 years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asma, A; Ubaidah, M A; Hasan, Siti Salbiah; Wan Fazlina, W H; Lim, B Y; Saim, L; Goh, B S

    2013-07-01

    Bone anchored hearing aid (Baha) implant is an option for patient with canal atresia, single sided deafness(SSD) and chronically discharging ears despite treatments. This retrospective study was conducted from 2001 to 2011 to evaluate the surgical outcome of Baha implant surgery. Thirty-three patients were identified during this study period. Their age at implantation ranged from 5 to 40 years. Of 33 patients, 29 (87.9 %) patients had bilateral microtia and canal atresia, 3 (9.1 %) patients had unilateral microtia and canal atresia and 1 (3.0 %) patients have SSD following labyrinthitis. One patient (3.2 %) had major complication which is lost of implant due to failure of osseointegration. Soft tissue reactions were seen 7 patients (21.1 %). Of these 7 patients, 4 patients required 3-4 procedures as day care operation for excision of the skin overgrowth surrounding the abutment. Recurrent antibiotic treatment was required in 3 patients (9.7 %). None of our patient had history of intraoperative or peri-operative complication following Baha surgery. The commonest complications are local infection and inflammation at the implant site. None of our patient had history of intraoperative or peri-operative complication following Baha implant surgery.

  12. Bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome: tips and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsella, Pasquale; Scorpecci, Alessandro; Pacifico, Concettina; Tieri, Luigi

    2011-10-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome, also known as mandibulofacial dysostosis, is an autosomal dominant disorder of the cranio-facial morphogenesis affecting 1 of 50,000 live newborns. Most children with this disease present with bilateral, severe conductive hearing loss due to bilateral aural atresia. Auditory rehabilitation of these children can be effectively carried out with bone-anchored hearing aids (Baha). The aim of this retrospective study is to review the "Bambino Gesù" Children's Hospital's experience with Baha in Treacher Collins patients, highlighting the tips and pitfalls of Baha surgery in this particular population. The clinical charts were reviewed of all children with a Treacher Collins syndrome diagnosis receiving a Baha in the "Bambino Gesù" Children's Hospital from January 1995 to January 2010. Data were collected concerning patients' anagraphics and medical history, comorbidities, surgical technique, complications and functional outcome. 23 Treacher Collins children were included. A two-stage surgery was adopted in 51% (n=12) cases, while a one-stage approach was chosen in 49% (n=11). 2 children underwent 1st stage surgery as they were younger than 5. There were neither cases of osseointegration failure, nor cases of traumatic implant loss. Overall, the local complication rate was not different in the one-stage and in the two-stage group. The functional gain was significantly better with the Baha than with the conventional bone-conduction hearing aids (pBaha at an age younger than 5 years and the rest (p=0.23). Baha can provide effective auditory rehabilitation for children with Treacher Collins syndrome, as long as it is performed in a tertiary care center where a multidisciplinary approach to the frequent comorbidities is possible. The main challenge of Baha surgery in this population is the poor or irregular thickness of the patient's calvarial bone, which often makes it necessary to drill additional holes, to place the fixture in contact with the

  13. Experience of bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in children younger than 5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonoo-Kuofi, Kwamena; Kelly, Andrea; Neeff, Michel; Brown, Colin R S

    2015-04-01

    To assess the practicality and benefit of Bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA(®)) implantation in children younger than 5 years of age. FDA approval for use of BAHA(®) only exists for children 5 years of age and older. Their use in Australia is also rare, however their use for younger children is approved by the European Union. We wish to share our experience of implantation in an antipodean setting in this age group. Institutional board approval was obtained for this study. All children undergoing BAHA(®) implantation under 5 years old were included from our prospective database. We examined the variety of surgical techniques, (including skin grafting, limited soft tissue reduction and no soft tissue reduction), BAHA(®) implants and abutments used, and use of the new series 400 hydroxyapatite coatings. Demographic data obtained included age at surgery, follow up duration, gender, ethnicity and indication for surgery. Anonymous benefit questionnaires (Glasgow children's benefit inventory (GCBI) and parents' evaluation of aural performance of children (PEACH)) were completed online as well as a questionnaire on device use. Complications recorded included soft tissue reactions, implant loss/removal, abutment replacement/removal. We also assessed whether patient weight, ethnicity or socioeconomic status were risk factors for these complications. 24 Children (26 ears/26 implants) under five years were identified from the database and included in the study. There was a 14:10 male to female ratio. Patient caregivers reported subjective benefit and improved quality of life (QOL) despite setbacks and complications related to BAHA(®) usage. 10/24 (42%) of children required treatment for significant peri-implant skin reactions whilst 25% required replacement of their abutments and/or implants. An increased risk of major complication was associated with socioeconomic deprived backgrounds and in patients of New Zealand Maori and Pacific Island ethnicity but not in patients

  14. Stability and survival of bone-anchored hearing aid implant systems in post-irradiated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Mark D; Lightbody, Kathryn A; Salamat, Ali A; Chakravarthy, Kalyan M; Luff, David A; Temple, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs) are based on the principle of osseointegration, which is fundamental to implant stability and survival. Previous exposure to ionising radiation may compromise this, as evidenced in relation to dental and craniofacial implants. There is a dearth of data, however, regarding BAHA implant systems in patients with previously irradiated implant sites. We sought, therefore, to investigate implant stability and survival in such patients. Patients were identified retrospectively from our electronic BAHA database. Hospital records were reviewed for demographics; operative technique; complications; and details regarding previous irradiation. Implant stability was assessed by resonance frequency analysis (RFA), generating a numerical value-implant stability quotient (ISQ). Extrapolating from dental studies, successfully loaded implants typically have ISQs of ≥60. Readings were, therefore, interpreted with respect to this. Seven patients were identified for inclusion. Mean time between irradiation and implant insertion was 33 months (range 16-72 months), and mean time from implant insertion to RFA measurement was 41 months (range 3-96 months). Operatively, all patients underwent single-stage procedures under local anaesthesia. One patient suffered a Holger's grade 2 skin reaction, while two suffered significant skin flap failure, requiring revision procedures. The implant survival rate was 100 %. All ISQ values were >60, with a mean of 66.9 (95 % confidence interval 63.1-70.6). Our data support sufficient osseointegration of BAHA implant systems in post-irradiated patients, but highlight issues with wound healing. Contemporary soft tissue preservation operative techniques will likely overcome this, facilitating safe and efficacious BAHA insertion in this ever-increasing group of patients.

  15. Comparison of implant stability measurement devices for bone-anchored hearing aid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westover, Lindsey; Faulkner, Gary; Hodgetts, William; Raboud, Don

    2018-01-01

    The success of implants for bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHA) relies on proper osseointegration at the bone-implant interface. Clinical evaluation of implant stability is important in prescribing loading, identifying the risk of failure, and monitoring the long-term health of the implant. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate 2 measurement systems for BAHA implant stability: the most commonly used, Osstell implant stability quotient (ISQ), and a newly developed advance system for implant stability testing (ASIST). BAHA implants (Oticon Medical Ponto and Cochlear BAHA Connect systems) were installed in plastic materials with adhesive to simulate implants integrated in bone with varying levels of interface stiffness. Different lengths of BAHA abutments were used with each implant specimen, and stability measurements were obtained with both the Osstell ISQ and the ASIST systems. The measurement systems were evaluated in terms of sensitivity to differences in interface stiffness and the effect of abutment length on the stability measurement. Repeated measures ANOVA followed by post hoc t tests were used for the comparisons with a Bonferroni adjusted alpha value of .05/15 = .003 to control for potential type 1 errors. Changing the abutment length of a single implant installation had minimal effect on the ASIST stability coefficient, whereas large variations were observed in the Osstell implant stability quotient (ISQ). The Osstell showed a clear relationship of decreasing ISQ with increasing abutment length for both the Oticon Medical and the Cochlear implant systems. Both the ASIST and the Osstell were found to be sensitive to changes in interface properties, with the ASIST being more sensitive to these changes. The ASIST system is more sensitive to changes in interface properties and shows smaller variation because of changes in abutment length than the Osstell ISQ system. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

  16. A multicenter study on objective and subjective benefits with a transcutaneous bone-anchored hearing aid device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Dan Dupont; Boldsen, Soren Kjaergaard; Jensen, Anne Marie

    2017-01-01

    Examination of objective as well as subjective outcomes with a new transcutaneous bone-anchored hearing aid device. The study was designed as a prospective multicenter consecutive case-series study involving tertiary referral centers at two Danish University Hospitals. A total of 23 patients were...... implanted. Three were lost to follow-up. Patients had single-sided deafness, conductive or mixed hearing loss. Intervention: Rehabilitative. Aided and unaided sound field hearing was evaluated objectively using (1) pure warble tone thresholds, (2) pure-tone average (PTA4), (3) speech discrimination score...... (SDS) in quiet, and (4) speech reception threshold 50% at 70 dB SPL noise level (SRT50%). Subjective benefit was evaluated by three validated questionnaires: (1) the IOI-HA, (2) the SSQ-12, and (3) a questionnaire evaluating both the frequency and the duration of hearing aid usage. The mean aided PTA4...

  17. Hearing rehabilitation in congenital aural atresia using the bone-anchored hearing aid: audiological and satisfaction results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsmann, Carine; Tringali, Stéphane; Disant, François; Buiret, Guillaume; Dubreuil, Christian; Froehlich, Patrick; Truy, Eric

    2010-12-01

    The BAHA (bone-anchored hearing aid) remains the most reliable method of auditory rehabilitation for patients with congenital aural atresia and improves hearing outcome and quality of life in these patients who are otherwise unable to benefit from traditional hearing aids. New techniques are being developed, such as fully implantable hearing devices, and will have to prove their efficacy and safety in this indication. To evaluate the audiological results and patient satisfaction after rehabilitation of congenital aural atresia using the BAHA. Sixteen patients suffering from bilateral congenital aural atresia were implanted with unilateral BAHA. Preoperative air- and bone-conduction thresholds and air-bone gap (ABG), preoperative sound reception threshold (SRT), postoperative aided thresholds, implantation complications, patient satisfaction, and the APHAB questionnaire were collected. After a mean follow-up period of 6.5 years, 15 patients were still using their device. Each patient had an average improvement of 33 ± 7 dB. Closure of the ABG within 15 dB of the preoperative bone-conduction thresholds occurred in 10 patients. Adverse skin reactions appeared in 50% of patients over 6.5 years of follow-up. Eleven of the 12 patients used their BAHA for more than 8 h per day.

  18. Audiometric results of bilateral bone-anchored hearing aid application in patients with bilateral congenital aural atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pouw, K T; Snik, A F; Cremers, C W

    1998-04-01

    The effect of bilateral application of bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs) was examined in terms of directional hearing and speech recognition in quiet and in noise in four patients with bilateral congenital atresia who, out of pure necessity, had been using a unilateral bone-conduction hearing aid since early life. This study comprised a prospective clinical evaluation in a single subject design; four patients with bilateral congenital atresia originating from the Nijmegen BAHA series participated. Three patients had Treacher Collins syndrome. All four patients had conductive, most probably, symmetrical, hearing loss. Recently these patients had applied for a second BAHA and were subsequently fitted bilaterally. With two BAHAs, all four patients showed significant improvement in sound localization. Also, speech perception in quiet showed significant improvement with bilateral application, and a significant improvement was found in speech perception in noise in three patients. These results suggest that patients with congenital conductive, symmetrical hearing loss will benefit from bilateral BAHAs.

  19. [Multicenter clinical study of bone-anchored hearing aids in Japan--application for congenital auricular atresia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kunihiro; Kariya, Shin; Nagayasu, Rie; Fukuda, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Kitamura, Ken; Kumakawa, Kozo; Usami, Shinichi; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Doi, Katsumi; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Tono, Tetsuya; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2011-09-01

    The effectiveness of bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA) for the patients with congenital aural atresia was evaluated by multicenter clinical study in Japan. Twenty patients (17 bilateral and 3 hemilateral) of congenital auricular atresia were registered for this study and finally, 18 of them (15 bilateral and 3 unilateral) were subjected to further evaluation. Primary endpoint of this study was free sound-field pure-tone audiometory and speech threshold hearing test in quiet and noisy circumstances. Secondary endpoint of this study was patient's satisfaction based upon APHAB (Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit) questionnaire survey. These results were compared between before and 12 weeks after BAHA surgery. Both hearing level of pure tone and speech threshold significantly improved after BAHA surgery. APHAB scores also suggested the improvement of the QOL after BAHA usage, except for the scores that concerned with unpleasantness of noisy sound. BAHA is one of the useful options for the treatment of congenital auricular atresia.

  20. [Bilateral bone anchored hearing aid management of children with external ear dysplasia and/or ear canal atresia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missfeldt, N; Baun, A; Zwirner, P

    2002-05-01

    The literature gives hardly any information about the benefits for children of using a bilateral bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) as opposed to a bilateral conventional bone conducting hearing aid. Within a period of 12 years, three children were selected for treatment with bilateral BAHA. At the time of surgery, the children were aged between 8 and 10 years. Two of the children suffered from Franceschetti syndrome and one child from Goldenhar's syndrome. The clinical course of these three patients is presented. In all cases, treatment with BAHA was beneficial according to subjective and objective criteria despite localized inflammatory complications in two of the three cases. The bilateral use of BAHA should be considered more frequently as an alternative to conventional bone conducting hearing aids even for children.

  1. Results of the implantation of bone-anchored hearing aids in patients with treacher-collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alexandra Kolontai de Sousa; Ferro, Lília Pereira Abreu; da Silva, Jaiede Nicacio; Okada, Daniel Mochida

    2013-04-01

     Treacher-Collins syndrome is characterized by craniofacial malformations, narrowing of the external auditory canal (EAC), and, in 30% of cases, agenesis of the canal and ossicular chain defects. The use of hearing aids (HA) is not possible in cases in which agenesis or stenosis of the EAC accompanies conductive deafness. In contrast, bone conduction implants such as the Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA(®)) allow direct stimulation of the cochlea and are thus superior to conventional hearing aids in cases of severe conductive hearing loss.  To present 2 cases of patients with Treacher-Collins syndrome who underwent implantation of BAHA(®).  The first patient was a 52-year-old woman diagnosed with Treacher-Collins syndrome who presented with severe bilateral mixed hearing loss and a history of unsuccessful previous use of a bone contact conduction device. The BAHA(®) implantation was uneventful, and the post-operative results were good. The second patient was a 14-year-old girl who was also diagnosed with Treacher-Collins Syndrome with bilateral moderate conductive hearing loss by audiometry. The use of a bone vibrator contact device did not improve her hearing; however, implantation of a BAHA(®) resulted in a decreased gap postoperatively. Final comments: BAHA(®) hearing devices provide adequate rehabilitation and consequent improvement of the quality of life in patients with Treacher-Collins syndrome.

  2. Results of the implantation of bone-anchored hearing aids in patients with treacher-collins syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kolontai de Sousa Oliveira1

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treacher-Collins syndrome is characterized by craniofacial malformations, narrowing of the external auditory canal (EAC, and, in 30% of cases, agenesis of the canal and ossicular chain defects. The use of hearing aids (HA is not possible in cases in which agenesis or stenosis of the EAC accompanies conductive deafness. In contrast, bone conduction implants such as the Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA® allow direct stimulation of the cochlea and are thus superior to conventional hearing aids in cases of severe conductive hearing loss. Objective: To present 2 cases of patients with Treacher-Collins syndrome who underwent implantation of BAHA®. Cases Reports: The first patient was a 52-year-old woman diagnosed with Treacher-Collins syndrome who presented with severe bilateral mixed hearing loss and a history of unsuccessful previous use of a bone contact conduction device. The BAHA® implantation was uneventful, and the post-operative results were good. The second patient was a 14-year-old girl who was also diagnosed with Treacher-Collins Syndrome with bilateral moderate conductive hearing loss by audiometry. The use of a bone vibrator contact device did not improve her hearing; however, implantation of a BAHA® resulted in a decreased gap postoperatively. Final comments: BAHA® hearing devices provide adequate rehabilitation and consequent improvement of the quality of life in patients with Treacher-Collins syndrome.

  3. Results of the implantation of bone-anchored hearing aids in patients with treacher-collins syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alexandra Kolontai de Sousa; Ferro, Lília Pereira Abreu; da Silva, Jaiede Nicacio; Okada, Daniel Mochida

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Treacher-Collins syndrome is characterized by craniofacial malformations, narrowing of the external auditory canal (EAC), and, in 30% of cases, agenesis of the canal and ossicular chain defects. The use of hearing aids (HA) is not possible in cases in which agenesis or stenosis of the EAC accompanies conductive deafness. In contrast, bone conduction implants such as the Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA®) allow direct stimulation of the cochlea and are thus superior to conventional hearing aids in cases of severe conductive hearing loss. Objective: To present 2 cases of patients with Treacher-Collins syndrome who underwent implantation of BAHA®. Cases Reports: The first patient was a 52-year-old woman diagnosed with Treacher-Collins syndrome who presented with severe bilateral mixed hearing loss and a history of unsuccessful previous use of a bone contact conduction device. The BAHA® implantation was uneventful, and the post-operative results were good. The second patient was a 14-year-old girl who was also diagnosed with Treacher-Collins Syndrome with bilateral moderate conductive hearing loss by audiometry. The use of a bone vibrator contact device did not improve her hearing; however, implantation of a BAHA® resulted in a decreased gap postoperatively. Final comments: BAHA® hearing devices provide adequate rehabilitation and consequent improvement of the quality of life in patients with Treacher-Collins syndrome. PMID:25992018

  4. Conversion of traditional osseointegrated bone-anchored hearing aids to the Baha®attract in four pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedars, Elizabeth; Chan, Dylan; Lao, Anga; Hardies, Lauren; Meyer, Anna; Rosbe, Kristina

    2016-12-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aids are external devices attached to the skull via a titanium implant, and can be used for multiple types of hearing loss. Traditionally, osseointegrated implants have been coupled to the external processor with a percutaneous abutment, but more recently, a fully implanted, transcutaneous magnet-based system has become available. Skin reactions from the percutaneous portion are a common complication that can prevent use of the device during critical windows of language development and learning in children. We describe our experience replacing the Baha ® abutment system with the Baha ® Attract in four pediatric patients. Specific operative considerations for incision placement, and magnet and implant coverage are discussed. All patients maintained osseointegration, had excellent long-term wound healing without post-operative infection, and were able to wear their devices more consistently. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA: indications, functional results, and comparison with reconstructive surgery of the ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA is a bone conduction hearing device that transmits sound directly into the inner ear. It is mainly used in patients with conductive hearing loss associated with aural atresia, but it is also used in those with mixed and sensorineural hearing loss. Goals: To review the main indications for BAHA, to analyze the audiometric results and its benefits for patients and compare them with other treatment modalities, and to compare the literature data with our sample of 13 patients. Method: The research was performed using a database covering works in English, Spanish, and Portuguese, with no limitations in the years when the procedures were performed. We compared the literature data with our results for the 13 patients who underwent BAHA implantation between the years 2000 and 2009. Results: Most of the studies showed that BAHA has great advantages over reconstructive surgery in terms of hearing results, complications, and disease recurrence. The postoperative results for our 13 patients were satisfactory and comparable with the results from the literature, with closure of the air-bone gap in 7 patients and achieving an air-bone gap of 10 dB in 6 patients. No postoperative complications were observed. Conclusion: BAHA is a better treatment option than reconstructive surgery for patients with bilateral deafness. It is a relatively simple surgical procedure with few complications and good hearing results. Recent studies have examined its use in conductive and unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

  6. Bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA): indications, functional results, and comparison with reconstructive surgery of the ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Kiesewetter, Alessandra; Ikari, Liliane Satomi; Brito, Rubens

    2012-07-01

     The bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) is a bone conduction hearing device that transmits sound directly into the inner ear. It is mainly used in patients with conductive hearing loss associated with aural atresia, but it is also used in those with mixed and sensorineural hearing loss.  To review the main indications for BAHA, to analyze the audiometric results and its benefits for patients and compare them with other treatment modalities, and to compare the literature data with our sample of 13 patients.  The research was performed using a database covering works in English, Spanish, and Portuguese, with no limitations in the years when the procedures were performed. We compared the literature data with our results for the 13 patients who underwent BAHA implantation between the years 2000 and 2009.  Most of the studies showed that BAHA has great advantages over reconstructive surgery in terms of hearing results, complications, and disease recurrence. The postoperative results for our 13 patients were satisfactory and comparable with the results from the literature, with closure of the air-bone gap in 7 patients and achieving an air-bone gap of 10 dB in 6 patients. No postoperative complications were observed.  BAHA is a better treatment option than reconstructive surgery for patients with bilateral deafness. It is a relatively simple surgical procedure with few complications and good hearing results. Recent studies have examined its use in conductive and unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

  7. A multicenter study on objective and subjective benefits with a transcutaneous bone-anchored hearing aid device: first Nordic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, Dan Dupont; Boldsen, Soren Kjaergaard; Jensen, Anne Marie; Hansen, Soren; Thomassen, Per Cayé

    2017-08-01

    Examination of objective as well as subjective outcomes with a new transcutaneous bone-anchored hearing aid device. The study was designed as a prospective multicenter consecutive case-series study involving tertiary referral centers at two Danish University Hospitals. A total of 23 patients were implanted. Three were lost to follow-up. Patients had single-sided deafness, conductive or mixed hearing loss. Rehabilitative. Aided and unaided sound field hearing was evaluated objectively using (1) pure warble tone thresholds, (2) pure-tone average (PTA4), (3) speech discrimination score (SDS) in quiet, and (4) speech reception threshold 50% at 70 dB SPL noise level (SRT50%). Subjective benefit was evaluated by three validated questionnaires: (1) the IOI-HA, (2) the SSQ-12, and (3) a questionnaire evaluating both the frequency and the duration of hearing aid usage. The mean aided PTA4 was lowered by 14.7 dB. SDS was increased by 37.5% at 50 dB SPL, SRT50% in noise improved 1.4 dB. Aided thresholds improved insignificantly at frequencies above 2 kHz. 52.9% of the patients used their device every day, and 76.5% used the device at least 5 days a week. Mean IOI-HA score was 3.4, corresponding to a good benefit. In SSQ-12, "quality of hearing" scored especially high. Patients with a conductive and/or mixed hearing loss benefitted the most. This device demonstrates a significant subjective hearing benefit 8 month post surgery. In patients with conductive and/or mixed hearing losses, patient satisfaction and frequency of use were high. Objective gain measures showed less promising results especially in patients with single-sided deafness (SSD) compared to other bone conduction devices.

  8. The bone-anchored hearing aid: a solution for previously unresolved otologic problems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snik, A.F.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2001-01-01

    A major challenge for otologists treating middle ear infection is to obtain a dry ear and optimal hearing. If the patient needs amplification and uses an air conduction hearing aid, the ear mold, occluding the ear canal, may provoke or aggravate the infection in the middle ear and thus cause

  9. Better performance with bone-anchored hearing aid than acoustic devices in patients with severe air-bone gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolf, Maarten J F; Hendrix, Sander; Cremers, Cor W R J; Snik, Ad F M

    2011-03-01

    A study performed in the 1990s with analogue linear hearing aids showed that in patients with mixed hearing loss and an air-bone gap that exceeded 25 to 30 dB, speech perception was better with a bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) than with a conventional behind-the-ear (BTE) device. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether this conclusion applies to today's digital BTEs with feedback cancellation and whether the crossover point still occurs at an air-bone gap of 25 to 30 dB. Case control. Experienced unilateral Baha users with the latest digital Baha processors were fitted with a powerful BTE with feedback cancellation. After an acclimatization period of 4 weeks, aided thresholds and speech recognition scores were determined and compared to those recorded previously with the Baha. To obtain patients' opinions, a disability-specific questionnaire was used. Participants comprised 16 subjects with bilateral mixed hearing loss participated Audiometric and speech recognition data showed similar trends to those described previously, but the crossover point had shifted to an air-bone gap of 30 to 35 dB. In the questionnaire, the BTE was rated higher than the Baha, except by the patients with an air-bone gap that exceeded an average of 45 dB. In patients with mixed hearing loss whose air-bone gap exceeded 35 dB, speech recognition is likely to be better with a Baha than with a BTE. Therefore, the Baha should receive greater consideration when mixed hearing loss is combined with a significant air-bone gap, even when there are no contraindications for BTEs. Copyright © 2010 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Outcomes of Bone Anchored Hearing Aid Implant at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Suhana Abdul; Goh, Bee-See; Zainor, Safinaz; Rahman, Roslenda Abdul; Abdullah, Asma

    2018-03-01

    The cross sectional study was conducted in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center (UKMMC), Malaysia from August 2012 to December 2013. All patients implanted with in UKMMC from December 2001 until December 2012 was included. Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI) questionnaires and UKMMC questionnaires were used as part of the assessment tool. The GBI is a scoring which measures the change in health status produced by surgical interventions. UKMMC questionnaires was invented by our department to assess questions related to social and life style of patients and also the cosmetic perspective Baha implant and other daily related activities. The audiological assessment was assessed using hearing aid gain threshold. Complication with regards to skin reaction was graded using Holger Skin Classification. A total of 40 patients underwent Baha implant were recruited but only 35 patients fulfilled the criteria and included in this study for analysis. Age of patients ranged from 5 year old to 38 year old, with median of 13 years old. There were 22 patients (62.8%) were male and 13 patients (37.1%) were females. Almost all cases were canal atresia except one adult patient was a case of bilateral chronic discharging ear with chronic irritation with ear mould. Majority of patients 21 (60%) have hearing level of moderate to severe hearing loss (40-89 dB) and 14 patients (40%) have mild to moderate hearing loss (20-39 dB). The level of hearing was retested post operatively. All of the patients have improvement in their aided hearing with the range of 10-25 dBL which is statistically significant at p value of aided hearing which is statistically significant at p value of <0.05. BAHA has been proven to show significant benefit in audiological improvement and quality of life.

  11. The current practice trends in pediatric bone-anchored hearing aids in Canada: a national clinical and surgical practice survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs) in the 1980s, the practices of surgeons who implant these hearing aids have become varied; different indications and surgical techniques are utilized depending on the surgeon and institution. The objective of the current study is to describe the clinical and surgical practices of otolaryngologists in Canada who perform pediatric BAHA operations. Methods A detailed practice questionnaire was devised and sent to all members of the Canadian Society of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Those who performed pediatric BAHA surgeries were asked to participate. Results Twelve responses were received (response rate of 80%). All of the respondents identified congenital aural atresia to be an indication for pediatric BAHAs. Other indications were chronic otitis externa or media with hearing loss (92%), allergic reactions to conventional hearing aids (75%), congenital fixation or anomaly of ossicular chain (67%), and unilateral deafness (25%). Minor complications, such as skin reactions, were reported in 25% of cases, while major complications were very rare. There was great variability with regards to surgical techinque and post-operative management. The extent of financial support for the BAHA hardware and device also varied between provinces, and even within the same province. Conclusion There is a lack of general consensus regarding pediatric BAHA surgeries in Canada. With such a small community of otolaryngologists performing this procedure, we are hopeful that this survey can serve as an impetus for a national collaboration to establish a set of general management principles and inspire multi-site research ventures. PMID:23815797

  12. Bilateral Bone-anchored Hearing Aid: impact on quality of life measured with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Eu Chin; Monksfield, Peter; Egan, Elizabeth; Reid, Andrew; Proops, David

    2009-10-01

    To investigate whether the fitting of bilateral Bone-anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) would result in any additional improvement in patients' quality of life (QOL) over and above what we would experience from the fitting of a single-sided BAHA. Retrospective, anonymized, cross-sectional postal survey using the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI). Tertiary referral center. All 93 adult patients who had been using bilateral BAHA for more than 6 months. Hearing rehabilitation using bilateral BAHA. These include the GBI benefit scores across the following domains: "overall benefit," "general health benefit," "physical health benefit," and "social benefit." Comparison of GBI scores against other otological interventions including single-sided BAHA. Response rate was 76%. Ninety-two percent of patients reported improvement in QOL. Positive QOL improvement scores were reported across all domains. Overall GBI benefit score was +ve 38. This is higher than the benefit scores reported by patients with single-sided BAHA, although this may not be statistically significant. After fitting the second BAHA, patients may report additional improvement in their QOL (of a smaller magnitude) over and above the initial improvement in their QOL after fitting of their first BAHA. In fact, the overall benefit score for bilateral BAHA seem to be close to that for cochlear implantation.

  13. Bone anchored hearing aid in single sided deafness: outcome in right-handed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Issam; Nader, Marc-Elie; El Fata, Fouad; Leroux, Tony

    2011-10-01

    To assess the benefits in terms of sound localization, to evaluate speech discrimination in noise, to appraise the prosthesis benefit and to identify outcome in right and left handed patients when BAHA are implanted on the right or on the left deaf side. Two years prospective study in a tertiary referral center. Tests consist on Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) and sound localization after 6 months of BAHA use. Quality of life was assessed by the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) questionnaire. The paired T-test and the analysis of variance were used for the statistical measures. Twenty-one subjects participated in this study. HINT: patients score better when speech and noise are spatially separated and noise is not presented to the healthy ear. In the right-handed group (left dominant brain), unaided left-implanted patients performed better than right-implanted patient when speech is in front and noise to the good ear; when speech is presented to the good ear and noise to the front, aided right-implanted patients performed better than aided left-implanted patients. Sound localization: correct answers attain 35% at best. No statistical difference between the frequencies was found, neither between the left and right implanted patients. APHAB: the score improvement is statistically significant for the global score, the background noise subscale at 5 weeks and for the reverberation subscale at 6 months. It seems that left dominant hemisphere is able to filter crossed noise better than the right hemisphere. Results of uncrossed speech to the dominant left brain are better than the uncrossed speech to the non-dominant right brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of Speech-in-Noise and Localization Benefits in Unilateral Hearing Loss Subjects Using Contralateral Routing of Signal Hearing Aids or Bone-Anchored Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, Hillary A; Holt, Fred D; Liu, Xuezhong; Rajguru, Suhrud M

    2017-01-01

    To compare the benefit of wireless contralateral routing of signal (CROS) technology to bone-anchored implant (BAI) technology in monaural listeners. Prospective, single-subject. Tertiary academic referral center. Adult English speaking subjects using either a CROS hearing aid or BAI as treatment for unilateral severe-profound hearing loss. Aided performance utilizing the subjects BAI or CROS hearing device. Outcome measures included speech-in-noise perception using the QuickSIN (Etymotic Research, Elkgrove Village, IL, 2001) speech-in-noise test and localization ability using narrow and broadband stimuli. Performance was measured in the unaided and aided condition and compared with normal hearing controls. Subjective outcomes measures included the Speech Spatial and Qualities hearing scale and the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile. A significant improvement in speech-in-noise performance for monaural listeners (p hearing aid users. No significant difference was observed between treatment groups for subjective measures of post-treatment residual disability or satisfaction. Our data demonstrate that both CROS and BAI systems provide significant benefit for monaural listeners. There is no significant difference between CROS or BAI systems for objective measures of speech-in-noise performance. CROS and BAI hearing devices do not provide any localization benefit in the horizontal plane for monaural listeners and there is no significant difference between systems.

  15. A Review of Temporal Bone CT Imaging With Respect to Pediatric Bone-anchored Hearing Aid Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Aaron; Fanelli, David; Kanekar, Sangam; Isildak, Huseyin

    2016-10-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aid has been shown to be effective in hearing rehabilitation for conductive loss or single-sided deafness. Current FDA guidelines allow implantation in patients over 5 years old. This guideline is at least partially due to concern for thickness of bone stock at the implant site. We aim to investigate whether temporal bone thickness should be a deterrent to implantation in those younger than five. A retrospective review of high-resolution temporal bone computed tomographies (CTs) comparing measurements between ears with chronic disease and controls. Single institution tertiary care center. One hundred patients between 1 and 5.99 years had temporal bone CTs performed between 2000 and 2009. Patients with chronic ear disease were identified by ICD-9 code, as well as confirmation by review of the imaging. None. Temporal bone thickness was measured on axial CT slices at a point 1 cm posterior to the sigmoid sinus, at the superior margin of the bony canal. Average thickness was greater than 3 mm in all age groups. No significant difference was found between age groups, or between normal ears and ears with chronic disease (3.5 mm versus 3.3 mm, p = 0.21) when compared individually. This data shows pediatric temporal bone thickness is frequently greater than the recommended 3 mm, even in patients as young as one. Anatomically, concerns regarding temporal bone thickness in patients younger than five could be reliably addressed with imaging typically obtained in workup of hearing loss.

  16. The use of a bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) in children with severe behavioural problems--the Birmingham Baha programme experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Jayesh; McDermott, Ann-Louise; Reid, Andrew; Proops, David

    2010-06-01

    A trial of a bone conductor is traditionally used to determine whether a bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) will be beneficial to a child. However there is a subgroup of children where a Baha assessment is not possible due to severe behavioural/mental/sensory disorders. We describe our experience in a small series of such children. Retrospective case series review of four children at the severe end of the spectrum of behavioural difficulties who underwent Baha implantation where no formal preoperative hearing aid assessment was possible. The Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory and a visual analogue scale assessing health status were used to determine the benefit of Baha implantation in this group. There was no surgical morbidity in this group although a more intensive postoperative follow up was required. All four children wore their hearing aids at least 8h a day. Parents reported a positive impact of the Baha on the behaviour and mood of their children. The Baha showed a positive benefit when assessed using the Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory and showed a positive change in health status. We feel that our early experience with Baha in children with severe behavioural difficulties has been positive to date. Multidisciplinary teams should not dismiss these children even if a trial of a bone conductor is not possible. We feel that the bone-anchored hearing aid has been successful in our cases because the children do not physically feel the presence of the hearing aid. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Speech and voice rehabilitation in selected patients fitted with a bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J

    1996-01-01

    With the Birmingham osseointegrated implant programme there have been several patients with severe pre-lingual conductive hearing loss. The majority of these have been patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. There are characteristic features of speech and voice in those with long-standing conductive hearing loss. In addition, the associated abnormalities of jaw, teeth and palate may amplify the problem. There may be spontaneous improvement in features such as voice pitch, quality and intensity following the fitting of a BAHA. However, in those with a pre-lingual hearing impairment, speech therapy may be necessary. Patients assessed as suitable for BAHA have a full assessment of communication skills including audio recording of speech and voice. Post-operative training improves auditory discrimination and perception and is followed by training in the production of the newly perceived speech sounds.

  18. Bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs) for people who are bilaterally deaf: a systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquitt, J L; Jones, J; Harris, P; Loveman, E; Bird, A; Clegg, A J; Baguley, D M; Proops, D W; Mitchell, T E; Sheehan, P Z; Welch, K

    2011-07-01

    A bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) consists of a permanent titanium fixture, which is surgically implanted into the skull bone behind the ear, and a small detachable sound processor that clips onto the fixture. BAHAs are suitable for people with conductive or mixed hearing loss who cannot benefit fully from conventional hearing aids. To assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of BAHAs for people who are bilaterally deaf. Nineteen electronic resources, including MEDLINE, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library (inception to November 2009). Additional studies were sought from reference lists and clinical experts. Inclusion criteria were applied by two reviewers independently. Data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken by one reviewer and checked by a second. Prospective studies of adults or children with bilateral hearing loss were eligible. Comparisons were BAHAs versus conventional hearing aids [air conduction hearing aid (ACHA) or bone conduction hearing aid (BCHA)], unaided hearing and ear surgery; and unilateral versus bilateral BAHAs. Outcomes included hearing measures, validated measures of quality of life (QoL), adverse events and measures of cost-effectiveness. For the review of cost-effectiveness, full economic evaluations were eligible. Twelve studies were included (seven cohort pre-post studies and five cross-sectional 'audiological comparison' studies). No prospective studies comparing BAHAs with ear surgery were identified. Overall quality was rated as weak for all included studies and meta-analysis was not possible due to differences in outcome measures and patient populations. There appeared to be some audiological benefits of BAHAs compared with BCHAs and improvements in speech understanding in noise compared with ACHAs; however, ACHAs may produce better audiological results for other outcomes. The limited evidence reduces certainty. Hearing is improved with BAHAs compared with unaided hearing. Improvements in QoL with BAHAs were

  19. Comparison of Performance of Transcranial Contralateral Routing of Signal, Pre-Implanted Trimmer Digital and Digital Bone Anchored Hearing Aid in Adults with Unilateral Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Neelamegarajan; Chatni, Suma; Ramadevi, Kasetty Jagannathaiah S; Fakruddin, Darga Baba

    2015-06-11

    Individuals with unilateral hearing loss of severe-profound degree face listening difficulties while localizing a sound source and while perceiving speech in the presence of noise. The objective was to compare the efficacy of the digitally programmable bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA), trimmer digital BAHA and the transcranial contralateral routing of signal (T-CROS) in improving the listening performance in adults with unilateral hearing loss. Twenty-four adults with unilateral hearing loss was assessed for sound field thresholds, speech perception performance in quiet and noise (direct and indirect conditions) and the subjective quality rating of speech in unaided and aided with either T-CROS or digitally programmable BAHA or trimmer digital BAHA attached to the headband. Results indicated that the participants performed better with both the digitally programmable and the trimmer digital BAHA than the T-CROS in both quiet and noise. However, the digitally programmable BAHA performed better when the speech arrived from the poorer ear side. The current study helps in prioritizing the hearing amplification devices for the trial and also helps in arriving at the appropriate hearing amplification device for the individuals with unilateral hearing loss.

  20. Comparison of performance of transcranial contralateral routing of signal, pre-implanted trimmer digital and digital bone anchored hearing aid in adults with unilateral hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelamegarajan Devi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with unilateral hearing loss of severe-profound degree face listening difficulties while localizing a sound source and while perceiving speech in the presence of noise. The objective was to compare the efficacy of the digitally programmable bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA, trimmer digital BAHA and the transcranial contralateral routing of signal (T-CROS in improving the listening performance in adults with unilateral hearing loss. Twenty-four adults with unilateral hearing loss was assessed for sound field thresholds, speech perception performance in quiet and noise (direct and indirect conditions and the subjective quality rating of speech in unaided and aided with either T-CROS or digitally programmable BAHA or trimmer digital BAHA attached to the headband. Results indicated that the participants performed better with both the digitally programmable and the trimmer digital BAHA than the T-CROS in both quiet and noise. However, the digitally programmable BAHA performed better when the speech arrived from the poorer ear side. The current study helps in prioritizing the hearing amplification devices for the trial and also helps in arriving at the appropriate hearing amplification device for the individuals with unilateral hearing loss.

  1. Clobetasol's Influence on the Management and Cost of Skin Overgrowth Associated with the Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildrew, Douglas M; Guittard, Jesse A; Carter, John M; Molony, Timothy B

    2015-01-01

    Management of the skin/abutment interface in patients with bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs) can occasionally be a challenge. Even with the most compliant patients and the most intensive home/office treatment regimens, painful triamcinolone injections and revision surgery can become necessary. Such treatments can be associated with an inordinate cost burden. To our knowledge this research provides the first objective comparison of cost and patient outcomes after the introduction of topical 0.05% clobetasol cream for the care of the skin/abutment interface in patients with BAHAs. Thirty-three patients were managed with the traditional algorithm (local wound care, triamcinolone injection, and revision surgery). Nineteen patients were managed with the contemporary algorithm in which 0.05% topical clobetasol cream was added to the traditional treatment regimen. Common postoperative skin reactions were comparable in the traditional vs contemporary treatment groups: granulation tissue (53.8% vs 56.3%), soft-tissue overgrowth (30.8% vs 18.8%), and both granulation tissue and soft-tissue overgrowth (15.4% vs 25.0%). The addition of clobetasol cream was associated with a marked decrease in the invasive treatment endpoints in the contemporary vs traditional treatment groups: triamcinolone injections (0.0% vs 12.1%) and surgical revision (0.0% vs 9.1%). The difference in cost for managing soft-tissue overgrowth at the abutment site was substantial, with the traditional treatment group averaging $2,773.25 per patient and the contemporary treatment group averaging $47.94 per patient (P<0.021) according to 2013 estimates and values. Clobetasol use during early postoperative care of a BAHA implant dramatically decreases cost and improves treatment outcomes by reducing the need for invasive postoperative procedures to treat common postoperative skin reactions.

  2. Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) in children: Experience of a tertiary referral centre in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Francisco; Silva, Ana; Reis, Cláudia; Coutinho, Miguel; Oliveira, Jorge; Almeida E Sousa, Cecília

    The aim of this study is to describe the experience of a tertiary referral centre in Portugal, of the placement of BAHA in children. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of all children for whom hearing rehabilitation with BAHA was indicated at a central hospital, between January 2003 and December 2014. 53 children were included. The most common indications for placement of BAHA were external and middle ear malformations (n=34, 64%) and chronic otitis media with difficult to control otorrhea (n=9, 17%). The average age for BAHA placement was 10.66±3.44 years. The average audiometric gain was 31.5±7.20dB compared to baseline values, with average hearing threshold with BAHA of 19.6±5.79dB. The most frequent postoperative complications were related to the skin (n=15, 28%). There were no major complications. This study concludes that BAHA is an effective and safe method of hearing rehabilitation in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  3. Retrospective analysis of skin complications related to bone-anchored hearing aid implant: association with surgical technique, quality of life, and audiological benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaranda, Daniel; Garcia, Juan Manuel; Aparicio, Maria Leonor; Montes, Felipe; Barón, Clemencia; Jiménez, Roberto C; Peñaranda, Augusto

    2017-04-25

    The bone-anchored hearing aid is an effective form of auditory rehabilitation. Due to the nature of the implant, the most common complications are skin related. A number of alternative surgical implantation techniques have been used to reduce the frequency and severity of skin complications, including the U-shaped graft and the linear incision. To assess skin complications and their association with surgical technique, quality of life, and audiological benefit in patients with bone-anchored hearing aids. This was a retrospective study conducted in a tertiary referral center in Bogotá, Colombia. Patients who had been fitted with a bone-anchored hearing aid implant (unilaterally or bilaterally) for at least 6 months were included in the study. The Holgers classification was used to classify skin complications (Grade 0=none; Grade 1=erythema; Grade 2=erythema and discharge; Grade 3=granulation tissue; and Grade 4=inflammation/infection resulting in the removal of the abutment). The Glasgow Benefit Inventory questionnaire was used to determine quality of life, and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit questionnaire was used to determine the subjective audiological benefit. A total of 37 patients were included in the study (30 with unilateral implants and 7 with bilateral implant). Of the 44 implants evaluated, 31 (70.3%) were associated with skin complications (7 [15.9%] Grade 1; 4 [9.1%] Grade 2; 15 [34.1%] Grade 3, 5 [11.4%] Grade 4). The U-shaped graft was statistically associated with major complications (Grades 3 and 4) compared with the linear incision technique (p=0.045). No statistically significant differences were found between Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit scores and severity of complications. Similarly, no differences were found between Glasgow Benefit Inventory physical health questions and skin complications. Despite the high frequency, skin complications did not seem to affect quality of life or subjective audiological benefits of

  4. Horizontal plane localization in single-sided deaf adults fitted with a bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, D Wesley; Ashmead, Daniel H; Haynes, David S; Hornsby, Benjamin W Y; Labadie, Robert F; Ricketts, Todd A

    2012-01-01

    : One purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of a unilateral bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) on horizontal plane localization performance in single-sided deaf adults who had either a conductive or sensorineural hearing loss in their impaired ear. The use of a 33-loudspeaker array allowed for a finer response measure than has previously been used to investigate localization in this population. In addition, a detailed analysis of error patterns allowed an evaluation of the contribution of random error and bias error to the total rms error computed in the various conditions studied. A second purpose was to investigate the effect of stimulus duration and head-turning on localization performance. : Two groups of single-sided deaf adults were tested in a localization task in which they had to identify the direction of a spoken phrase on each trial. One group had a sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL group; N = 7), and the other group had a conductive hearing loss (CHL group; N = 5). In addition, a control group of four normal-hearing adults was tested. The spoken phrase was either 1250 msec in duration (a male saying "Where am I coming from now?") or 341 msec in duration (the same male saying "Where?"). For the longer-duration phrase, subjects were tested in conditions in which they either were or were not allowed to move their heads before the termination of the phrase. The source came from one of nine positions in the front horizontal plane (from -79° to +79°). The response range included 33 choices (from -90° to +90°, separated by 5.6°). Subjects were tested in all stimulus conditions, both with and without the Baha device. Overall rms error was computed for each condition. Contributions of random error and bias error to the overall error were also computed. : There was considerable intersubject variability in all conditions. However, for the CHL group, the average overall error was significantly smaller when the Baha was on than when it was off

  5. Three-year experience with the Sophono in children with congenital conductive unilateral hearing loss: tolerability, audiometry, and sound localization compared to a bone-anchored hearing aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelissen, Rik C; Agterberg, Martijn J H; Hol, Myrthe K S; Snik, Ad F M

    2016-10-01

    Bone conduction devices (BCDs) are advocated as an amplification option for patients with congenital conductive unilateral hearing loss (UHL), while other treatment options could also be considered. The current study compared a transcutaneous BCD (Sophono) with a percutaneous BCD (bone-anchored hearing aid, BAHA) in 12 children with congenital conductive UHL. Tolerability, audiometry, and sound localization abilities with both types of BCD were studied retrospectively. The mean follow-up was 3.6 years for the Sophono users (n = 6) and 4.7 years for the BAHA users (n = 6). In each group, two patients had stopped using their BCD. Tolerability was favorable for the Sophono. Aided thresholds with the Sophono were unsatisfactory, as they did not reach under a mean pure tone average of 30 dB HL. Sound localization generally improved with both the Sophono and the BAHA, although localization abilities did not reach the level of normal hearing children. These findings, together with previously reported outcomes, are important to take into account when counseling patients and their caretakers. The selection of a suitable amplification option should always be made deliberately and on individual basis for each patient in this diverse group of children with congenital conductive UHL.

  6. Long-term benefit perception, complications, and device malfunction rate of bone-anchored hearing aid implantation for profound unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluth, Michael B; Eager, Katrise M; Eikelboom, Robert H; Atlas, Marcus D

    2010-12-01

    To longitudinally evaluate short- and long-term subject satisfaction/benefit perception, device usage rates, complication rates, and external device repair rates of bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) implantation on a cohort of adult subjects with profound unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (PUSHL). Prospective clinical trial. Tertiary referral center. Fifty-six adults with PUSHL, 21 of which underwent BAHA implantation (followed for an average of 3.2 years after implantation; range, 0.8-4.6 yr). Short- and long-term satisfaction/benefit perception outcomes consisting of the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile, Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit, and Single-Sided Deafness Questionnaire, including a comparison of results between implanted and nonimplanted subjects. Short- and long-term device usage rates, complications, and device failure issues also were carefully documented. There were statistically significant improvements in nearly all measures of benefit perception documented as well as a high rate of long-term device usage (81%). Although satisfaction and benefit perception outcomes generally tended to regress over time when compared with initial short-term outcomes, long-term scores still tended to be significantly improved nevertheless as compared with preoperative levels. Approximately 38% of implants experienced severe local skin reactions (Grade 2 and above) around the implant site at some point throughout the follow-up period, whereas only one (4.8%) required implant removal. 66.7% of subjects required repair of their external sound processor. BAHA implantation seems to provide a high level of short- and long-term perceived benefit and satisfaction in subjects with PUSHL and high rate of long-term device usage. Implant site adverse local skin reactions and repairs of the external sound processor were quite common.

  7. Technology-limited and patient-derived versus audibility-derived fittings in bone-anchored hearing aid users: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgetts, William E; Hagler, Paul; Hakansson, Bo E V; Soli, Sigfrid D

    2011-02-01

    Current approaches to fit bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) rely heavily on patient feedback of "loudness" and "sound quality." Audiologists are limited to this approach for two reasons: (1) the technology in current models of Baha does not allow for much fine-tuning of frequency response or maximum output on an individual basis and (2) there has not been a valid approach to verify the frequency response or maximum output on an individual basis. The objectives of this study are to (1) describe an alternative approach to fit Baha, an "audibility-derived (AD)" fitting, and (2) test whether outcomes improve with this new fitting compared with the current "patient-derived (PD)" fitting. This study used a repeated measures design where each subject experienced both the AD and PD fittings in random order. Subjects were tested on a variety of outcome measures including output levels of aided speech, hearing in noise test (quiet and in noise), consonant recognition in noise, aided loudness, and subjective percentage of words understood. Electromechanical testing revealed significantly higher aided output with the AD fitting, especially in the high frequencies. Subjects performed significantly better in all outcome measures with the AD fitting approach except when testing aided loudness and subjective perception for which the differences were nonsignificant. When the input levels to the Baha were soft, advantages for the AD fitting were emerging on these tests, but they did not reach significance. This study presents a more objective, fitting approach for Baha that leads to better outcomes in the laboratory. The next steps will be to test these fittings in the real world and to make the approach generally available to clinicians fitting Bahas.

  8. Bone -Anchored Hearing Aid versus Reconstruction of the External Auditory Canal in Children and Adolescents with Congenital Aural Atresia: A Comparison Study of Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Mei Don

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives/Hypothesis: Congenital aural atresia is a rare condition in children affecting 1 in 10,000 to 20,000 children a year. Surgery is required to restore hearing to facilitate normal development. The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in hearing, complications and quality of life of surgical reconstruction of the external auditory canal (EACR and bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA in a pediatric population with congenital aural atresia. Study Design: Subjects were children who had a diagnosis of congenital aural atresia or stenosis and who received either BAHA or EACR. Methods: The medical records of 68 children were reviewed for operative complications and audiometric results. A quality of life questionnaire was prospectively administered to a subset of subjects. Results: Pre-operatively, air conduction threshold were not significantly different between groups at 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz (p>0.05. Post-operatively, the BAHA group (44.3 ± 14.3 and 44.5 ± 11.3 demonstrated a significantly larger hearing gain than the EACR group (20.0 ± 18.9 and 15.3 ± 19.9 in both the short and long-term periods (p<0.001. Overall the incidence of complications and need for revision surgery were comparable between groups (p>0.05. Quality of life assessment revealed no statistical significance between the two groups (p>0.05 Conclusion: Although the quality of life and incidence of surgical complications between the two interventions was not significantly different, BAHA implantation appears to provide a better, more reliable audiologic outcome than EACR.

  9. Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid vs. Reconstruction of the External Auditory Canal in Children and Adolescents with Congenital Aural Atresia: A Comparison Study of Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnoosh, Soroush; Mitsinikos, F Tania; Maceri, Dennis; Don, Debra M

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aural atresia is a rare condition affecting 1 in 10,000-20,000 children a year. Surgery is required to restore hearing to facilitate normal development. The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in hearing, complications, and quality of life of surgical reconstruction of the external auditory canal reconstruction (EACR) and bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in a pediatric population with congenital aural atresia. Subjects were children who had a diagnosis of congenital aural atresia or stenosis and who received either BAHA or EACR. The medical records of 68 children were reviewed for operative complications and audiometric results. A quality of life questionnaire was prospectively administered to a subset of subjects. Pre-operatively, air conduction threshold was not significantly different between groups at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz (p > 0.05). Post-operatively, the BAHA group (44.3 ± 14.3 and 44.5 ± 11.3) demonstrated a significantly larger hearing gain than the EACR group (20.0 ± 18.9 and 15.3 ± 19.9) in both the short and long-term periods (p  0.05). Quality of life assessment revealed no statistical significance between the two groups (p > 0.05). Although the quality of life and incidence of surgical complications between the two interventions was not significantly different, BAHA implantation appears to provide a better, more reliable audiologic outcome than EACR.

  10. In vitro assessment of MRI safety at 1.5 T and 3.0 T for bone-anchored hearing aid implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyoo Jin; KIm, Hyun Soo; Lee, Seung Keun [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae Soo [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate Magnetic Resonance Imaging safety by measuring the translational attraction, torque and susceptibility artifact for Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) implant at 1.5 T and 3.0 T MRI by standard criteria. In vitro assessment tools were made of acrylic-resin by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F2052-06 and F2119-07 standard. Translational attraction of BAHA implant was measured by the maximum deflection angle at 96 cm position, where the magnetically induced deflection was the greatest. The torque was assessed by the qualitative criteria of evaluating the alignment and rotation pattern, when the BAHA implant was positioned on a line with 45° intervals inside the circular container in the center of the bore. The susceptibility artifact images were obtained using the hanged test tool, which was filled with CuSO4 solution. And then the artifact size was measured using Susceptibility Artifact Measurement (SAM) software. In results, the translational attraction was 0 mm at both 1.5 T and 3.0 T and the torque was 0(no torque) at 1.5 T, and +1(mild torque) at 3.0 T. The size of susceptibility artifacts was between 13.20 mm and 38.91 mm. Therefore, The BAHA implant was safe for the patient in clinical MR environment.

  11. Measurement of skull bone thickness for bone-anchored hearing aids: an experimental study comparing both a novel ultrasound system (SonoPointer) and computed tomographic scanning to mechanical measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspil, Philipp A; Tretbar, Steffen H; Böhlen, Friederike H; Rohde, Stefan; Glaser, Simon; Plinkert, Peter K

    2010-04-01

    A-mode ultrasound scanning with coded signals allows bone thickness measurements at the site of bone-anchored hearing aid surgery as compared to computed tomographic scanning and mechanical measurements. Adequate bone thickness is a prerequisite for successful, long-lasting osseointegration of titanium fixtures for bone-anchored hearing aids. Computed tomography can be used to measure bone thickness but has several drawbacks. Bone thickness was measured at the site of bone-anchored hearing aids surgery in 28 formaldehyde-preserved human cadaver temporoparietal bones. Four blinded investigators used a hand-held, A-mode ultrasound system with direct coupling at 2.25 MHz transducer using coded signals (SonoPointer) and repeated the measurements twice. Comparisons were made with high-resolution computed tomographic scanning and mechanical micrometer caliper measurements. There was significant anatomical variation in the temporoparietal bones. Computed tomography was in good agreement with the mechanical reference. All specimens could be measured by the SonoPointer. The mean difference between the mechanical control and ultrasound scanning averaged for all measurements by all investigators was 0.3 mm (standard deviation, 1.2 mm). Trained ultrasound experts yielded better results (mean difference, 0.3 mm; standard deviation, 1.0 mm). Agreement was best for bone thickness up to 5 mm. Outliers occurred in bones thicker than 7.5 mm. The SonoPointer is a promising, noninvasive, hand-held tool for real-time measurement of bone thickness in bone-anchored hearing aid surgery, especially for children. Even disregarding the absolute thickness reading, the SonoPointer could be used to search intraoperatively for a local maximum of bone thickness.

  12. Are open-fit hearing aids a possible alternative to bone-anchored hearing devices in patients with mild to severe hearing loss? A preliminary trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amberley V. Ostevik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Open-fit hearing aids (OFHAs may be of benefit for some individuals with chronic outer and middle ear conditions for which boneanchored hearing devices (BAHDs are normally recommended. The purpose of this study was to compare performance between OFHAs and BAHDs. A Starkey Destiny 800 OFHA was fit on eight adult BAHD users and speech perception measures in quiet and in background noise were compared under two different test conditions: i BAHD only and ii OFHA only. Equivalent outcome measure performance between these two conditions suggests that the OFHA was able to provide sufficient amplification for mild to moderate degrees of hearing loss (pure-tone averages (PTAs less than 47 dB HL. The improved speech perception performances and increased loudness ratings observed for several of the participants with moderately-severe to severe degrees of hearing loss (PTAs of 47 dB HL or greater in the BAHD only condition suggest that the OFHA did not provide sufficient amplification for these individuals. Therefore, OFHAs may be a successful alternative to the BAHD for individuals with no more than a moderate conductive hearing loss who are unable or unwilling to undergo implant surgery or unable to wear conventional hearing aids due to allergies, irritation, or chronic infection associated with the ear being blocked with a shell or earmold.

  13. Accuracy of Image-guided Surgical Systems at the Lateral Skull Base as Clinically Assessed Using Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Posts as Surgical Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Ramya; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objective Image-guided surgical (IGS) technology has been clinically available for over a decade. To date, no acceptable standard exists for reporting the accuracy of IGS systems, especially for lateral skull base applications. We present a validation method that uses the post from bone anchored hearing aid (BAHA) patients as a target. We then compare the accuracy of two IGS systems—one using laser skin-surface scanning (LSSS) and another using a non-invasive fiducial frame (FF) attached to patient via dental bite-block (DBB) for registration. Study design Prospective. Setting Tertiary referral center. Patients Six BAHA patients who had adequate dentition for creation of a DBB. Intervention(s) For each patient, a dental impression was obtained, and a customized DBB was made to hold a FF. Temporal bone CT scans were obtained with the patient wearing the DBB, FF, and a customized marker on the BAHA post. In a mock OR, CT scans were registered to operative anatomy using two methods: (a) LSSS, (b) FF. Main outcome measure(s) For each patient and each system, the position of the BAHA marker in the CT scan and in the mock OR (using optical measurement technology) were compared and the distances between them are reported to demonstrate accuracy. Results Accuracy (mean ± standard deviation) was 1.54 ± 0.63 mm for DBB registration and 3.21 ± 1.02 mm for LSSS registration. Conclusions An IGS system using FF registration is more accurate than one using LSSS (p = 0.03, two-sided Student's t-test). BAHA patients provide a unique patient population upon which IGS systems may be validated. PMID:18836389

  14. Clinical determination of target registration error of an image-guided otologic surgical system using patients with bone-anchored hearing aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Ramya; Labadie, Robert F.; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael

    2007-03-01

    Image guidance in otologic surgery has been thwarted by the need for a non-invasive fiducial system with target registration error (TRE) at the inner ear below 1.5mm. We previously presented a fiducial frame for this purpose that attaches to the upper dentition via patient-specific bite blocks and demonstrated a TRE of 0.73mm (+/-0.23mm) on cadaveric skulls. In that study, TRE measurement depended upon placement of bone-implanted, intracranial target fiducials-clearly impossible to repeat clinically. Using cadaveric specimens, we recently presented a validation method based on an auditory implant system (BAHA System® Cochlear Corp., Denver, CO). That system requires a skull-implanted titanium screw behind the ear upon which a bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) is mounted. In our validation, we replace the BAHA with a fiducial marker to permit measurement of TRE. That TRE is then used to estimate TRE at an internal point. While the method can be used to determine accuracy at any point within the head, we focus in this study on the inner ear, in particular the cochlea, and we apply the method to patients (N=5). Physical localizations were performed after varying elapsed times since bite-block fabrication, and TRE at the cochlea was estimated. We found TRE to be 0.97mm at the cochlea within one month and 2.5mm after seven months. Thus, while accuracy deteriorates considerably with delays of seven months or more, if this frame is used within one month of the fabrication of the bite-block, it achieves the goal and in fact exhibits submillimetric accuracy.

  15. Audiological and subjective benefit results in bone-anchored hearing device users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleas-Aguirre, Maria Soledad; Bulnes Plano, Maria Dolores; de Erenchun Lasa, Iñigo Ruiz; Ibáñez Beroiz, Berta

    2012-06-01

    Audiological and subjective benefits in adult bone-anchored hearing device users. Retrospective evaluation. Tertiary referral center. Thirty-eight adult subjects fitted with unilateral bone-anchored hearing device. Audiometric measurements included sound-field pure-tone and speech audiometries (speech reception threshold, maximum speech discrimination). Subjective benefit was assessed by the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) questionnaire. Ipsilateral and contralateral hearing loss was considered. Comparison was drawn between Compact, Divino, and Intenso processors. To compare sound-field pure-tone and speech audiometries and APHAB results with and without the device adjusted for the unaided results. With the device, sound-field pure-tone audiometry results revealed an increase gain in all frequencies. Sound-field speech audiometry showed that the mean threshold of speech recognition was 20 dB lower, maximum discrimination was attained at 5 dB less, and percentage of maximum discrimination increased by 5%. Scores in the APHAB questionnaire decreased except for the aversiveness subscale. Auditory-adjusted gain showed greater benefit in subjects with ipsilateral conductive hearing loss.Subjects with contralateral normal hearing or conductive hearing loss showed greater improvement that those with contralateral mixed or sensorineural hearing loss. There were no differences between Compact, Divino and Intenso processors. When comparisons are adjusted for unaided condition, the bone-anchored hearing device provided auditory and subjective benefit in subjects with ipsilateral conductive hearing loss and contralateral normal hearing or conductive hearing loss. It gave marginal benefit in ipsilateral mixed and contralateral mixed or sensorineural hearing loss. No differences were found between the Compact, Intenso, and Divino processors.

  16. Bone-anchored hearing device placement with translabyrinthine tumor removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRackan, Theodore R; Goddard, John C; Wilkinson, Eric P; Slattery, William H; Brackmann, Derald E

    2015-02-01

    Translabyrinthine resection of intracranial tumors results in single-sided deafness, which can be treated by surgical and nonsurgical means. Here we describe the first series examining complication and device usage rates among patients receiving a surgically implanted bone-anchored hearing device (BAHD) at the time of translabyrinthine tumor removal. Case series with chart review. Private tertiary neurotologic referral center. Patients (N = 154) undergoing concurrent BAHD placement and translabyrinthine tumor resection. Concurrent BAHD placement and translabyrinthine tumor removal. Postoperative complication rates and BAHD usage. Of the 154 patients, 121 (78.6%) had no device-related complications. The most common device-related complications were skin overgrowth (8.4%), acute infection (5.2%), and chronic infection (3.2%). The overall and specific complication rates did not differ from published BAHD complication rates. One patient (0.6%) developed a cerebrospinal leak through the surgical site for the device. At the time of last follow-up (mean, 39.8 months), 151 patients (95.0%) were still using their devices. Patients undergoing concurrent translabyrinthine tumor removal and BAHD placement exhibit similar device-related complication profiles as patients undergoing standard device placement. Based on these outcomes and the high long-term usage rates, BAHD insertion at the time of translabyrinthine intracranial surgery can be considered a safe and useful procedure. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  17. Bone-anchored hearing devices in children with unilateral conductive hearing loss: a patient-carer perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banga, Rupan; Doshi, Jayesh; Child, Anne; Pendleton, Elizabeth; Reid, Andrew; McDermott, Ann-Louise

    2013-09-01

    We sought to determine the outcome of implantation of a bone-anchored hearing device in children with unilateral conductive hearing loss. A retrospective case note analysis was used in a tertiary referral pediatric hospital to study 17 consecutive cases of pediatric patients with unilateral conductive hearing loss who were fitted with a bone-anchored hearing device between 2005 and 2010. The average age of the patients at the time of bone-anchored hearing device fitting was 10 years 6 months (range, 6 years 3 months to 16 years). Qualitative subjective outcome measures demonstrated benefit. The vast majority of patients reported improved social and physical functioning and improved quality of life. All 17 patients are currently using their bone-anchored hearing device on a daily basis after a follow-up of 6 months. This study has shown improved quality of life in children with unilateral hearing loss after implantation of their bone-anchored hearing device. There was a high degree of patient satisfaction and improvement in health status reported by children and/or carers. Bone-anchored hearing devices have an important role in the management of children with symptomatic unilateral hearing loss. Perhaps earlier consideration of a bone-anchored hearing device would be appropriate in selected cases.

  18. On the evaluation of a superpower sound processor for bone-anchored hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, A J; Kruyt, I J; Mylanus, E A M; Hol, M K S; Snik, A F M

    2018-04-01

    Performance of a superpower bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha), the Baha Cordelle from Cochlear Bone-Anchored Solutions (BCD1), was compared to its successor, the Baha 5 SuperPower (BCD2). A comparative study in which each patient served as its own control. Tertiary clinic. Ten experienced BCD1 users with profound mixed hearing loss. For comparison, data from another study with 10 experienced users with a severe mixed hearing loss using a Cochlear Baha 5 power sound processor (BCD-P) were included. Speech reception thresholds in noise and APHAB and SSQ questionnaires. Speech reception thresholds for the digits-in-noise (DIN) test were significantly lower (P  5%) from the BCD2 values. With the APHAB questionnaire scores were significantly lower, that is more favourable, for the ease of communication (P  5%). Scores for the speech and quality domains of the SSQ questionnaire were significantly higher, that is more favourable, for BCD2 than for BCD1. APHAB and SSQ scores for BCD-P were not significantly different from those for BCD2 (P > 5%). Data for BCD2 in profound mixed loss are similar to those for BCD-P and a severe mixed loss. Of 10 patients, 2 expressed a strong preference for BCD2 over BCD1, and 7 patients had a preference for BCD2 over BCD1. One patient preferred BCD1 because of its built-in telecoil facility. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Otolaryngology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Site for bone-anchored hearing system for children younger than 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukatu, Ceisha Chinwe; Desai, Nilesh Kundanlal; Todd, Norman Wendell

    2015-02-01

    To describe in children younger than the present US FDA-approved 5 years of age the thickest part of the temporal bone available for placement of a bone-anchored hearing system. Children with unilateral hearing loss, as with aural atresia, have deficits in at least language comprehension and oral expression. The early provision of hearing to the atretic ear may minimize the potential for auditory deprivation. Point prevalence descriptive study. Tertiary referral pediatric hospital. Thirty-eight patients less than 6 years old with congenital aural atresia had undergone temporal bone computed tomography (CT). Bone thickness lateral (ie, superficial) to the sinodural angle, in the topmost axial CT slice that included any adjacent petrous ridge, was measured. The mean bone thicknesses lateral to the sinodural angles of the atretic ears were 5.1, 5.0, 5.9, 5.2, 5.2, and 4.8 mm for the bone thickness lateral (ie, superficial) to the sinodural angle is sufficient for many children suffering from aural atresia to have bone-anchored hearing devices implanted younger than age 5 years. Use of the sinodural site would require a magnetic bone-anchored hearing system, which could be repositioned posteriorly at age 5 years when pinna construction and atresiaplasty endeavors typically begin. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  20. Clinical Outcome of a Wide-diameter Bone-anchored Hearing Implant and a Surgical Technique With Tissue Preservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowinckel, Marius S; Møller, Martin N; Wielandt, Kirsten N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical outcome of a surgical technique with tissue preservation for a wide bone-anchored hearing implant concerning postoperative complications, skin reactions, implant loss, and implant stability. STUDY DESIGN: Consecutive, prospective case series. SETTING: Tertia...

  1. Evaluation of a new powerful bone-anchored hearing system: a comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Arjan J; Snik, Ad F M; Hol, Myrthe K S; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M

    2013-06-01

    The recent introduction of digital hearing aid technology for bone-conduction devices employing percutaneous stimulation may be beneficial for patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss and single sided deafness. Performance of a recently released sound processor for bone-anchored implants, the Ponto Pro Power from Oticon Medical (bone-conduction device 2 [BCD2]), was compared with that of the Baha Intenso from Cochlear (bone-conduction device 1 [BCD1]). Direct comparison of the subject's own device (BCD1) with the new device (BCD2) was examined in a nonrandomized design. Subjects were initially tested with BCD1. BCD2 was tested after a 4 wk acclimatization period. Eighteen subjects with mixed hearing loss and with at least 4 mo experience with BCD1 completed the study. Mean air-conduction and bone-conduction thresholds averaged across the frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz were 73.9 and 34.2 dB HL, respectively. Performance of the two devices was evaluated objectively by measuring aided free-field thresholds, speech perception in quiet, and speech perception in noise. A subjective evaluation was carried out with the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) (Cox and Alexander, 1995) and the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) questionnaire (Gatehouse and Noble, 2004). In addition, user experiences, user satisfaction, and device preference were obtained via proprietary questionnaires. Statistical significance was established with analysis-of-variance (ANOVA) and paired t-statistics with Bonferroni correction. Aided free-field thresholds and speech reception thresholds (SRTs) in quiet were not statistically significantly different for either device (p > 0.05). In contrast, SRTs in noise were 2.0 dB lower (p < 0.001) for BCD2 than for BCD1. APHAB questionnaire scores on all subscales provided statistically significantly greater benefit (p < 0.05) for BCD2 than for BCD1. Also, with the SSQ most items in the speech and sound

  2. Abutment-free bone-anchored hearing devices in children: initial results and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centric, Aaron; Chennupati, Sri Kiran

    2014-05-01

    Bone-anchored implantable hearing devices are widely accepted as a surgical option for certain types of hearing loss in both adults and children. Most commercially available devices involve a percutaneous abutment to which a sound processor attaches. The rate of complications with such bone conduction systems is greater than 20%. Most complications arise from the abutment. Recently, the Sophono (Boulder, CO) Alpha 1, an abutment-free system, has been introduced. We conducted a retrospective chart review of the first five patients who underwent implantation with the Sophono abutment-free bone conduction hearing system with the Alpha 1 processor at our institution and report here on these patients' pre- and postoperative audiometric data and clinical courses. Average improvement in pure-tone average was 32dB hearing loss and average improvement in speech response threshold was 28dB hearing loss. All patients were responding in the normal to mild hearing loss range in the operated ear after device activation. Average improvement across individual frequencies was between 17 and 37dB (SD 5.5-11dB). Our audiometric results to date are promising and have been consistent with published data on other bone-anchored hearing devices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A minimally invasive technique for the implantation of bone-anchored hearing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David F; Kim, Harold H

    2013-09-01

    To describe and evaluate a novel technique for the implantation of bone conduction hearing devices as compared with a common, conventional technique. Case series with chart review. Tertiary referral otology and neurotology practice. Individuals who underwent the implantation of bone-anchored hearing devices between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2011, were identified. Demographic data, surgical indications, surgical technique used, surgical time, and complications were recorded. Soft tissue complications were graded on the Holgers classification scheme. Group 1 was defined as those undergoing a traditional technique using a dermatome with subcutaneous tissue reduction. Group 2 was defined as those undergoing the described technique for implantation of the coupling hardware with minimal subcutaneous soft tissue reduction. Forty patients underwent the procedure, with 11 patients comprising group 1 and 29 patients comprising group 2. Group 2 required a shorter operative time (32.3 vs 56.1 minutes, P bone-anchored hearing devices using the described technique that necessitated minimal soft tissue reduction.

  4. Prospective analysis of stability testing for bone-anchored hearing implants in children after osseointegrating surgery without skin thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultcrantz, Malou; Lanis, Aviya

    2015-04-01

    To report normative values for osseointegration in 10 children with bone-anchored hearing implants who were consecutively operated on using a tissue preserving technique with individualized abutments and prospectively followed with stability testing 1 year after surgery. Children were implanted with bone-anchored hearing devices using a non-skin thinning implantation technique and followed during the course of a year. Mean age was 5.1 years. Stability testing with Osstell's resonance frequency analysis (RFA) measurement was used at each visit, providing values between 0 and 100 (representing a range of low to high stability, respectively). Clinical signs and symptoms were also noted at each visit. Three of the children were operated on using a two-step procedure, while the remaining seven children were operated on using a one-step procedure. Eight of the children showed skin-related problems during the 1-year control period that were easily treated. Two children experienced an abutment loss early following surgery (1 two-step and 1 one-step) and showed low resonance measurements of 30 or less within the first 3-4 weeks. Two children experienced a traumatic abutment loss and two required a change in abutment length. During the 1-year follow-up, nine children demonstrated signs of peri-implant infections, only two of which were recurrent. Stability was measured to be higher in eight children with longer abutments. Two children experienced low stability (hearing aid and mean ISQ values were 56.2 and 47.5 for 6mm and 9mm abutments, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Innovation in abutment-free bone-anchored hearing devices in children: Updated results and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Shaun; Centric, Aaron; Chennupati, Sri Kiran

    2015-10-01

    Bone-anchored hearing devices are an accepted treatment option for hearing restoration in various types of hearing loss. Traditional devices have a percutaneous abutment for attachment of the sound processor that contributes to a high complication rate. Previously, our institution reported on the Sophono (Boulder, CO, USA) abutment-free system that produced similar audiologic results to devices with abutments. Recently, Cochlear Americas (Centennial, CO, USA) released an abutment-free bone-anchored hearing device, the BAHA Attract. In contrast to the Sophono implant, the BAHA Attract utilizes an osseointegrated implant. This study aims to demonstrate patient benefit abutment-free devices, compare the results of the two abutment-free devices, and examine complication rates. A retrospective chart review was conducted for the first eleven Sophono implanted patients and for the first six patients implanted with the BAHA Attract at our institution. Subsequently, we analyzed patient demographics, audiometric data, clinical course and outcomes. Average improvement for the BAHA Attract in pure-tone average (PTA) and speech reception threshold (SRT) was 41dB hearing level (dBHL) and 56dBHL, respectively. Considering all frequencies, the BAHA Attract mean improvement was 39dBHL (range 32-45dBHL). The Sophono average improvement in PTA and SRT was 38dBHL and 39dBHL, respectively. The mean improvement with Sophono for all frequencies was 34dBHL (range 24-43dBHL). Significant improvements in both pure-tone averages and speech reception threshold for both devices were achieved. In direct comparison of the two separate devices using the chi-square test, the PTA and SRT data between the two devices do not show a statistically significant difference (p-value 0.68 and 0.56, respectively). The complication rate for these abutment-free devices is lower than that of those featuring the transcutaneous abutment, although more studies are needed to further assess this potential advantage

  6. Bone-anchored hearing implants in single-sided deafness patients: Long-term use and satisfaction by gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Hubert T; Nelissen, Rik C; Kramer, Sophia E; Cremers, Cor W R J; Snik, Ad F M; Hol, Myrthe K S

    2015-12-01

    To examine the long-term satisfaction and possible effects of gender in patients with single-sided deafness (SSD) who underwent bone-anchored hearing implant (BAHI) surgery. Retrospective case-control study. All (n = 145) consecutive SSD patients fitted with a BAHI between January 2001 and October 2011 were asked to complete a questionnaire consisting of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB), the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired (CPHI), and the SSD questionnaire. Twenty-three of the 135 responding patients (17%) reported discontinuation of the device over an average follow-up time of 61.7 months. No significant differences were found in the degree of disability or coping between men and women, according to the APHAB and CPHI scores. Improvement in quality of life and appreciation of the BAHI were not affected by gender, age, directional hearing ability, and handling of the device. The appearance of the device positively affected their appreciation. At the mean follow-up time of 117 months, 69.2% was using their BAHI. In the domains background noise, reverberant surroundings, and aversion to sounds, the mean APHAB scores were significantly changed at 3 months, 1 year, and 10 years after implantation. Our study examined the results of BAHI use in SSD patients over a relatively long follow-up period, with an average of 5 years. The majority of users (83%) were satisfied with the device. No significant gender differences were in terms of reported appreciation, hearing disability, or coping with a BAHI. 3b. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. A new wide-diameter bone-anchored hearing implant-prospective 1-year data on complications, implant stability, and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate a new wide bone-anchored hearing implant considering initial stability, stability over time, implant loss, and skin reaction. STUDY DESIGN: Consecutive, prospective case series. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Twenty adult patients were enrolled. All operati...

  8. Decisional Conflict in Parents Considering Bone-Anchored Hearing Devices in Children With Unilateral Aural Atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M Elise; Haworth, Rebecca; Chorney, Jill; Bance, Manohar; Hong, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The benefits of bone-anchored hearing devices (BAHD) in children with unilateral aural atresia are controversial. We sought to determine whether there is parental decisional conflict surrounding elective placement of BAHD for this indication. Caregivers of pediatric patients with unilateral aural atresia and normal contralateral ear undergoing percutaneous BAHD consultation were enrolled. All consultations were carried out by one pediatric otolaryngologist in a consistent manner. After consultation, the participants completed a demographics form and the Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS) questionnaire. Twenty-three caregivers of 15 male (65.2%) and 8 female (34.8%) children (mean age 5.65 years) participated. The overall median DCS score was 15.63 (standard error = 4.21). Significant decisional conflict (DCS score ≥ 25) was found in 10 participants (43.5%). The median DCS score in the group choosing surgery was 5.47, and it was 23.44 in those who did not choose surgery (Mann-Whitney U = 39, Z = -1.391, P = .164). The median DCS score for mothers and fathers was 25 and 3.91, respectively. Many parents experienced significant decisional conflict when considering percutaneous BAHD surgery in children with unilateral aural atresia in our study population. Future research should explore the impact of decisional conflict on health outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Bone-anchored hearing device surgery: Linear incision without soft tissue reduction. A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuna, Xabier; Navarro, Juan José; Palicio, Idoia; Álvarez, Leire

    2015-01-01

    The classic surgical procedure for percutaneous bone-anchored hearing devices involves removal of a large area of subcutaneous tissue down to the periosteum. This leads to alopecia and raises the risk of devascularization of the overlying skin with the potential for infection and scarring. The objective of this study was to determine the results of implant placement using a single, linear incision with no underlying soft tissue reduction. A prospective study was conducted in our hospital over a period of 14 months in all consecutive surgeries performed using this technique in adults. Patients were reviewed regularly (week 1, week 3, weeks 4-6 and months 3, 6 and 12) to assess wound healing including evaluation with the Holgers scale. Corresponding to 34 patients, 34 cases were consecutively enrolled in this study. We found that 15% of the patients had minor skin reactions during the first visit (Holgers grade 1 or 2); this number raised to 20% in week 3, but at week 4 only 1 patient had a reaction score of 1 (which was solved by week 6). None of the cases required revision surgery and all skin reactions were treated topically. Our results suggest that the tissue preservation technique is a simple and effective insertion technique with a favourable healing process and cosmesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of an abutment-level superpower sound processor for bone-anchored hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, A J; Kruyt, I J; Mylanus, E A M; Hol, M K S; Snik, A F M

    2018-02-16

    Performance of an abutment-level superpower sound processor for bone-anchored hearing, the Ponto 3 SuperPower from Oticon Medical (BCD2), was compared to an earlier model from Oticon Medical (BCD1). A comparative study in which each patient serves as its own control. Tertiary clinic. Eighteen experienced BCD1 users with profound mixed hearing loss. Speech reception thresholds in noise; APHAB and SSQ questionnaires. In a group of 18 patients with severe mixed hearing loss, the performance of a recently introduced bone conduction device (BCD2) is evaluated relative to that of an earlier model (BCD1). Speech reception thresholds for the sentence-in-noise test in the speech and noise frontal condition are not significantly different (P > .05) for BCD1 and BCD2. Speech reception thresholds for frontal speech and three identical noise sources are 1.7 dB lower for BCD2 than for BCD1 (P  .05). Scores for the speech, spatial and quality of hearing domains of the SSQ questionnaire are significantly higher (P < .01), that is more favourable, for BCD2 than for BCD1 with effect sizes of 1.22, 0.71 and 1.05, respectively. Scores for the SSQ-factors "speech understanding," "spatial," "clarity, separation and identification" and "listening effort and concentration" were all significantly higher (P < .05) for BCD2 than for BCD1, with effect sizes of 1.28, 0.64, 0.98 and 0.78, respectively. On a proprietary questionnaire, 16 patients indicate a preference for BCD2 over BCD1 for conversations in a small group and two patients have no preference for either device. In a large group, one patient prefers BCD1, six patients have no preference, and eleven patients prefer BCD2. When listening to music, all patients prefer BCD2 over BCD1, with a strong preference for BCD2 for seven patients. When asked for an overall preference, all patients prefer BCD2 over BCD1, with nine patients strongly preferring BCD2. The lower speech reception thresholds in noise with BCD2 relative to BCD1

  11. Quality-of-life outcomes after bone-anchored hearing device surgery in children with single-sided sensorineural deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Jayesh; Banga, Rupan; Child, Anne; Lawrence, Rebecca; Reid, Andrew; Proops, David; McDermott, Ann-Louise

    2013-01-01

    To report our experience in a series of children with single-sided sensorineural deafness where a bone-anchored hearing device (BAHD) was used for auditory rehabilitation. Retrospective case review. Tertiary referral centre. Eight children (4 boys and 4 girls) who had BAHD surgery for single-sided sensorineural deafness between 2007 and 2010. Bone-anchored hearing device was used for auditory rehabilitation. Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory (GCBI), Single-sided Deafness (SSD) Questionnaire and change in health benefit scores (visual analogue scale). All but one of the children showed a positive GCBI score; the child that reported a negative score was because of low self confidence and self-esteem issues secondary to bullying at school. The results of the SSD questionnaire were generally positive with a mean satisfaction score of the BAHD as 9/10. All the children had an improvement in heath benefit. Our findings add further evidence to support patient perceived benefit of a BAHD in single sided sensorineural deafness in the paediatric population.

  12. Comparison of speech discrimination in noise and directional hearing with 2 different sound processors of a bone-anchored hearing system in adults with unilateral severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesarg, Thomas; Aschendorff, Antje; Laszig, Roland; Beck, Rainer; Schild, Christian; Hassepass, Frederike; Kroeger, Stefanie; Hocke, Thomas; Arndt, Susan

    2013-08-01

    objective benefit from SP-1. Depending on the speech-in-noise presentation setting, the difference between objective benefit from SP-2 and SP-1 might be mainly attributed to the new technological features in SP-2 unavailable in SP-1 such as 1) automatic noise management reducing the noise in the speech signal and thus improving the signal-to-noise ratio of the resulting signal on the better ear, 2) programmable multichannel sound-processing and nonlinear dynamic range compression offering considerably greater control over signal amplification compared to SP-1, and 3) implementation of a prescription rule for unilateral deafness addressing the specific amplification needs of patients with UHL by reducing amplification in the low frequencies and applying additional gain in the high frequencies. Sound localization is poor but better than chance level in the unaided condition as well as in both bone-anchored hearing system-aided conditions.

  13. Predisposing factors for adverse skin reactions with percutaneous bone anchored hearing devices implanted with skin reduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candreia, Claudia; Birrer, Ruth; Fistarol, Susanna; Kompis, Martin; Caversaccio, Marco; Arnold, Andreas; Stieger, Christof

    2016-12-01

    We present an analysis of adverse events after implantation of bone anchored hearing device in our patient population with focus on individual risk factors for peri-implant skin reactions. The investigation involved a chart review of adult Baha patients (n = 179) with 203 Bahas implanted with skin reduction techniques between 1993 and 2009, a questionnaire (n = 97) and a free clinical examination (n = 47). Skin reactions were graded by severity from 0 (no skin reaction) to 4 (implant loss resulting from infection) according to Holgers. We analyzed the skin reaction rate (SRR) defined as the number of skin reactions per year and the worst Holgers grade (WHG), which indicates the grade of the worst skin reaction per implant. We defined 20 parameters including the demographic characteristics, surgery details, subjective benefits, handling and individual factors. The most frequent adverse events (85 %) were skin reactions. The average SRR was 0.426 per Baha year. Six parameters showed an association with the SRR or the WHG. The clinically most relevant factors are an elevated Body Mass Index (BMI, p = 0.02) and darker skin type (p = 0.03). The SRR increased with the distance between the tragus and the implant (p = 0.02). Regarding the identified risk factors, the SRR might be reduced by selecting a location for the implant near the pinna and by specific counseling regarding post-operative care for patients with darker skin type or an elevated Body Mass Index (BMI). Few of the factors analyzed were found to influence the SRR and WHG. Since most adverse skin reactions could be treated easily with local therapy, our results suggest that in adult patients, individual risk factors for skin reactions are not a contraindication for Baha implantation. Thus, patients can be selected purely on audiological criteria.

  14. Laser-Modified Surface Enhances Osseointegration and Biomechanical Anchorage of Commercially Pure Titanium Implants for Bone-Anchored Hearing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Omar; Simonsson, Hanna; Palmquist, Anders; Thomsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants inserted in the temporal bone are a vital component of bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS). Despite low implant failure levels, early loading protocols and simplified procedures necessitate the application of implants which promote bone formation, bone bonding and biomechanical stability. Here, screw-shaped, commercially pure titanium implants were selectively laser ablated within the thread valley using an Nd:YAG laser to produce a microtopography with a superimposed nanotexture and a thickened surface oxide layer. State-of-the-art machined implants served as controls. After eight weeks’ implantation in rabbit tibiae, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) values increased from insertion to retrieval for both implant types, while removal torque (RTQ) measurements showed 153% higher biomechanical anchorage of the laser-modified implants. Comparably high bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC) were recorded for both implant types but with distinctly different failure patterns following biomechanical testing. Fracture lines appeared within the bone ~30–50 μm from the laser-modified surface, while separation occurred at the bone-implant interface for the machined surface. Strong correlations were found between RTQ and BIC and between RFA at retrieval and BA. In the endosteal threads, where all the bone had formed de novo, the extracellular matrix composition, the mineralised bone area and osteocyte densities were comparable for the two types of implant. Using resin cast etching, osteocyte canaliculi were observed directly approaching the laser-modified implant surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed canaliculi in close proximity to the laser-modified surface, in addition to a highly ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils aligned parallel to the implant surface contour. It is concluded that the physico-chemical surface properties of laser-modified surfaces (thicker oxide, micro- and nanoscale texture) promote bone bonding

  15. Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prefer the open-fit hearing aid because their perception of their voice does not sound “plugged up.” ... My voice sounds too loud. The “plugged-up” sensation that causes a hearing aid user’s voice to ...

  16. A new transcutaneous bone anchored hearing device - the Baha® Attract System: the first experience in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işeri, Mete; Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Kara, Ahmet; Durgut, Merve; Oztürk, Murat; Topdağ, Murat; Calışkan, Sebla

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we reported our experience with a new transcutaneous bone conduction hearing device, the Baha® Attract System. This multi-center clinical study included the first 12 patients (8 females, 4 males; mean age 27.6 years; range 5 to 65 years) in whom a new transcutaneous bone conduction system was implanted in Turkey. The mean air-bone gap was 41 dB. Bone smoothing around the implant was needed in five patients. We placed a sound processor in the fourth postoperative week for all patients. Our study results suggest that the new bone conduction implant is promising for the patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss who are unable to wear conventional air conduction hearing aid and comparable to percutaneous systems.

  17. How to Get Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Products Hearing Aids How to get Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... my hearing aids? How do I get hearing aids? Before getting a hearing aid, you should consider ...

  18. The Master Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, James R.

    2013-01-01

    As early as the 1930s the term Master Hearing Aid (MHA) described a device used in the fitting of hearing aids. In their original form, the MHA was a desktop system that allowed for simulated or actual adjustment of hearing aid components that resulted in a changed hearing aid response. Over the years the MHA saw many embodiments and contributed to a number of rationales for the fitting of hearing aids. During these same years, the MHA was viewed by many as an inappropriate means of demonstrating hearing aids; the audio quality of the desktop systems was often superior to the hearing aids themselves. These opinions and the evolution of the MHA have molded the modern perception of hearing aids and the techniques used in the fitting of hearing aids. This article reports on a history of the MHA and its influence on the fitting of hearing aids. PMID:23686682

  19. Bone-anchored hearing aid implant location in relation to skin reactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, H.T.; Wolf, M.J.F. de; Rooy, J.W.J. de; Hol, M.K.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Mylanus, E.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of implant location and skin thickness on the frequency and degree of adverse skin reactions around the abutment. DESIGN: Retrospective multivariate analysis of implant position related to skin thickness and clinical variables. SETTING: Tertiary referral center.

  20. Hearing Aid and children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamileh Fatahi

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop oral communication, hearing impaired infants and young children must be able to hear speech comfortably and consistently. To day children with all degrees of hearing loss may be condidates for some kinds of amlification. As children differ from adults, many Factors should be consider in hearing aid selection, evaluation and fitting. For example the child age when he or she is candidate for custom instruments? Do we consider programmable Hearing aid? Are multi memory instruments appropriate for them? What about directional microphones? What style of hearing aid do we select? In this paper such questions are Answered.

  1. Stability, survival, and tolerability of a 4.5-mm-wide bone-anchored hearing implant: 6-month data from a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelissen, Rik C; den Besten, Christine A; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Hol, Myrthe K S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the stability, survival, and tolerability of 2 percutaneous osseointegrated titanium implants for bone conduction hearing: a 4.5-mm diameter implant (test) and a 3.75-mm diameter implant (control). Fifty-seven adult patients were included in this randomized controlled clinical trial. Sixty implants were allocated in a 2:1 (test-control) ratio. Follow-up visits were scheduled at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days; 6 and 12 weeks; and 6 months. At every visit, implant stability quotient (ISQ) values were recorded by means of resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and skin reactions were evaluated according to the Holgers classification. Implants were loaded with the bone conduction device at 3 weeks. Hearing-related quality of life was evaluated using the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB), the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), and the Glasgow Health Status Inventory (GHSI). ISQ values were statistically significantly higher for the test implant compared to the control implant. No implants were lost and soft tissue reactions were comparable for both implants. Positive results were reported in the hearing-related quality of life questionnaires. These 6-month results indicate that both implants and their corresponding hearing devices are safe options for hearing rehabilitation in patients with the appropriate indications. Loading at 3 weeks did not affect the stability of either implant.

  2. Music and Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. PMID:25361601

  3. Music and Hearing Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. K. Madsen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems.

  4. Music and hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Sara M K; Moore, Brian C J

    2014-10-31

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Hearing aid adjustment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemann, Trine; Matthews, Ben; Raudaskoski, Pirkko

    2012-01-01

    to the interaction during hearing aid fitting. This report of a Danish pilot study describes two such problems. The first problem arises from the requirement that the audiologist needs to ‘translate’ the patient’s subjective hearing description for making technological decisions. The second problem is the way...... in which the hearing aid user’s implicit and often unrealistic expectations are handled. This kind of research has potential application for developing a model of best practices....

  6. [Bone-anchored auricular prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bille, M; Homøe, P; Vesterhauge, S; Rixen, M; Bretlau, P

    1994-10-03

    During the period February 1989-September 1991, 15 patients with absent or defective pinna were treated with a bone-anchored auricular prosthesis at the ENT-department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen. These patients were followed up from the hospital records and by means of a questionnaire. Altogether 40 titanium implants have been inserted, of which one implant was found not to be integrated at the time of the second-stage surgery. Five patients underwent additional surgery, one patient because of non-integration of a screw, and four patients on account of soft-tissue reactions. From the questionnaire replies it appears that all patients found the cosmetic result and the technique concerning mounting of the prosthesis very satisfactory. Nearly half the patients found that the care of the skin around the abutments caused considerable problems. Three patients had experienced unintended losses of the prosthesis. In conclusion, treatment with a bone anchored auricular prosthesis has considerable advantages compared to treatment with a prosthesis attached by adhesive. Furthermore the use of a bone-anchored prosthesis should be considered a viable alternative to surgical reconstruction because of the outstanding aesthetic result and because the surgical procedure puts less strain on the patient. The disadvantage of the method is the lifelong daily care of the skin and the dependence on the health services.

  7. Hearing Aids Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Globally, hearing loss is the second most frequent disability. About 80% of the persons affected by hearing loss do not use hearing aids. The goal of this edited volume is to present a theoretically founded, interdisciplinary approach geared at understanding and improving social interaction...... impacted by hearing loss and (non-) use of hearing technologies. The researchers report on pilot studies from Australia, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Switzerland and the USA. Using Conversation Analysis, the studies identify problems and serve as points of departure for possible solutions. Researchers...

  8. Types of Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain situations (for example, background noise and whistle reduction). They also have greater flexibility in hearing aid programming so that the sound they transmit can be matched to the needs ...

  9. Hearing Aid Personalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Nielsen, Jakob; Jensen, Bjørn Sand

    2013-01-01

    Modern digital hearing aids require and offer a great level of personalization. Today, this personalization is not performed based directly on what the user actually perceives, but on a hearing-care professional’s interpretation of what the user explains about what is perceived. In this paper......, an interactive personalization system based on Gaussian process regression and active learning is proposed, which personalize the hearing aids based directly on what the user perceives. Preliminary results demonstrate a significant difference between a truly personalized setting obtained with the proposed system...

  10. Contralateral routing of signal hearing aid versus transcutaneous bone conduction in single-sided deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leterme, Gaëlle; Bernardeschi, Daniele; Bensemman, Anissa; Coudert, Cyrille; Portal, Jean-Jacques; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier; Vicaut, Eric; Frachet, Bruno; Bozorg Grayeli, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a contralateral routing of signal (CROS) hearing aid to a transcutaneous bone-anchored device in the same conditions. This prospective crossover study included 18 adult patients with a single-sided deafness (SSD). After a trial period of 60 days with CROS and 7 days with a transcutaneous bone-anchored device (Alpha 1®, Sophono, Boulder, Colo., USA) on a headband, 13 (72%) patients opted for Alpha 1, 2 patients for CROS, and 3 rejected both rehabilitation methods. Clinical tolerance, satisfaction, hearing performances (pure-tone audiometry, speech test in quiet and in noise, stereo audiometry, sound localization, and Hearing in Noise Test), and quality of life (Glasgow Benefit Inventory, Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit and Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit questionnaires) were measured at 3 and 12 months after the implantation. Both devices improved equally the hearing in noise and the quality of life. Transcutaneous devices represent an effective option in SSD. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. [Medical devices correcting the deafness: Hearing aids and auditory implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevoux, Jérôme; Coez, Arnaud; Truy, Éric

    2017-11-01

    The management of deafness has become a major public health issue as their lack of detection has a deleterious effect in children and increases the risk factors for aggravation of other pathologies in adults. The detection of deafness remains a real challenge: in the newborn, systematic screening at birth is a good strategy, in adults, much remains to be done. The functional rehabilitation of deafness is based on the use of hearing aids by aerial or bone conduction or of auditory implants. There are three types of auditory implants available: bone anchored hearing implants, middle ear implants and cochlear implants. Many actors, in particular social organizations, can intervene in the financial management of these medical devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Parent Hearing Aid Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen; Roberts, Mallory; Mullings, Day; Harward, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses parent experiences in obtaining and managing hearing aids for their young child. The purpose was to identify challenges parents encounter to determine what state agencies can do to improve parent access to amplification. Data were collected July through September of 2010; 40 parents of children ages birth to 3 years old…

  13. Influence of Implantable Hearing Aids and Neuroprosthesison Music Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Rahne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification and discrimination of timbre are essential features of music perception. One dominating parameter within the multidimensional timbre space is the spectral shape of complex sounds. As hearing loss interferes with the perception and enjoyment of music, we approach the individual timbre discrimination skills in individuals with severe to profound hearing loss using a cochlear implant (CI and normal hearing individuals using a bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha. With a recent developed behavioral test relying on synthetically sounds forming a spectral continuum, the timbre difference was changed adaptively to measure the individual just noticeable difference (JND in a forced-choice paradigm. To explore the differences in timbre perception abilities caused by the hearing mode, the sound stimuli were varied in their fundamental frequency, thus generating different spectra which are not completely covered by a CI or Baha system. The resulting JNDs demonstrate differences in timbre perception between normal hearing individuals, Baha users, and CI users. Beside the physiological reasons, also technical limitations appear as the main contributing factors.

  14. Is complex signal processing for bone conduction hearing aids useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompis, Martin; Kurz, Anja; Pfiffner, Flurin; Senn, Pascal; Arnold, Andreas; Caversaccio, Marco

    2014-05-01

    To establish whether complex signal processing is beneficial for users of bone anchored hearing aids. Review and analysis of two studies from our own group, each comparing a speech processor with basic digital signal processing (either Baha Divino or Baha Intenso) and a processor with complex digital signal processing (either Baha BP100 or Baha BP110 power). The main differences between basic and complex signal processing are the number of audiologist accessible frequency channels and the availability and complexity of the directional multi-microphone noise reduction and loudness compression systems. Both studies show a small, statistically non-significant improvement of speech understanding in quiet with the complex digital signal processing. The average improvement for speech in noise is +0.9 dB, if speech and noise are emitted both from the front of the listener. If noise is emitted from the rear and speech from the front of the listener, the advantage of the devices with complex digital signal processing as opposed to those with basic signal processing increases, on average, to +3.2 dB (range +2.3 … +5.1 dB, p ≤ 0.0032). Complex digital signal processing does indeed improve speech understanding, especially in noise coming from the rear. This finding has been supported by another study, which has been published recently by a different research group. When compared to basic digital signal processing, complex digital signal processing can increase speech understanding of users of bone anchored hearing aids. The benefit is most significant for speech understanding in noise.

  15. Buying a Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other medical information about your ears and health. Conductive Hearing Loss: A hearing loss is conductive when there is ... be available for these and other forms of conductive hearing loss. Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A hearing loss is sensorineural ...

  16. [Implantable middle ear hearing aids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    à Wengen, D F

    2004-01-01

    Conventional acoustic hearing aids are limited in their performance. Due to physical laws their amplification of sound is limited to within 5 kHz. However, the frequencies between 5 and 10 kHz are essential for understanding consonants. Words can only be understood correctly if their consonants can be understood. Furthermore noise amplification remains a problem with hearing aids. Other problems consist of recurrent infections of the external auditory canal, intolerance for occlusion of the ear canal, feedback noise, and resonances in speech or singing. Implantable middle ear hearing aids like the Soundbridge of Symphonix-Siemens and the MET of Otologics offer improved amplification and a more natural sound. Since the first implantation of a Soundbridge in Switzerland in 1996 almost one thousand patients have been implanted worldwide. The currents systems are semi-implantable. The external audio processor containing the microphone, computer chip, battery and radio system is worn in the hair bearing area behind the ear. Implantation is only considered after unsuccessful fitting of conventional hearing aids. In Switzerland the cost for these implantable hearing aids is covered by social insurances. Initially the cost for an implant is higher than for hearing aids. However, hearing aids need replacement every 5 or 6 years whereas implants will last 20 to 30 years. Due to the superior sound quality and the improved understanding of speech in noise, the number of patients with implantable hearing aids will certainly increase in the next years. Other middle ear implants are in clinical testing.

  17. Hearing Aids and Hearing Impaired Students in Rural Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Charles

    This paper describes functions of the components of hearing aids and provides a detailed procedure to detect hearing aid dysfunctions. The most common type of hearing aids for school children are the behind the ear type. Various hearing aid components change sound into an electrical signal, which is amplified and adjusted by a volume control. The…

  18. Comparison of hearing aid outcome measures in adult hearing aid users

    OpenAIRE

    Miggiani, Pauline; Tabone, Nadine;

    2016-01-01

    Hearing aid outcome measures have become an essential part of audiological intervention. This study aimed to explore hearing aid benefit in Maltese hearing aid users through subjective and objective outcome measures. The Profil Imqassar dwar il-Benefiċċju tal-Hearing Aids (PIBHA), a translated version of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) questionnaire, was used to subjectively examine hearing aid benefit in 56 adult hearing aid users fallin...

  19. Subjective benefit after BAHA system application in patients with congenital unilateral conductive hearing impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, S.J.W.; Hol, M.K.S.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Leijendeckers, J.M.; Snik, A.F.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether unilateral Bone-anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) fitting led to subjective hearing benefit in patients with congenital unilateral conductive hearing impairment. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective evaluation on 20 patients. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Ten adults and 10

  20. Hearing Aid with Visual Indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    The invention comprises a hearing aid, which has a casing containing a signal receiving part for receiving an audio signal, an audio transducer for providing an audio signal to the user, a signal transmission path between the signal receiving part and the audio transducer, whereby a battery...... is provided for powering the signal receiving part, the signal path and the audio transducer, and where further means are provided for assessing the function of the hearing aid and for generating an electrical indication signal which indicates the function of the hearing aid and where further means...... are provided for intermittently generating a power signal in response to the electrical indication signal and where means are provided for converting the power signal into a light signal, such that the light signal is visible from outside the hearing aid....

  1. A Hearing Aid Primer 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetter, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    This hearing aid primer is designed to define the differences among the three levels of hearing instrument technology: conventional analog circuit technology (most basic), digitally programmable/analog circuit technology (moderately advanced), and fully digital technology (most advanced). Both moderate and advanced technologies mean that hearing…

  2. 21 CFR 874.3300 - Hearing Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hearing Aid. 874.3300 Section 874.3300 Food and... EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3300 Hearing Aid. (a) Identification. A hearing aid is wearable sound-amplifying device that is intended to compensate for impaired hearing. This...

  3. Hearing Aid Fitting & Electrophysiologic Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Jalaei

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of deaf individual is one of the important subjects that has attracted attention of many researchers during past centuries. Different opinions have been established in this direction. Electrophysiologic tests were established and developed parallel to developments in rehabilitation. Therefore, opinion of using electrophysiologic test for evaluation and fitting of hearing aid became gradually popular. Ultimately, the electrophysiologic tests are used in evaluation and fitting of hearing aid in two ways: 1-Direct way 2- Indirect way "nIn direct way aided ABR is obtained and special attention is paid to wave V. This technique has many difficulties. Inindirect way, electrophysiologic tests such, ECochG, OAE and ABR, AMLR, ALR and P300 and other objective tests are used, especially in infants and neonates for evaluating the state of hearing. Researches are continuing in this field. It is probable to have aided electrophysiologic responses with speech stimuli in near future.

  4. Hearing Aid Acquisition in Chinese Older Adults With Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Wen, Xu; Hu, Xiangyang; Gong, Rui; Luo, Yanan; Guo, Chao; Chen, Gong; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence and associated factors of hearing aid acquisition in Chinese older adults. We obtained data from a population-based survey on ear and hearing disorders, which was conducted in 4 provinces of China in 2014 to 2015. Trained examiners conducted pure tone audiometry and audiologists further ascertained for hearing loss. We relied on hearing conditions and audiologists' recommendations to identify 1503 participants who needed to wear hearing aids. Among those 1503 participants, the estimated prevalence of hearing aid acquisition was 6.5% (95% confidence interval = 5.3%, 7.8%). Urban residency, having severe hearing loss, understanding hearing aid function, and receiving a hearing test in the past 12 months were associated with elevated prevalence of hearing aid acquisition. The top-3 reported reasons for not acquiring a hearing aid were not understanding its function (25.4%), not needing it (22.3%), and not being able to afford it (21.3%). Hearing aid use, as a widespread rehabilitation and treatment of hearing loss, remains a big challenge in China. Apart from providing low-cost hearing aids, more efforts should focus on improving hearing knowledge and disseminating information about hearing aid function among older adults.

  5. Exploring Hearing Aid Problems: Perspectives of Hearing Aid Owners and Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rebecca J; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Meyer, Carly J; Eikelboom, Robert H

    To gather perspectives of hearing aid owners and hearing healthcare clinicians with regard to problems that arise after hearing aid fitting and use these perspectives to generate a conceptual framework to gain a better understanding of these problems. Participants included a group of 17 hearing aid owners and a group of 21 hearing healthcare clinicians; data collection occurred separately for each group. Participants each attended two group sessions in Perth, Western Australia, wherein they: (1) generated statements describing the problems associated with hearing aids and (2) grouped and rated the statements to identify key themes. Concept mapping was used to generate a conceptual framework. Participants identified four concepts regarding hearing aid problems as follows: (1) hearing aid management; (2) hearing aid sound quality and performance; (3) feelings, thoughts, and behaviors; and (4) information and training. While hearing aid owners and clinicians generated similar results regarding the concepts derived, the clinicians reported that the problems identified had a greater negative impact on hearing aid success than did hearing aid owners. The magnitude and diversity of hearing aid problems identified in this study highlight the ongoing challenges that hearing aid owners face and suggest that current processes for hearing aid fitting can be improved. Problems relating to hearing aid management were most often deemed to have the greatest impact on hearing aid success and be the most preventable/solvable, and thus are a good starting point when addressing hearing aid-related problems.

  6. Interactive Strategies for Hearing Aid Fitting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2011-01-01

    Fitting advanced hearing aids is complex. The fitting of a hearing aid is the complex process of finding the optimal compensation for the auditory disabilities of an individual hearing aid user, given the important preconditions of his/her auditory tasks in daily life and the acoustical invironment

  7. Social Support Predicts Hearing Aid Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurjit; Lau, Sin-Tung; Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The goals of the current research were to determine: (1) whether there is a relationship between perceived social support and hearing aid satisfaction, and (2) how well perceived social support predicts hearing aid satisfaction relative to other correlates previously identified in the literature. In study 1, 173 adult ((Equation is included in full-text article.)age = 68.9 years; SD = 13.4) users of hearing aids completed a survey assessing attitudes toward health, hearing, and hearing aids, as well as a questionnaire assessing Big-Five personality factors (Openness to Experience, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism) either using paper and pencil or the Internet. In a follow-up study designed to replicate and extend the results from study 1, 161 adult ((Equation is included in full-text article.)age = 32.8 years; SD = 13.3) users of hearing aids completed a similar survey on the Internet. In study 2, participants also completed a measure of hearing aid benefit and reported the style of their hearing aid. In studies 1 and 2, perceived social support was significantly correlated with hearing aid satisfaction (respectively, r = 0.34, r = 0.51, ps hearing aid satisfaction scores was predicted by perceived social support, satisfaction with one's hearing health care provider, duration of daily hearing aid use, and openness. In study 2, 43% of the variance in hearing aid satisfaction was predicted by perceived social support, hearing aid benefit, neuroticism, and hearing aid style. Overall, perceived social support was the best predictor of hearing aid satisfaction in both studies. After controlling for response style (i.e., acquiescence or the tendency to respond positively), the correlation between perceived social support and hearing aid satisfaction remained the same in study 1 (r = 0.34, p hearing aids, a finding that was replicated in a different sample of participants investigated in study 2. A significant relationship between perceived

  8. Self-Fitting Hearing Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitte Keidser

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A self-contained, self-fitting hearing aid (SFHA is a device that enables the user to perform both threshold measurements leading to a prescribed hearing aid setting and fine-tuning, without the need for audiological support or access to other equipment. The SFHA has been proposed as a potential solution to address unmet hearing health care in developing countries and remote locations in the developed world and is considered a means to lower cost and increase uptake of hearing aids in developed countries. This article reviews the status of the SFHA and the evidence for its feasibility and challenges and predicts where it is heading. Devices that can be considered partly or fully self-fitting without audiological support were identified in the direct-to-consumer market. None of these devices are considered self-contained as they require access to other hardware such as a proprietary interface, computer, smartphone, or tablet for manipulation. While there is evidence that self-administered fitting processes can provide valid and reliable results, their success relies on user-friendly device designs and interfaces and easy-to-interpret instructions. Until these issues have been sufficiently addressed, optional assistance with the self-fitting process and on-going use of SFHAs is recommended. Affordability and a sustainable delivery system remain additional challenges for the SFHA in developing countries. Future predictions include a growth in self-fitting products, with most future SFHAs consisting of earpieces that connect wirelessly with a smartphone and providers offering assistance through a telehealth infrastructure, and the integration of SFHAs into the traditional hearing health-care model.

  9. Self-Fitting Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convery, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    A self-contained, self-fitting hearing aid (SFHA) is a device that enables the user to perform both threshold measurements leading to a prescribed hearing aid setting and fine-tuning, without the need for audiological support or access to other equipment. The SFHA has been proposed as a potential solution to address unmet hearing health care in developing countries and remote locations in the developed world and is considered a means to lower cost and increase uptake of hearing aids in developed countries. This article reviews the status of the SFHA and the evidence for its feasibility and challenges and predicts where it is heading. Devices that can be considered partly or fully self-fitting without audiological support were identified in the direct-to-consumer market. None of these devices are considered self-contained as they require access to other hardware such as a proprietary interface, computer, smartphone, or tablet for manipulation. While there is evidence that self-administered fitting processes can provide valid and reliable results, their success relies on user-friendly device designs and interfaces and easy-to-interpret instructions. Until these issues have been sufficiently addressed, optional assistance with the self-fitting process and on-going use of SFHAs is recommended. Affordability and a sustainable delivery system remain additional challenges for the SFHA in developing countries. Future predictions include a growth in self-fitting products, with most future SFHAs consisting of earpieces that connect wirelessly with a smartphone and providers offering assistance through a telehealth infrastructure, and the integration of SFHAs into the traditional hearing health-care model. PMID:27072929

  10. The Society and the Hearing Aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Danesh

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Many people around the world are in need for using hearing aid, a prothesis which is prescribed for compensating the hearing loss in hard of hearing patients.Although Hearing aid has crucial role in improving hearing skills in such patients, it has many psychological effects and Social premonitions for the users.we will discuss some of these distresses and the common approaches for resolving economical, cosmetic and the emotional and social problems relted to hearing aid will be discussed.

  11. Fitting multichannel-compression hearing aids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreschler, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    Multichannel hearing aids have been introduced recently in clinical practice. In this paper, some advantages and disadvantages of multichannel hearing aids are discussed. The advantages include an improved use of compression. However, the number of settings will be larger in multichannel hearing

  12. Hearing Aid Use in Everyday Life: Managing Contextual Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Williger, Bettina; Lang, Frieder R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: We investigated usage of and satisfaction with hearing aid devices in everyday life among older adults with hearing loss. Our research further advances the role of hearing contexts for hearing aid use and satisfaction. A central assumption was that hearing aid owners adapt the usage of the hearing aid devices to contextual demands of hearing depending on their personal resources. Methods: In a sample of 158 hearing aid owners aged 50-88 years, we examined proactive h...

  13. IEC-based Hearing Aids Fitting

    OpenAIRE

    Hideyuki, Takagi; 高木, 英行; Ohsaki, Miho; Osaki, Miho

    1999-01-01

    We propose a hearing aid fitting method based on an interactive evolutionary computation (IEC). First, we identify the problems with current hearing aid fitting methods and propose an IEC fitting method to improve the fitting process with completely different approach from that of conventional fitting methods. Then, we design an experimental hearing aid system and evaluate the IEC fitting method. Using speech and music sources, we show that our proposed IEC fitting method outperforms conventi...

  14. Hearing aids with no batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I wish to offer a characterization of 'skilled practitioners' from an Ethnomethodological perspective. The skilled practitioner in question is a generic 'hard of hearing' person. The ambition is that such a characterization, both in its making and its final state, may be an intrinsic...... part of design practices concerning the development of hearing aids. Within design studies, the idea of a skilled practitioner has a host of brothers and sisters all prefaced with the family name 'skilled'- skilled users, skilled workers, skilled employees - but the basic idea is the same for all....... Those for whom a design process may ultimately benefit in the form of a product, taken broadly, are skilled, a priori, in the set of practices for which the product is intended. The idea of a skilled practitioner is also prevalent in other areas of study, for example in Activity Theory (Engström...

  15. Hearing Aid Buying Guide: Sound Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aid retailers—were rated among the highest in customer satisfaction.) Both audiologists and hearing-aid specialists can evaluate ... try bargaining or asking for a lower-priced model. 5. Look for bargains. Costco offers free screenings ...

  16. Hearing Aids and Personal Sound Amplifiers: Know the Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Hearing Aids and Personal Sound Amplifiers: Know the Difference Share ... or use them as substitutes—for approved hearing aids. "Hearing aids and personal sound amplification products (PSAPS) ...

  17. Hearing aids for mild to moderate hearing loss in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Melanie A; Kitterick, Pádraig T; Chong, Lee Yee; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; Barker, Fiona; Hoare, Derek J

    2017-09-25

    The main clinical intervention for mild to moderate hearing loss is the provision of hearing aids. These are routinely offered and fitted to those who seek help for hearing difficulties. By amplifying and improving access to sounds, and speech sounds in particular, the aim of hearing aid use is to reduce the negative consequences of hearing loss and improve participation in everyday life. To evaluate the effects of hearing aids for mild to moderate hearing loss in adults. The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the ENT Trials Register; the Cochrane Register of Studies Online; MEDLINE; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 23 March 2017. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of hearing aids compared to a passive or active control in adults with mild to moderate hearing loss. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcomes in this review were hearing-specific health-related quality of life and the adverse effect pain. Secondary outcomes were health-related quality of life, listening ability and the adverse effect noise-induced hearing loss. We used GRADE to assess the quality of the evidence for each outcome; this is indicated in italics. We included five RCTs involving 825 participants. The studies were carried out in the USA and Europe, and were published between 1987 and 2017. Risk of bias across the studies varied. Most had low risk for selection, reporting and attrition bias, and a high risk for performance and detection bias because blinding was inadequate or absent.All participants had mild to moderate hearing loss. The average age across all five studies was between 69 and 83 years. The duration of the studies ranged between six weeks and six months.There was a large beneficial effect of hearing aids on hearing-specific health-related quality of life associated with participation in daily life as

  18. Efficient individualization of hearing aid processed sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Nielsen, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    preferences while the system itself learns the user’s preference. Since the learning is based on probabilistic modeling concepts, the system handles inconsistent user feedback efficiently. Experiments with hearing impaired subjects show that the system quickly discovers individual preferred hearing......Due to the large amount of options offered by the vast number of adjustable parameters in modern digital hearing aids, it is becoming increasingly daunting—even for a fine-tuning professional—to perform parameter fine tuning to satisfactorily meet the preference of the hearing aid user. In addition......, the communication between the fine-tuning professional and the hearing aid user might muddle the task. In the present paper, an interactive system is proposed to ease and speed up fine tuning of hearing aids to suit the preference of the individual user. The system simultaneously makes the user conscious of his own...

  19. Challenges in IC design for hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2012-01-01

    . The demands for performance and features at very low supply voltage and power consumption constantly prove a challenge to the physical design of hearing aids and not at least the design of the ICs for these. As a result of this all large hearing aid manufacturers use fully customized ASICs in their products...

  20. Satisfaction of Elderly Hearing Aid Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Lorena; Ribas, Angela; Almeida, Gleide; Luz, Idalina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The impact of auditory sensory deprivation in the life of an individual is enormous because it not only affects one's ability to properly understand auditory information, but also the way people relate to their environment and their culture. The monitoring of adult and elderly subjects with hearing loss is intended to minimize the difficulties and handicaps that occur as a consequence of this pathology. Objective To evaluate the level of user satisfaction with hearing aids. Methods A clinical and experimental study involving 91 elderly hearing aid users. We used the questionnaire Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life to determine the degree of the satisfaction provided by hearing aids. We evaluated mean global score, subscales, as well as the variables time to use, age, and degree of hearing loss. Results Mean global score was 4.73, the score for Positive Effects 5.45, Negative Factors 3.2, demonstrating that they were satisfied; Services and Costs 5.98: very satisfied ; 3.65 Personal Image: dissatisfied. We observed statistically significant difference for the time of hearing aid use, age, and degree of hearing loss. Conclusion The SADL is a tool, simple and easy to apply and in this study we can demonstrate the high degree of satisfaction with the hearing aids by the majority of the sample collected, increasing with time of use and a greater degree of hearing loss. PMID:28050214

  1. Introduction to audiology: Some basics about hearing loss, hearing technologies and barriers to hearing aid use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtou, Eleni; Meis, Markus

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides background information for researchers who wish to become familiar with some basic medical and audiological aspects of hearing loss and the technology of hearing aids. It introduces (1) the disciplines involved in research on hearing loss, (2) the medical categories of hearing...... loss and their various effects on communication, (3) the different degrees of hearing loss as defined by different national and international organizations, (4) statistics on the preva- lence of hearing loss worldwide, (5) some technological aspects of hearing instruments, (6) sta- tistics on non......-usage of hearing instruments worldwide, and (7) barriers to using hearing aids. Since hearing loss is a worldwide pervasive phenomenon which is likely to increase even further in the future, the authors point out that an understanding of the non-use of hearing aids is crucial....

  2. 21 CFR 874.3330 - Master hearing aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Master hearing aid. 874.3330 Section 874.3330 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3330 Master hearing aid. (a) Identification. A master hearing aid is an electronic device intended to simulate a hearing aid during audiometric...

  3. Hearing Aid Buying Guide: Sound Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... managed with cochlear implants, which electrically stimulate the auditory nerve by bypassing the damaged portions of the ... connectivity between hearing aids, data logging, and a memory of your listening preferences. Another newer feature is ...

  4. Objective and subjective hearing aid assessment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Lisa Lucks

    2007-12-01

    To determine whether specific sentence recognition assessments were sensitive enough to serve as objective outcome measurements that document subjective improvements in speech understanding with hearing aids. The Revised Speech Perception in Noise test (R-SPIN; R. C. Bilger, J. M. Nuetzel, W. M. Rabinowitz, & C. Rzeczkowski, 1984), the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT; M. Nilsson, S. D. Soli, & J. A. Sullivan, 1994), and the Quick Speech-in-Noise test (QuickSIN; Etymotic Research, 2001; M. C. Killion, P. A. Niquette, G. I. Gudmundsen, L. J. Revit, & S. Banerjee, 2004) were administered to 21 hearing aid users to determine whether the tests could adequately document improvements in speech understanding with hearing aids compared with the research participants' self-assessments of their own performance. Comparisons were made between unaided and aided performance on these sentence tests and on the Hearing Aid Performance Inventory (HAPI; B. E. Walden, M. Demorest, & E. Hepler, 1984). The R-SPIN, the HINT Quiet threshold, and the QuickSIN signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss were the most sensitive of the sentence recognition tests to objectively assess improvements in speech perception performance with hearing aids. Comparisons among the subjective and objective outcome measures documented that HAPI ratings improved as performance on the R-SPIN, the HINT Quiet threshold, and the QuickSIN SNR loss improved. Objective documentation of subjective impressions is essential for determining the efficacy of treatment outcomes in hearing aid fitting. The findings reported here more clearly define the relationship between objective and subjective outcome measures in an attempt to better define true hearing aid benefit.

  5. Investigating the Knowledge, Skills, and Tasks Required for Hearing Aid Management: Perspectives of Clinicians and Hearing Aid Owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rebecca J; Meyer, Carly J; Eikelboom, Robert H; Atlas, Marcus D

    2018-03-08

    The purpose of this study is to identify hearing aid owners' and clinicians' opinions of the knowledge, skills, and tasks required for hearing aid management and the importance of each of these to overall success with hearing aids. Concept mapping techniques were used to identify key themes, wherein participants generated, sorted, and rated the importance of statements in response to the question "What must hearing aid owners do in order to use, handle, manage, maintain, and care for their hearing aids?" Twenty-four hearing aid owners (56 to 91 years of age; 54.2% men, 45.8% women) and 22 clinicians (32 to 69 years of age; 9.1% men, 90.9% women) participated. Participants identified 111 unique items describing hearing aid management within 6 concepts: (a) "Daily Hearing Aid Use," (b) "Hearing Aid Maintenance and Repairs," (c) "Learning to Come to Terms with Hearing Aids," (d) "Communication Strategies," (e) "Working With Your Clinician," and (f) "Advanced Hearing Aid Knowledge." Clinicians' opinions of the importance of each statement varied only slightly from the opinions of the hearing aid owner group. Hearing aid owners indicated that all 6 concepts were of similar importance, whereas clinicians indicated that the concept "Advanced Hearing Aid Knowledge" was significantly less important than the other 5 concepts. The results highlight the magnitude of information and skill required to optimally manage hearing aids. Clinical recommendations are made to improve hearing aid handling education and skill acquisition.

  6. A Bone-Thickness Map as a Guide for Bone-Anchored Port Implantation Surgery in the Temporal Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignard, Jérémie; Arnold, Andreas; Weisstanner, Christian; Caversaccio, Marco; Stieger, Christof

    2013-01-01

    The bone-anchored port (BAP) is an investigational implant, which is intended to be fixed on the temporal bone and provide vascular access. There are a number of implants taking advantage of the stability and available room in the temporal bone. These devices range from implantable hearing aids to percutaneous ports. During temporal bone surgery, injuring critical anatomical structures must be avoided. Several methods for computer-assisted temporal bone surgery are reported, which typically add an additional procedure for the patient. We propose a surgical guide in the form of a bone-thickness map displaying anatomical landmarks that can be used for planning of the surgery, and for the intra-operative decision of the implant’s location. The retro-auricular region of the temporal and parietal bone was marked on cone-beam computed tomography scans and tridimensional surfaces displaying the bone thickness were created from this space. We compared this method using a thickness map (n = 10) with conventional surgery without assistance (n = 5) in isolated human anatomical whole head specimens. The use of the thickness map reduced the rate of Dura Mater exposition from 100% to 20% and suppressed sigmoid sinus exposures. The study shows that a bone-thickness map can be used as a low-complexity method to improve patient’s safety during BAP surgery in the temporal bone. PMID:28788390

  7. Hearing Aid Fitting: Monaural vs. Binaural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Keshani

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important issue for selecting and fitting of hearing aids that should receive special attention is binaural amplification. According to several investigations, superiority of binaural amplification on monaural one is confirmed. Binaural Amplification may have considerable effects on fromation and developing of superior dimensions of hearing including: Localization, Binaural squelch (Better hearing in presence of noise. So, it is necessary to know the basic and scientific concepts and applicable principles of binaural hearing and binaural fitting. Present paper deals with this important subject.

  8. Cognitive hearing aids? Insights and possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Eline Borch; Lunner, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The working memory plays an important role in successfully overcoming adverse listening conditions and should consequently be considered when designing and testing hearing aids. A number of studies have established the relationship between hearing in noise and working memory involvement, but with the Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall (SWIRL) test, it is possible to show that working memory is also involved in listening under favorable conditions and that noise reduction has a positive influence in situation with very little noise. Although the capacity of the working memory is a finite individual size, its involvement can differ with fatigue and other factors and individualization of hearing aids should take this into account to obtain the best performance. A way of individually adapting hearing aids is based on changes in the electrical activity of the brain (EEG). Here we present the possibilities that arise from using EEG and show that ear-mounted electrodes is able to record useful EEG that can be explored for individualization of hearing aids. Such an adaptation could be done based on changes in the electrical activity of the brain (EEG). Here we present the possibilities that arise from using EEG and show that ear-mounted electrodes is able to record useful EEG that can be explored for individualization of hearing aids.

  9. Internet Competency Predicts Practical Hearing Aid Knowledge and Skills in First-Time Hearing Aid Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidment, David; Brassington, William; Wharrad, Heather; Ferguson, Melanie

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess whether Internet competency predicted practical hearing aid knowledge and handling skills in first-time hearing aid users. The design was a prospective, randomized controlled trial of a multimedia educational intervention consisting of interactive video tutorials (or reusable learning objects [RLOs]). RLOs were delivered through DVD for TV or PC, and online. Internet competency was measured at the hearing aid fitting appointment, whereas hearing aid knowledge and practical handling skills were assessed 6 weeks postfitting. Internet competency predicted practical hearing aid knowledge and handling skills, controlling for age, hearing sensitivity, educational status, and gender for the group that received the RLOs. Internet competency was inversely related to the number of times the RLOs were watched. Associations between Internet competency and practical hearing aid knowledge, handling skills, and watching the RLOs fewer times may have arisen because of improved self-efficacy. Therefore, first-time hearing aid users who are more competent Internet users may be better equipped to apply newly learned information to effectively manage their hearing loss.

  10. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Hartmut; Rählmann, Sebastian; Walger, Martin; Margolf-Hackl, Sabine; Kießling, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss with clinically assessed hearing aid benefit in older hearing-impaired persons. Hearing aid benefit was assessed using objective measures regarding speech recognition in quiet and noisy environments as well as a subjective measure reflecting everyday situations captured using a standardized questionnaire. A broad range of general cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and intelligence were determined using different neuropsychological tests. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the outcome of the neuropsychological tests as well as age and hearing loss as independent variables and the benefit measures as dependent variables. Thirty experienced older hearing aid users with typical age-related hearing impairment participated. Most of the benefit measures revealed that the participants obtained significant improvement with their hearing aids. Regression models showed a significant relationship between a fluid intelligence measure and objective hearing aid benefit. When individual hearing thresholds were considered as an additional independent variable, hearing loss was the only significant contributor to the benefit models. Lower cognitive capacity - as determined by the fluid intelligence measure - was significantly associated with greater hearing loss. Subjective benefit could not be predicted by any of the variables considered. The present study does not give evidence that hearing aid benefit is critically associated with cognitive function in experienced hearing aid users. However, it was found that lower fluid intelligence scores were related to higher hearing thresholds. Since greater hearing loss was associated with a greater objective benefit, these results strongly support the advice of using hearing aids regardless of age and cognitive function to counter hearing loss and the adverse effects of age-related hearing impairment. Still, individual cognitive capacity might

  11. Beyond the hearing aid: Assistive listening devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Alice E.

    2003-04-01

    Persons with hearing loss can obtain great benefit from hearing aids but there are many situations that traditional amplification devices will not provide enough help to ensure optimal communication. Assistive listening and signaling devices are designed to improve the communication of the hearing impaired in instances where traditional hearing aids are not sufficient. These devices are designed to help with problems created by listening in noise or against a competing message, improve distance listening, facilitate group conversation (help with problems created by rapidly changing speakers), and allow independence from friends and family. With the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990, assistive listening devices (ALDs) are becoming more accessible to the public with hearing loss. Employers and public facilities must provide auxiliary aids and services when necessary to ensure effective communication for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing. However many professionals and persons with hearing loss are unaware of the various types and availability of ALDs. An overview of ALDs along with a discussion of their advantages and disadvantages will be given.

  12. A Self-Fitting Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidser, Gitte; Dillon, Harvey; Hartley, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The need for reliable access to hearing health care services is growing globally, particularly in developing countries and in remotely located, underserved regions in many parts of the developed world. Individuals with hearing loss in these areas are at a significant disadvantage due to the scarcity of local hearing health care professionals and the high cost of hearing aids. Current approaches to making hearing rehabilitation services more readily available to underserved populations include teleaudiology and the provision of amplification devices outside of the traditional provider-client relationship. Both strategies require access to such resources as dedicated equipment and/or specially trained staff. Another possible strategy is a self-fitting hearing aid, a personal amplification device that is equipped with an onboard tone generator to enable user-controlled, automated, in situ audiometry; an onboard prescription to determine the initial hearing aid settings; and a trainable algorithm to enable user-controlled fine-tuning. The device is thus assembled, fitted, and managed by the user without the need for audiological or computer support. This article details the self-fitting concept and its potential application in both developing and developed countries. Potential advantages and disadvantages of such a device are discussed, and considerations for further investigations into the concept are presented. Overall, the concept is considered technologically viable with the main challenges anticipated to be development of clear, simple user instructions and a delivery model that ensures reliable supplies of instant-fit ear tips and batteries. PMID:22143873

  13. Investigation of internal feedback in hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Lars

    2009-01-01

    There are many aesthetics and structural design requirements to modern hearing aids and their size has been reduced considerably during the last decades. This has led to designs where the receiver (loudspeaker) and microphones are placed closely together. As a consequence, problems with vibroacou......There are many aesthetics and structural design requirements to modern hearing aids and their size has been reduced considerably during the last decades. This has led to designs where the receiver (loudspeaker) and microphones are placed closely together. As a consequence, problems...... with vibroacoustic transmission from the receiver to the microphones often occur during the use of hearing aids. This transmission causes feedback at certain critical gain levels where it produces a loud uncomfortable squealing. Consequently feedback often constitutes the limiting factor for the maximum obtainable...... gain in the hearing aid and it therefore represents a critical design problem. Feedback in hearing aids is usually divided into external and internal feedback. External feedback is caused by the leakage of sound from the ear canal whereas internal feedback is due to transmission of sound and vibrations...

  14. Intelligent hearing aids: the next revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao Zhang; Mustiere, Fred; Micheyl, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    The first revolution in hearing aids came from nonlinear amplification, which allows better compensation for both soft and loud sounds. The second revolution stemmed from the introduction of digital signal processing, which allows better programmability and more sophisticated algorithms. The third revolution in hearing aids is wireless, which allows seamless connectivity between a pair of hearing aids and with more and more external devices. Each revolution has fundamentally transformed hearing aids and pushed the entire industry forward significantly. Machine learning has received significant attention in recent years and has been applied in many other industries, e.g., robotics, speech recognition, genetics, and crowdsourcing. We argue that the next revolution in hearing aids is machine intelligence. In fact, this revolution is already quietly happening. We will review the development in at least three major areas: applications of machine learning in speech enhancement; applications of machine learning in individualization and customization of signal processing algorithms; applications of machine learning in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical tests. With the advent of the internet of things, the above developments will accelerate. This revolution will bring patient satisfactions to a new level that has never been seen before.

  15. Using a Shape Model in the Design of Hearing Aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Nielsen, Claus; Laugesen, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Today the design of custom completely-in-the-canal hearing aids is a manual process and therefore there is a variation in the quality of the finished hearing aids. Especially the placement of the so-called faceplate on the hearing aid strongly influences the size and shape of the hearing aid. Since...... the future hearing aid production will be less manual there is a need for algorithms that mimic the craftsmanship of skilled operators. In this paper it is described how a statistical shape model of the ear canal can be used to predict the placement of the faceplate on a hearing aid made for a given ear...

  16. Novel Bone-Anchored Vascular Access on the Mastoid for Hemodialysis: Concept and Preclinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Christof; Arnold, Andreas; Kruse, Anja; Wiedmer, Simona; Widmer, Matthias; Guignard, Jeremie; Schutz, Daniel; Guenat, Jean-Marc; Bachtler, Matthias; Caversaccio, Marco; Uehlinger, Dominik E; Frey, Felix J; Hausler, Rudolf

    2016-05-01

    We present the development of a bone-anchored port for the painless long-term hemodialytic treatment of patients with renal failure. This port is implanted behind the ear. The port was developed based on knowledge obtained from long-term experience with implantable hearing devices, which are firmly anchored to the bone behind the ear. This concept of bone anchoring was adapted to the requirements for a vascular access during hemodialysis. The investigational device is comprised of a base plate that is firmly fixed with bone screws to the bone behind the ear (temporal bone). A catheter leads from the base plate valve block through the internal jugular vein and into the right atrium. The valves are opened using a special disposable adapter, without any need to puncture the blood vessels. Between hemodialysis sessions, the port is protected with a disposable cover. Flow rate, leak tightness, and purification were tested on mockups. Preoperative planning and the surgical procedure were verified in 15 anatomical human whole head specimens. Preclinical evaluations demonstrated the technical feasibility and safety of the investigational device. Approximately 1.5 million people are treated with hemodialysis worldwide, and 25% of the overall cost of dialysis therapy results from vascular access problems. New approaches toward enhancing vascular access could potentially reduce the costs and complications of hemodialytic therapy.

  17. Wireless communication for hearing aid system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nour, Baqer

    This thesis focuses on the wireless coupling between hearing aids close to a human head. Hearing aids constitute devices withadvanced technology and the wireless communication enables the introduction of a range of completely new functionalities. Such devices are small and the available power...... the ear-to-ear wireless communication channel by understanding the mechanisms that control the propagations of the signals and the losses. The second objective isto investigate the properties of magneto-dielectric materials and their potential in antenna miniaturization. There are three approaches...

  18. Hearing Loss, Control, and Demographic Factors Influencing Hearing Aid Use among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garstecki, Dean C.; Erler, Susan F.

    1998-01-01

    Older adults (N=131) with hearing loss completed measures of hearing, hearing handicap, psychological control, depression, and ego strength. Older adults who accepted advice from hearing professionals to acquire and use hearing aids differed from those not accepting such advice on measures of hearing sensitivity, psychological control, and…

  19. 47 CFR 68.4 - Hearing aid-compatible telephones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatible telephones. 68.4 Section... (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK General § 68.4 Hearing aid-compatible... for export) or imported for use in the United States after August 16, 1989, must be hearing aid...

  20. Assisting Older Persons With Adjusting to Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Kari R; Clark, M Kathleen

    2016-02-01

    This intervention study tested the feasibility and initial effect of Hearing Aid Reintroduction (HEAR) to assist persons aged 70 to 85 years adjust to hearing aids. Following this 30-day intervention, hearing aid use increased between 1 and 8 hr per day with 50% of participants able to wear them for at least 4 hr. Hearing aid satisfaction improved from not satisfied to satisfied overall. The study demonstrated that HEAR is feasible and could improve hearing aid use of a substantial number of older persons who had previously failed to adjust to their hearing aids and had given up. However, further testing among a larger and more diverse population is needed to better understand the effectiveness and sustainability of the intervention. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Factors associated with success with hearing aids in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly; Lovelock, Karen; Lampert, Michelle; Khan, Asad

    2014-02-01

    To examine associations between audiological and non-audiological factors and successful hearing aid use in older adults. In a retrospective study, audiological factors, attitudinal beliefs (as derived from the health belief model), client demographics, psychological factors, and age-related factors were evaluated. Participants included 160 individuals, 60 years or older, with unilateral or bilateral hearing impairment (HI), fitted with hearing aids for the first time in the previous two years. Participants were assigned to either an unsuccessful hearing aid owner group (n=75) or a successful hearing aid owner group (n=85) based on their self-reported hearing aid use and benefit. A multivariate, binomial logistic regression model indicated five factors associated with group membership: participants who had greater support from significant others; more difficulties with hearing and communication in everyday life before getting hearing aids; more positive attitudes to hearing aids; coupled with greater perceived self-efficacy for advanced handling of hearing aids; or who were receiving more gain from their devices; were more likely to be successful hearing aid owners. These findings highlight the importance of addressing non-audiological factors in order to assist older adults achieve success with hearing aids.

  2. Hearing Aid Use and Associated Factors in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Il Joon; Baek, Sun Young; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2015-10-01

    Despite the high prevalence of hearing impairment in the elderly, the rate of hearing aid use is still low. The objectives of this study were to report the nation-wide prevalence of hearing aid use in the Korean population and to determine the associated factors with hearing aid use utilizing a nationally representative data set.We obtained data from the 2010 to 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which were cross-sectional surveys of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the Republic of Korea at age ≥40 years (N = 12,709). A field survey team performed interviews as well as physical examinations. Hearing aid use was assessed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire and pure-tone audiometry was administered for all participants in a sound-attenuating booth. Prevalence of hearing aid acquisition and regular use were calculated in participants who reported perceived hearing loss and who have bilateral hearing thresholds exceeding the 40 dB hearing level. Multivariable analyses were used to examine the associated factors with hearing aid use.The prevalence of hearing aid acquisition and regular use was 17.4% and 12.6%, respectively, in South Korea. Increased hearing threshold (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.03-1.07), severe perceived hearing loss (OR 10.73, 95% CI 4.52-25.46), annoying tinnitus (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.61-6.74), balance problems (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.18-0.86), and myopia (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.12-0.76) were associated factors of regular use of hearing aids.The prevalence of hearing aid use in Korea is relatively low. Finding relevant factors of hearing aid use could provide further insight in setting up hearing-rehabilitation strategy for the elderly with significant hearing loss.

  3. Hearing aid and hearing assistance technology use in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Campbell, Rebecca J; Lessoway, Kamea

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe factors that are related to hearing aid and hearing assistance technology ownership and use in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Adults with hearing impairment living in New Zealand were surveyed regarding health-related quality of life and device usage. Audiometric data (hearing sensitivity and speech in noise) were collected. Data were obtained from 123 adults with hearing impairment: 73 reported current hearing-aid use, 81 reported current hearing assistance technology use. In both analyses, device users had more difficulty understanding speech in background noise, had poor hearing in both their better and worse hearing ears, and perceived more consequences of hearing impairment in their everyday lives (both emotionally and socially) than non-hearing-aid users. Discriminant analyses showed that the social consequences of hearing impairment and the better ear hearing best classified hearing aid users from non-users but social consequences and worse ear hearing best classified hearing assistance technology users from non-users. Quality of life measurements and speech-in-noise assessments provide useful clinical information. Hearing-impaired adults in New Zealand who use hearing aids also tend to use hearing assistance technology, which has important clinical implications.

  4. Hearing aid fine-tuning based on Dutch descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielemans, Thijs; Pans, Donné; Chenault, Michelene; Anteunis, Lucien

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to derive an independent fitting assistant based on expert consensus. Two questions were asked: (1) what (Dutch) terms do hearing impaired listeners use nowadays to describe their specific hearing aid fitting problems? (2) What is the expert consensus on how to resolve these complaints by adjusting hearing aid parameters? Hearing aid dispensers provided descriptors that impaired listeners use to describe their reactions to specific hearing aid fitting problems. Hearing aid fitting experts were asked "How would you adjust the hearing aid if its user reports that the aid sounds…?" with the blank filled with each of the 40 most frequently mentioned descriptors. 112 hearing aid dispensers and 15 hearing aid experts. The expert solution with the highest weight value was considered the best solution for that descriptor. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to identify a factor structure in fitting problems. Nine fitting problems could be identified resulting in an expert-based, hearing aid manufacturer independent, fine-tuning fitting assistant for clinical use. The construction of an expert-based, hearing aid manufacturer independent, fine-tuning fitting assistant to be used as an additional tool in the iterative fitting process is feasible.

  5. Hearing aid user guides: suitability for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the content, design, and readability of printed hearing aid user guides to determine their suitability for older adults, who are the main users of hearing aids. Hearing aid user guides were assessed using four readability formulae and a standardized tool to assess content and design (SAM - Suitability Assessment of Materials). A sample of 36 hearing aid user guides (four user guides from nine different hearing aid manufacturers) were analysed. Sixty nine percent of user guides were rated 'not suitable' and 31% were rated 'adequate' for their suitability. Many scored poorly for scope, vocabulary, aspects of layout and typography, and learning stimulation and motivation. The mean reading grade level for all user guides was grade 9.6 which is too high for older adults. The content, design, and readability of hearing aid user guides are not optimal for older adults and thus may serve as a barrier to successful hearing aid outcomes for this population.

  6. HEARING AID USE IN PATIENTS WITH PRESBYACUSIS: A QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karimaneh A. Eftekharian

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The acceptability of hearing aids in people with presbyacusis has been improved but assessment of whether there is a need for more counseling to increase the number of regular hearing-aid users seems to be important. The aim of this study was to determine if the hearing aid was worn regularly and over a long period of time in people with presbyacusis. A questionnaire survey of patients with presbyacusis who had been fitted with a monaural behind the ear hearing aid for the first time was undertaken. The patients were divided into four groups ranging from 6 months to 3 years after fitting. Overall regular long-term use of the hearing aid was found in the majority of patients with presbyacusis. The main dropout point was within the first year after fitting the hearing aid. The study furthermore revealed a relatively high demand for further help and advice with the hearing aid in all groups.

  7. Autonomous motivation is associated with hearing aid adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Jason; Hickson, Louise; Lind, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    To use the self-determination theory of motivation to investigate whether different forms of motivation were associated with adults' decisions whether or not to adopt hearing aids. A quantitative approach was used in this cohort study. Participants completed the treatment self-regulation questionnaire (TSRQ), which measured autonomous and controlled motivation for hearing aid adoption. Sociodemographic data and audiometric information were also obtained. Participants were 253 adults who had sought information about their hearing but had not consulted with a hearing professional. Participants were categorized as hearing aid adopters if they had been fitted with hearing aids 4-6 months after completing the TSRQ, and as non-adopters if they had not. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between autonomous and controlled motivation, sociodemographic and audiometric variables, and hearing aid adoption (n = 160). Three factors were significantly associated with increased hearing aid adoption when the influence of other variables was accounted for: autonomous motivation, perceived hearing difficulty, and poorer hearing. Controlled motivation was not found to influence hearing aid adoption. These empirical findings that link autonomous motivation to decisions of hearing help-seekers have implications for the ways practitioners may evaluate motivation and could inform discussions with clients about hearing aid adoption.

  8. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meister H

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hartmut Meister,1 Sebastian Rählmann,1 Martin Walger,2 Sabine Margolf-Hackl,3 Jürgen Kießling3 1Jean Uhrmacher Institute for Clinical ENT-Research, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Othorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany Purpose: To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss with clinically assessed hearing aid benefit in older hearing-impaired persons.Methods: Hearing aid benefit was assessed using objective measures regarding speech recognition in quiet and noisy environments as well as a subjective measure reflecting everyday situations captured using a standardized questionnaire. A broad range of general cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and intelligence were determined using different neuropsychological tests. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the outcome of the neuropsychological tests as well as age and hearing loss as independent variables and the benefit measures as dependent variables. Thirty experienced older hearing aid users with typical age-related hearing impairment participated.Results: Most of the benefit measures revealed that the participants obtained significant improvement with their hearing aids. Regression models showed a significant relationship between a fluid intelligence measure and objective hearing aid benefit. When individual hearing thresholds were considered as an additional independent variable, hearing loss was the only significant contributor to the benefit models. Lower cognitive capacity – as determined by the fluid intelligence measure – was significantly associated with greater hearing loss. Subjective benefit could not be predicted by any of the variables considered.Conclusion: The present study does not give evidence that hearing aid benefit is critically associated with cognitive

  9. Study of hearing aid effectiveness and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayabaşoğlu, Gürkan; Kaymaz, Recep; Erkorkmaz, Ünal; Güven, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate hearing aid using rate, patient satisfaction rate and achievements in social communication of patients by assessing the hearing thresholds before and after device use in patients who were determined as suitable for hearing aid use. Hundred eighty patients who were admitted to Otolaryngology Clinic of Sakarya University Medical Faculty and approved of hearing aid usage between January 2013 and May 2013 were included in the study. Patients (21 males, 26 females; mean age 61.91±12.82; range 24 to 85 years) were performed free field audiometry with and without the device by the same audiometrist and Turkish version of the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids by the same otolaryngologist. Of patients, 14.28% did not obtain the hearing aid even though they received a hearing aid approval report. Assessment of the answers of inventory questions revealed that 87% of patients used hearing aid more than four hours a day, 72% benefited significantly from hearing aid, and 64% had no complaint or had few complaints compared to the before-hearing aid period. Using hearing aid affects daily activities of patients slightly or moderately and increases their communication skills.

  10. Hearing Aids: How to Choose the Right One

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearing aids: How to choose the right one Many types of hearing aids exist. So which is best for you? Find out what to consider when choosing a hearing ... used to the device and decide if it's right for you. Have the dispenser put in writing ...

  11. Stability Testing of a Wide Bone-Anchored Device after Surgery without Skin Thinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malou Hultcrantz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To longitudinally follow the osseointegration using Resonance Frequency Analysis (RFA for different lengths of abutment on a new wide bone-anchored implant, introduced with the non-skin thinning surgical technique. Study Design. A single-center, prospective 1 year study following adults with bone-anchored hearing implants. Materials and Methods. Implantation was performed and followed for a minimum of 1 year. All patients were operated on according to the tissue preserving technique. A 4.5 mm wide fixture (Oticon Medical with varying abutments (9 to 12 mm was used and RFA was tested 1 week, 7 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months later. Implant Stability Quotient (ISQ, was measured from 1 to 100. Stability was compared to a group of patients (N=7 implanted with another brand (Cochlear BI400 of 4.5 mm fixtures. Results. All 10 adults concluded the study. None of the participants lost their implant during the test period indicating a good anchoring of abutments to the wide fixture tested. Stability testing was shown to vary depending on abutment length and time after surgery and with higher values for shorter abutments and increasing values over the first period of time. One patient changed the abutment from 12 to 9 mm and another from a 9 to a 12 during the year. No severe skin problems, numbness around the implant, or cosmetic problems arose. Conclusion. After 1 year of follow-up, combination of a wide fixture implant and the non-skin thinning surgical technique indicates a safe procedure with good stability and no abutment losses.

  12. 21 CFR 874.3310 - Hearing aid calibrator and analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hearing aid calibrator and analysis system. 874... aid calibrator and analysis system. (a) Identification. A hearing aid calibrator and analysis system... sound intensity characteristics emanating from a hearing aid, master hearing aid, group hearing aid or...

  13. Evaluating hearing aid handling skills: A systematic and descriptive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rebecca J; Taljaard, Dunay S; Brennan-Jones, Christopher G; Tegg-Quinn, Susan; Eikelboom, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    To review and appraise the content and quality of surveys that evaluate hearing aid handling. A systematic and descriptive review. Twelve surveys were identified as containing at least one item evaluating hearing aid handling. Fifteen aspects of hearing aid handling were evaluated. None of the surveys evaluated all aspects of handling skills identified. While the majority of studies reported some psychometric evaluation during survey development, the quality of the methodology used and extent of psychometric evaluation reported varied considerably. There is currently no single survey that evaluates handling skills comprehensively. In the absence of an ideal survey, the Practical Hearing aid Skills Test appears to be the most inclusive clinician-administered survey and the Hearing aid User's Questionnaire appears to be the most inclusive self-report survey evaluating hearing aid handling precision; however, there are limitations in the analysis of their psychometric properties. Nonetheless, use of these surveys in clinical practice could identify areas of handling that warrant additional training in order to improve hearing aid success. Research identifying the full range of hearing aid handling skills necessary for successful hearing aid use will further contribute knowledge to the complex construct of successful hearing aid-use.

  14. HIV/AIDS among Adolescents with Hearing Impairment in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIDS to be elusive; such as prejudice against individuals with hearing impairment, lack of adequate data, exclusion from programmes that talk about sexuality, cultural beliefs, poor knowledge and attitude of adolescents with hearing impairment ...

  15. Advantages of directional hearing aid microphones related to room acoustics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, A. R.; Dreschler, W. A.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, two types of hearing aids were used. Both aids had the same frequency characteristics for frontal sound, but one employed an omnidirectional microphone and the other a directional microphone. The frequency characteristics of both hearing aids were measured for five azimuths on KEMAR

  16. Hearing loss and cognition: the role of hearing AIDS, social isolation and depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piers Dawes

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is associated with poor cognitive performance and incident dementia and may contribute to cognitive decline. Treating hearing loss with hearing aids may ameliorate cognitive decline. The purpose of this study was to test whether use of hearing aids was associated with better cognitive performance, and if this relationship was mediated via social isolation and/or depression. Structural equation modelling of associations between hearing loss, cognitive performance, social isolation, depression and hearing aid use was carried out with a subsample of the UK Biobank data set (n = 164,770 of UK adults aged 40 to 69 years who completed a hearing test. Age, sex, general health and socioeconomic status were controlled for as potential confounders. Hearing aid use was associated with better cognition, independently of social isolation and depression. This finding was consistent with the hypothesis that hearing aids may improve cognitive performance, although if hearing aids do have a positive effect on cognition it is not likely to be via reduction of the adverse effects of hearing loss on social isolation or depression. We suggest that any positive effects of hearing aid use on cognition may be via improvement in audibility or associated increases in self-efficacy. Alternatively, positive associations between hearing aid use and cognition may be accounted for by more cognitively able people seeking and using hearing aids. Further research is required to determine the direction of association, if there is any direct causal relationship between hearing aid use and better cognition, and whether hearing aid use results in reduction in rates of cognitive decline measured longitudinally.

  17. Hearing Screening in the Elderly and Evaluating the Need for Hearing Aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Jalilvand Karimi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions affecting the elderly. The impacts of hearing loss are depression, social isolation, and functional disability, particularly for those who have not yet been evaluated or treated for hearing loss. The aim of this study was audiologic screening and assessing candidacy for hearing aid in the elderly people.Materials and Methods: This analytic-cross sectional study was performed on 52 older adults aged from 51 to 97. Subjects were evaluated according to ASHA guidelines for audiologic screening in adults (1997. Using HHIE-S as hearing disability screening instrument, the need for hearing aid use was evaluated.Results: About 86 percent of subjects had some degree of hearing loss. There were significant correlation between PTA(0.5, 1, 2 KHz>26 and HHIE-S>10. According to these two factors 21.2 percent of subjects needed to use hearing aid while 18 percent of this group had hearing aids.Conclusion: There is high prevalence of hearing loss among older adults, thus it's necessary to evaluate the need for hearing aid in this rapidly growing population. Among different factors affecting hearing aid candidacy the most correlated were PTA(0.5, 1, 2KHz>26 and HHIE-S>10. Therefore according to this study by combination of these two evaluation of hearing aid candidacy would be more appropriate.

  18. Does hearing aid use affect audiovisual integration in mild hearing impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseler, Anja; Tahden, Maike A S; Thiel, Christiane M; Colonius, Hans

    2018-02-16

    There is converging evidence for altered audiovisual integration abilities in hearing-impaired individuals and those with profound hearing loss who are provided with cochlear implants, compared to normal-hearing adults. Still, little is known on the effects of hearing aid use on audiovisual integration in mild hearing loss, although this constitutes one of the most prevalent conditions in the elderly and, yet, often remains untreated in its early stages. This study investigated differences in the strength of audiovisual integration between elderly hearing aid users and those with the same degree of mild hearing loss who were not using hearing aids, the non-users, by measuring their susceptibility to the sound-induced flash illusion. We also explored the corresponding window of integration by varying the stimulus onset asynchronies. To examine general group differences that are not attributable to specific hearing aid settings but rather reflect overall changes associated with habitual hearing aid use, the group of hearing aid users was tested unaided while individually controlling for audibility. We found greater audiovisual integration together with a wider window of integration in hearing aid users compared to their age-matched untreated peers. Signal detection analyses indicate that a change in perceptual sensitivity as well as in bias may underlie the observed effects. Our results and comparisons with other studies in normal-hearing older adults suggest that both mild hearing impairment and hearing aid use seem to affect audiovisual integration, possibly in the sense that hearing aid use may reverse the effects of hearing loss on audiovisual integration. We suggest that these findings may be particularly important for auditory rehabilitation and call for a longitudinal study.

  19. Effectiveness of a teleaudiology approach to hearing aid fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamey, Peter J; Blamey, Jeremy K; Saunders, Elaine

    2015-12-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of an online speech perception test (SPT) for the measurement of hearing and hearing aid fitting in comparison with conventional methods. Phase 1 was performed with 88 people to evaluate the SPT for the detection of significant hearing loss. The SPT had high sensitivity (94%) and high selectivity (98%). In Phase 2, phonetic stimulus-response matrices derived from the SPT results for 408 people were used to calculate "Infograms™." At every frequency, there was a highly significant correlation (p hearing thresholds derived from the Infogram and conventional audiograms. In Phase 3, initial hearing aid fittings were derived from conventional audiograms and Infograms for two groups of hearing impaired people. Unaided and aided SPTs were used to measure the perceptual benefit of the aids for the two groups. The mean increases between unaided and aided SPT scores were 19.6%, and 22.2% (n = 517, 484; t = 2.2; p hearing aids fitted using conventional audiograms and Infograms respectively. The research provided evidence that the SPT is a highly effective tool for the detection and measurement of hearing loss and hearing aid fitting. Use of the SPT reduces the costs and increases the effectiveness of hearing aid fitting, thereby enabling a sustainable teleaudiology business model. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Hearing aids' electromagnetic immunity to environmental RF fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facta, S.; Benedetto, A.; Anglesio, L.; D'Amore, G.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the electromagnetic interference on hearing aids was evaluated. Electromagnetic (EM) immunity tests on different types of hearing aids were carried out, using signals of intensity and modulation comparable to those present in the environment. The purpose of this work is to characterise the interference, establishing the immunity threshold for different frequencies and finding out which types of hearing aids are more susceptible, and in which frequency range. The tests were carried out in a GTEM cell on seven hearing aids, using AM and GSM signals in the radiofrequency (RF) range. (authors)

  1. Auditory profiling and hearing-aid satisfaction in hearing-aid candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Nicoline; Santurette, Sébastien; Jørgensen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often complain about difficulties communicating in the presence of background noise, although audibility may be restored by a hearing-aid (HA). The audiogram typically forms the basis for HA fitting, i.e. people with similar audiograms are given the same prescription...... resolution, binaural hearing, speech intelligibility in stationary and fluctuating noise and a working-memory test. Six weeks after HA fitting, the HI listeners answered a questionnaire evaluating HA treatment. RESULTS: No other measures than masking release between fluctuating and stationary noise...... correlated significantly with audibility. The HI listeners who obtained the least advantage from fluctuations in background noise in terms of speech intelligibility experienced greater HA satisfaction. CONCLUSION: HI listeners have difficulties in different hearing domains that are not predictable from...

  2. Auditory profiling and hearing-aid satisfaction in hearing-aid candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Nicoline; Santurette, Sébastien; Jørgensen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often complain about difficulties communicating in the presence of background noise, although audibility may be restored by a hearing-aid (HA). The audiogram typically forms the basis for HA fitting, i.e. people with similar audiograms are given...... the same prescription by default. This study aimed at identifying clinically relevant tests that may serve as an informative addition to the audiogram and which may relate more directly to HA satisfaction than the audiogram does. METHODS: A total of 29 HI and 26 normal-hearing listeners performed tests...... of spectral and temporal resolution, binaural hearing, speech intelligibility in stationary and fluctuating noise and a working-memory test. Six weeks after HA fitting, the HI listeners answered a questionnaire evaluating HA treatment. RESULTS: No other measures than masking release between fluctuating...

  3. Pediatric unilateral sensorineural hearing loss: implications and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornhoffer, James R; Dornhoffer, John L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize current studies detailing the impact of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss in children and the most current modalities of treatment used in its management. Current studies corroborate historic views on the impact of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss on patient wellbeing and academic success and stress the use of additional surveillance and studies to diagnose those patients that may pass standard screening practices and suffer from lack of prompt and proper care. With respect to management, notable findings include the continuous development of improved conventional and contralateral routing of signal amplification devices that may act to provide alternatives to percutaneous bone-anchored hearing aid implantation. These include improvements in more conventional hearing aid technology, so as to bridge the performance gap with the classical bone-anchored hearing aid implant, and the development of partially implanted transcutaneous bone conduction hearing devices. Due to dissatisfaction with sound localization, a new and significant development is the burgeoning accumulation of research on cochlear implantation for the treatment of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss in children. With advances in technology in historic modalities of treatment, and the advent of new modalities such as cochlear implantation, the clinician has a wide armamentarium by which to provide treatment to patients based on clinical circumstances and patient desires.

  4. Pediatric Hearing Aid Management: Challenges among Hispanic Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Ana; Muñoz, Karen; White, Karl; Nelson, Lauri; Domenech-Rodriguez, Melanie; Twohig, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Hearing aid fitting in infancy has become more common in the United States as a result of earlier identification of hearing loss. Consistency of hearing aid use is an area of concern for young children, as well as other hearing aid management challenges parents encounter that may contribute to less-than-optimal speech and language outcomes. Research that describes parent hearing aid management experiences of Spanish-speaking Hispanic families, or the extent of their needs, is not available. To effectively support parent learning, in a culturally sensitive manner, providers may benefit from having a better understanding of the needs and challenges Hispanic families experience with hearing aid management. The purpose of the current study was to describe challenges with hearing aid management and use for children from birth to 5 yr of age, as reported by Spanish-speaking parents in the United States, and factors that may influence hearing aid use. This study used a cross-sectional survey design. Forty-two Spanish-speaking parents of children up to 5 yr of age who had been fitted with hearing aids. Responses were obtained from surveys mailed to parents through early intervention programs and audiology clinics. Descriptive statistics were used to describe frequencies and variance in responses. Forty-seven percent of the parents reported the need for help from an interpreter during audiology appointments. Even though parents received information and were taught skills by their audiologist, many wanted to receive more information. For example, 59% wanted to know how to meet other parents of children who have hearing loss, although 88% had previously received this information; 56% wanted to know how to do basic hearing aid maintenance, although 71% had previously received instruction. The two most frequently reported hearing aid use challenges were fear of losing the hearing aids, and not seeing benefit from the hearing aids. Hearing aid use during all waking hours was

  5. Elderly With Different Types of Hearing Loss and Comorbidities: Satisfaction With Hearing Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dashti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Hearing loss is developing when age is rising. Initiation and progression rates of hearing loss vary among different individuals and groups. Objectives The current study aimed to determine satisfaction of the elderly with their hearing aids in different types of hearing loss and comorbidities. Patients and Methods The study was conducted on 40 elderly subjects suffering from hearing loss and using hearing aids. The data collection method included assessment of hearing loss in addition to using a questionnaire to estimate respondents' satisfaction with their hearing aids in daily life. The Persian version of the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL questionnaire was administered. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics by SPSS software version19. Results The mean satisfaction scores of the elderly were 4.83 ± 0.51 and 5.36 ± 0.30 in the sensorineural loss groups. There was no significant difference between different comorbidities. There was a significant difference between satisfaction level of cost and services subscales in the symmetrical styles of hearing loss (P value = 0.04. Conclusions The findings of the study indicated a high satisfaction of the elderly with their hearing aids, considering the type of hearing loss. Despite all the efforts to improve the audiologic services during verification process, the elderly should be consulted specifically in order to fit their hearing aid as well as their expectations from aid.

  6. [Hearing aid application performance evaluation questionnaire to presbycusis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianghong; Zhou, Huifang; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Liqun

    2011-02-01

    By matching patients with presbycusis hearing aids,hearing aid performance assessment questionnaire to fill out to assess the effect of its use and targeted to solve problems encountered in its use and improve the quality of life of older persons. Through face to face way to investigate and analyse patients with hearing aids fitting, totally 30 subjects accepted the analysis, preliminary assessment of the use of hearing aids in patient with presbycusis results and solve problems encountered in its use by using SPSS software to analyze the collecting data. HHIE questionnaire on statistical analysis, obtained in patients with hearing loss use hearing aids after the problem is a significant improvement statistical analysis of the SADL questionnaire, the conclusion is relatively satisfied with the overall satisfaction. Effects Assessment Questionnaire in patients with hearing aids hearing impairment can be epitomized the disabled after use to improve the situation and understand the satisfaction of patients with hearing aids can be an initial effect as the rehabilitation of a reliable subjective assessment of the impact assessment indicators.

  7. Findings From EuroTrak Surveys From 2009 to 2015: Hearing Loss Prevalence, Hearing Aid Adoption, and Benefits of Hearing Aid Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisgaard, Nikolai; Ruf, Stefan

    2017-10-12

    The purpose of this study was to analyze data from the EuroTrak surveys performed from 2009 to 2015 in Germany, France, and the United Kingdom to identify factors that could account for the growth in hearing aid sales over that period. Data of 132,028 people-approximately 15,000 for each of the 3 countries at 3-year intervals-were collected using a questionnaire. The sample in each country was weighted using the respective country age-gender populations to get balanced results. Furthermore, 11,867 persons with self-reported hearing impairment filled in a comprehensive questionnaire on hearing status and related matters; 4,631 were hearing aid owners. Data were pooled over the 3 countries for each of the years 2009, 2012, and 2015 and analyzed for developments over the 6-year period. In certain cases, data were pooled across countries and years. The analysis focused on hearing loss prevalence, hearing aid adoption rates, satisfaction with hearing aids, and benefits of hearing aid use. Hearing loss prevalence was stable over the period around 10%-slightly higher for men than for women. Hearing aid adoption overall increased from 33% to 37%, and bilateral use increased from 55% to 69%. Intervals between hearing aid renewals decreased. These factors contribute to increased hearing aid sales. Bilateral users are more satisfied with the hearing aid product features (76%) and performance (72%) and use their hearing aids 9.1 hr per day, compared with unilateral users where the corresponding numbers are 71%, 67%, and 7.8 hr, respectively. Satisfaction with hearing aid product features and performance in general is slightly increasing; hearing aid users are 14.5% less exhausted at the end of the day compared with nonusers with similar hearing loss and exhibit less depressive and forgetfulness symptoms. The prevalence of self-reported hearing loss is 10.6% and stable, and hearing aid adoption has increased, particularly of bilateral fittings that are more satisfactory and

  8. Prevalence and factors associated with hearing loss and hearing aid use in korean elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Su

    2015-03-01

    This study examined hearing loss prevalence and hearing aid usage rates among Korean elders by comparing the differences between those with and without hearing loss, and between those who used and did not use hearing aids. This study was based on data collected during the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V (2010-2012). The study sample consisted of 5,447 Koreans aged ≥60 years who received a hearing assessment. Hearing loss was measured using a pure tone audiometry test and classified according to the World Health Organization's criteria. Hearing aid use was assessed by self-report. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the associations between hearing loss, hearing aid use, and related variables. Hearing loss was found in 16.8% of the elders and only 15.9% of them used a hearing aid. Male (95% CI: 1.27-2.15), tinnitus (95% CI: 1.58-2.32), dizziness (95% CI: 1.05-1.73), and occupational noise exposure (95% CI: 1.32-2.38) were the variables most strongly associated with hearing loss after multivariate adjustment. Tinnitus (95% CI: 1.34-4.13) and occupational noise exposure (95% CI: 1.01-5.02) were strongly associated with hearing aid use after multivariate adjustment. More than half of South Korean elders aged ≥60 and older have hearing loss but the rate of hearing aid use is very low. An aural public health program should address modifiable risk factors, such as tinnitus and noise exposure, and non-modifiable risk factors associated with hearing loss in the elderly.

  9. Hearing Aids and Room Acoustics: an Entrepreneurial Physics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caner, Edward

    2002-10-01

    We present an acoustics-based physics entrepreneurship project that identifies problems associated with hearing aids and listening environments such as restaurants and churches. The proposed company "Earcrafters" deals with the alarmingly low market penetration of hearing aids--especially amongst baby boomers--in two key ways: 1) Offering hearing instruments that "sound better" by way of improved frequency response throughout the audio spectrum and 2) applying marketing forces to effectively change the public perception that hearing aids are bulky and tinny-sounding. In contrast, the proposed company "US Sound" recognizes low hearing aid market penetration as a trend that will continue. The company is developing efficient methods to improve the acoustical environment of public areas such as restaurants and churches in order to fill the demand of baby boomers with hearing impairment--a number that has reached staggering proportions.

  10. Concerns regarding Direct-to-Consumer Hearing Aid Purchasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Suzanne H.

    2010-01-01

    An individual over age 18 can purchase a hearing aid online or through mail order if they sign a waiver declining a medical evaluation, while those under 18 are required to be seen by a physician to obtain medical consent. However, in many states there is nothing to prevent a parent or caregiver from purchasing hearing aids for their child from a…

  11. 47 CFR 68.414 - Hearing aid-compatibility: Enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatibility: Enforcement. 68.414... (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK Complaint Procedures § 68.414 Hearing aid-compatibility: Enforcement. Enforcement of §§ 68.4 and 68.112 is hereby delegated to those states...

  12. Hearing aid measurements with speech and noise signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrlund, Ole; Ludvigsen, Carl; Olofsson, Åke

    1994-01-01

    An increasing number of hearing aid types include one or more features which are intentionally non-linear. In such devices measurement of frequency response and distortion using sweep tone measurements are typically of little relevance. Five different non-linear hearing aid types were used...

  13. Identifying the barriers and facilitators to optimal hearing aid self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Carly; Hickson, Louise; Fletcher, Amanda

    2014-02-01

    Many older adults with hearing impairment are not confident in their ability to use hearing aids (i.e. experience low hearing aid self-efficacy), which has been found to be a barrier to hearing help-seeking and hearing aid use. This study aimed to determine what factors were associated with achieving adequate hearing aid self-efficacy. A retrospective research design was employed wherein hearing aid self-efficacy was the primary outcome. Explanatory variables included personal demographics, visual disability, and experiences related to participants' hearing ability and hearing aids. A total of 307 older adults with hearing impairment participated in the study (147 non hearing aid owners and 160 hearing aid owners). Non-hearing aid owners were more likely to report adequate hearing aid self-efficacy if they reported no visual disability, had experienced hearing loss for longer, reported more positive support from a significant other, and were not anxious about wearing hearing aids. Hearing aid owners were more likely to report adequate hearing aid self-efficacy if they had had a positive hearing aid experience and no visual disability. More research is needed to develop and evaluate intervention approaches that promote optimal levels of hearing aid self-efficacy among older adults with hearing impairment.

  14. Comprehensive Hearing Aid Intervention at a Free Subspecialty Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Aileen P; Mannarelli, Gregory; Shuman, Andrew G; McKean, Erin L

    2017-09-01

    Providing a model of a comprehensive free audiologic program may assist other health care professionals in developing their own similar program. To describe the structure, feasibility, and outcomes of a free subspecialty clinic providing hearing aids to develop a paradigm for other programs interested in implementing similar projects. A retrospective case series was conducted from September 1, 2013, through March 31, 2016. In a partnership between a free independent clinic for indigent patients and an academic medical center, 54 indigent patients were referred to the clinic for audiograms. A total of 50 of these patients had results of audiograms available for review and were therefore included in the study; 34 of these 50 patients were determined to be eligible for hearing aid fitting based on audiometric results. Free audiometric testing, hearing aid fitting, and hearing aid donation. The number of hearing aids donated, number of eligible patients identified, number of patients fitted with hearing aids, and work effort (hours) and start-up costs associated with implementation of this program were quantified. A total of 54 patients (31 women [57.4%] and 23 men [42.6%]; median age, 61 years; range, 33-85 years) had audiograms performed, and 84 hearing aids were donated to the program. The patients were provided with free audiograms, hearing aid molds, and hearing aid programming, as well as follow-up appointments to ensure continued proper functioning of their hearing aids. Since 2013, a total of 34 patients have been determined to be eligible for the free program and were offered hearing aid services. Of these, 20 patients (59%) have been fitted or are being fitted with free hearing aids. The value of services provided is estimated to be $2260 per patient. It is feasible to provide free, comprehensive audiologic care, including hearing aids and fitting, in a well-established, free clinic model. The opportunity for indigent patients to use hearing aids at minimal

  15. Extrusion of bone anchor suture following flexor digitorum profundus tendon avulsion injury repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2011-09-01

    Flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) zone I tendon avulsion injury is traditionally repaired with a pullout suture technique. More recently, bone anchor sutures have been used as a viable alternative and have largely replaced areas in hand surgery where pullout suture technique was once required. To date, there have been very few complications reported related to bone anchor suture use in FDP tendon reattachment to the bone. We report a very unusual case of extrusion of bone anchor through the nailbed, 6 years after zone I FDP tendon avulsion injury repair and a brief review of literature.

  16. Injection Moulding Simulation and Experimental Validation of Hearing Aid Shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Li, Xiaoliu

    ) mode was adopted in this work to simulate the injection molding process of a hearing aid shell made of Polybutylene Terephthalate (PBT) filled with 30% glass fiber. The typical hearing aid shells are complex thin-walled structures made by injection molding. Highly sophisticated molds and lots...... of process optimizations by trial and errors are needed to make successful shells for hearing aids. In this context, a dedicated simulation tool can be very useful to reduce the time and cost for developing the new hearing aids. In this work, the injection molding experimental validation of the Moldex3D...... simulation was conducted for the upper shell of a hearing aid. With the pressure sensors integrated in the molding tool, real cavity pressure data was collected and the real filling time was estimated to replicate the processing conditions in the simulation. Injection time, injection pressure; pressure loss...

  17. Electronic filters, hearing aids and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, A. Maynard (Inventor); O'Connell, Michael P. (Inventor); Zheng, Baohua (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electronic filter for an electroacoustic system. The system has a microphone for generating an electrical output from external sounds and an electrically driven transducer for emitting sound. Some of the sound emitted by the transducer returns to the microphone means to add a feedback contribution to its electical output. The electronic filter includes a first circuit for electronic processing of the electrical output of the microphone to produce a filtered signal. An adaptive filter, interconnected with the first circuit, performs electronic processing of the filtered signal to produce an adaptive output to the first circuit to substantially offset the feedback contribution in the electrical output of the microphone, and the adaptive filter includes means for adapting only in response to polarities of signals supplied to and from the first circuit. Other electronic filters for hearing aids, public address systems and other electroacoustic systems, as well as such systems, and methods of operating them are also disclosed.

  18. Comparison of Carina active middle-ear implant with conventional hearing aids for mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaş, V A; Gündüz, B; Karamert, R; Cevizci, R; Düzlü, M; Tutar, H; Bayazit, Y A

    2016-04-01

    To compare the auditory outcomes of Carina middle-ear implants with those of conventional hearing aids in patients with moderate-to-severe mixed hearing loss. The study comprised nine patients (six males, three females) who underwent middle-ear implantation with Carina fully implantable active middle-ear implants to treat bilateral moderate-to-severe mixed hearing loss. The patients initially used conventional hearing aids and subsequently received the Carina implants. The hearing thresholds with implants and hearing aids were compared. There were no significant differences between: the pre-operative and post-operative air and bone conduction thresholds (p > 0.05), the thresholds with hearing aids and Carina implants (p > 0.05), or the pre-operative (mean, 72.8 ± 19 per cent) and post-operative (mean, 69.9 ± 24 per cent) speech discrimination scores (p > 0.05). One of the patients suffered total sensorineural hearing loss three months following implantation despite an initial 38 dB functional gain. All except one patient showed clinical improvements after implantation according to quality of life questionnaire (Glasgow Benefit Inventory) scores. Acceptance of Carina implants is better than with conventional hearing aids in patients with mixed hearing loss, although both yield similar hearing amplification. Cosmetic reasons appear to be critical for patient acceptance.

  19. Assessment of hearing aid algorithms using a master hearing aid: the influence of hearing aid experience on the relationship between speech recognition and cognitive capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rählmann, Sebastian; Meis, Markus; Schulte, Michael; Kießling, Jürgen; Walger, Martin; Meister, Hartmut

    2017-04-27

    Model-based hearing aid development considers the assessment of speech recognition using a master hearing aid (MHA). It is known that aided speech recognition in noise is related to cognitive factors such as working memory capacity (WMC). This relationship might be mediated by hearing aid experience (HAE). The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of WMC and speech recognition with a MHA for listeners with different HAE. Using the MHA, unaided and aided 80% speech recognition thresholds in noise were determined. Individual WMC capacity was assed using the Verbal Learning and Memory Test (VLMT) and the Reading Span Test (RST). Forty-nine hearing aid users with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss divided into three groups differing in HAE. Whereas unaided speech recognition did not show a significant relationship with WMC, a significant correlation could be observed between WMC and aided speech recognition. However, this only applied to listeners with HAE of up to approximately three years, and a consistent weakening of the correlation could be observed with more experience. Speech recognition scores obtained in acute experiments with an MHA are less influenced by individual cognitive capacity when experienced HA users are taken into account.

  20. [Influence of hearing aids on monosyllabic test score and subjective everyday hearing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thümmler, R; Liebscher, T; Hoppe, U

    2016-08-01

    Pure tone and speech audiometry are essential methods for examining the indication for hearing aids, as well as for hearing aid evaluation. Additionally, the subjective benefit of hearing aids has to be evaluated with appropriate questionnaires. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between speech audiometry data and the results of a simple and user-friendly questionnaire, as well as to provide normative data for subjective benefit. Data from 136 hearing aid users with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss were analyzed retrospectively. Pure tone thresholds and Freiburg monosyllabic speech perception in the binaural situation were measured at 65 dB in quiet and in noise (signal-to-noise ratio, SNR = +5 dB), with and without hearing aids. Additionally, subjective hearing in everyday life was recorded using the 12-item Oldenburg Inventory. Improvement of speech perception with hearing aids for the Freiburg monosyllabic test in quiet was 32.0 percentage points on average; in noise, there was an average improvement of 16.4 percentage points. There was a strong correlation between the results of pure tone and speech audiometry. With hearing aids, patients scored their everyday hearing using the Oldenburg Inventory on average 1.4 scale points better than without hearing aids. Results of the Oldenburg Inventory correlate with both pure tone and speech audiometry. Hearing aid evaluation should include both speech audiometry and systematic measurement of the subjective benefit using a suitable questionnaire. In combination, the Freiburg monosyllabic test and the Oldenburg Inventory allow for quick and comprehensive evaluation.

  1. Evaluation of a Modified User Guide for Hearing Aid Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly; Khan, Asaduzzaman

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated if a hearing aid user guide modified using best practice principles for health literacy resulted in superior ability to perform hearing aid management tasks, compared with the user guide in the original form. This research utilized a two-arm study design to compare the original manufacturer's user guide with a modified user guide for the same hearing aid--an Oticon Acto behind-the-ear aid with an open dome. The modified user guide had a lower reading grade level (4.2 versus 10.5), used a larger font size, included more graphics, and had less technical information. Eighty-nine adults ages 55 years and over were included in the study; none had experience with hearing aid use or management. Participants were randomly assigned either the modified guide (n = 47) or the original guide (n = 42). All participants were administered the Hearing Aid Management test, designed for this study, which assessed their ability to perform seven management tasks (e.g., change battery) with their assigned user guide. The regression analysis indicated that the type of user guide was significantly associated with performance on the Hearing Aid Management test, adjusting for 11 potential covariates. In addition, participants assigned the modified guide required significantly fewer prompts to perform tasks and were significantly more likely to perform four of the seven tasks without the need for prompts. The median time taken by those assigned the modified guide was also significantly shorter for three of the tasks. Other variables associated with performance on the Hearing Aid Management test were health literacy level, finger dexterity, and age. Findings indicate that the need to design hearing aid user guides in line with best practice principles of health literacy as a means of facilitating improved hearing aid management in older adults.

  2. Formal auditory training in adult hearing aid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss are often able to regain some lost auditory function with the help of hearing aids. However, hearing aids are not able to overcome auditory distortions such as impaired frequency resolution and speech understanding in noisy environments. The coexistence of peripheral hearing loss and a central auditory deficit may contribute to patient dissatisfaction with amplification, even when audiological tests indicate nearly normal hearing thresholds. OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to validate the effects of a formal auditory training program in adult hearing aid users with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. METHODS: Fourteen bilateral hearing aid users were divided into two groups: seven who received auditory training and seven who did not. The training program was designed to improve auditory closure, figure-to-ground for verbal and nonverbal sounds and temporal processing (frequency and duration of sounds. Pre- and post-training evaluations included measuring electrophysiological and behavioral auditory processing and administration of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB self-report scale. RESULTS: The post-training evaluation of the experimental group demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in P3 latency, improved performance in some of the behavioral auditory processing tests and higher hearing aid benefit in noisy situations (p-value < 0,05. No changes were noted for the control group (p-value <0,05. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrated that auditory training in adult hearing aid users can lead to a reduction in P3 latency, improvements in sound localization, memory for nonverbal sounds in sequence, auditory closure, figure-to-ground for verbal sounds and greater benefits in reverberant and noisy environments.

  3. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Hearing Loss Using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids Compared to Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Shina-August, Ella; Meilijson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the profile of pragmatic abilities among 24 children with hearing loss (HL) aged 6.3-9.4 years, 13 using hearing aids (HAs) and 11 using cochlear implants (CIs), in comparison to those of 13 hearing children with similar chronological and language ages. All the children with HL used spoken language, attended regular…

  4. Positive, Neutral, and Negative Connotations Associated with Social Representation of 'Hearing Loss' and 'Hearing Aids'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchaiah, Vinaya; Stein, Gretchen; Danermark, Berth; Germundsson, Per

    2015-12-01

    In our previous studies we explored the social representation of hearing loss and hearing aids. In this study we aimed at exploring if the positive, neutral and negative connotations associated with the social representation of 'hearing loss' and 'hearing aids' for the same categories vary across countries. In addition, we also looked at if there is an association between connotations and demographic variables. A total of 404 individuals from four countries were asked to indicate the words and phrases that comes to mind when they think about 'hearing loss' and 'hearing aids'. They also indicated if the words and phrases they reported had positive, neutral or negative association, which were analyzed and reported in this paper. There are considerable differences among the countries in terms of positive, neutral and negative associations report for each category in relation to hearing loss and hearing aids. However, there is limited connection between demographic variables and connotations reported in different countries. These results suggesting that the social representation about the phenomenon hearing loss and hearing aids are relatively stable within respondents of each country.

  5. Verification and validation of hearing aids: Opportunity not an obstacle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey E. Jorgensen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Verification and validation are objective and subjective measurements of hearing aid function. Many studies have provided rationales for performing these measurements as necessary for hearing aid practitioners to provide the highest level of care. Several researchers have suggested that completing these measurements as part of routine clinical care will reduce the number of return visits, reduce the number of aids returned for credit, and increase patient satisfaction. The purpose of this review article is to provide background, method and rationale for practitioners to use these measurements to improve their practice of hearing healthcare.

  6. Auditory and language skills of children using hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Leticia Macedo; Lemos, Stela Maris Aguiar; Alves, Cláudia Regina Lindgren

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss may impair the development of a child. The rehabilitation process for individuals with hearing loss depends on effective interventions. To describe the linguistic profile and the hearing skills of children using hearing aids, to characterize the rehabilitation process and to analyze its association with the children's degree of hearing loss. Cross-sectional study with a non-probabilistic sample of 110 children using hearing aids (6-10 years of age) for mild to profound hearing loss. Tests of language, speech perception, phonemic discrimination, and school performance were performed. The associations were verified by the following tests: chi-squared for linear trend and Kruskal-Wallis. About 65% of the children had altered vocabulary, whereas 89% and 94% had altered phonology and inferior school performance, respectively. The degree of hearing loss was associated with differences in the median age of diagnosis; the age at which the hearing aids were adapted and at which speech therapy was started; and the performance on auditory tests and the type of communication used. The diagnosis of hearing loss and the clinical interventions occurred late, contributing to impairments in auditory and language development. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Auditory and language skills of children using hearing aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Macedo Penna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hearing loss may impair the development of a child. The rehabilitation process for individuals with hearing loss depends on effective interventions.OBJECTIVE: To describe the linguistic profile and the hearing skills of children using hearing aids, to characterize the rehabilitation process and to analyze its association with the children's degree of hearing loss.METHODS: Cross-sectional study with a non-probabilistic sample of 110 children using hearing aids (6-10 years of age for mild to profound hearing loss. Tests of language, speech perception, phonemic discrimination, and school performance were performed. The associations were verified by the following tests: chi-squared for linear trend and Kruskal-Wallis.RESULTS: About 65% of the children had altered vocabulary, whereas 89% and 94% had altered phonology and inferior school performance, respectively. The degree of hearing loss was associated with differences in the median age of diagnosis; the age at which the hearing aids were adapted and at which speech therapy was started; and the performance on auditory tests and the type of communication used.CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of hearing loss and the clinical interventions occurred late, contributing to impairments in auditory and language development.

  8. What is important for hearing aid satisfaction? Application of the expectancy-disconfirmation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Carly; Hickson, Louise; Khan, Asad; Walker, David

    2014-01-01

    Between 68.1-89.5% of clients report that they are satisfied with their hearing aids. Two variables that are thought to contribute to dissatisfaction with hearing aids are product performance, and a mismatch between performance and client prefitting expectations about hearing-aid performance (i.e., disconfirmation). A focus on variables related to satisfaction is relevant to improving hearing rehabilitation services. The aim of this study was to determine if measures of hearing-aid performance and disconfirmation, specifically related to hearing ability and hearing-aid problems, were associated with overall hearing-aid satisfaction among a sample of hearing-aid users. A retrospective research design was employed. A total of 123 individuals participated in the study (57% male; mean age: 72 yr). All participants owned hearing aids. A personal details questionnaire and the Profile of Hearing Aid Consumer Satisfaction questionnaire (Wong et al, 2009) were completed by participants, 3-12 mo after they obtained hearing aids. Overall hearing-aid satisfaction was a dichotomized variable (satisfaction vs. dissatisfaction); therefore, logistic regression modeling was applied to the data to determine which variables were associated with overall hearing-aid satisfaction. Sixty-one percent of the sample reported that they were satisfied with their hearing aids. Hearing-aid satisfaction was associated with the ability to hear with hearing aids and better-than-expected performance in this same area; fewer hearing-aid problems; and fewer problems with hearing-aid manipulation, hearing-aid appearance, and wearer discomfort than were anticipated before hearing-aid fitting. It is recommended that to improve hearing-aid satisfaction, clinicians should ensure optimal hearing-aid benefit in the listening situations that the person with hearing impairment most wants to hear better; reduce the likelihood of hearing-aid problems occurring; and promote positive disconfirmation (performance

  9. 21 CFR 874.3950 - Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system... Transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid system. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous air conduction hearing aid... occluding the ear canal. The device consists of an air conduction hearing aid attached to a surgically...

  10. 21 CFR 874.3320 - Group hearing aid or group auditory trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Group hearing aid or group auditory trainer. 874... hearing aid or group auditory trainer. (a) Identification. A group hearing aid or group auditory trainer is a hearing aid that is intended for use in communicating simultaneously with one or more listeners...

  11. Beamforming under Quantization Errors in Wireless Binaural Hearing Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Sriram

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the intelligibility of speech in different environments is one of the main objectives of hearing aid signal processing algorithms. Hearing aids typically employ beamforming techniques using multiple microphones for this task. In this paper, we discuss a binaural beamforming scheme that uses signals from the hearing aids worn on both the left and right ears. Specifically, we analyze the effect of a low bit rate wireless communication link between the left and right hearing aids on the performance of the beamformer. The scheme is comprised of a generalized sidelobe canceller (GSC that has two inputs: observations from one ear, and quantized observations from the other ear, and whose output is an estimate of the desired signal. We analyze the performance of this scheme in the presence of a localized interferer as a function of the communication bit rate using the resultant mean-squared error as the signal distortion measure.

  12. Beamforming under Quantization Errors in Wireless Binaural Hearing Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees Janse

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Improving the intelligibility of speech in different environments is one of the main objectives of hearing aid signal processing algorithms. Hearing aids typically employ beamforming techniques using multiple microphones for this task. In this paper, we discuss a binaural beamforming scheme that uses signals from the hearing aids worn on both the left and right ears. Specifically, we analyze the effect of a low bit rate wireless communication link between the left and right hearing aids on the performance of the beamformer. The scheme is comprised of a generalized sidelobe canceller (GSC that has two inputs: observations from one ear, and quantized observations from the other ear, and whose output is an estimate of the desired signal. We analyze the performance of this scheme in the presence of a localized interferer as a function of the communication bit rate using the resultant mean-squared error as the signal distortion measure.

  13. 47 CFR 68.316 - Hearing aid compatibility: Technical requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., published by the Telecommunications Industry Association, copyright 1983, and reproduced by permission of the Telecommunications Industry Association: Electronic Industries Association Recommended Standard RS... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing aid compatibility: Technical...

  14. Hearing aid-related satisfaction based on type and degree of hearing loss in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad FarajiKhiavi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the elderly; using a hearing aid to alleviate auditory impairment can positively affect their quality of life. This research aimed to determine the level of satisfaction concerning hearing aids in elderly people with hearing impairment based on the type and degree of hearing loss.Methods: An analytic cross-sectional research design was used ; the sample included 40 elderly people who used hearing aids. According to the World Health Organization (WHO age classification, participants were divided into two age groups: 65-74 years (n=20 and 75-90 years (n=20. Satisfaction levels were assessed using a standard satisfaction with amplification in daily life (SADL questionnaire.Results: Satisfaction levels in the 65-74 age group were significantly higher than that in the 75-90 age group (p=0.02. Participants with mixed hearing loss revealed higher satisfaction levels than participants with sensorineural hearing loss (p=0.02. On the negative effects dimension, participants with severe hearing loss exhibited significantly higher satisfaction levels than participants with moderate or moderate to severe hearing loss (p=0.01.Conclusion: Total satisfaction mean scores were relatively high in the elderly participants . Negative features could be reduced via careful consultation regarding the aids’ amplifying capabilities and limitations in groups with moderate or moderate to severe hearing loss.

  15. The benefits of using bluetooth accessories with hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pauline; Davis, Adrian

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the benefits in reported outcomes after providing bluetooth accessories for established hearing aid users. Prospective observational study using validated quantitative outcome measures and detailed patient narrative before and two months after patients were provided with bluetooth accessories. Twelve patients with bilateral NHS hearing aids participated. They had a wide range of ages and hearing loss. After two months, 10 patients reported substantial additional benefit and kept the accessories; two returned them for various reasons. Statistically significant changes were seen in two validated outcome measures: the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile and the International Outcome Inventory - Hearing Aids, but not in the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale. Two notable benefits were reported: some described hearing the emotion and mood in a voice for the first time; others were amazed to report an improved ability to hear film or to hold conversations over the telephone. The provision of bluetooth accessories can give additional reported benefit for some patients - we need better knowledge about who benefits, and whether further support/training to individuals would make a difference.

  16. Survey on Satisfaction Level With Hearing Aid in the Daily Life of Elderly Hearing Impaired Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Ahadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate satisfaction levels with hearing aids in daily life of older adult users, in addition to associated factors. Methods & Materials: In this cross sectional study, 32 subjects with moderate to severe sensory neural hearing loss (mean age; 63.5±9.8 Yrs and different socio-economic status, referred to private practice audiology clinic (Alltone Shenava audiology clinic, Newsha hearing rehabilitation center, Golriz audiology clinic, were selected to answer Farsi version of SADL (Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life questionnaire. This questionnaire quantifies satisfaction using a global score and four subscales. Based on history form, all subjects had moderate socio-economic status. Results: Mean score of Farsi Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL and respective correspondence of categorical scale were: Overall score 4.24±0.57 (min. 2.24 and max. 5.12; Medium satisfied; Positive effects 4.33±0.83; Medium to considerably satisfied; Services and costs 3.60±0.84; Somewhat satisfied; and Personal image 5.00±1.25; considerably satisfied. Difference between satisfaction level and experience with current hearing aid, daily hearing aid use, degree of hearing loss and educational level was significant (P<0.05 but there was no significant difference between sex (P<0.0566. Conclusion: Results of hearing aid satisfaction in geriatric hearing impaired population were less than those of the previous studies. Upon analyzing factors associated with satisfaction with the use of hearing aids, it seems that factors such as use of modem technology, evaluation of communication and listening needs (before and after hearing aid prescription, detailed consultation about abilities and limitations of this devices as well as improvement in public and social services, enhance the satisfaction with hearing aid use.

  17. Tracking of Noise Tolerance to Measure Hearing Aid Benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Francis; Seper, Eric; Lau, Chi-Chuen; Korhonen, Petri

    2017-09-01

    The benefits offered by noise reduction (NR) features on a hearing aid had been studied traditionally using test conditions that set the hearing aids into a stable state of performance. While adequate, this approach does not allow the differentiation of two NR algorithms that differ in their timing characteristics (i.e., activation and stabilization time). The current study investigated a new method of measuring noise tolerance (Tracking of Noise Tolerance [TNT]) as a means to differentiate hearing aid technologies. The study determined the within-session and between-session reliability of the procedure. The benefits provided by various hearing aid conditions (aided, two NR algorithms, and a directional microphone algorithm) were measured using this procedure. Performance on normal-hearing listeners was also measured for referencing. A single-blinded, repeated-measures design was used. Thirteen experienced hearing aid wearers with a bilaterally symmetrical (≤10 dB) mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss participated in the study. In addition, seven normal-hearing listeners were tested in the unaided condition. Participants tracked the noise level that met the criterion of tolerable noise level (TNL) in the presence of an 85 dB SPL continuous discourse passage. The test conditions included an unaided condition and an aided condition with combinations of NR and microphone modes within the UNIQUE hearing aid (omnidirectional microphone, no NR; omnidirectional microphone, NR; directional microphone, no NR; and directional microphone, NR) and the DREAM hearing aid (omnidirectional microphone, no NR; omnidirectional microphone, NR). Each tracking trial lasted 2 min for each hearing aid condition. Normal-hearing listeners tracked in the unaided condition only. Nine of the 13 hearing-impaired listeners returned after 3 mo for retesting in the unaided and aided conditions with the UNIQUE hearing aid. The individual TNL was estimated for each participant for all test

  18. Pediatric hearing aid use: parent-reported challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Karen; Olson, Whitney A; Twohig, Michael P; Preston, Elizabeth; Blaiser, Kristina; White, Karl R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate parent-reported challenges related to hearing aid management and parental psychosocial characteristics during the first 3 years of the child's life. Using a cross-sectional survey design, surveys were distributed to parents of children with hearing loss via state Early Intervention programs in Utah and Indiana. Packets contained one family demographic form and two sets of three questionnaires to obtain responses from mothers and fathers separately: the Parent Hearing Aid Management Inventory explored parent access to information, parent confidence in performing skills, expectations, communication with the audiologist, and hearing aid use challenges. The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire measured psychological flexibility, experiential avoidance, and internal thought processes that can affect problem-solving ability and decrease an individual's ability to take value-based actions. The Patient Health Questionnaire identified symptoms of depression. Thirty-seven families completed questionnaires (35 mothers and 20 fathers). Most responses were parents of toddlers (M = 22 months) who had been wearing binaural hearing aids for an average of 15 months. Both mothers and fathers reported that even though the amount of information they received was overwhelming, most (84%) preferred to have all the information at the beginning, rather than to receive it over an extended time period. Parents reported an array of challenges related to hearing aid management, with the majority related to daily management, hearing aid use, and emotional adjustment. Sixty-six percent of parents reported an audiologist taught them how to complete a listening check using a stethoscope, however, only one-third reported doing a daily hearing aid listening check. Both mothers and fathers reported a wide range of variability in their confidence in performing activities related to hearing aid management, and most reported minimal confidence in their ability to

  19. Rurality and determinants of hearing healthcare in adult hearing aid recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephen; Hixon, Brian; Adkins, Margaret; Shinn, Jennifer B; Bush, Matthew L

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the timing of hearing aid (HA) acquisition between adults in rural and urban communities. We hypothesized that time of acquisition of HA after onset of hearing loss is greater in rural adults compared with urban adults. Secondary objectives included assessment of socioeconomic/educational status and impact of hearing loss and hearing rehabilitation of urban and rural HA recipients. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey. We assessed demographics, timing of HA fitting from onset of hearing loss, and impact of hearing impairment in 336 adult HA recipients (273 urban, 63 rural) from a tertiary referral center. Amplification benefit was assessed using the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI). The time to HA acquisition was greater for rural participants compared to urban participants (19.1 vs. 25.7 years, P = 0.024) for those with untreated hearing loss for at least 8 years. Age at hearing loss onset was correlated with time to HA acquisition (P = -0.54, P hearing specialists (68 vs. 32 minutes, P Hearing impairment caused job performance difficulty in 60% of all participants. Rural adults are at risk for delayed HA acquisition, which may be related to distance to hearing specialists. Further research is indicated to investigate barriers to care and expand access for vulnerable populations. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2362-2367, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Comparison of Audiological Results Between a Transcutaneous and a Percutaneous Bone Conduction Instrument in Conductive Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Timo; Salcher, Rolf Benedikt; Schwab, Burkard; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2016-07-01

    In conductive, mixed hearing losses and single-sided-deafness bone-anchored hearing aids are a well-established treatment. The transcutaneous transmission across the intact skin avoids the percutaneous abutment of a bone-anchored device with the usual risk of infections and requires less care.In this study, the audiological results of the Bonebridge transcutaneous bone conduction implant (MED-EL) are compared to the generally used percutaneous device BP100 (Cochlear Ltd., Sydney, Australia). Ten patients implanted with the transcutaneous hearing implant were compared to 10 matched patients implanted with a percutaneous device. Tests included pure-tone AC and BC thresholds and unaided and aided sound field thresholds. Speech intelligibility was determined in quiet using the Freiburg monosyllable test and in noise with the Oldenburg sentence test (OLSA) in sound field with speech from the front (S0). The subjective benefit was assessed with the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit. In comparison with the unaided condition there was a significant improvement in aided thresholds, word recognition scores (WRS), and speech reception thresholds (SRT) in noise, measured in sound field, for both devices. The comparison of the two devices revealed a minor but not significant difference in functional gain (Bonebridge: PTA = 27.5 dB [mean]; BAHA: PTA = 26.3 dB [mean]). No significant difference between the two devices was found when comparing the improvement in WRSs and SRTs (Bonebridge: improvement WRS = 80% [median], improvement SRT = 6.5 dB SNR [median]; BAHA: improvement WRS = 77.5% [median], BAHA: improvement SRT = 6.9 dB SNR [median]). Our data show that the transcutaneous bone conduction hearing implant is an audiologically equivalent alternative to percutaneous bone-anchored devices in conductive hearing loss with a minor sensorineural hearing loss component.

  1. [New aspects of hearing aid fitting in noise-induced hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, J

    2006-07-01

    In the past hearing aid fitting frequently turned out to be a problem in patients with noise-induced hearing loss. Selective amplification in the high frequency range and at the same time natural sound and appropriate wearing comfort (open fitting) could not be achieved in numerous cases. Today these problems can be tackled by modern hearing aid technology providing us with efficient feedback suppression algorithms making open fittings possible for many more patients. This development is particularly beneficial for patients with noise-induced hearing loss. Unfortunately, open fitting is in opposition to wearing hearing aids at noisy workplaces. Tight fittings, however, can be used at work if a special listening program for noisy conditions is available. This dilemma is discussed and possible solutions are pointed out.

  2. Audiologist Practices: Parent Hearing Aid Education and Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibos, Alex; Muñoz, Karen; White, Karl; Preston, Elizabeth; Pitt, Cache; Twohig, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Early identification of hearing loss has led to routine fitting of hearing aids in infants and young children. Amplification provides opportunities to optimize child development, although it also introduces challenges for parents to navigate. Audiologists have a central role in providing parents with support to achieve effective management strategies and habits. The purpose of this study was to explore current practices of pediatric audiologists who work with children birth to 5 yr of age, regarding their support of parent learning in achieving effective hearing aid management, identify existing gaps in service delivery, and to determine if audiologists were receptive to receiving training related to effective approaches to provide counseling and support to parents. A cross-sectional, population-based survey was used. Three hundred and forty-nine surveys were analyzed from pediatric audiologists who provided services to children birth to 5 yr of age. Responses were received from 22 states in the United States. Responses were collected through the mail and online. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the information. More than half (61%) of the audiologists in the study had been providing pediatric hearing aid services to children birth to 5 yr of age for >10 yr. Of the audiologists who reported monitoring hours of hearing aid use, the majority reported that they used data logging (90%). More than half of the audiologists (57%) who shared data logging with parents reported that they encountered defensiveness from parents when addressing hearing aid use. Information and skills that were not routinely provided by one-third to one-half of the audiologists included the following: how to get access to loaner hearing aids (30%), available hearing aid options/accessories (33%), available financial assistance (36%), how to teach hearing aid management to other caregivers (38%), how to do hearing aid maintenance (44%), and how to do a Ling 6 sound check (52%). Many

  3. Interventions to improve hearing aid use in adult auditory rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Fiona; Mackenzie, Emma; Elliott, Lynette; Jones, Simon; de Lusignan, Simon

    2016-08-18

    Acquired adult-onset hearing loss is a common long-term condition for which the most common intervention is hearing aid fitting. However, up to 40% of people fitted with a hearing aid either fail to use it or may not gain optimal benefit from it. This is an update of a review first published in The Cochrane Library in 2014. To assess the long-term effectiveness of interventions to promote the use of hearing aids in adults with acquired hearing loss fitted with at least one hearing aid. The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the Cochrane ENT Trials Register; Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 5); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 13 June 2016. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions designed to improve or promote hearing aid use in adults with acquired hearing loss compared with usual care or another intervention. We excluded interventions that compared hearing aid technology. We classified interventions according to the 'chronic care model' (CCM). The primary outcomes were hearing aid use (measured as adherence or daily hours of use) and adverse effects (inappropriate advice or clinical practice, or patient complaints). Secondary patient-reported outcomes included quality of life, hearing handicap, hearing aid benefit and communication. Outcomes were measured over the short ( 12 to quality of evidence to be very low or low for the primary outcomes where data were available.The majority of participants were over 65 years of age with mild to moderate adult-onset hearing loss. There was a mix of new and experienced hearing aid users. Six of the studies (287 participants) assessed long-term outcomes.All 37 studies tested interventions that could be classified using the CCM as self-management support (ways to help someone to manage their hearing loss and hearing aid(s) better by giving

  4. Aspects of Hearing Aid Fitting Procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Metselaar (Mick)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSensorineural hearing loss is a common and chronic disorder that affects almost ten percent of the world population. In the Netherlands, it is also the major disorder in the working population [NCvB, 2008]. Hearing loss leads to restriction in the interaction with others and withdrawal

  5. In situ Hearing Tests for the Purpose of a Self-Fit Hearing Aid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boymans, Monique; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the potential and limitations of a self-fit hearing aid. This can be used in the "developing" world or in countries with large distances between the hearing-impaired subjects and the professional. It contains an on-board tone generator for in situ user-controlled, automated

  6. The Influence of Hearing Aid Use on Outcomes of Children with Mild Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Holte, Lenore; McCreery, Ryan W.; Spratford, Meredith; Page, Thomas; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of consistent hearing aid (HA) use on outcomes in children with mild hearing loss (HL). Method: Five- or 7-year-old children with mild HL were separated into 3 groups on the basis of patterns of daily HA use. Using analyses of variance, we compared outcomes between groups on speech and language tests and a…

  7. Predictors of Hearing Aid Use Time in Children with Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Spratford, Meredith; Moeller, Mary Pat; Oleson, Jacob; Ou, Hua; Roush, Patricia; Jacobs, Shana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated predictors of hearing aid (HA) use time for children with mild-to-severe hearing loss (HL). Barriers to consistent HA use and reliability of parent report measures were also examined. Method: Participants included parents of 272 children with HL. Parents estimated the amount of time the child used HAs daily.…

  8. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... evaluation and rehabilitation of individuals whose communication disorders center in whole or in part in the... hearing aid evaluation. The audiologist or hearing aid dispenser will conduct a hearing aid evaluation to... since hearing loss may cause problems in language development and the educational and social growth of a...

  9. The impact of self-efficacy, expectations, and readiness on hearing aid outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Melanie A.; Woolley, Annie; Munro, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the impact of self-efficacy and expectations for hearing aids, and readiness to improve hearing, on hearing aidoutcome measures in first-time adult hearing aid users Design: A prospective, single centre design. Predictor variables measured at thehearing assessment included measures of self-efficacy, expectations and readiness to improve hearing. Outcome measures obtained at sixweekfollow-up were the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile and Satisfaction with Amplification ...

  10. A Comparative Study on Hearing Aid Benefits of Digital Hearing Aid Use (BTE) from Six Months to Two Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Lukeshwari; Sanju, Himanshu Kumar; Scaria, Bibina; Awasthi, Mayank; Ravichandran, Aparna; Kaki, Ashritha; Prakash, Savalam Gnana Rathna

    2017-07-01

    Introduction  For many reasons, it is important for audiologists and consumers to document improvement and benefit from amplification device at various stages of uses of amplification device. Professional are also interested to see the impact of amplification device on the consumer's auditory performance at different stages i.e. immediately after fitting and over several months of use. Objective  The objective of the study was to measure the hearing aid benefit following 6 months - 1-year usage, 1 year - 1.5 yeaŕs usage, and 1.5 yeaŕs - 2 years' usage. Methods  A total of 45 subjects participated in the study and were divided equally in three groups: hearing aid users from 6 months to 1 year, 1 year to 1.5 year, and 1.5 year to two years. All subjects responded to the Hearing Aid Benefit Questionnaire (63 questions), which assesses six domains of listening skills. Result  Results showed the mean scores obtained were higher for all domains in the aided condition, as compared with unaided condition for all groups. Results also showed a significant improvement in the overall score between first-time users with hearing aid experience of six months to one year and hearing aid users using hearing aids for a period between 1.5 and 2 years. Conclusion  It is possible to conclude that measuring the hearing aid benefit with the self-assessment questionnaires will assist the clinicians in making judgments about the areas in which a patient is experiencing more difficulty in everyday listening environment and in revising the possible technologies.

  11. [Interceptive treatment of maxillary hypoplasia with the use of bone anchors. A review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, F M J; De Clerck, H J; van Beek, H; Becking, A G

    2014-02-01

    A Class III malocclusion is mainly caused by a hypoplastic maxilla and therefore the treatment is principally aimed at stimulating the growth of the maxilla. Disadvantages of conventional treatment methods are that treatment effects are mainly dentoalveolar rather than skeletal and that there is often an increase in the height of the lowerface. Moreover, patients are not always cooperative about wearing extra-oral appliances. Because of these disadvantages, a new treatment approach has been developed which makes use of skeletal anchoring. In this new technique, called 'bone anchored maxillary protraction, bone anchors are placed on both sides of the maxilla and the mandibula, onto which Class III elastics are attached. The literature shows that good results have been achieved with this method. Disadvantages of this method are that the placement of the bone anchors requires a surgical procedure and that complications, like the loosening or breaking of the anchors, can occur.

  12. Are hearing aid owners able to identify and self-report handling difficulties? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rebecca J; Meyer, Carly; Olaithe, Michelle; Schmulian, Dunay; Eikelboom, Robert H

    2017-11-01

    Although clinician administered surveys evaluating hearing aid handling skills exist, the development of a self-administered version may reduce clinical load, save consultation time, and facilitate more frequent use than face-to-face consultations allow. However, there is currently no evidence to support whether hearing aid owners can accurately self-report hearing aid handling skills via self-report survey that systematically evaluates the ability to accurately perform the individual aspects of hearing aid handling required for effective hearing aid management. An explorative pilot study using a prospective research design. Nineteen adult hearing aid owners, aged between 65 and 93 years. The self-administered survey demonstrated high sensitivity when compared with clinician evaluation of skills, with 93% of participants accurately self-identifying and reporting whether hearing aid handling skill training was required. Hearing aid owners are able to accurately self-report hearing aid handling difficulties when provided with an itemised list of skills.

  13. A self-fitting hearing aid: need and concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convery, Elizabeth; Keidser, Gitte; Dillon, Harvey; Hartley, Lisa

    2011-12-01

    The need for reliable access to hearing health care services is growing globally, particularly in developing countries and in remotely located, underserved regions in many parts of the developed world. Individuals with hearing loss in these areas are at a significant disadvantage due to the scarcity of local hearing health care professionals and the high cost of hearing aids. Current approaches to making hearing rehabilitation services more readily available to underserved populations include teleaudiology and the provision of amplification devices outside of the traditional provider-client relationship. Both strategies require access to such resources as dedicated equipment and/or specially trained staff. Another possible strategy is a self-fitting hearing aid, a personal amplification device that is equipped with an onboard tone generator to enable user-controlled, automated, in situ audiometry; an onboard prescription to determine the initial hearing aid settings; and a trainable algorithm to enable user-controlled fine-tuning. The device is thus assembled, fitted, and managed by the user without the need for audiological or computer support. This article details the self-fitting concept and its potential application in both developing and developed countries. Potential advantages and disadvantages of such a device are discussed, and considerations for further investigations into the concept are presented. Overall, the concept is considered technologically viable with the main challenges anticipated to be development of clear, simple user instructions and a delivery model that ensures reliable supplies of instant-fit ear tips and batteries.

  14. Outcomes of Hearing Aid Use by Individuals with Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss (USNHL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Charles E; Hamadain, Elgenaid; Galster, Jason A; Johnson, Mary Frances; Spankovich, Christopher; Windmill, Ian

    Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL) can have a negative impact on functions associated with the advantages of balanced, binaural hearing. Although single-sided deafness, which is a complete loss of audibility in one ear, has gained increased interest in the published research, there is a gap in the literature concerning hearing aid outcomes for individuals with residual, or otherwise "aidable," hearing in the affected ear. To assess hearing aid outcomes for a group of individuals with USNHL with residual, aidable function. A quasi-experimental study of hearing aid outcomes with paired comparisons made between unaided and aided test conditions. A convenience sample of twenty-two individuals with USNHL, with sufficient residual hearing in the affected ear as to receive audibility from use of a hearing aid, were recruited into the study from September 2011 to August 2012. Each participant was fit with a digital behind-the-ear hearing aid coupled to a custom ear mold. Assessments were performed at baseline (unaided) and after a three-month field trial (aided) with primary outcomes involving objective measures in sound field yielding signal-to-noise ratio loss (SNR Loss) via the Quick Speech-in-Noise Test and word recognition scores (WRS) via the Northwestern University Auditory Test, No. 6. Outcomes also involved the administration of two well-established subjective benefit questionnaires: The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) and the 49-item Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ49). As a group, participants showed significantly improved median SNR Loss thresholds when aided in a test condition that included spatial separation of speech and noise, with speech stimuli directed toward the worse ear and noise stimuli directed toward the better ear (diff. = -4.5; p Hearing aid use had a small, though statistically significant, negative impact on median SNR Loss thresholds, when speech and noise stimuli originated from the same 0

  15. Case Factors Affecting Hearing Aid Recommendations by Hearing Care Professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gioia, Carmine; Ben-Akiva, Moshe; Jørgensen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Background: Professional recommendations to patients concerning hearing instrument (HI) technology levels are not currently evidence-based. Pre-fitting parameters have not been proven to be the primary indicators for optimal patient outcome with different HI technology levels. This results in sub...... in subjective decision-making as regards the technology level recommendation made by professionals. Purpose: The objective of this study is to gain insight into the decision-making criteria utilized by professionals when recommending HI technology levels to hearing-impaired patients.......Background: Professional recommendations to patients concerning hearing instrument (HI) technology levels are not currently evidence-based. Pre-fitting parameters have not been proven to be the primary indicators for optimal patient outcome with different HI technology levels. This results...

  16. The influence of hearing aids on the speech and language development of children with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomblin, J Bruce; Oleson, Jacob J; Ambrose, Sophie E; Walker, Elizabeth; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2014-05-01

    IMPORTANCE Hearing loss (HL) in children can be deleterious to their speech and language development. The standard of practice has been early provision of hearing aids (HAs) to moderate these effects; however, there have been few empirical studies evaluating the effectiveness of this practice on speech and language development among children with mild-to-severe HL. OBJECTIVE To investigate the contributions of aided hearing and duration of HA use to speech and language outcomes in children with mild-to-severe HL. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational cross-sectional design was used to examine the association of aided hearing levels and length of HA use with levels of speech and language outcomes. One hundred eighty 3- and 5-year-old children with HL were recruited through records of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and referrals from clinical service providers in the general community in 6 US states. INTERVENTIONS All but 4 children had been fitted with HAs, and measures of aided hearing and the duration of HA use were obtained. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Standardized measures of speech and language ability were obtained. RESULTS Measures of the gain in hearing ability for speech provided by the HA were significantly correlated with levels of speech (ρ179 = 0.20; P = .008) and language: ρ155 = 0.21; P = .01) ability. These correlations were indicative of modest levels of association between aided hearing and speech and language outcomes. These benefits were found for children with mild and moderate-to-severe HL. In addition, the amount of benefit from aided hearing interacted with the duration of HA experience (Speech: F4,161 = 4.98; P < .001; Language: F4,138 = 2.91; P < .02). Longer duration of HA experience was most beneficial for children who had the best aided hearing. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The degree of improved hearing provided by HAs was associated with better speech and language development in children

  17. The effect of hearing aid bandwidth on speech recognition performance of listeners using a cochlear implant and contralateral hearing aid (bimodal hearing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Arlene C.; Svirsky, Mario A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine how the bandwidth of the hearing aid (HA) fitting affects bimodal speech recognition of listeners with a cochlear implant (CI) in one ear and severe-to-profound hearing loss in the unimplanted ear (but with residual hearing sufficient for wideband amplification using NAL-RP prescriptive guidelines; unaided thresholds no poorer than 95 dB HL through 2000 Hz). Design Recognition of sentence material in quiet and in noise was measured with the CI alone and with CI plus HA as the amplification provided by the hearing aid in the high and mid-frequency regions was systematically reduced from the wideband condition (NAL-RP prescription). Modified bandwidths included upper frequency cutoffs of 2,000, 1,000 or 500 Hz. Results On average, significant bimodal benefit was obtained when the hearing aid provided amplification at all frequencies with aidable residual hearing. Limiting the hearing aid bandwidth to only low frequency amplification (below 1000 Hz) did not yield significant improvements in performance over listening with the CI alone. Conclusion These data suggest the importance of providing amplification across as wide a frequency region as permitted by audiometric thresholds in the hearing aid used by bimodal users. PMID:23632973

  18. Hearing Aids: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Other Communication Disorders NIH MedlinePlus Magazine A Journey with Mid-Life Hearing Loss: Don't Wait ... our quality guidelines . About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  19. Effects of hearing aid amplification on voice F0 variability in speakers with prelingual hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guo-She; Liu, Chialin; Lee, Shao-Hsuan

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the audio-vocal feedback responses of (F0) to hearing amplification in severe-to-profound prelingual hearing loss (SPHL) using power spectral analysis of F0 contour of sustained vowels. Sustained phonations of vowel/a/of seventeen participants with SPHL were acquired with and without hearing-aid amplifications. The vocal intensity was visually fed back to the participants to help controlling the vocal intensity at 65-75 dBA and 85-95 dBA. The F0 contour of the phonations was extracted and submitted to spectral analysis to measure the extent of F0 fluctuations at different frequency ranges. The results showed that both high vocal intensity and hearing-aid amplification significantly improved voice F0 control by reducing the low-frequency fluctuations (low-frequency power, LFP, 0.2-3 Hz) in F0 spectrum. However, the enhanced feedback from higher vocal intensity and/or hearing amplification was not adequate to reduce the LFP to the level of a normal hearing person. Moreover, we found significant and negative correlations between LFP and supra-threshold feedback intensity (phonation intensity - hearing threshold level) for the frequencies of 500-2000 Hz. Increased vocal intensity, as well as hearing-aid amplification, improved voice F0 control by reducing the LFP of F0 spectrum, and the subtle changes in voices could be well explored using spectral analysis of F0. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Consensus on Hearing Aid Candidature and Fitting for Mild Hearing Loss, With and Without Tinnitus: Delphi Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Derek J.; Nicholson, Richard; Smith, Sandra; Hall, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In many countries including the United Kingdom, hearing aids are a first line of audiologic intervention for many people with tinnitus and aidable hearing loss. Nevertheless, there is a lack of high quality evidence to support that they are of benefit for tinnitus, and wide variability in their use in clinical practice especially for people with mild hearing loss. The aim of this study was to identify a consensus among a sample of UK clinicians on the criteria for hearing aid candidature and clinical practice in fitting hearing aids specifically for mild hearing loss with and without tinnitus. This will allow professionals to establish clinical benchmarks and to gauge their practice with that used elsewhere. Design: The Delphi technique, a systematic methodology that seeks consensus amongst experts through consultation using a series of iterative questionnaires, was used. A three-round Delphi survey explored clinical consensus among a panel of 29 UK hearing professionals. The authors measured panel agreement on 115 statements covering: (i) general factors affecting the decision to fit hearing aids, (ii) protocol-driven factors affecting the decision to fit hearing aids, (iii) general practice, and (iv) clinical observations. Consensus was defined as a priori ≥70% agreement across the panel. Results: Consensus was reached for 58 of the 115 statements. The broad areas of consensus were around factors important to consider when fitting hearing aids; hearing aid technology/features offered; and important clinical assessment to verify hearing aid fit (agreement of 70% or more). For patients with mild hearing loss, the greatest priority was given by clinicians to patient-centered criteria for fitting hearing aids: hearing difficulties, motivation to wear hearing aids, and impact of hearing loss on quality of life (chosen as top five by at least 64% of panelists). Objective measures were given a lower priority: degree of hearing loss and shape of the

  1. Influence of a remote microphone on localization with hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selby, Johan G.; Weisser, Adam; MacDonald, Ewen

    2017-01-01

    When used with hearing aids (HA), the addition of a remote microphone (RM) may alter the spatial perception of the listener. First, the RM signal is presented diotically from the HAs. Second, the processing in the HA often delays the RM signal relative to the HA microphone signals. Finally......, the level of the RM signal is independent of the distance from the RM to HA. The present study investigated localization performance of 15 normal-hearing and 9 hearing-impaired listeners under conditions simulating the use of an RM with a behind the ear (BTE) HA. Minimum audible angle discrimination around...

  2. Health-related quality of life in adults with hearing impairment before and after hearing-aid rehabilitation in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemensivu, Riina; Manchaiah, Vinaya; Roine, Risto P; Kentala, Erna; Sintonen, Harri

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adults with hearing impairment in Finland before and after hearing rehabilitation. The study was prospective with hearing-aid rehabilitation as the intervention. The data was collected, using the 15D instrument, before and six months after hearing-aid rehabilitation. The data was analysed using t-tests and multiple linear regression methods. The study sample included 949 adults with hearing impairment, and the control group included a sample of age- and gender-standardized general population. The study population had significantly poorer HRQoL on most dimensions of the 15D when compared to the control group both before and after hearing-aid rehabilitation. Hearing-aid rehabilitation resulted in improved mean scores on the dimensions of hearing and in the overall 15D score that were statistically significant, although the mean improvement in the overall score was marginal. Self-reported hearing ability can better predict the change in HRQoL, as a result of a hearing aid, when compared with measured hearing sensitivity. The study supports the hypothesis that on average, use of a unilateral hearing aid results in improved subjective hearing and marginal improvement in HRQoL in adults with hearing impairment.

  3. Satisfaction with hearing aids: a consumer research perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lena L N; Hickson, Louise; McPherson, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    This research aimed at describing satisfaction with hearing aids from the perspective of the client as a consumer. A disconfirmation-expectancy model, derived from consumer research, was evaluated. This model posits that pre-fitting expectations, post-fitting performance, and the experience of how performance compares to expectations (disconfirmation), contribute to satisfaction. Positive disconfirmation occurs when performance is better than original expectations and is associated with higher satisfaction. Negative disconfirmation is when performance is poorer than expectations and is associated with dissatisfaction. New hearing aid users in Hong Kong (N=42) were tested with a newly developed self-report measure (PHACS: profile of hearing aid consumer satisfaction) that included items focused on hearing ability, problems, cost, and service. Pre-fitting expectations and post-fitting performance, disconfirmation, and satisfaction were measured. Results showed that expectations were generally not related to satisfaction, that disconfirmation was correlated with many aspects of satisfaction, and that performance was most strongly related to satisfaction. The implications of the findings are that hearing aid performance is the most important element for determining satisfaction; however disconfirmation should not be overlooked.

  4. Babies' Portal Website Hearing Aid Section: Assessment by Audiologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos, Bárbara Guimarães

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The family has ultimate responsibility for decisions about the use and care during the daily routine and problem solving in the manipulation of hearing aids (HA in infants and children. Objective The purpose of the study was to assess technical and content quality of Babies' Portal website Hearing Aid section by audiologists. Methods Letters and e-mails were sent inviting professionals to surf the website and anonymously fill out an online form with 58 questions covering demographic data as well as the website's technical (Emory questionnaire with the subscales of accuracy, authorship, updates, public, navigation, links, and structure and content quality. Results A total of 109 professionals (tree men and 106 women with mean age of 31.6 years participated in the study. Emory percentage scores ranged from 90.1 to 96.7%. The Hearing Aid section contents were considered good or very good. Conclusion The website was deemed to have good technical and content quality, being suitable to supplement informational counseling to parents of hearing-impaired children fitted with hearing aids.

  5. Group follow up proposal for elderly with hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Eliara Pinto; Miranda, Elisiane Crestani de; Calais, Lucila Leal; Carvalho, Laura Maria Araújo de; Iório, Maria Cecília Martinelli; Borges, Alda Christina Lopes de Carvalho

    2007-01-01

    Implementing rehabilitation programs to hearing impaired adults is of great importance, mainly in the elderly population, and it is necessary to add them to the routine of outpatient care programs. to present a group care program for elderly patients who are fitted with hearing aids. to carry out a pilot study of clinical and experimental type, with the participation of 40 elderly users of hearing aids donated by the government, distributed within six groups, with maximum of eight participants jointly with their respective companions. Program consisted of three meetings every fifteen days, where information and education on the proper use hearing aids was transmitted. Most of the patients participated actively in the meetings spontaneously giving their opinion or answering questions when so requested. All elderly had been informed as to the importance of accepting their auditory deficiency and on the need to be motivated towards using hearing aids. Moreover, listening to depositions of other elderly users seemed to facilitate understanding of their own difficulties and stimulated them in the process of getting used to the sound amplification. Groups structure facilitated interaction among aged ones, helping them to clarify communication doubts and strategies and, consequently, it promoted their adaptation.

  6. FPGA implementation of adaptive beamforming in hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samtani, Kartik; Thomas, Jobin; Varma, G Abhinav; Sumam, David S; Deepu, S P

    2017-07-01

    Beamforming is a spatial filtering technique used in hearing aids to improve target sound reception by reducing interference from other directions. In this paper we propose improvements in an existing architecture present for two omnidirectional microphone array based adaptive beamforming for hearing aid applications and implement the same on Xilinx Artix 7 FPGA using VHDL coding and Xilinx Vivado ® 2015.2. The nulls are introduced in particular directions by combination of two fixed polar patterns. This combination can be adaptively controlled to steer the null in the direction of noise. The beamform patterns and improvements in SNR values obtained from experiments in a conference room environment are analyzed.

  7. Towards Cognizant Hearing Aids: Modeling of Content, Affect and Attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karadogan, Seliz

    Hearing aids improved significantly after the integration of advanced digital signal processing applications. This improvement will continue and evolve through obtaining intelligent, individualized hearing aids integrating top-down (knowledge-based) and bottom-up (signal-based) approaches by making...... attention is studied. A computational top-down attention model is presented and behavioral experiments are carried out to investigate the role of top-down task driven attention in the cocktail party problem. Finally, automatic emotion recognition from speech is studied using a dimensional approach...

  8. Encoding of speech sounds at auditory brainstem level in good and poor hearing aid performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Hemanth Narayan; Puttabasappa, Manjula

    Hearing aids are prescribed to alleviate loss of audibility. It has been reported that about 31% of hearing aid users reject their own hearing aid because of annoyance towards background noise. The reason for dissatisfaction can be located anywhere from the hearing aid microphone till the integrity of neurons along the auditory pathway. To measure spectra from the output of hearing aid at the ear canal level and frequency following response recorded at the auditory brainstem from individuals with hearing impairment. A total of sixty participants having moderate sensorineural hearing impairment with age range from 15 to 65 years were involved. Each participant was classified as either Good or Poor Hearing aid Performers based on acceptable noise level measure. Stimuli /da/ and /si/ were presented through loudspeaker at 65dB SPL. At the ear canal, the spectra were measured in the unaided and aided conditions. At auditory brainstem, frequency following response were recorded to the same stimuli from the participants. Spectrum measured in each condition at ear canal was same in good hearing aid performers and poor hearing aid performers. At brainstem level, better F 0 encoding; F 0 and F 1 energies were significantly higher in good hearing aid performers than in poor hearing aid performers. Though the hearing aid spectra were almost same between good hearing aid performers and poor hearing aid performers, subtle physiological variations exist at the auditory brainstem. The result of the present study suggests that neural encoding of speech sound at the brainstem level might be mediated distinctly in good hearing aid performers from that of poor hearing aid performers. Thus, it can be inferred that subtle physiological changes are evident at the auditory brainstem in a person who is willing to accept noise from those who are not willing to accept noise. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier

  9. Localization ability with bimodal hearing aids and bilateral cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Bernhard U.; Baumann, Uwe; Fastl, Hugo

    2004-09-01

    After successful cochlear implantation in one ear, some patients continue to use a hearing aid at the contralateral ear. They report an improved reception of speech, especially in noise, as well as a better perception of music when the hearing aid and cochlear implant are used in this bimodal combination. Some individuals in this bimodal patient group also report the impression of an improved localization ability. Similar experiences are reported by the group of bilateral cochlear implantees. In this study, a survey of 11 bimodally and 4 bilaterally equipped cochlear implant users was carried out to assess localization ability. Individuals in the bimodal implant group were all provided with the same type of hearing aid in the opposite ear, and subjects in the bilateral implant group used cochlear implants of the same manufacturer on each ear. Subjects adjusted the spot of a computer-controlled laser-pointer to the perceived direction of sound incidence in the frontal horizontal plane by rotating a trackball. Two subjects of the bimodal group who had substantial residual hearing showed localization ability in the bimodal configuration, whereas using each single device only the subject with better residual hearing was able to discriminate the side of sound origin. Five other subjects with more pronounced hearing loss displayed an ability for side discrimination through the use of bimodal aids, while four of them were already able to discriminate the side with a single device. Of the bilateral cochlear implant group one subject showed localization accuracy close to that of normal hearing subjects. This subject was also able to discriminate the side of sound origin using the first implanted device alone. The other three bilaterally equipped subjects showed limited localization ability using both devices. Among them one subject demonstrated a side-discrimination ability using only the first implanted device.

  10. A programmable sound processor for advanced hearing aid research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, H

    1998-03-01

    A portable sound processor has been developed to facilitate research on advanced hearing aids. Because it is based on a digital signal processing integrated circuit (Motorola DSP56001), it can readily be programmed to execute novel algorithms. Furthermore, the parameters of these algorithms can be adjusted quickly and easily to suit the specific hearing characteristics of users. In the processor, microphone signals are digitized to a precision of 12 bits at a sampling rate of approximately 12 kHz for input to the DSP device. Subsequently, processed samples are delivered to the earphone by a novel, fully-digital class-D driver. This driver provides the advantages of a conventional class-D amplifier (high maximum output, low power consumption, low distortion) without some of the disadvantages (such as the need for precise analog circuitry). In addition, a cochlear implant driver is provided so that the processor is suitable for hearing-impaired people who use an implant and an acoustic hearing aid together. To reduce the computational demands on the DSP device, and therefore the power consumption, a running spectral analysis of incoming signals is provided by a custom-designed switched-capacitor integrated circuit incorporating 20 bandpass filters. The complete processor is pocket-sized and powered by batteries. An example is described of its use in providing frequency-shaped amplification for aid users with severe hearing impairment. Speech perception tests confirmed that the processor performed significantly better than the subjects' own hearing aids, probably because the digital filter provided a frequency response generally closer to the optimum for each user than the simpler analog aids.

  11. The Effects of Hearing Aids on Localization of White Noise by Blind Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Bruce R.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to observe the effects of hearing aids on the ability of 20 blind veterans to localize white noise. In all cases, Ss performed more poorly on a localization task while wearing a hearing aid. (Author)

  12. Education qualification levels and school careers of unilateral versus bilateral hearing aid users.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijen, J.W.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Analyse the difference in school careers and secondary school qualification levels between unilateral hearing aid users and bilateral hearing aid users. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective questionnaire study. SETTING: Postal-based questionnaire. PARTICIPANTS: Names of adults known to have been

  13. Exploration of a physiologically-inspired hearing-aid algorithm using a computer model mimicking impaired hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Tim; Clark, Nicholas R; Lecluyse, Wendy; Meddis, Ray

    2016-01-01

    To use a computer model of impaired hearing to explore the effects of a physiologically-inspired hearing-aid algorithm on a range of psychoacoustic measures. A computer model of a hypothetical impaired listener's hearing was constructed by adjusting parameters of a computer model of normal hearing. Absolute thresholds, estimates of compression, and frequency selectivity (summarized to a hearing profile) were assessed using this model with and without pre-processing the stimuli by a hearing-aid algorithm. The influence of different settings of the algorithm on the impaired profile was investigated. To validate the model predictions, the effect of the algorithm on hearing profiles of human impaired listeners was measured. A computer model simulating impaired hearing (total absence of basilar membrane compression) was used, and three hearing-impaired listeners participated. The hearing profiles of the model and the listeners showed substantial changes when the test stimuli were pre-processed by the hearing-aid algorithm. These changes consisted of lower absolute thresholds, steeper temporal masking curves, and sharper psychophysical tuning curves. The hearing-aid algorithm affected the impaired hearing profile of the model to approximate a normal hearing profile. Qualitatively similar results were found with the impaired listeners' hearing profiles.

  14. Self-reported disability and handicap after hearing-aid fitting and benefit of hearing aids: comparison of fitting procedures, degree of hearing loss, experience with hearing aids and uni- and bilateral fittings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, Mick; Maat, Bert; Krijnen, Pieta; Verschuure, Hans; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Feenstra, Louw

    2009-01-01

    Self-reported outcome on hearing disability and handicap as well as overall health-related quality of life were measured after hearing-aid fitting in a large-scale clinical population. Fitting was performed according to two different procedures in a double-blind study design. We used a comparative

  15. Self-reported disability and handicap after hearing-aid fitting and benefit of hearing aids : comparison of fitting procedures, degree of hearing loss, experience with hearing aids and uni- and bilateral fittings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, Mick; Maat, Bert; Krijnen, Pieta; Verschuure, Hans; Dreschler, Wouter A; Feenstra, Louw

    Self-reported outcome on hearing disability and handicap as well as overall health-related quality of life were measured after hearing-aid fitting in a large-scale clinical population. Fitting was performed according to two different procedures in a double-blind study design. We used a comparative

  16. Tinnitus Management: Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Extended-Wear Hearing Aids, Conventional Hearing Aids, and Combination Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, James A; McMillan, Garnett; Dann, Serena; Bennett, Keri; Griest, Susan; Theodoroff, Sarah; Silverman, Shien Pei; Whichard, Susan; Saunders, Gabrielle

    2017-06-01

    Whereas hearing aids have long been considered effective for providing relief from tinnitus, controlled clinical studies evaluating this premise have been very limited. The purpose of this study was to systematically determine the relative efficacy of conventional receiver-in-the-canal hearing aids (HA), the same hearing aids with a sound generator (HA+SG), and extended-wear, deep fit hearing aids (EWHA), to provide relief from tinnitus through a randomized controlled trial. Each of these ear-level devices was a product of Phonak, LLC. Participants were randomized to HA, HA+SG, or EWHA and wore bilaterally fit devices for about 4 months. Fittings, adjustments, and follow-up appointments were conducted to comply with company guidelines and to ensure that all participants attended appointments on the same schedule. At 4-5 months, participants returned to complete final outcome measures, which concluded their study participation. Participants were 55 individuals (mean age: 63.1 years) with mild to moderately-severe hearing loss who: (a) did not currently use hearing aids; (b) reported tinnitus that was sufficiently bothersome to warrant intervention; and (c) were suitable candidates for each of the study devices. The primary outcome measure was the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI). Secondary outcome measures included hearing-specific questionnaires and the Quick Speech in Noise test (QuickSIN). The goal of the analysis was to evaluate efficacy of the EWHA and HA+SG devices versus the HA standard device. There were 18 participants in each of the HA and EWHA groups and 19 in the HA+SG group. Gender, age, and baseline TFI severity were balanced across treatment groups. Nearly all participants had a reduction in tinnitus symptoms during the study. The average TFI change (improvement) from baseline was 21 points in the HA group, 31 points in the EWHA group, and 33 points in the HA+SG group. A "clinically significant" improvement in reaction to tinnitus (at least 13-point

  17. The Modern Hearing Aid – an Extreme System Integration Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    of the ICs for these. This leads to very large demands for system integration at the packing level, SiP (System-in-Package), and not at least at the IC level, SoC (System-on-Chip). As a result of this all large hearing aid manufactures use custom package technology which again uses fully customized ASICs...

  18. [The outcome analysis of different age paragraph hearing aid users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingqing; Zhou, Huijfang; Zhang, Jing; Guo, Yuxi; Wang, Xiuzhen

    2012-05-01

    To compare and analysis outcomes of different age paragraph hearing aid users by questionnaires. The questionnaire was deployed to 90 hearing aid users, 40 females and 50 males, with ages between 19 and 80 years-from junior high school education to university education, suffering binaural severe or moderate sensorineural deafness. The subjects were devided into 3 groups, the A group with ages between 19 and 40 years, the B group with ages between 41 and 60 years, the C group with ages between 61 and 80 years. After being fitted with hearing aids for 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months, SADL and IOI-HA were applied to evaluating 90 subjects. The study was carried out through face to face interview or by telephone. There were significant differences in SADL scores of positive effect, service and Personal image among the 3 groups (P paragraph is improved with the wearing time growth, but the outcome and satisfaction of hearing aids are decreased with the age growth.

  19. development of microcontroller based binaural digital hearing aids

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    circumscribed dynamic frequencies series of the impaired-ears. It has been designed to pick up sound waves with a microphone, strengthen the weak sound waves into strong or loud sound waves and send them to the ear through a speaker [6]. With the microchips, available today, hearing aids have become smaller and.

  20. 47 CFR 68.112 - Hearing aid-compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... motel room is renovated or newly constructed, or the telephone in a hotel or motel room is replaced or... after January 1, 2000. (ii) The telephones in at least twenty percent of the guest rooms in a hotel or... at least twenty percent of the guest rooms in a hotel or motel must be hearing aid compatible, as...

  1. HIV/AIDS among Adolescents with Hearing Impairment in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    exclusion from programmes that talk about sexuality, cultural beliefs, poor knowledge and attitude of adolescents with hearing impairment to some risk factors. .... to some risk practices that can serve as avenues for transmission of HIV/AIDS. Lack of information and resources to ensure safe sex is another limiting factor.

  2. Hearing aid noise suppression and working memory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Rosa-Linde; Neher, Tobias; Wagener, Kirsten C.

    Research findings concerning the relation between outcome from hearing aid (HA) noise suppression and working memory function are unclear. The current study thus investigated the effects of three noise suppression algorithms on auditory working memory as well as the relation with reading span...

  3. Hearing aid noise suppression and working memory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neher, Tobias; Wagener, Kirsten C.; Fischer, Rosa-Linde

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Research findings concerning the relation between benefit from hearing aid (HA) noise suppression and working memory function are inconsistent. The current study thus investigated the effects of three noise suppression algorithms on auditory working memory and the relation with reading...

  4. The effect of a carrier phrase on hearing aid amplification of single words in quiet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versfeld, N.J.; Goverts, S.T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A common method to assess the functional benefit of hearing aids is by measuring the performance-intensity curve of single words in quiet with and without hearing aids. Currently, virtually all hearing aids use signal processing, which may have a marked effect on gain as a function of

  5. 47 CFR 68.415 - Hearing aid-compatibility and volume control informal complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatibility and volume control... Procedures § 68.415 Hearing aid-compatibility and volume control informal complaints. Persons with complaints... complaints regarding rules in this part pertaining to hearing aid compatibility and volume control, may bring...

  6. The effect of hearing aid noise reduction on listening effort in hearing-impaired adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Jamie L; Doherty, Karen A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a noise-reduction (NR) algorithm on the listening effort hearing-impaired participants expend on a speech in noise task. Twelve hearing-impaired listeners fitted with behind-the-ear hearing aids with a fast-acting modulation-based NR algorithm participated in this study. A dual-task paradigm was used to measure listening effort with and without the NR enabled in the hearing aid. The primary task was a sentence-in-noise task presented at fixed overall speech performance levels of 76% (moderate listening condition) and 50% (difficult listening condition) correct performance, and the secondary task was a visual-tracking test. Participants also completed measures of working memory (Reading Span test), and processing speed (Digit Symbol Substitution Test) ability. Participants' speech recognition in noise scores did not significantly change with the NR algorithm activated in the hearing aid in either listening condition. The NR algorithm significantly decreased listening effort, but only in the more difficult listening condition. Last, there was a tendency for participants with faster processing speeds to expend less listening effort with the NR algorithm when listening to speech in background noise in the difficult listening condition. The NR algorithm reduced the listening effort adults with hearing loss must expend to understand speech in noise.

  7. Individualized correction factors in the preselection of hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikret-Pasa, S; Revit, L J

    1992-04-01

    This study investigated three issues involving corrections for individual ear acoustics in hearing aid prescriptions: (a) the extent to which inconsistencies in the sound-field reference position can affect comparative corrections for the real-ear unaided response (REUR); (b) the extent to which individual variability in the real-ear-to-coupler level difference (RECD) supports the use of individual measurements as opposed to an average-ear estimate; and (c) the adequacy of using KEMAR estimates of the effects of the location of the hearing aid microphone. In Experiment 1, KEMAR REURs using over-the-ear and under-the-ear reference positions were compared with KEMAR REURs using a center-of-head reference position. Maximum differences of 4-9 dB were found in the 1500- to 5000-Hz range, depending on test conditions. In Experiment 2, the ear canal response of an insert earphone was compared to the 2-cc coupler response of the same earphone to calculate the RECD. Individual RECDs for a population of hearing aid candidates were compared to the RECD for KEMAR. For 8 of the 15 subjects (9 of 18 ears), the RECD was more than 4 dB different from KEMAR at two or more third-octave frequencies between 500 and 4000 Hz. In Experiment 3, the effect of the location of the hearing aid microphone for in-the-ear (ITE) and in-the-canal (ITC) locations was compared with the over-the-ear (OTE) location for 18 ears and for KEMAR. The effects varied across individual ears, but all ears and KEMAR showed positive gain in the high frequencies for the ITE and ITC locations. The relevance of these results to hearing aid prescription practices is discussed.

  8. Characterization of the dominant structural vibration of hearing aid receivers: Towards the moderation of mechanical feedback in hearing aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanda, Brenno R.

    Presented are the results from the experimental, analytical, and computational analyses accomplished to characterize the mechanical vibration of hearing aid receivers, a key electro-acoustic component of hearing aids. The function of a receiver in a hearing aid is to provide an amplified sound signal into the ear canal. Unfortunately, as the receiver produces sound, it also undergoes vibration which can be transmitted through the hearing aid package to the microphones, resulting in undesirable feedback oscillations. To gain more knowledge and control on the source of these feedback oscillations, a dynamic rigid body model of the receiver is proposed. The rigid body model captures the essential dynamic features of the receiver. The model is represented by two hinged rigid bodies, under an equal and opposite dynamic moment load, and connected to each other by a torsional spring and damper. The mechanical coupling ratio between the two rigid bodies is proved to be acoustically independent. A method is introduced to estimate the parameters for the proposed model using experimental data. An equivalent finite element analysis model is established and tested against a known and characterized mechanical attachment. The simulated model successfully predicts the structural dynamic response showing excellent agreement between the finite element analysis and measured results.

  9. Vowel production of Mandarin-speaking hearing aid users with different types of hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Hung

    Full Text Available In contrast with previous research focusing on cochlear implants, this study examined the speech performance of hearing aid users with conductive (n = 11, mixed (n = 10, and sensorineural hearing loss (n = 7 and compared it with the speech of hearing control. Speech intelligibility was evaluated by computing the vowel space area defined by the Mandarin Chinese corner vowels /a, u, i/. The acoustic differences between the vowels were assessed using the Euclidean distance. The results revealed that both the conductive and mixed hearing loss groups exhibited a reduced vowel working space, but no significant difference was found between the sensorineural hearing loss and normal hearing groups. An analysis using the Euclidean distance further showed that the compression of vowel space area in conductive hearing loss can be attributed to the substantial lowering of the second formant of /i/. The differences in vowel production between groups are discussed in terms of the occlusion effect and the signal transmission media of various hearing devices.

  10. Interventions after screening for hearing difficulties: a retrospective investigation of interventions other than hearing aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafydd Stephens

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been a number of studies on screening of hearing in adult populations. Despite the high importance of interventions following screening for hearing (Wilson and Jungner, 1968 there is a dearth of information on the nature of interventions following such screening, other than hearing aid fitting (HA or referral to audiology/ENT departments (Pronk et al., 2011. In the late 1980s and early 1990s four studies were performed in Wales, which offered such other interventions to those individuals indicating hearing disabilities in screening questionnaires (eg Stephens et al., 1990; Davis et al., 1992. The majority of the patient notes from these studies were still accessible and have been examined to extract the following information: - what interventions were used other than hearing aids? - who received these interventions? - would they have been more appropriate than HAs for some of those fitted? The aim of this paper is to list the interventions provided in these studies and relate them to the initial complaints of those indicating hearing problems.

  11. Working Memory, Sleep, and Hearing Problems in Patients with Tinnitus and Hearing Loss Fitted with Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarenoe, Reza; Hällgren, Mathias; Andersson, Gerhard; Ledin, Torbjörn

    2017-02-01

    Tinnitus is a common condition and there is a need to evaluate effects of tinnitus management in relation to moderating factors such as degree of hearing loss. As it is possible that tinnitus influences concentration, and thus is likely to disturb cognitive processing, the role of cognitive functioning also needs to be investigated. To compare a group of patients with sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus to a control group with only sensorineural hearing loss (and no tinnitus). To investigate working memory, sleep, and hearing problems measured before and after hearing rehabilitation. A prospective study. The sample consisted of 100 patients, 50 with hearing loss and tinnitus, and 50 controls with hearing loss but no tinnitus. All patients were between 40 and 82 yr old and had a pure-tone average (PTA; average of 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) memory capacity, sleep quality, hearing problems, speech recognition, and tinnitus annoyance. Eight patients dropped out of the study. Thus, a total of 92 patients were included for analysis, with 46 in each group. As a consequence of unplanned age and PTA differences between the groups, an age-matched subsample (n = 30 + 30) was selected for further analysis. Tests including the Reading Span, Hearing-in-Noise Test (HINT), Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were administered before and after hearing aid rehabilitation. There were no between-group differences at baseline in the full sample (n = 92), with the exception of the THI (p < 0.001) and the PSQI (p < 0.002), on which the hearing loss and tinnitus group had significantly higher scores. Pre/post changes were significant for both groups on the Reading Span, and HHIE. However, these improvements were significantly larger for the patients in the hearing loss and tinnitus group on the Reading Span test (p < 0.001) and the PSQI (p < 0.001). Patients with tinnitus and hearing loss also

  12. Implications of using the Hearing Aids on quality of life of elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniel, Camila Zorzetto; Sousa, Juliana Cristina Ferreira de; Silva, Carla Dias da; Fortunato-Queiroz, Carla Aparecida de Urzedo; Hyppolito, Miguel Ângelo; Santos, Patricia Leila Dos

    2017-10-19

    To evaluate through standardized questionnaires the quality of life of elderly people with hearing loss diagnosed with and without the use of hearing aids (HA) and elderly without hearing complaints. This is a cross-sectional study with non probabilistic sample, divided into three groups divided as follows: 30 elderly people with diagnosed hearing loss and indication for use of individual sound amplification devices (hearing aids), but have not yet made use of the prosthesis; 30 individuals with hearing impairment who used hearing aids and 30 elderly without hearing complaints. Participants completed a questionnaire investigating sociodemographic and family data, the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly Screening Version (HHIE-S) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life - Short version (WHOQOL-BREF). In addition to the descriptive analysis of the data were performed tests to compare the three groups by applying analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Bonferroni post hoc test. The three groups differed significantly in all domains of quality of life. The group of the elderly people with hearing loss diagnosed and with indication for the use of hearing aids presented lower scores and the group of the elderly with hearing disabilities that used the hearing aid and that the reference group. The AASI group presented the best quality of life results. The hearing loss affects the quality of life of the elderly. The effective use of hearing aid is beneficial to this population, improving their living and health conditions.

  13. Vibrant SoundBridge application to middle ear windows versus conventional hearing aids: a comparative study based on international outcome inventory for hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atas, Ahmet; Tutar, Hakan; Gunduz, Bulent; Bayazıt, Yıldırım A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the outcomes of satisfaction of the patients who used hearing aids preceding the vibrant sound bridge (VSB) application on middle ear windows (14 oval window and 5 round window). Nineteen adult patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss were included in the study. All patients used behind the ear hearing aids on the site which was selected for VSB application. The patients used hearing aids for at least 3 months before the VSB operation. The floating mass transducer (FMT) was placed on one of the middle ear windows (oval or round) in VSB operation. The patients were evaluated with International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) preoperatively after at least 3 months trial of conventional hearing aid and postoperatively after 3 months use of VSB. No perioperative problem was encountered. The total score of IOI-HA was significantly higher with VSB compared with conventional hearing aids (p 0.05). The IOI-HA scores were significantly higher with the middle ear implant than the conventional hearing aid regarding benefit and residual participation restrictions (p < 0.05). Although the scores for quality of life assessment was similar between VSB and hearing aid use, there was a superiority of VSB in terms of benefit and residual participation restrictions as well as overall IOI-HA scores as the FMT was placed on one of the middle ear windows.

  14. Load applied on bone-anchored transfemoral prosthesis: Characterization of a prosthesis—A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Laurent Frossard, PhD; Eva Häggström, CPO; Kerstin Hagberg, PhD; Rickard Brånemark, MD, PhD

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) record the inner-prosthesis loading during activities of daily living (ADLs), (2) present a set of variables comparing loading data, and (3) provide an example of characterization of two prostheses. The load was measured at 200 Hz using a multi-axial transducer mounted between the residuum and the knee of an individual with unilateral transfemoral amputation fitted with a bone-anchored prosthesis. The load was measured while using two different prosthe...

  15. Hearing aids for otitis media with effusion: Do children use them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Richard Wei Chern; Overton, Parisa; Benton, Claire; Daniel, Matija

    2017-08-01

    ENT surgeons may refer children with otitis media with effusion (OME) to audiology for consideration of hearing aids. They are an option for the treatment of OME, but are only effective if the child actually wears them. Our study investigated what proportion of children referred for hearing aids actually receive them, and whether children use them. Retrospective study of children referred to audiology from November 2013 to August 2014, including 70 children referred by ENT for hearing aids for OME, plus a further 5 children with OME given hearing aids through direct access audiology service. During the study period, there were 202 referrals of children to audiology, of which 70 (34.7%) were for consideration of hearing aids for OME. Of these 70 referred children, 37 (52.9%) were not fitted with hearing aids due to normal audiometry (23), asymptomatic mild hearing loss (7), nonattendance (3), clinical decision to just monitor hearing (1), parental decline (2), and unrecorded reason (1). A total of 38 children (including direct access patients) were fitted with hearing aids for OME. Majority (36/38) of children issued aids used them, 16 all day, 7 only at school, 1 only at home, 3 only when needed, and 9 used them for an unspecified duration; 1 child's use of hearing aids was unrecorded, and 1 child refused to use it. 21 were fitted bilaterally and 17 unilaterally. 37 were behind the ear aids and 1 a BAHA softband. A third of referrals to paediatric audiology by ENT are for consideration of hearing aids for OME. Only about half of children referred to audiology for hearing aids for OME actually receive them, as by the time they see audiology the hearing loss has frequently resolved or is asymptomatic so that aiding is unwarranted. Once fitted, they appear to be well accepted. Hearing aids have fair utilization in children fitted with them for OME. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Surgical repair of central slip avulsion injuries with Mitek bone anchor--retrospective analysis of a case series.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Jeffrey C Y

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe our technique of central slip repair using the Mitek bone anchor and to evaluate the treatment outcome. Eight digits in eight patients were reconstructed using the bone anchor: three little fingers, two middle fingers, two index fingers and one ring finger. There were two immediate and six delayed repairs (range from one day to eight months). Four patients had pre-operative intensive splinting and physiotherapy to restore passive extension of the proximal interphalangeal joint prior to central slip reconstruction. All patients have made good progress since surgery. No patient requires a second procedure and none of the bone anchors have dislodged or loosened. We conclude that the Mitek bone anchor is a reliable technique to achieve soft tissue to bone fixation in central slip avulsion injuries. We recommend that this technique be considered as a treatment option for patients requiring surgical repair.

  17. Corrosion failure analysis of hearing aid battery-spring contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    Reliability of low power electrical contacts such as those in hearing aid battery-spring systems is a very critical aspect for the overall performance of the device. These systems are exposed to certain harsh environments like high humidity and elevated temperatures, and often in combination...... the susceptibility of these systems to galvanic corrosion. In this study, traditional behind the ear (BTE) hearing aid systems, which failed during service were analysed. Failure analysis was performed on the dome type battery-spring contact systems. The morphology of the contact areas was observed using scanning...... electron microscopy, and the compositional analysis of the corrosion products and contaminants was performed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Wear track morphology was observed on the contact points, and the top coating on the dome was worn out exposing the substrate spring material...

  18. Use of silicone hearing aid mold material in laryngotracheal reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heman-Ackah, Yolanda D; Sataloff, Robert T

    2005-10-01

    Endolaryngeal stenting in patients with irregularly shaped larynges can be challenging. In such cases, the use of a moldable yet reasonably rigid endolaryngeal stent is desirable. The purpose of this report is to describe our experience with silicone hearing aid material as a moldable endolaryngeal stent in a patient with an atypically shaped larynx. A patient with relapsing polychondritis that resulted in complete stenosis of the subglottic airway underwent laryngotracheal reconstruction. Moldable silicone, commonly used to prepare ear canal molds for hearing aids, was molded into the neo-endolarynx to serve as a custom-made endolaryngeal stent. The patient tolerated the moldable silicone stent well and had a patent airway with epithelialization 8 months after removal. Silicone mold material is a suitable substance for endolaryngeal stenting. It conforms to the configuration of the individual's airway, is tolerated well, can be removed relatively easily, and is a useful alternative to prefabricated stents in laryngotracheal reconstruction.

  19. Working memory and intelligibility of hearing-aid processed speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Pamela E.; Arehart, Kathryn H.; Shen, Jing; Anderson, Melinda; Kates, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous work suggested that individuals with low working memory capacity may be at a disadvantage in adverse listening environments, including situations with background noise or substantial modification of the acoustic signal. This study explored the relationship between patient factors (including working memory capacity) and intelligibility and quality of modified speech for older individuals with sensorineural hearing loss. The modification was created using a combination of hearing aid processing [wide-dynamic range compression (WDRC) and frequency compression (FC)] applied to sentences in multitalker babble. The extent of signal modification was quantified via an envelope fidelity index. We also explored the contribution of components of working memory by including measures of processing speed and executive function. We hypothesized that listeners with low working memory capacity would perform more poorly than those with high working memory capacity across all situations, and would also be differentially affected by high amounts of signal modification. Results showed a significant effect of working memory capacity for speech intelligibility, and an interaction between working memory, amount of hearing loss and signal modification. Signal modification was the major predictor of quality ratings. These data add to the literature on hearing-aid processing and working memory by suggesting that the working memory-intelligibility effects may be related to aggregate signal fidelity, rather than to the specific signal manipulation. They also suggest that for individuals with low working memory capacity, sensorineural loss may be most appropriately addressed with WDRC and/or FC parameters that maintain the fidelity of the signal envelope. PMID:25999874

  20. Combined Active Noise Control and noise reduction in Hearing Aids

    OpenAIRE

    Serizel, Romain; Moonen, Marc; Wouters, Jan; Jensen, Søren,

    2008-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a combined active noise control and noise reduction scheme for hearing aids to tackle secondary path effects and effects of signal leakage through the fitting. While such leakage contributions and the secondary accoustic path from the reciever to the tympanic membrane are usually not taken into account in standard noise reduction systems, they appear to have a non-negligible impact on the final signal quality. Integrating an active noise control sys...

  1. Hearing aid noise suppression and working memory function

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Rosa-Linde; Neher, Tobias; Wagener, Kirsten C.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Research findings concerning the relation between benefit from hearing aid (HA) noise suppression and working memory function are inconsistent. The current study thus investigated the effects of three noise suppression algorithms on auditory working memory and the relation with reading span.DESIGN: Using a computer simulation of bilaterally fitted HAs, four settings were tested: (1) unprocessed, (2) directional microphones, (3) single-channel noise reduction and (4) binaural cohere...

  2. Hearing Aid Benefit in Patients with Mild Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carole E; Danhauer, Jeffrey L; Ellis, Blakely B; Jilla, Anna Marie

    2016-04-01

    Untreated sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is associated with chronic health-care conditions, isolation, loneliness, and reduced quality of life. Although hearing aids can minimize the negative effects of SNHL, only about one in five persons with SNHL seeks help for communication problems. Many persons wait 10 yr or more from the time they first notice a problem before pursuing amplification. Further, little information about the benefits of amplification is available for persons with mild SNHL (MSNHL), who likely defer treatment even longer. To conduct a systematic review to weigh the evidence regarding benefits derived from the use of amplification by adults with MSNHL. Systematic review with meta-analysis. Adult hearing aid wearers with bilateral average pure-tone thresholds ≤45 dB HL at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz. PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied-Health Literature, Cochrane Collaboration, and Google Scholar were searched independently by the authors during September 2013. The authors used a consensus approach to assess the quality and extract data for the meta-analysis. Of 106 articles recovered for full-text review, only 10 met inclusion criteria (at least Level IV of evidence and involved and reported separate pre-/postfitting hearing aid outcomes for patients with MSNHL). Included studies involved mainly middle-aged to elderly patients using hearing aids of various styles and circuitry. Results from all of the studies indicated positive benefits from amplification for patients with MSNHL. Data from five studies were suitable for a meta-analysis, which produced a small-to-medium effect size of 0.85 (95% confidence intervals = 0.44-1.25) after adjusting for a small publication bias. This evidence confirmed benefits from the use of amplification in adults with MSNHL. Evidence exists supporting the notion that adults with MSNHL benefit from hearing aids. This information is important and useful to audiologists, patients, and third-party payers

  3. 47 CFR 68.317 - Hearing aid compatibility volume control: technical standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing aid compatibility volume control... for Terminal Equipment Approval § 68.317 Hearing aid compatibility volume control: technical standards... hearing. (g) These incorporations by reference of paragraph 4.1.2 (including table 4.4) of American...

  4. Self-Assessment of Hearing and Purchase of Hearing Aids by Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otavio, Andressa Colares da Costa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Presbycusis is a consequence of aging. Prescription of hearing aids is part of the treatment, although the prevalence of use by elderly people is still small. Objective To verify whether or not self-assessment of hearing is a predictor for purchase of hearing aids. Methods Quantitative, cross-sectional, descriptive, and observational study. Participants were subjects who sought a private hearing center for selection of hearing aids. During the diagnostic interview, subjects answered the following question: “On a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being the worst and 10 the best, how would you rate your overall hearing ability?” After that, subjects underwent audiometry, selected a hearing aid, performed a home trial, and decided whether or not to purchase the hearing aid. The variables were associated and analyzed statistically. Results The sample was comprised of 32 subjects, both men and women, with a higher number of women. Mean age was 71.41 ± 12.14 years. Self-assessment of hearing ranged from 2 to 9 points. Overall, 71.9% of the subjects purchased hearing aids. There was no association between scores in the self-assessment and the purchase of hearing aids (p = 0.263. Among those who scored between 2 and 5 points, 64.7% purchased the device; between 6 and 7 points, 76.09% purchased the device; and between 8 and 9 points, 50% purchased the device, respectively. Conclusion There is evidence that low self-assessment scores lead to the purchase of hearing aids, although no significant association was observed in the sample.

  5. Hearing Aid-Induced Plasticity in the Auditory System of Older Adults: Evidence from Speech Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Limor; Banai, Karen; Karni, Avi; Attias, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We tested whether using hearing aids can improve unaided performance in speech perception tasks in older adults with hearing impairment. Method: Unaided performance was evaluated in dichotic listening and speech-­in-­noise tests in 47 older adults with hearing impairment; 36 participants in 3 study groups were tested before hearing aid…

  6. Sounds perceived as annoying by hearing-aid users in their daily soundscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skagerstrand, Åsa; Stenfelt, Stefan; Arlinger, Stig; Wikström, Joel

    2014-04-01

    The noises in modern soundscapes continue to increase and are a major origin for annoyance. For a hearing-impaired person, a hearing aid is often beneficial, but noise and annoying sounds can result in non-use of the hearing aid, temporary or permanently. The purpose of this study was to identify annoying sounds in a daily soundscape for hearing-aid users. A diary was used to collect data where the participants answered four questions per day about annoying sounds in the daily soundscape over a two-week period. Sixty adult hearing-aid users. Of the 60 participants 91% experienced annoying sounds daily when using hearing aids. The annoying sound mentioned by most users, was verbal human sounds, followed by other daily sound sources categorized into 17 groups such as TV/radio, vehicles, and machine tools. When the hearing-aid users were grouped in relation to age, hearing loss, gender, hearing-aid experience, and type of signal processing used in their hearing aids, small and only few significant differences were found when comparing their experience of annoying sounds. The results indicate that hearing-aid users often experience annoying sounds and improved clinical fitting routines may reduce the problem.

  7. Management of hearing aid assembly by urban-dwelling hearing-impaired adults in a developed country: implications for a self-fitting hearing aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convery, Elizabeth; Keidser, Gitte; Hartley, Lisa; Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly

    2011-12-01

    A self-fitting hearing aid, designed to be assembled and programmed without audiological or computer support, could bring amplification to millions of people in developing countries, who remain unaided due to the lack of a local, professional, audiological infrastructure. The ability to assemble and insert a hearing aid is fundamental to the successful use of a self-fitting device. In this study, the management of such tasks was investigated. Eighty older, urban-dwelling, hearing-impaired adults in a developed country were asked to follow a set of written, illustrated instructions to assemble two slim-fit behind-the-ear hearing aids. Participants were allowed to access assistance with the task from an accompanying partner. A range of personal and audiometric variables was measured through the use of structured questionnaires and standardized tests of health literacy, cognitive function, and manual dexterity. The results showed that 99% of participants were able to complete the hearing aid assembly task, either on their own or with assistance. Health literacy, or the ability to read and understand health-related text, and gender most strongly influenced participants' ability to complete the assembly task independently and accurately. Higher levels of health literacy were associated with an increased likelihood of independent and successful task completion. Male participants were more likely to complete the task on their own, while female participants were more likely to assemble the device without errors. The results of this study will inform future work regarding development of educational material for the self-fitting hearing aid as well as candidacy for such a device.

  8. The psychosocial impact of hearing aids in children with otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureishi, A; Garas, G; Mallick, A; Parker, D

    2014-11-01

    In children, otitis media with effusion is treated using grommets or hearing aids. Parents considering treatment options express concerns regarding the psychosocial impact of hearing aids in terms of self-esteem and bullying. This study assessed the psychosocial impact of hearing aid use. A cross-sectional study was undertaken comparing hearing aid users to non hearing aid users with regard to their attitudes towards hearing aids. All subjects, who had been diagnosed with otitis media with effusion, were aged less than 16 years, were without disability and attended mainstream schools. A questionnaire was designed and utilised. The study comprised 47 children with hearing aids and 50 with grommets. Significant between-group differences (p negative perceptions of non hearing aid users were not reported by hearing aid users. Children with hearing aids do not suffer from bullying or low self-esteem to the extent perceived by parents. This information is useful for informed decisions regarding treatment of otitis media with effusion.

  9. Pediatric Hearing Aid Management: Parent-Reported Needs for Learning Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Karen; Rusk, Stephanie E P; Nelson, Lauri; Preston, Elizabeth; White, Karl R; Barrett, Tyson S; Twohig, Michael P

    The aim of this study was to investigate parent learning and support needs related to hearing aid management for young children, and factors that influence parent-reported hours of hearing aid use. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect survey data in seven states. The child's primary caregiver completed a demographic form, a questionnaire to explore parent learning and support needs as well as their challenges with hearing aid use, and the patient health questionnaire to identify symptoms of depression. Three hundred and eighteen parents completed the questionnaires. Responses were analyzed for 318 parents of children (M = 23.15 months; SD = 10.43; range: 3 to 51) who had been wearing hearing aids (M = 15.52; SD = 10.11; range: hearing aids, what their child can/cannot hear, financial assistance, how to meet other parents, how to do basic hearing aid maintenance, and how to keep the hearing aids on their child. The most frequently reported challenges that interfered with hearing aid use (rated often or always) were child activities, child not wanting to wear the hearing aids, and fear of losing or damaging the hearing aids. Forty-two percent of parents reported that, on good days, their child used hearing aids all waking hours. Multiple regression was used to compare the effect on parent-reported typical hours of hearing aid use based on good days for the variables of (1) presence of depressive symptoms for the parent, (2) child age, (3) family income, (4) primary caregiver education level, (5) presence of additional disabilities for the child, (6) degree of hearing loss, and (7) length of time since the child was fitted with hearing aids. There were statistically significantly fewer hours of reported hearing aid use when parents reported mild to severe symptoms of depression, lower income, less education level, and when children had mild hearing loss or additional disabilities. Although parents reported overall that their needs for hearing aid

  10. Effects of Hearing Impairment and Hearing Aid Amplification on Listening Effort: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlenforst, Barbara; Zekveld, Adriana A; Jansma, Elise P; Wang, Yang; Naylor, Graham; Lorens, Artur; Lunner, Thomas; Kramer, Sophia E

    To undertake a systematic review of available evidence on the effect of hearing impairment and hearing aid amplification on listening effort. Two research questions were addressed: Q1) does hearing impairment affect listening effort? and Q2) can hearing aid amplification affect listening effort during speech comprehension? English language articles were identified through systematic searches in PubMed, EMBASE, Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO from inception to August 2014. References of eligible studies were checked. The Population, Intervention, Control, Outcomes, and Study design strategy was used to create inclusion criteria for relevance. It was not feasible to apply a meta-analysis of the results from comparable studies. For the articles identified as relevant, a quality rating, based on the 2011 Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation Working Group guidelines, was carried out to judge the reliability and confidence of the estimated effects. The primary search produced 7017 unique hits using the keywords: hearing aids OR hearing impairment AND listening effort OR perceptual effort OR ease of listening. Of these, 41 articles fulfilled the Population, Intervention, Control, Outcomes, and Study design selection criteria of: experimental work on hearing impairment OR hearing aid technologies AND listening effort OR fatigue during speech perception. The methods applied in those articles were categorized into subjective, behavioral, and physiological assessment of listening effort. For each study, the statistical analysis addressing research question Q1 and/or Q2 was extracted. In seven articles more than one measure of listening effort was provided. Evidence relating to Q1 was provided by 21 articles that reported 41 relevant findings. Evidence relating to Q2 was provided by 27 articles that reported 56 relevant findings. The quality of evidence on both research questions (Q1 and Q2) was very low, according to the Grading of

  11. Defects in Students’ Hearing Aids in Tehran Exceptional Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Jalali

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Although for a child to maximize his or her mastery of language, hearing aids (HAs must consistently be worn, and they must be functioning correctly many studies indicates some hearing- impaired children`s hearing aid do not work perfectly.The purpose of this study was to determine types of defects in students' hearing aid (HA in Tehran Exceptional Schools. Materials and method: In this cross-sectional analytic study defects in sixty –two HAs of 41 children were determined. All were the students of Exceptional Schools referred to Audiology Clinic, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medical Sciences University of Tehran. Functions of the HAs were first checked by a sthetoclips. Then the electroacoustic measurements performed to determine the values of maximum gain and maximum power output. The data were separately recorded in a questionnaire for each kind of the HAs. Results: Fifty-six percent of HAs functioned perfectly and forty-four percent were not. The most Frequet defects were 24% and 20% pertained to the battery and manual controls respectively. External components had more difficulties than internal components. Seventy percent of ear molds were damaged. There were significant differences between peak of FOG and MPO curves in the catalogue and electroacoustic measurements in 2cc coupler. Conclusion: Most damaged parts of HAs in Tehran Exceptional students is related to the battery and controls which are external components of HAs. Because of high rate of dysfunctioning HAs and ear molds in this population in this survey, it is necessary to promote orientation and counseling level after fitting and to develop the quality of HAs and ear molds for Exceptional School students.

  12. Hearing loss in the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensink, R J; Marres, H A; Brunner, H G; Cremers, C W

    1996-10-01

    A three-generation family with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and an isolated case are presented. The proband presented with conductive hearing loss. His mother and grandmother showed minor features of the syndrome including conductive hearing loss. Symptoms of the craniosynostosis syndromes can include stapes ankylosis, a fixed ossicular chain in a too small epitympanum, and small or even absent mastoids. The proband was treated with a bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) instead of reconstructive middle ear surgery. Current literature on the results of ear surgery is reviewed. In general, reconstructive middle ear surgery should be considered if congenital anomalies of the middle ear are the only presenting symptom. In cases with additional anomalies such as atresia of the ear canal or damage due to chronic ear infections, the outcome of reconstructive surgery to correct the anomalous ossicular chain is unsatisfactory. In such cases of the BAHA is probably the best solution.

  13. Hearing Aid Effect on Elderly\\'s Depression in Tehran\\'s Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Hosienabadi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Moderate hearing impairment in older age can affect physical and psychosocial health of people. The rate of isolation, lack of self confidence, depression and probably dementia in this people is high. This study was conducted to study the hearing aid effect on older adults depression in tehran nursing homes. Methods & Materials: In this study depression was assessed in 3 groups of older adults: 30 normal hearing older adults, 30 hearing impaired older adults without hearing aid and 20 hearing impaired older adults with hearing aid. Beck depression inventory (ii was used to assess depression. For analyzing data one way anova was used. Results: Mean scores in bdi was 11.43, 21.53, 16.40 for groups. The difference between groups was significant. Correlation between age and depression was significant in 1 and 3 groups. Conclusion: It seems that hearing aid use is effective in decreasing depression in older adults.

  14. Description, Normative Data, and Utility of the Hearing Aid Skills and Knowledge Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Gabrielle H; Morse-Fortier, Charlotte; McDermott, Daniel J; Vachhani, Jay J; Grush, Leslie D; Griest, Susan; Lewis, M Samantha

    2018-03-01

    The ability to manage hearing aids is crucial for successful outcomes and for maintaining hearing aid use. It is therefore important to have a tool that can effectively identify which hearing aid management skills are lacking so that the audiologist can provide additional education and training on that skill. Such a tool can also provide useful quantitative data for researchers. To collect normative data (Experiment 1) and assess inter- and intrarater reliability (Experiment 2) for a hearing aid management assessment tool known as the Hearing Aid Skills and Knowledge (HASK) test. Two hundred thirty-six new hearing aid users recruited from the VA Portland Health Care System and 126 experienced hearing aid users recruited from the local Portland community participated in Experiment 1. The veteran participants were taking part in a larger hearing aid study, and the community participants were recruited at community events that took place around Portland, OR. Three clinical audiologists and two AuD students completing their fourth year externship participated in Experiment 2. In Experiment 1, HASK data were collected from the new hearing aid users at 4-8 wk and 6-8 mo after the fitting of their first pair of hearing aids, and from experienced users on a single occasion. In addition, self-reported hearing aid use, benefit, and satisfaction were assessed for all participants. The audiologists/students in Experiment 2 watched and independently scored videos of six individuals completing the HASK. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) across audiologists were computed for HASK scores. Three audiologists/students rated at least one video on two occasions to provide interrater reliability data. Mean performance on the HASK was about 70% for knowledge and 80% for skills for both the new and experienced hearing aid users. Performance did not change among the new users between the 4-8 wk and 6-8 mo administration. The specific skills lacking were associated with advanced

  15. Language Outcomes in Children Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing: The Role of Language Ability Before Hearing Aid Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, Olivia; Bagatto, Marlene P; Johnson, Andrew M; Cardy, Janis Oram

    2017-11-09

    Early auditory experiences are fundamental in infant language acquisition. Research consistently demonstrates the benefits of early intervention (i.e., hearing aids) to language outcomes in children who are deaf and hard of hearing. The nature of these benefits and their relation with prefitting development are, however, not well understood. This study examined Ontario Infant Hearing Program birth cohorts to explore predictors of performance on the Preschool Language Scale-Fourth Edition at the time of (N = 47) and after (N = 19) initial hearing aid intervention. Regression analyses revealed that, before the hearing aid fitting, severity of hearing loss negatively predicted 19% and 10% of the variance in auditory comprehension and expressive communication, respectively. After hearing aid fitting, children's standard scores on language measures remained stable, but they made significant improvement in their progress values, which represent individual skills acquired on the test, rather than standing relative to same-age peers. Magnitude of change in progress values was predicted by a negative interaction of prefitting language ability and severity of hearing loss for the Auditory Comprehension scale. These findings highlight the importance of considering a child's prefitting language ability in interpreting eventual language outcomes. Possible mechanisms of hearing aid benefit are discussed. https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5538868.

  16. Verification of improved patient outcomes with a partially implantable hearing aid, The SOUNDTEC direct hearing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, P S; Shoup, A G; Shea, M C; Richey, H S; Jones, D B

    2001-10-01

    Partially implantable hearing devices have been developed to address some of the user-perceived shortcomings of standard amplification systems. Partially implantable devices are purported to provide improved sound quality as a result of decreased occlusion, decreased feedback, and enhanced clarity resulting from increased high-frequency gain. Such improvements may result in greater user satisfaction. To justify selection of a partially implantable device and undergoing a minor surgical procedure, verification techniques must be used to document user improvement or increased satisfaction over conventional amplification. To evaluate patient satisfaction with the SOUNDTEC direct hearing system. Within-subjects repeated measures design. Objective and subjective evaluation pre- and post-implantation with the SOUNDTEC device. Verification techniques included tonal functional gain measures with traditional amplification and the SOUNDTEC device, word recognition in quiet (NU-6) and in noise (SPIN), the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB), and the Hough Ear Institute Profile (HEIP). Although there was no significant difference between optimal traditional amplification and the SOUNDTEC device for speech perception measures, the SOUNDTEC device yielded statistically significant increased high-frequency functional gain. Subjective reports indicated that the SOUNDTEC device provides a cleaner, more natural sound without feedback than traditional amplification. Partially implantable hearing aids may address some of the limitations of traditional amplification systems.

  17. Development of a music perception test for adult hearing-aid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinda Uys

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was two-fold. Firstly to develop a music perception test for hearing aid users and secondly to evaluate the influence of non-linear frequency compression (NFC on music perception with the use of the self-compiled test. This article focuses on the description of the development and validation of a music perception test. To date, the main direction in frequency lowering hearing aid studies has been in relation to speech perception abilities. With improvements in hearing aid technology, interest in musical perception as a dimension that could improve hearing aid users’ quality of life grew. The Music Perception Test (MPT was designed to evaluate different aspects of rhythm, timbre, pitch and melody. The development of the MPT could be described as design based. Phase 1 of the study included test development and recording while Phase 2 entailed presentation of stimuli to normal hearing listeners (n=15 and hearing aid users (n=4. Based on the findings of Phase 2, item analysis was performed to eliminate or change stimuli that resulted in high error rates. During Phase 3 the adapted version of the test was performed on a smaller group of normal hearing listeners (n=4 and twenty hearing aid users. Results proved that normal hearing adults as well as adults using hearing aids were able to complete all the sub-tests of the MPT although hearing aid users scored less on the various sub-tests than normal hearing listeners. For the rhythm section of the MPT normal hearing listeners scored on average 93.8% versus 75.5% of hearing aid users and 83% for the timbre section compared to 62.3% by hearing aid users. Normal hearing listeners obtained an average score of 86.3% for the pitch section and 88.2% for the melody section compared to the 70.8% and 61.9% respectively obtained by hearing aid users. This implicates that the MPT can be used successfully for assessment of music perception in hearing aid users within the South African

  18. The Personal Hearing System—A Software Hearing Aid for a Personal Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Giso; Guilmin, Gwénaël; Poppen, Frank; Vlaming, Marcel S. M. G.; Hohmann, Volker

    2009-12-01

    A concept and architecture of a personal communication system (PCS) is introduced that integrates audio communication and hearing support for the elderly and hearing-impaired through a personal hearing system (PHS). The concept envisions a central processor connected to audio headsets via a wireless body area network (WBAN). To demonstrate the concept, a prototype PCS is presented that is implemented on a netbook computer with a dedicated audio interface in combination with a mobile phone. The prototype can be used for field-testing possible applications and to reveal possibilities and limitations of the concept of integrating hearing support in consumer audio communication devices. It is shown that the prototype PCS can integrate hearing aid functionality, telephony, public announcement systems, and home entertainment. An exemplary binaural speech enhancement scheme that represents a large class of possible PHS processing schemes is shown to be compatible with the general concept. However, an analysis of hardware and software architectures shows that the implementation of a PCS on future advanced cell phone-like devices is challenging. Because of limitations in processing power, recoding of prototype implementations into fixed point arithmetic will be required and WBAN performance is still a limiting factor in terms of data rate and delay.

  19. The Personal Hearing System—A Software Hearing Aid for a Personal Communication System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giso Grimm

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept and architecture of a personal communication system (PCS is introduced that integrates audio communication and hearing support for the elderly and hearing-impaired through a personal hearing system (PHS. The concept envisions a central processor connected to audio headsets via a wireless body area network (WBAN. To demonstrate the concept, a prototype PCS is presented that is implemented on a netbook computer with a dedicated audio interface in combination with a mobile phone. The prototype can be used for field-testing possible applications and to reveal possibilities and limitations of the concept of integrating hearing support in consumer audio communication devices. It is shown that the prototype PCS can integrate hearing aid functionality, telephony, public announcement systems, and home entertainment. An exemplary binaural speech enhancement scheme that represents a large class of possible PHS processing schemes is shown to be compatible with the general concept. However, an analysis of hardware and software architectures shows that the implementation of a PCS on future advanced cell phone-like devices is challenging. Because of limitations in processing power, recoding of prototype implementations into fixed point arithmetic will be required and WBAN performance is still a limiting factor in terms of data rate and delay.

  20. Working memory and intelligibility of hearing-aid processed speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eSouza

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous work suggested that individuals with low working memory capacity may be at a disadvantage in adverse listening environments, including situations with background noise or substantial modification of the acoustic signal. This study explored the relationship between patient factors (including working memory capacity and intelligibility and quality of modified speech for older individuals with sensorineural hearing loss. The modification was created using a combination of hearing aid processing (wide-dynamic range compression and frequency compression applied to sentences in multitalker babble. The extent of signal modification was quantified via an envelope fidelity index. We also explored the contribution of components of working memory by including measures of processing speed and executive function. We hypothesized that listeners with low working memory capacity would perform more poorly than those with high working memory capacity across all situations, and would also be differentially affected by high amounts of signal modification. Results showed a significant effect of working memory capacity for speech intelligibility, and an interaction between working memory, amount of hearing loss and signal modification. Signal modification was the major predictor of quality ratings. These data add to the literature on hearing-aid processing and working memory by suggesting that the working memory-intelligibility effects may be related to aggregate signal fidelity, rather than on the specific signal manipulation. They also suggest that for individuals with low working memory capacity, sensorineural loss may be most appropriately addressed with wide-dynamic range compression and/or frequency compression parameters that maintain the fidelity of the signal envelope.

  1. Respect for a young male with and without a hearing aid: a reversal of the "hearing-aid effect" in medical and non-medical students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clucas, Claudine; Karira, Jaya; Claire, Lindsay St

    2012-10-01

    To investigate, in line with the "hearing-aid effect", whether medical students would have less respect for a young male with a hearing aid than without when he was described as either respectworthy (i.e. as deserving respect) or non-respectworthy, and whether their attitudes differed from non-medical students. The interaction between the presence/absence of a hearing aid and respectworthiness on respect level was also explored. Participants were shown a photograph and a written description of a young male. They were pseudo-randomly assigned to one of four core conditions reflecting the presence or absence of a hearing aid and the young man's respectworthiness, and completed questions regarding their behaviours, beliefs, and feelings of respect towards him. One hundred and eighty-one medical students and a control group of 92 non-medical students. Results showed more respect for the young male with a hearing aid than without from female participants, and for the young male described as respectworthy compared to non-respectworthy in medical and in non-medical students. However, medical students had more respect for the young male with and without a hearing aid than non-medical students. Findings were contrary to the "hearing-aid effect". Possible explanations are given and implications are discussed.

  2. Some effects of FM-system coupling on hearing aid characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, D B; Schum, D J

    1985-05-01

    A variety of electroacoustic characteristics was measured on four hearing aids and then repeated with the hearing aids connected to two different FM systems via three coupling methods: direct input, neck loop, and silhouette inductor. The measurements included frequency response, harmonic distortion, noise levels, input-output functions, and FM receiver volume control wheel taper curves. Omnidirectional and directional FM microphones were compared in a classroom environment, and minor changes in hearing aid-silhouette coupling were investigated. Large differences were found in some frequency response comparisons, with no single coupling method providing consistently better agreement with the hearing aid alone response. With the exception of the silhouette inductor, distortion and noise levels were similar for the hearing aids and FM-hearing aid combinations. Differences in the input-output functions between the hearing aids and the FM systems were observed. Some FM-hearing aid combinations produced very nonlinear FM receiver volume control wheel taper curves. The output level of a broadband noise in a classroom was reduced when a directional FM microphone was compared to the omnidirectional version. The results indicate that it cannot be assumed that the electroacoustic characteristics of a personal hearing aid are preserved when it is connected to an FM system.

  3. Experimental investigation on corrosion properties of LDS MID for Hearing Aid applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Risager, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    of the main concerns for MIDs in hearing aids is the corrosion of metal tracks. This paper investigates the corrosion of the MID parts based on different base materials, layer thickness and mechanical wear of the MIDs. The results presented in the paper will be useful for designing MIDs in hearing aids......The trend towards miniaturization is ever going in the hearing aid industry. The Moulded Interconnect Device (MID) technology can offer the unique possibility to reduce the size of the hearing aids by combining electrical and mechanical functions in the same components. On the other hand, one...

  4. The clinical implications of ear canal debris in hearing aid users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orji, Foster Tochukwu; O Onyero, Emmanuel; Agbo, Christian Ejiofor

    2014-05-01

    Objective : The ear irritations suffered by hearing aid (HA) users are yet to be related to the clinical state of canal. We undertook this study to examine the nature of debris and the microbial flora of ears of hearing aid users, as well as evaluate the determinant factors of ear irritation in this population. Methods : An observational clinical study was carried out involving 32 unilateral hearing aid users recruited from ENT clinic of a tertiary referral center. Each subject underwent otoscopic assessment of canal debris and microbial analysis of swab cultures taken from the hearing aid-wearing ear and contralateral normal ear without hearing aid. Results : Canal debris [wax (28%), fungal deposits (19%), bacteria exudates (13%)]. as well as microorganisms were identified in significant number of ears with hearing aids than ears without hearing aid (P = 0.003 and P = 0.006 respectively). Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the commonest identified bacteria. Others were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus species. Intolerable irritations of hearing aid wearing ears were significantly associated with bacterial and fungal otitis externa, and ear discharge (P = 0.005, 0.02, 0.03 respectively). Conclusions : This study demonstrates that using hearing aid alters the ear canal flora; increases risk of both fungal and bacterial otitis externa, as well as encourage wax debris formation, with resultant ear irritations. To ensure compliance their ears should periodically be attended to, by de-waxing or given topical antimicrobial agents where indicated.

  5. Hearing aid use in the elderly as measured by datalogging and self-report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, Jorunn; Hickson, Louise

    2017-07-01

    The primary aim was to compare the objective and the subjective assessments of hearing aid use among elderly people at a 6-month follow-up after fitting. A secondary aim was to determine whether advanced knowledge of follow-up impacts hearing aid use. Hearing aid use was assessed by datalogging (objective) and self-report (subjective) 6 months after initial fitting. Participants were also randomised to an intervention (informed of 6-month follow-up at fitting) or control group (informed just prior to follow-up). A total of 181 hearing aid recipients ≥60 years (mean age = 79.2 years). Daily hearing aid use based on datalogging (mean = 6.12 h, SD = 4.94) was significantly less than self-reports (mean = 8.39 h, SD = 5.07). More severe hearing impairment and prior hearing aid experience were associated with increased hearing aid use. Advanced knowledge of the follow-up had no significant impact on use, which did not differ between intervention (n = 93) and control (n = 88) groups. Elderly people typically use their hearing aids for a substantial part of the day in the 6 months after fitting, but tend to overestimate their usage. Datalogging is recommended to identify those who do not use or rarely use their aids so that appropriate rehabilitation and support can be provided.

  6. Perception-Based Personalization of Hearing Aids Using Gaussian Processes and Active Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Nielsen, Jakob; Larsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Personalization of multi-parameter hearing aids involves an initial fitting followed by a manual knowledge-based trial-and-error fine-tuning from ambiguous verbal user feedback. The result is an often suboptimal HA setting whereby the full potential of modern hearing aids is not utilized. This ar......Personalization of multi-parameter hearing aids involves an initial fitting followed by a manual knowledge-based trial-and-error fine-tuning from ambiguous verbal user feedback. The result is an often suboptimal HA setting whereby the full potential of modern hearing aids is not utilized...

  7. Effect of hearing aid release time and presentation level on speech perception in noise in elderly individuals with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottackal Mathai, Jijo; Mohammed, Hasheem

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of compression time settings and presentation levels on speech perception in noise for elderly individuals with hearing loss. To compare aided speech perception performance in these individuals with age-matched normal hearing subjects. Twenty (normal hearing) participants within the age range of 60-68 years and 20 (mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss) in the age range of 60-70 years were randomly recruited for the study. In the former group, SNR-50 was determined using phonetically balanced sentences that were mixed with speech-shaped noise presented at the most comfortable level. In the SNHL group, aided SNR-50 was determined at three different presentation levels (40, 60, and 80 dB HL) after fitting binaural hearing aids that had different compression time settings (fast and slow). In the SNHL group, slow compression time settings showed significantly better SNR-50 compared to fast release time. In addition, the mean of SNR-50 in the SNHL group was comparable to normal hearing participants while using a slow release time. A hearing aid with slow compression time settings led to significantly better speech perception in noise, compared to that of a hearing aid that had fast compression time settings.

  8. Brainstem Encoding of Aided Speech in Hearing Aid Users with Cochlear Dead Region(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassaan, Mohammad Ramadan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neural encoding of speech begins with the analysis of the signal as a whole broken down into its sinusoidal components in the cochlea, which has to be conserved up to the higher auditory centers. Some of these components target the dead regions of the cochlea causing little or no excitation. Measuring aided speech-evoked auditory brainstem response elicited by speech stimuli with different spectral maxima can give insight into the brainstem encoding of aided speech with spectral maxima at these dead regions. Objective This research aims to study the impact of dead regions of the cochlea on speech processing at the brainstem level after a long period of hearing aid use. Methods This study comprised 30 ears without dead regions and 46 ears with dead regions at low, mid, or high frequencies. For all ears, we measured the aided speech-evoked auditory brainstem response using speech stimuli of low, mid, and high spectral maxima. Results Aided speech-evoked auditory brainstem response was producible in all subjects. Responses evoked by stimuli with spectral maxima at dead regions had longer latencies and smaller amplitudes when compared with the control group or the responses of other stimuli. Conclusion The presence of cochlear dead regions affects brainstem encoding of speech with spectral maxima perpendicular to these regions. Brainstem neuroplasticity and the extrinsic redundancy of speech can minimize the impact of dead regions in chronic hearing aid users.

  9. Two-component micro injection moulding for hearing aid applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Marhöfer, David Maximilian

    2012-01-01

    Two-component (2k) injection moulding is an important process technique at the present state of technology, and it is growing rapidly in the field of precision micro moulding. Besides combining different material properties in the same product, two-component moulding can eliminate many assembly...... parts. An intensive search for suitable 2k materials is made and few combinations of plastic materials are presented in the paper which can be used for highly demanding application areas like hearing aids. By using these material combinations, a demonstrator 2k micro part has been fabricated...

  10. Sound exposure measurements using hearing-aid technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon Boelt; Drastrup, Mads; Morales, Esteban Chávez

    2016-01-01

    scenarios. The purpose of this work is to document the use of a modified behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing-aid as a portable sound pressure level (SPL) meter. In order to obtain sound level measurements with a BTE device comparable to sound field values that can be used with existing risk assessment strategies...... at the BTE position on a head and torso simulator (HATS) were measured and combined with the A-weighting filter, frequency weigted sound field values. The compensation filters improved the accuracy of the BTE devices especially in laboratory conditions. Field tests corroborate the necessity of both diffuse...

  11. Assessment of broadband SNR estimation for hearing aid applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Tobias; Kowalewski, Borys; Fereczkowski, Michal

    2017-01-01

    An accurate estimation of the broadband input signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a prerequisite for many hearing-aid algorithms. An extensive comparison of three SNR estimation algorithms was performed. Moreover, the influence of the duration of the analysis window on the SNR estimation performance...... was systematically investigated. The most accurate approach utilized an estimation of the clean speech power spectral density (PSD) and the noisy speech power across a sliding window of 1280 ms and achieved an total SNR estimation error below 3 dB across a wide variety of background noises and input SNRs...

  12. The relationship between hearing aid frequency response and acceptable noise level in patients with sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilvand, Hamid; Pourbakht, Akram; Jalaee, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    When fitting hearing aid as a compensatory device for an impaired cochlea in a patient with sensorineural hearing loss (HL), it is needed to the effective and efficient frequency response would be selected regarding providing the patient's perfect speech perception. There is not any research about the effects of frequency modifications on speech perception in patients with HL regarding the cochlear desensitization. The effect (s) of modifications in frequency response of hearing aid amplification on the results of acceptable noise level (ANL) test is the main aim of this study. The amounts of ANL in two conditions of linear amplification (high frequency emphasis [HFE] and mid frequency emphasis [MFE]) were measured. Thirty-two male subjects who participated in this study had the moderate to severe sensorineural HL. There was not any significant difference between ANL in linear amplification of hearing aid with HFE frequency response and ANL in linear amplification of hearing aid with MFE frequency response. The gain modification of frequency response not only does not affect the patient's performance of speech intelligibility in ANL test. This indicates that we need to note to the cochlear desensitization phenomenon when fitting hearing aid as a compensatory device for an impaired cochlea in a patient. The cochlear desensitization has not been considered properly in hearing aid fitting formula which is needed to be explored more about the bio-mechanisms of impaired cochlea.

  13. Wireless telephone-hearing aid electromagnetic compatibility research at the University of Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, R E; Ravindran, A R; Raman, S; Grant, H

    2001-06-01

    A multiphase study examining electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) between wireless digital telephones and hearing aids has been under way at the University of Oklahoma EMC Center since May 1995. In a phase 1 clinical study involving 68 hearing aid wearers, interference varied significantly by telephone technology, hearing aid type, and hearing loss characteristics. More than 80 percent of the tests resulted in either no interference or a detection threshold distance less than 1 meter. Metallic shielding of the units yielded positive results. Various elements of phase 2 involved instrument-based tests of hearing aid interference using telephones in a sound-isolation chamber and radio frequency signals in a waveguide, along with clinical studies of speech-to-interference ratios, all leading to the development of standards of measurement and performance criteria for telephone emissions and hearing aid immunity. Results to date confirm that bystander interference is of less concern than user interference, which is the focus of continuing research.

  14. Hearing aid processing of loud speech and noise signals: Consequences for loudness perception and listening comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Erik

    2007-01-01

    research -for example investigations of loudness perception in hearing impaired listeners. Most research has been focused on speech and sounds at medium input-levels (e.g., 60-65 dB SPL). It is well documented that for speech at conversational levels, hearing aid-users prefer the signal to be amplified......, such prescriptions are based mainly on logic, as there is limited evidence on what type of amplification is best for these input-levels. The focus of the PhD-project has been on hearing aid processing of loud speech and noise signals. Previous research, investigating the preferred listening levels for soft and loud......Hearing aid processing of loud speech and noise signals: Consequences for loudness perception and listening comfort. Sound processing in hearing aids is determined by the fitting rule. The fitting rule describes how the hearing aid should amplify speech and sounds in the surroundings...

  15. Patient preferences for direct hearing aid provision by a private dispenser. A discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grutters, Janneke P C; Joore, Manuela A; Kessels, Alfons G H; Davis, Adrian C; Anteunis, Lucien J C

    2008-08-01

    Our objective was to elicit patient preferences for transferring elements of hearing aid provision from the medical sector [Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) specialists and audiological centers] to private hearing aid dispensers, and to understand the trade-offs between different elements of hearing aid provision. A discrete choice experiment was administered from 150 hearing-impaired persons in the Netherlands. Mean age was 71 (range 18-95) and 57% were male. Participants preferred the initial assessment at the dispenser, higher accuracy in identifying persons in need of medical care, shorter duration of the total hearing aid provision, and a follow-up at the ENT specialist. They required compensation of at least euro 17 per 2 mo extra duration, euro 54 for an initial assessment at the ENT specialist, euro 119 per 10% decrease in accuracy, and euro 227 to forgo the follow-up at the ENT specialist. Preferences were influenced by sex, age, educational level, and experience with hearing aid provision. Hearing-impaired persons are receptive to transferring elements of hearing aid provision from the medical sector to private dispensers. Although safety and efficiency issues should also be considered, from the present study we can conclude that in the organization of hearing aid provision hearing-impaired persons prefer an initial assessment at a private dispenser when the dispenser is at least 95% as accurate as the ENT specialist, and prefer a follow-up visit at the ENT specialist.

  16. [APHAB scores for individual assessment of the benefit of hearing aid fitting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhler, J; Wollenberg, B; Schönweiler, R

    2017-11-01

    The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) questionnaire measures subjective hearing impairment on four different subscales pertaining to different listening situations. Using a very large patient cohort, this study aims to show how answers are distributed within the four subscales before and after hearing aid fitting, and what benefit the patients experience. The results are discussed on the basis of the available literature. Between April 2013 and March 2016, 35,000 APHAB questionnaires from nine German statutory health insurance providers were evaluated. The average values before and after hearing aid fitting, as well as the benefit, were determined for all four APHAB subscales and analyzed graphically. The results of the subjective evaluation of hearing impairment before and after hearing aid fitting and the resultant benefit were plotted by percentile distribution graphs and boxplots. The data were analyzed statistically. There was no overlap of the interquartile ranges before and after hearing aid fitting in any of the APHAB subscales. In three scales (EC, BN and RV), the median improvement after hearing aid fitting was nearly 30 percentage points. In the AV subscale, this value was slightly negative. The percentile distribution graphs used in this study allow individual evaluation of subjective hearing impairment before and after hearing aid fitting, as well as of the resultant benefit, on the background of a huge database. Additionally, it is demonstrated why presentation as boxplots and the average benefit values calculated from these is problematic.

  17. Acceptable noise level (ANL) and real-world hearing-aid success in Taiwanese listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Hsiao, Shih-Hsuan; Zhang, Xuyang

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to investigate the relationship between acceptable noise level (ANL), which was measured using Taiwanese and the international speech test signal (ISTS), and real-world hearing-aid success for listeners who were representative of the population commonly seen in clinics. Unaided ANLs were measured pre-hearing-aid fitting. Hearing-aid success was assessed three months post-fitting using the international outcome inventory for hearing aids (IOI-HA) and a hearing-aid use questionnaire. Eighty adults with hearing impairment completed the study. Both Taiwanese and ISTS ANLs were significantly associated with hearing-aid success, with higher ANLs suggesting poorer outcomes. However, the ANL's prediction accuracy for the probability of hearing-aid success was either much lower than that suggested by some literature, or was not much different from that of simply predicting all listeners as successful users. The current study suggested the possibility of using ANL to predict hearing-aid success. However, the usefulness of ANL as a clinical tool is unlikely to be as great as indicated by the literature.

  18. A study of mercuric oxide and zinc-air battery life in hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, C; Lacey, N K

    1997-09-01

    The requirement to phase out mercuric oxide (mercury) batteries on environmental grounds has led to the widespread introduction of zinc-air technology. The possibility arises that high drain hearing aids may not be adequately catered for by zinc-air cells, leading to poor performance. This study investigated the hearing aid user's ability to perceive differences between zinc-air and mercury cells in normal everyday usage. The data was collected for 100 experienced hearing aid users in field trials. Users report 50 per cent greater life for zinc-air cells in high power aids and 28 per cent in low power aids. The average life of the zinc-air cells range from 15 days in high power to 34 days in low power aids. Users are able to perceive a difference in sound quality in favour of zinc-air cells for low and medium power aids. The hearing aid population is not disadvantaged by phasing out mercury cells.

  19. [Dependency of APHAB score in the ECusubscale on age, gender and subjective hearing loss : Hearing aid fitting in two subjective hearing loss groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhler, J; Wegner, O; Wollenberg, B; Schönweiler, R

    2018-03-12

    The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) determines subjective impairment by hearing loss in four situations before and after hearing aid fitting. The first part (APHAB u ) of the questionnaire can be used independently of hearing aid fitting. Previous research has demonstrated that the answers in the EC u subscale for hearing under easy conditions are concentrated in two groups: one with subjectively better, one with subjectively worse hearing. This study aimed to investigate in a large collective whether there are differences between these two groups in terms of age, gender, and individual hearing loss. The data of 1755 patients were analyzed, whose APHAB answers and pure-tone thresholds had been collected during hearing aid fitting. Group 1 had an average EC u score ≤37.5%; in group 2 it was ≥67.5%. The individual hearing losses was determined. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U, χ 2 , Spearman, and Pearson tests. The 616 members of group 1 were significantly younger (68.7 vs. 73.0 years) and comprised more females (53.9 vs. 46.1%) than the 1139 members of group 2. Hearing was frequency specific in group 1, and hearing loss as classified using standard audiograms and according to the three-frequency table was significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2, CONCLUSION: The distribution with two maximums in the EC u subscale can be explained by individual differences in terms of age and hearing loss, in part also by gender. The lower absolute number of patients in group 1 could be explained by the still relatively late fitting of hearing aids in general.

  20. Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Perception of Emotions by Individuals with Cochlear Implants, Hearing Aids, and Normal Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Aviner, Chen

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the benefits of cochlear implant (CI) with regard to emotion perception of participants differing in their age of implantation, in comparison to hearing aid users and adolescents with normal hearing (NH). Emotion perception was examined by having the participants identify happiness, anger, surprise, sadness, fear, and disgust.…

  1. A micro-drive hearing aid: a novel non-invasive hearing prosthesis actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulick, Peyton Elizabeth; Merlo, Mark W; Mahboubi, Hossein; Djalilian, Hamid R; Bachman, Mark

    2014-12-01

    The direct hearing device (DHD) is a new auditory prosthesis that combines conventional hearing aid and middle ear implant technologies into a single device. The DHD is located deep in the ear canal and recreates sounds with mechanical movements of the tympanic membrane. A critical component of the DHD is the microactuator, which must be capable of moving the tympanic membrane at frequencies and magnitudes appropriate for normal hearing, with little distortion. The DHD actuator reported here utilized a voice coil actuator design and was 3.7 mm in diameter. The device has a smoothly varying frequency response and produces a precisely controllable force. The total harmonic distortion between 425 Hz and 10 kHz is below 0.5 % and acoustic noise generation is minimal. The device was tested as a tympanic membrane driver on cadaveric temporal bones where the device was coupled to the umbo of the tympanic membrane. The DHD successfully recreated ossicular chain movements across the frequencies of human hearing while demonstrating controllable magnitude. Moreover, the micro-actuator was validated in a short-term human clinical performance study where sound matching and complex audio waveforms were evaluated by a healthy subject.

  2. Vocabulary Facilitates Speech Perception in Children With Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kelsey E; Walker, Elizabeth A; Kirby, Benjamin; McCreery, Ryan W

    2017-08-16

    We examined the effects of vocabulary, lexical characteristics (age of acquisition and phonotactic probability), and auditory access (aided audibility and daily hearing aid [HA] use) on speech perception skills in children with HAs. Participants included 24 children with HAs and 25 children with normal hearing (NH), ages 5-12 years. Groups were matched on age, expressive and receptive vocabulary, articulation, and nonverbal working memory. Participants repeated monosyllabic words and nonwords in noise. Stimuli varied on age of acquisition, lexical frequency, and phonotactic probability. Performance in each condition was measured by the signal-to-noise ratio at which the child could accurately repeat 50% of the stimuli. Children from both groups with larger vocabularies showed better performance than children with smaller vocabularies on nonwords and late-acquired words but not early-acquired words. Overall, children with HAs showed poorer performance than children with NH. Auditory access was not associated with speech perception for the children with HAs. Children with HAs show deficits in sensitivity to phonological structure but appear to take advantage of vocabulary skills to support speech perception in the same way as children with NH. Further investigation is needed to understand the causes of the gap that exists between the overall speech perception abilities of children with HAs and children with NH.

  3. Vocabulary Facilitates Speech Perception in Children With Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Kirby, Benjamin; McCreery, Ryan W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We examined the effects of vocabulary, lexical characteristics (age of acquisition and phonotactic probability), and auditory access (aided audibility and daily hearing aid [HA] use) on speech perception skills in children with HAs. Method Participants included 24 children with HAs and 25 children with normal hearing (NH), ages 5–12 years. Groups were matched on age, expressive and receptive vocabulary, articulation, and nonverbal working memory. Participants repeated monosyllabic words and nonwords in noise. Stimuli varied on age of acquisition, lexical frequency, and phonotactic probability. Performance in each condition was measured by the signal-to-noise ratio at which the child could accurately repeat 50% of the stimuli. Results Children from both groups with larger vocabularies showed better performance than children with smaller vocabularies on nonwords and late-acquired words but not early-acquired words. Overall, children with HAs showed poorer performance than children with NH. Auditory access was not associated with speech perception for the children with HAs. Conclusions Children with HAs show deficits in sensitivity to phonological structure but appear to take advantage of vocabulary skills to support speech perception in the same way as children with NH. Further investigation is needed to understand the causes of the gap that exists between the overall speech perception abilities of children with HAs and children with NH. PMID:28738138

  4. Language-specific strategy for programming hearing aids - A double-blind randomized controlled crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Nozomu; Suzuki, Nobuyoshi; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Kazuha; Tsukiji, Hiroki; Higashino, Yoshie; Tabuki, Tomoko; Nakagawa, Takashi

    2017-11-17

    Voice-aligned compression (VAC) is a method used in Oticon's hearing aids to provide more comfortable hearing without sacrificing speech discrimination. The complex, non-linear compression curve for the VAC strategy is designed based on the frequency profile of certain spoken Western languages. We hypothesized that hearing aids could be further customized for Japanese-speaking users by modifying the compression curve using the frequency profile of spoken Japanese. A double-blind randomized controlled crossover study was performed to determine whether or not Oticon's modified amplification strategy (VAC-J) provides subjectively preferable hearing aids for Japanese-speaking hearing aid users compared to the same company's original amplification strategy (VAC). The participants were randomized to two groups. The VAC-first group received a pair of hearing aids programmed using the VAC strategy and wore them for three weeks, and then received a pair of hearing aids programmed using VAC-J strategy and wore them for three weeks. The VAC-J-first group underwent the same study, but they received hearing aids in the reverse sequence. A Speech, Spatial and Qualities (SSQ) questionnaire was administered before beginning to use the hearing aids, at the end of using the first pair of hearing aids, and at the end of using the second pair of hearing aids. Twenty-five participants that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria from January 1 to October 31, 2016, were randomized to two groups. Twenty-two participants completed the study. There were no statistically significant differences in the increment of SSQ scores between the participants when using the VAC- or the VAC-J-programmed hearing aids. However, participants preferred the VAC-J strategy to the VAC strategy at the end of the study, and this difference was statistically significant. Japanese-speaking hearing aid users preferred using hearing aids that were fitted with the VAC-J strategy. Our results show that the VAC strategy

  5. Effects of hearing-aid dynamic range compression on spatial perception in a reverberant environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; Wiinberg, Alan; Dau, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fast-acting hearing-aid compression on normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners’ spatial perception in a reverberant environment. Three compression schemes—independent compression at each ear, linked compression between the two ears, and “spatially ideal...

  6. A comparative study of hiv/aids knowledge and attitudes of hearing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study showed that the hearing-impaired students had poorer knowledge and attitudes to HIV/AIDS compared with their non-hearing-impaired counterparts. There is a pressing need for development. A cross-sectional survey of all the hearing impaired students and an equal number of nonhearing-impaired students ...

  7. Auditory training: assessment of the benefit of hearing aids in elderly individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megale, Renata Luciane; Iório, Maria Cecília Martinelli; Schochat, Eliane

    2010-01-01

    hearing impairment has a negative impact on communication. This impact can be minimized by hearing aids fitting and auditory training. to verify the effectiveness of auditory training in elderly individuals, new users of hearing aids, regarding the benefit in fitting. forty-two individuals with mild to moderate neurosensorial hearing loss, ranging in age from 60 to 90 years, were selected. Individuals were new users of bilateral hearing aids and were divided in two groups: Experimental Group (EG) and Sham Group (SG). The EG was submitted to training in an acoustic cabin during six sessions. Both groups were assessed through the following tests: Speech in Noise, Dichotic Digits and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit Aphab self-assessment questionnaire, without the hearing aids, four and eight weeks after they were fitted. there was a statistically significant difference between the groups in both of the used tests, and for the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit Aphab in the second and third assessments in the sub-scales of: Communication Easiness, Reverberation and Environmental Noise. auditory training favored the improvement in the auditory processing abilities and benefited the hearing aid fitting process.

  8. Ormiaochracea as a Model Organism in Sound Localization Experiments and in Inventing Hearing Aids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - -

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Hearing aid prescription for patients suffering hearing loss has always been one of the main concerns of the audiologists. Thanks to technology that has provided Hearing aids with digital and computerized systems which has improved the quality of sound heard by hearing aids. Though we can learn from nature in inventing such instruments as in the current article that has been channeled to a kind of fruit fly. Ormiaochracea is a small yellow nocturnal fly, a parasitoid of crickets. It is notable because of its exceptionally acute directional hearing. In the current article we will discuss how it has become a model organism in sound localization experiments and in inventing hearing aids.

  9. Older adults' experiences and issues with hearing aids in the first six months after hearing aid fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, Jorunn; Gay, Caryl; Hickson, Louise

    2018-01-01

    This study describes older adults' experiences with a new hearing aid (HA) during the first 6 months after fitting. In a longitudinally designed study, experiences and issues with HA use were assessed at a six-month follow-up appointment in individual structured interviews lasting 30 min. Associations between HA experiences and demographic factors, degree of hearing loss, and an objective measure of HA use (datalogging) were also examined. 181 HA recipients (≥60 years) attending a six-month follow-up appointment. Participants reported an average of 1.4 issues (range 0-5, median = 1, mode = 1) with HA use, the most common pertaining to the earmold (26.5%), sound quality (26.0%) and handling (25.5%). Participants who reported at least one issue had fewer hours of use per day, but were not more likely to be non-users (issues. Most older adults use their HAs regardless of reported issues. However, handling issues and no perceived need may interfere with HA usage among some adults with hearing impairment. Moreover, reported issues were associated with less frequent HA use. Follow-up support is thus important to address issues that may interfere with optimal use.

  10. 47 CFR 20.19 - Hearing aid-compatible mobile handsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatible mobile handsets. 20.19... COMMERCIAL MOBILE RADIO SERVICES § 20.19 Hearing aid-compatible mobile handsets. (a) Scope of section..., consistent with its own marketing practices. However, if a manufacturer assigns different model device...

  11. Acoustical and Perceptual Comparison of Noise Reduction and Compression in Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brons, Inge; Houben, Rolph; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Noise reduction and dynamic-range compression are generally applied together in hearing aids but may have opposite effects on amplification. This study evaluated the acoustical and perceptual effects of separate and combined processing of noise reduction and compression. Design: Recordings of the output of 4 hearing aids for speech in…

  12. Development of a Self-Report Tool to Evaluate Hearing Aid Outcomes among Chinese Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lena L. N.; Hang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on the development of a self-report tool--the Chinese Hearing Aid Outcomes Questionnaire (CHAOQ)--to evaluate hearing aid outcomes among Chinese speakers. Method: There were 4 phases to construct the CHAOQ and evaluate its psychometric properties. First, items were selected to evaluate a range of culturally relevant…

  13. Comparative studies on hearing aid selection and fitting procedures : a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, Mick; Maat, Bert; Verschuure, Hans; Dreschler, Wouter A; Feenstra, Louw

    Although a large number of fitting procedures have been developed and are nowadays generally applied in modern hearing aid fitting technology, little is known about their effectiveness in comparison with each other. This paper argues the need for comparative validation studies on hearing aid fitting

  14. Interpolation Filter Design for Hearing-Aid Audio Class-D Output Stage Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pracný, Peter; Bruun, Erik; Llimos Muntal, Pere

    2012-01-01

    is to compare this design to designs presented in other state-of-the-art works ranging from hi-fi audio to hearing-aids. By performing comparison, trends and tradeoffs in interpolation filter design are indentified and hearing-aid specifications are derived. The possibilities for hardware reduction...

  15. Trends and Predictors of Longitudinal Hearing Aid Use for Children Who Are Hard of Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elizabeth A; McCreery, Ryan W; Spratford, Meredith; Oleson, Jacob J; Van Buren, John; Bentler, Ruth; Roush, Patricia; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    Children who are hard of hearing (CHH) have restricted access to acoustic and linguistic information. Increased audibility provided by hearing aids (HAs) influences language outcomes, but the advantages of appropriately fit HAs can only be realized if children wear their devices on a consistent basis. The purpose of this article was to characterize long-term HA use in CHH, based on parent-report measures, and identify factors that influence longitudinal trends in HA use. Participants were parents of 290 children with mild to severe hearing loss. At every visit, parents estimated the average amount of time the child used HAs per day during the week and on the weekends. Parent reports of daily HA use were analyzed to determine if different patterns of HA use were observed longitudinally during the study. Independent predictor variables were then related to longitudinal trends in HA use within three age groups (infant, preschool, school age). On average across multiple visits, parents reported that their children wore their HAs for 10.63 hr per day (SD = 3.29). Data logging values were lower than parent-report measures (M = 8.44, SD = 4.06), suggesting that parents overestimated daily HA use. The majority of children in each age group wore HAs at least 8 hr per day from their first research testing interval to their last, based on parent-report measures. Maternal education level predicted longitudinal trends in HA use for infants and school-age CHH. Degree of hearing loss was related to trends in school-age children only. These results indicated that the majority of CHH increased HA use over time, but a sizable minority demonstrated a low level of use or decreased use in the time period studied. Maternal education level influenced longitudinal trends in daily HA use. Degree of hearing loss influenced trends in school-age children only. Audiologists and early intervention service providers might aid in improving HA use by providing regular hands-on training with the

  16. On the dynamics of the preference-performance relation for hearing aid noise reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Rosa-Linde; Wagener, Kirsten C.; Vormann, Matthias

    may prefer a certain NR setting, but perform better with a different one. The aim of the present work was to investigate the influence of individual noise sensitivity, hearing aid experience and acclimatization on the preference-performance relation for different NR settings. For this purpose......Previous research has shown that hearing aid users can differ substantially in their preference for noise reduction (NR) strength, and that preference for and speech recognition with NR processing typically are not correlated (e.g. Neher 2014; Serman et al. 2016). In other words, hearing aid users......, a longitudinal study with three consecutive laboratory assessments distributed over a 12-week period was conducted. Two experimental groups of experienced and inexperienced hearing aid users (N = 20 each) participated. These subjects were bilaterally fitted with hearing aids (HA) with individual NAL-NL1-based...

  17. Measuring cognitive anxiety through the consultation process for hearing aids: Older adults and their significant others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Campbell, Rebecca J; Wendel, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the level of cognitive anxiety experienced by first-time hearing aid adopters and their significant others before, during, and after hearing aid fitting. A total of 16 couples were interviewed at three points: (1) at the initial consultation for hearing aids, (2) during the hearing aid trial, and (3) 1 month following the final clinical appointment in which the hearing aids were formally adopted. Cognitive anxiety was assessed through a content analysis of the interviews using the Cognitive Anxiety Scale. Results of this study show that the levels of cognitive anxiety generally decreased across the entire consultation process for both adults with hearing impairment and their significant others. The results also indicated that couples generally experienced similar levels of cognitive anxiety at initial consultation, but their levels of cognitive anxiety differed throughout the remainder of the study. These findings highlight the importance of inclusion of significant others in the rehabilitation process. The reader will be able to: (1) discuss the relationship between cognitive anxiety and hearing impairment, (2) define cognitive anxiety, (3) discuss the impact of hearing impairment on significant others, (4) describe the experience of cognitive anxiety through the hearing aid consultation process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Perception of a Self-Fitting Hearing Aid Among Urban-Dwelling Hearing-Impaired Adults in a Developed Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidser, Gitte; Hartley, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    A self-fitting hearing aid is a personal amplification device that is designed to be assembled, programmed, and fine-tuned by the user, without the need for additional equipment or professional support. A written description of the device was presented to 80 older adults with a hearing impairment, all of whom were residents of an urban area in a developed country. In response to a structured questionnaire, the majority of participants reported that the self-fitting hearing aid concept was a good idea (83%), would be of personal benefit (60%), and could be managed independently by the user (90%). Overall, half of the participant group agreed with all three statements. Two were uncertain about the concept, but none of the participants rejected it outright. There were no significant differences between the opinions of participants with previous hearing aid experience and those without. Participant responses to open-ended questions revealed that the main benefits of a self-fitting hearing aid were thought to be the ability to self-adjust the device’s settings (reported by 33% of participants) and increased convenience (20% of participants). The main drawback, mentioned by 25% of participants, was a preference for professional guidance through the fitting process. These results suggest that the self-fitting hearing aid may present as an alternative product in developed countries for those users who prefer to be in control of the fitting process. PMID:22079900

  19. Relationship between acceptable noise level and the abbreviated profile of hearing aid benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyaldenhoven, Melinda C; Nabelek, Anna K; Tampas, Joanna W

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated the relationship between acceptable noise levels (ANLs) and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB; R. M. Cox & G. C. Alexander, 1995). This study further examined the APHAB's ability to predict hearing aid use. ANL and APHAB data were collected for 191 listeners with impaired hearing, separated into 3 groups based on hearing aid use: full-time, part-time, or nonuse. Results demonstrated ANLs were not correlated with APHAB scores. Results further demonstrated 2 of the 4 APHAB subscales (Ease of Communication [EC] and Background Noise [BN]) predicted hearing aid success with 60% accuracy, which is 25% poorer than that observed using the ANL alone. When combining the ANL with the EC and BN subscales, accuracy of the prediction increased to 91%. Lastly, 3 of the 4 APHAB subscales (EC, BN, and Reverberation) enhanced the present prediction of hearing aid use for patients with mid-range ANLs. These results indicate that ANLs and APHAB scores provide unique information regarding hearing aid use. These results further indicate that the prediction can be enhanced by administering both the ANL and the EC and BN APHAB subscales. Lastly, some of the ambiguity of the prediction of hearing aid use for listeners with mid-range ANLs may be eliminated.

  20. Development of a digital hearing aid to meet the Brazilian Government's Ordinance 587 (APAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, Silvio Pires; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of sensorineural hearing loss is based on hearing aids, also known as individual sound amplification devices. The hearing aids purchased by the Brazilian Government, aiming at fulfilling public policies, are based on dedicated components, which bring about benefits, but also render them expensive and may impair repair services after manufacture's warranty expires. to design digital behind-the-ear hearing aids built from standardized components coming from the very supply chain of these manufacturers. experimental. to identify the supply chain of these manufacturers, request samples and set up hearing aids in the laboratory. The developed hearing aids did not show lesser electroacoustic characteristics when compared to those acquired by the Government, also being tested by the same reference international technical standard. It is possible to develop digital behind-the-ear hearing aids based on off-the-shelf components from hearing aid manufacturers' supply chain. Their advantages include low operational costs - for acquisition (with clear advantages for the Government) and service (advantage for the patient).

  1. Sound Classification in Hearing Aids Inspired by Auditory Scene Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchler, Michael; Allegro, Silvia; Launer, Stefan; Dillier, Norbert

    2005-12-01

    A sound classification system for the automatic recognition of the acoustic environment in a hearing aid is discussed. The system distinguishes the four sound classes "clean speech," "speech in noise," "noise," and "music." A number of features that are inspired by auditory scene analysis are extracted from the sound signal. These features describe amplitude modulations, spectral profile, harmonicity, amplitude onsets, and rhythm. They are evaluated together with different pattern classifiers. Simple classifiers, such as rule-based and minimum-distance classifiers, are compared with more complex approaches, such as Bayes classifier, neural network, and hidden Markov model. Sounds from a large database are employed for both training and testing of the system. The achieved recognition rates are very high except for the class "speech in noise." Problems arise in the classification of compressed pop music, strongly reverberated speech, and tonal or fluctuating noises.

  2. The Frequency of Hearing Loss and Hearing Aid Prescription in the Clients of the Avesina Education and Health Center, Audiometry Clinic, 1377

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bastani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Determining the frequency of hearing disorders and hearing aid using in the clients referring to the Avesina education and health center, audiometry clinic, 1377. Method and Material: This is an assesive-descriptive survey that conducted on more than 2053 (1234 males and 819 females who referred for audiometry after examination by a physician. Case history, otoscopy, PTA, speech and immittance audiometry were conducted for all the clients. The findings were expressed in tables and diagrams of frequency. The age and sex relationship. All types of hearing losses and the number of the hearing-impaired clients need a hearing aid were assessed. Findings: 56% of this population were hearing-impaired and 44% had normal hearing were hearing. 60% were males and 40% females. Of the hearing-impaired, 44% had SNHL, 35.6% CHL and 8.2% mixed hearing loss. The hearing aid was prescribed for 204 (83 females and121 males if they need that only 20 females and 32 males wear it. Conclusion: It this sample, SNHL is of higher frequency. According to this survey, the more the age, the more the hearing aid is accepted (85% of wearer are more than 49 the prevalence of the hearing impaired males are more than females (60% versus 40%. Only 25% of the hearing-impaired wear hearing aids.

  3. The role of bone conduction hearing aids in congenital unilateral hearing loss: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C Carrie; Livingstone, Devon; Yunker, Warren K

    2017-03-01

    To systematically review the literature on the audiological and/or quality of life benefits of a bone conduction hearing aid (BCHA) in children with congenital unilateral conductive or sensorineural deafness. A systematic search was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines using the PubMed, Medline, and Embase databases. Data were collected on the following outcomes of interest: speech reception threshold, speech discrimination, sound localization, and quality of life measures. Given the heterogeneity of the data for quantitative analysis, the results are qualitatively summarized. Eight studies were included in the review. Four studies examined the audiological outcomes associated with bone conduction hearing aid implantation. There was a consistent gain in speech reception thresholds and speech discrimination, especially in noisy environments. Results pertaining to sound localization was inconsistent. The studies that examined quality of life measures reported a high usage rate of BCHAs among children. Quality of life improvements are reported with suggested benefit in the subdomain of learning. Given the potential benefits of a BCHA, along with the fact that it can be safely trialed using a headband, it is reasonable to trial a BCHA in children with congenital unilateral deafness. Should the trial offer audiological and/or quality of life benefits for the individual child, then BCHA implantation can be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Three year review following bone anchor repair of acute biceps tendon insertion rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, C J; Howell, G E

    2001-01-01

    Three patients with acute biceps brachii tendon insertion ruptures were treated (less than 7 days post injury) using bone anchor anatomical repair. Dynamometer assessment of strength in both limbs was performed after completion of rehabilitation and again at 3.3 years after surgery. All patients were male, age 34, 35 and 53 years. Early isokinetic assessment was performed at 6, 7 and 12 months post surgery and medium assessment at 3.3 years post surgery. A full range of movement was achieved at early assessment and maintained into medium term assessment. All patients returned to their full premorbid occupation and sporting activity. Dynamometer strength of a repaired dominant limb equated to two thirds of a normal non dominant limb at early assessment, equal power was found at medium term assessment and a measurable increase in strength in both affected and unaffected arms was seen.

  5. A Simplified Technique for Orientation of a Bone Anchored Auricular Prostheses: a Clinical Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein G. El Charkawi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: A simple technique was presented in this clinical report for orientation of a bone anchored auricular prosthesis.Methods: The proposed technique includes drawing the intact ear on a transparent celluloid paper or radiographic film and flipping it to the opposite side and relating it to the fixed anatomical features on the face of patient.Results: The drawing, by this way provides a simple and easy way to duplicate and transfer the exact size and position of the intact ear to the defect side.Conclusions: This technique provides a simple, safe, inexpensive and time saving yet, an accurate and effective surgical template that orients the craniofacial implants to the confines of the definitive auricular prosthesis. It is indicated for restoration of single missing external ear either in aplasia, injuries and total resection.

  6. Survey of hearing aid fitting practices for children with multiple impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharpe, A M; Fino-Szumski, M S; Bess, F H

    2001-06-01

    The fitting of amplification on young children with multiple impairments in addition to hearing loss is a challenge faced regularly by audiologists. However, very little has been published on this topic in the audiological literature. The purpose of this survey was to document hearing aid fitting practices for this population within the United States. Specifically, audiologists who regularly serve children were asked to complete a series of questions on their educational preparation and their hearing aid selection, fitting, and verification practices for children with multiple impairments. For purposes of this survey, multiple impairments included vision impairment, mental retardation, physical impairment, and autism spectrum disorders. Findings from this survey suggest that children with special needs in addition to hearing loss are typically fit in the same way and with the same type of amplification as those with hearing loss only. In addition, differences were noted in hearing aid selection, fitting, and verification practices across work settings. Future directions and research needs are suggested.

  7. An evaluation of the quality of evidence available to inform current bone conducting hearing device national policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandavia, R; Carter, A W; Haram, N; Mossialos, E; Schilder, A G M

    2017-10-01

    In 2016, NHS England published the commissioning policy on Bone Conducting Hearing Devices (BCHDs). This policy was informed by updated evidence on the clinical and cost-effectiveness of BCHDs as well as by the 2013 Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) policy. Commissioning policies set the criteria for service delivery and therefore have a major impact on the care received by patients. It is important that stakeholders have a good appreciation of the available evidence informing policy, as this will promote engagement both with the policy and with future research leading on from the policy. In this article, we provide stakeholders with a transparent and pragmatic assessment of the quality of the body of evidence available to inform current BCHD national policy. (i) A systematic review of the literature on BCHDs published since the development of the 2013 policy was performed in September 2016, adhering to PRISMA recommendations. The search terms used were as follows bone conduction; bone conducting; bone anchor; BAHA; Bone Anchored Hearing Aid; Bone Conducting Hearing Device; BCHD; Bone Conducting Hearing Implant; BCHI; Sophono; Bonebridge; Soundbite; Ponto; Hearing aid; implant; device; hearing device. Publications that could inform current BCHD policy were included. The quality of included articles was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. (ii) The quality of evidence referenced by the 2013 BAHA policy was assessed using the GRADE system. (i) Of the 2576 publications on BCHDs identified by the systematic search, 39 met the inclusion criteria for further analysis. Using the GRADE criteria, the quality of evidence was classified as of 'very low quality'. (ii) The 2013 BAHA policy was informed by 14 references. The GRADE system classifies the quality of evidence that informed the policy as of 'very low quality'. The GRADE system defines the body of evidence available to inform current national BCHD policy

  8. Impact of Hearing Aid Technology on Outcomes in Daily Life I: The Patients' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robyn M; Johnson, Jani A; Xu, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    One of the challenges facing hearing care providers when recommending hearing aids is the choice of device technology level. Major manufacturers market families of hearing aids that are described as spanning the range from basic technology to premium technology. Premium technology hearing aids include acoustical processing capabilities (features) that are not found in basic technology instruments. These premium features are intended to yield improved hearing in daily life compared with basic-feature devices. However, independent research that establishes the incremental effectiveness of premium-feature devices compared with basic-feature devices is lacking. This research was designed to explore reported differences in hearing abilities for adults using premium- and basic-feature hearing aids in their daily lives. This was a single-blinded, repeated, crossover trial in which the participants were blinded. All procedures were carefully controlled to limit researcher bias. Forty-five participants used carefully fitted bilateral hearing aids for 1 month and then provided data to describe the hearing improvements or deficiencies noted in daily life. Typical participants were 70 years old with mild to moderate adult-onset hearing loss bilaterally. Each participant used four pairs of hearing aids: premium- and basic-feature devices from brands marketed by each of two major manufacturers. Participants were blinded about the devices they used and about the research questions. All of the outcomes were designed to capture the participant's point of view about the benefits of the hearing aids. Three types of data were collected: change in hearing-related quality of life, extent of agreement with six positively worded statements about everyday hearing with the hearing aids, and reported preferences between the premium- and basic-feature devices from each brand as well as across all four research hearing aids combined. None of these measures yielded a statistically significant

  9. Impact of Hearing Aid Technology on Outcomes in Daily Life I: the Patients’ Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robyn M; Johnson, Jani A; Xu, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    Objectives One of the challenges facing hearing care providers when recommending hearing aids is the choice of device technology level. Major manufacturers market families of hearing aids that are described as spanning the range from basic technology to premium technology. Premium technology hearing aids include acoustical processing capabilities (features) that are not found in basic technology instruments. These premium features are intended to yield improved hearing in daily life compared to basic-feature devices. However, independent research that establishes the incremental effectiveness of premium-feature devices compared to basic-feature devices is lacking. This research was designed to explore reported differences in hearing abilities for adults using premium-feature and basic-feature hearing aids in their daily lives. Design This was a single-blinded, repeated, crossover trial in which the participants were blinded. All procedures were carefully controlled to limit researcher bias. Forty-five participants used carefully fitted bilateral hearing aids for one month and then provided data to describe the hearing improvements or deficiencies noted in daily life. Typical participants were 70 years old with mild to moderate adult-onset hearing loss bilaterally. Each participant used 4 pairs of hearing aids: premium- and basic-feature devices from brands marketed by each of two major manufacturers. Participants were blinded about the devices they used and about the research questions. Results All of the outcomes were designed to capture the participant’s point of view about the benefits of the hearing aids. Three types of data were collected: change in hearing-related quality of life, extent of agreement with six positively worded statements about everyday hearing with the hearing aids, and reported preferences between the premium- and basic-feature devices from each brand as well as across all four research hearing aids combined. None of these measures yielded

  10. Clinical results of hearing aid with noise-level-controlled selective amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, H; Kanzaki, J; Mizoi, K

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a hearing aid which reduces the low-frequency energy of the input sound according to the input noise level and the spectrum of the environmental noise. The results of speech discrimination tests using speech in noise in 70 hearing-impaired subjects showed improvement in word discrimination scores in noise of over 15% for 50 of 53 subjects with sensorineural hearing loss. This group of hearing-impaired patients was subdivided into categories according to (a) audiogram type [flat, sloping (i.e. gradual high-frequency loss) and abruptly falling (steep high-frequency slope)]; (b) degree of hearing loss (less than or more than 50 dB average loss) and (c) etiology (familial deafness, presbyacusis). Results on 17 subjects with conductive or mixed hearing impairments showed no improvement, but expressed a preference for this system. The subject reported that the sound was more natural and quiet compared with the conventional AGC hearing aids.

  11. Effect of a Bluetooth-implemented hearing aid on speech recognition performance: subjective and objective measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Beom; Chung, Won-Ho; Choi, Jeesun; Hong, Sung Hwa; Cho, Yang-Sun; Park, Gyuseok; Lee, Sangmin

    2014-06-01

    The object was to evaluate speech perception improvement through Bluetooth-implemented hearing aids in hearing-impaired adults. Thirty subjects with bilateral symmetric moderate sensorineural hearing loss participated in this study. A Bluetooth-implemented hearing aid was fitted unilaterally in all study subjects. Objective speech recognition score and subjective satisfaction were measured with a Bluetooth-implemented hearing aid to replace the acoustic connection from either a cellular phone or a loudspeaker system. In each system, participants were assigned to 4 conditions: wireless speech signal transmission into hearing aid (wireless mode) in quiet or noisy environment and conventional speech signal transmission using external microphone of hearing aid (conventional mode) in quiet or noisy environment. Also, participants completed questionnaires to investigate subjective satisfaction. Both cellular phone and loudspeaker system situation, participants showed improvements in sentence and word recognition scores with wireless mode compared to conventional mode in both quiet and noise conditions (P Bluetooth-implemented hearing aids helped to improve subjective and objective speech recognition performances in quiet and noisy environments during the use of electronic audio devices.

  12. The importance of creating a social business to produce low-cost hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccamo, Samantha; Voloshchenko, Anastasia; Dankyi, Nana Yaa

    2014-09-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that about 280 million people worldwide have a bilateral hearing loss, mostly living in poor countries. Hearing loss causes heavy social burdens on individuals, families, communities and countries. However, due to the lack of accessibility and affordability, the vast majority of people in the world who need hearing aids do not have access to them. Low-income countries are thus pulled into a disability/poverty spiral. From this standpoint, the production of available, accessible and affordable hearing aids for the poorest populations of our planet should be one of the main issues in global hearing healthcare. Designing and producing a brand new low-cost hearing aid is the most effective option. Involving a large producer of hearing aids in the creation of a social business to solve the problem of access to affordable hearing aids is an essential step to reduce hearing disability on a large scale globally. Today's technology allows for the creation of a "minimal design" product that does not exceed $100-$150, that can be further lowered when purchased in large quantities and dispensed with alternative models. It is conceivable that by making a sustainable social business, the low cost product could be sold with a cross-subsidy model in order to recover the overhead costs. Social business is an economic model that has the potential to produce and distribute affordable hearing aids in low- and middle-income countries. Rehabilitation of hearing impaired children will be carried out in partnership with Sahic (Society of Assistance to Hearing Impaired Children) in Dhaka, Bangladesh and the ENT Department of Ospedale Burlo di Trieste, Dr. Eva Orzan.

  13. The First Step to Early Intervention Following Diagnosis: Communication in Pediatric Hearing Aid Orientation Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermeyer, Jennifer; Kanji, Amisha; Sarvan, Safiyyah

    2017-12-12

    This preliminary study aimed to explore communication processes and information exchange in pediatric hearing aid orientation (HAO) sessions. Effective information exchange in such sessions is crucial to support appropriate hearing aid use. Using a qualitative sociolinguistic framework, we recorded and analyzed 5 HAO sessions between 2 audiologists and 5 caregivers of children who had just been fitted with hearing aids. We also conducted semistructured interviews with the audiologists and caregivers and analyzed these using content analysis. By necessity, audiologists provide a significant amount of information about hearing aids to caregivers in HAO sessions. Although caregivers in our study recalled and understood certain points such as the importance of not getting the hearing aids wet, crucial information about insertion and cleaning was often not recalled. Some caregivers misunderstood how the hearing aids would assist their child. Caregivers need time to practice and absorb the information given, particularly given the emotional aspects associated with the diagnosis and "switch-on." There is a need to revisit approaches to information giving, which align with the ongoing early intervention process. We offer some suggestions for improving HAO sessions and information giving about hearing aids.

  14. Exploring the relationship between technology use, hearing help-seeking, and hearing aid outcomes in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz Ham, Heidi; Bunn, Paul; Meyer, Carly; Khan, Asad; Hickson, Louise

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to explore technology use and its relationship to help-seeking for hearing impairment (HI) and success with hearing aids among older adults. Previous research had suggested a link between higher levels of technology use and hearing aid success. General technology use was evaluated using a purposefully developed 25-item questionnaire. Twelve items related to everyday technology use (e.g. DVD player) and 13 related to advanced technology use (e.g. Bluetooth). Four groups of older adults with HI participated in the study: (1) non-consulters (n=49), (2) consulters (n=62), (3) unsuccessful hearing aid owners (n=61), and (4) successful hearing aid owners (n=79). Preliminary analyses revealed a main effect in the use of everyday and advanced technology across the four participant groups. However, it was found that age and living arrangements accounted for most of the variance in reported everyday technology use (p=.030; p=.029, respectively) and age and gender accounted for the variance in reported advanced technology use (phearing aid owners, our findings did not support this prediction. Technology use did not vary by group membership once the covariates of age, gender, and living arrangements were accounted for.

  15. The Effects of Hearing Aid Directional Microphone and Noise Reduction Processing on Listening Effort in Older Adults with Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Jamie L

    2016-01-01

    Older listeners with hearing loss may exert more cognitive resources to maintain a level of listening performance similar to that of younger listeners with normal hearing. Unfortunately, this increase in cognitive load, which is often conceptualized as increased listening effort, may come at the cost of cognitive processing resources that might otherwise be available for other tasks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent and combined effects of a hearing aid directional microphone and a noise reduction (NR) algorithm on reducing the listening effort older listeners with hearing loss expend on a speech-in-noise task. Participants were fitted with study worn commercially available behind-the-ear hearing aids. Listening effort on a sentence recognition in noise task was measured using an objective auditory-visual dual-task paradigm. The primary task required participants to repeat sentences presented in quiet and in a four-talker babble. The secondary task was a digital visual pursuit rotor-tracking test, for which participants were instructed to use a computer mouse to track a moving target around an ellipse that was displayed on a computer screen. Each of the two tasks was presented separately and concurrently at a fixed overall speech recognition performance level of 50% correct with and without the directional microphone and/or the NR algorithm activated in the hearing aids. In addition, participants reported how effortful it was to listen to the sentences in quiet and in background noise in the different hearing aid listening conditions. Fifteen older listeners with mild sloping to severe sensorineural hearing loss participated in this study. Listening effort in background noise was significantly reduced with the directional microphones activated in the hearing aids. However, there was no significant change in listening effort with the hearing aid NR algorithm compared to no noise processing. Correlation analysis between objective and self

  16. Using conjoint analysis to examine the importance of hearing aid attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, H; Lausberg, I; Walger, M; von Wedel, H

    2001-04-01

    To introduce conjoint analysis (CA) as a method to explain choice decisions of hearing aid users and to measure the contributions of different hearing aid attributes involved. The study was conducted using CA, a method that is well established in marketing, but has not been used for hearing aid research. CA examines the contributions (importance) various attributes make to overall preference judgements. It is based on the premises that objects (i.e., hearing aids) can be described as different combinations of several attributes. The relative importance of the attributes is estimated from integral judgements of hypothetical hearing aids. The advantages of CA are a more realistic presentation of complete products instead of isolated attributes and the consideration of trade-offs between the features. The following attributes selected from 12 features in a prestudy were included in the application: speech perception in quiet, speech perception in noise, handling, sound quality, localization, and feedback. 93 randomly chosen experienced hearing aid wearers participated in the survey. It was found that the attributes concerning speech perception were by far most important. Speech discrimination in quiet and in noise were almost equally significant and contributed with 56% to the preference decisions of the subjects. The remaining attributes showed values in the range of 10% to 12%. When comparing various subgroups dependent on age, sex, hearing loss, satisfaction, etc., significant differences concerning the preferences were found. Elder and female subjects attached greater importance of the attribute "handling" whereas younger patients judged "speech in noise" more important. In general, subjects with greater hearing loss considered speech intelligibility in quiet to be more important than in noisy surroundings. Moreover, sound quality seems to be a significant indicator for satisfaction with the hearing aid. This study proposes CA as a survey technique to examine

  17. Improvement of older-person-specific QOL after hearing aid fitting and its relation to social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yukari; Švejdíková, Barbora; Kisvetrová, Helena

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether hearing aids use is associated with improvement of older-person-specific QOL and whether social interactions modify the association. The WHOQOL-OLD questionnaire was answered by 105 older adults aged 60 to 90 years who were newly fitted hearing aids on the day of fitting and at 2 - 6 months afterward. The associations between the daily hours of hearing aid usage and social relations with changes in the WHOQOL-OLD total score after hearing aids fitting were estimated adjusting for possible confounders. Older persons with hearing loss experienced significant increases in WHOQOL-OLD total score after hearing aid fitting. Regular use of hearing aid was associated with a greater increase in the total score. The combined categorical variable of social relations and hearing aid usage revealed no separate effects of these two variables, but a combined effect; only those with frequent social interactions who used their hearing aid regularly had a significantly greater increase in WHOQOL-OLD total score. This study's findings indicate that hearing aid fitting may be associated with a subsequent improvement in older-person-specific QOL by improvements in hearing due to the hearing aid, and possibly enhanced communication opportunities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Semi-non-intrusive objective intelligibility measure using spatial filtering in hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Charlotte; Boldt, Jesper Bünsow; Gran, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Reliable non-intrusive online assessment of speech intelligibility can play a key role for the functioning of hearing aids, e.g. as guidance for adjusting the hearing aid settings to the environment. While existing intrusive metrics can provide a precise and reliable measure, the current non......-intrusive metrics have not been able to achieve acceptable intelligibility predictions. This paper presents a new semi-non-intrusive intelligibility measure based on an existing intrusive measure, STOI, where an estimate of the clean speech is extracted using spatial filtering in the hearing aid. The results...

  19. Using a reflection model for modeling the dynamic feedback path of digital hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Guilin; Gran, Fredrik; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    Feedback whistling is one of the severe problems with hearing aids, especially in dynamic situations when the users hug, pick up a telephone, etc. This paper investigates the properties of the dynamic feedback paths of digital hearing aids and proposes a model based on a reflection assumption...... gain. The method is also extended to dual-microphone hearing aids to assess the possibility of relating the two dynamic feedback paths through the reflection model. However, it is found that in a complicated acoustic environment, the relation between the two feedback paths can be very intricate...

  20. Vibrant Soundbridge and Bone Conduction Hearing Aid in Patients with Bilateral Malformation of External Ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hearing loss is the most common clinical finding in patients with malformation of the external ear canal. Among the possibilities of treatment, there is the adaptation of hearing aids by bone conduction and the adaptation of implantable hearing aids. Objective To assess speech perception with the use of Vibrant Soundbridge (VBS - MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria associated with additional amplification in patients with bilateral craniofacial malformation. Method We evaluated 11 patients with bilateral malformation over 12 years with mixed hearing loss or bilateral conductive. They were using the Softband (Oticon Medical, Sweden and bone conduction hearing aid in the ear opposite the one with the VSB. We performed the evaluation of speech perception using the Hearing in Noise Test. Results Participants were eight men and three women with a mean of 19.5 years. The signal / noise ratio presented significant results in patients fitted with VSB and bone conduction hearing aid. Conclusion The results of speech perception were significantly better with use of VBS combined with bone conduction hearing aids.

  1. Age-related changes in auditory and cognitive abilities in elderly persons with hearing aids fitted at the initial stages of hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Obuchi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the relation between the use of hearing aids at the initial stages of hearing loss and age-related changes in the auditory and cognitive abilities of elderly persons. 12 healthy elderly persons participated in an annual auditory and cognitive longitudinal examination for three years. According to their hearing level, they were divided into 3 subgroups - the normal hearing group, the hearing loss without hearing aids group, and the hearing loss with hearing aids group. All the subjects underwent 4 tests: pure-tone audiometry, syllable intelligibility test, dichotic listening test (DLT, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R Short Forms. Comparison between the 3 groups revealed that the hearing loss without hearing aids group showed the lowest scores for the performance tasks, in contrast to the hearing level and intelligibility results. The other groups showed no significant difference in the WAIS-R subtests. This result indicates that prescription of a hearing aid during the early stages of hearing loss is related to the retention of cognitive abilities in such elderly people. However, there were no statistical significant correlations between the auditory and cognitive tasks.

  2. Effects of hearing aid use on self concept in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harless, E L; McConnell, F

    1982-08-01

    The present study was designed to determine if self concept as measured in an older group of hearing-impaired individuals who had adjusted successfully to hearing aid use might be different from that of a similar group who had not yet begun such a rehabilitation process. The Tennessee Self Concept Scale (TSCS), a standardized and multipurpose instrument, was used for appraisal of self concept. In addition, a secondary procedure was the assessment of communicative efficiency by use of a questionnaire relating to various diverse listening situations. The major finding emerging from the present study showed the hearing aid group higher in overall self concept compared to a similar group who had not begun hearing aid use. This finding suggested that improvement in communicative efficiency, achieved through use of appropriate wearable amplification, may bear some relation to the self image of older hearing-impaired individuals.

  3. The Influence of Hearing Aid Use on Outcomes of Children With Mild Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elizabeth A; Holte, Lenore; McCreery, Ryan W; Spratford, Meredith; Page, Thomas; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the effects of consistent hearing aid (HA) use on outcomes in children with mild hearing loss (HL). Five- or 7-year-old children with mild HL were separated into 3 groups on the basis of patterns of daily HA use. Using analyses of variance, we compared outcomes between groups on speech and language tests and a speech perception in noise task. Regression models were used to investigate the influence of cumulative auditory experience (audibility, early intervention, HA use) on outcomes. Full-time HA users demonstrated significantly higher scores on vocabulary and grammar measures compared with nonusers. There were no significant differences between the 3 groups on articulation or speech perception measures. After controlling for the variance in age at confirmation of HL, level of audibility, and enrollment in early intervention, only amount of daily HA use was a significant predictor of grammar and vocabulary. The current results provide evidence that children's language development benefits from consistent HA use. Nonusers are at risk in areas such as vocabulary and grammar compared with other children with mild HL who wear HAs regularly. Service providers should work collaboratively to encourage consistent HA use.

  4. Effects of hearing-aid dynamic range compression on spatial perception in a reverberant environment

    OpenAIRE

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; Wiinberg, Alan; Dau, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fast-acting hearing-aid compression on normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners’ spatial perception in a reverberant environment. Three compression schemes—independent compression at each ear, linked compression between the two ears, and “spatially ideal” compression operating solely on the dry source signal—were considered using virtualized speech and noise bursts. Listeners indicated the location and extent of their perceived sound images on the h...

  5. Improved prediction error filters for adaptive feedback cancellation in hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Kim; van Waterschoot, Toon; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic feedback is a well-known problem in hearing aids, caused by the undesired acoustic coupling between the hearing aid loudspeaker and microphone. Acoustic feedback produces annoying howling sounds and limits the maximum achievable hearing aid amplification. This paper is focused on adaptive...... feedback cancellation (AFC) where the goal is to adaptively model the acoustic feedback path and estimate the feedback signal, which is then subtracted from the microphone signal. The main problem in identifying the acoustic feedback path model is the correlation between the near-end signal...... a number of improved PEF designs that are inspired by harmonic sinusoidal modeling and pitch prediction of speech signals. The resulting PEM-based AFC algorithms are evaluated in terms of the maximum stable gain (MSG), filter misadjustment, and computational complexity. Simulation results for a hearing aid...

  6. Effects of a Dual Sensory Loss Protocol on Hearing Aid Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeken, H.L.; van Rens, G.H.M.B.; Kramer, S.E.; Knol, D.L.; van Nispen, R.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Dual sensory loss (DSL; concurrent vision and hearing loss) negatively affects quality of life. As speechreading is hampered, use of hearing AIDS (HAs) is important for older adults with DSL. However, due to vision loss, use of small and complex HAs is assumed to be difficult. An integrative DSL

  7. 47 CFR 64.608 - Provision of hearing aid compatible telephones by exchange carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunications Relay Services and Related Customer Premises Equipment for Persons With Disabilities § 64.608... in an exchange area, an exchange carrier must provide a hearing aid compatible telephone, as defined... telephones on a detariffed basis to any customer with a hearing disability who requests such equipment or...

  8. A model of mechanical contacts in hearing aids for uncertainty analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell Mediante, Ester; Brunskog, Jonas; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    in the hearing aid field, where the small lightweight structures present vibration modes at frequencies within the hearing range. To approach this issue, a model of contacts based on lumped elements is suggested. The joint parameters are the stiffness of a series of spring elements placed along the contact...

  9. Music preferences with hearing aids: effects of signal properties, compression settings, and listener characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croghan, Naomi B H; Arehart, Kathryn H; Kates, James M

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge of how to design and fit hearing aids to optimize music listening is limited. Many hearing-aid users listen to recorded music, which often undergoes compression limiting (CL) in the music industry. Therefore, hearing-aid users may experience twofold effects of compression when listening to recorded music: music-industry CL and hearing-aid wide dynamic-range compression (WDRC). The goal of this study was to examine the roles of input-signal properties, hearing-aid processing, and individual variability in the perception of recorded music, with a focus on the effects of dynamic-range compression. A group of 18 experienced hearing-aid users made paired-comparison preference judgments for classical and rock music samples using simulated hearing aids. Music samples were either unprocessed before hearing-aid input or had different levels of music-industry CL. Hearing-aid conditions included linear gain and individually fitted WDRC. Combinations of four WDRC parameters were included: fast release time (50 msec), slow release time (1,000 msec), three channels, and 18 channels. Listeners also completed several psychophysical tasks. Acoustic analyses showed that CL and WDRC reduced temporal envelope contrasts, changed amplitude distributions across the acoustic spectrum, and smoothed the peaks of the modulation spectrum. Listener judgments revealed that fast WDRC was least preferred for both genres of music. For classical music, linear processing and slow WDRC were equally preferred, and the main effect of number of channels was not significant. For rock music, linear processing was preferred over slow WDRC, and three channels were preferred to 18 channels. Heavy CL was least preferred for classical music, but the amount of CL did not change the patterns of WDRC preferences for either genre. Auditory filter bandwidth as estimated from psychophysical tuning curves was associated with variability in listeners' preferences for classical music. Fast

  10. The influence of hearing-aid compression on forward-masked thresholds for adults with hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Marc A.; McCreery, Ryan W.; Jesteadt, Walt

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes forward-masked thresholds for adults with hearing loss. Previous research has demonstrated that the loss of cochlear compression contributes to deficits in this measure of temporal resolution. Cochlear compression can be mimicked with fast-acting compression where the normal dynamic range is mapped to the impaired dynamic range. To test the hypothesis that fast-acting compression will most-closely approximate the normal ability to perceive forward-masked pure-tones, forward-masked thresholds were measured for two groups of adults (normal hearing, hearing loss). Adults with normal hearing were tested without amplification. Adults with hearing loss were tested with three different compression speeds and two different prescriptive procedures using a hearing-aid simulator. The two prescriptive procedures differed in the extent to which the normal dynamic range was mapped onto the impaired dynamic range. When using a faster compression speed with the prescriptive procedure that best restored the lost dynamic range, forward-masked thresholds for the listeners with hearing loss approximated those observed for the listeners with normal hearing. PMID:26520341

  11. Semi-structured listening experience (listening training) in hearing aid fitting: influence on dichotic listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Limor; Attias, Joseph; Karni, Avi

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the authors tested whether training with amplified, clear speech in regular room acoustics would result in larger perceptual gains of auditory processing in elderly hearing aid users. Elderly participants with hearing impairment (N = 36, ages 64–88) were fitted with bilateral hearing aids and were randomly assigned to 2 unequal groups. Study group participants were provided with 7 sessions (1 month) of individual listening training during which a free conversation was conducted, with the aim of stimulating the amplified ears with verbal auditory input. The control group participants were fitted with hearing aids without training. Auditory processing changes were assessed through the use of dichotic listening tasks. During hearing aid use, dichotic listening scores—tested without the hearing aids—improved in both groups, mainly in the non-dominant ears. The overall dichotic performance was significantly higher in the study group, and the main effect of auditory training was manifested in the scores of the dominant ear. Hearing aid use may improve auditory processing performance as tested in unaided conditions. Listening training has an additional beneficial effect on the dominant ear—that is, the ear with the lesser potential for improvement. Listening training in elderly adults presumably enhanced the acclimatization process by better recruiting the potential for auditory plasticity and improving attention recruitment.

  12. Dispensing Rates of Four Common Hearing Aid Product Features: Associations With Variations in Practice Among Audiologists

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Earl E.; Ricketts, Todd A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop and examine a list of potential variables that may account for variability in the dispensing rates of four common hearing aid features. A total of 29 potential variables were identified and placed into the following categories: (1) characteristics of the audiologist, (2) characteristics of the hearing aids dispensed by the audiologist, (3) characteristics of the audiologist's patient population, and (4) evidence-based practice grades of recommendation f...

  13. A conceptual framework for designing micro electrical connectors for hearing aid instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doagou Rad, Saeed; Islam, Aminul; Fuglsang-Philip, M.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical connectors play vital roles in modern electronic instruments. Hearing aid devices as advanced combinations of micro mechanics and electronics comprise various electrical connectors for different purposes. However, the current trend in the miniaturization along with the sharp...... technological advancements have urged them to incorporate increased number of electrical contacts. The current paper presents a conceptual framework for designing and manufacturing novel plug and socket systems for hearing aid instruments by using the state of art manufacturing technologies for micro components...

  14. The effect of hearing aid signal-processing schemes on acceptable noise levels: perception and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Stangl, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test determines the maximum noise level that an individual is willing to accept while listening to speech. The first objective of the present study was to systematically investigate the effect of wide dynamic range compression processing (WDRC), and its combined effect with digital noise reduction (DNR) and directional processing (DIR), on ANL. Because ANL represents the lowest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that a listener is willing to accept, the second objective was to examine whether the hearing aid output SNR could predict aided ANL across different combinations of hearing aid signal-processing schemes. Twenty-five adults with sensorineural hearing loss participated in the study. ANL was measured monaurally in two unaided and seven aided conditions, in which the status of the hearing aid processing schemes (enabled or disabled) and the location of noise (front or rear) were manipulated. The hearing aid output SNR was measured for each listener in each condition using a phase-inversion technique. The aided ANL was predicted by unaided ANL and hearing aid output SNR, under the assumption that the lowest acceptable SNR at the listener's eardrum is a constant across different ANL test conditions. Study results revealed that, on average, WDRC increased (worsened) ANL by 1.5 dB, while DNR and DIR decreased (improved) ANL by 1.1 and 2.8 dB, respectively. Because the effects of WDRC and DNR on ANL were opposite in direction but similar in magnitude, the ANL of linear/DNR-off was not significantly different from that of WDRC/DNR-on. The results further indicated that the pattern of ANL change across different aided conditions was consistent with the pattern of hearing aid output SNR change created by processing schemes. Compared with linear processing, WDRC creates a noisier sound image and makes listeners less willing to accept noise. However, this negative effect on noise acceptance can be offset by DNR, regardless of microphone mode

  15. Hearing aid use and long-term health outcomes: hearing handicap, mental health, social engagement, cognitive function, physical health and mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Piers; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Fischer, Mary E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Nondahl, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To clarify the impact of hearing aids on mental health, social engagement, cognitive function, and physical health outcomes in older adults with hearing impairment. Design We assessed hearing handicap (Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly; HHIE-S), cognition (Mini Mental State Exam, Trail Making, Auditory Verbal Learning, Digit-Symbol Substitution, Verbal Fluency, incidence of cognitive impairment), physical health (SF-12 physical component, basic and instrumental activities of daily living, mortality), social engagement (hours per week spent in solitary activities) and mental health (SF-12 mental component) at baseline, 5 years prior to baseline, and 5 and 11 years after baseline. Study sample Community-dwelling older adults with hearing impairment (N=666) from the Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study cohort. Results There were no significant differences between hearing aid users and non-users in cognitive, social engagement or mental health outcomes at any time point. Aided HHIE-S was significantly better than unaided HHIE-S. At 11 years hearing aid users had significantly better SF-12 physical health scores (46.2 versus 41.2; p=0.03). There was no difference in incidence of cognitive impairment or mortality. Conclusion There was no evidence that hearing aids promote cognitive function, mental health, or social engagement. Hearing aids may reduce hearing handicap and promote better physical health. PMID:26140300

  16. Hearing-aid use and long-term health outcomes: Hearing handicap, mental health, social engagement, cognitive function, physical health, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Piers; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Fischer, Mary E; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Nondahl, David M

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the impact of hearing aids on mental health, social engagement, cognitive function, and physical health outcomes in older adults with hearing impairment. We assessed hearing handicap (hearing handicap inventory for the elderly; HHIE-S), cognition (mini mental state exam, trail making, auditory verbal learning, digit-symbol substitution, verbal fluency, incidence of cognitive impairment), physical health (SF-12 physical component, basic and instrumental activities of daily living, mortality), social engagement (hours per week spent in solitary activities), and mental health (SF-12 mental component) at baseline, five years prior to baseline, and five and 11 years after baseline. Community-dwelling older adults with hearing impairment (N = 666) from the epidemiology of hearing loss study cohort. There were no significant differences between hearing-aid users and non-users in cognitive, social engagement, or mental health outcomes at any time point. Aided HHIE-S was significantly better than unaided HHIE-S. At 11 years hearing-aid users had significantly better SF-12 physical health scores (46.2 versus 41.2; p = 0.03). There was no difference in incidence of cognitive impairment or mortality. There was no evidence that hearing aids promote cognitive function, mental health, or social engagement. Hearing aids may reduce hearing handicap and promote better physical health.

  17. Management of Hearing Aid Assembly by Urban-Dwelling Hearing-Impaired Adults in a Developed Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidser, Gitte; Hartley, Lisa; Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly

    2011-01-01

    A self-fitting hearing aid, designed to be assembled and programmed without audiological or computer support, could bring amplification to millions of people in developing countries, who remain unaided due to the lack of a local, professional, audiological infrastructure. The ability to assemble and insert a hearing aid is fundamental to the successful use of a self-fitting device. In this study, the management of such tasks was investigated. Eighty older, urban-dwelling, hearing-impaired adults in a developed country were asked to follow a set of written, illustrated instructions to assemble two slim-fit behind-the-ear hearing aids. Participants were allowed to access assistance with the task from an accompanying partner. A range of personal and audiometric variables was measured through the use of structured questionnaires and standardized tests of health literacy, cognitive function, and manual dexterity. The results showed that 99% of participants were able to complete the hearing aid assembly task, either on their own or with assistance. Health literacy, or the ability to read and understand health-related text, and gender most strongly influenced participants’ ability to complete the assembly task independently and accurately. Higher levels of health literacy were associated with an increased likelihood of independent and successful task completion. Male participants were more likely to complete the task on their own, while female participants were more likely to assemble the device without errors. The results of this study will inform future work regarding development of educational material for the self-fitting hearing aid as well as candidacy for such a device. PMID:22200734

  18. The Care and Use of a Child's Hearing Aid: A Practical Guide for Parents, Teachers, and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael A.

    The booklet is intended to provide practical information on hearing aids for hearing impaired children, their families and teachers. Illustrations are provided to describe the hearing process. The nature of hearing loss is considered in terms of types (conductive, sensori-neural, and mixed), causes, degrees, and educational implications. Four…

  19. Technology transfer of hearing aids to low and middle income countries: policy and market factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelman, Katherine D; Werner, Roye

    2014-09-01

    The competitive market advantages of industry and the balancing force of international governmental organizations (IGOs) are examined to identify market and policy in support of sustainable technology transfer of hearing aids to low and middle income countries. A second purpose is to examine the usefulness of findings for other assistive technologies (AT). Searches of electronic databases, IGO documents, industry reports and journals were supplemented by informal discussions with industry and IGO staff and audiologists. The value chain is used to examine the competitive advantage of industry and the balancing tools of certain IGOs. Both industry and IGOs engage in intellectual property (IP) and competition activities and are active in each segment of the hearing aid value chain. Their market and policy objectives and strategies are different. IGOs serve as balancing forces for the competitive advantages of industry. The hearing aid market configuration and hearing aid fitting process are not representative of other AT products but IP, trade and competition policy tools used by IGOs and governments are relevant to other AT. The value chain is a useful tool to identify the location of price mark-ups and the influence of actors. Market factors and reimbursement and subsidization policies drive hearing aid innovation. UN-related international government organization activities are responsive to the needs of disability populations who cannot afford assistive technology. Policy tools used by international governmental organizations are applicable across assistive technology. A partnership model is important to distribution of hearing aids to low and middle income countries.

  20. Open Versus Closed Hearing-Aid Fittings: A Literature Review of Both Fitting Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzel, Matthias; Holube, Inga

    2016-01-01

    One of the main issues in hearing-aid fittings is the abnormal perception of the user’s own voice as too loud, “boomy,” or “hollow.” This phenomenon known as the occlusion effect be reduced by large vents in the earmolds or by open-fit hearing aids. This review provides an overview of publications related to open and closed hearing-aid fittings. First, the occlusion effect and its consequences for perception while using hearing aids are described. Then, the advantages and disadvantages of open compared with closed fittings and their impact on the fitting process are addressed. The advantages include less occlusion, improved own-voice perception and sound quality, and increased localization performance. The disadvantages associated with open-fit hearing aids include reduced benefits of directional microphones and noise reduction, as well as less compression and less available gain before feedback. The final part of this review addresses the need for new approaches to combine the advantages of open and closed hearing-aid fittings. PMID:26879562

  1. Contemporary Hearing Rehabilitation Options in Patients with Aural Atresia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Jacky F. W.; Tsang, Willis S. S.; Yu, Joannie Y. K.; Ho, Osan Y. M.; Ku, Peter K. M.; Tong, Michael C. F.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aural atresia is the failure of development of the external auditory canal. It usually occurs in conjunction with microtia, which is the malformation of the auricle due to a failure of development of the external ear. Aural atresia, with or without microtia, may significantly affect the hearing and social life of the patients. It is important for every medical practitioner to be aware of the possible treatment options for hearing rehabilitation in this group of patients. In the era of modern technology, new choices, including Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) (Cochlear Ltd. and Oticon Medical), Vibrant Soundbridge (VSB) (MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria), and Bonebridge system (BB) (MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria), provide high-end alternatives to traditional Bone Conduction Hearing Aid and Auditory Canal Reconstruction. All these options have advantages and disadvantages, and they are appropriate for different patients and/or at different ages. This paper aims to provide an overview of the management of hearing rehabilitation in congenital aural atresia patients and a discussion of each treatment option. PMID:24883324

  2. Contemporary Hearing Rehabilitation Options in Patients with Aural Atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky F. W. Lo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital aural atresia is the failure of development of the external auditory canal. It usually occurs in conjunction with microtia, which is the malformation of the auricle due to a failure of development of the external ear. Aural atresia, with or without microtia, may significantly affect the hearing and social life of the patients. It is important for every medical practitioner to be aware of the possible treatment options for hearing rehabilitation in this group of patients. In the era of modern technology, new choices, including Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA (Cochlear Ltd. and Oticon Medical, Vibrant Soundbridge (VSB (MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria, and Bonebridge system (BB (MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria, provide high-end alternatives to traditional Bone Conduction Hearing Aid and Auditory Canal Reconstruction. All these options have advantages and disadvantages, and they are appropriate for different patients and/or at different ages. This paper aims to provide an overview of the management of hearing rehabilitation in congenital aural atresia patients and a discussion of each treatment option.

  3. Comparison of two protocols for maxillary protraction: bone anchors versus face mask with rapid maxillary expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; McNamara, James A.; De Clerck, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that there is no difference in the active treatment effects for maxillary advancement induced by bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) and the active treatment effects for face mask in association with rapid maxillary expansion (RME/FM). Materials and Methods This is a study on consecutively treated patients. The changes in dentoskeletal cephalometric variables from start of treatment (T1) to end of active treatment (T2) with an average T1–T2 interval of about 1 year were contrasted in a BAMP sample of 21 subjects with a RME/FM sample of 34 patients. All subjects were prepubertal at T1. Statistical comparison was performed with t-tests for independent samples. Results The BAMP protocol produced significantly larger maxillary advancement than the RME/FM therapy (with a difference of 2 mm to 3 mm). Mandibular sagittal changes were similar, while vertical changes were better controlled with BAMP. The sagittal intermaxillary relationships improved 2.5 mm more in the BAMP patients. Additional favorable outcomes of BAMP treatment were the lack of clockwise rotation of the mandible as well as a lack of retroclination of the lower incisors. Conclusions The hypothesis is rejected. The BAMP protocol produced significantly larger maxillary advancement than the RME/FM therapy. PMID:20578848

  4. [Function of prosthesis components in lower limb amputees with bone-anchored percutaneous implants : Biomechanical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumentritt, S

    2017-05-01

    Bone anchorage of an artificial limb has been proven to be an alternative intervention for amputees when prosthesis use is seriously reduced because of stump problems. Little is known about how prosthesis components interact with bone and joints and which potential the optimum use provides with respect to quality of treatment of leg amputees. Does osseointegration influence the motor activity of residual limbs differently compared with socket prostheses? How should prosthesis components be aligned? What type of prosthetic knee joints should be preferred in transfemoral amputees? Transfer of biomechanical knowledge of socket prosthetics to bone-anchored prostheses. Pilot studies with a limited number of amputees. Force transmission at the interface between the prosthesis and residual limb stump is completely different for osseointegrated fixation and socket design; however, the number of muscles available for control remains unchanged. Because the iliotibial tract is missing, bending moments of the femur are expected to be greater. Prosthetic alignment is very critical for gait pattern and the basic rules seem to be the same as for socket design. The foot position determines the knee function for below-knee amputees. The position of the femur influences the gait pattern of above-knee amputees. The lowest risk of falls and best functional properties are shown by microprocessor controlled knee joints. Osseointegrated leg prostheses have some biomechanical advantages over the socket design. Since rehabilitation quality is clearly affected the prosthetic alignment has to be done carefully and precisely. As a rule microprocessor controlled knee joints are indicated.

  5. Alternative techniques in reconstructive surgery: bone-anchored extraoral implants for burn cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottini, D J; Gentile, P; Colicchia, G; Grimaldi, M; Trimarco, A; Cervelli, V

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the use of extraoral implants for reconstruction of the ear area after burns. The first step of the protocol includes positioning of implants in the mastoid process. The second step, after 3 to 4 months, is to realize the auricle prosthesis and apply it. Extraoral, bone-integrated implants offer low surgical risks and few postsurgical complications, leading to optimal aesthetic results, mainly in the ear area. Compared with traditional surgery techniques, the aesthetic results are better, with less surgery, possibly only two surgery sessions. Adhesive prostheses can be placed without the usual local irritation, and a more correct positioning can be obtained. For this study, two female patients, treated from December 2001 to January 2005, were selected to receive auricle epitheses. In the authors' experience, 79% of case reporting describes the creation of this epithesis type. The patient age has a range of 26 years. The two study patients initially had the same diagnosis: burns of the auricle-temporal region. In all cases, a good aesthetic result was obtained. The authors believe that bone-anchored implants for the treatment of auricle burns is a valid and brilliant technique that complements traditional reconstructive procedures. The advantages are the low incidence of long-term complications and the possibility of obtaining excellent aesthetic lasting results even for very complicated cases that would not have been solved in the past.

  6. Intermediate outcomes of a transcutaneous bone conduction hearing device in a paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Panagiotis A; Carrick, Suzanne; Ray, Jaydip

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to review the outcomes of Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA ® ) Attract implantation in a cohort of paediatric patients. Prospective data collection and case review were undertaken in a paediatric tertiary referral centre. We have included patients under the age of 16 years with unilateral or bilateral hearing loss that met the criteria for BAHA ® Attract implantation. The main outcome measures were surgical complications and Patient Reported Outcomes including the 'Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing scale' (SSQ-12) and 'Qualitative Feedback for BAHA ® 5 Hearing Aids'. Twenty-five paediatric patients were implanted with the BAHA ® Attract between June 2014 and July 2016. Nine of them had a conversion from a percutaneous Bone Conduction Hearing Device (BCHD). Four children had minor skin problems that settled with conservative measures. Two children with a previous percutaneous BCHD developed skin dehiscence over the magnet after conversion to the transcutaneous version. The SSQ-12 was completed by 6 children and an improvement of 22% was noted between the unaided and aided condition. The patients and their parents were generally satisfied with the BAHA ® Attract. The BAHA ® Attract offers a good solution for hearing rehabilitation in appropriately selected and counseled patients. The complication rate was low for primary surgery but higher in cases of conversion from a percutaneous device. Large, prospective data is needed to evaluate the relative risks and benefits of this BCHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Self-reported outcomes of aural rehabilitation for adult hearing aid users in a developing South African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Pienaar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impairment has far reaching consequences for affected individuals, in terms of quality of life indicators. In a developing South African context the hearing impaired population is faced with limited aural rehabilitation services. This study evaluated self-reported outcomes of aural rehabilitation in a group of adults in the public healthcare sector with a standardized outcomes measurement tool (IOI-HA. Sixty-one respondents participated (44% males; 56% females, with a mean age of 69.7 years. Results revealed that the majority of respondents experienced favourable outcomes in all domains of the inventory comprising of: daily use of hearing aids, benefits provided by hearing aids, residual activity limitation, satisfaction with hearing aids, residual participation restriction, impact of hearing difficulties on others, and changes in quality of life. Statistically significant relationships were obtained between the daily use of hearing aids, the degree of hearing loss, and the type of hearing aids fitted, as well as the benefits received from hearing aids in difficult listening environments (p < 0.05. Despite challenges of developing contexts, the mean scores distribution compared positively to similar reports from developed countries. Outcomes of improved quality of life emphasize the importance of providing affordable hearing aids and services to all hearing impaired individuals in South Africa.

  8. Dual Language versus English-Only Support for Bilingual Children with Hearing Loss Who Use Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunta, Ferenc; Douglas, Michael; Dickson, Hanna; Cantu, Amy; Wickesberg, Jennifer; Gifford, René H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a critical need to understand better speech and language development in bilingual children learning two spoken languages who use cochlear implants (CIs) and hearing aids (HAs). The paucity of knowledge in this area poses a significant barrier to providing maximal communicative outcomes to a growing number of children who have…

  9. Relationship between Otolaryngologic Complaints and Systemic Comorbidities Observed in a Group of Hearing Aid Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribas, Angela

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Optimization of the selection, adaptation, and benefit of hearing aids is necessary to characterize and manage hearing loss, user expectations, otolaryngologic symptoms, and systemic comorbidities. Objective To compare the occurrence of otologic complaints, systemic diseases, and effective use of hearing aids in men and women with deafness. Methods Patients from a Unified Health System–accredited hearing health service, who reported problems in adapting to their hearing aids, were evaluated by a physician and audiologist. An anamnesis, ENT evaluation, and audiological evaluation were performed. Results During the data collection period, 278 subjects came in for follow-up visits; of these, 61 (21% reported otologic or operational problems with their equipment. The most prevalent type of hearing loss was basocochlear, a characteristic of presbycusis, in both men and women; the most frequently reported comorbidities were hypercholesterolemia (more significant in women and hypertension (more significant in men. Fourteen subjects reported using their device discontinuously, with no significant difference between genders; the reasons for discontinuation of use were itching and ringing, with more complaints from women. Conclusion The incidence of systemic and audiological complaints is high in this population. These patients should be evaluated thoroughly, as resolutions of these complaints can contribute to improving the quality of life and assist in the process of hearing aid fitting.

  10. Evaluation of a clinical auditory profile in hearing-aid candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Nicoline; Santurette, Sébastien; Jørgensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often complain about communicating in the presence of background noise, although audibility may be restored by a hearing-aid (HA). The audiogram typically forms the basis for HA fitting, such that people with similar audiograms are given the same prescription...... and temporal resolution, binaural hearing, speech intelligibility in stationary and fluctuating noise, and a working-memory test. Six weeks after HA fitting they answered the International Outcome Inventory – Hearing Aid evaluation. The HI group was homogeneous based on the audiogram, but only one test...... was correlated to pure-tone hearing thresholds. Moreover, HI listeners who took the least advantage from fluctuations in background noise in terms of speech intelligibility experienced greater HA benefit. Further analysis of whether specific outcomes are directly related to speech intelligibility in fluctuating...

  11. Signal Processing in High-End Hearing Aids: State of the Art, Challenges, and Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Rass

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of hearing aids incorporates two aspects, namely, the audiological and the technical point of view. The former focuses on items like the recruitment phenomenon, the speech intelligibility of hearing-impaired persons, or just on the question of hearing comfort. Concerning these subjects, different algorithms intending to improve the hearing ability are presented in this paper. These are automatic gain controls, directional microphones, and noise reduction algorithms. Besides the audiological point of view, there are several purely technical problems which have to be solved. An important one is the acoustic feedback. Another instance is the proper automatic control of all hearing aid components by means of a classification unit. In addition to an overview of state-of-the-art algorithms, this paper focuses on future trends.

  12. Hearing Aid Use and Mild Hearing Impairment: Learnings from Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmer, Barbra H B; Hickson, Louise; Launer, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Previous research, mostly reliant on self-reports, has indicated that hearing aid (HA) use is related to the degree of hearing impairment (HI). No large-scale investigation of the relationship between data-logged HA use and HI has been conducted to date. This study aimed to investigate if objective measures of overall daily HA use and HA use in various listening environments are different for adults with mild HI compared to adults with moderate HI. This retrospective study used data extracted from a database of fitting appointments from an international group of HA providers. Only data from the participants' most recent fitting appointment were included in the final dataset. A total of 8,489 bilateral HA fittings of adults over the age of 18 yr, conducted between January 2013 and June 2014, were included. Participants were subsequently allocated to HI groups, based on British Society of Audiology and American Speech-Language-Hearing Association audiometric descriptors. Fitting data from participating HA providers were regularly transferred to a central server. The data, with all personal information except age and gender removed, contained participants' four-frequency average (at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) as well as information on HA characteristics and usage. Following data cleaning, bivariate and post hoc statistical analyses were conducted. The total sample of adults' average daily HA use was 8.52 hr (interquartile range [IQR] = 5.49-11.77) in the left ear and 8.51 hr (IQR = 5.49-11.72) in the right ear. With a few exceptions, there were no statistical differences between hours of HA use for participants with mild HI compared to those with moderate impairment. Across all mild and moderate HI groups, the most common overall HA usage was between 8 and 12 hr per day. Other factors such as age, gender, and HA style also showed no relationship to hours of use. HAs were used, on average, for 7 hr (IQR = 4.27-9.96) per day in quiet and 1 hr (IQR = 0.33-1.41) per

  13. Rethinking Hearing Aid Fitting by Learning From Behavioral Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Benjamin; Petersen, Michael Kai; Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik

    2017-01-01

    The recent introduction of Internet connected hearing instruments offers a paradigm shift in hearing instrument fitting. Potentially this makes it possible for devices to adapt their settings to a changing context, inferred from user interactions. In a pilot study we enabled hearing instrument....... A significant difference between program usage, and weekdays versus weekends, were found. Users not only changed programs to modify aspects of directionality and noise reduction, but also continuously adjusted the volume. Rethinking hearing instruments as devices that adaptively learn behavioral patterns based...

  14. Prevalence and associated factors of hearing aid use among older adults in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-López, Eduardo; Fuente, Adrian; Cardemil, Felipe; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Albala, Cecilia

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of use of hearing aids by older adults in Chile and the influence of some variables such as education level, income level and geographic area of residence on the prevalence of hearing aids. A national cross-sectional survey which was carried out in 2009. A representative sample of 4766 Chilean older adults aged 60 years and above. The percentage of older adults in Chile who self-reported hearing problems and used hearing aids was 8.9%. Such prevalence increased for adults living in urban areas and for those who knew about the new Chilean programme of universal access to health services (AUGE). For older adults who did not know about this programme, significant associations between the use of hearing aids and the variables of age, geographic area of residence, and income level were found. People's knowledge about AUGE programme may positively influence the use of hearing aids, although a direct effect cannot be attributed.

  15. Prevalence of Contralateral Hearing Aid Use in Adults with Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi, Cintia Tizue

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The exclusive use of a cochlear implant (CI in one ear allows patients to effectively hear speech in a quiet environment. However, in environments with competing noise, the processing of multiple sounds becomes complex. In an attempt to promote binaural hearing in a noninvasive manner, the use of a hearing aid in the nonimplanted ear is suggested for patients with a unilateral CI. Aims: To identify the prevalence of hearing aid use in the contralateral ear in adults who already have a CI; to determine the reasons why some patients do not use contralateral hearing aids (CHAs; and to analyze the effects of residual hearing in CHA users. Materials and Methods: This is a clinical study in 82 adult patients with CI implants who responded to a questionnaire designed to determine current use of CHA. Results: In our patient sample, 70 CHA nonusers were identified. The prevalence of CHA users was determined to be 12% with a 95% confidence interval of 11 to 13%. About 58.2% of the CHA nonusers reported a lack of noticeable benefit even after wearing hearing aids, and 23.6% reported not having received the option to use a CHA. CHA users had a pure tone average of 107-dB hearing level, whereas CHA nonusers had a pure tone average of 117-dB hearing level. Conclusion: The prevalence of the use of a CHA is low in our study. We attribute the low use of a CHA to either a lack of residual hearing or to a lack of benefit from the amplification.

  16. [Treating age-related hearing loss: hearing aids are not very popular

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snik, A.F.M.; Leijendeckers, J.M.; Marres, H.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Presbycusis means the deterioration of hearing resulting from the ageing process. Presbycusis can greatly affect one's quality of life; impaired hearing restricts communication and untreated presbycusis could result in social isolation and even depression. Nevertheless, only a minority of elderly

  17. Use of Hearing Aids and Functional Capacity in Middle-Aged and Elderly Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carioli, Juliana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hearing loss is among the sensory changes strongly associated with loss of functional capacity. Objective It aims to determine whether the use of hearing aid contributes to the improvement of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL for middle aged and elderly hearing-impaired individuals. Methods This is a descriptive, longitudinal, and interventional study. We evaluated 17 subjects, 13 (76.5% female, aged between 58 and 96 years old (mean 77.1 ± 10.4 years. All were new users of hearing aids. Evaluation included social history, pure tone audiometry, and scale of IADL developed by Lawton and Brody. The subjects were presented daily life situations and were expected to respond if they could do them without assistance (3 points, partially assisted (2 points or if they were unable to perform them (1 point. IADL was applied before the use of hearing aids adaptation and after a three- and six-month period of use. Results Data analysis revealed that before the use of hearing aids the average score obtained by the subjects was 22.94 ± 4.04 points. Three months after beginning the use the average score was 23.29 ± 4.12 and after six months the average score was 23.71 ± 3.69 points. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between scores obtained before the use of hearing aids and six months post-fitting (p = 0.015* Conclusion The use of hearing aids among the subjects evaluated promoted positive changes in performing IADL, especially to using the telephone.

  18. Hearing aids in children: the importance of the verification and validation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissatto, Mara Renata; Novaes, Beatriz Cavalcanti de Albuquerque Caiuby

    2009-01-01

    during the fitting of hearing aids in children it is important, besides using a verification protocol, to have a validation process. to describe and discuss the use of a protocol for the fitting and the verification of hearing aids in children, as well as the impact of the adjustment of the acoustic characteristics in speech perception tasks. ten children aging from three to eleven years were enrolled in this study. All children presented bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, were users of hearing aids and were followed at a public hearing health care service in Bahia. The children were submitted to the following procedures: pure tone air and bone conduction thresholds; real-ear coupler difference (RECD); verification with real-ear measurement equipment: coupler gain/output and insertion gain and to speech perception tasks: 'The Six-Sound Test' (Ling, 2006) and the 'Word Associations for Syllable Perception' (WASP - Koch, 1999). The programmed electro acoustic characteristics of the hearing aids were compared to the electro acoustic characteristics prescribed by the DSL [i/o] v4.1 software. The speech perception tasks were reapplied on three occasions: straight after the modification of the electro acoustic characteristics, after 30 days and 60 days. for more than 50% of the tested children, the programmed electro acoustic characteristics of the hearing aids did not correspond to that suggested by the DSL [i/o] software. Adequate prescription was verified in 70% of the investigated sample; this was also confirmed by the results in the speech perception tasks (p=0.000). This data confirmed that the mean percentage of correct answers increased after the modification of the electro acoustic characteristics. the use of a protocol that verifies and validates the fitting of hearing aids in children is necessary.

  19. How hearing aids, background noise, and visual cues influence objective listening effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picou, Erin M; Ricketts, Todd A; Hornsby, Benjamin W Y

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to evaluate factors that influence the listening effort experienced when processing speech for people with hearing loss. Specifically, the change in listening effort resulting from introducing hearing aids, visual cues, and background noise was evaluated. An additional exploratory aim was to investigate the possible relationships between the magnitude of listening effort change and individual listeners' working memory capacity, verbal processing speed, or lipreading skill. Twenty-seven participants with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss were fitted with linear behind-the-ear hearing aids and tested using a dual-task paradigm designed to evaluate listening effort. The primary task was monosyllable word recognition and the secondary task was a visual reaction time task. The test conditions varied by hearing aids (unaided, aided), visual cues (auditory-only, auditory-visual), and background noise (present, absent). For all participants, the signal to noise ratio was set individually so that speech recognition performance in noise was approximately 60% in both the auditory-only and auditory-visual conditions. In addition to measures of listening effort, working memory capacity, verbal processing speed, and lipreading ability were measured using the Automated Operational Span Task, a Lexical Decision Task, and the Revised Shortened Utley Lipreading Test, respectively. In general, the effects measured using the objective measure of listening effort were small (~10 msec). Results indicated that background noise increased listening effort, and hearing aids reduced listening effort, while visual cues did not influence listening effort. With regard to the individual variables, verbal processing speed was negatively correlated with hearing aid benefit for listening effort; faster processors were less likely to derive benefit. Working memory capacity, verbal processing speed, and lipreading ability were related to benefit from visual cues. No

  20. Chosen Listening Levels for Music With and Without the Use of Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croghan, Naomi B H; Swanberg, Anne M; Anderson, Melinda C; Arehart, Kathryn H

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to describe chosen listening levels (CLLs) for recorded music for listeners with hearing loss in aided and unaided conditions. The study used a within-subject, repeated-measures design with 13 adult hearing-aid users. The music included rock and classical samples with different amounts of audio-industry compression limiting. CLL measurements were taken at ear level (i.e., at input to the hearing aid) and at the tympanic membrane. For aided listening, average CLLs were 69.3 dBA at the input to the hearing aid and 80.3 dBA at the tympanic membrane. For unaided listening, average CLLs were 76.9 dBA at the entrance to the ear canal and 77.1 dBA at the tympanic membrane. Although wide intersubject variability was observed, CLLs were not associated with audiometric thresholds. CLLs for rock music were higher than for classical music at the tympanic membrane, but no differences were observed between genres for ear-level CLLs. The amount of audio-industry compression had no significant effect on CLLs. By describing the levels of recorded music chosen by hearing-aid users, this study provides a basis for ecologically valid testing conditions in clinical and laboratory settings.

  1. Multicenter evaluation of signal enhancement algorithms for hearing aids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luts, Heleen; Eneman, Koen; Wouters, Jan; Schulte, Michael; Vormann, Matthias; Buechler, Michael; Dillier, Norbert; Houben, Rolph; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Froehlich, Matthias; Puder, Henning; Grimm, Giso; Hohmann, Volker; Leijon, Arne; Lombard, Anthony; Mauler, Dirk; Spriet, Ann

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the European HearCom project, promising signal enhancement algorithms were developed and evaluated for future use in hearing instruments. To assess the algorithms' performance, five of the algorithms were selected and implemented on a common real-time hardware/software platform.

  2. Enhancing Auditory Selective Attention Using a Visually Guided Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Gerald, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Listeners with hearing loss, as well as many listeners with clinically normal hearing, often experience great difficulty segregating talkers in a multiple-talker sound field and selectively attending to the desired "target" talker while ignoring the speech from unwanted "masker" talkers and other sources of sound. This…

  3. The Effects of Unilateral Adaptation of Hearing Aids on Symptoms of Depression and Social Activity Constraints of Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, Fernanda Dutra dos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hearing loss is one of the most common problems in the elderly population. Besides compromising oral communication, it directly affects social relations and prevents elderly patients from living actively in society, possibly leading to the onset of depression or other conditions. Objective To analyze the effects of unilateral adaptation of hearing aids on symptoms of depression and the social activity constraints of elderly subjects with hearing impairment. Methods The sample consisted of elderly subjects with hearing loss who did not use hearing aids. Data were collected in two phases. Initially, all participants underwent an audiological assessment and answered the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Elderly (summarized version and the Geriatric Depression Scale. All subjects participated in the selection and hearing aid adaptation processes and became monaural hearing aid users. After 30 days of hearing aid use, they were assessed with the same instruments. The results of the questionnaires before and after hearing aid adaptation were compared. Results The sample consisted of 13 individuals, between 60 and 90 years old (mean 72.85 ± 11.05 years. Data analysis showed that there was significant improvement in social activity constraints (p < 0.001 and in symptoms of depression (p = 0.031. Conclusion Results show that, in the sample studied, unilateral hearing aid adaptation reduced social activity constraints and depression symptoms.

  4. [Effect of rehabilitation for prelingual deaf children who use cochlear implants in conjunction with hearing aids in the opposite ears].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yanjing; Zhou, Huifang; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Dong; Xu, Yi; Guo, Yuxi

    2012-10-01

    To compare the effect of rehabilitation of prelingual deaf children who used a cochlear implant (CI) in one ear and a hearing aids in the opposite ear while the hearing level of the opposite ears are different. Hearing ability, language ability and learning ability was included in the content. The aim of this research is to investigate better style of rehabilitation, and to offer the best help to the prelingual deaf children. Accord ing to the hearing level of the ear opposite to the one wearing a cochlear implant and whether the opposite ear wear a hearing aid or not, 30 prelingual deaf children were divided into three groups, including cochlear implant with opposite severe hearing loss and hearing aid ear (CI+SHA), cochlear implant with opposite profound hearing loss and hearing aid ear (CI+PHA), cochlear implant only (CI). The effect of rehabilitation was assessed in six different times (3,6,9,12,15 and 18 months after the cochlear implants and hearing aids began to work). The longer time the rehabilitation spends, the better the hearing ability,language ability and the learning ability were. The hearing ability of CI+SHA was better than those of CI+PHA (Pdeaf children should take much more time on rehabilitation. The effect of rehabilitation for prelingual deaf children who used cochlear implant in one ear and hearing aid in the other depend on the residual hearing level of the other ear. If a prelingual deaf children still has any residual hearing level in the ear opposite to the cochlear implant ear, it is better for him/her to wear a hearing aid in the ear.

  5. Objective assessment of listening effort in the oscillatory EEG: comparison of different hearing aid configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernarding, Corinna; Strauss, Daniel J; Hannemann, Ronny; Seidler, Harald; Corona-Strauss, Farah I

    2014-01-01

    An objective estimate of listening effort could support the hearing aid fitting procedure. Most of the digital hearing aids have already hearing aid settings which are supposed to reduce the listening effort, but the effects of these settings on the individual's listening effort remain unclear. In this study, we propose an objective estimate of listening effort using electroencephalographic data. The new method is based on the phase distribution of the ongoing oscillatory EEG activity. We hypothesize that for a non-effortful listening environment the phase is rather uniformly distributed on the unit circle than for a demanding condition. To prove if the phase is uniformly distributed around the unit circle, the Rayleigh Test was applied to the phase of the EEG. This method was tested in 14 hearing impaired subjects (moderate hearing loss, 65.64 ±7.93 yrs, 7 female). The tested hearing aid settings were a directional microphone combined with a noise reduction algorithm in a medium and a strong setting, the noise reduction setting turned off as well as a setting using omnidirectional microphones. Noise embedded sentences (Oldenburg Sentence Test, OlSa) were used as test materials. The task of the subject was to repeat each sentence. The results indicate that the objective estimate of listening effort maps the subjectively rated effort and for a listening situation like the presented one, the strong setting of the directional microphone requires the smallest effort.

  6. A technical comparison of digital frequency-lowering algorithms available in two current hearing aids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J McDermott

    Full Text Available Recently two major manufacturers of hearing aids introduced two distinct frequency-lowering techniques that were designed to compensate in part for the perceptual effects of high-frequency hearing impairments. The Widex "Audibility Extender" is a linear frequency transposition scheme, whereas the Phonak "SoundRecover" scheme employs nonlinear frequency compression. Although these schemes process sound signals in very different ways, studies investigating their use by both adults and children with hearing impairment have reported significant perceptual benefits. However, the modifications that these innovative schemes apply to sound signals have not previously been described or compared in detail.The main aim of the present study was to analyze these schemes'technical performance by measuring outputs from each type of hearing aid with the frequency-lowering functions enabled and disabled. The input signals included sinusoids, flute sounds, and speech material. Spectral analyses were carried out on the output signals produced by the hearing aids in each condition.The results of the analyses confirmed that each scheme was effective at lowering certain high-frequency acoustic signals, although both techniques also distorted some signals. Most importantly, the application of either frequency-lowering scheme would be expected to improve the audibility of many sounds having salient high-frequency components. Nevertheless, considerably different perceptual effects would be expected from these schemes, even when each hearing aid is fitted in accordance with the same audiometric configuration of hearing impairment. In general, these findings reinforce the need for appropriate selection and fitting of sound-processing schemes in modern hearing aids to suit the characteristics and preferences of individual listeners.

  7. Dynamic Relation Between Working Memory Capacity and Speech Recognition in Noise During the First 6 Months of Hearing Aid Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine H. N. Ng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the changing relationship between aided speech recognition and cognitive function during the first 6 months of hearing aid use. Twenty-seven first-time hearing aid users with symmetrical mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Aided speech recognition thresholds in noise were obtained in the hearing aid fitting session as well as at 3 and 6 months postfitting. Cognitive abilities were assessed using a reading span test, which is a measure of working memory capacity, and a cognitive test battery. Results showed a significant correlation between reading span and speech reception threshold during the hearing aid fitting session. This relation was significantly weakened over the first 6 months of hearing aid use. Multiple regression analysis showed that reading span was the main predictor of speech recognition thresholds in noise when hearing aids were first fitted, but that the pure-tone average hearing threshold was the main predictor 6 months later. One way of explaining the results is that working memory capacity plays a more important role in speech recognition in noise initially rather than after 6 months of use. We propose that new hearing aid users engage working memory capacity to recognize unfamiliar processed speech signals because the phonological form of these signals cannot be automatically matched to phonological representations in long-term memory. As familiarization proceeds, the mismatch effect is alleviated, and the engagement of working memory capacity is reduced.

  8. Dynamic relation between working memory capacity and speech recognition in noise during the first 6 months of hearing aid use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Elaine H N; Classon, Elisabet; Larsby, Birgitta; Arlinger, Stig; Lunner, Thomas; Rudner, Mary; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2014-11-23

    The present study aimed to investigate the changing relationship between aided speech recognition and cognitive function during the first 6 months of hearing aid use. Twenty-seven first-time hearing aid users with symmetrical mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Aided speech recognition thresholds in noise were obtained in the hearing aid fitting session as well as at 3 and 6 months postfitting. Cognitive abilities were assessed using a reading span test, which is a measure of working memory capacity, and a cognitive test battery. Results showed a significant correlation between reading span and speech reception threshold during the hearing aid fitting session. This relation was significantly weakened over the first 6 months of hearing aid use. Multiple regression analysis showed that reading span was the main predictor of speech recognition thresholds in noise when hearing aids were first fitted, but that the pure-tone average hearing threshold was the main predictor 6 months later. One way of explaining the results is that working memory capacity plays a more important role in speech recognition in noise initially rather than after 6 months of use. We propose that new hearing aid users engage working memory capacity to recognize unfamiliar processed speech signals because the phonological form of these signals cannot be automatically matched to phonological representations in long-term memory. As familiarization proceeds, the mismatch effect is alleviated, and the engagement of working memory capacity is reduced. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Functional treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusion using bone-anchored devices and intermaxillary elastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Reza Kalantar Motamedi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentofacial functional appliances used for the treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusion are divided into two groups: Removable appliances and fixed (bonded appliances, each with certain advantages and disadvantages. Considering the problems related to functional appliances such as high volume in the oral cavity, patient noncompliance, esthetics, tissue irritation or ulceration, speech or breathing difficulties, etc., there is considerable demand to develop a new appliance that can overcome these issues. Thus, the aim of the current study is to present a hypothesis regarding a new functional treatment technique. The hypothesis: We hypothesize that by fixing mini-plates or -implants in the posterior region of the mandible and the anterior part of the infrazygomatic crest region of the maxilla using intermaxillary elastics, we can expect a forward growth of the mandible in a growing child. Using this technique, the force vector will be in the oblique (forward-upward direction. By installing mini-plates with a long connecting bar in the infrazygomatic crest region (with the orthodontic attachment head approximating the level of the occlusal plane, and mini-plates or -implants in the most posterior and superior regions of the mandible, such as the retromolar region, the force vector can be placed in the most horizontal direction possible. Evaluation of the hypothesis: In the literature, significant growth modification results were reported in skeletal Class III patients using intermaxillary elastics and bone-anchored devices fixed in both jaws, when compared with those in the nontreatment group. Therefore, in practice, intermaxillary elastics can produce enough traction to stimulate the bone to change and grow. Thus, we presume that inverting the direction of the force vector (i.e., posterior-anterior force may have similar growth effects on the mandibles of growing children.

  10. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit

    OpenAIRE

    Meister H; Rählmann S; Walger M; Margolf-Hackl S; Kießling J

    2015-01-01

    Hartmut Meister,1 Sebastian Rählmann,1 Martin Walger,2 Sabine Margolf-Hackl,3 Jürgen Kießling3 1Jean Uhrmacher Institute for Clinical ENT-Research, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Othorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany Purpose: To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing lo...

  11. Dispensing rates of four common hearing aid product features: associations with variations in practice among audiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Earl E; Ricketts, Todd A

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop and examine a list of potential variables that may account for variability in the dispensing rates of four common hearing aid features. A total of 29 potential variables were identified and placed into the following categories: (1) characteristics of the audiologist, (2) characteristics of the hearing aids dispensed by the audiologist, (3) characteristics of the audiologist's patient population, and (4) evidence-based practice grades of recommendation for each feature. The potentially associative variables then were examined using regression analyses from the responses of 257 audiologists to a dispensing practice survey. There was a direct relation between price and level of hearing aid technology with the frequency of dispensing product features. There was also a direct relation between the belief by the audiologist that a feature might benefit patients and the frequency of dispensing that feature. In general, the results suggested that personal differences among audiologists and the hearing aids audiologists choose to dispense are related more strongly to dispensing rates of product features than to differences in characteristics of the patient population served by audiologists. An additional finding indicated that evidence-based practice recommendations were inversely related to dispensing rates of product features. This finding, however, may not be the result of dispensing trends as much as hearing aid manufacturing trends.

  12. Achieving prescribed gain/frequency responses with advances in hearing aid technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammeth, C A; Preves, D A; Bratt, G W; Peek, B F; Bess, F H

    1993-01-01

    Technological limitations have restricted the capability of older generation in-the-ear (ITE) hearing aids to closely match prescribed real ear gain/frequency responses. Newer technology, widely available in currently marketed ITE hearing aids, has considerably improved this capability. Data for 60 ears are presented comparing the real ear insertion gain (REIG) actually achieved to the target REIG, using ITE hearing aids having: 1) older generation narrow-band receivers, and amplifiers with single-pole-filter low frequency tone control and a class A amplifier output stage (n = 30), and 2) newer generation amplifiers with a two- or four-pole-filter low frequency tone control, and wide band receivers, containing a class D amplifier output stage (n = 30). With the newer technology ITE hearing aids, the means and ranges of deviation from target gain were reduced. Capability for achieving prescription REIG with ITE hearing aids can be further improved with multichannel amplifiers. Examples of the latter are shown for several difficult-to-fit audiograms.

  13. Objective and perceptual comparisons of two bluetooth hearing aid assistive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jackie L; Pustejovsky, Carmen; Vanneste, Sven

    2017-08-01

    With the advent of Bluetooth technology, many of the assistive listening devices for hearing have become manufacturer specific, with little objective information about the performance provided. Thirty native English-speaking adults (mean age 29.8) with normal hearing were tested pseudo-randomly with two major hearing aid manufacturers' proprietary Bluetooth connectivity devices paired to the accompanying manufacturer's specific hearing aids. Sentence recognition performance was objectively measured for each system with signals transmitted via a land-line to the same iPhone in two conditions. There was a significant effect of participant's performance according to listening condition. There was no significant effect between device manufacturers according to listening condition, but there was a significant effect in participant's perception of "quality of sound". Despite differences in signal transmission for each devise, when worn by participants both the systems performed equally. In fact, participants expressed personal preferences for specific technology that was largely due to their perceived quality of sound while listening to recorded signals. While further research is necessary to investigate other measures of benefit for Bluetooth connectivity devices, preliminary data suggest that in order to ensure comfort and compatibility, not only should objective measures of the patient benefit be completed, but also assessing the patient's perception of benefit is equally important. Implications for Rehabilitation All professionals who work with individuals with hearing loss, become aware of the differences in the multiple choices for assistive technology readily available for hearing loss. With the ever growing dispensing of Bluetooth connectivity devices coupled to hearing aids, there is an increased burden to determine whether performance differences could exist between manufacturers. There is a growing need to investigate other measures of benefit for Bluetooth

  14. Analysis, Design, and Evaluation of Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Systems for Hearing Aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic feedback problems occur when the output loudspeaker signal of an audio system is partly returned to the input microphone via an acoustic coupling through the air. This problem often causes significant performance degradations in applications such as public address systems and hearing aids....... In the worst case, the audio system becomes unstable and howling occurs. In this work, first we analyze a general multiple microphone audio processing system, where a cancellation system using adaptive filters is used to cancel the effect of acoustic feedback. We introduce and derive an accurate approximation...... in acoustic feedback cancellation for hearing aids. It utilizes a probe noise signal which is generated with a specific characteristic so that it can facilitate an unbiased adaptive filter estimation with fast tracking of feedback path variations/changes despite its low signal level. We show in a hearing aid...

  15. Computational reduction techniques for numerical vibro-acoustic analysis of hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell Mediante, Ester

    , topology optimization techniques for structure acoustic interaction problems are investigated with the aim of evaluating their applicability to the design of hearing aid parts. The strong fluid-structure interaction between the air and some of the thin, soft parts makes it necessary to include the effects......Numerical modelling is a key point for vibro-acoustic analysis and optimization of hearing aids. The great number of small components constituting the devices, and the strong structure-acoustic coupling of the system make it a challenge to obtain accurate and computationally efficient models....... In this thesis, several challenges encountered in the process of modelling and optimizing hearing aids are addressed. Firstly, a strategy for modelling the contacts between plastic parts for harmonic analysis is developed. Irregularities in the contact surfaces, inherent to the manufacturing process of the parts...

  16. A New Probe Noise Approach For Acoustic Feedback Cancellation In Hearing Aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    is not possible with the tradi-tional probe noise approach. We show simulation results of a challenging situation for AFC sys-tems, where the acoustic feedback path changes momentarily while the hearing aid user is listen-ing to music. The traditional AFC system fails completely with significant sound distortions......Acoustic feedback is a big challenge in hearing aids. If not appropriately treated, the feedback limits the maximum possible amplification and may lead to significant sound distortions. In a state-of-the-art hearing aid, an acoustic feedback cancellation (AFC) system is used to compensate...... the artifacts caused by acoustic feedback. The AFC is usually carried out by adaptively estimating the feedback paths (from receiver to micro-phones) and using these estimates to reduce the artifacts introduced by the acoustic feedback. One major limitation in the widely used adaptive filter technique for AFC...

  17. Rehabilitative online education versus internet discussion group for hearing aid users: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorén, Elisabet; Svensson, Monica; Törnqvist, Anna; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Lunner, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    By using the Internet in the audiological rehabilitation process, it might be possible in a cost-effective way to include additional rehabilitation components by informing and guiding hearing aid users about such topics as communication strategies, hearing tactics, and how to handle hearing aids. To evaluate the effectiveness of an online education program for adult experienced hearing aid users including professional guidance by an audiologist and compare it with the effects of participation in an online discussion forum without any professional contact. A randomized controlled study with two groups of participants. Repeated measures at prestudy, immediate follow-up, and a 6 mo follow-up. Fifty-nine experienced hearing aid users participated in the study, ranging in age from 24 to 84 yr (mean 63.5 yr). The intervention group (N = 29) underwent a five-week rehabilitative online education in which activities for each week included information, tasks, and assignments, and contact with a professional audiologist was included. The participants in the control group (N = 30) were referred to an online discussion forum without any audiologist contact. A set of questionnaires administered online were used as outcome measures: (1) Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly, (2) International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids, (3) Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life, and (4) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Significant improvements measured by the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly were found in both groups of participants, and the effects were maintained at the 6 mo follow-up. The results on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale showed that the participants in the intervention group showed reduced symptoms of depression immediately/6 mo after the intervention. At the 6 mo follow-up participants in the control group reported fewer symptoms of anxiety than they did before the intervention started. This study provides preliminary evidence that the

  18. Sex-specific predictors of hearing-aid use in older persons: The age, gene/environment susceptibility - Reykjavik study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Diana E.; Li, Chuan-Ming; Hoffman, Howard J.; Chiu, May S.; Themann, Christa L.; Petersen, Hannes; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Jonsson, Helgi; Jonasson, Fridbert; Sverrisdottir, Johanna Eyrun; Launer, Lenore J.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cotch, Mary Frances

    2015-01-01

    Objective We estimate the prevalence of hearing-aid use in Iceland and identify sex-specific factors associated with use. Design Population-based cohort study. Study sample A total of 5172 age, gene/environment susceptibility - Reykjavik study (AGES-RS) participants, aged 67 to 96 years (mean age 76.5 years), who completed air-conduction and pure-tone audiometry. Results Hearing-aid use was reported by 23.0% of men and 15.9% of women in the cohort, although among participants with at least moderate hearing loss in the better ear (pure-tone average [PTA] of thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz ≥ 35 dB hearing level [HL]) it was 49.9% and did not differ by sex. Self-reported hearing loss was the strongest predictor of hearing-aid use in men [OR: 2.68 (95% CI: 1.77, 4.08)] and women [OR: 3.07 (95% CI: 1.94, 4.86)], followed by hearing loss severity based on audiometry. Having diabetes or osteoarthritis were significant positive predictors of use in men, whereas greater physical activity and unimpaired cognitive status were important in women. Conclusions Hearing-aid use was comparable in Icelandic men and women with moderate or greater hearing loss. Self-recognition of hearing loss was the factor most predictive of hearing-aid use; other influential factors differed for men and women. PMID:25816699

  19. Sex-specific predictors of hearing-aid use in older persons: The age, gene/environment susceptibility - Reykjavik study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Diana E; Li, Chuan-Ming; Hoffman, Howard J; Chiu, May S; Themann, Christa L; Petersen, Hannes; Jonsson, Palmi V; Jonsson, Helgi; Jonasson, Fridbert; Sverrisdottir, Johanna Eyrun; Launer, Lenore J; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cotch, Mary Frances

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the prevalence of hearing-aid use in Iceland and identify sex-specific factors associated with use. Population-based cohort study. A total of 5172 age, gene/environment susceptibility - Reykjavik study (AGES-RS) participants, aged 67 to 96 years (mean age 76.5 years), who completed air-conduction and pure-tone audiometry. Hearing-aid use was reported by 23.0% of men and 15.9% of women in the cohort, although among participants with at least moderate hearing loss in the better ear (pure-tone average [PTA] of thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz ≥ 35 dB hearing level [HL]) it was 49.9% and did not differ by sex. Self-reported hearing loss was the strongest predictor of hearing-aid use in men [OR: 2.68 (95% CI: 1.77, 4.08)] and women [OR: 3.07 (95% CI: 1.94, 4.86)], followed by hearing loss severity based on audiometry. Having diabetes or osteoarthritis were significant positive predictors of use in men, whereas greater physical activity and unimpaired cognitive status were important in women. Hearing-aid use was comparable in Icelandic men and women with moderate or greater hearing loss. Self-recognition of hearing loss was the factor most predictive of hearing-aid use; other influential factors differed for men and women.

  20. Differences in speech processing among elderly hearing-impaired listeners with or without hearing aid experience: Eye-tracking and fMRI measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habicht, Julia; Behler, Oliver; Kollmeier, Birger

    2018-01-01

    -only condition was also included. Groups of elderly hearing-impaired individuals matched in terms of age, hearing loss and working memory capacity with (eHA; N = 13) or without (iHA; N = 14) HA experience participated. All acoustic stimuli were presented via earphones with individual linear amplification......Recently, evidence has been accumulating that untreated hearing loss can lead to neurophysiological changes that affect speech-in-noise processing abilities. In order to explore how aiding impacts these effects, this study examined the influence of hearing aid (HA) experience on the cognitive...

  1. A Tutorial on Implantable Hearing Amplification Options for Adults with Unilateral Microtia and Atresia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Joannie Ka Yin; Wong, Lena Lai Nar; Tsang, Willis Sung Shan; Tong, Michael Chi Fai

    2014-01-01

    Background. Patients with unilateral atresia and microtia encounter problems in sound localization and speech understanding in noise. Although there are four implantable hearing devices available, there is little discussion and evidence on the application of these devices on patients with unilateral atresia and microtia problems. Objective. This paper will review the details of these four implantable hearing devices for the treatment of unilateral atresia. They are percuteaneous osseointegrated bone anchored hearing aid, Vibrant Soundbridge middle ear implant, Bonebridge bone conduction system, and Carina fully implantable hearing device. Methods. Four implantable hearing devices were reviewed and compared. The clinical decision process that led to the recommendation of a device was illustrated by using a case study. Conclusions. The selection of appropriate implantable hearing devices should be based on various factors, including radiological findings and patient preferences, possible surgical complications, whether the device is Food and Drug Administration- (FDA-)/CE-approved, and the finances. To ensure the accurate evaluation of candidacy and outcomes, the evaluation methods should be adapted to suite the type of hearing device. PMID:24991564

  2. A Tutorial on Implantable Hearing Amplification Options for Adults with Unilateral Microtia and Atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joannie Ka Yin Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with unilateral atresia and microtia encounter problems in sound localization and speech understanding in noise. Although there are four implantable hearing devices available, there is little discussion and evidence on the application of these devices on patients with unilateral atresia and microtia problems. Objective. This paper will review the details of these four implantable hearing devices for the treatment of unilateral atresia. They are percuteaneous osseointegrated bone anchored hearing aid, Vibrant Soundbridge middle ear implant, Bonebridge bone conduction system, and Carina fully implantable hearing device. Methods. Four implantable hearing devices were reviewed and compared. The clinical decision process that led to the recommendation of a device was illustrated by using a case study. Conclusions. The selection of appropriate implantable hearing devices should be based on various factors, including radiological findings and patient preferences, possible surgical complications, whether the device is Food and Drug Administration- (FDA-/CE-approved, and the finances. To ensure the accurate evaluation of candidacy and outcomes, the evaluation methods should be adapted to suite the type of hearing device.

  3. Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Speech Perception by Individuals with Cochlear Implants versus Individuals with Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Rothem, Hilla; Luntz, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The researchers evaluated the contribution of cochlear implants (CIs) to speech perception by a sample of prelingually deaf individuals implanted after age 8 years. This group was compared with a group with profound hearing impairment (HA-P), and with a group with severe hearing impairment (HA-S), both of which used hearing aids. Words and…

  4. Contribution of a Contralateral Hearing Aid to Perception of Consonant Voicing, Intonation, and Emotional State in Adult Cochlear Implantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Gaon-Sivan, Gal; Shpak, Talma; Luntz, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Binaural hearing in cochlear implant (CI) users can be achieved either by bilateral implantation or bimodally with a contralateral hearing aid (HA). Binaural-bimodal hearing has the advantage of complementing the high-frequency electric information from the CI by low-frequency acoustic information from the HA. We examined the contribution of a…

  5. Psychosocial Development in 5-Year-Old Children With Hearing Loss Using Hearing Aids or Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Cupples, Linda; Button, Laura; Leigh, Greg; Marnane, Vivienne; Whitfield, Jessica; Gunnourie, Miriam; Martin, Louise

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the psychosocial development and factors influencing outcomes of 5-year-old children with cochlear implants (CIs) or hearing aids (HAs). It further examines differences between children with CIs and HAs with similar levels of hearing loss. Data were collected as part of the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment study—a prospective, population-based study. Parents/caregivers of children completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (n = 333), the Social Skills subscale from the Child Development Inventory (n = 317), and questionnaires on functional auditory behavior (Parents’ Evaluation of Aural/oral performance of Children), and demographics. Children completed assessments of nonverbal cognitive ability (Wechsler Non-verbal Scale of Ability) and language (Preschool Language Scale - fourth edition). On average, parent-rated Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire scores on emotional or behavioral difficulties were within 1 SD of the normative mean; however, Child Development Inventory scores on social skills were more than 1 SD below the norm. Children with severe-to-profound hearing losses using HAs had significantly more behavioral problems than children with CIs. Regression analyses showed that non-verbal cognitive ability, language, and functional auditory behavior were significantly associated with psychosocial outcomes for children with HAs, whereas outcomes for children with CIs were associated with functional auditory behavior and the presence of additional disabilities. Age at hearing intervention, severity of hearing loss, and communication mode were not associated with outcomes. The results suggest that even children who develop good language ability with the help of a HA or CI may have psychosocial problems if they exhibit difficulties with listening and communicating in everyday environments. The findings have implications for developing interventions for young children with hearing

  6. Psychosocial Development in 5-Year-Old Children With Hearing Loss Using Hearing Aids or Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cara L; Ching, Teresa Y C; Cupples, Linda; Button, Laura; Leigh, Greg; Marnane, Vivienne; Whitfield, Jessica; Gunnourie, Miriam; Martin, Louise

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the psychosocial development and factors influencing outcomes of 5-year-old children with cochlear implants (CIs) or hearing aids (HAs). It further examines differences between children with CIs and HAs with similar levels of hearing loss. Data were collected as part of the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment study-a prospective, population-based study. Parents/caregivers of children completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire ( n = 333), the Social Skills subscale from the Child Development Inventory ( n = 317), and questionnaires on functional auditory behavior (Parents' Evaluation of Aural/oral performance of Children), and demographics. Children completed assessments of nonverbal cognitive ability (Wechsler Non-verbal Scale of Ability) and language (Preschool Language Scale - fourth edition). On average, parent-rated Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire scores on emotional or behavioral difficulties were within 1 SD of the normative mean; however, Child Development Inventory scores on social skills were more than 1 SD below the norm. Children with severe-to-profound hearing losses using HAs had significantly more behavioral problems than children with CIs. Regression analyses showed that non-verbal cognitive ability, language, and functional auditory behavior were significantly associated with psychosocial outcomes for children with HAs, whereas outcomes for children with CIs were associated with functional auditory behavior and the presence of additional disabilities. Age at hearing intervention, severity of hearing loss, and communication mode were not associated with outcomes. The results suggest that even children who develop good language ability with the help of a HA or CI may have psychosocial problems if they exhibit difficulties with listening and communicating in everyday environments. The findings have implications for developing interventions for young children with hearing

  7. Maximum likelihood approach to “informed” Sound Source Localization for Hearing Aid applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmani, Mojtaba; Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Most state-of-the-art Sound Source Localization (SSL) algorithms have been proposed for applications which are "uninformed'' about the target sound content; however, utilizing a wireless microphone worn by a target talker, enables recent Hearing Aid Systems (HASs) to access to an almost noise......'' SSL algorithms which use binaural microphones for localization, MLSSL performs better using signals of one or more microphones placed on just one ear, thereby reducing the wireless transmission overhead of binaural hearing aids. More specifically, when the target location confined to the front...

  8. Hearing-aid assembly management among adults from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds: toward the feasibility of self-fitting hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convery, Elizabeth; Keidser, Gitte; Caposecco, Andrea; Swanepoel, De Wet; Wong, Lena L N; Shen, Eed

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the study was twofold: (1) to assess the ability of hearing-impaired adults in the developing world to independently and accurately assemble a pair of hearing aids by following instructions that were written and illustrated according to best-practice health literacy principles; and (2) to determine which factors influence independent and accurate task completion. Correlational study. Forty South African and 40 Chinese adults with a hearing loss and their partners. The participant group included 42 females and 38 males ranging in age from 32 to 92 years. Ninety-five percent of South African and 60% of Chinese participants completed the assembly task, either on their own or with assistance from their partners. Better health literacy, younger age, and a more prestigious occupation were significantly associated with independent task completion for the South African and Chinese participants. Task accuracy was significantly linked to higher levels of cognitive function among South African participants, while a paucity of valid data prevented an analysis of accuracy from being conducted with the Chinese data. Individuals of diverse backgrounds can manage the self-fitting hearing-aid assembly task as long as health literacy levels and cultural differences are considered.

  9. 34 CFR 300.113 - Routine checking of hearing aids and external components of surgically implanted medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... components of surgically implanted medical devices. 300.113 Section 300.113 Education Regulations of the... surgically implanted medical devices. (a) Hearing aids. Each public agency must ensure that hearing aids worn...) External components of surgically implanted medical devices. (1) Subject to paragraph (b)(2) of this...

  10. Acceptable noise level (ANL) with Danish and non-semantic speech materials in adult hearing-aid users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Lantz, Johannes; Nielsen, Lars Holme

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is used for quantification of the amount of background noise subjects accept when listening to speech. This study investigates Danish hearing-aid users' ANL performance using Danish and non-semantic speech signals, the repeatability of ANL, and the association...... between ANL and outcome of the international outcome inventory for hearing aids (IOI-HA)....

  11. Dual sensory loss: A major age-related increase of comorbid hearing loss and hearing aid ownership in visually impaired adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeken, Hilde L; van Rens, Ger H M B; Knol, Dirk L; van Reijen, Nadja A; Kramer, Sophia E; Festen, Joost M; van Nispen, Ruth M A

    2014-07-01

    Despite increasing interest in visual and hearing impairment in the older population, little attention has been paid to concurrent hearin