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Sample records for bone size variation

  1. Evidence for major pleiotropic effects on bone size variation from a principal component analysis of 451 Caucasian families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jun TAN; Yao-zhong LIU; Peng XIAO; Fang YANG; Zi-hui TANG; Peng-yuan LIU; Robert R RECKER; Hong-wen DENG

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To identify pleiotropic quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing bone size (BS) at different skeletal sites in Caucasians. Methods: In a sample containing 3899 Caucasians from 451 pedigrees, 410 microsatellite markers spaced ~8.9 cM apart across the human genome were genotyped. Phenotypical and genetic corre-lations of BS at lumbar spine, hip (femoral neck, trochanter, and intertrochanter regions), and wrist (ultradistal, mid-distal, and one-third distal sites) were deter-mined using bivariate quantitative genetic analysis. A principal component analy-sis (PCA) was performed to obtain principal component (PC) factors that were then subjected to variance components linkage analysis to identify regions linked to the PC. Results: Genetic correlations of BS at different skeletal sites ranged from 0.40 to 0.79 (P<0.001). The PCA yielded a PC named Pctotal, which explained up to 76% of the total (co)variation of all the BS at the 7 skeletal sites for the whole sample. We identified a QTL influencing the BS of multiple skeletal sites on chromo-some 7 at 140 cM [logarithm of odds (LOD)=2.85] in the overall sample. Sex-specific evidence for linkage was observed on chromosome 11 at 53 cM (LOD =2.82) in the male-only data subset. Conclusion: Our study identified several genomic regions that may have pleiotropic effects on different skeletal sites. These regions may contain genes that play a critical role in overall bone development and osteoporo-sis at multiple skeletal sites, hence are biologically and clinically important.

  2. Identification of PLCL1 gene for hip bone size variation in females in a genome-wide association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Zhong Liu

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis, the most prevalent metabolic bone disease among older people, increases risk for low trauma hip fractures (HF that are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Hip bone size (BS has been identified as one of the key measurable risk factors for HF. Although hip BS is highly genetically determined, genetic factors underlying the trait are still poorly defined. Here, we performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS of hip BS interrogating approximately 380,000 SNPs on the Affymetrix platform in 1,000 homogeneous unrelated Caucasian subjects, including 501 females and 499 males. We identified a gene, PLCL1 (phospholipase c-like 1, that had four SNPs associated with hip BS at, or approaching, a genome-wide significance level in our female subjects; the most significant SNP, rs7595412, achieved a p value of 3.72x10(-7. The gene's importance to hip BS was replicated using the Illumina genotyping platform in an independent UK cohort containing 1,216 Caucasian females. Two SNPs of the PLCL1 gene, rs892515 and rs9789480, surrounded by the four SNPs identified in our GWAS, achieved p values of 8.62x10(-3 and 2.44x10(-3, respectively, for association with hip BS. Imputation analyses on our GWAS and the UK samples further confirmed the replication signals; eight SNPs of the gene achieved combined imputed p values<10(-5 in the two samples. The PLCL1 gene's relevance to HF was also observed in a Chinese sample containing 403 females, including 266 with HF and 177 control subjects. A SNP of the PLCL1 gene, rs3771362 that is only approximately 0.6 kb apart from the most significant SNP detected in our GWAS (rs7595412, achieved a p value of 7.66x10(-3 (odds ratio = 0.26 for association with HF. Additional biological support for the role of PLCL1 in BS comes from previous demonstrations that the PLCL1 protein inhibits IP3 (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated calcium signaling, an important pathway regulating mechanical sensing of

  3. Pregnancy associated plasma protein A2 (PAPP-A2) affects bone size and shape and contributes to natural variation in postnatal growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christians, Julian Kenneth; de Zwaan, Devin Rhys; Fung, Sunny Ho Yeung

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy associated plasma protein A2 (PAPP-A2) is a protease of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 and is receiving increasing attention for its roles in pregnancy and postnatal growth. The goals of the present study were to characterize the effects of PAPP-A2 deletion on bone size and shape in mice at 10 weeks of age, and to determine whether Pappa2 is the gene responsible for a previously-identified quantitative trait locus (QTL) contributing to natural variation in postnatal growth in mice. Mice homozygous for constitutive PAPP-A2 deletion were lighter than wild-type littermates, and had smaller mandible dimensions and shorter skull, humerus, femur, tibia, pelvic girdle, and tail bone. Furthermore, PAPP-A2 deletion reduced mandible dimensions and the lengths of the skull, femur, pelvic girdle, and tail bone more than would be expected due to the effect on body mass. In addition to its effects on bone size, PAPP-A2 deficiency also altered the shape of the mandible and pelvic girdle, as assessed by geometric morphometrics. Mice homozygous for the PAPP-A2 deletion had less deep mandibles, and pelvic girdles with a more feminine shape. Using a quantitative complementation test, we confirmed that Pappa2 is responsible for the effects of the previously-identified QTL, demonstrating that natural variation in the Pappa2 gene contributes to variation in postnatal growth in mice. If similar functional variation in the Pappa2 gene exists in other species, effects of this variation on the shape of the pelvic girdle might explain the previously-reported associations between Pappa2 SNPs and developmental dysplasia of the hip in humans, and birthing in cattle.

  4. Morphometrical variations of the carpal bones in thoroughbreds and ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdunnabi, A H; Ahmed, Y A; Philip, C J; Davies, H M S

    2012-04-01

    There is scant morphological data for equine carpal bones despite the frequent pathology in Thoroughbreds (TB). This study aimed to identify morphological and morphometrical variations and similarities in carpal bones between and within TB and Ponies (Po). Carpal bones from nine TB and 13 Po were prepared by boiling and drying. Lateromedial width, dorsopalmar depth, proximodistal height, relative density and volume of each bone were measured. Normalized measurements of the radial (Cr) and third (C3) carpal bones were significantly different in all dimensions, and there were significant variations in relative sizes of articular facets of the ulnar (Cu), C3 and fourth (C4) carpal bones between the groups. Bilaterally, the proportionate volume of the intermediate carpal bone (Ci) was significantly greater in Po while that of Cu and C4 were significantly greater in TB. Relative density of most bones was greater in Po. The palmar tuberosity of the proximal surface of Ci and palmar tubercle on the palmar surface of Cu were more prominent and relatively larger in TB. In the second carpal bone (C2), the distal extent of the proximal articular surface on the palmar surface was greater in Po. The inconsistent first carpal bone (C1) was relatively larger in Po. Morphometrical similarities and differences in carpal bones between TB and Po indicate potential effects of selection for body size or fast exercise.

  5. Genome size variation in Begonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitte, Angelo; Leus, Leen; Eeckhaut, Tom; Vanstechelman, Ives; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Van Bockstaele, Erik

    2009-10-01

    The genome sizes of a Begonia collection comprising 37 species and 23 hybrids of African, Asiatic, Middle American, and South American origin were screened using flow cytometry. Within the collection, 1C values varied between 0.23 and 1.46 pg DNA. Genome sizes were, in most cases, not positively correlated with chromosome number, but with pollen size. A 12-fold difference in mean chromosome size was found between the genotypes with the largest and smallest chromosomes. In general, chromosomes from South American genotypes were smaller than chromosomes of African, Asian, or Middle American genotypes, except for B. boliviensis and B. pearcei. Cytological chromosome studies in different genotypes showed variable chromosome numbers, length, width, and total chromosome volume, which confirmed the diversity in genome size. Large secondary constrictions were present in several investigated genotypes. These data show that chromosome number and structure exhibit a great deal of variation within the genus Begonia, and likely help to explain the large number of taxa found within the genus.

  6. Size Matters: Individual Variation in Ectotherm Growth and Asymptotic Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for a detailed analysis of population and individual growth. We describe population mean growth separately for males and females based on size of known age individuals (847 captures of 769 males, 748 captures of 684 females) and annual growth increments of individuals of unknown age (1,152 males, 730 females). We characterize individual variation in asymptotic size based on repeated measurements of 69 males and 71 females that were each captured in five to nine different years. The most striking result of our analyses is that asymptotic size varies dramatically among individuals, ranging from 631–820 mm snout-vent length in males and from 835–1125 mm in females. Because female fecundity increases with increasing body size, we explore the impact of individual variation in asymptotic size on lifetime reproductive success using a range of realistic estimates of annual survival. When all females commence reproduction at the same age, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with greater asymptotic size regardless of annual survival. But when reproduction is delayed in females with greater asymptotic size, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with lower asymptotic size when annual survival is low. Possible causes of individual variation in asymptotic size, including individual- and cohort-specific variation in size at birth and early growth, warrant further investigation. PMID

  7. Size variation in Middle Pleistocene humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsuaga, J L; Carretero, J M; Lorenzo, C; Gracia, A; Martínez, I; Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Carbonell, E

    1997-08-22

    It has been suggested that European Middle Pleistocene humans, Neandertals, and prehistoric modern humans had a greater sexual dimorphism than modern humans. Analysis of body size variation and cranial capacity variation in the large sample from the Sima de los Huesos site in Spain showed instead that the sexual dimorphism is comparable in Middle Pleistocene and modern populations.

  8. Growth hormone stimulates bone healing in a critical-sized bone defect model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theyse, L. F. H.; Oosterlaken-Dijksterhuis, M. A.; van Doorn, J.; Dhert, W. J. A.; Hazewinkel, H. A. W.

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone plays an important role in bone metabolism. Treating bone deficits is a major topic in orthopaedic surgery. Our hypothesis was that local continuous growth hormone administration stimulates bone healing in a canine critical-sized bone defect model. Bone formation in the defects was qu

  9. Size did not matter: An evolutionary account of the variation in penis size and size anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Menelaos Apostolou

    2016-01-01

    The human penis exhibits considerable variation in size, while a substantial proportion of the adult male population experiences size anxiety. This paper employs an evolutionary framework in order to understand this variation, as well as the concern men exhibit about the adequacy of the size of their penis. It is argued that female choice has been one important sexual selection force, responsible for shaping the size of the penis. However, this force has been relatively weak, because women do...

  10. Size did not matter: An evolutionary account of the variation in penis size and size anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menelaos Apostolou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The human penis exhibits considerable variation in size, while a substantial proportion of the adult male population experiences size anxiety. This paper employs an evolutionary framework in order to understand this variation, as well as the concern men exhibit about the adequacy of the size of their penis. It is argued that female choice has been one important sexual selection force, responsible for shaping the size of the penis. However, this force has been relatively weak, because women do not consider the size of their partners’ penis to be the most important determinant of their sexual satisfaction. Also, in ancestral human societies, sexual satisfaction was a secondary concern, while women had limited space to exercise mate choice. The mismatch between ancestral and modern conditions, with female choice being stronger in the present than in the past, causes anxiety in men about their ability to satisfy their partners, which is also manifested in their concerns about size.

  11. 49 CFR 231.20 - Variation in size permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Variation in size permitted. 231.20 Section 231.20..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.20 Variation in size permitted. To... total variation of 5 percent below size given is permitted....

  12. The influence of calcium intake and physical activity on bone mineral content and bone size in healthy children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Christian; Thomsen, B. Lykke; Michaelsen, Kim F.

    2001-01-01

    Adolescents, Bone area, Bone minral content, Calcium intake, Children, Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, Physical activity, Size-adjusted......Adolescents, Bone area, Bone minral content, Calcium intake, Children, Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, Physical activity, Size-adjusted...

  13. Size variation of fossil rodent populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freudenthal, M.; Cuenca Bescos, G.

    1984-01-01

    Pearson's coefficient of variation is in general not applicable in palaeontology, due to the heterogeneity of samples. The heterogeneity may be due to the mixing of two species, mixture of material from various biotopes, or from a relatively large time span. A new coefficient of variation is propose

  14. Genome size variation in the genus Avena.

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    Yan, Honghai; Martin, Sara L; Bekele, Wubishet A; Latta, Robert G; Diederichsen, Axel; Peng, Yuanying; Tinker, Nicholas A

    2016-03-01

    Genome size is an indicator of evolutionary distance and a metric for genome characterization. Here, we report accurate estimates of genome size in 99 accessions from 26 species of Avena. We demonstrate that the average genome size of C genome diploid species (2C = 10.26 pg) is 15% larger than that of A genome species (2C = 8.95 pg), and that this difference likely accounts for a progression of size among tetraploid species, where AB genome configuration had similar genome sizes (average 2C = 25.74 pg). Genome size was mostly consistent within species and in general agreement with current information about evolutionary distance among species. Results also suggest that most of the polyploid species in Avena have experienced genome downsizing in relation to their diploid progenitors. Genome size measurements could provide additional quality control for species identification in germplasm collections, especially in cases where diploid and polyploid species have similar morphology.

  15. Patterns of genome size variation in snapping shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Nicholas W; Hultgren, Kristin; Chak, Solomon Tin Chi; Gregory, T Ryan; Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2016-06-01

    Although crustaceans vary extensively in genome size, little is known about how genome size may affect the ecology and evolution of species in this diverse group, in part due to the lack of large genome size datasets. Here we investigate interspecific, intraspecific, and intracolony variation in genome size in 39 species of Synalpheus shrimps, representing one of the largest genome size datasets for a single genus within crustaceans. We find that genome size ranges approximately 4-fold across Synalpheus with little phylogenetic signal, and is not related to body size. In a subset of these species, genome size is related to chromosome size, but not to chromosome number, suggesting that despite large genomes, these species are not polyploid. Interestingly, there appears to be 35% intraspecific genome size variation in Synalpheus idios among geographic regions, and up to 30% variation in Synalpheus duffyi genome size within the same colony.

  16. [Bone tissue engineering. Reconstruction of critical sized segmental bone defects in the ovine tibia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, J C; Epari, D R; Wullschleger, M E; Berner, A; Saifzadeh, S; Nöth, U; Dickinson, I C; Schuetz, M A; Hutmacher, D W

    2012-04-01

    Well-established therapies for bone defects are restricted to bone grafts which face significant disadvantages (limited availability, donor site morbidity, insufficient integration). Therefore, the objective was to develop an alternative approach investigating the regenerative potential of medical grade polycaprolactone-tricalcium phosphate (mPCL-TCP) and silk-hydroxyapatite (silk-HA) scaffolds.Critical sized ovine tibial defects were created and stabilized. Defects were left untreated, reconstructed with autologous bone grafts (ABG) and mPCL-TCP or silk-HA scaffolds. Animals were observed for 12 weeks. X-ray analysis, torsion testing and quantitative computed tomography (CT) analyses were performed. Radiological analysis confirmed the critical nature of the defects. Full defect bridging occurred in the autograft and partial bridging in the mPCL-TCP group. Only little bone formation was observed with silk-HA scaffolds. Biomechanical testing revealed a higher torsional moment/stiffness (p CT analysis a significantly higher amount of bone formation for the ABG group when compared to the silk-HA group. No significant difference was determined between the ABG and mPCL-TCP groups. The results of this study suggest that mPCL-TCP scaffolds combined can serve as an alternative to autologous bone grafting in long bone defect regeneration. The combination of mPCL-TCP with osteogenic cells or growth factors represents an attractive means to further enhance bone formation.

  17. Intrapopulation genome size variation in D. melanogaster reflects life history variation and plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa L Ellis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We determined female genome sizes using flow cytometry for 211 Drosophila melanogaster sequenced inbred strains from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and found significant conspecific and intrapopulation variation in genome size. We also compared several life history traits for 25 lines with large and 25 lines with small genomes in three thermal environments, and found that genome size as well as genome size by temperature interactions significantly correlated with survival to pupation and adulthood, time to pupation, female pupal mass, and female eclosion rates. Genome size accounted for up to 23% of the variation in developmental phenotypes, but the contribution of genome size to variation in life history traits was plastic and varied according to the thermal environment. Expression data implicate differences in metabolism that correspond to genome size variation. These results indicate that significant genome size variation exists within D. melanogaster and this variation may impact the evolutionary ecology of the species. Genome size variation accounts for a significant portion of life history variation in an environmentally dependent manner, suggesting that potential fitness effects associated with genome size variation also depend on environmental conditions.

  18. Placental Size Is Associated Differentially With Postnatal Bone Size and Density

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    Holroyd, Christopher R; Osmond, Clive; Barker, David JP; Ring, Sue M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Tobias, Jon H; Smith, George Davey; Harvey, Nicholas C

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated relationships between placental size and offspring adolescent bone indices using a population‐based, mother–offspring cohort. The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) recruited pregnant women from the southwest of England between 1991 and 1993. There were 12,942 singleton babies born at term who survived at least the first 12 months. From these, 8933 placentas were preserved in formaldehyde, with maternal permission for their use in research studies. At the approximate age of 15.5 years, the children underwent a dual‐energy X‐ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan (measurements taken of the whole body minus head bone area [BA], bone mineral content [BMC], and areal bone mineral density [aBMD]). A peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) scan (Stratec XCT2000L; Stratec, Pforzheim, Germany) at the 50% tibial site was performed at this visit and at approximately age 17.7 years. In 2010 a sample of 1680 placentas were measured and photographed. To enable comparison of effect size across different variables, predictor and outcome variables were standardized to Z‐scores and therefore results may be interpreted as partial correlation coefficients. Complete placental, DXA, and pQCT data were available for 518 children at age 15.5 years. After adjustment for gender, gestational age at birth, and age at time of pQCT, the placental area was positively associated with endosteal circumference (β [95% CI]: 0.21 [0.13, 0.30], p < 0.001), periosteal circumference (β [95% CI]: 0.19 [0.10, 0.27], p < 0.001), and cortical area (β [95% CI]: 0.10 [0.01, 0.18], p = 0.03), and was negatively associated with cortical density (β [95% CI]: –0.11 [–0.20, –0.03], p = 0.01) at age 15.5 years. Similar relationships were observed for placental volume, and after adjustment for additional maternal and offspring covariates. These results suggest that previously observed associations between placental size and

  19. Selective laser melting-produced porous titanium scaffolds regenerate bone in critical size cortical bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Stok, Johan; Van der Jagt, Olav P; Amin Yavari, Saber; De Haas, Mirthe F P; Waarsing, Jan H; Jahr, Holger; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Patka, Peter; Verhaar, Jan A N; Zadpoor, Amir A; Weinans, Harrie

    2013-05-01

    Porous titanium scaffolds have good mechanical properties that make them an interesting bone substitute material for large bone defects. These scaffolds can be produced with selective laser melting, which has the advantage of tailoring the structure's architecture. Reducing the strut size reduces the stiffness of the structure and may have a positive effect on bone formation. Two scaffolds with struts of 120-µm (titanium-120) or 230-µm (titanium-230) were studied in a load-bearing critical femoral bone defect in rats. The defect was stabilized with an internal plate and treated with titanium-120, titanium-230, or left empty. In vivo micro-CT scans at 4, 8, and 12 weeks showed more bone in the defects treated with scaffolds. Finally, 18.4 ± 7.1 mm(3) (titanium-120, p = 0.015) and 18.7 ± 8.0 mm(3) (titanium-230, p = 0.012) of bone was formed in those defects, significantly more than in the empty defects (5.8 ± 5.1 mm(3) ). Bending tests on the excised femurs after 12 weeks showed that the fusion strength reached 62% (titanium-120) and 45% (titanium-230) of the intact contralateral femurs, but there was no significant difference between the two scaffolds. This study showed that in addition to adequate mechanical support, porous titanium scaffolds facilitate bone formation, which results in high mechanical integrity of the treated large bone defects.

  20. Regulatory change at Physalis Organ Size 1 correlates to natural variation in tomatillo reproductive organ size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; He, Lingli; Li, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Li, Zhichao; He, Chaoying

    2014-07-01

    The genetic basis of size variation in the reproductive organs of tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica) is unknown. Here we report that the expression levels of the gene Physalis Organ Size 1 (POS1) are positively associated with size variation in P. philadelphica reproductive organs such flowers, berries and seeds. POS1 knockdown results in smaller flowers and berries with smaller cells as compared with their wild-type counterparts. Conversely, POS1 overexpression promotes organ size without increasing the cell number. The first introns of the POS1 alleles from the large, intermediate and small tomatillo groups contain one, two and three 37-bp repeats, respectively. Furthermore, our results show that copy variation of repeats in the first intron of POS1 alleles results in differential expression of this gene. Thus, co-variation in tomatillo reproductive organ sizes can be attributed to the novel regulatory variation in POS1.

  1. Exploring variation in active network size : Constraints and ego characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roberts, Sam G. B.; Dunbar, Robin I. M.; Pollet, Thomas V.; Kuppens, Toon

    2009-01-01

    Studies of active personal networks have primarily focused on providing reliable estimates of the size of the network. In this study, we examine how compositional properties of the network and ego characteristics are related to Variation in network size. There was a negative relationship between mea

  2. Geographic variation in body size and sexual size dimorphism of a seed-feeding beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillwell, R Craig; Morse, Geoffrey E; Fox, Charles W

    2007-09-01

    Body size of many animals varies with latitude: body size is either larger at higher latitudes (Bergmann's rule) or smaller at higher latitudes (converse Bergmann's rule). However, the causes underlying these patterns are poorly understood. Also, studies rarely explore how sexual size dimorphism varies with latitude. Here we investigate geographic variation in body size and sexual size dimorphism of the seed-feeding beetle Stator limbatus, collected from 95 locations along a 38 degrees range in latitude. We examine 14 variables to test whether clines in environmental factors are adequate to explain geographic patterns of body size. We found that body size and sexual size dimorphism of S. limbatus varied considerably with latitude; beetles were smaller but more dimorphic at lower latitudes. Body size was not correlated with a gradient in mean temperature, contrary to the commonly accepted hypothesis that clines are produced by latitudinal gradients in temperature. Instead, we found that three factors were adequate to explain the cline in body size: clinal variation in host plant seed size, moisture (humidity), and seasonality (variance in humidity, precipitation, and temperature). We also found that the cline in sexual size dimorphism was partially explainable by a gradient in moisture, though moisture alone was not sufficient to explain the cline. Other ecological or environmental variables must necessarily contribute to differences in selection on male versus female body size. The main implications of our study are that the sexes differ in the magnitude of clinal variation in body size, creating latitudinal variation in sexual size dimorphism, and that clines in body size of seed beetles are likely influenced by variation in host seed size, water availability, and seasonality.

  3. Four loci explain 83% of size variation in the horse.

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    Shokouh Makvandi-Nejad

    Full Text Available Horse body size varies greatly due to intense selection within each breed. American Miniatures are less than one meter tall at the withers while Shires and Percherons can exceed two meters. The genetic basis for this variation is not known. We hypothesize that the breed population structure of the horse should simplify efforts to identify genes controlling size. In support of this, here we show with genome-wide association scans (GWAS that genetic variation at just four loci can explain the great majority of horse size variation. Unlike humans, which are naturally reproducing and possess many genetic variants with weak effects on size, we show that horses, like other domestic mammals, carry just a small number of size loci with alleles of large effect. Furthermore, three of our horse size loci contain the LCORL, HMGA2 and ZFAT genes that have previously been found to control human height. The LCORL/NCAPG locus is also implicated in cattle growth and HMGA2 is associated with dog size. Extreme size diversification is a hallmark of domestication. Our results in the horse, complemented by the prior work in cattle and dog, serve to pinpoint those very few genes that have played major roles in the rapid evolution of size during domestication.

  4. Sizing ocean giants: patterns of intraspecific size variation in marine megafauna

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    Craig R. McClain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available What are the greatest sizes that the largest marine megafauna obtain? This is a simple question with a difficult and complex answer. Many of the largest-sized species occur in the world’s oceans. For many of these, rarity, remoteness, and quite simply the logistics of measuring these giants has made obtaining accurate size measurements difficult. Inaccurate reports of maximum sizes run rampant through the scientific literature and popular media. Moreover, how intraspecific variation in the body sizes of these animals relates to sex, population structure, the environment, and interactions with humans remains underappreciated. Here, we review and analyze body size for 25 ocean giants ranging across the animal kingdom. For each taxon we document body size for the largest known marine species of several clades. We also analyze intraspecific variation and identify the largest known individuals for each species. Where data allows, we analyze spatial and temporal intraspecific size variation. We also provide allometric scaling equations between different size measurements as resources to other researchers. In some cases, the lack of data prevents us from fully examining these topics and instead we specifically highlight these deficiencies and the barriers that exist for data collection. Overall, we found considerable variability in intraspecific size distributions from strongly left- to strongly right-skewed. We provide several allometric equations that allow for estimation of total lengths and weights from more easily obtained measurements. In several cases, we also quantify considerable geographic variation and decreases in size likely attributed to humans.

  5. The Genetic Basis of Baculum Size and Shape Variation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Nicholas G.; Ingels, Jesse; Hillhouse, Andrew; Wardwell, Keegan; Chang, Peter L.; Cheverud, James M.; Lutz, Cathleen; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W.; Dean, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid divergence of male genitalia is a preeminent evolutionary pattern. This rapid divergence is especially striking in the baculum, a bone that occurs in the penis of many mammalian species. Closely related species often display diverse baculum morphology where no other morphological differences can be discerned. While this fundamental pattern of evolution has been appreciated at the level of gross morphology, nearly nothing is known about the genetic basis of size and shape divergence. Quantifying the genetic basis of baculum size and shape variation has been difficult because these structures generally lack obvious landmarks, so comparing them in three dimensions is not straightforward. Here, we develop a novel morphometric approach to quantify size and shape variation from three-dimensional micro-CT scans taken from 369 bacula, representing 75 distinct strains of the BXD family of mice. We identify two quantitative trait loci (QTL) that explain ∼50% of the variance in baculum size, and a third QTL that explains more than 20% of the variance in shape. Together, our study demonstrates that baculum morphology may diverge relatively easily, with mutations at a few loci of large effect that independently modulate size and shape. Based on a combination of bioinformatic investigations and new data on RNA expression, we prioritized these QTL to 16 candidate genes, which have hypothesized roles in bone morphogenesis and may enable future genetic manipulation of baculum morphology. PMID:26935419

  6. The Genetic Basis of Baculum Size and Shape Variation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas G. Schultz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The rapid divergence of male genitalia is a preeminent evolutionary pattern. This rapid divergence is especially striking in the baculum, a bone that occurs in the penis of many mammalian species. Closely related species often display diverse baculum morphology where no other morphological differences can be discerned. While this fundamental pattern of evolution has been appreciated at the level of gross morphology, nearly nothing is known about the genetic basis of size and shape divergence. Quantifying the genetic basis of baculum size and shape variation has been difficult because these structures generally lack obvious landmarks, so comparing them in three dimensions is not straightforward. Here, we develop a novel morphometric approach to quantify size and shape variation from three-dimensional micro-CT scans taken from 369 bacula, representing 75 distinct strains of the BXD family of mice. We identify two quantitative trait loci (QTL that explain ∼50% of the variance in baculum size, and a third QTL that explains more than 20% of the variance in shape. Together, our study demonstrates that baculum morphology may diverge relatively easily, with mutations at a few loci of large effect that independently modulate size and shape. Based on a combination of bioinformatic investigations and new data on RNA expression, we prioritized these QTL to 16 candidate genes, which have hypothesized roles in bone morphogenesis and may enable future genetic manipulation of baculum morphology.

  7. The Genetic Basis of Baculum Size and Shape Variation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Nicholas G; Ingels, Jesse; Hillhouse, Andrew; Wardwell, Keegan; Chang, Peter L; Cheverud, James M; Lutz, Cathleen; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W; Dean, Matthew D

    2016-05-03

    The rapid divergence of male genitalia is a preeminent evolutionary pattern. This rapid divergence is especially striking in the baculum, a bone that occurs in the penis of many mammalian species. Closely related species often display diverse baculum morphology where no other morphological differences can be discerned. While this fundamental pattern of evolution has been appreciated at the level of gross morphology, nearly nothing is known about the genetic basis of size and shape divergence. Quantifying the genetic basis of baculum size and shape variation has been difficult because these structures generally lack obvious landmarks, so comparing them in three dimensions is not straightforward. Here, we develop a novel morphometric approach to quantify size and shape variation from three-dimensional micro-CT scans taken from 369 bacula, representing 75 distinct strains of the BXD family of mice. We identify two quantitative trait loci (QTL) that explain ∼50% of the variance in baculum size, and a third QTL that explains more than 20% of the variance in shape. Together, our study demonstrates that baculum morphology may diverge relatively easily, with mutations at a few loci of large effect that independently modulate size and shape. Based on a combination of bioinformatic investigations and new data on RNA expression, we prioritized these QTL to 16 candidate genes, which have hypothesized roles in bone morphogenesis and may enable future genetic manipulation of baculum morphology.

  8. Variation in osteocytes morphology vs bone type in turtle shell and their exceptional preservation from the Jurassic to the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Edwin A; Schweitzer, Mary H

    2012-09-01

    Here we describe variations in osteocytes derived from each of the three bone layers that comprise the turtle shell. We examine osteocytes in bone from four extant turtle species to form a morphological 'baseline', and then compare these with morphologies of osteocytes preserved in Cenozoic and Mesozoic fossils. Two different morphotypes of osteocytes are recognized: flattened-oblate osteocytes (FO osteocytes), which are particularly abundant in the internal cortex and lamellae of secondary osteons in cancellous bone, and stellate osteocytes (SO osteocytes), principally present in the interstitial lamellae between secondary osteons and external cortex. We show that the morphology of osteocytes in each of the three bone layers is conserved through ontogeny. We also demonstrate that these morphological variations are phylogenetically independent, as well as independent of the bone origin (intramembranous or endochondral). Preservation of microstructures consistent with osteocytes in the morphology in Cenozoic and Mesozoic fossil turtle bones appears to be common, and occurs in diverse diagenetic environments including marine, freshwater, and terrestrial deposits. These data have potential to illuminate aspects of turtle biology and evolution previously unapproachable, such as estimates of genome size of extinct species, differences in metabolic rates among different bones from a single individual, and potential function of osteocytes as capsules for preservation of ancient biomolecules.

  9. Biomimetic coatings for bone tissue engineering of critical-sized defects

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The repair of critical-sized bone defects is still challenging in the fields of implantology, maxillofacial surgery and orthopaedics. Current therapies such as autografts and allografts are associated with various limitations. Cytokine-based bone tissue engineering has been attracting increasing attention. Bone-inducing agents have been locally injected to stimulate the native bone-formation activity, but without much success. The reason is that these drugs must be delivered slowly and at a l...

  10. Association of vitamin D receptor and estrogen receptor-α gene polymorphism with peak bone mass and bone size in Chinese women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-juan QIN; Zhen-lin ZHANG; Qi-ren HUANG; Jin-wei HE; Yun-qiu HU; Qi ZHOU; Jing-hui LU; Miao LI; Yu-juan LIU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene Apa I polymorphism and estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) gene Pvu II, Xba I polymorphisms are related to bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC) and bone size in premenopausal Chinese women. METHODS: The VDR Apa I genotype and ER-α Pvu II, Xba I genotype were determined by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in 493 unrelated healthy women aged 20-40 years of Hah nationality in Shanghai city. BMD (g/cm2), BMC (g), and bone areal size (BAS, cm2) at lumbar spine 1-4 (L1-4) and proximal femur (femoral neck, trochanter and Ward's triangle) were measured by duel-energy X-ray absorptionmetry. RESULTS: All allele frequencies did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. After phenotypes were adjusted for age, height, and weight, a significant association was found between VDR Apa I genotype and BMC variation at L1-4 and Ward's triangle (P<0.05), but not in BMD or BAS at lumbar spine and proximal femur.ER-α Pvu II, Xba I genotype was not related to BMC, BMD, and BAS at all sites. CONCLUSION: The study suggested that Apa I polymorphism in VDR gene may influence on attainment and maintenance of peak bone mass in premenopausal Chinese women.

  11. A perfusion bioreactor system efficiently generates cell‐loaded bone substitute materials for addressing critical size bone defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Claudia; Mohan, Ramkumar Ramani; Vacun, Gabriele; Schwarz, Thomas; Haller, Barbara; Sun, Yang; Kahlig, Alexander; Kluger, Petra; Finne‐Wistrand, Anna; Walles, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Critical size bone defects and non‐union fractions are still challenging to treat. Cell‐loaded bone substitutes have shown improved bone ingrowth and bone formation. However, a lack of methods for homogenously colonizing scaffolds limits the maximum volume of bone grafts. Additionally, therapy robustness is impaired by heterogeneous cell populations after graft generation. Our aim was to establish a technology for generating grafts with a size of 10.5 mm in diameter and 25 mm of height, and thus for grafts suited for treatment of critical size bone defects. Therefore, a novel tailor‐made bioreactor system was developed, allowing standardized flow conditions in a porous poly(L‐lactide‐co‐caprolactone) material. Scaffolds were seeded with primary human mesenchymal stem cells derived from four different donors. In contrast to static experimental conditions, homogenous cell distributions were accomplished under dynamic culture. Additionally, culture in the bioreactor system allowed the induction of osteogenic lineage commitment after one week of culture without addition of soluble factors. This was demonstrated by quantitative analysis of calcification and gene expression markers related to osteogenic lineage. In conclusion, the novel bioreactor technology allows efficient and standardized conditions for generating bone substitutes that are suitable for the treatment of critical size defects in humans. PMID:26011163

  12. A perfusion bioreactor system efficiently generates cell-loaded bone substitute materials for addressing critical size bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Claudia; Mohan, Ramkumar Ramani; Vacun, Gabriele; Schwarz, Thomas; Haller, Barbara; Sun, Yang; Kahlig, Alexander; Kluger, Petra; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Walles, Heike; Hansmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Critical size bone defects and non-union fractions are still challenging to treat. Cell-loaded bone substitutes have shown improved bone ingrowth and bone formation. However, a lack of methods for homogenously colonizing scaffolds limits the maximum volume of bone grafts. Additionally, therapy robustness is impaired by heterogeneous cell populations after graft generation. Our aim was to establish a technology for generating grafts with a size of 10.5 mm in diameter and 25 mm of height, and thus for grafts suited for treatment of critical size bone defects. Therefore, a novel tailor-made bioreactor system was developed, allowing standardized flow conditions in a porous poly(L-lactide-co-caprolactone) material. Scaffolds were seeded with primary human mesenchymal stem cells derived from four different donors. In contrast to static experimental conditions, homogenous cell distributions were accomplished under dynamic culture. Additionally, culture in the bioreactor system allowed the induction of osteogenic lineage commitment after one week of culture without addition of soluble factors. This was demonstrated by quantitative analysis of calcification and gene expression markers related to osteogenic lineage. In conclusion, the novel bioreactor technology allows efficient and standardized conditions for generating bone substitutes that are suitable for the treatment of critical size defects in humans.

  13. BMP2 genetically engineered MSCs and EPCs promote vascularized bone regeneration in rat critical-sized calvarial bone defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning He

    Full Text Available Current clinical therapies for critical-sized bone defects (CSBDs remain far from ideal. Previous studies have demonstrated that engineering bone tissue using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is feasible. However, this approach is not effective for CSBDs due to inadequate vascularization. In our previous study, we have developed an injectable and porous nano calcium sulfate/alginate (nCS/A scaffold and demonstrated that nCS/A composition is biocompatible and has proper biodegradability for bone regeneration. Here, we hypothesized that the combination of an injectable and porous nCS/A with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2 gene-modified MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs could significantly enhance vascularized bone regeneration. Our results demonstrated that delivery of MSCs and EPCs with the injectable nCS/A scaffold did not affect cell viability. Moreover, co-culture of BMP2 gene-modified MSCs and EPCs dramatically increased osteoblast differentiation of MSCs and endothelial differentiation of EPCs in vitro. We further tested the multifunctional bone reconstruction system consisting of an injectable and porous nCS/A scaffold (mimicking the nano-calcium matrix of bone and BMP2 genetically-engineered MSCs and EPCs in a rat critical-sized (8 mm caviarial bone defect model. Our in vivo results showed that, compared to the groups of nCS/A, nCS/A+MSCs, nCS/A+MSCs+EPCs and nCS/A+BMP2 gene-modified MSCs, the combination of BMP2 gene -modified MSCs and EPCs in nCS/A dramatically increased the new bone and vascular formation. These results demonstrated that EPCs increase new vascular growth, and that BMP2 gene modification for MSCs and EPCs dramatically promotes bone regeneration. This system could ultimately enable clinicians to better reconstruct the craniofacial bone and avoid donor site morbidity for CSBDs.

  14. Bigger size and defatting of bone chips will increase cup stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmark, G

    2000-01-01

    Morcellised bone allograft in an in vitro model was used to test the tendency towards cup rotation using small or larger fragment sizes of an impacted graft bed and different fat contents. A cup cemented on an impacted graft bed of larger sized bone chips from the Howex bone mill containing natural marrow fat was loaded eccentrically until the cup rotated. This required 3450 N. The same chips impacted in the same way, but defatted with warm saline solution required 7000 N for rotation. The smaller sized bone chips from the Tracer bone mill defatted in a similar manner required only 1950 N for cup rotation. The conclusion was that larger sized chips, partly defatted, prevent rotation of a cup cemented on a graft bed.

  15. Intrinsic Pixel Size Variation in an LSST Prototype Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Baumer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The ambitious science goals of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) have motivated a search for new and unexpected sources of systematic error in the LSST camera. Flat-field images are a rich source of data on sensor anomalies, although such effects are typically dwarfed by shot noise in a single flat field. After combining many ($\\sim 500$) such images into `ultraflats' to reduce the impact of shot noise, we perform photon transfer analysis on a pixel-by-pixel basis and observe no spatial structure in pixel linearity or gain at light levels of 100 ke$^-$ and below. At 125 ke$^-$, a columnar structure is observed in the gain map--we attribute this to a flux-dependent charge transfer inefficiency. We also probe small-scale variations in effective pixel size by analyzing pixel-neighbor correlations in ultraflat images, where we observe clear evidence of intrinsic variation in effective pixel size in an LSST prototype sensor near the $\\sim .3\\%$ level.

  16. How many patients are needed? Variation and design considerations in bone histomorphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, E M; Mosekilde, L; Melsen, F; Frydenberg, M

    2001-05-01

    In osteoporosis research, bone histomorphometry plays an important role in documenting the biological effects and possible side-effects of new drug treatments. To ensure that the study is properly scaled, it is important to be concerned with the risk of type II error; that is, the risk of failing to detect a real difference. We therefore calculated the necessary sample size in bone histomorphometric studies according to a specified difference of 15% between two groups. The calculations were based on variance components estimated from three different studies: women with a distal fracture of the forearm (n = 22); patients with pituitary insufficiency (n = 21); and patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (n = 21). Using a significance level of 0.05 and a risk of type II error of 0.20, the statistical power of two different designs was compared: a single biopsy design comparing the responses in two groups after the treatment; and a paired biopsy design in which individual differences (posttreatment minus baseline) were calculated before the comparison of the two groups. We found that the mineral apposition rate, wall thickness, and erosion depth are statistically powerful indices that, in the single biopsy design, require no more than n = 25 in each group to detect differences of 15% between the groups. Bone volume, erosion surface, osteoid surface, mineralizing surface, and activation frequency need group sizes of 100-600 individuals to find a 15% difference to be statistically significant. However, the effect of bisphosphonate treatment, for instance, is large enough to reduce the group size to 20 individuals concerning activation frequency. The remodeling balance reaches extreme group sizes of several thousand for a 15% difference to be statistically significant, but for a 5 microm (approximately 150%) improvement, about 100 individuals are required in the single biopsy design. An analysis of the components of variance showed that the variation between individuals

  17. Inflammatory response and bone healing capacity of two porous calcium phosphate ceramics in critical size cortical bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjea, Anindita; van der Stok, Johan; Danoux, Charlène B; Yuan, Huipin; Habibovic, Pamela; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Weinans, Harrie; de Boer, Jan

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, two open porous calcium phosphate ceramics, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), and hydroxyapatite (HA) were compared in a critical-sized femoral defect in rats. Previous comparisons of these two ceramics showed significantly greater osteoinductive potential of β-TCP upon intramuscular implantation and a better performance in a spinal fusion model in dogs. Results of the current study also showed significantly more bone formation in defects grafted with β-TCP compared to HA; however, both the ceramics were not capable of increasing bone formation to such extend that it bridges the defect. Furthermore, a more pronounced degradation of β-TCP was observed as compared to HA. Progression of inflammation and initiation of new bone formation were assessed for both materials at multiple time points by histological and fluorochrome-based analyses. Until 12 days postimplantation, a strong inflammatory response in absence of new bone formation was observed in both ceramics, without obvious differences between the two materials. Four weeks postimplantation, signs of new bone formation were found in both β-TCP and HA. At 6 weeks, inflammation had subsided in both ceramics while bone deposition continued. In conclusion, the two ceramics differed in the amount of bone formed after 8 weeks of implantation, whereas no differences were found in the duration of the inflammatory phase after implantation or initiation of new bone formation.

  18. Litter size variation in Polish selected small dog breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Goleman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In breeders’ general opinion small breed females produce less numerous litters. The aim of the study was to analyse the litter size and the frequency of the gender ratio in selected small dog breeds in view of their popularity in Poland. The data set comprised information on 639 litters (in total 2578 puppies of eight breeds, which were born between January 2003 and end December 2014. The results were statistically analysed using statistical program SPSS 20.0. Medium-size litters were observed in the analysed small dog breeds (4.034±0.1. Comparison of the selected breeds of the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI Groups showed that the mean litter size in Group IX was higher (4.36±0.08 than that in Group III (3.87±0.14 and the differences were statistically significant. The study has confirmed the hypothesis that larger females produce more numerous litters, but there are large intra-individual variations in the number of pups born in individual breeds. Additionally, the gender ratio in the puppies born in the analysed breeds was equal, despite the fluctuations in the individual breeds.

  19. Integrin-specific hydrogels functionalized with VEGF for vascularization and bone regeneration of critical-size bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José R; Clark, Amy Y; García, Andrés J

    2016-04-01

    Vascularization of bone defects is considered a crucial component to the successful regeneration of large bone defects. Although vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been delivered to critical-size bone defect models to augment blood vessel infiltration into the defect area, its potential to increase bone repair remains ambiguous. In this study, we investigated whether integrin-specific biomaterials modulate the effects of VEGF on bone regeneration. We engineered protease-degradable, VEGF-loaded poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels functionalized with either a triple-helical, α2 β1 integrin-specific peptide GGYGGGP(GPP)5 GFOGER(GPP)5 GPC (GFOGER) or an αv β3 integrin-targeting peptide GRGDSPC (RGD). Covalent incorporation of VEGF into the PEG hydrogel allowed for protease degradation-dependent release of the protein while maintaining VEGF bioactivity. When applied to critical-size segmental defects in the murine radius, GFOGER-functionalized VEGF-free hydrogels exhibited significantly increased vascular volume and density and resulted in a larger number of thicker blood vessels compared to RGD-functionalized VEGF-free hydrogels. VEGF-loaded RGD hydrogels increased vascularization compared to VEGF-free RGD hydrogels, but the levels of vascularization for these VEGF-containing RGD hydrogels were similar to those of VEGF-free GFOGER hydrogels. VEGF transiently increased bone regeneration in RGD hydrogels but had no effect at later time points. In GFOGER hydrogels, VEGF did not show an effect on bone regeneration. However, VEGF-free GFOGER hydrogels resulted in increased bone regeneration compared to VEGF-free RGD hydrogels. These findings demonstrate the importance of integrin-specificity in engineering constructs for vascularization and associated bone regeneration.

  20. Queen Size Variation in the Ponerine Ant Ponera coarctata (Hymenoptera: Formicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liebig

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Queens of Ponera coarctata show a pronounced variation in size as measured by ommatidia number and Weber's alitrunk length. Isometric size variation and the normal distribution of size categories indicate that, despite these differences, only one queen morph exists. Queen size varies less within colonies than between colonies, and thus appears to be colony specific. Ovary length apparently varies with queen size. Similar size variations as in queens also occured in males, but not in workers.

  1. Selective laser melting-produced porous titanium scaffolds regenerate bone in critical size cortical bone defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van der Stok (Johan); O.P. van der Jagt (Olav); S. Amin Yavari (Saber); M.F.P. de Haas (Mirthe); J.H. Waarsing (Jan); H. Jahr (Holger); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); P. Patka (Peter); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); A.A. Zadpoor (Amir Abbas); H.H. Weinans (Harrie)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPorous titanium scaffolds have good mechanical properties that make them an interesting bone substitute material for large bone defects. These scaffolds can be produced with selective laser melting, which has the advantage of tailoring the structure's architecture. Reducing the strut siz

  2. Size does matter: an integrative in vivo-in silico approach for the treatment of critical size bone defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Carlier

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although bone has a unique restorative capacity, i.e., it has the potential to heal scarlessly, the conditions for spontaneous bone healing are not always present, leading to a delayed union or a non-union. In this work, we use an integrative in vivo-in silico approach to investigate the occurrence of non-unions, as well as to design possible treatment strategies thereof. The gap size of the domain geometry of a previously published mathematical model was enlarged in order to study the complex interplay of blood vessel formation, oxygen supply, growth factors and cell proliferation on the final healing outcome in large bone defects. The multiscale oxygen model was not only able to capture the essential aspects of in vivo non-unions, it also assisted in understanding the underlying mechanisms of action, i.e., the delayed vascularization of the central callus region resulted in harsh hypoxic conditions, cell death and finally disrupted bone healing. Inspired by the importance of a timely vascularization, as well as by the limited biological potential of the fracture hematoma, the influence of the host environment on the bone healing process in critical size defects was explored further. Moreover, dependent on the host environment, several treatment strategies were designed and tested for effectiveness. A qualitative correspondence between the predicted outcomes of certain treatment strategies and experimental observations was obtained, clearly illustrating the model's potential. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that due to the complex non-linear dynamics of blood vessel formation, oxygen supply, growth factor production and cell proliferation and the interactions thereof with the host environment, an integrative in silico-in vivo approach is a crucial tool to further unravel the occurrence and treatments of challenging critical sized bone defects.

  3. Age variations in the properties of human tibial trabecular bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Dalstra, M; Danielsen, CC;

    1997-01-01

    We tested in compression specimens of human proximal tibial trabecular bone from 31 normal donors aged from 16 to 83 years and determined the mechanical properties, density and mineral and collagen content. Young's modulus and ultimate stress were highest between 40 and 50 years, whereas ultimate...

  4. Influence of Cow Bone Particle Size Distribution on the Mechanical Properties of Cow Bone-Reinforced Polyester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isiaka Oluwole Oladele

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was carried out to investigate the influence of cow bone particle size distribution on the mechanical properties of polyester matrix composites in order to consider the suitability of the materials as biomaterials. Cow bone was procured from an abattoir, washed with water, and sun-dried for 4 weeks after which it was crushed with a sledge hammer and was further pulverized with laboratory ball mill. Sieve size analysis was carried out on the pulverized bone where it was sieved into three different sizes of 75, 106, and 300 m sieve sizes. Composite materials were developed by casting them into tensile and flexural tests moulds using predetermined proportions of 2, 4, 6, and 8%. The samples after curing were striped from the moulds and were allowed to be further cured at room temperature for 3 weeks before tensile and flexural tests were performed on them. Both tensile and flexural strength were highly enhanced by 8 wt% from 75 m while toughness was highly enhanced by 6 and 8 wt% from 300 m. This shows that fine particles lead to improved strength while coarse particles lead to improved toughness. The results show that these materials are structurally compatible and are being developed from animal fibre based particle; it is expected to also aid the compatibility with the surface conditions as biomaterials.

  5. Voxel size dependency, reproducibility and sensitivity of an in vivo bone loading estimation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Patrik; Schulte, Friederike A; Zwahlen, Alexander; van Rietbergen, Bert; Boutroy, Stephanie; Melton, L Joseph; Amin, Shreyasee; Khosla, Sundeep; Goldhahn, Jörg; Müller, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    A bone loading estimation algorithm was previously developed that provides in vivo loading conditions required for in vivo bone remodelling simulations. The algorithm derives a bone's loading history from its microstructure as assessed by high-resolution (HR) computed tomography (CT). This reverse engineering approach showed accurate and realistic results based on micro-CT and HR-peripheral quantitative CT images. However, its voxel size dependency, reproducibility and sensitivity still need to be investigated, which is the purpose of this study. Voxel size dependency was tested on cadaveric distal radii with micro-CT images scanned at 25 µm and downscaled to 50, 61, 75, 82, 100, 125 and 150 µm. Reproducibility was calculated with repeated in vitro as well as in vivo HR-pQCT measurements at 82 µm. Sensitivity was defined using HR-pQCT images from women with fracture versus non-fracture, and low versus high bone volume fraction, expecting similar and different loading histories, respectively. Our results indicate that the algorithm is voxel size independent within an average (maximum) error of 8.2% (32.9%) at 61 µm, but that the dependency increases considerably at voxel sizes bigger than 82 µm. In vitro and in vivo reproducibility are up to 4.5% and 10.2%, respectively, which is comparable to other in vitro studies and slightly higher than in other in vivo studies. Subjects with different bone volume fraction were clearly distinguished but not subjects with and without fracture. This is in agreement with bone adapting to customary loading but not to fall loads. We conclude that the in vivo bone loading estimation algorithm provides reproducible, sensitive and fairly voxel size independent results at up to 82 µm, but that smaller voxel sizes would be advantageous.

  6. BMP2-coprecipitated calcium phosphate granules enhance osteoinductivity of deproteinized bovine bone, and bone formation during critical-sized bone defect healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tie; Zheng, Yuanna; Wu, Gang; Wismeijer, Daniel; Pathak, Janak L; Liu, Yuelian

    2017-01-31

    Most materials used clinically for filling critical-sized bone defects (CSBD), such as deproteinized bovine bone (DBB), lack osteoinductivity so that their therapeutic effects are far from satisfactory. The effect of bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2)-coprecipitated biomimetic calcium phosphate granules (BMP2-cop.BioCaP) on osteoinduction of DBB graft(s) during CSBD healing is still unknown. We investigated whether BMP2-cop.BioCaP affects the osteoinductivity of DBB, bone formation, and foreign body reaction during CSBD healing. DBB + BMP2-cop.BioCaP, DBB, DBB + BMP2, DBB + BioCaP, and autologous bone grafts were implanted in the CSBD of sheep. Bone formation, DBB/BioCaP degradability, foreign body reaction, and osteoinductivity of DBB were analyzed histologically and histomorphometrically at week 4 and 8. Combination of BMP2-cop.BioCaP and DBB healed CSBD as effectively as autologous bone grafts. About 95% of the BMP2-cop.BioCaP had been degraded and replaced by new bone at week 8 in the DBB + BMP2-cop.BioCaP-group. Foreign body reaction was reduced in the DBB + BMP2-cop.BioCaP-group compared to the other groups. The independent use of the BMP2-cop.BioCaP did not achieve a satisfactory bone repair. In conclusion, the BMP2-cop.BioCaP showed good degradability and biocompatibility, and enhanced osteoinductivity of DBB during CSBD healing in sheep, suggesting BMP2-cop.BioCaP as a potential osteoinducer to enhance the therapeutic effects of the graft materials in clinic.

  7. Structural variation in the nasal bone region of European moose (Alces alces L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygrén, K; Paatsama, S; de Gritz, B

    1990-01-01

    The ontogeny of typical (normal) nasal bone region of the European moose (Alces alces L.) and the 3 variants of the pattern, was studied. The variants, named as "extra bone type", "punctured type" and "open type" referring the morphology of the internasal suture, were originally observed in Finnish male and female moose skulls in 1971. All of the variants were later found in hunting trophy exhibitions presenting male moose trophies from Sweden, Norway, Baltic Republics of USSR and Poland. The frequencies of the variants showed regional differences. By using histological, radiological and OTC bone labelling methods, all of the nasal bone types were observed in this study in embryonal (N = 36), newborn (N = 21), juvenile (N = 38) and adult (N = 12) moose. Two twin embryos showed different nasal bone structure. The variation is considered to be of congenital origin.

  8. Size variation in small-bodied humans from palau, micronesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gallagher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent discoveries on Palau are claimed to represent the remains of small-bodied humans that may display evidence insular size reduction. This claim has yet to be statistically validated METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Published postcranial specimens (n = 16 from Palau were assessed relative to recent small-bodied comparative samples. Resampling statistical approaches were employed to test specific hypotheses relating to body size in the Palau sample. Results confirm that the Palau postcranial sample is indisputably small-bodied. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A single, homogenous body size morph is represented in early prehistoric postcrania from Palau. Small body size in early Palauans is an ancestral characteristic and was likely not a consequence of in-situ size reduction. Specimens from Palau have little bearing upon hypothesised insular size reduction in the ancestral lineage of Homo floresiensis.

  9. Age variations in the properties of human tibial trabecular bone and cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2000-01-01

    such as osteoarthrosis and osteoporosis, and for the design, fixation and durability of total joint prosthesis. The specific aims of the present studies were: 1) to investigate normal age-related variations in the mechanical, physical/compositional, and structural properties of human tibial trabecular bone; and 2......) to investigate the age-related and osteoarthrosis-related changes in the mechanical properties of the human tibial cartilage-bone complex; and 3) to evaluate mutual associations among various properties. Normal specimens from human autopsy proximal tibiae were used for investigation of age variations...

  10. Variation in body size and metamorphic traits of Iberian spadefoot toads over a short geographic distance

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Determinants of geographic variation in body size are often poorly understood, especially in organisms with complex life cycles. We examined patterns of adult body size and metamorphic traits variation in Iberian spadefoot toad (Pelobates cultripes) populations, which exhibit an extreme reduction in adult body size, 71.6% reduction in body mass, within just about 30 km at south-western Spain. We hypothesized that size at and time to metamorphosis would be predictive of the spatial pattern obs...

  11. Frontoparietal Bone in Extinct Palaeobatrachidae (Anura): Its Variation and Taxonomic Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roček, Zbyněk; Boistel, Renaud; Lenoir, Nicolas; Mazurier, Arnaud; Pierce, Stephanie E; Rage, Jean-Claude; Smirnov, Sergei V; Schwermann, Achim H; Valentin, Xavier; Venczel, Márton; Wuttke, Michael; Zikmund, Tomáš

    2015-11-01

    Palaeobatrachidae are extinct frogs from Europe closely related to the Gondwanan Pipidae, which includes Xenopus. Their frontoparietal is a distinctive skeletal element which has served as a basis for establishing the genus Albionbatrachus. Because little was known about developmental and individual variation of the frontoparietal, and its usefulness in delimiting genera and species has sometimes been doubted, we investigate its structure in Palaeobatrachus and Albionbatrachus by means of X-ray high resolution computer tomography (micro-CT). To infer the scope of variation present in the fossil specimens, we also examined developmental and interspecific variation in extant Xenopus. In adults of extinct taxa, the internal structure of the frontoparietal bone consists of a superficial and a basal layer of compact bone, with a middle layer of cancellous bone between them, much as in early amphibians. In Albionbatrachus, the layer of cancellous bone, consisting of small and large cavities, was connected with the dorsal, sculptured surface of the bone by a system of narrow canals; in Palaeobatrachus, the layer of cancellous bone and the canals connecting this layer with the dorsal surface of the frontoparietal were reduced. The situation in Palaeobatrachus robustus from the lower Miocene of France is intermediate-while external features support assignment to Palaeobatrachus, the inner structure is similar to that in Albionbatrachus. It may be hypothesized that sculptured frontoparietals with a well-developed layer of cancellous (i.e., vascularized) bone may indicate adaptation to a more terrestrial way of life, whereas a reduced cancellous layer might indicate a permanent water dweller.

  12. Hawaiian Drosophila genomes: size variation and evolutionary expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Elysse M; Gall, Joseph G; Jonas, Mark

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports genome sizes of one Hawaiian Scaptomyza and 16 endemic Hawaiian Drosophila species that include five members of the antopocerus species group, one member of the modified mouthpart group, and ten members of the picture wing clade. Genome size expansions have occurred independently multiple times among Hawaiian Drosophila lineages, and have resulted in an over 2.3-fold range of genome sizes among species, with the largest observed in Drosophila cyrtoloma (1C = 0.41 pg). We find evidence that these repeated genome size expansions were likely driven by the addition of significant amounts of heterochromatin and satellite DNA. For example, our data reveal that the addition of seven heterochromatic chromosome arms to the ancestral haploid karyotype, and a remarkable proportion of ~70 % satellite DNA, account for the greatly expanded size of the D. cyrtoloma genome. Moreover, the genomes of 13/17 Hawaiian picture wing species are composed of substantial proportions (22-70 %) of detectable satellites (all but one of which are AT-rich). Our results suggest that in this tightly knit group of recently evolved species, genomes have expanded, in large part, via evolutionary amplifications of satellite DNA sequences in centric and pericentric domains (especially of the X and dot chromosomes), which have resulted in longer acrocentric chromosomes or metacentrics with an added heterochromatic chromosome arm. We discuss possible evolutionary mechanisms that may have shaped these patterns, including rapid fixation of novel expanded genomes during founder-effect speciation.

  13. Associations between adiposity, hormones, and gains in height, whole-body height-adjusted bone size, and size-adjusted bone mineral content in 8- to 11-year-old children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Ritz, Christian; Larnkjær, Anni

    2016-01-01

    We examined fat-independent associations of hormones with height and whole-body bone size and mineral content in 633 school children. IGF-1 and osteocalcin predict growth in height, while fat, osteocalcin, and in girls also, IGF-1 predict growth in bone size. Leptin and ghrelin are inversely asso...

  14. Body weight in relation to variation in body size of Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwarts, L; Hulscher, JB; Koopman, K; Zegers, PM

    1996-01-01

    This paper analyses the relationships between body weight in the Oystercatcher and two measures of its body size, bill length and wing length. The weight variation between individuals due to differences in body size is nearly as large as the seasonal variation in body weight within individuals. Wing

  15. A review of mouse critical size defect models in weight bearing bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jonathan S; Bemenderfer, Thomas B; Wessel, Alexander R; Kacena, Melissa A

    2013-07-01

    Current and future advances in orthopedic treatment are aimed at altering biological interactions to enhance bone healing. Currently, several clinical scenarios exist for which there is no definitive treatment, specifically segmental bone loss from high-energy trauma or surgical resection - and it is here that many are aiming to find effective solutions. To test experimental interventions and better understand bone healing, researchers employ critical size defect (CSD) models in animal studies. Here, an overview of CSDs is given that includes the specifications of varying models, a discussion of current scaffold and bone graft designs, and current outcome measures used to determine the extent of bone healing. Many promising graft designs have been discovered along with promising adjunctive treatments, yet a graft that offers biomechanical support while allowing for neovascularization with eventual complete resorption and remodeling remains to be developed. An overview of this important topic is needed to highlight current advances and provide a clear understanding of the ultimate goal in CSD research--develop a graft for clinical use that effectively treats the orthopedic conundrum of segmental bone loss.

  16. Internal size variations in Tn1546-like elements due to the presence of IS1216V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1998-01-01

    In this study, internal size variations in the VanA gene cluster Tn1546, encoding resistance to glycopeptides, is described. Studies of previously uncharacterized size variations of an internal region, encoding the vanX and vanY genes of Tn1546, revealed that these variations were due to the pres......-essential for vancomycin resistance. (C) 1998 Federation of European Microbiological Societies....

  17. Phylogenetic, functional, and structural components of variation in bone growth rate of amniotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, Jorge; Legendre, Pierre; de Ricqlès, Armand; Montes, Laëtitia; de Margerie, Emmanuel; Castanet, Jacques; Desdevises, Yves

    2008-01-01

    The biological features observed in every living organism are the outcome of three sets of factors: historical (inherited by homology), functional (biological adaptation), and structural (properties inherent to the materials with which organs are constructed, and the morphogenetic rules by which they grow). Integrating them should bring satisfactory causal explanations of empirical data. However, little progress has been accomplished in practice toward this goal, because a methodologically efficient tool was lacking. Here we use a new statistical method of variation partitioning to analyze bone growth in amniotes. (1) Historical component. The variation of bone growth rates contains a significant phylogenetic signal, suggesting that the observed patterns are partly the outcome of shared ancestry. (2) Functional causation. High growth rates, although energy costly, may be adaptive (i.e., they may increase survival rates) in taxa showing short growth periods (e.g., birds). In ectothermic amniotes, low resting metabolic rates may limit the maximum possible growth rates. (3) Structural constraint. Whereas soft tissues grow through a multiplicative process, growth of mineralized tissues is accretionary (additive, i.e., mineralization fronts occur only at free surfaces). Bone growth of many amniotes partially circumvents this constraint: it is achieved not only at the external surface of the bone shaft, but also within cavities included in the bone cortex as it grows centrifugally. Our approach contributes to the unification of historicism, functionalism, and structuralism toward a more integrated evolutionary biology.

  18. Intramale variation in sperm size: functional significance in a polygynous mammal

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Studies concerning the relationships between sperm size and velocity at the intraspecific level are quite limited and often yielded contradictory results across the animal kingdom. Intramale variation in sperm size may represent a meaningful factor to predict sperm velocity, due to its relationship with the level of sperm competition among related taxa. Because sperm phenotype is under post-copulatory sexual selection, we hypothesized that a reduced intramale variation in sperm size is associ...

  19. Phylogeny, rate variation, and genome size evolution of Pelargonium (Geraniaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Gibby, Mary; Jansen, Robert K

    2012-09-01

    The phylogeny of 58 Pelargonium species was estimated using five plastid markers (rbcL, matK, ndhF, rpoC1, trnL-F) and one mitochondrial gene (nad5). The results confirmed the monophyly of three major clades and four subclades within Pelargonium but also indicate the need to revise some sectional classifications. This phylogeny was used to examine karyotype evolution in the genus: plotting chromosome sizes, numbers and 2C-values indicates that genome size is significantly correlated with chromosome size but not number. Accelerated rates of nucleotide substitution have been previously detected in both plastid and mitochondrial genes in Pelargonium, but sparse taxon sampling did not enable identification of the phylogenetic distribution of these elevated rates. Using the multigene phylogeny as a constraint, we investigated lineage- and locus-specific heterogeneity of substitution rates in Pelargonium for an expanded number of taxa and demonstrated that both plastid and mitochondrial genes have had accelerated substitution rates but with markedly disparate patterns. In the plastid, the exons of rpoC1 have significantly accelerated substitution rates compared to its intron and the acceleration was mainly due to nonsynonymous substitutions. In contrast, the mitochondrial gene, nad5, experienced substantial acceleration of synonymous substitution rates in three internal branches of Pelargonium, but this acceleration ceased in all terminal branches. Several lineages also have dN/dS ratios significantly greater than one for rpoC1, indicating that positive selection is acting on this gene, whereas the accelerated synonymous substitutions in the mitochondrial gene are the result of elevated mutation rates.

  20. Size distribution and seasonal variation of atmospheric cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puxbaum, Hans; Tenze-Kunit, Monika

    Atmospheric cellulose is a main constituent of the insoluble organic aerosol and a "macrotracer" for plant debris. A time series of the cellulose concentration at a downtown site in Vienna showed a maximum concentration during fall and a secondary maximum during spring. The fall maximum appears to be associated with leaf litter production, the spring maximum with increased biological activity involving repulsion of cellulose-containing particles, e.g. seed production. The grand average of the time series over 9 months was 0.374 μg m -3 cellulose, respectively, 0.75 μg m -3 plant debris. Compared to an annual average of 5.7 μg m -3 organic carbon as observed at a Vienna downtown site it becomes clear that plant debris is a major contributor to the organic aerosol and has to be considered in source attribution studies. Simultaneous measurements at the downtown and a suburban site indicated that particulate cellulose is obviously not produced within the city in notable amounts, at least during the campaign in December. Size distribution measurements with impactors showed the unexpected result that "fine aerosol" size particles (0.1- 1.6 μm aerodynamic diameter) contained 0.7% "free cellulose" on a mass basis, forming a wettable, but insoluble part of the accumulation mode aerosol.

  1. Size variation of polyaniline nanoparticles dispersed in polyvinyl alcohol matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Bhadra; D Sarkar

    2010-10-01

    We report the preparation of polyaniline (PANI) nanoparticles dispersed in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix. From SEM picture it is seen that the particle sizes vary from 100–20 nm. Also with increase in PVA content the stability of dispersion is found to increase. Apart from SEM, spin cast films of PANI in PVA are also characterized through XRD and FTIR. XRD shows increase in crystallinity with PVA content and FTIR gives evidence of crosslinking between PANI and PVA molecules. In plane electrical conductivity (in the range of 102 Scm-1) and the exponent of nonlinear – are found to decrease with increase of PVA content. There is a good correlation between SEM, XRD, FTIR and electrical properties.

  2. Synergistic effects of dimethyloxallyl glycine and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on repair of critical-sized bone defects in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Liu, Yang; Ding, Zhen-Yu; Cao, Jia-Qing; Huang, Jing-Huan; Zhang, Jie-Yuan; Jia, Wei-Tao; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chang-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Lin

    2017-02-01

    In bone remodeling, osteogenesis is closely coupled to angiogenesis. Bone tissue engineering using multifunctional bioactive materials is a promising technique which has the ability to simultaneously stimulate osteogenesis and angiogenesis for repair of bone defects. We developed mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG)-doped poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) composite scaffolds as delivery vehicle. Two bioactive molecules, dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), a small-molecule angiogenic drug, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), an osteoinductive growth factor, were co-incorporated into the scaffold. The synergistic effects of DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the composite scaffolds on osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs were investigated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Moreover, in vivo studies were conducted to observe bone regeneration and vascular formation of critical-sized bone defects in rats using micro-computed tomography, histological analyses, Microfil® perfusion, fluorescence labeling, and immunohistochemical analysis. The results showed that DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the MBG-PHBHHx scaffolds did exert synergistic effects on the osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Moreover, DMOG and rhBMP-2 produced significant increases in newly-formed bone and neovascularization of calvarial bone defects in rats. It is concluded that the co-delivery strategy of both rhBMP-2 and DMOG can significantly improve the critical-sized bone regeneration.

  3. Synergistic effects of dimethyloxallyl glycine and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on repair of critical-sized bone defects in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Liu, Yang; Ding, Zhen-yu; Cao, Jia-qing; Huang, Jing-huan; Zhang, Jie-yuan; Jia, Wei-tao; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chang-sheng; Li, Xiao-lin

    2017-01-01

    In bone remodeling, osteogenesis is closely coupled to angiogenesis. Bone tissue engineering using multifunctional bioactive materials is a promising technique which has the ability to simultaneously stimulate osteogenesis and angiogenesis for repair of bone defects. We developed mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG)-doped poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) composite scaffolds as delivery vehicle. Two bioactive molecules, dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), a small-molecule angiogenic drug, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), an osteoinductive growth factor, were co-incorporated into the scaffold. The synergistic effects of DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the composite scaffolds on osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs were investigated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Moreover, in vivo studies were conducted to observe bone regeneration and vascular formation of critical-sized bone defects in rats using micro-computed tomography, histological analyses, Microfil® perfusion, fluorescence labeling, and immunohistochemical analysis. The results showed that DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the MBG-PHBHHx scaffolds did exert synergistic effects on the osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Moreover, DMOG and rhBMP-2 produced significant increases in newly-formed bone and neovascularization of calvarial bone defects in rats. It is concluded that the co-delivery strategy of both rhBMP-2 and DMOG can significantly improve the critical-sized bone regeneration. PMID:28230059

  4. Effect of micro-computed tomography voxel size and segmentation method on trabecular bone microstructure measures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Blaine A

    2016-12-01

    Micro-computed tomography (μCT) is currently the gold standard for determining trabecular bone microstructure in small animal models. Numerous parameters associated with scanning and evaluation of μCT scans can strongly affect morphologic results obtained from bone samples. However, the effect of these parameters on specific trabecular bone outcomes is not well understood. This study investigated the effect of μCT scanning with nominal voxel sizes between 6-30 μm on trabecular bone outcomes quantified in mouse vertebral body trabecular bone. Additionally, two methods for determining a global segmentation threshold were compared: based on qualitative assessment of 2D images, or based on quantitative assessment of image histograms. It was found that nominal voxel size had a strong effect on several commonly reported trabecular bone parameters, in particular connectivity density, trabecular thickness, and bone tissue mineral density. Additionally, the two segmentation methods provided similar trabecular bone outcomes for scans with small nominal voxel sizes, but considerably different outcomes for scans with larger voxel sizes. The Qualitatively Selected segmentation method more consistently estimated trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness across different voxel sizes, but the Histogram segmentation method more consistently estimated trabecular number, trabecular separation, and structure model index. Altogether, these results suggest that high-resolution scans be used whenever possible to provide the most accurate estimation of trabecular bone microstructure, and that the limitations of accurately determining trabecular bone outcomes should be considered when selecting scan parameters and making conclusions about inter-group variance or between-group differences in studies of trabecular bone microstructure in small animals.

  5. Geographical variation in body size and sexual size dimorphism in an Australian lizard, Boulenger's Skink (Morethia boulengeri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Damian R; Banks, Sam C; Piggott, Maxine P; Cunningham, Ross B; Crane, Mason; MacGregor, Christopher; McBurney, Lachlan; Lindenmayer, David B

    2014-01-01

    Ecogeographical rules help explain spatial and temporal patterns in intraspecific body size. However, many of these rules, when applied to ectothermic organisms such as reptiles, are controversial and require further investigation. To explore factors that influence body size in reptiles, we performed a heuristic study to examine body size variation in an Australian lizard, Boulenger's Skink Morethia boulengeri from agricultural landscapes in southern New South Wales, south-eastern Australia. We collected tissue and morphological data on 337 adult lizards across a broad elevation and climate gradient. We used a model-selection procedure to determine if environmental or ecological variables best explained body size variation. We explored the relationship between morphology and phylogenetic structure before modeling candidate variables from four broad domains: (1) geography (latitude, longitude and elevation), (2) climate (temperature and rainfall), (3) habitat (vegetation type, number of logs and ground cover attributes), and (4) management (land use and grazing history). Broad phylogenetic structure was evident, but on a scale larger than our study area. Lizards were sexually dimorphic, whereby females had longer snout-vent length than males, providing support for the fecundity selection hypothesis. Body size variation in M. boulengeri was correlated with temperature and rainfall, a pattern consistent with larger individuals occupying cooler and more productive parts of the landscape. Climate change forecasts, which predict warmer temperature and increased aridity, may result in reduced lizard biomass and decoupling of trophic interactions with potential implications for community organization and ecosystem function.

  6. Changes in pollinator fauna affect altitudinal variation of floral size in a bumblebee-pollinated herb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Yusuke; Abe, Kota; Kitazawa, Tomoaki; Hattori, Mitsuru; Hirao, Akira S; Itino, Takao

    2014-09-01

    Geographic trait variations are often caused by locally different selection regimes. As a steep environmental cline along altitude strongly influences adaptive traits, mountain ecosystems are ideal for exploring adaptive differentiation over short distances. We investigated altitudinal floral size variation of Campanula punctata var. hondoensis in 12 populations in three mountain regions of central Japan to test whether the altitudinal floral size variation was correlated with the size of the local bumblebee pollinator and to assess whether floral size was selected for by pollinator size. We found apparent geographic variations in pollinator assemblages along altitude, which consequently produced a geographic change in pollinator size. Similarly, we found altitudinal changes in floral size, which proved to be correlated with the local pollinator size, but not with altitude itself. Furthermore, pollen removal from flower styles onto bees (plant's male fitness) was strongly influenced by the size match between flower style length and pollinator mouthpart length. These results strongly suggest that C. punctata floral size is under pollinator-mediated selection and that a geographic mosaic of locally adapted C. punctata exists at fine spatial scale.

  7. A proteomic study of protein variation between osteopenic and age-matched control bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Christopher D; Dangott, Lawrence J; Rahm, Mark D; Hitt, Kirby D; Stewart, Donald S; Wayne Sampson, H

    2012-05-01

    The focus of this study was to identify changes in protein expression within the bone tissue environment between osteopenic and control bone tissue of human femoral neck patients with osteoarthritis. Femoral necks were compared from osteopenic patients and age-matched controls. A new method of bone protein extraction was developed to provide a swift, clear view of the bone proteome. Relative changes in protein expression between control and osteopenic samples were quantified using difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technology after affinity chromatographic depletion of albumin and IgG. The proteins that were determined to be differentially expressed were identified using standard liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and database searching techniques. In order to rule out blood contamination, blood from age-matched osteoporotic, osteopenic and controls were analyzed in a similar manner. Image analysis of the DIGE gels indicated that 145 spots in the osteopenic bone samples changed at least ± 1.5-fold from the control samples (P proteins were identified by LC/MS/MS. Of the proteins that increased in the osteopenic femurs, two were especially significant: carbonic anhydrase I and phosphoglycerate kinase 1. Apolipoprotein A-I was the most prominent protein that significantly decreased in the osteopenic femurs. The blood samples revealed no significant differences between groups for any of these proteins. In conclusion, carbonic anhydrase I, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 and apolipoprotein A-I appeared to be the most significant variations of proteins in patients with osteopenia and osteoarthritis.

  8. Variation in size, morphology and chemical composition of polymetallic nodules from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Parthiban, G.

    Chemical composition of 613 polymetallic nodules from 150 stations in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) are determined and variations in Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Co, Zn and moisture content are studied with respect to their size and surface texture...

  9. Comparison between dog-bone and Gaussian specimens for size effect evaluation in gigacycle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tridello

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gigacycle fatigue properties of materials are strongly affected by the specimen risk volume (volume of material subjected to a stress amplitude larger than the 90% of the maximum stress. Gigacycle fatigue tests, performed with ultrasonic fatigue testing machines, are commonly carried out by using hourglass shaped specimens with a small risk volume. The adoption of traditional dog-bone specimens allows for increasing the risk volume, even if the increment is quite limited. In order to obtain larger risk volumes, a new specimen shape is proposed (Gaussian specimen. The dog-bone and the Gaussian specimens are compared through Finite Element Analyses and the numerical results are validated experimentally by means of strain gages measurements. The range of applicability of the two different specimens in terms of available risk volume and stress concentration effects due to the cross section variation is determined.

  10. Consequences of intraspecific seed-size variation in Sparganium emersum for dispersal by fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollux, B.J.A.; Ouborg, J.; Van Groenendael, J.M.; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for seed dispersal by fish (ichthyochory) is likely to vary within aquatic plant species, depending on intraspecific variation in phenotypic seed traits. 2. We studied the effect of seed size variation within the unbranched burreed (Sparganium emersum) on the potential for internal dis

  11. Does litter size variation affect models of terrestrial carnivore extinction risk and management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor S Devenish-Nelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Individual variation in both survival and reproduction has the potential to influence extinction risk. Especially for rare or threatened species, reliable population models should adequately incorporate demographic uncertainty. Here, we focus on an important form of demographic stochasticity: variation in litter sizes. We use terrestrial carnivores as an example taxon, as they are frequently threatened or of economic importance. Since data on intraspecific litter size variation are often sparse, it is unclear what probability distribution should be used to describe the pattern of litter size variation for multiparous carnivores. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used litter size data on 32 terrestrial carnivore species to test the fit of 12 probability distributions. The influence of these distributions on quasi-extinction probabilities and the probability of successful disease control was then examined for three canid species - the island fox Urocyon littoralis, the red fox Vulpes vulpes, and the African wild dog Lycaon pictus. Best fitting probability distributions differed among the carnivores examined. However, the discretised normal distribution provided the best fit for the majority of species, because variation among litter-sizes was often small. Importantly, however, the outcomes of demographic models were generally robust to the distribution used. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide reassurance for those using demographic modelling for the management of less studied carnivores in which litter size variation is estimated using data from species with similar reproductive attributes.

  12. Length of activity season drives geographic variation in body size of a widely distributed lizard

    OpenAIRE

    Horváthová, Terézia; Cooney, Christopher R.; Fitze, Patrick S; Oksanen, Tuula; Jelic, Dusan; Ghira, Ioan; Uller, Tobias; Jandzik, David

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the factors that drive geographic variation in life history is an important challenge in evolutionary ecology. Here, we analyze what predicts geographic variation in life-history traits of the common lizard, Zootoca vivipara, which has the globally largest distribution range of all terrestrial reptile species. Variation in body size was predicted by differences in the length of activity season, while we found no effects of environmental temperature per se. Females experiencing r...

  13. Histologic Evaluation of Critical Size Defect Healing With Natural and Synthetic Bone Grafts in the Pigeon ( Columba livia ) Ulna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunio, Ahmed; Jalila, Abu; Goh, Yong Meng; Shameha-Intan; Shanthi, Ganabadi

    2015-06-01

    Fracture and bone segment loss are major clinical problems in birds. Achieving bone formation and clinical union in a fracture case is important for the survival of the bird. To evaluate the efficacy of bone grafts for defect healing in birds, 2 different bone grafts were investigated in the healing of a bone defect in 24 healthy pigeons ( Columba livia ). In each bird, a 1-cm critical size defect (CSD) was created in the left ulna, and the fracture was stabilized with external skeletal fixation (ESF). A graft of hydroxyapatite (HA) alone (n = 12 birds) or demineralized bone matrix (DBM) combined with HA (n = 12 birds) was implanted in the CSD. The CSD healing was evaluated at 3 endpoints: 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Four birds were euthanatized at each endpoint from each treatment group, and bone graft healing in the ulna CSD was evaluated by histologic examination. The CSD and graft implants were evaluated for quality of union, cortex development, and bone graft incorporation. Results showed no graft rejection in any bird, and all birds had connective tissue formation in the defect because of the bone graft application. These results suggest that bone defect healing can be achieved by a combination of osteoinductive and osteoconductive bone graft materials for clinical union and new bone regeneration in birds. The combination of DBM and HA resulted in a better quality bone graft (P < .05) than did HA alone, but there was no significant differences in cortex development or bone graft incorporation at 3, 6, or 12 weeks. From the results of this study, we conclude that HA bone grafts, alone or in combination with DBM, with external skeletal fixation is suitable and safe for bone defect and fracture treatment in pigeons.

  14. Intramale variation in sperm size: functional significance in a polygynous mammal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Ros-Santaella

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies concerning the relationships between sperm size and velocity at the intraspecific level are quite limited and often yielded contradictory results across the animal kingdom. Intramale variation in sperm size may represent a meaningful factor to predict sperm velocity, due to its relationship with the level of sperm competition among related taxa. Because sperm phenotype is under post-copulatory sexual selection, we hypothesized that a reduced intramale variation in sperm size is associated with sperm competitiveness in red deer. Our results show that low variation in sperm size is strongly related to high sperm velocity and normal sperm morphology, which in turn are good predictors of male fertility in this species. Furthermore, it is well known that the red deer show high variability in testicular mass but there is limited knowledge concerning the significance of this phenomenon at intraspecific level, even though it may reveal interesting processes of sexual selection. Thereby, as a preliminary result, we found that absolute testes mass is negatively associated with intramale variation in sperm size. Our findings suggest that sperm size variation in red deer is under a strong selective force leading to increase sperm function efficiency, and reveal new insights into sexual selection mechanisms.

  15. Grading Standards of the Coefficient of Variation in the Electronic Raw Silk Size Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to shorten the difference between the raw silk size grading standards of the world and that of China,to quicken the step of the electronic raw silk testing process,the distribution of the coefficient of variation (CV50m%) of the raw silk size in the electronic testing and the development of the new standards are studied according to the sampling and grading theory. By the theoretical deduction and the simulating experiments, the distribution of the coefficient of variation of the raw silk size is given,and the grading scheme whose quality index is the coefficient of variation(CV50m%)of the raw silk size and the grading precisions of all grades are proposed. Moreover,the rightness and the feasibility of the grading scheme are testified by the sampling and grading simulation.

  16. High variation in manufacturer-declared serving size of packaged discretionary foods in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskelberg, Hila; Neal, Bruce; Dunford, Elizabeth; Flood, Victoria; Rangan, Anna; Thomas, Beth; Cleanthous, Xenia; Trevena, Helen; Zheng, Jazzmin Miaobing; Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu; Gill, Timothy; Wu, Jason H Y

    2016-05-28

    Despite the potential of declared serving size to encourage appropriate portion size consumption, most countries including Australia have not developed clear reference guidelines for serving size. The present study evaluated variability in manufacturer-declared serving size of discretionary food and beverage products in Australia, and how declared serving size compared with the 2013 Australian Dietary Guideline (ADG) standard serve (600 kJ). Serving sizes were obtained from the Nutrition Information Panel for 4466 packaged, discretionary products in 2013 at four large supermarkets in Sydney, Australia, and categorised into fifteen categories in line with the 2013 ADG. For unique products that were sold in multiple package sizes, the percentage difference between the minimum and the maximum serving size across different package sizes was calculated. A high variation in serving size was found within the majority of food and beverage categories - for example, among 347 non-alcoholic beverages (e.g. soft drinks), the median for serving size was 250 (interquartile range (IQR) 250, 355) ml (range 100-750 ml). Declared serving size for unique products that are available in multiple package sizes also showed high variation, particularly for chocolate-based confectionery, with median percentage difference between minimum and maximum serving size of 183 (IQR 150) %. Categories with a high proportion of products that exceeded the 600 kJ ADG standard serve included cakes and muffins, pastries and desserts (≥74 % for each). High variability in declared serving size may confound interpretation and understanding of consumers interested in standardising and controlling their portion selection. Future research is needed to assess if and how standardising declared serving size might affect consumer behaviour.

  17. Combination of calcium sulfate and simvastatin-controlled release microspheres enhances bone repair in critical-sized rat calvarial bone defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu YC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Yin-Chih Fu,1–4 Yan-Hsiung Wang,1,5 Chung-Hwan Chen,1,3,4 Chih-Kuang Wang,1,6 Gwo-Jaw Wang,1,3,4 Mei-Ling Ho1,3,7,8 1Orthopaedic Research Center, 2Graduate Institute of Medicine, 3Department of Orthopaedics, 4Department of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine, 5School of Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, 6Department of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, 7Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 8Department of Marine Biotechnology and Resources, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, TaiwanAbstract: Most allogenic bone graft substitutes have only osteoconductive properties. Developing new strategies to improve the osteoinductive activity of bone graft substitutes is both critical and practical for clinical application. Previously, we developed novel simvastatin-encapsulating poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres (SIM/PLGA that slowly release simvastatin and enhance fracture healing. In this study, we combined SIM/PLGA with a rapidly absorbable calcium sulfate (CS bone substitute and studied the effect on bone healing in critical-sized calvarial bone defects in a rat model. The cytotoxicity and cytocompatibility of this combination was tested in vitro using lactate dehydrogenase leakage and a cell attachment assay, respectively. Combination treatment with SIM/PLGA and the CS bone substitute had no cytotoxic effect on bone marrow stem cells. Compared with the control, cell adhesion was substantially enhanced following combination treatment with SIM/PLGA and the CS bone substitute. In vivo, implantation of the combination bone substitute promoted healing of critical-sized calvarial bone defects in rats; furthermore, production of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and neovascularization were enhanced in the area of the defect. In summary, the combination of SIM/PLGA and a CS bone substitute has osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties, indicating that it could be used for regeneration

  18. Characterization of an ovine bilateral critical sized bone defect iliac wing model to examine treatment modalities based on bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdowne, Jennifer L; Devine, Declan; Eberli, Ursula; Emans, Pieter; Welting, Tim J M; Odekerken, Jim C E; Schiuma, Damiano; Thalhauser, Martin; Bouré, Ludovic; Zeiter, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Critical sized bone defect (CSBD) animal models are used to evaluate and confirm efficacy and potency of new treatment modalities based on bone tissue engineering before the latter can be applied in clinical practice. In this study, a bilateral CSBD model in the iliac wings of sheep is described in detail. To demonstrate that this is a large animal CSBD model in sheep, bone healing within the defect left empty (negative control) or filled with autologous corticocancellous bone graft (clinical gold standard, positive control) was assessed using micro-CT, histology, histomorphometric, and fluorochrome analysis. After three months, new bone into the defect site was formed across the whole defect in the positive controls but limited to the edge of the defects in the negative controls. Bone volume in the positive controls was statistically higher than in the negative controls, with the latter having less than 10% new bone growth. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The model described here represents a reliable and reproducible bilateral CSBD in sheep with low morbidity that can be used for in vivo evaluation of new treatment modalities based on bone tissue engineering.

  19. Characterization of an Ovine Bilateral Critical Sized Bone Defect Iliac Wing Model to Examine Treatment Modalities Based on Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Lansdowne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical sized bone defect (CSBD animal models are used to evaluate and confirm efficacy and potency of new treatment modalities based on bone tissue engineering before the latter can be applied in clinical practice. In this study, a bilateral CSBD model in the iliac wings of sheep is described in detail. To demonstrate that this is a large animal CSBD model in sheep, bone healing within the defect left empty (negative control or filled with autologous corticocancellous bone graft (clinical gold standard, positive control was assessed using micro-CT, histology, histomorphometric, and fluorochrome analysis. After three months, new bone into the defect site was formed across the whole defect in the positive controls but limited to the edge of the defects in the negative controls. Bone volume in the positive controls was statistically higher than in the negative controls, with the latter having less than 10% new bone growth. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The model described here represents a reliable and reproducible bilateral CSBD in sheep with low morbidity that can be used for in vivo evaluation of new treatment modalities based on bone tissue engineering.

  20. Causes and consequences of range size variation: the influence of traits, speciation, and extinction

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    Steven M. Vamosi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous variation in species richness observed among related clades across the tree of life has long caught the imagination of biologists. Recently, there has been growing attention paid to the possible contribution of range size variation, either alone or in combination with putative key innovations, to these patterns. Here, we review three related topics relevant to range size evolution, speciation, and extinction. First, we provide a brief overview of the debate surrounding patterns and mechanisms for phylogenetic signal in range size. Second, we discuss some recent findings regarding the joint influence of traits and range size on diversification. Finally, we present the preliminary results of a study investigating whether range size is negatively correlated with contemporary extinction risk in flowering plants.

  1. Effect of population size on genetic variation levels in Capparis spinosa (Capparaceae detected by RAPDs

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    Houshang Nosrati

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The population size of plants affects on population genetic variation. Materials and Methods: We studied the impact of population size on genetic variation in populations of Capparis spinosa (caper, Capparaceae using RAPDs in East Azerbaijan (Iran. Within-population genetic diversity was estimated based on Nei`s and Shanonn`s diversity using Popgen, and genetic similarity among the populations was studied from a UPGMA dendrogram based the matrix of Nei’s distances obtained through SHAN. Difference in the level genetic variation between small-sized and large-sized populations was tested using Mann-Whitney U test, and correlation between geographical and genetic distances among populations was examined by Pearson test (SPSS, 11.3. Total genetic variation was partitioned into within and among populations based on AMOVA using Arlequin. Results: The polymorphism levels of RAPDs bands among the populations ranged from 48.8% to 81.4%, and within-population Nei’s diversity varied from 0.1667 to 0.2630. Genetic variation in small-sized populations (0.1667 to 0.1809 was significantly lower than the variations in large-sized populations (0.2158 -0.2630 (N= 7, P0.674, Pearson correlation test. Conclusions: Population size has a dramatic impact on its genetic diversity. The results revealed that fragmentation of caper population in the study region has most likely occurred recently. The low genetic diversity revealed within caper populations indicates high risk of extinction and suggests that urgent conservation action is needed to recover diversity in these populations.

  2. Body Size Adaptations to Altitudinal Climatic Variation in Neotropical Grasshoppers of the Genus Sphenarium (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Altitudinal clines in body size can result from the effects of natural and sexual selection on growth rates and developing times in seasonal environments. Short growing and reproductive seasons constrain the body size that adults can attain and their reproductive success. Little is known about the effects of altitudinal climatic variation on the diversification of Neotropical insects. In central Mexico, in addition to altitude, highly heterogeneous topography generates diverse climates that can occur even at the same latitude. Altitudinal variation and heterogeneous topography open an opportunity to test the relative impact of climatic variation on body size adaptations. In this study, we investigated the relationship between altitudinal climatic variation and body size, and the divergence rates of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in Neotropical grasshoppers of the genus Sphenarium using a phylogenetic comparative approach. In order to distinguish the relative impact of natural and sexual selection on the diversification of the group, we also tracked the altitudinal distribution of the species and trends of both body size and SSD on the phylogeny of Sphenarium. The correlative evidence suggests no relationship between altitude and body size. However, larger species were associated with places having a warmer winter season in which the temporal window for development and reproduction can be longer. Nonetheless, the largest species were also associated with highly seasonal environments. Moreover, large body size and high levels of SSD have evolved independently several times throughout the history of the group and male body size has experienced a greater evolutionary divergence than females. These lines of evidence suggest that natural selection, associated with seasonality and sexual selection, on maturation time and body size could have enhanced the diversification of this insect group. PMID:26684616

  3. Body Size Adaptations to Altitudinal Climatic Variation in Neotropical Grasshoppers of the Genus Sphenarium (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomón Sanabria-Urbán

    Full Text Available Altitudinal clines in body size can result from the effects of natural and sexual selection on growth rates and developing times in seasonal environments. Short growing and reproductive seasons constrain the body size that adults can attain and their reproductive success. Little is known about the effects of altitudinal climatic variation on the diversification of Neotropical insects. In central Mexico, in addition to altitude, highly heterogeneous topography generates diverse climates that can occur even at the same latitude. Altitudinal variation and heterogeneous topography open an opportunity to test the relative impact of climatic variation on body size adaptations. In this study, we investigated the relationship between altitudinal climatic variation and body size, and the divergence rates of sexual size dimorphism (SSD in Neotropical grasshoppers of the genus Sphenarium using a phylogenetic comparative approach. In order to distinguish the relative impact of natural and sexual selection on the diversification of the group, we also tracked the altitudinal distribution of the species and trends of both body size and SSD on the phylogeny of Sphenarium. The correlative evidence suggests no relationship between altitude and body size. However, larger species were associated with places having a warmer winter season in which the temporal window for development and reproduction can be longer. Nonetheless, the largest species were also associated with highly seasonal environments. Moreover, large body size and high levels of SSD have evolved independently several times throughout the history of the group and male body size has experienced a greater evolutionary divergence than females. These lines of evidence suggest that natural selection, associated with seasonality and sexual selection, on maturation time and body size could have enhanced the diversification of this insect group.

  4. Variation and Sexual Dimorphism of Body Size in the Plateau Brown Frog along an Altitudinal Gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueyun FENG; Wei CHEN; Junhua HU; Jianping JIANG

    2015-01-01

    Variation in body size and sexual size dimorphism (SSD) can have important consequences for animal ecology, behavior, population dynamics and the evolution of life-history traits. Organisms are expected to be larger in colder climate (i.e., Bergmann’s rule) and SSD varies with body size (i.e., Rensch’s rule). However, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. The plateau brown frog (Rana kukunoris), a medium-sized anuran species with female-biased SSD, is endemic to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP). From 1797 m (Maoxiang’ping) to 3453 m (Heihe’qiao) in the eastern margin of the QTP, we surveyed 10 populations of R. kukunoris and collected phalanges and snout vent length (SVL) data for 258 adult individuals (199 males versus 59 females). Based on these data, we explored how body size and SSD varying along the altitudinal gradient and examined the corresponding effects of temperature. We found body size to be larger at higher altitude for males but not for females, with likely effects from the temperature on the variation in male body size. Sex differences in growth rates may be the main cause of the variation in SSD. Our results suggested that only males follow the Bergmann’s rule and variation in SSD of R. kukunoris do not support the Rensch’s rule and its inverse. Therefore, the variations of body size can be different between sexes and the applicability of both Bergmann’s rule and Rensch’s rule should depend on species and environment where they live.

  5. Presentation of the intrasubject coefficient of variation for sample size planning in bioequivalence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschke, D; Steinijans, W V; Diletti, E; Schall, R; Luus, H G; Elze, M; Blume, H

    1994-07-01

    Bioequivalence studies are generally performed as crossover studies and, therefore, information on the intrasubject coefficient of variation is needed for sample size planning. Unfortunately, this information is usually not presented in publications on bioequivalence studies, and only the pooled inter- and intrasubject coefficient of variation for either test or reference formulation is reported. Thus, the essential information for sample size planning of future studies is not made available to other researchers. In order to overcome such shortcomings, the presentation of results from bioequivalence studies should routinely include the intrasubject coefficient of variation. For the relevant coefficients of variation, theoretical background together with modes of calculation and presentation are given in this communication with particular emphasis on the multiplicative model.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells-seeded bio-ceramic construct for bone regeneration in large critical-size bone defect in rabbit

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    Maiti SK

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC represent an attractive cell population for tissue engineering purpose. The objective of this study was to determine whether the addition of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2 and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 to a silica-coated calcium hydroxyapatite (HASi - rabbit bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell (rBMSC construct promoted bone healing in a large segmental bone defect beyond standard critical -size radial defects (15mm in rabbits. An extensively large 30mm long radial ostectomy was performed unilaterally in thirty rabbits divided equally in five groups. Defects were filled with a HASi scaffold only (group B; HASi scaffold seeded with rBMSC (group C; HASi scaffold seeded with rBMSC along with rhBMP-2 and IGF-1 in groups D and E respectively. The same number of rBMSC (five million cells and concentration of growth factors rhBMP-2 (50µg and IGF-1 (50µg was again injected at the site of bone defect after 15 days of surgery in their respective groups. An empty defect served as the control group (group A. Radiographically, bone healing was evaluated at 7, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90 days post implantation. Histological qualitative analysis with microCT (µ-CT, haematoxylin and eosin (H & E and Masson’s trichrome staining were performed 90 days after implantation. All rhBMP-2-added constructs induced the formation of well-differentiated mineralized woven bone surrounding the HASi scaffolds and bridging bone/implant interfaces as early as eight weeks after surgery. Bone regeneration appeared to develop earlier with the rhBMP-2 constructs than with the IGF-1 added construct. Constructs without any rhBMP-2 or IGF-1 showed osteoconductive properties limited to the bone junctions without bone ingrowths within the implantation site. In conclusion, the addition of rhBMP-2 to a HASi scaffold could promote bone generation in a large critical-size-defect.

  7. Intra-specific variation in genome size in maize: cytological and phenotypic correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realini, María Florencia; Poggio, Lidia; Cámara-Hernández, Julián; González, Graciela Esther

    2016-01-01

    Genome size variation accompanies the diversification and evolution of many plant species. Relationships between DNA amount and phenotypic and cytological characteristics form the basis of most hypotheses that ascribe a biological role to genome size. The goal of the present research was to investigate the intra-specific variation in the DNA content in maize populations from Northeastern Argentina and further explore the relationship between genome size and the phenotypic traits seed weight and length of the vegetative cycle. Moreover, cytological parameters such as the percentage of heterochromatin as well as the number, position and sequence composition of knobs were analysed and their relationships with 2C DNA values were explored. The populations analysed presented significant differences in 2C DNA amount, from 4.62 to 6.29 pg, representing 36.15 % of the inter-populational variation. Moreover, intra-populational genome size variation was found, varying from 1.08 to 1.63-fold. The variation in the percentage of knob heterochromatin as well as in the number, chromosome position and sequence composition of the knobs was detected among and within the populations. Although a positive relationship between genome size and the percentage of heterochromatin was observed, a significant correlation was not found. This confirms that other non-coding repetitive DNA sequences are contributing to the genome size variation. A positive relationship between DNA amount and the seed weight has been reported in a large number of species, this relationship was not found in the populations studied here. The length of the vegetative cycle showed a positive correlation with the percentage of heterochromatin. This result allowed attributing an adaptive effect to heterochromatin since the length of this cycle would be optimized via selection for an appropriate percentage of heterochromatin. PMID:26644343

  8. Transposable element distribution, abundance and role in genome size variation in the genus Oryza

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    Collura Kristi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Oryza is composed of 10 distinct genome types, 6 diploid and 4 polyploid, and includes the world's most important food crop – rice (Oryza sativa [AA]. Genome size variation in the Oryza is more than 3-fold and ranges from 357 Mbp in Oryza glaberrima [AA] to 1283 Mbp in the polyploid Oryza ridleyi [HHJJ]. Because repetitive elements are known to play a significant role in genome size variation, we constructed random sheared small insert genomic libraries from 12 representative Oryza species and conducted a comprehensive study of the repetitive element composition, distribution and phylogeny in this genus. Particular attention was paid to the role played by the most important classes of transposable elements (Long Terminal Repeats Retrotransposons, Long interspersed Nuclear Elements, helitrons, DNA transposable elements in shaping these genomes and in their contributing to genome size variation. Results We identified the elements primarily responsible for the most strikingly genome size variation in Oryza. We demonstrated how Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons belonging to the same families have proliferated to very different extents in various species. We also showed that the pool of Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposons is substantially conserved and ubiquitous throughout the Oryza and so its origin is ancient and its existence predates the speciation events that originated the genus. Finally we described the peculiar behavior of repeats in the species Oryza coarctata [HHKK] whose placement in the Oryza genus is controversial. Conclusion Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons are the major component of the Oryza genomes analyzed and, along with polyploidization, are the most important contributors to the genome size variation across the Oryza genus. Two families of Ty3-gypsy elements (RIRE2 and Atlantys account for a significant portion of the genome size variations present in the Oryza genus.

  9. Intraspecific Variation in Maximum Ingested Food Size and Body Mass in Varecia rubra and Propithecus coquereli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Hartstone-Rose

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent study, we quantified the scaling of ingested food size (Vb—the maximum size at which an animal consistently ingests food whole—and found that Vb scaled isometrically between species of captive strepsirrhines. The current study examines the relationship between Vb and body size within species with a focus on the frugivorous Varecia rubra and the folivorous Propithecus coquereli. We found no overlap in Vb between the species (all V. rubra ingested larger pieces of food relative to those eaten by P. coquereli, and least-squares regression of Vb and three different measures of body mass showed no scaling relationship within each species. We believe that this lack of relationship results from the relatively narrow intraspecific body size variation and seemingly patternless individual variation in Vb within species and take this study as further evidence that general scaling questions are best examined interspecifically rather than intraspecifically.

  10. Diet calcium level but not calcium supplement particle size affects bone density and mechanical properties in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnazari, Mohammad; Martin, Berdine R; Legette, Leecole L; Lachcik, Pamela J; Welch, Jo; Weaver, Connie M

    2009-07-01

    Calcium (Ca) supplements, especially Ca carbonate (CaCO3), are the main alternative sources of dietary Ca and an important part of a treatment regimen for osteoporosis, the most common metabolic bone disorder of aging and menopause. In a female ovariectomized (OVX) rat model for studying postmenopausal osteoporosis, we tested the hypothesis that a small compared with a large particle size of CaCO3 (13.0- vs. 18.5-mum geometric diameter) would result in increased Ca balance and subsequently bone mass and that this would be affected by dietary Ca level. We used 6-mo-old rats that were OVX either at 6 or 3 mo of age as models of early or stable menopausal status, respectively. The rats received semipurified diets that contained either 0.4 or 0.2% dietary Ca provided from CaCO3 of 2 particle sizes. A group of Sham-operated rats with intact ovaries served as control and were fed 0.4% dietary Ca from large particles. Estrogen deficiency as a result of ovariectomy had an adverse effect on bone density, mineral content, and bone mechanical properties (P < 0.001). Reducing dietary Ca from 0.4 to 0.2% resulted in significant adverse effects on bone density and mechanical properties (P < 0.001). The particle size of CaCO3 did not affect total Ca balance, bone dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography indices, bone ash and Ca content, or the mechanical determinants of bone strength. We conclude that a decrease in particle size of CaCO3 to 70% of that typically found in Ca supplements does not provide a benefit to overall Ca metabolism or bone characteristics and that the amount of Ca consumed is of greater influence in enhancing Ca nutrition and skeletal strength.

  11. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasonic diagnosis of early bone loss and density variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkari, Bahman; Mandelis, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Over the past two decades, osteoporosis has been recognized among the most serious public health problems. Fortunately with the growing awareness of osteoporosis, new treatments have been developed for the prevention of fracture. At the same time, there is a rapid improvement in diagnostic methods. In this study biomedical photoacoustics (PA) is applied to the analysis of bone mineral concentration. The PA signal depends on optical as well as mechanical properties of the object and therefore has the potential to provide higher sensitivity to density variations compared with standard diagnostic methods, like ultrasound. A laser source with 800 nm wavelength and different ultrasonic transducers with resonance frequencies in the range 1 to 5 MHz were employed. The CW or frequency-domain (FD) PA radar method was utilized with linear frequency modulation chirps to provide temporal gating control over the transmitted signal and higher sensitivity in the detected signal. The laser intensity was set below the safety standards for skin exposure. The preliminary studies showed adequate optical absorption by cortical bone to generate measurable PA signals and the transmission of laser light through this layer. Experiments are focused on detection and evaluation of PA signals from in-vitro animal cortical bones with and without a trabecular sublayer. The trabecular layer is then diluted by chemical etching and differences in the PA signals are discussed.

  12. Variations in Desired Family Size and Excess Fertility in East Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhoza, D.N.; Broekhuis, A.; Hooimeijer, P.

    2014-01-01

    This contribution studies the variation in desired family size and excess fertility in four East African countries by analyzing the combined impact of wealth, education, religious affiliation, and place of residence. The findings show an enormous heterogeneity in Kenya. Wealthy and higher educated p

  13. Intraspecific egg size variation and sperm limitation in the broadcast spawning bivalve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, P.C.; Honkoop, P.J.C.; Drent, J.

    2011-01-01

    Broadcast spawners are exceptionally suited and simple models for studying parental investment in offspring, because direct post-spawning investment is nonexistent. However, a comprehensive understanding of the large variation that exists in their egg sizes is still lacking. One of the main hypothes

  14. Exploring patterns of variation in clutch size-density reaction norms in a wild passerine bird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolaus, M.; Brommer, J. E.; Ubels, R.; Tinbergen, J. M.; Dingemanse, N. J.

    2013-01-01

    Negative density dependence of clutch size is a ubiquitous characteristic of avian populations and is partly due to within-individual phenotypic plasticity. Yet, very little is known about the extent to which individuals differ in their degree of phenotypic plasticity, whether such variation has a g

  15. Effect of platelet-rich plasma and fibrin glue on healing of critical-size calvarial bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findikcioglu, Kemal; Findikcioglu, Fulya; Yavuzer, Reha; Elmas, Cigdem; Atabay, Kenan

    2009-01-01

    Despite the insufficient number of experimental studies, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) including high amounts of growth factors is introduced to clinical use rapidly. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of PRP and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) on healing of critical-size bone defects.Bilateral full-thickness, critical-size bone defects were created in the parietal bones of 32 rabbits, which had been studied in 4 groups. Saline, thrombin solution, PPP, and PRP were applied to the created defects before closure. Radiologic defect area measurement results at 0, 4, and 16 weeks were compared between the groups. In addition, densities of the newly formed bones at 16th week were studied. Histologic parameters (primary and secondary bone trabecula, neovascularization, and bone marrow and connective tissue formation) were compared between 4- and 16-week groups.More rapid decrease in defect size was observed in groups 3 and 4 than in groups 1 and 2, both in the 4th and 16th weeks. Newly formed bone densities were also found to be higher in these 2 groups. New bone formation was detected to be more rapid considering histologic parameters, in groups 3 and 4 at 4th and 16th weeks.Study demonstrates that PRP and PPP might have favorable effects on bone healing. Although we cannot reveal any statistical difference between these 2 substances considering osteoinductive potential, PRP group has demonstrated superior results compared with fibrin glue group. Higher platelet concentrations may expose beneficial effects of PRP.

  16. Improving the Process-Variation Tolerance of Digital Circuits Using Gate Sizing and Statistical Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Neiroukh, Osama

    2011-01-01

    A new approach for enhancing the process-variation tolerance of digital circuits is described. We extend recent advances in statistical timing analysis into an optimization framework. Our objective is to reduce the performance variance of a technology-mapped circuit where delays across elements are represented by random variables which capture the manufacturing variations. We introduce the notion of statistical critical paths, which account for both means and variances of performance variation. An optimization engine is used to size gates with a goal of reducing the timing variance along the statistical critical paths. We apply a pair of nested statistical analysis methods deploying a slower more accurate approach for tracking statistical critical paths and a fast engine for evaluation of gate size assignments. We derive a new approximation for the max operation on random variables which is deployed for the faster inner engine. Circuit optimization is carried out using a gain-based algorithm that terminates w...

  17. [Egg size variation in egrets and herons (Aves: Ardeidae) nesting in Birama's swamp, Cuba].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis Avila, Dennis

    2015-03-01

    Intraclutch egg size variation in birds depends on many ecological factors and on the evolutive history of each species. In wading birds, a trend to smaller eggs with laying order has been described, but comparative reports are scarce. In this study, egg size variation patterns were described for nine Egrets and Heron species nesting in Birama' Swamp, Cuba. The patterns were described using external dimensions of 3142 eggs from 1875 nests of Butorides virescens, Bubulcus ibis, Ardea alba, Nycticorax nycticorax, Nyctanassa violacea and four Egretta species, taken in the field between 1998 and 2006. Results showed that eggs were 4.9-10% of adult weight and had volume variation coefficients between 6-9%. There were no general and consistent interspecies relationship between clutch size and egg sizes. Average volumes tend to get smaller with laying order, but it is not statistically detectable in Butorides and Bubulcus. Last egg was between 0.2% and 15% smaller than the first, showing an inverse relationship with it. Intraclutch asymmetry is light in E. thula and fluctuating around null in Bubulcus. Size only predicted laying or hatching order for the last egg, in nests with more than two eggs, with 72.4% of confidence.

  18. Effect of pore size on bone ingrowth into porous titanium implants fabricated by additive manufacturing: An in vivo experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Naoya, E-mail: tani110@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Fujibayashi, Shunsuke, E-mail: shfuji@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Takemoto, Mitsuru, E-mail: m.take@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Sasaki, Kiyoyuki, E-mail: kiy-sasaki@spcom.co.jp [Sagawa Printing Co., Ltd., 5-3, Inui, Morimoto-Cho, Mukou-Shi, Kyoto 617-8588 (Japan); Otsuki, Bungo, E-mail: bungo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Takashi, E-mail: ntaka@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [National Hospital Organization Kyoto Medical Center, 1-1, Mukaihatacho, Hukakusa, Hushimi, Kyoto 612-8555 (Japan); Matsushita, Tomiharu, E-mail: matsushi@isc.chubu.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Kokubo, Tadashi, E-mail: kokubo@isc.chubu.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Matsuda, Shuichi, E-mail: smat522@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing technique with the ability to produce metallic scaffolds with accurately controlled pore size, porosity, and interconnectivity for orthopedic applications. However, the optimal pore structure of porous titanium manufactured by SLM remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of pore size with constant porosity on in vivo bone ingrowth in rabbits into porous titanium implants manufactured by SLM. Three porous titanium implants (with an intended porosity of 65% and pore sizes of 300, 600, and 900 μm, designated the P300, P600, and P900 implants, respectively) were manufactured by SLM. A diamond lattice was adapted as the basic structure. Their porous structures were evaluated and verified using microfocus X-ray computed tomography. Their bone–implant fixation ability was evaluated by their implantation as porous-surfaced titanium plates into the cortical bone of the rabbit tibia. Bone ingrowth was evaluated by their implantation as cylindrical porous titanium implants into the cancellous bone of the rabbit femur for 2, 4, and 8 weeks. The average pore sizes of the P300, P600, and P900 implants were 309, 632, and 956 μm, respectively. The P600 implant demonstrated a significantly higher fixation ability at 2 weeks than the other implants. After 4 weeks, all models had sufficiently high fixation ability in a detaching test. Bone ingrowth into the P300 implant was lower than into the other implants at 4 weeks. Because of its appropriate mechanical strength, high fixation ability, and rapid bone ingrowth, our results indicate that the pore structure of the P600 implant is a suitable porous structure for orthopedic implants manufactured by SLM. - Highlights: • We studied the effect of pore size on bone tissue in-growth in a rabbit in vivo model. • Titanium samples with 300/600/900 μm pore size in three-dimensionally controlled shapes were fabricated by additive manufacturing. • Samples were

  19. Amorphous Silica: A New Antioxidant Role for Rapid Critical-Sized Bone Defect Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Azhar; Odatsu, Tetsuro; Shah, Ami; Monte, Felipe; Kim, Harry K W; Kramer, Philip; Aswath, Pranesh B; Varanasi, Venu G

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic fractures cause structurally unstable sites due to severe bone loss. Such fractures generate a high yield of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can lead to oxidative stress. Excessive and prolonged ROS activity impedes osteoblast differentiation and instigates long healing times. Stimulation of antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD1), are crucial to reduce ROS, stimulate osteogenesis, and strengthen collagen and mineral formation. Yet, no current fixative devices have shown an ability to enhance collagen matrix formation through antioxidant expression. This study reports plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition based amorphous silicon oxynitride (Si(ON)x) as a potential new fracture healing biomaterial that adheres well to the implant surface, releases Si(+4) to enhance osteogenesis, and forms a surface hydroxyapatite for collagen mineral attachment. These materials provide a sustained release of Si(+4) in physiological environment for extended times. The dissolution rate partially depends on the film chemistry and can be controlled by varying O/N ratio. The presence of Si(+4) enhances SOD1, which stimulates other osteogenic markers downstream and leads to rapid mineral formation. In vivo testing using a rat critical-sized calvarial defect model shows a more rapid bone-regeneration for these biomaterials as compared to control groups, that implies the clinical significance of the presented biomaterial.

  20. Quantification of bone mass gain in response to the application of biphasic bioceramics and platelet concentrate in critical-size bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Sonja Ellen; Wykrota, Francisco Henrique Lanna; Oliveira, Ana Carolina Marques Barbosa; Kerkis, Irina; Mahecha, Germán Bohorquez; Alves, Humberto José

    2009-05-01

    Biphasic bioceramics have been widely indicated for bone reconstruction; however, the real gain in bone mass due to the presence of such biomaterials has not been established yet nor the advantages of its association with platelet concentrate. This study aims at quantifying the volume of bone matrix, osteoblasts, osteocytes, blood vessels and adipose tissue after the application of a biphasic bioceramics composed of 65% hydroxyapatite and 35% beta-tricalcium phosphate. Critical-size bone defects were produced in rabbit femora and reconstructed with bioceramics only, with bioceramics combined with platelet concentrate, with platelet concentrate alone, and with no treatment (blood clot). The quantitative evaluation was performed on histological sections using histomorphometry. Our data provide original evidence that consolidates the indication of bioceramics for clinical bone loss reconstruction. The application of biphasic bioceramics alone led to major bone mass gain and was followed by its association with platelet concentrate. On the other hand, platelet concentrate can contribute to the augmentation and maintenance of the adipose tissue, representing a new field for future applications in plastic surgery.

  1. Novel Osteoinductive Photo-cross-linkable Chitosan-lactide-fibrinogen Hydrogels Enhance Bone Regeneration in Critical Size Segmental Bone Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) is the FDA-approved device for clinical applications including lumbar spine fusion, open tibial fractures, and...endochondral ossification by regulating periosteal cell fate during bone repair. Bone 2010:47;65-73. 4. Schu¨tzenberger S, Schultz A, Hausner T...J, Bejar J, Zinman C, Seliktar D. A novel poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen hydrogel for tibial segmental defect repair in a rat model. J Biomed

  2. Modeling grain size variations of aeolian gypsum deposits at White Sands, New Mexico, using AVIRIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrefat, H.A.; Goodell, P.C.; Hubbard, B.E.; Langford, R.P.; Aldouri, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) through Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) (0.4-2.5????m) AVIRIS data, along with laboratory spectral measurements and analyses of field samples, were used to characterize grain size variations in aeolian gypsum deposits across barchan-transverse, parabolic, and barchan dunes at White Sands, New Mexico, USA. All field samples contained a mineralogy of ?????100% gypsum. In order to document grain size variations at White Sands, surficial gypsum samples were collected along three Transects parallel to the prevailing downwind direction. Grain size analyses were carried out on the samples by sieving them into seven size fractions ranging from 45 to 621????m, which were subjected to spectral measurements. Absorption band depths of the size fractions were determined after applying an automated continuum-removal procedure to each spectrum. Then, the relationship between absorption band depth and gypsum size fraction was established using a linear regression. Three software processing steps were carried out to measure the grain size variations of gypsum in the Dune Area using AVIRIS data. AVIRIS mapping results, field work and laboratory analysis all show that the interdune areas have lower absorption band depth values and consist of finer grained gypsum deposits. In contrast, the dune crest areas have higher absorption band depth values and consist of coarser grained gypsum deposits. Based on laboratory estimates, a representative barchan-transverse dune (Transect 1) has a mean grain size of 1.16 ??{symbol} (449????m). The error bar results show that the error ranges from - 50 to + 50????m. Mean grain size for a representative parabolic dune (Transect 2) is 1.51 ??{symbol} (352????m), and 1.52 ??{symbol} (347????m) for a representative barchan dune (Transect 3). T-test results confirm that there are differences in the grain size distributions between barchan and parabolic dunes and between interdune and dune crest areas. The t-test results

  3. Intraspecific variation in erythrocyte sizes among populations of Hypsiboas cordobas (Anura: Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Baraquet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and size of erythrocytes of H. cordobae, and analysed the geographic variation of this character along the distribution of the species, in relation to the latitudinal and altitudinal distances. Erythrocyte shape of the H. cordobae is ellipsoidal and the nuclei are also ellipsoidal and centrally oriented. Erythrocyte and nuclear size showed significant differences among populations, with the highest mean size corresponding to the population of Achiras (low altitude site and the lowest mean size to Los Linderos (high altitude site. There was no significant relationship between the latitude of each population and the both erythrocyte and nuclear size. The altitudinal variation in erythrocyte cell size may be attributable to the surface available for gas exchange; a small erythrocyte offers a possibility of greater rate of exchange than a larger one. Our results are consistent with studies of other amphibians, where intraspecific comparisons of populations at different altitudes show that individuals at higher altitudes are characterized by smaller erythrocytes.

  4. Variations in otolith patterns, sizes and body morphometrics of jack mackerel Trachurus japonicus juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaji, Y; Kishida, M; Watanabe, Y; Kawamura, T; Xie, S; Yamashita, Y; Sassa, C; Tsukamoto, Y

    2010-10-01

    Variations in otolith patterns, sizes and body morphometrics of jack mackerel Trachurus japonicus juveniles were investigated. Under transmitted light, translucent (W(t)) and opaque otoliths (W(o)) were detected in juveniles collected from Wakasa Bay between July 2005 and April 2006, whereas only opaque otoliths (G(o)) were detected in Goto-nada Sea individuals between May and June 2006. Three groups of juveniles were distinguished based on differences in hatch season, otolith size and growth history, and body morphometrics. As T. japonicus has different spawning seasons according to spawning grounds, each group was estimated to hatch in different waters. Juveniles with W(t) otoliths were considered to have stayed in coastal habitat longer, as the hatch area was estimated to be near Wakasa Bay. Juveniles with W(o) and G(o) otoliths appear to recruit to coastal waters at larger size, since their hatch areas were estimated to be far from each collection area. Larger otoliths of W(t) were attributed to otolith accretion after the second growth flexion, which was observed only for W(t) . Standard length of W(t) fish at the second otolith growth flexion was estimated to correspond to recruitment size to coastal rocky reefs in Wakasa Bay. Body morphometrics were correlated with otolith size after removing body size effect, suggesting that morphological variations of T. japonicus juveniles were also associated with the timing of recruitment to coastal habitat.

  5. Ecological correlates of group-size variation in a resource-defense ungulate, the sedentary guanaco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Marino

    Full Text Available For large herbivores, predation-risk, habitat structure and population density are often reported as major determinants of group size variation within and between species. However, whether the underlying causes of these relationships imply an ecological adaptation or are the result of a purely mechanistic process in which fusion and fragmentation events only depend on the rate of group meeting, is still under debate. The aim of this study was to model guanaco family and bachelor group sizes in contrasting ecological settings in order to test hypotheses regarding the adaptive significance of group-size variation. We surveyed guanaco group sizes within three wildlife reserves located in eastern Patagonia where guanacos occupy a mosaic of grasslands and shrublands. Two of these reserves have been free from predators for decades while in the third, pumas often prey on guanacos. All locations have experienced important changes in guanaco abundance throughout the study offering the opportunity to test for density effects. We found that bachelor group size increased with increasing density, as expected by the mechanistic approach, but was independent of habitat structure or predation risk. In contrast, the smaller and territorial family groups were larger in the predator-exposed than in the predator-free locations, and were larger in open grasslands than in shrublands. However, the influence of population density on these social units was very weak. Therefore, family group data supported the adaptive significance of group-size variation but did not support the mechanistic idea. Yet, the magnitude of the effects was small and between-population variation in family group size after controlling for habitat and predation was negligible, suggesting that plasticity of these social units is considerably low. Our results showed that different social units might respond differentially to local ecological conditions, supporting two contrasting hypotheses in a

  6. Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmberger, Thomas K.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    The typical clinical signs in bone tumours are pain, destruction and destabilization, immobilization, neurologic deficits, and finally functional impairment. Primary malignant bone tumours are a rare entity, accounting for about 0.2% of all malignancies. Also benign primary bone tumours are in total rare and mostly asymptomatic. The most common symptomatic benign bone tumour is osteoid osteoma with an incidence of 1:2000.

  7. Sample size planning for the coefficient of variation from the accuracy in parameter estimation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Ken

    2007-11-01

    The accuracy in parameter estimation approach to sample size planning is developed for the coefficient of variation, where the goal of the method is to obtain an accurate parameter estimate by achieving a sufficiently narrow confidence interval. The first method allows researchers to plan sample size so that the expected width of the confidence interval for the population coefficient of variation is sufficiently narrow. A modification allows a desired degree of assurance to be incorporated into the method, so that the obtained confidence interval will be sufficiently narrow with some specified probability (e.g., 85% assurance that the 95 confidence interval width will be no wider than to units). Tables of necessary sample size are provided for a variety of scenarios that may help researchers planning a study where the coefficient of variation is of interest plan an appropriate sample size in order to have a sufficiently narrow confidence interval, optionally with somespecified assurance of the confidence interval being sufficiently narrow. Freely available computer routines have been developed that allow researchers to easily implement all of the methods discussed in the article.

  8. Distributional variations in trabecular architecture of the mandibular bone: an in vivo micro-CT analysis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongshuang Liu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of trabecular thickness and trabecular separation on modulating the trabecular architecture of the mandibular bone in ovariectomized rats.Fourteen 12-week-old adult female Wistar rats were divided into an ovariectomy group (OVX and a sham-ovariectomy group (sham. Five months after the surgery, the mandibles from 14 rats (seven OVX and seven sham were analyzed by micro-CT. Images of inter-radicular alveolar bone of the mandibular first molars underwent three-dimensional reconstruction and were analyzed.Compared to the sham group, trabecular thickness in OVX alveolar bone decreased by 27% (P = 0.012, but trabecular separation in OVX alveolar bone increased by 59% (P = 0.005. A thickness and separation map showed that trabeculae of less than 100 μm increased by 46%, whereas trabeculae of more than 200 μm decreased by more than 40% in the OVX group compared to those in the sham group. Furthermore, the OVX separation of those trabecular of more than 200 μm was 65% higher compared to the sham group. Bone mineral density (P = 0.028 and bone volume fraction (p = 0.001 were also significantly decreased in the OVX group compared to the sham group.Ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mandibular bone may be related to the distributional variations in trabecular thickness and separation which profoundly impact the modulation of the trabecular architecture.

  9. Habitat area and climate stability determine geographical variation in plant species range sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morueta-Holme, Naia; Enquist, Brian J.; McGill, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being a fundamental aspect of biodiversity, little is known about what controls species range sizes. This is especially the case for hyperdiverse organisms such as plants. We use the largest botanical data set assembled to date to quantify geographical variation in range size for ~85,000 ...... concerns over the potential effects of future climate change and habitat loss on biodiversity.......,000 plant species across the New World. We assess prominent hypothesised range-size controls, finding that plant range sizes are codetermined by habitat area and long- and short-term climate stability. Strong short- and long-term climate instability in large parts of North America, including past...... glaciations, are associated with broad-ranged species. In contrast, small habitat areas and a stable climate characterise areas with high concentrations of small-ranged species in the Andes, Central America and the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest region. The joint roles of area and climate stability strengthen...

  10. Habitat area and climate stability determine geographical variation in plant species range sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morueta-Holme, Naia; Enquist, Brian J; McGill, Brian J; Boyle, Brad; Jørgensen, Peter M; Ott, Jeffrey E; Peet, Robert K; Símová, Irena; Sloat, Lindsey L; Thiers, Barbara; Violle, Cyrille; Wiser, Susan K; Dolins, Steven; Donoghue, John C; Kraft, Nathan J B; Regetz, Jim; Schildhauer, Mark; Spencer, Nick; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2013-12-01

    Despite being a fundamental aspect of biodiversity, little is known about what controls species range sizes. This is especially the case for hyperdiverse organisms such as plants. We use the largest botanical data set assembled to date to quantify geographical variation in range size for ~ 85 000 plant species across the New World. We assess prominent hypothesised range-size controls, finding that plant range sizes are codetermined by habitat area and long- and short-term climate stability. Strong short- and long-term climate instability in large parts of North America, including past glaciations, are associated with broad-ranged species. In contrast, small habitat areas and a stable climate characterise areas with high concentrations of small-ranged species in the Andes, Central America and the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest region. The joint roles of area and climate stability strengthen concerns over the potential effects of future climate change and habitat loss on biodiversity.

  11. When size matters: differences in demineralized bone matrix particles affect collagen structure, mesenchymal stem cell behavior, and osteogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozza, B; Lesci, I G; Duchi, S; Della Bella, E; Martini, L; Salamanna, F; Falconi, M; Cinotti, S; Fini, M; Lucarelli, E; Donati, D

    2017-04-01

    Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is a natural, collagen-based, osteoinductive biomaterial. Nevertheless, there are conflicting reports on the efficacy of this product. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether DBM collagen structure is affected by particle size and can influence DBM cytocompatibility and osteoinductivity. Sheep cortical bone was ground and particles were divided in three fractions with different sizes, defined as large (L, 1-2 mm), medium (M, 0.5-1 mm), and small (S, structure, with DBM-M being altered but not as much as DBM-S. DBM-M displayed a preferable trend in almost all biological characteristics tested, although all DBM particles revealed an optimal cytocompatibility. Subcutaneous implantation of DBM particles into immunocompromised mice resulted in bone induction only for DBM-M. When sheep MSC were seeded onto particles before implantation, all DBM particles were able to induce new bone formation with the best incidence for DBM-M and DBM-S. In conclusion, the collagen alteration in DBM-M is likely the best condition to promote bone induction in vivo. Furthermore, the choice of 0.5-1 mm particles may enable to obtain more efficient and consistent results among different research groups in bone tissue-engineering applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1019-1033, 2017.

  12. Correlations between initial cleft size and dental anomalies in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients after alveolar bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Fatima; Reiser, Erika; Thor, Andreas; Hakelius, Malin; Nowinski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine in individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate the correlation between initial cleft size and dental anomalies, and the outcome of alveolar bone grafting. Methods A total of 67 consecutive patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were included from the cleft lip and palate-craniofacial center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. All patients were operated by the same surgeon and treated according to the Uppsala protocol entailing: lip plasty at 3 months, soft palate closure at 6 months, closure of the residual cleft in the hard palate at 2 years of age, and secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) prior to the eruption of the permanent canine. Cleft size was measured on dental casts obtained at the time of primary lip plasty. Dental anomalies were registered on radiographs and dental casts obtained before bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was evaluated with the Modified Bergland Index (mBI) at 1 and 10-year follow-up. Results Anterior cleft width correlated positively with enamel hypoplasia and rotation of the central incisor adjacent to the cleft. There was, however, no correlation between initial cleft width and alveolar bone height at either 1 or 10 years follow-up. Conclusions Wider clefts did not seem to have an impact on the success of secondary alveolar bone grafting but appeared to be associated with a higher degree of some dental anomalies. This finding may have implications for patient counseling and treatment planning.

  13. Effects of sample size and intraspecific variation in phylogenetic comparative studies: a meta-analytic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garamszegi, László Z; Møller, Anders P

    2010-11-01

    Comparative analyses aim to explain interspecific variation in phenotype among taxa. In this context, phylogenetic approaches are generally applied to control for similarity due to common descent, because such phylogenetic relationships can produce spurious similarity in phenotypes (known as phylogenetic inertia or bias). On the other hand, these analyses largely ignore potential biases due to within-species variation. Phylogenetic comparative studies inherently assume that species-specific means from intraspecific samples of modest sample size are biologically meaningful. However, within-species variation is often significant, because measurement errors, within- and between-individual variation, seasonal fluctuations, and differences among populations can all reduce the repeatability of a trait. Although simulations revealed that low repeatability can increase the type I error in a phylogenetic study, researchers only exercise great care in accounting for similarity in phenotype due to common phylogenetic descent, while problems posed by intraspecific variation are usually neglected. A meta-analysis of 194 comparative analyses all adjusting for similarity due to common phylogenetic descent revealed that only a few studies reported intraspecific repeatabilities, and hardly any considered or partially dealt with errors arising from intraspecific variation. This is intriguing, because the meta-analytic data suggest that the effect of heterogeneous sampling can be as important as phylogenetic bias, and thus they should be equally controlled in comparative studies. We provide recommendations about how to handle such effects of heterogeneous sampling.

  14. Variations in basic demographics consequential to population size of governorate in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khraif, Rshood; Salam, Asharaf Abdul; Potty, Rajaram Subramanian; Aldosari, Ali; Elsegaey, Ibrahim; AlMutairi, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Saudi Arabia, divided into 5 planning regions, 13 administrative regions and further to 118 governorates (administrative units), has diverse demographic characteristics from one region to another and from one governorate to another. Rural to urban migration and an exodus of immigrants characterize the Kingdom, where development planning depend largely upon local level requirements based on economic activities. An attempt was made to analyze the population characteristics, such as population size, sex ratio, native to foreigner ratio, and households and persons per households by keeping governorate as unit of analysis. Data of two census period (2004 and 2010) was used in order to explore the situation and track the intercensal changes. Large variations in population were observed between governorates and it varied from 3686 to 5,007,886 in 2010. Governorates are divided according to the number of native population demarcating urbanization, modernization and infrastructure. During the intercensal period, the number of small governorates reduced and medium and large sized governorates increased mainly due to population growth. The average population in governorates was increased in total and in the larger governorates during the period. However, we noticed a reduction in the average population size in the small and medium sized governorates. The size of native population in a governorate influences the sex ratio, the native-foreigner ratio and the persons per household as well as the variations within the group of governorates. Analyses of lower level data shall aid not only to understand the situation but also to support local development policies.

  15. Dental pulp-derived stromal cells exhibit a higher osteogenic potency than bone marrow-derived stromal cells in vitro and in a porcine critical-size bone defect model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Tvedesøe, Claus; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) was compared with that of dental pulp-derived stromal cells (DPSCs) in vitro and in a pig calvaria critical-size bone defect model. METHODS: BMSCs and DPSCs were extracted from the tibia bone...

  16. Variation in the MC4R gene is associated with bone phenotypes in elderly Swedish women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Garg

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is characterized by reduced bone mineral density (BMD and increased fracture risk. Fat mass is a determinant of bone strength and both phenotypes have a strong genetic component. In this study, we examined the association between obesity associated polymorphisms (SNPs with body composition, BMD, Ultrasound (QUS, fracture and biomarkers (Homocysteine (Hcy, folate, Vitamin D and Vitamin B12 for obesity and osteoporosis. Five common variants: rs17782313 and rs1770633 (melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R; rs7566605 (insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2; rs9939609 and rs1121980 (fat mass and obesity associated (FTO were genotyped in 2 cohorts of Swedish women: PEAK-25 (age 25, n = 1061 and OPRA (age 75, n = 1044. Body mass index (BMI, total body fat and lean mass were strongly positively correlated with QUS and BMD in both cohorts (r(2 = 0.2-0.6. MC4R rs17782313 was associated with QUS in the OPRA cohort and individuals with the minor C-allele had higher values compared to T-allele homozygotes (TT vs. CT vs.100 vs. 103 vs. 103; p = 0.002; (SOS: 1521 vs. 1526 vs. 1524; p = 0.008; (Stiffness index: 69 vs. 73 vs. 74; p = 0.0006 after adjustment for confounders. They also had low folate (18 vs. 17 vs. 16; p = 0.03 and vitamin D (93 vs. 91 vs. 90; p = 0.03 and high Hcy levels (13.7 vs 14.4 vs. 14.5; p = 0.06. Fracture incidence was lower among women with the C-allele, (52% vs. 58%; p = 0.067. Variation in MC4R was not associated with BMD or body composition in either OPRA or PEAK-25. SNPs close to FTO and INSIG2 were not associated with any bone phenotypes in either cohort and FTO SNPs were only associated with body composition in PEAK-25 (p≤0.001. Our results suggest that genetic variation close to MC4R is associated with quantitative ultrasound and risk of fracture.

  17. Egg size variation among tropical and temperate songbirds: An embryonic temperature hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T.E.

    2008-01-01

    Species with 'slow' life history strategies (long life, low fecundity) are thought to produce high-quality offspring by investing in larger, but fewer, young. Larger eggs are indeed associated with fewer eggs across taxa and can yield higher-quality offspring. Tropical passerines appear to follow theory because they commonly exhibit slow life history strategies and produce larger, but fewer, eggs compared with northern species. Yet, I show here that relative egg mass (corrected for adult mass) varies extensively in the tropics and subtropics for the same clutch size, and this variation is unexplained. I propose a hypothesis to explain egg size variation both within the tropics and between latitudes: Relative egg mass increases in species with cooler egg temperatures and longer embryonic periods to offset associated increases in energetic requirements of embryos. Egg temperatures of birds are determined by parental incubation behavior and are often cooler among tropical passerines because of reduced parental attentiveness of eggs. Here, I show that cooler egg temperatures and longer embryonic periods explained the enigmatic variation in egg mass within and among regions, based on field studies in tropical Venezuela (36 species), subtropical Argentina (16 species), and north temperate Arizona (20 species). Alternative explanations are not supported. Thus, large egg sizes may reflect compensation for increased energetic requirements of cool egg temperatures and long embryonic periods that result from reduced parental attentiveness in tropical birds. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  18. Co-variation of metabolic rates and cell-size in coccolithophores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Aloisi

    2015-04-01

    , the model is able to reproduce the co-variation of growth rate and cell size observed in the laboratory when these nutrients become limiting. These results support ongoing efforts to interpret coccosphere and coccolith size measurements in the context of climate change.

  19. Multi-decadal variation in size of juvenile Summer Flounder (Paralichthys dentatus) in Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nys, Lauren N.; Fabrizio, Mary C.; Tuckey, Troy D.

    2016-01-01

    During the last quarter-century, management of Summer Flounder Paralichthys dentatus along the Atlantic coast resulted in significant increases in abundance such that rebuilding targets were recently achieved. Although spawning stock biomass is high, recruitment of young-of-the-year (YOY) Summer Flounder remains variable. Chesapeake Bay is one of the principal nursery areas for this species, but processes such as growth and survival that affect production of YOY Summer Flounder in this estuary have not been explored. Here, we investigated the relationship between abundance and size of Summer Flounder recruits from the 1988 to 2012 year classes in Chesapeake Bay. We also considered the effects of environmental factors on fish size because conditions in the bay vary spatially during the time that fish occupy nursery areas. To describe variations in Summer Flounder size, we used monthly length observations from 13,018 YOY fish captured by bottom trawl from the lower Chesapeake Bay and the James, York, and Rappahannock river subestuaries where Summer Flounder are commonly observed. We applied a generalized additive model to describe spatial, temporal, and environmental effects on observed fish size; we also considered the density of Summer Flounder and an index of productivity as factors in the model. Summer Flounder in Chesapeake Bay exhibited density-dependent and spatially related variations in mean length: larger fish were found mostly in the Bay and smaller fish in the subestuaries. Additionally, low ( 26 °C) temperatures and low salinities (fish size, indicating that individuals found in these environments were typically smaller than conspecifics inhabiting areas of moderate temperatures and higher salinities. Variable nursery habitat conditions in temperate estuaries affect fish size and, subsequently, may influence production of Summer Flounder year classes through effects on maturation and survival. As water temperatures in the mid-Atlantic region continue to

  20. The three-dimensional microstructure of trabecular bone: Analysis of site-specific variation in the human jaw bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jo Eun; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Huh, Kyung Hoe [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae Myung [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sung Ook [A Plus Dental Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    This study was performed to analyze human maxillary and mandibular trabecular bone using the data acquired from micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), and to characterize the site-specific microstructures of trabeculae. Sixty-nine cylindrical bone specimens were prepared from the mandible and maxilla. They were divided into 5 groups by region: the anterior maxilla, posterior maxilla, anterior mandible, posterior mandible, and mandibular condyle. After the specimens were scanned using a micro-CT system, three-dimensional microstructural parameters such as the percent bone volume, bone specific surface, trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, trabecular number, structure model index, and degrees of anisotropy were analyzed. Among the regions other than the condylar area, the anterior mandibular region showed the highest trabecular thickness and the lowest value for the bone specific surface. On the other hand, the posterior maxilla region showed the lowest trabecular thickness and the highest value for the bone specific surface. The degree of anisotropy was lowest at the anterior mandible. The condyle showed thinner trabeculae with a more anisotropic arrangement than the other mandibular regions. There were microstructural differences between the regions of the maxilla and mandible. These results suggested that different mechanisms of external force might exist at each site.

  1. Exercise-induced bone gain is due to enlargement in bone size without a change in volumetric bone density: a peripheral quantitative computed tomography study of the upper arms of male tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapasalo, H; Kontulainen, S; Sievänen, H; Kannus, P; Järvinen, M; Vuori, I

    2000-09-01

    Bilateral bone characteristics of the humerus (proximal, shaft, and distal sites) and radius (shaft and distal sites) in 12 former Finnish national-level male tennis players (mean age 30 years) and their 12 age-, height-, and weight-matched controls were measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). The pQCT variables analyzed were bone mineral content (BMC), total cross-sectional area of bone (Tot.Ar), cross-sectional area of the marrow cavity (M.Cav.Ar), cortical bone (Co.Ar) and trabecular bone (Tr.Ar), volumetric density of cortical (Co.Dn) and trabecular (Tr. Dn) bone, cortical wall thickness (Co.Wi.Th), bone strength index (BSI), and principal moments of inertia (I(min) and I(max)). In the players, significant side-to-side differences, in favor of the dominant (playing) arm, were found in BMC (ranging 14%-27%), Tot.Ar (16%-21%), Co.Ar (12%-32%), BSI (23%-37%), I(min) (33%-61%), and I(max) (27%-67%) at all measured bone sites, and in Co.Wi.Th. (5%-25%) at the humeral and radial shafts, and distal humerus. The side-to-side M.Cav.Ar difference was significant at the proximal humerus (19%) and radial shaft (29%). Concerning the players' Co.Dn and Tr.Dn, the only significant side-to-side difference was found in the Co.Dn of the distal humerus, with the playing arm showing a slightly smaller Co.Dn than the nonplaying arm (-2%). In controls, significant dominant-to-nondominant side differences were also found, but with the majority of the differences being rather small, and significantly lower than those of the players. In conclusion, despite the large side-to-side differences in BMC, the volumetric bone density (Co.Dn, Tr.Dn) was almost identical in the dominant and nondominant arms of the players and controls. Thus, the players' high playing-arm BMC was due to increases in the Tot.Ar, M.Cav.Ar, Co.Ar, and CW.Th. In other words, the playing arm's extra bone mineral, and thus increased bone strength, was mainly due to increased bone size and not

  2. Influence of birth size and body composition on bone mineral density in early adulthood : the PROGRAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leunissen, R. W. J.; Stijnen, T.; Boot, A. M.; Hokken-Koelega, A. C. S.

    2008-01-01

    Background/objectives Low bone mineral density (BMD) may lead to osteoporosis and is associated with increased fracture risk. Associations between BMD and various factors have been reported. Our objective was to investigate whether birth size, lean body mass (LBM) and fat mass (FM) are determinants

  3. Variation in avian brain shape: relationship with size and orbital shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Soichiro; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Miki, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Seiji; Endo, Hideki

    2013-11-01

    There is wide variation in brain shape among birds. Differences in brain dimensions reflect species-specific sensory capacities and behavioral repertoires that are shaped by environmental and biological factors during evolution. Most previous studies aimed at defining factors impacting brain shape have used volumetric or linear measurements. However, few have explored the quantitative indices of three-dimensional (3D) brain geometry that are absolutely imperative to understanding avian evolutionary history. This study aimed: (i) to explore the relationship between brain shape and overall brain size; and (ii) to assess the relationship between brain shape and orbital shape. Avian brain endocasts were reconstructed from computed tomography images and analyzed using 3D geometric morphometrics. Principal component analysis revealed dominant regional variations in avian brain shape and shape correlations between the telencephalon and cerebellum, between the cerebellum and myelencephalon, and between the diencephalon and optic tectum. Brain shape changes relative to total brain size were determined by multivariate regression analysis. Larger brain size was associated with a relatively slender telencephalon and differences in brain orientation. The correlation between brain shape and orbital shape was assessed by two-block partial least-squares analysis. Relatively round brains with a ventrally flexed brain base were associated with rounder orbits, while narrower brains with a flat brain base were associated with more elongated orbits. The shapes of functionally associated avian brain regions are correlated, and orbital size and shape are dominant factors influencing the overall shape of the avian brain.

  4. Effect of litter size on the variation in birth and weaning weights of Landrace piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Duarte Prazeres

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the size class of the litter at birth on the variation in birth and weaning weights and on the survival rate of piglets from birth to weaning. For this purpose, records of individual weight at birth and weaning of piglets obtained from a database of 295 Landrace litters born between 2000 and 2010 on a pig farm in the western region of the State of Paraná were used. The litters were classified as small (up to 7 piglets, medium (8 to 13 piglets, and large (> 14 piglets according to the total number of piglets born. The data were analyzed considering the effects of the year of sow mating and size class of the litter at birth. The correlations between mean weight and variance in litter weight and size were higher for medium and large litters. The size class of the litter significantly influenced the mean weight of piglets at birth and weaning and the variance in birth weight. Piglets born in medium and large litters weighed less and exhibited greater birth weight variation and a lower survival rate until weaning than piglets born in small litters.

  5. Genetic architecture of bone quality variation in layer chickens revealed by a genome-wide association study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Sun, Congjiao; Qu, Liang; Shen, Manman; Dou, Taocun; Ma, Meng; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal problems in layer chickens are gaining attention due to animal welfare and economic losses in the egg industry. The genetic improvement of bone traits has been proposed as a potential solution to these issues; however, genetic architecture is not well understood. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on bone quality using a sample of 1534 hens genotyped with a 600 K Chicken Genotyping Array. Using a linear mixed model approach, a novel locus close to GSG1L, associated with femur bone mineral density (BMD), was uncovered in this study. In addition, nine SNPs in genes were associated with bone quality. Three of these genes, RANKL, ADAMTS and SOST, were known to be associated with osteoporosis in humans, which makes them good candidate genes for osteoporosis in chickens. Genomic partitioning analysis supports the fact that common variants contribute to the variations of bone quality. We have identified several strong candidate genes and genomic regions associated with bone traits measured in end-of-lay cage layers, which accounted for 1.3–7.7% of the phenotypic variance. These SNPs could provide the relevant information to help elucidate which genes affect bone quality in chicken. PMID:28383518

  6. Variation in the fitness effects of mutations with population density and size in Escherichia coli.

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    Huansheng Cao

    Full Text Available The fitness effects of mutations are context specific and depend on both external (e.g., environment and internal (e.g., cellular stress, genetic background factors. The influence of population size and density on fitness effects are unknown, despite the central role population size plays in the supply and fixation of mutations. We addressed this issue by comparing the fitness of 92 Keio strains (Escherichia coli K12 single gene knockouts at comparatively high (1.2×10(7 CFUs/mL and low (2.5×10(2 CFUs/mL densities, which also differed in population size (high: 1.2×10(8; low: 1.25×10(3. Twenty-eight gene deletions (30% exhibited a fitness difference, ranging from 5 to 174% (median: 35%, between the high and low densities. Our analyses suggest this variation among gene deletions in fitness responses reflected in part both gene orientation and function, of the gene properties we examined (genomic position, length, orientation, and function. Although we could not determine the relative effects of population density and size, our results suggest fitness effects of mutations vary with these two factors, and this variation is gene-specific. Besides being a mechanism for density-dependent selection (r-K selection, the dependence of fitness effects on population density and size has implications for any population that varies in size over time, including populations undergoing evolutionary rescue, species invasions into novel habitats, and cancer progression and metastasis. Further, combined with recent advances in understanding the roles of other context-specific factors in the fitness effects of mutations, our results will help address theoretical and applied biological questions more realistically.

  7. Dental size variation in the Atapuerca-SH Middle Pleistocene hominids.

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    Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Sarmiento, S; Cunha, E; Rosas, A; Bastir, M

    2001-09-01

    The Middle Pleistocene Atapuerca-Sima de los Huesos (SH) site in Spain has yielded the largest sample of fossil hominids so far found from a single site and belonging to the same biological population. The SH dental sample includes a total of 452 permanent and deciduous teeth, representing a minimum of 27 individuals. We present a study of the dental size variation in these hominids, based on the analysis of the mandibular permanent dentition: lateral incisors, n=29; canines, n=27; third premolars, n=30; fourth premolars, n=34; first molars, n=38; second molars, n=38. We have obtained the buccolingual diameter and the crown area (measured on occlusal photographs) of these teeth, and used the bootstrap method to assess the amount of variation in the SH sample compared with the variation of a modern human sample from the Museu Antropologico of the Universidade of Coimbra (Portugal). The SH hominids have, in general terms, a dental size variation higher than that of the modern human sample. The analysis is especially conclusive for the canines. Furthermore, we have estimated the degree of sexual dimorphism of the SH sample by obtaining male and female dental subsamples by means of sexing the large sample of SH mandibular specimens. We obtained the index of sexual dimorphism (ISD=male mean/female mean) and the values were compared with those obtained from the sexed modern human sample from Coimbra, and with data found in the literature concerning several recent human populations. In all tooth classes the ISD of the SH hominids was higher than that of modern humans, but the differences were generally modest, except for the canines, thus suggesting that canine size sexual dimorphism in Homo heidelbergensis was probably greater than that of modern humans. Since the approach of sexing fossil specimens has some obvious limitations, these results should be assessed with caution. Additional data from SH and other European Middle Pleistocene sites would be necessary to test

  8. Influence of fracture gap size on the pattern of long bone healing: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Benito, M J; García-Aznar, J M; Kuiper, J H; Doblaré, M

    2005-07-07

    Following fractures, bones restore their original structural integrity through a complex process in which several cellular events are involved. Among other factors, this process is highly influenced by the mechanical environment of the fracture site. In this study, we present a mathematical model to simulate the effect of mechanical stimuli on most of the cellular processes that occur during fracture healing, namely proliferation, migration and differentiation. On the basis of these three processes, the model then simulates the evolution of geometry, distributions of cell types and elastic properties inside a healing fracture. The three processes were implemented in a Finite Element code as a combination of three coupled analysis stages: a biphasic, a diffusion and a thermoelastic step. We tested the mechano-biological regulatory model thus created by simulating the healing patterns of fractures with different gap sizes and different mechanical stimuli. The callus geometry, tissue differentiation patterns and fracture stiffness predicted by the model were similar to experimental observations for every analysed situation.

  9. Association between a variation in the phosphodiesterase 4D gene and bone mineral density

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    Sambrook Philip N

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragility fractures caused by osteoporosis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in aging populations. Bone mineral density (BMD is a useful surrogate marker for risk of fracture and is a highly heritable trait. The genetic variants underlying this genetic contribution are largely unknown. Methods We performed a large-scale association study investigating more than 25,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located within 16,000 genes. Allele frequencies were estimated in contrasting DNA pools from white females selected for low (2, n = 319 and high (> 1.11 g/cm2, n = 321 BMD at the lumbar spine. Significant findings were verified in two additional sample collections. Results Based on allele frequency differences between DNA pools and subsequent individual genotyping, one of the candidate loci indicated was the phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D gene region on chromosome 5q12. We subsequently tested the marker SNP, rs1498608, in a second sample of 138 white females with low (2 and 138 females with high (>1.04 g/cm2 lumbar spine BMD. Odds ratios were 1.5 (P = 0.035 in the original sample and 2.1 (P = 0.018 in the replication sample. Association fine mapping with 80 SNPs located within 50 kilobases of the marker SNP identified a 20 kilobase region of association containing exon 6 of PDE4D. In a second, family-based replication sample with a preponderance of females with low BMD, rs1498608 showed an opposite relationship with BMD at different sites (p = 0.00044-0.09. We also replicated the previously reported association of the Ser37Ala polymorphism in BMP2, known to interact biologically with PDE4D, with BMD. Conclusion This study indicates that variants in the gene encoding PDE4D account for some of the genetic contribution to bone mineral density variation in humans. The contrasting results from different samples indicate that the effect may be context-dependent. PDE4 inhibitors have been shown to increase bone mass in

  10. Home range size variation in female arctic grizzly bears relative to reproductive status and resource availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark A; Derocher, Andrew E; Nagy, John A

    2013-01-01

    The area traversed in pursuit of resources defines the size of an animal's home range. For females, the home range is presumed to be a function of forage availability. However, the presence of offspring may also influence home range size due to reduced mobility, increased nutritional need, and behavioral adaptations of mothers to increase offspring survival. Here, we examine the relationship between resource use and variation in home range size for female barren-ground grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) of the Mackenzie Delta region in Arctic Canada. We develop methods to test hypotheses of home range size that address selection of cover where cover heterogeneity is low, using generalized linear mixed-effects models and an information-theoretic approach. We found that the reproductive status of female grizzlies affected home range size but individually-based spatial availability of highly selected cover in spring and early summer was a stronger correlate. If these preferred covers in spring and early summer, a period of low resource availability for grizzly bears following den-emergence, were patchy and highly dispersed, females travelled farther regardless of the presence or absence of offspring. Increased movement to preferred covers, however, may result in greater risk to the individual or family.

  11. Home range size variation in female arctic grizzly bears relative to reproductive status and resource availability.

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    Mark A Edwards

    Full Text Available The area traversed in pursuit of resources defines the size of an animal's home range. For females, the home range is presumed to be a function of forage availability. However, the presence of offspring may also influence home range size due to reduced mobility, increased nutritional need, and behavioral adaptations of mothers to increase offspring survival. Here, we examine the relationship between resource use and variation in home range size for female barren-ground grizzly bears (Ursus arctos of the Mackenzie Delta region in Arctic Canada. We develop methods to test hypotheses of home range size that address selection of cover where cover heterogeneity is low, using generalized linear mixed-effects models and an information-theoretic approach. We found that the reproductive status of female grizzlies affected home range size but individually-based spatial availability of highly selected cover in spring and early summer was a stronger correlate. If these preferred covers in spring and early summer, a period of low resource availability for grizzly bears following den-emergence, were patchy and highly dispersed, females travelled farther regardless of the presence or absence of offspring. Increased movement to preferred covers, however, may result in greater risk to the individual or family.

  12. Size variation of the end Permian conodont Neogondolella at Meishan Section, Changxing, Zhejiang and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This study is based on both a generic and species level investigation of the individual size of the latest Permian conodont Neogondolella Pa elements collected from Meishan Section A, Changxing, Zhejiang Province. In this study, an obvious size reduction of Neogondolella Pa elements within bed 24e of the upper Changxing Limestone is recognized. The size variation of the Neogondolella occurs simultaneously with some important events including the negative shift of δ13C, change in the ratio of the abundance of cyanobacterial biomarkers versus that of other general bacterial biomarkers and the shallowing of the sea water. Through the investigation of the paleoenvironmental changes and the analysis of the paleoecology of the conodont genus Neogondolella, the authors propose that the major factors for the size reduction of species of the conodont genus Neogondolella are food shortages caused by the mass extinction, the shallowing of the sea water as well as the increase in opacity of the sea water during the end Permian. The same phenomenon of Neogondolella size reduction is also observed in preliminary research from the same horizon at Shangsi Section, Sichuan Province. All the evidence suggests that there was a mass extinction that occurred at the horizon of bed 24e, and the evidence supports the viewpoint of a multi-phase mass extinction during the Permian and Triassic transition in South China.

  13. Genome size and phenotypic variation of Nymphaea (Nymphaeaceae species from Eastern Europe and temperate Asia

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    Magdalena Anna Dąbrowska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite long-term research, the aquatic genus Nymphaea still possesses major taxonomic challenges. High phenotypic plasticity and possible interspecific hybridization often make it impossible to identify individual specimens. The main aim of this study was to assess phenotypic variation in Nymphaea taxa sampled over a wide area of Eastern Europe and temperate Asia. Samples were identified based on species-specific genome sizes and diagnostic morphological characters for each taxon were then selected. A total of 353 specimens from 32 populations in Poland, Russia and Ukraine were studied, with nine biometric traits being examined. Although some specimens morphologically matched N. ×borealis (a hybrid between N. alba and N. candida according to published determination keys, only one hybrid individual was revealed based on genome size data. Other specimens with intermediate morphology possessed genome size corresponding to N. alba, N. candida or N. tetragona. This indicates that natural hybridization between N. alba and N. candida is not as frequent as previously suggested. Our results also revealed a considerably higher variation in the studied morphological traits (especially the quantitative ones in N. alba and N. candida than reported in the literature. A determination key for the investigated Nymphaea species is provided, based on taxonomically-informative morphological characters identified in our study.

  14. Lamellar bone is an incremental tissue reconciling enamel rhythms, body size, and organismal life history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromage, Timothy G; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Hogg, Russell; Goldman, Haviva M; McFarlin, Shannon C; Warshaw, Johanna; Dirks, Wendy; Perez-Ochoa, Alejandro; Smolyar, Igor; Enlow, Donald H; Boyde, Alan

    2009-05-01

    Mammalian enamel formation is periodic, including fluctuations attributable to the daily biological clock as well as longer-period oscillations that enigmatically correlate with body mass. Because the scaling of bone mass to body mass is an axiom of vertebrate hard tissue biology, we consider that long-period enamel formation rhythms may reflect corresponding and heretofore unrecognized rhythms in bone growth. The principal aim of this study is to seek a rhythm in bone growth demonstrably related to enamel oscillatory development. Our analytical approach is based in morphology, using a variety of hard tissue microscopy techniques. We first ascertain the relationship among long-period enamel rhythms, the striae of Retzius, and body mass using a large sample of mammalian taxa. In addition, we test whether osteocyte lacuna density (a surrogate for rates of cell proliferation) in bone is correlated with mammalian body mass. Finally, using fluorescently labeled developing bone tissues, we investigate whether the bone lamella, a fundamental microanatomical unit of bone, relates to rhythmic enamel growth increments. Our results confirm a positive correlation between long-period enamel rhythms and body mass and a negative correlation between osteocyte density and body mass. We also confirm that lamellar bone is an incremental tissue, one lamella formed in the species-specific time dependency of striae of Retzius formation. We conclude by contextualizing our morphological research with a current understanding of autonomic regulatory control of the skeleton and body mass, suggesting a central contribution to the coordination of organismal life history and body mass.

  15. Transcriptome-wide mining of the differentially expressed transcripts for natural variation of floral organ size in Physalis philadelphica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Li, Zhichao; He, Chaoying

    2012-11-01

    Natural phenotypic variation, a result of genetic variation, developed during evolution in response to environmental selections. Physalis philadelphica, known as tomatillo in the Solanaceae, is rich in floral and post-floral organ size diversity. However, its genetic variation is unknown. Here P. philadelphica was classified into three groups with large, intermediate, and small reproductive organ size, and a positive correlation was observed between floral organ and berry sizes. Through cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analyses, 263 differentially expressed transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were isolated from two accessions with different floral organ sizes. The genes encode various transcription factors, protein kinases, and enzymes, and they displayed multiple expression patterns during floral development, indicating a complexity in the genetic basis of phenotypic variation. Detailed expression analyses revealed that they were differentially expressed during floral and post-floral development, implying that they have roles in the development of flowers and fruits. Expression of three genes was further monitored in 26 accessions, and in particular the expression variation of Pp30, encoding an AP2-like transcription factor, correlates well with the observed phenotypic variations, which strongly supports an essential role for the gene in the natural variation of floral and post-floral organ size in Physalis. The results suggest that alteration in the expression pattern of a few key regulatory genes in the developmental process may be an important source of genetic variations that lead to natural variation in morphological traits.

  16. Seed size variation and predation of seeds produced by wild and crop-wild sunflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, H M; Cummings, C L; Kahn, L; Snow, A A

    2001-04-01

    The movement of pollen between crop and wild sunflowers (both Helianthus annuus) has led to concerns about the possible introduction of crop transgenes into wild populations. The persistence of crop traits in wild populations will depend in part on the relative fitness of crop-wild hybrid vs. wild plants. Using seeds from two large experimental field plots, we found that seeds produced by crop-wild plants were twice the size of wild seeds and differed in coloration. Head diameter, date of flowering, identity of mother plant, and levels of predispersal predation explained some variation in mean seed size. We hypothesized that postdispersal vertebrate seed predation would be affected by seed size, with hybrid seeds preferentially eaten. In each of three field trials, significantly more hybrid seeds were eaten (62% of hybrid seed; 42% of wild seed). Within the category of wild seeds, larger seeds were preferentially eaten; however among hybrid seeds, predation was not significantly related to seed size. In this study, differential predation thus reduces hybrid fitness and would presumably slow the spread of transgenes into wild populations.

  17. Variation in Bachman's Sparrow home-range size at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, J.M.; Krementz, D.G.

    2006-01-01

    Using radiotelemetry, we studied variation in home-range size of the Bachman's Sparrow (Aimophila aestivalis) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina, during the 1995 breeding season. At SRS, sparrows occurred primarily in two habitats: mature pine habitats managed for Red-cockaded Woodpecker (Picoides borealis) and pine plantations 1 to 6 years of age. The mean 95% minimum convex polygon home-range size for males and females combined (n = 14) was 2.95 ha + 0.57 SE, across all habitats. Mean homerange size for males in mature pine stands (4.79 ha + 0.27, n = 4) was significantly larger than that in 4-year-old (3.00 ha + 0.31, n = 3) and 2-year-old stands (1.46 ha + 0.31, it = 3). Home-range sizes of paired males and females (it = 4 pairs) were similar within habitat type; mean distances between consecutive locations differed by habitat type and sex. We hypothesize that a gradient in food resources drives home-range dynamics.

  18. Variation in Size and Growth of the Great Scallop Pecten maximus along a Latitudinal Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvaud, Laurent; Patry, Yann; Jolivet, Aurélie; Cam, Emmanuelle; Le Goff, Clement; Strand, Øivind; Charrier, Grégory; Thébault, Julien; Lazure, Pascal; Gotthard, Karl; Clavier, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between growth and temperature will aid in the evaluation of thermal stress and threats to ectotherms in the context of anticipated climate changes. Most Pecten maximus scallops living at high latitudes in the northern hemisphere have a larger maximum body size than individuals further south, a common pattern among many ectotherms. We investigated differences in daily shell growth among scallop populations along the Northeast Atlantic coast from Spain to Norway. This study design allowed us to address precisely whether the asymptotic size observed along a latitudinal gradient, mainly defined by a temperature gradient, results from differences in annual or daily growth rates, or a difference in the length of the growing season. We found that low annual growth rates in northern populations are not due to low daily growth values, but to the smaller number of days available each year to achieve growth compared to the south. We documented a decrease in the annual number of growth days with age regardless of latitude. However, despite initially lower annual growth performances in terms of growing season length and growth rate, differences in asymptotic size as a function of latitude resulted from persistent annual growth performances in the north and sharp declines in the south. Our measurements of daily growth rates throughout life in a long-lived ectothermic species provide new insight into spatio-temporal variations in growth dynamics and growing season length that cannot be accounted for by classical growth models that only address asymptotic size and annual growth rate. PMID:22649553

  19. Guided bone regeneration produced by new mineralized and reticulated collagen membranes in critical-sized rat calvarial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veríssimo, Denusa M; Leitão, Renata F C; Figueiró, Sônia D; Góes, Júlio C; Lima, Vilma; Silveira, Charles O; Brito, Gerly A C

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone regenerative effect of glutaraldehyde (GA) cross-linking on mineralized polyanionic collagen membranes in critical-sized defects on rat calvarias. Bone calvarial defects were induced in Wistar rats, which were then divided into five groups: a sham group; a control group, which received a commercial membrane; and GA, 25GA, and 75GA groups, which received one of three different polyanionic collagen membranes mineralized by 0, 25, or 75 hydroxyapatite cycles and then cross-linked by GA. Bone formation was evaluated based on digital radiography and computerized tomography. Histological analyses were performed 4 and 12 weeks after the surgical procedure to observe bone formation, membrane resorption, and fibrous tissue surrounding the membranes. Measurement of myeloperoxidase activity, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 1beta production was performed 24 h after surgery. The percentage of new bone formation in the GA, 25GA, and 75GA groups was higher compared with the control and sham groups. In the GA and 25 GA groups, the membranes were still in place and were contained in a thick fibrous capsule after 12 weeks. No significant difference was found among the groups regarding myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin 1beta levels, although the GA, 25GA, and 75GA groups presented decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha compared with the control group. These new GA cross-linked membranes accelerated bone healing of the calvarium defects and did not induce inflammation. In addition, unlike the control membrane, the experimental membranes were not absorbed during the analyzed period, so they may offer advantages in large bone defects where prolonged membrane barrier functions are desirable.

  20. Closed head experimental traumatic brain injury increases size and bone volume of callus in mice with concomitant tibial fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Rhys D; Grills, Brian L; Church, Jarrod E; Walsh, Nicole C; McDonald, Aaron C; Agoston, Denes V; Sun, Mujun; O’Brien, Terence J; Shultz, Sandy R; McDonald, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI) and long bone fracture are commonly observed in multitrauma and polytrauma. Despite clinical observations of enhanced bone healing in patients with TBI, the relationship between TBI and fracture healing remains poorly understood, with clinical data limited by the presence of several confounding variables. Here we developed a novel trauma model featuring closed-skull weight-drop TBI and concomitant tibial fracture in order to investigate the effect of TBI on fracture healing. Male mice were assigned into Fracture + Sham TBI (FX) or Fracture + TBI (MULTI) groups and sacrificed at 21 and 35 days post-injury for analysis of healing fractures by micro computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry. μCT analysis revealed calluses from MULTI mice had a greater bone and total tissue volume, and displayed higher mean polar moment of inertia when compared to calluses from FX mice at 21 days post-injury. Histomorphometric results demonstrated an increased amount of trabecular bone in MULTI calluses at 21 days post-injury. These findings indicate that closed head TBI results in calluses that are larger in size and have an increased bone volume, which is consistent with the notion that TBI induces the formation of a more robust callus. PMID:27682431

  1. Genome downsizing and karyotype constancy in diploid and polyploid congeners: a model of genome size variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Lidia; Realini, María Florencia; Fourastié, María Florencia; García, Ana María; González, Graciela Esther

    2014-06-26

    Evolutionary chromosome change involves significant variation in DNA amount in diploids and genome downsizing in polyploids. Genome size and karyotype parameters of Hippeastrum species with different ploidy level were analysed. In Hippeastrum, polyploid species show less DNA content per basic genome than diploid species. The rate of variation is lower at higher ploidy levels. All the species have a basic number x = 11 and bimodal karyotypes. The basic karyotypes consist of four short metacentric chromosomes and seven large chromosomes (submetacentric and subtelocentric). The bimodal karyotype is preserved maintaining the relative proportions of members of the haploid chromosome set, even in the presence of genome downsizing. The constancy of the karyotype is maintained because changes in DNA amount are proportional to the length of the whole-chromosome complement and vary independently in the long and short sets of chromosomes. This karyotype constancy in taxa of Hippeastrum with different genome size and ploidy level indicates that the distribution of extra DNA within the complement is not at random and suggests the presence of mechanisms selecting for constancy, or against changes, in karyotype morphology.

  2. Variations in CYP78A13 coding region influence grain size and yield in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Fang, Jun; Ou, Shujun; Gao, Shaopei; Zhang, Fengxia; Du, Lin; Xiao, Yunhua; Wang, Hongru; Sun, Xiaohong; Chu, Jinfang; Wang, Guodong; Chu, Chengcai

    2015-04-01

    Grain size is one of the most important determinants of crop yield in cereals. Here, we identified a dominant mutant, big grain2 (bg2-D) from our enhancer-trapping population. Genetic analysis and SiteFinding PCR (polymerase chain reaction) revealed that BG2 encodes a cytochrome P450, OsCYP78A13. Sequence search revealed that CYP78A13 has a paralogue Grain Length 3.2 (GL3.2, LOC_Os03g30420) in rice with distinct expression patterns, analysis of transgenic plants harbouring either CYP78A13 or GL3.2 showed that both can promote grain growth. Sequence polymorphism analysis with 1529 rice varieties showed that the nucleotide diversity at CYP78A13 gene body and the 20 kb flanking region in the indica varieties were markedly higher than those in japonica varieties. Further, comparison of the genomic sequence of CYP78A13 in the japonica cultivar Nipponbare and the indica cultivar 9311 showed that there were three InDels in the promoter region and eight SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism) in its coding sequence. Detailed examination of the transgenic plants with chimaeric constructs suggested that variation in CYP78A13 coding region is responsible for the variation of grain yield. Taken together, our results suggest that the variations in CYP78A13 in the indica varieties hold potential in rice breeding for application of grain yield improvement.

  3. Temporal variation in genetic diversity and effective population size of Mediterranean and subalpine Arabidopsis thaliana populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Nasr H; Montesinos-Navarro, Alicia; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos; Picó, F Xavier

    2011-09-01

    Currently, there exists a limited knowledge on the extent of temporal variation in population genetic parameters of natural populations. Here, we study the extent of temporal variation in population genetics by genotyping 151 genome-wide SNP markers polymorphic in 466 individuals collected from nine populations of the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana during 4 years. Populations are located along an altitudinal climatic gradient from Mediterranean to subalpine environments in NE Spain, which has been shown to influence key demographic attributes and life cycle adaptations. Genetically, A. thaliana populations were more variable across space than over time. Common multilocus genotypes were detected several years in the same population, whereas low-frequency multilocus genotypes appeared only 1 year. High-elevation populations were genetically poorer and more variable over time than low-elevation populations, which might be caused by a higher overall demographic instability at higher altitudes. Estimated effective population sizes were low but also showed a significant decreasing trend with increasing altitude, suggesting a deeper impact of genetic drift at high-elevation populations. In comparison with single-year samplings, repeated genotyping over time captured substantially higher amount of genetic variation contained in A. thaliana populations. Furthermore, repeated genotyping of populations provided novel information on the genetic properties of A. thaliana populations and allowed hypothesizing on their underlying mechanisms. Therefore, including temporal genotyping programmes into traditional population genetic studies can significantly increase our understanding of the dynamics of natural populations.

  4. Determinants of bone mass and bone size in a large cohort of physically active young adult men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett P

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The determinants of bone mineral density (BMD at multiple sites were examined in a fit college population. Subjects were 755 males (mean age = 18.7 years entering the United States Military Academy. A questionnaire assessed exercise frequency and milk, caffeine, and alcohol consumption and tobacco use. Academy staff measured height, weight, and fitness. Calcaneal BMD was measured by peripheral dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (pDXA. Peripheral-quantitative computed tomography (pQCT was used to measure tibial mineral content, circumference and cortical thickness. Spine and hip BMD were measured by DXA in a subset (n = 159. Mean BMD at all sites was approximately one standard deviation above young normal (p

  5. Spatial variation in particle number size distributions in a large metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Mejía

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Air quality studies have indicated that particle number size distribution (NSD is unevenly spread in urban air. To date, these studies have focussed on differences in concentration levels between sampling locations rather than differences in the underlying geometries of the distributions. As a result, the existing information on the spatial variation of the NSD in urban areas remains incomplete. To investigate this variation in a large metropolitan area in the southern hemisphere, NSD data collected at nine different locations during different campaigns of varying duration were compared using statistical methods. The spectra were analysed in terms of their modal structures (the graphical representation of the number size distribution function, cumulative distribution and number median diameter (NMD. The study found that with the exception of one site all distributions were bimodal or suggestive of bimodality. In general, peak concentrations were below 30 nm and NMDs below 50 nm, except at a site dominated by diesel trucks, where it shifted to around 50 and 60 nm respectively. Ultrafine particles (UFPs contributed to 82–90% of the particle number, nanoparticles (<50 nm to around 60–70%, except at the diesel traffic site, where their contribution dropped to 50%. Statistical analyses found that the modal structures heterogeneously distributed throughout Brisbane whereas it was not always the case for the NMD. The discussion led to the following site classification: (1 urban sites dominated by petrol traffic, (2 urban sites affected by the proximity to the road and (3 an isolated site dominated by diesel traffic. Comparisons of weekday and weekend data indicated that, the distributions were not statistically different. The only exception occurred at one site, where there is a significant drop in the number of diesel buses on the weekend. The differences in sampling period between sites did not affect the results. The statistics instead suggested

  6. A Review on Anatomical Variations of Mental Foramen (Number, Location, Shape, Symmetry, Direction and Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ezoddini-Ardakani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mental foramen is located on the anterior aspect of the mandible that permits the terminal branch of the inferior alveolar nerve and blood vessels to exit. The anatomical variations of mental foramen are of considerable importance in local anesthesia, treatment of the fractures in the parasymphysis area, orthognatic surgeries, implant placement, etc. Regarding the importance of mental foramen in dentistry (from local anesthesia to invasive surgical procedures, this study intends to review the anatomical variations of mental foramen in this study. Absence of mental foramen is rare. On the other hand, prevalence of accessory mental foramen has been estimated lower than 15% in the most studies. The position of mental foramen is normally between first and second premolar teeth or under second premolar tooth in different ethnic groups and bilateral symmetry exists in regard with location in most cases. In most studies, the ratio of distance from mental foramen to symphysis to distance from symphysis to posterior border of ramus has been reported about 1/3.5 to 1/3. Mental foramen is oval or circular in shape and its most common direction is usually posterosuperior. Its size in different studies has been estimated about 2 to 5 millimeters and asymmetry in size is possible on both sides of mandible. Due to variations of mental foramen between various ethnic groups and even different individuals in the same ethnic group, using advanced imaging techniques such as CBCT is recommended in order to gain detailed knowledge of anatomy and morphology of mental foramen before applying invasive surgeries.

  7. Population-based resequencing of experimentally evolved populations reveals the genetic basis of body size variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L Turner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Body size is a classic quantitative trait with evolutionarily significant variation within many species. Locating the alleles responsible for this variation would help understand the maintenance of variation in body size in particular, as well as quantitative traits in general. However, successful genome-wide association of genotype and phenotype may require very large sample sizes if alleles have low population frequencies or modest effects. As a complementary approach, we propose that population-based resequencing of experimentally evolved populations allows for considerable power to map functional variation. Here, we use this technique to investigate the genetic basis of natural variation in body size in Drosophila melanogaster. Significant differentiation of hundreds of loci in replicate selection populations supports the hypothesis that the genetic basis of body size variation is very polygenic in D. melanogaster. Significantly differentiated variants are limited to single genes at some loci, allowing precise hypotheses to be formed regarding causal polymorphisms, while other significant regions are large and contain many genes. By using significantly associated polymorphisms as a priori candidates in follow-up studies, these data are expected to provide considerable power to determine the genetic basis of natural variation in body size.

  8. In vivo bone remodeling rates determination and compressive stiffness variations before, during 60 days bed rest and two years follow up: A micro-FE-analysis from HR-pQCT measurements of the berlin Bed Rest Study-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Zully; Belavy, Daniel; Baumann, Wolfgang W.; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2017-03-01

    Bed rest studies are used for simulation and study of physiological changes as observed in unloading/non-gravity environments. Amongst others, bone mass reduction, similar as occurring due to aging osteoporosis, combined with bio-fluids redistribution and muscle atrophy have been observed and analyzed. Advanced radiological methods of high resolution such as HR-pQCT (XtremeCT) allow 3D-visualizing in vivo bone remodeling processes occurring during absence/reduction of mechanical stimuli (0 to <1 g) as simulated by bed rest. Induced bone micro-structure (e.g. trabecular number, cortical thickness, porosity) and density variations can be quantified. However, these parameters are average values of each sample and important information regarding bone mass distribution and within bone mechanical behaviour is lost. Finite element models with hexa-elements of identical size as the HR-pQCT measurements (0.082 mm×0.082 mm×0.082 mm, ca. 7E6 elements/sample) can be used for subject-specific in vivo stiffness calculation. This technique also allows quantifying if bone microstructural changes represent a risk of mechanical bone collapse (fracture).

  9. Not all sharks are "swimming noses": variation in olfactory bulb size in cartilaginous fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopak, Kara E; Lisney, Thomas J; Collin, Shaun P

    2015-03-01

    Olfaction is a universal modality by which all animals sample chemical stimuli from their environment. In cartilaginous fishes, olfaction is critical for various survival tasks including localizing prey, avoiding predators, and chemosensory communication with conspecifics. Little is known, however, about interspecific variation in olfactory capability in these fishes, or whether the relative importance of olfaction in relation to other sensory systems varies with regard to ecological factors, such as habitat and lifestyle. In this study, we have addressed these questions by directly examining interspecific variation in the size of the olfactory bulbs (OB), the region of the brain that receives the primary sensory projections from the olfactory nerve, in 58 species of cartilaginous fishes. Relative OB size was compared among species occupying different ecological niches. Our results show that the OBs maintain a substantial level of allometric independence from the rest of the brain across cartilaginous fishes and that OB size is highly variable among species. These findings are supported by phylogenetic generalized least-squares models, which show that this variability is correlated with ecological niche, particularly habitat. The relatively largest OBs were found in pelagic-coastal/oceanic sharks, especially migratory species such as Carcharodon carcharias and Galeocerdo cuvier. Deep-sea species also possess large OBs, suggesting a greater reliance on olfaction in habitats where vision may be compromised. In contrast, the smallest OBs were found in the majority of reef-associated species, including sharks from the families Carcharhinidae and Hemiscyllidae and dasyatid batoids. These results suggest that there is great variability in the degree to which these fishes rely on olfactory cues. The OBs have been widely used as a neuroanatomical proxy for olfactory capability in vertebrates, and we speculate that differences in olfactory capabilities may be the result of

  10. Injectable Reactive Biocomposites For Bone Healing In Critical-Size Rabbit Calvarial Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    2008 BMP-2-based repair of large-scale calvarial defects in an experimental model: regenerative surgery in cranioplasty J. Craniofac. Surg. 19 1315–22...anterior lumbar interbody fusion and periodontal ridge augmentation (INFUSE R© bone graft) [21, 22]. When implanted in a rabbit calvarial CSD, rhBMP-2...typically used in the clinic. Following standard practices for aseptic surgery , a full-thickness calvarial defect was prepared in the parietal bones using a

  11. An Investigation of Coral Based Bioactive Composite Bone in a Critical-sized Cranial Defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionNatural coral is a porous three-dimensional biocompatible material with osteo-conductivity~([1]). Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is a member of TGF-β family possessing strong osteoinductive properties~([2]). Collagen has been demonstrated efficacy in sustained releasing growth factor due to gradually absorption of collagen matrix~([3]). And bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been chosen as seed cells owing to the capacity of differentiating into o...

  12. Variations in programmed phase defect size and its impact on defect detection signal intensity using at-wavelength inspection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tsuyoshi; Takagi, Noriaki; Abe, Tsukasa

    2015-10-01

    A programmed phase defect Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) mask was fabricated and measurement repeatability of the defect size using a scanning probe microscope (SPM) was evaluated. The SPM measurement results indicated that the defect size variation as registered by the measurement repeatability were much smaller than the defect-to-defect variations. It means the defect-to-defect variation in size actually does exist. Some defects were found where their sizes before a multilayer coating (on quartz) were all the same but after the coat their sizes varied quite significantly when observed on the multilayer. This result indicated that it is difficult to estimate the phase defect size on quartz, whereas they can be accurately measured on multilayer. Influences of the defect size variation on defect detection signal intensity (DSI) using an actinic blank inspection (ABI) system were examined; their influences on the wafer printability were also examined. The DSI was strongly correlated with defect depth on the multilayer, and it was also indicated that the ABI can detect small variations in defect sizes. It was also confirmed that the impact of the phase defects on wafer printed CDs were proportional to the DSIs, and that the ABI has a potential to detect phase defect that could cause 5 % of the CD error when printing 16 nm dense lines.

  13. Latitudinal aerosol size distribution variation in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean measured aboard the FS-Polarstern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Gallagher

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol size distribution measurements from 0.03 µm to 25 µm diameter were taken at ambient humidity aboard the German research vessel, FS-Polarstern, during a transect from Bremerhaven in northern Germany, to Cape Town in South Africa across latitudes 53°32' N to 33°55' S, denoted cruise number ANT XXI/1. The data were segregated according to air mass history, wind speed and latitude. Under clean marine conditions, the averaged size distributions were generally in good agreement with those reported previously for diameters less than 0.5 µm and can be approximated by two log-normal modes, with significant variation in the mean modal diameters. Two short periods of tri-modal behaviour were observed. Above 0.5 µm, there is indication of a limit to the mechanical generation of marine aerosol over the range of wind speeds observed (~1.7–14.7 m s−1. A new technique to determine the errors associated with aerosol size distribution measurements using Poisson statistics has been applied to the dataset, providing a tool to determine the necessary sample or averaging times for correct interpretation of such data. Finally, the data were also used to investigate the loss rate of condensing gases with potentially important consequences for heterogeneous marine photochemical cycles.

  14. FERTILITY VARIATION AND EFFECTIVE POPULATION SIZE IN A TEAK CLONAL SEED ORCHARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumardi Sumardi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A 27 year old  clonal seed orchard of teak (Tectona grandis L.f in Padangan, East Java comprising 24 clones, was evaluated for fertility, offspring diversity, and genetic drift. Flower and fruit productions were used to assess clone fertility in the orchard. Fertility variation measured as ‘sibling coefficient’ was found to be 1,62, having high genetic diversity (0,97 and low coancestry (0,03. The clones varied in fertility in which,  25 % of the most fertile clones in the orchard contributed to 47,5 % of flower and fruit yields. Effective population size in the orchard was 15, indicating that 15 of the clones contributed effectively to seed yield. Separating on the amounts of seeds that can be collected, individual collection, and proportional mixing of seed per clone might be useful in restricting over representation of highly reproductive clones thereby increasing genetic diversity in the seed crop. Another way to improve seed yield in the orchard is by increasing the effective population size. Thinning or prunning on highly reproductive clones might be useful in increasing effective population size.

  15. Latitudinal aerosol size distribution variation in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean measured aboard the FS-Polarstern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Williams

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol size distribution measurements from 0.03 μm to 25 μm diameter were taken at ambient humidity aboard the German research vessel, FS-Polarstern, during a transect from Bremerhaven in northern Germany, to Cape Town in South Africa across latitudes 53°32' N to 33°55' S, denoted cruise number ANT XXI/1. The data were segregated according to air mass history, wind speed and latitude. Under clean marine conditions, the averaged size distributions were generally in good agreement with those reported previously for diameters less than 0.5 μm and can be approximated by two log-normal modes, with significant variation in the mean modal diameters. Two short periods of tri-modal behaviour were observed. Above 0.5 μm, there is indication of a limit to the mechanical generation of marine aerosol over the range of wind speeds observed. A new technique to determine the errors associated with aerosol size distribution measurements using Poisson statistics has been applied to the dataset, providing a tool to determine the necessary sample or averaging times for correct interpretation of such data. Finally, the data were also used to investigate the loss rate of condensing gases with potentially important consequences for heterogeneous marine photochemical cycles.

  16. Clutch and egg size variation, and productivity of the House Sparrow (Passer domesticus): effects of temperature, rainfall, and humidity

    OpenAIRE

    ASLAN, Aziz; Yavuz, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted on the campus of the regional department of the forestry service, encompassing 2.25 ha in Antalya city center. The area has gardens and is surrounded by trees, providing nesting and feeding opportunities for many songbird species. The study aimed to determine clutch and egg size variation, breeding success, and productivity of the House Sparrow (Passer domesticus), in terms of clutch size and breeding attempts, and to evaluate variation in temperature, rainfall, and h...

  17. Angiogenesis and bone regeneration of porous nano-hydroxyapatite/coralline blocks coated with rhVEGF165 in critical-size alveolar bone defects in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bing; Liu, Weizhen; Deng, Yue; Li, Shaobing; Liu, Xiangning; Gao, Yan; Zhou, Lei

    2015-01-01

    To improve the regenerative performance of nano-hydroxyapatite/coralline (nHA/coral) block grafting in a canine mandibular critical-size defect model, nHA/coral blocks were coated with recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor(165) (rhVEGF) via physical adsorption (3 μg rhVEGF165 per nHA/coral block). After the nHA/coral blocks and VEGF/nHA/coral blocks were randomly implanted into the mandibular box-shaped defects in a split-mouth design, the healing process was evaluated by histological observation and histomorphometric and immunohistological analyses. The histological evaluations revealed the ingrowth of newly formed blood vessels and bone at the periphery and cores of the blocks in both groups at both 3 and 8 weeks postsurgery, respectively. In the histomorphometric analysis, the VEGF/nHA/coral group exhibited a larger quantity of new bone formation at 3 and 8 weeks postsurgery. The percentages of newly formed bone within the entire blocks in the VEGF/nHA/coral group were 27.3% ± 8.1% and 39.3% ± 12.8% at 3 weeks and 8 weeks, respectively, and these values were slightly greater than those of the nHA/coral group (21.7% ± 3.0% and 32.6% ± 10.3%, respectively), but the differences were not significant (P>0.05). The immunohistological evaluations revealed that the neovascular density in the VEGF/nHA/coral group (146 ± 32.9 vessel/mm(2)) was much greater than that in the nHA/coral group (105 ± 51.8 vessel/mm(2)) at the 3-week time point (P0.05). The present study indicated that nHA/coral blocks might be optimal scaffolds for block grafting in critical-size mandibular defects and that additional VEGF coating via physical adsorption can promote angiogenesis in the early stage of bone healing, which suggests that prevascularized nHA/coral blocks have significant potential as a bioactive material for bone regeneration in large-scale alveolar defects.

  18. Analysis of variation of sagittal position of the jaw bones in skeletal class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zdenka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Skeletal Class III malocclusion is a discrepancy in the sagittal jaw relationship, due to imbalances in their development and/or position, resulting in the dominant appearance of the lower jaw in facial profile. The aim of this study was to determine variations in the sagittal position of the jaw bones to the cranial base in subjects with skeletal Class III, for the earliest possible diagnosis of malocclusion. Methods. Fifty children and as many adults with skeletal Class III, both sexes, were examined and selected, based on the findings of sagittal interjaw relationship (ANB ≤ 0° from the cephalometric analysis of tele-x-ray profile head shots. The subjects were grouped according to age. The first group consisted of children aged 6-12 years, and another group, of adults aged 18-26 years. We measured the angles of maxillary prognathism (SNA, mandibular prognathism (SNB and ANB. Based on these results, within the respective groups subclassification into the subgroups was done, among which a significant difference measured values was evaluated. In both groups a significant correlation of the determined values was evaluated. Results. An average SNA angle ranged 77.36 ± 3.58 in children and 77.32 ± 4.88 in adults, while an average SNB angle was 79.46 ± 3.91 in the group of children and 81.12 ± 3.76 in adults. An average ANB angle was -2.10 ± 2.07 in children, and -4.00 ± 2.34 in adults. In both groups, a significant correlation between the measured values and a significant difference in the values of all the measured parameters were found between patients from different subgroups (p < 0.01. Conclusion. The most common morphological variation of sagittal position of the upper jaw is its retrognatism, which is equally present in both children and adults. Sagittal position of the lower jaw in most of the adults was prognathic, while mandible prognathism in the children was less present.

  19. Angiogenesis and bone regeneration of porous nano-hydroxyapatite/coralline blocks coated with rhVEGF165 in critical-size alveolar bone defects in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du B

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bing Du,1,2 Weizhen Liu,1 Yue Deng,1,3 Shaobing Li,1 Xiangning Liu,4 Yan Gao,1 Lei Zhou1 1Department of Oral Implantology, Guangdong Provincial Stomatological Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Center of Stomatology, The First People’s Hospital of Foshan, Foshan, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Qingdao Stomatological Hospital, Qingdao, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: To improve the regenerative performance of nano-hydroxyapatite/coralline (nHA/coral block grafting in a canine mandibular critical-size defect model, nHA/coral blocks were coated with recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor165 (rhVEGF via physical adsorption (3 µg rhVEGF165 per nHA/coral block. After the nHA/coral blocks and VEGF/nHA/coral blocks were randomly implanted into the mandibular box-shaped defects in a split-mouth design, the healing process was evaluated by histological observation and histomorphometric and immunohistological analyses. The histological evaluations revealed the ingrowth of newly formed blood vessels and bone at the periphery and cores of the blocks in both groups at both 3 and 8 weeks postsurgery, respectively. In the histomorphometric analysis, the VEGF/nHA/coral group exhibited a larger quantity of new bone formation at 3 and 8 weeks postsurgery. The percentages of newly formed bone within the entire blocks in the VEGF/nHA/coral group were 27.3%±8.1% and 39.3%±12.8% at 3 weeks and 8 weeks, respectively, and these values were slightly greater than those of the nHA/coral group (21.7%±3.0% and 32.6%±10.3%, respectively, but the differences were not significant (P>0.05. The immunohistological evaluations revealed that the neovascular density in the VEGF/nHA/coral group (146±32.9 vessel/mm2 was much greater than

  20. Variation in skull size and shape of the Common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis): allometric and non-allometric shape changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urošević, A.; Ljubisavljević, K.; Ivanović, A.

    2014-01-01

    We analysed patterns of skull size and shape variation among populations of the Common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis) in the Central Balkans, particularly the effecs of insularity and the presence of the ecologically similar lacertid lizard species P. melisellensis. Two components of shape variation

  1. Polyether ether ketone implants achieve increased bone fusion when coated with nano-sized hydroxyapatite: a histomorphometric study in rabbit bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson P

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pär Johansson,1 Ryo Jimbo,1 Yoshihito Naito,2 Per Kjellin,3 Fredrik Currie,3 Ann Wennerberg1 1Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden; 2Oral Implant Center, Tokushima University Hospital, Tokushima, Japan; 3Promimic AB, Stena Center, Göteborg, Sweden Abstract: Polyether ether ketone (PEEK possesses excellent mechanical properties similar to those of human bone and is considered the best alternative material other than titanium for orthopedic spine and trauma implants. However, the deficient osteogenic properties and the bioinertness of PEEK limit its fields of application. The aim of this study was to limit these drawbacks by coating the surface of PEEK with nano-scaled hydroxyapatite (HA minerals. In the study, the biological response to PEEK, with and without HA coating, was investigated. Twenty-four screw-like and apically perforated implants in the rabbit femur were histologically evaluated at 3 weeks and 12 weeks after surgery. Twelve of the 24 implants were HA coated (test, and the remaining 12 served as uncoated PEEK controls. At 3 weeks and 12 weeks, the mean bone–implant contact was higher for test compared to control (P<0.05. The bone area inside the threads was comparable in the two groups, but the perforating hole showed more bone area for the HA-coated implants at both healing points (P<0.01. With these results, we conclude that nano-sized HA coating on PEEK implants significantly improved the osteogenic properties, and in a clinical situation this material composition may serve as an implant where a rapid bone fusion is essential. Keywords: HA, PEEK, osseointegration, histology, orthopedics, in vivo

  2. Genetic variations in FSH action affect sex hormone levels and breast tissue size in infant girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Louise Scheutz; Hagen, Casper P; Assens, Maria

    2016-01-01

    , especially FSHR -29G>A and FSHR 2039A>G, affect female hormone profile and glandular breast tissue development already during minipuberty. Thus, genetic variations of FSH signaling appear to determine the individual set point of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis already early in life.......Context: Single nucleotide polymorphisms altering FSH action (FSHB -211G>T, FSHR -29G>A, and FSHR 2039A>G) are associated with peripubertal and adult levels of reproductive hormones and age at pubertal onset in girls. Objective: To investigate whether genetic polymorphisms altering FSH action...... present in homozygotes. FSHB -211T carriers had smaller breast tissue size than girls who without a minor allele; GT+TT 10.5 (confidence interval 9.4 -11.5) mm vs GG 12.1 (confidence interval 11.4-12.8) mm, P = .014. Conclusions: Our study indicates that 3 genetic polymorphisms altering FSH action...

  3. Variations of flaring kernel sizes in various parts of the H-alpha line profile

    CERN Document Server

    Radziszewski, K

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the temporal variations of the sizes and emission intensities of thirtyone flaring kernels in various parts of the H{\\alpha} line profile. We have found that the areas of all kernels decrease systematically when observed in consecutive wavelengths toward the wings of the H{\\alpha} line, but their areas and emission intensity vary in time. Our results are in agreement with the commonly accepted model of the glass-shaped lower parts of the magnetic flaring loops channelling high energy variable particle beams toward the chromospheric plasma. High time resolution spectral-imaging data used in our work were collected using the Large Coronagraph and Horizontal Telescope equipped with the Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass Spectrograph and the Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (MSDP-SECIS) at the Bia{\\l}k\\'ow Observatory of the University of Wroc{\\l}aw, Poland.

  4. Seed size variation in the palm Euterpe edulis and the effects of seed predators on germination and seedling survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizo, Marco A.; Von Allmen, Christiane; Morellato, L. Patricia C.

    2006-05-01

    Intraspecific variation in seed size is common in wild plant populations and has important consequences for the reproductive success of individual plants. Multiple, often conflicting evolutionary forces mediated by biotic as well as abiotic agents may maintain such a variation. In this paper we assessed seed size variation in a population of the threatened, commercially important palm Euterpe edulis in southeast Brazil. We investigated (i) how this variation affects the probability of attack by vertebrate and invertebrate post-dispersal seed predators, and (ii) if seed size influences the outcome of seeds damaged by beetles in terms of seed germination and early survival of seedlings. Euterpe edulis seeds varied in diameter from 8.3 to 14.1 mm. Neither insects nor rodents selected the seeds they preyed upon based on seed size. Seed germination and total, shoot and root biomasses of one-year seedlings were significantly and positively affected by seed size. Root biomass and seedling survival were negatively affected by seed damage caused by a scolytid beetle ( Coccotrypes palmarum) whose adults bore into seeds to consume part of the endosperm, but do not oviposit on them. Seed size had a marginally significant effect on seedling survival. Therefore, if any advantage is accrued by E. edulis individuals producing large seeds, this is because of greater seed germination success and seedling vigor. If this is so, even a relatively narrow range of variation in seed size as observed in the E. edulis population studied may translate into differential success of individual plants.

  5. Interpreting broad emission-line variations II: Tensions between luminosity, characteristic size and responsivity

    CERN Document Server

    Goad, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the variability behaviour of the broad Hb emission-line to driving continuum variations in the best-studied AGN NGC 5548. For a particular choice of BLR geometry, Hb surface emissivity based on photoionization models, and using a scaled version of the 13 yr optical continuum light curve as a proxy for the driving ionizing continuum, we explore several key factors that determine the broad emission line luminosity L, characteristic size R(RW), and variability amplitude (i.e., responsivity) eta, as well as the interplay between them. For fixed boundary models which extend as far as the hot-dust the predicted delays for Hb are on average too long. However, the predicted variability amplitude of Hb provides a remarkably good match to observations except during low continuum states. We suggest that the continuum flux variations which drive the redistribution in Hb surface emissivity F(r) do not on their own lead to large enough changes in R(RW) or eta(eff). We thus investigate dust-bounded BLRs for w...

  6. Long-term accounting for raindrop size distribution variations improves quantitative precipitation estimation by weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazenberg, Pieter; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-04-01

    Weather radars provide information on the characteristics of precipitation at high spatial and temporal resolution. Unfortunately, rainfall measurements by radar are affected by multiple error sources. The current study is focused on the impact of variations of the raindrop size distribution on radar rainfall estimates. Such variations lead to errors in the estimated rainfall intensity (R) and specific attenuation (k) when using fixed relations for the conversion of the observed reflectivity (Z) into R and k. For non-polarimetric radar, this error source has received relatively little attention compared to other error sources. We propose to link the parameters of the Z-R and Z-k relations directly to those of the normalized gamma DSD. The benefit of this procedure is that it reduces the number of unknown parameters. In this work, the DSD parameters are obtained using 1) surface observations from a Parsivel and Thies LPM disdrometer, and 2) a Monte Carlo optimization procedure using surface rain gauge observations. The impact of both approaches for a given precipitation type is assessed for 45 days of summertime precipitation observed in The Netherlands. Accounting for DSD variations using disdrometer observations leads to an improved radar QPE product as compared to applying climatological Z-R and Z-k relations. This especially holds for situations where widespread stratiform precipitation is observed. The best results are obtained when the DSD parameters are optimized. However, the optimized Z-R and Z-k relations show an unrealistic variability that arises from uncorrected error sources. As such, the optimization approach does not result in a realistic DSD shape but instead also accounts for uncorrected error sources resulting in the best radar rainfall adjustment. Therefore, to further improve the quality of preciptitation estimates by weather radar, usage should either be made of polarimetric radar or by extending the network of disdrometers.

  7. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles with Buffer-Dependent Variations of Size and Morphology in Biological Buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Oh, Sangjin; Baba, Rina; Zhou, Hongjian; Hwang, Sungu; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-12-01

    The demand for biologically compatible and stable noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in recent years due to their inert nature and unique optical properties. In this article, we present 11 different synthetic methods for obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) through the use of common biological buffers. The results demonstrate that the sizes, shapes, and monodispersity of the NPs could be varied depending on the type of buffer used, as these buffers acted as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer in each synthesis. Theoretical simulations and electrochemical experiments were performed to understand the buffer-dependent variations of size and morphology exhibited by these Au NPs, which revealed that surface interactions and the electrostatic energy on the (111) surface of Au were the determining factors. The long-term stability of the synthesized NPs in buffer solution was also investigated. Most NPs synthesized using buffers showed a uniquely wide range of pH stability and excellent cell viability without the need for further modifications.

  8. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles with Buffer-Dependent Variations of Size and Morphology in Biological Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Oh, Sangjin; Baba, Rina; Zhou, Hongjian; Hwang, Sungu; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-02-01

    The demand for biologically compatible and stable noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in recent years due to their inert nature and unique optical properties. In this article, we present 11 different synthetic methods for obtaining gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) through the use of common biological buffers. The results demonstrate that the sizes, shapes, and monodispersity of the NPs could be varied depending on the type of buffer used, as these buffers acted as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer in each synthesis. Theoretical simulations and electrochemical experiments were performed to understand the buffer-dependent variations of size and morphology exhibited by these Au NPs, which revealed that surface interactions and the electrostatic energy on the (111) surface of Au were the determining factors. The long-term stability of the synthesized NPs in buffer solution was also investigated. Most NPs synthesized using buffers showed a uniquely wide range of pH stability and excellent cell viability without the need for further modifications.

  9. Variations in Desired Family Size and Excess Fertility in East Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieudonné Ndaruhuye Muhoza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution studies the variation in desired family size and excess fertility in four East African countries by analyzing the combined impact of wealth, education, religious affiliation, and place of residence. The findings show an enormous heterogeneity in Kenya. Wealthy and higher educated people have fertility desires close to replacement level, regardless of religion, while poor, uneducated people, particularly those in Muslim communities, have virtually uncontrolled fertility. Rwanda is at the other extreme: poor, uneducated people have the same desired fertility as their wealthy, educated compatriots, regardless of their religion—a case of “poverty Malthusianism.”. The potential for family planning is high in both countries as more than 50% of the women having 5 children or more would have preferred to stop at 4 or less. Tanzania and Uganda have an intermediate position in desired family size and a lower potential for family planning. Generally, the main factor that sustains higher fertility is poverty exacerbated by religious norms among the poor only.

  10. Acute myocardial infarction and infarct size: do circadian variations play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibáñez B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aída Suárez-Barrientos,1 Borja Ibáñez1,21Cardiovascular Institute, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, 2Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The circadian rhythm influences cardiovascular system physiology, inducing diurnal variations in blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, endothelial functions, platelet aggregation, and coronary arterial flow, among other physiological parameters. Indeed, an internal circadian network modulates cardiovascular physiology by regulating heart rate, metabolism, and even myocyte growth and repair ability. Consequently, cardiovascular pathology is also controlled by circadian oscillations, with increased morning incidence of cardiovascular events. The potential circadian influence on the human tolerance to ischemia/reperfusion has not been systematically scrutinized until recently. It has since been proven, in both animals and humans, that infarct size varies during the day depending on the symptom onset time, while circadian fluctuations in spontaneous cardioprotection in humans with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI have also been demonstrated. Furthermore, several studies have proposed that the time of day at which revascularization occurs in patients with STEMI may also influence infarct size and reperfusion outcomes. The potential association of the circadian clock with infarct size advocates the acknowledgment of time of day as a new prognostic factor in patients suffering acute myocardial infarction, which would open up a new field for chronotherapeutic targets and lead to the inclusion of time of day as a variable in clinical trials that test novel cardioprotective strategies.Keywords: cardioprotection, circadian rhythm, reperfusion injury, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

  11. ON THE QUESTION OF SIZE-INDEPENDENT SEX-SPECIFIC DIFFERENCES IN HUMAN LONG BONES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KNUSSMANN, R; VANVARK, GN; HARTMANN, BR; DENAREND, A

    1994-01-01

    Forty six measurements of the humerus, radius, ulna, and femur of - depending on the bones 71-79 sexually known individuals from Holland were examined as to significant sex differences. With the exception of the depth of the fossa olecrani and the angle measurements significantly higher mean values

  12. Evaluation of bone regeneration using the rat critical size calvarial defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spicer, P.P.; Kretlow, J.D.; Young, S.; Jansen, J.A.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    Animal models that are reliably reproducible, appropriate analogs to the clinical condition they are used to investigate, and that offer minimal morbidity and periprocedural mortality to the subject, are the keystone to the preclinical development of translational technologies. For bone tissue engin

  13. Contribution of genotype and ethnicity to bone mineral density variation in Caucasians and Chinese:a test for five candidate genes for bone mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Volodymyr Dvornyk; LIU Peng-yuan; LONG Ji-rong; ZHANG Yuan-yuan; LEI Shu-feng; Robert R Recker; DENG Hong-wen

    2005-01-01

    Background Ethnicity is shown to be one of important factors affacting bone mineral density (BMD).The present study was performed to compare the association of six markers for five candidate genes with BMD variation in two populations of different ethnicity, Caucasian and Chinese, and the contribution of genotype and ethnicity to this variation in the populations.Methods The studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms were BsaH Ⅰ of the calcium-sensing receptor gene, SacⅠ of the α2HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) gene, PvuⅡ and XbaⅠ of the oestrogen receptor α gene, ApaⅠ of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and BstBⅠ of the parathyroid hormone gene.The association of these markers with BMD was analysed by one-way and two-way ANOVA with adjustment for covariates.Results Two polymorphisms, AHSG-SacⅠ and VDR-ApaⅠ, showed no association with BMD, while the others were associated with BMD variation at some skeletal sites in either males or females.The polymorphisms indicated clear distinctions between the associations depending on ethnicity, gender and skeletal site.Similar patterns were observed in their contribution to the total population BMD variation.Ethnicity appears to have a larger effect on the total population BMD variation in females than in males.It may account, on the average, for about 2% total population BMD variation at the spine of females and about 1% at the hip of males and females.Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that significant interethnic differentiation at some loci may contribute to the significant interethnic difference in BMD.However, this contribution apparently is not large.

  14. Bone formation induced by strontium modified calcium phosphate cement in critical-size metaphyseal fracture defects in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Ulrich; Ray, Seemun; Sommer, Ursula; Elkhassawna, Thaqif; Rehling, Tanja; Hundgeburth, Marvin; Henß, Anja; Rohnke, Marcus; Janek, Jürgen; Lips, Katrin S; Heiss, Christian; Schlewitz, Gudrun; Szalay, Gabor; Schumacher, Matthias; Gelinsky, Michael; Schnettler, Reinhard; Alt, Volker

    2013-11-01

    The first objective was to investigate new bone formation in a critical-size metaphyseal defect in the femur of ovariectomized rats filled with a strontium modified calcium phosphate cement (SrCPC) compared to calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and empty defects. Second, detection of strontium release from the materials as well as calcium and collagen mass distribution in the fracture defect should be targeted by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). 45 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three different treatment groups: (1) SrCPC (n = 15), (2) CPC (n = 15), and (3) empty defect (n = 15). Bilateral ovariectomy was performed and three months after multi-deficient diet, the left femur of all animals underwent a 4 mm wedge-shaped metaphyseal osteotomy that was internally fixed with a T-shaped plate. The defect was then either filled with SrCPC or CPC or was left empty. After 6 weeks, histomorphometric analysis showed a statistically significant increase in bone formation of SrCPC compared to CPC (p = 0.005) and the empty defect (p = 0.002) in the former fracture defect zone. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher bone formation at the tissue-implant interface in the SrCPC group compared to the CPC group (p < 0.0001). These data were confirmed by immunohistochemistry revealing an increase in bone-morphogenic protein 2, osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin expression and a statistically significant higher gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, collagen10a1 and osteocalcin in the SrCPC group compared to CPC. TOF-SIMS analysis showed a high release of Sr from the SrCPC into the interface region in this area compared to CPC suggesting that improved bone formation is attributable to the released Sr from the SrCPC.

  15. Microstructural, densitometric and metabolic variations in bones from rats with normal or altered skeletal states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew N Luu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High resolution μCT, and combined μPET/CT have emerged as non-invasive techniques to enhance or even replace dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA as the current preferred approach for fragility fracture risk assessment. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of µPET/CT imaging to differentiate changes in rat bone tissue density and microstructure induced by metabolic bone diseases more accurately than current available methods. METHODS: Thirty three rats were divided into three groups of control, ovariectomy and vitamin-D deficiency. At the conclusion of the study, animals were subjected to glucose ((18FDG and sodium fluoride (Na(18F PET/CT scanning. Then, specimens were subjected to µCT imaging and tensile mechanical testing. RESULTS: Compared to control, those allocated to ovariectomy and vitamin D deficiency groups showed 4% and 22% (significant increase in (18FDG uptake values, respectively. DXA-based bone mineral density was higher in the vitamin D deficiency group when compared to the other groups (cortical bone, yet μCT-based apparent and mineral density results were not different between groups. DXA-based bone mineral density was lower in the ovariectomy group when compared to the other groups (cancellous bone; yet μCT-based mineral density results were not different between groups, and the μCT-based apparent density results were lower in the ovariectomy group compared to the other groups. CONCLUSION: PET and micro-CT provide an accurate three-dimensional measurement of the changes in bone tissue mineral density, as well as microstructure for cortical and cancellous bone and metabolic activity. As osteomalacia is characterized by impaired bone mineralization, the use of densitometric analyses may lead to misinterpretation of the condition as osteoporosis. In contrast, µCT alone and in combination with the PET component certainly provides an accurate three-dimensional measurement of the changes in both bone

  16. The variation of cancellous bones at lumbar vertebra, femoral neck, mandibular angle and rib in ovariectomized sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Li, Yongfeng; Gao, Qi; Shao, Bo; Xiao, Jianrui; Zhou, Hong; Niu, Qiang; Shen, Mingming; Liu, Baolin; Hu, Kaijin; Kong, Liang

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to compare the variation of cancellous bones at four skeletal sites: lumbar vertebra, femoral neck, mandibular angle and rib in ovariectomized sheep. Sixteen adult sheep were randomly divided into two groups: eight sheep were ovariectomized served as experimental group; the other eight untreated sheep were served as control group. Bone mineral density was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry on lumbar vertebrae at baseline and twelve months after ovariectomy. After 12 months, lumbar vertebrae L3 and L4, femoral necks, mandibular angles and the fourth ribs were harvested for micro-CT scanning, histological analysis and biomechanical test. The results showed that bone mineral density of lumbar vertebra decreased significantly in twelfth month (pCT showed that the bone volume/total volume decreased by 45.6%, 36.1% 21.3% and 18.7% in lumbar vertebrae, femoral necks, mandibular angles and ribs in experimental group (psheep was site-specific on a pattern as follows: lumbar vertebra, femoral neck, mandibular angle and rib.

  17. Electrochemical studies on interplay of mineralogical variation and particle size on bioleaching low grade complex sulphide ores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P. A. OLUBAMBI; J. H. POTGIETER; S. NDLOVU; J. O. BORODE

    2009-01-01

    The interplay of mineralogical variation and mineral phase distribution within varying particle sizes on the dissolution behaviour of a low grade complex sulphide ore was investigated through bioleaching experiments and electrochemical technique. Investigations were carried out utilizing mineralogical data on the variations in mineral and phase distribution within particle sizes of<53 μm, 53-75 μm, 75-106 μm and 106-150 μm in mixed mesophilic cultures of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans. Electrochemical behaviour was studied using particulate electrodes from the four varying particle sizes and from massive electrodes prepared from the two major sulphide mineral rich phases (sphalerite-rich and galena-rich) and a complex mineralogical phase of the bulk ore. Bioleaching studies reveal the highest recoveries at a particle size of 75 μm, while electrochemical investigations reveal the highest dissolution at particle size of 106 μm. Electrochemical results show that sphalerite rich phase has the highest dissolution rate while galena-rich complex phase has the least. SEM studies confirm the highest bacterial attack at the sphalerite-rich phase. The discrepancies between the dissolutions within particle sizes obtained from bioleaching experiments and electrochemical studies are consistent with and attributed both to the physical and mineralogical influences. Electrochemical behaviour is influenced and controlled by galvanic interaction resulting from mineralogical variation, while bioleaching behaviour is influenced by mineralogical variation as well as physical effect of particle size.

  18. VARIATION IN THE NUMBER AND POSITION OF NUTRIENT FORAMINA OF LONG BONES OF LOWER LIMB IN NORTH INDIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The major blood supply of the long bones is through the nutrient arterywhich enter through the nutrient foramina leadinginto an oblique nutrient canal. The presence, number, position and distances from the various prominent landmarks on the bone have medical as well as surgical significance. The present study was done on the long bones of North Indians to know the mean values of the number, position of nutrient foramina and distance from various landmarks on the bones and ultimately to compare with other populations. Materials and Methods: The present study consists of 180 long bones of lower limb (60 femora, 60 tibiae, 60 fibulae which were taken from Department of Anatomy, Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Vallah (Amritsar, India and studied carefully for the number, position and distance of nutrient foramina in relation to length and from the proximal epiphysis of the long bones. Also the anteroposterior and lateromedial diameter of the bone at the level of nutrient foramen were studied. Main outcome measure: Variations in number, position and distance in relation to length and from proximal epiphysis of long bones was seen. Results: The nutrient foramen of femur was located on the linea aspera in 76.50% of cases(39% in interstice 9.5% on the lateral lip and 28.00% on the medial lip of the linea aspera, 18.50 %on the medial surface and 5%.on the lateral surface. Nutrient foramen of tibia was located in 95.50% of cases under the soleal line at the average distance of 119.8 mm from intercondylar eminence to the nutrient foramen, on the soleal line in 4%and on the lateral border in 0.50% of cases. Nutrient foramen of fibula was found on the posterior surface in 65 % of cases, in 15% on the medial surface, on the interosseous border in 10% ,on the lateral surface in 7% and on the posterior border in 3% of cases. Conclusion: This study will provide the ethnic data for comparison among various

  19. Influence of Particle Size of Deproteinized Bovine Bone Mineral on New Bone Formation and Implant Stability after Simultaneous Sinus Floor Elevation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon S; Aaboe, Merete; Janner, Simone F M;

    2013-01-01

    Deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) is one of the best-documented bone substitute materials for sinus floor elevation (SFE).......Deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) is one of the best-documented bone substitute materials for sinus floor elevation (SFE)....

  20. Intrapopulational body size variation and cranial capacity variation in Middle Pleistocene humans: the Sima de los Huesos sample (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, C; Carretero, J M; Arsuaga, J L; Gracia, A; Martínez, I

    1998-05-01

    A sexual dimorphism more marked than in living humans has been claimed for European Middle Pleistocene humans, Neandertals and prehistoric modern humans. In this paper, body size and cranial capacity variation are studied in the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene sample. This is the largest sample of non-modern humans found to date from one single site, and with all skeletal elements represented. Since the techniques available to estimate the degree of sexual dimorphism in small palaeontological samples are all unsatisfactory, we have used the bootstraping method to asses the magnitude of the variation in the Sima de los Huesos sample compared to modern human intrapopulational variation. We analyze size variation without attempting to sex the specimens a priori. Anatomical regions investigated are scapular glenoid fossa; acetabulum; humeral proximal and distal epiphyses; ulnar proximal epiphysis; radial neck; proximal femur; humeral, femoral, ulnar and tibial shaft; lumbosacral joint; patella; calcaneum; and talar trochlea. In the Sima de los Huesos sample only the humeral midshaft perimeter shows an unusual high variation (only when it is expressed by the maximum ratio, not by the coefficient of variation). In spite of that the cranial capacity range at Sima de los Huesos almost spans the rest of the European and African Middle Pleistocene range. The maximum ratio is in the central part of the distribution of modern human samples. Thus, the hypothesis of a greater sexual dimorphism in Middle Pleistocene populations than in modern populations is not supported by either cranial or postcranial evidence from Sima de los Huesos.

  1. Polyether ether ketone implants achieve increased bone fusion when coated with nano-sized hydroxyapatite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär; Jimbo, Ryo; Naito, Yoshihito

    2016-01-01

    fields of application. The aim of this study was to limit these drawbacks by coating the surface of PEEK with nano-scaled hydroxyapatite (HA) minerals. In the study, the biological response to PEEK, with and without HA coating, was investigated. Twenty-four screw-like and apically perforated implants...... in the rabbit femur were histologically evaluated at 3 weeks and 12 weeks after surgery. Twelve of the 24 implants were HA coated (test), and the remaining 12 served as uncoated PEEK controls. At 3 weeks and 12 weeks, the mean bone-implant contact was higher for test compared to control (P... inside the threads was comparable in the two groups, but the perforating hole showed more bone area for the HA-coated implants at both healing points (Pcoating on PEEK implants significantly improved the osteogenic properties, and in a clinical...

  2. Presentation of coefficient of variation for bioequivalence sample-size calculation
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi Lin; Mak, Wen Yao; Looi, Irene; Wong, Jia Woei; Yuen, Kah Hay

    2017-03-03

    The current study aimed to further contribute information on intrasubject coefficient of variation (CV) from 43 bioequivalence studies conducted by our center. Consistent with Yuen et al. (2001), current work also attempted to evaluate the effect of different parameters (AUC0-t, AUC0-∞, and Cmax) used in the estimation of the study power. Furthermore, we have estimated the number of subjects required for each study by looking at the values of intrasubject CV of AUC0-∞ and have also taken into consideration the minimum sample-size requirement set by the US FDA. A total of 37 immediate-release and 6 extended-release formulations from 28 different active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) were evaluated. Out of the total number of studies conducted, 10 studies did not achieve satisfactory statistical power on two or more parameters; 4 studies consistently scored poorly across all three parameters. In general, intrasubject CV values calculated from Cmax were more variable compared to either AUC0-t and AUC0-∞. 20 out of 43 studies did not achieve more than 80% power when the value was calculated from Cmax value, compared to only 11 (AUC0-∞) and 8 (AUC0-t) studies. This finding is consistent with Steinijans et al. (1995) [2] and Yuen et al. (2001) [3]. In conclusion, the CV values obtained from AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ were similar, while those derived from Cmax were consistently more variable. Hence, CV derived from AUC instead of Cmax should be used in sample-size calculation to achieve a sufficient, yet practical, test power.
.

  3. I. Sexual, individual, and geographical variation in leucosticte tephrocotis, II.Geographical variation among North American mammals, especially in respect to size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J.A.

    1876-01-01

    Having recently had an opportunity (through the kindness of Professor Baird) of studying with some care the magnificent series of skulls of the North American Mammalia belonging to the National Museum (amounting often to eighty or a hundred specimens of a single species), I have been strongly impressed with the different degrees of variability exhibited by the representatives of the species and genera of even the same family. The variation in size, for instance, with latitude, in the Wolves and Foxes is surprisingly great, amounting in some species (as will be shown later) to 25 per cent. of the average size of the species, while in other species of the Ferae it is almost nil. Contrary to the general supposition, the variation in size among representatives of the same species is not always a decrease with the decrease of the latitude of the locality, but is in some cases exactly the reverse, in some species there being a very considerable and indisputable increase southward. This, for instance, is very markedly true of some species of Felis and in Procyon lotor. Consequently, the very generally-received impression that in North America the species of Mammalia diminish in size southward, or with the decrease in the latitude (and altitude) of the locality, requires modification. While such is generally the case, the reverse of this too often occurs, with occasional instances also of a total absence of variation in size with locality, to be considered as forming "the exceptions" necessary to "prove the rule".

  4. A fast variational Gaussian wavepacket method: size-induced structural transitions in large neon clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Ionuţ; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2011-10-21

    The variational Gaussian wavepacket (VGW) approximation provides an alternative to path integral Monte Carlo for the computation of thermodynamic properties of many-body systems at thermal equilibrium. It provides a direct access to the thermal density matrix and is particularly efficient for Monte Carlo approaches, as for an N-body system it operates in a non-inflated 3N-dimensional configuration space. Here, we greatly accelerate the VGW method by retaining only the relevant short-range correlations in the (otherwise full) 3N × 3N Gaussian width matrix without sacrificing the accuracy of the fully coupled VGW method. This results in the reduction of the original O(N(3)) scaling to O(N(2)). The fast-VGW method is then applied to quantum Lennard-Jones clusters with sizes up to N = 6500 atoms. Following Doye and Calvo [JCP 116, 8307 (2002)] we study the competition between the icosahedral and decahedral structural motifs in Ne(N) clusters as a function of N.

  5. Variations of hydrological characteristics at the rivers of different size in the Lena river basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, Olga; Tananaev, Nikita; Lebedeva, Luidmila; Popova, Evdokiya

    2016-04-01

    There are many speculations about possible impact of climate change at hydrological regime of Northern Eurasia, and permafrost basins in particular. Though the changes of flow of large rivers are relatively well described, the trends for small and middle-size watersheds are unknown. After the papers by Shiklomanov et al. (2007) and Smith et al. (2007) examining the variations of maximum and minimum flow in Northern Russia by 2001 there was no much update in this issue. In this study we compiled the database of continuous daily runoff for about 110 gauges within the Lena River basin with the order of basin area from 10 to 100000 sq.km. All currently functioning flow gauges with continuous observations not less than 35 years were selected for the database which contains the data up to 2013. For chosen gauges the parameters of row-correlation, cyclic recurrence and the stationarity of main runoff characteristics (mean, maximum and minimum flow) were estimated. The conclusions are drawn about the evidence of unsteadiness and/or internal correlation in runoff series; the robust indicators of the intensity of detected changes are evaluated; the duration of water cycles and evaluation the spatial correlation between water cycles are explored. The study is supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 15-35-21146 mol_a).

  6. Factors related to variation in premenopausal bone mineral status: a health promotion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor-Locke, C; McColl, R S

    2000-01-01

    Bone loss prior to menopause may contribute to later risk of fracture due to osteoporosis. Women may be able to optimize premenopausal bone mass and/or prevent losses. Heredity, and possibly age at menarche (retrospectively determined), are unmodifiable risk factors and attention should therefore be directed to more amenable factors. Amenorrhea, low body weight, disordered eating, and smoking are modifiable risk factors. Vitamin D is not a factor for premenopausal women who receive incidental sun exposure and consume fortified foods, but supplementation should be considered for others, especially during the winter months. Protective factors include a higher body weight (especially due to increased muscularity), calcium supplementation, and purposeful load-bearing exercise. Positive effects of oral contraceptives are most apparent in women with menstrual irregularities. Reproductive history (parity), lactation, moderate intakes of alcohol and caffeine, and the appropriate treatment of endometriosis have no apparent effect on premenopausal bone.

  7. Increased brain size in mammals is associated with size variations in gene families with cell signalling, chemotaxis and immune-related functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Urrutia, Araxi O; Gutiérrez, Humberto

    2014-01-22

    Genomic determinants underlying increased encephalization across mammalian lineages are unknown. Whole genome comparisons have revealed large and frequent changes in the size of gene families, and it has been proposed that these variations could play a major role in shaping morphological and physiological differences among species. Using a genome-wide comparative approach, we examined changes in gene family size (GFS) and degree of encephalization in 39 fully sequenced mammalian species and found a significant over-representation of GFS variations in line with increased encephalization in mammals. We found that this relationship is not accounted for by known correlates of brain size such as maximum lifespan or body size and is not explained by phylogenetic relatedness. Genes involved in chemotaxis, immune regulation and cell signalling-related functions are significantly over-represented among those gene families most highly correlated with encephalization. Genes within these families are prominently expressed in the human brain, particularly the cortex, and organized in co-expression modules that display distinct temporal patterns of expression in the developing cortex. Our results suggest that changes in GFS associated with encephalization represent an evolutionary response to the specific functional requirements underlying increased brain size in mammals.

  8. Development of gelatin-chitosan-hydroxyapatite based bioactive bone scaffold with controlled pore size and mechanical strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Kanchan; Dasgupta, Sudip; Kundu, Biswanath; Bissoyi, Akalabya

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite-chitosan/gelatin (HA:Chi:Gel) nanocomposite scaffold has potential to serve as a template matrix to regenerate extra cellular matrix of human bone. Scaffolds with varying composition of hydroxyapatite, chitosan, and gelatin were prepared using lyophilization technique where glutaraldehyde (GTA) acted as a cross-linking agent for biopolymers. First, phase pure hydroxyapatite-chitosan nanocrystals were in situ synthesized by coprecipitation method using a solution of 2% acetic acid dissolved chitosan and aqueous solution of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate [Ca(NO3)2,4H2O] and diammonium hydrogen phosphate [(NH4)2H PO4]. Keeping solid loading constant at 30 wt% and changing the composition of the original slurry of gelatin, HA-chitosan allowed control of the pore size, its distribution, and mechanical properties of the scaffolds. Microstructural investigation by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a well interconnected porous scaffold with a pore size in the range of 35-150 μm. The HA granules were uniformly dispersed in the gelatin-chitosan network. An optimal composition in terms of pore size and mechanical properties was obtained from the scaffold with an HA:Chi:Gel ratio of 21:49:30. The composite scaffold having 70% porosity with pore size distribution of 35-150 μm exhibited a compressive strength of 3.3-3.5 MPa, which is within the range of that exhibited by cancellous bone. The bioactivity of the scaffold was evaluated after conducting mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) - materials interaction and MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay using MSCs. The scaffold found to be conducive to MSC's adhesion as evident from lamellipodia, filopodia extensions from cell cytoskeleton, proliferation, and differentiation up to 14 days of cell culture.

  9. Poly-ε-caprolactone Coated and Functionalized Porous Titanium and Magnesium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Critically Sized Bone Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Roland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For healing of critically sized bone defects, biocompatible and angiogenesis supporting implants are favorable. Murine osteoblasts showed equal proliferation behavior on the polymers poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL and poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate/poly-(4-hydroxybutyrate (P(3HB/P(4HB. As vitality was significantly better for PCL, it was chosen as a suitable coating material for further experiments. Titanium implants with 600 µm pore size were evaluated and found to be a good implant material for bone, as primary osteoblasts showed a vitality and proliferation onto the implants comparable to well bottom (WB. Pure porous titanium implants and PCL coated porous titanium implants were compared using Live Cell Imaging (LCI with Green fluorescent protein (GFP-osteoblasts. Cell count and cell covered area did not differ between the implants after seven days. To improve ingrowth of blood vessels into porous implants, proangiogenic factors like Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF and High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1 were incorporated into PCL coated, porous titanium and magnesium implants. An angiogenesis assay was performed to establish an in vitro method for evaluating the impact of metallic implants on angiogenesis to reduce and refine animal experiments in future. Incorporated concentrations of proangiogenic factors were probably too low, as they did not lead to any effect. Magnesium implants did not yield evaluable results, as they led to pH increase and subsequent cell death.

  10. Impact of Common Variation in Bone-Related Genes on Type 2 Diabetes and Related Traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Billings, Liana K.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Ackerman, Rachel J.; Dupuis, Josee; Voight, Benjamin F.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Barnes, Daniel; Langenberg, Claudia; Hui, Jennie; Fu, Mao; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Lecoeur, Cecile; An, Ping; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Surakkaza, Ida; Ripatti, Samuli; Christiansen, Lene; Dalgard, Christine; Folkersen, Lasse; Grundberg, Elin; Eriksson, Per; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Province, Michael A.; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Wareham, Nick; Meneton, Pierre; Johnson, Toby; Pankow, James S.; Karasik, David; Meigs, James B.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Florez, Jose C.

    2012-01-01

    Exploring genetic pleiotropy can provide clues to a mechanism underlying the observed epidemiological association between type 2 diabetes and heightened fracture risk. We examined genetic variants associated with bone mineral density (BMD) for association with type 2 diabetes and glycemic traits in

  11. Ultrafast laser ablation and machining large-size structures on porcine bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ran; Khadar, Ghadeer W; Wilk, Emilia I; Emigh, Brent; Haugen, Harold K; Wohl, Gregory R; Dunlop, Brett; Anvari, Mehran; Hayward, Joseph E; Fang, Qiyin

    2013-07-01

    When using ultrafast laser ablation in some orthopedic applications where precise cutting/drilling is required with minimal damage to collateral tissue, it is challenging to produce large-sized and deep holes using a tightly focused laser beam. The feasibility of producing deep, millimeter-size structures under different ablation strategies is investigated. X-ray computed microtomography was employed to analyze the morphology of these structures. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of producing holes with sizes required in clinical applications using concentric and helical ablation protocols.

  12. Tree-to-tree variation in seed size and its consequences for seed dispersal versus predation by rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Ives, Anthony R

    2017-03-01

    Individual variation in seed size and seed production is high in many plant species. How does this variation affect seed-dispersing animals and, in turn, the fitness of individual plants? In this study, we first surveyed intraspecific variation in seed mass and production in a population of a Chinese white pine, Pinus armandii. For 134 target trees investigated in 2012, there was very high variation in seed size, with mean seed mass varying among trees almost tenfold, from 0.038 to 0.361 g. Furthermore, 30 of the 134 trees produced seeds 2 years later, and for these individuals there was a correlation in seed mass of 0.59 between years, implying consistent differences among individuals. For a subset of 67 trees, we monitored the foraging preferences of scatter-hoarding rodents on a total of 15,301 seeds: 8380 were ignored, 3184 were eaten in situ, 2651 were eaten after being cached, and 395 were successfully dispersed (cached and left intact). At the scale of individual seeds, seed mass affected almost every decision that rodents made to eat, remove, and cache individual seeds. At the level of individual trees, larger seeds had increased probabilities of both predation and successful dispersal: the effects of mean seed size on costs (predation) and benefits (caching) balanced out. Thus, despite seed size affecting rodent decisions, variation among trees in dispersal success associated with mean seed size was small once seeds were harvested. This might explain, at least in part, the maintenance of high variation in mean seed mass among tree individuals.

  13. Conditional Knockout of the MicroRNA 17-92 Cluster in Type-I Collagen-Expressing Cells Decreases Alveolar Bone Size and Incisor Tooth Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M; Mohan, S; Xing, M J; Kesavan, C

    2016-01-01

    To test the role of the miR17-92 (miR) cluster in dental bones, we evaluated the incisor tooth phenotype by micro-CT in 5- and 12-week-old conditional knockout (CKO) mice deficient in the miR17-92 cluster in type-I collagen-expressing cells and bone strength by finite element analysis. The incisor teeth of CKO mice showed a 23-30 % reduction in tissue volume and bone volume. Accordingly, the stiffness and failure load of incisor teeth assessed by finite element analysis showed an 18-40 % decrease in CKO compared to wild-type mice. A positive correlation between bone parameters and strength data suggests that the decreased mechanical properties of incisor teeth are due to decreased tissue volume and bone volume. Subsequently, we found that the width of alveolar bone was reduced by 25 % with a 16 % increase in periodontal ligament space, suggesting that the CKO mice are more susceptible to tooth movement. Since alveolar bone is populated primarily by osteoblast lineage cells, it is likely that the reduction in periosteal expansion of alveolar bone in the lower jaw of CKO mice results from decreased periosteal bone formation. Overall, our phenotype analysis demonstrates that the miR17-92 cluster is essential for development and maintenance of tooth strength by regulating its tooth size.

  14. Computerized system to measure interproximal alveolar bone levels in epidemiologic, radiographic investigations. II. Intra- and inter-examinar variation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouters, F.R.; Frithiof, L.; Soeder, P.Oe.; Hellden, L.; Lavstedt, S.; Salonen, L.

    1988-01-01

    The study was aimed at analyzing intra- and inter-examiner variations in computerized measurement and in non-measurability of alveolar bone level in a cross-sectional, epidemiologic material. At each interproximal tooth surface, alveolar bone height in percentage of root length (B/R) and tooth length (B/T) were determined twice by one examiner and once by a second examiner from X5-magnified periapical radiographs. The overall intra- and inter-examiner variations in measurement were 2.85% and 3.84% of root length and 1.97% and 2.82% of tooth length, respectively. The varations were different for different tooth groups and for different degrees of severity of marginal periodontitis. The overall proportions on non-measurable tooth surfaces varied with examiner from 32% to 39% and from 43% to 48% of the available interproximal tooth surfaces for B/R and B/T, respectively. With regard to the level of reliability, the computerized method reported is appropriate to cross-sectional, epidemiologic investigations from radiographs.

  15. Evolutionary and Taxonomic Implications of Variation in Nuclear Genome Size: Lesson from the Grass Genus Anthoxanthum (Poaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumová, Zuzana; Krejčíková, Jana; Mandáková, Terezie; Suda, Jan; Trávníček, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The genus Anthoxanthum (sweet vernal grass, Poaceae) represents a taxonomically intricate polyploid complex with large phenotypic variation and its evolutionary relationships still poorly resolved. In order to get insight into the geographic distribution of ploidy levels and assess the taxonomic value of genome size data, we determined C- and Cx-values in 628 plants representing all currently recognized European species collected from 197 populations in 29 European countries. The flow cytometric estimates were supplemented by conventional chromosome counts. In addition to diploids, we found two low (rare 3x and common 4x) and one high (~16x-18x) polyploid levels. Mean holoploid genome sizes ranged from 5.52 pg in diploid A. alpinum to 44.75 pg in highly polyploid A. amarum, while the size of monoploid genomes ranged from 2.75 pg in tetraploid A. alpinum to 9.19 pg in diploid A. gracile. In contrast to Central and Northern Europe, which harboured only limited cytological variation, a much more complex pattern of genome sizes was revealed in the Mediterranean, particularly in Corsica. Eight taxonomic groups that partly corresponded to traditionally recognized species were delimited based on genome size values and phenotypic variation. Whereas our data supported the merger of A. aristatum and A. ovatum, eastern Mediterranean populations traditionally referred to as diploid A. odoratum were shown to be cytologically distinct, and may represent a new taxon. Autopolyploid origin was suggested for 4x A. alpinum. In contrast, 4x A. odoratum seems to be an allopolyploid, based on the amounts of nuclear DNA. Intraspecific variation in genome size was observed in all recognized species, the most striking example being the A. aristatum/ovatum complex. Altogether, our study showed that genome size can be a useful taxonomic marker in Anthoxathum to not only guide taxonomic decisions but also help resolve evolutionary relationships in this challenging grass genus.

  16. Evolutionary and Taxonomic Implications of Variation in Nuclear Genome Size: Lesson from the Grass Genus Anthoxanthum (Poaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Chumová

    Full Text Available The genus Anthoxanthum (sweet vernal grass, Poaceae represents a taxonomically intricate polyploid complex with large phenotypic variation and its evolutionary relationships still poorly resolved. In order to get insight into the geographic distribution of ploidy levels and assess the taxonomic value of genome size data, we determined C- and Cx-values in 628 plants representing all currently recognized European species collected from 197 populations in 29 European countries. The flow cytometric estimates were supplemented by conventional chromosome counts. In addition to diploids, we found two low (rare 3x and common 4x and one high (~16x-18x polyploid levels. Mean holoploid genome sizes ranged from 5.52 pg in diploid A. alpinum to 44.75 pg in highly polyploid A. amarum, while the size of monoploid genomes ranged from 2.75 pg in tetraploid A. alpinum to 9.19 pg in diploid A. gracile. In contrast to Central and Northern Europe, which harboured only limited cytological variation, a much more complex pattern of genome sizes was revealed in the Mediterranean, particularly in Corsica. Eight taxonomic groups that partly corresponded to traditionally recognized species were delimited based on genome size values and phenotypic variation. Whereas our data supported the merger of A. aristatum and A. ovatum, eastern Mediterranean populations traditionally referred to as diploid A. odoratum were shown to be cytologically distinct, and may represent a new taxon. Autopolyploid origin was suggested for 4x A. alpinum. In contrast, 4x A. odoratum seems to be an allopolyploid, based on the amounts of nuclear DNA. Intraspecific variation in genome size was observed in all recognized species, the most striking example being the A. aristatum/ovatum complex. Altogether, our study showed that genome size can be a useful taxonomic marker in Anthoxathum to not only guide taxonomic decisions but also help resolve evolutionary relationships in this challenging grass genus.

  17. Investigating the weight ratio variation of alginate-hydroxyapatite composites for vertebroplasty method bone filler material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, Gusti Ruri; Yuwono, Akhmad Herman; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Ramahdita, Ghiska

    2017-02-01

    One of the newly developed methods for curing spinal fracture due to osteoporosis is vertebroplasty. The method is basically based on injection of special material directly to the fractured spine in order to commence the formation of new bone. Therefore, appropriate injectable materials are very important to the curing success. In this study, injectable alginate-hydroxyapatite (HA) composites were fabricated varying the weight percentage of alginate upon synthesis procedure. The result of injection capability and compressive tests as well as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) suggested that bone filler composite containing 60 wt% alginate is the optimum composition obtaining a compressive modulus up to 0.15 MPa, injection capability of more than 85% and morphology with uniform porous and fibrous structure. This injectable composite fabrication process can be used for the development of injectable materials system for vertebroplasty method.

  18. Predictable variation of range-sizes across an extreme environmental gradient in a lizard adaptive radiation: evolutionary and ecological inferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pincheira-Donoso

    Full Text Available Large-scale patterns of current species geographic range-size variation reflect historical dynamics of dispersal and provide insights into future consequences under changing environments. Evidence suggests that climate warming exerts major damage on high latitude and elevation organisms, where changes are more severe and available space to disperse tracking historical niches is more limited. Species with longer generations (slower adaptive responses, such as vertebrates, and with restricted distributions (lower genetic diversity, higher inbreeding in these environments are expected to be particularly threatened by warming crises. However, a well-known macroecological generalization (Rapoport's rule predicts that species range-sizes increase with increasing latitude-elevation, thus counterbalancing the impact of climate change. Here, I investigate geographic range-size variation across an extreme environmental gradient and as a function of body size, in the prominent Liolaemus lizard adaptive radiation. Conventional and phylogenetic analyses revealed that latitudinal (but not elevational ranges significantly decrease with increasing latitude-elevation, while body size was unrelated to range-size. Evolutionarily, these results are insightful as they suggest a link between spatial environmental gradients and range-size evolution. However, ecologically, these results suggest that Liolaemus might be increasingly threatened if, as predicted by theory, ranges retract and contract continuously under persisting climate warming, potentially increasing extinction risks at high latitudes and elevations.

  19. Temporal variation and size class distribution in a hepertological assemblage from Córdoba, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martori, Ricardo

    2005-05-01

    fernandezae and Odontophrynus americanus; the most constant was Pantodactylus schreibersi. Hypothesis 3 was rejected for all species; except Elachistochleis bicolor that showed a similar activity pattern as the assemblage. Hypothesis 4 was rejected, size groups of each species showed temporal variation due to recruitment and recruitment period varied in and between species. During the first period, the highest diversity index was registered in April 1999 (5.46. During the second year the highest diversity index recorded (6.85 was in January 2000. This study shows the importance of long-term studies for conservation purposes. It also emphasizes the importance of understanding variation of the phenologies of individual species and the variation of activity and diversity within assemblages between years.

  20. Restoration of Critical-Sized Defects in the Rabbit Mandible Using Autologous Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Hybridized with Nano-β-tricalcium Phosphate/Collagen Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehui Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-β-tricalcium phosphate/collagen (n-β-TCP/Col is considered with good osteoconductivity. However, the therapeutic effectiveness of n-β-TCP/Col scaffolds in combination with autologous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs remains to be elucidated for the repair of critical-sized bone defects. In this study, we found that n-β-TCP/Col scaffolds exhibited high biocompatibility in vitro. The introduction of BMSCs expanded in vitro to the scaffolds dramatically enhanced their efficiency to restore critical-sized bone defects, especially during the initial stage after implantation. Collectively, these results suggest that autologous BMSCs in n-β-TCP/Col scaffolds have the potential to be applied in bone tissue engineering.

  1. In-vivo efficacy of compliant 3D nano-composite in critical-size bone defect repair: a six month preclinical study in rabbit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Sagar

    Full Text Available Bone defects above critical size do not heal completely by itself and thus represent major clinical challenge to reconstructive surgery. Numerous bone substitutes have already been used to promote bone regeneration, however their use, particularly for critical-sized bone defects along with their long term in vivo safety and efficacy remains a concern. The present study was designed to obtain a complete healing of critical-size defect made in the proximal tibia of New Zealand White rabbit, using nano-hydroxyapatite/gelatin and chemically carboxymethylated chitin (n-HA/gel/CMC scaffold construct. The bone-implant interfaces and defect site healing was evaluated for a period up to 25 weeks using radiography, micro-computed tomography, fluorescence labeling, and histology and compared with respective SHAM (empty contra lateral control. The viscoelastic porous scaffold construct allows easy surgical insertion and post-operatively facilitate oxygenation and angiogenesis. Radiography of defect treated with scaffold construct suggested expedited healing at defect edges and within the defect site, unlike confined healing at edges of the SHAM sites. The architecture indices analyzed by micro-computed tomography showed a significant increase in percentage of bone volume fraction, resulted in reconciled cortico-trabecular bone formation at n-HA/gel/CMC constructs treated site (15.2% to 52.7% when compared with respective SHAM (10.2% to 31.8%. Histological examination and fluorescence labeling revealed that the uniformly interconnected porous surface of scaffold construct enhanced osteoblasts' activity and mineralization. These preclinical data suggest that, n-HA/gel/CMC construct exhibit stimulation of bone's innate regenerative capacity, thus underscoring their use in guided bone regeneration.

  2. Association between low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 gene polymorphisms and bone mineral density variation in Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wang

    Full Text Available Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 gene (LRP2 is located next to the genomic region showing suggestive linkage with both hip and wrist bone mineral density (BMD phenotypes. LRP2 knockout mice showed severe vitamin D deficiency and bone disease, indicating the involvement of LRP2 in the preservation of vitamin D metabolites and delivery of the precursor to the kidney for the generation of 1α,25(OH(2D(3. In order to investigate the contribution of LRP2 gene polymorphisms to the variation of BMD in Chinese population, a total of 330 Chinese female-offspring nuclear families with 1088 individuals and 400 Chinese male-offspring nuclear families with 1215 individuals were genotyped at six tagSNPs of the LRP2 gene (rs2389557, rs2544381, rs7600336, rs10210408, rs2075252 and rs4667591. BMD values at the lumbar spine 1-4 (L1-4 and hip sites were measured by DXA. The association between LRP2 polymorphisms and BMD phenotypes was assessed by quantitative transmission disequilibrium tests (QTDTs in female- and male-offspring nuclear families separately. In the female-offspring nuclear families, rs2075252 and haplotype GA of rs4667591 and rs2075252 were identified in the nominally significant total association with peak BMD at L1-4; however, no significant within-family association was found between peak BMD at the L1-4 and hip sites and six tagSNPs or haplotypes. In male-offspring nuclear families, neither the six tagSNPs nor the haplotypes was in total association or within-family association with the peak BMD variation at the L1-4 and hip sites by QTDT analysis. Our findings suggested that the polymorphisms of LRP2 gene is not a major factor that contributes to the peak BMD variation in Chinese population.

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of CBCT with Different Voxel Sizes and Intraoral Digital Radiography for Detection of Periapical Bone Lesions: An Ex-Vivo Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shirin Sakhdari; Ahmad Reza Talaeipour; Maziar Talaeipour; Maryam Pazhutan; Sanaz Heidarkhan Tehrani; Mohammad Javad Kharazifard

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to assess the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with different voxel sizes and intraoral digital radiography with photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate for detection of periapical (PA) bone lesions.Materials and Methods: In this ex vivo diagnostic study, one-millimeter defects were created in the alveolar sockets of 15 bone blocks, each with two posterior teeth. A no-defect control group was also included. Digital PA radiographs with PSP ...

  4. Temporal variations in the export of REE in boreal catchments of varying character and size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, S.; Lidman, F.; Mörth, M.; Björkvald, L.; Laudon, H.

    2009-04-01

    Organic matter and iron colloids have a large impact on the mobilisation of trivalent elements such as aluminium (Al), rare earth elements (REE) and actinides. Recent results of the relative importance of these colloids are diverging though (POURRET et al., 2007); STEINMANN and STILLE, 2008) and there is a general lack of information of the importance of flow pathways and landscape type on the relative importance of the various colloidal fractions that mobilizes REE from the catchment soils. In this study we present the data of water chemical analysis of a series of catchments with varying size and character but all within the boreal zone. Two speciation techniques and two column separation methods involving ion exchange were used to quantify the causes for the temporal variation of the dissolved amounts of trivalent ions in these water courses. Our study indicates that REE export is controlled mostly by landscape type while changes in the acid-base character of organic matter are of minor importance. Changes in flow pathways in a riparian zone in one of the studied areas in a forested site may be used to decipher the effect of chemical versus physical processes for the mobilisation of REE and aluminium and open up the possibility for a quantitative modelling of the varying sources of REE. Iron and aluminium are mobilized together with organic matter in varying amounts in different landscape types and this affects the REE export from the various landscape elements. While the amount of strongly bound aluminium mobilized from the catchments usually correlate positively with any of the REE this is not the case for strongly bound iron. Fractionation patterns of REE are discussed and the observed binding of REE to organic matter was modelled using the speciation program WHAM VI (TIPPING, 1998). Pourret O., Davranche M., Gruau G., and Dia A. (2007) Organic complexation of rare earth elements in natural waters: Evaluating model calculations from ultrafiltration data

  5. The relationship between latitudinal light variation and orbit and cranial size in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Short Alice

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased orbit size is suggested to be an adaptation for enhanced visual acuity and sensitivity in conditions of reduced light quality. Whilst light ambience has a well established correlation with eye size in birds and primates, evidence in humans is very limited. The aim of this study was to analyse the anatomical compensations of the eye and visual cortex as a result of varying levels of light exposure. It was hypothesized that humans of higher latitudes will have an increased orbit size to improve visual sensitivity and acuity in conditions of decreased light, and thus greater cranium size due to enlarged visual cortices. Craniometric measurements of 1,209 male and 1,021 female individuals from 27 series coming from different latitudes were sourced from William W. Howells Craniometric Data Set. Mean cranial and orbit size was calculated by combining linear craniometric measurements of length, width and height for individual males and females at each latitude. Linear regressions of orbit and cranial size on latitude were created and significance was measured using Pearson’s r and P value. Partial correlations were calculated to test whether orbit size correlates with latitude independent of cranial size. Significant positive correlations were found between i orbit and cranial size and ii orbit size and latitude and iii cranial size and latitude in males and females. Additionally, partial correlation values for latitude and orbit size were significant in both males and females. The relationship between visual system size and increasing latitude among humans is currently understudied. Significant relationships between visual system size and increasing latitude suggest that enlarged eyes were an evolutionary mechanism for individuals with compromised light availability. Other factors related to varying geographic location may also play a role

  6. Rheological properties of acrylic bone cement during curing and the role of the size of the powder particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gladius; Carroll, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic compressive rheometric technique was used to determine the true or complex viscosity (eta*) of three poly (methyl methacrylate), PMMA-based bone cement formulations (one commercially available and two experimental), as a function of the time that elapsed from commencement of hand mixing of the cement constituents (t). For each cement, two rheological parameters [namely, the time of onset of cure (t(ons)) and the critical cure rate (CCR), which is herein defined as the complex viscosity rate computed at t(ons)] were determined from the eta*-t data. For each cement, particle analysis was used to obtain the powder particle size distribution, from which the following parameters were obtained: (a) the overall mean particle diameter D(m), and (b) the relative amounts of small-sized PMMA beads (mean diameter d between 0 and 40 mum) (alpha) and large-sized PMMA beads (d > 75 mum) (beta). It is seen that the key particle parameter is not D(m) per se but alpha and beta. Thus, the highest values of t(ons) and CCR were obtained from a cement with the highest values of alpha and beta. An explanation for these trends is given, and two areas for further research work in this field are outlined.

  7. Navel jewelry artifacts and intravertebral variation in spine bone densitometry in adolescents and young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Susan M; Ichikawa, Laura E; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Scholes, Delia

    2009-01-01

    Non-removable navel jewelry can increase the measured bone density of the underlying vertebra. We measured lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in an observational study of 727 adolescents and young women aged 14-30 yr. We evaluated several methods of correcting BMD: manually erasing a small area, eliminating 1 or 2 vertebrae, estimating the BMD from 1 or 2 vertebrae using data from remaining vertebrae, and estimating the BMD using T-scores of the remaining vertebrae. Ten percent (n=71) of the subjects were wearing navel jewelry. The areal BMD by DXA of L1 and L2 was similar in those with jewels as in controls without jewels, but L3-L4 showed higher bone density in those with jewelry, and the spine BMD of L1-L4 was significantly higher in the bejeweled women (1.043+/-0.011 vs 1.006+/-0.004 g/cm2, p=0.01). The estimated errors in accuracy (g/cm2) were 0.034 due to the jewels; 0.005 from erasing a small area; 0.019 from eliminating L4; 0.044 from eliminating both L3 and L4; 0.016 from predicting BMD using L1-L3; and 0.028 using L1-L2. The T-scores using the Hologic database were progressively lower in the caudal vertebrae, even in 96 local women aged 30-35 yr, whose average T-score was 0.35 at L1 but -0.26 at L4. Thus, we found significant errors due to intravertebral variability. We suggest the optimal method of correcting for small artifacts is to erase the area under the artifact.

  8. There is no universal molecular clock for invertebrates, but rate variation does not scale with body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jessica A; Welch, John J; Woolfit, Megan; Bromham, Lindell

    2006-05-01

    The existence of a universal molecular clock has been called into question by observations that substitution rates vary widely between lineages. However, increasing empirical evidence for the systematic effects of different life history traits on the rate of molecular evolution has raised hopes that rate variation may be predictable, potentially allowing the "correction" of the molecular clock. One such example is the body size trend observed in vertebrates; smaller species tend to have faster rates of molecular evolution. This effect has led to the proposal of general predictive models correcting for rate heterogeneity and has also been invoked to explain discrepancies between molecular and paleontological dates for explosive radiations in the fossil record. Yet, there have been no tests of an effect in any nonvertebrate taxa. In this study, we have tested the generality of the body size effect by surveying a wide range of invertebrate metazoan lineages. DNA sequences and body size data were collected from the literature for 330 species across five phyla. Phylogenetic comparative methods were used to investigate a relationship between average body size and substitution rate at both interspecies and interfamily comparison levels. We demonstrate significant rate variation in all phyla and most genes examined, implying a strict molecular clock cannot be assumed for the Metazoa. Furthermore, we find no evidence of any influence of body size on invertebrate substitution rates. We conclude that the vertebrate body size effect is a special case, which cannot be simply extrapolated to the rest of the animal kingdom.

  9. Genetic variation in litter size and kit survival of mink (Neovison vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B K; Su, G; Berg, P

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study are to estimate variance components of litter size and kit survival rate and estimate genetic correlations of litter size and kit survival rate with dam's juvenile body weight and pregnancy length. Variance components for litter size and kit survival were analysed using an AI......-REML approach, based on data from 1940 litters of the black colour type mink from 1996 to 2001. The models included (i) additive genetic effect of dam; (ii) dam and sire genetic effects; (iii) additive genetic effect of dam in relation to litter size and dam and sire genetic effects in relation to survival rate......; (iv) additive genetic effect of dam to estimate the correlations of litter size or kit survival with dam juvenile body weight and pregnancy length on yearling dams (1357 litters). The dam heritabilities were of litter size (0.02-0.08) and survival rate (0.05-0.10). The permanent effects of dam were...

  10. The relationship between latitudinal light variation and orbit and cranial size in humans

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Increased orbit size is suggested to be an adaptation for enhanced visual acuity and sensitivity in conditions of reduced light quality. Whilst light ambience has a well established correlation with eye size in birds and primates, evidence in humans is very limited. The aim of this study was to analyse the anatomical compensations of the eye and visual cortex as a result of varying levels of light exposure. It was hypothesized that humans of higher latitudes will have an increased orbit size ...

  11. Common polymorphic variation in the genetically diverse African insulin gene and its association with size at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Clive J; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Fulford, Anthony J C; Stead, John D H; Wingate, Dianne L; Ong, Ken K; Sirugo, Giorgio; Prentice, Andrew M; Dunger, David B

    2009-09-01

    The insulin variable number of tandem repeats (INS VNTR) has been variably associated with size at birth in non-African populations. Small size at birth is a major determinant of neonatal mortality, so the INS VNTR may influence survival. We tested the hypothesis, therefore, that genetic variation around the INS VNTR in a rural Gambian population, who experience seasonal variation in nutrition and subsequently birth weight, may be associated with foetal and early growth. Six polymorphisms flanking the INS VNTR were genotyped in over 2,500 people. Significant associations were detected between the maternally inherited SNP 27 (rs689) allele and birth length [effect size 17.5 (5.2-29.8) mm; P = 0.004; n = 361]. Significant associations were also found between the maternally inherited African-specific SNP 28 (rs5506) allele and post-natal weight gain [effect size 0.19 (0.05-0.32) z score points/year; P = 0.005; n = 728). These results suggest that in the Gambian population studied there are associations between polymorphic variation in the genetically diverse INS gene and foetal and early growth characteristics, which contribute to overall polygenic associations with these traits.

  12. Natural variation of magnesium isotopes in mammal bones and teeth from two South African trophic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeremy E.; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Isotopic fractionations accompanying element transfer through terrestrial ecosystems have the potential to shed light on ecological interactions between primary producers and consumers, but with the exception of carbon and nitrogen this potential has barely been exploited. Here, the magnesium stable isotope composition of bones and teeth of extant mammals from Kruger National Park (KNP) and Western Cape (WC), South Africa was measured for the first time. The nature of the geological substrate proves to be a major determinant of the ecosystem isotope baseline, as indicated by the lighter magnesium isotope ratios measured in WC mammals (ranging from -1.58‰ to -0.79‰) compared to those from KNP mammals (ranging from -1.01‰ to -0.04‰). Therefore, comparisons between the isotope signatures of taxa must be restricted to a pre-defined geographic area with a homogeneous substrate. In both parks, Mg shows slight enrichment in heavier isotopes from herbivores to carnivores. Plant remains trapped in the dentition of herbivores provide direct evidence of dietary source and, when available, were measured. In KNP only, δ26Mg of plant remains is systematically lighter than the values for herbivore teeth. These results invite further exploration of the variability of Mg isotopes in vertebrate ecosystems in order to test whether magnesium, a bio-essential element present in relatively large proportions in bone and teeth apatite, may serve as an additional trophic tracer to nitrogen, which is a constituent of collagen that rapidly degrades after burial.

  13. No association between the aluminium content of trabecular bone and bone density, mass or size of the proximal femur in elderly men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallmin Hans

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aluminium is considered a bone toxic metal since poisoning can lead to aluminium-induced bone disease in patients with chronic renal failure. Healthy subjects with normal renal function retain 4% of the aluminium consumed. They might thus also accumulate aluminium and eventually be at risk of long-term low-grade aluminium intoxication that can affect bone health. Methods We therefore examined 62 patients with femoral neck fractures or osteoarthritis of the hip (age range 38–93, with the aim of examining whether aluminium in bone is associated with bone-mineral density (BMD, content (BMC or width of the femoral neck measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA. During operations bone biopsies were taken from the trabecular bone of the proximal femur. The samples were measured for their content of aluminium using a mass spectrometer. Results No significant association between the aluminium content in bone and femoral neck BMD, BMC or width could be found after multivariate adjustment. Conclusion Our results indicate that the accumulated aluminium content in bone during life does not substantially influence the extent of osteoporosis.

  14. Real-time-guided bone regeneration around standardized critical size calvarial defects using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and collagen membrane with and without using tricalcium phosphate: an in vivo microcomputed tomographic and histologic experiment in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khalid Al-Hezaimi; Sundar Ramalingam; Mansour Al-Askar; Aws S ArRejaie; Nasser Nooh; Fawad Jawad; Abdullah Aldahmash; Muhammad Atteya; Cun-Yu Wang

    2016-01-01

    The aimof the present real time in vivo micro-computed tomography (mCT) and histologic experiment was to assess the efficacy of guided bone regeneration (GBR) around standardized calvarial critical size defects (CSD) using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), and collagen membrane (CM) with and without tricalcium phosphate (TCP) graft material. In the calvaria of nine female Sprague-Dawley rats, full-thickness CSD (diameter 4.6 mm) were created under general anesthesia. Treatment-wise, rats were divided into three groups. In group 1, CSD was covered with a resorbable CM; in group 2, BMSCs were filled in CSD and covered with CM; and in group 3, TCP soaked in BMSCs was placed in CSD and covered with CM. All defects were closed using resorbable sutures. Bone volume and bone mineral density of newly formed bone (NFB) and remaining TCP particles and rate of new bone formation was determined at baseline, 2, 4, 6, and 10 weeks using in vivo mCT. At the 10th week, the rats were killed and calvarial segments were assessed histologically. The results showed that the hardness ofNFBwas similar to that of the native bone in groups 1 and 2 as compared to theNFB in group 3. Likewise, values for the modulus of elasticity were also significantly higher in group 3 compared to groups 1 and 2. This suggests that TCP when used in combination with BMSCs and without CM was unable to form bone of significant strength that could possibly provide mechanical “lock” between the natural bone and NFB. The use of BMSCs as adjuncts to conventional GBR initiated new bone formation as early as 2 weeks of treatment compared to when GBR is attempted without adjunct BMSC therapy.

  15. Ethnic Differences in Bone Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse eZengin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There are differences in bone health between ethnic groups in both men and in women. Variations in body size and composition are likely to contribute to reported differences. Most studies report ethnic differences in areal bone mineral density (aBMD which do not consistently parallel ethnic patterns in fracture rates. This suggests that other parameters beside aBMD should be considered when determining fracture risk between and within populations, including other aspects of bone strength: bone structure and microarchitecture as well muscle strength (mass, force generation, anatomy and fat mass. We review what is known about differences in bone-densitometry derived outcomes between ethnic groups and the extent to which they account for the differences in fracture risk. Studies are included that were published primarily between 1994 – 2014. A ‘one size fits all approach’ should not be used to understand better ethnic differences in fracture risk.

  16. Six new examples of the bipartite trapezoid bone: morphology, significant population variation, and an examination of pre-existing criteria to identify bipartition of individual carpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Scott E; Stojanowski, Christopher M; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2015-03-01

    Carpal bone bipartition is a developmental variant resulting in the division of a normally singular carpal into two distinct segments. Cases involving the scaphoid are best known, though many other carpals can be affected, including the trapezoid. Six new examples of bipartite trapezoids, identified in African and Asian anatomical and archeological samples, are reported here and compared with the eight previously known. While the site of bipartition is consistent, the resulting segments exhibit variability in their articulations with neighboring carpals. Five of the six affected trapezoids were identified in African or African-derived samples, yielding a significantly higher frequency (0.323%) of bipartite trapezoid than seen in anatomical or archeological series of European origin. Bilateral bipartite trapezoids in archeological remains from the Mid Holocene site of Gobero (Niger) are potentially the oldest bipartite carpals yet identified in humans. Their discovery may indicate that trapezoid bipartition is a condition that has been present in African populations since prehistoric times, though more data are needed. Because bipartite carpals may be symptomatic and can occur as part of syndromes, the significant population variation in frequency identified here has potential utility in both anatomical and clinical contexts. However, a comparison of the morphological appearance of bipartite trapezoids with the suggested criteria for bipartite scaphoid diagnosis indicates that these criteria are not equally applicable to other carpals. Fortunately, due to the rarity of fracture, identification of the bipartite trapezoid and separating it from pathological conditions is considerably easier than diagnosing a bipartite scaphoid.

  17. Temporal variation and lack of host specificity among bacterial endosymbionts of Osedax bone worms (Polychaeta: Siboglinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salathé Rahel M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osedax worms use a proliferative root system to extract nutrients from the bones of sunken vertebrate carcasses. The roots contain bacterial endosymbionts that contribute to the nutrition of these mouthless and gutless worms. The worms acquire these essential endosymbionts locally from the environment in which their larvae settle. Here we report on the temporal dynamics of endosymbiont diversity hosted by nine Osedax species sampled during a three-year investigation of an experimental whale fall at 1820-m depth in the Monterey Bay, California. The host species were identified by their unique mitochondrial COI haplotypes. The endosymbionts were identified by ribotyping with PCR primers specifically designed to target Oceanospirillales. Results Thirty-two endosymbiont ribotypes associated with these worms clustered into two distinct bacterial ribospecies that together comprise a monophyletic group, mostly restricted to deep waters (>1000 m. Statistical analyses confirmed significant changes in the relative abundances of host species and the two dominant endosymbiont ribospecies during the three-year sampling period. Bone type (whale vs. cow also had a significant effect on host species, but not on the two dominant symbiont ribospecies. No statistically significant association existed between the host species and endosymbiont ribospecies. Conclusions Standard PCR and direct sequencing proved to be an efficient method for ribotyping the numerically dominant endosymbiont strains infecting a large sample of host individuals; however, this method did not adequately represent the frequency of mixed infections, which appears to be the rule rather than an exception for Osedax individuals. Through cloning and the use of experimental dilution series, we determined that minority ribotypes constituting less than 30% of a mixture would not likely be detected, leading to underestimates of the frequency of multiple infections in host

  18. Variation in egg size and nestling growth rate in relation to clutch size and laying sequence in great tits Parus major

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuyan You; Jiang Feng; Haitao Wang; Jilong Wang; Chao Dong; Xunrui Su; Hanmei Sun; Wei Gao

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine (1) optimal clutch size in great tits (Parus major) nesting in nest boxes;(2) variation in egg morphology and nestling growth rate with position in the laying sequence;and (3) hatching asynchrony and nestling survival as determined by infrared nest cameras.We collected data from 73 clutches in artificial nest boxes in the Zuojia Natural Preserve area in Jilin Province,China,in 2005 and 2006,using infrared cameras to match laying order to hatching order for four nests.Egg morphology and growth rate were significantly affected by clutch size and position in the laying order.Overall,egg size and growth rate increased with position in the laying order.In general,it was difficult to detect asynchronous hatching from observations alone,but data from our infrared cameras showed that early-laid eggs tended to hatch before later-laid eggs,leading to hatching asynchrony.However,females invested more into last-laid eggs and nestlings,reducing size asynchrony among the chicks and leading to higher survival rates of nestlings.Our results,therefore,provide support for the "brood survival" hypothesis rather than for the "brood reduction" hypothesis.

  19. Set-size procedures for controlling variations in speech-reception performance with a fluctuating masker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joshua G W; Summers, Van; Iyer, Nandini; Brungart, Douglas S

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) tracking is often used to measure speech reception in noise. Because SNR varies with performance using this method, data interpretation can be confounded when measuring an SNR-dependent effect such as the fluctuating-masker benefit (FMB) (the intelligibility improvement afforded by brief dips in the masker level). One way to overcome this confound, and allow FMB comparisons across listener groups with different stationary-noise performance, is to adjust the response set size to equalize performance across groups at a fixed SNR. However, this technique is only valid under the assumption that changes in set size have the same effect on percentage-correct performance for different masker types. This assumption was tested by measuring nonsense-syllable identification for normal-hearing listeners as a function of SNR, set size and masker (stationary noise, 4- and 32-Hz modulated noise and an interfering talker). Set-size adjustment had the same impact on performance scores for all maskers, confirming the independence of FMB (at matched SNRs) and set size. These results, along with those of a second experiment evaluating an adaptive set-size algorithm to adjust performance levels, establish set size as an efficient and effective tool to adjust baseline performance when comparing effects of masker fluctuations between listener groups.

  20. Body Size Versus Depth: Regional and Taxonomical Variation in Deep-Sea Meio- and Macrofaunal Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Grient, Jesse M A; Rogers, Alex D

    2015-01-01

    Body size (weight per individual) is an important concept in ecology. It has been studied in the deep sea where a decrease in size with increasing depth has often been found. This has been explained as an adaptation to food limitation where size reduction results in a lowered metabolic rate and a decreased energetic requirement. However, observations vary, with some studies showing an increase in size with depth, and some finding no depth correlation at all. Here, we collected data from peer-reviewed studies on macro- and meiofaunal abundance and biomass, creating two datasets allowing statistical comparison of factors expected to influence body size in meio- and macrofaunal organisms. Our analyses examined the influence of region, taxonomic group and sampling method on the body size of meiofauna and macrofauna in the deep sea with increasing depth, and the resulting models are presented. At the global scale, meio- and macrofaunal communities show a decrease in body size with increasing depth as expected with the food limitation hypothesis. However, at the regional scale there were differences in trends of body size with depth, either showing a decrease (e.g. southwest Pacific Ocean; meio- and macrofauna) or increase (e.g. Gulf of Mexico; meiofauna only) compared to a global mean. Taxonomic groups also showed differences in body size trends compared to total community average (e.g. Crustacea and Bivalvia). Care must be taken when conducting these studies, as our analyses indicated that sampling method exerts a significant influence on research results. It is possible that differences in physiology, lifestyle and life history characteristics result in different responses to an increase in depth and/or decrease in food availability. This will have implications in the future as food supply to the deep sea changes as a result of climate change (e.g. increased ocean stratification at low to mid latitudes and reduced sea ice duration at high latitudes).

  1. Body Size Shifts in Philippine Reef Fishes: Interfamilial Variation in Responses to Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Y. Fidler

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of intense fishing pressure, fished populations experience reduced population sizes and shifts in body size toward the predominance of smaller and early maturing individuals. Small, early-maturing fish exhibit significantly reduced reproductive output and, ultimately, reduced fitness. As part of resource management and biodiversity conservation programs worldwide, no-take marine protected areas (MPAs are expected to ameliorate the adverse effects of fishing pressure. In an attempt to advance our understanding of how coral reef MPAs meet their long-term goals, this study used visual census data from 23 MPAs and fished reefs in the Philippines to address three questions: (1 Do MPAs promote shifts in fish body size frequency distribution towards larger body sizes when compared to fished reefs? (2 Do MPA size and (3 age contribute to the efficacy of MPAs in promoting such shifts? This study revealed that across all MPAs surveyed, the distribution of fishes between MPAs and fished reefs were similar; however, large-bodied fish were more abundant within MPAs, along with small, young-of-the-year individuals. Additionally, there was a significant shift in body size frequency distribution towards larger body sizes in 12 of 23 individual reef sites surveyed. Of 22 fish families, eleven demonstrated significantly different body size frequency distributions between MPAs and fished reefs, indicating that shifts in the size spectrum of fishes in response to protection are family-specific. Family-level shifts demonstrated a significant, positive correlation with MPA age, indicating that MPAs become more effective at increasing the density of large-bodied fish within their boundaries over time.

  2. Estimation of particle size variations for laser speckle rheology of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K

    2015-03-01

    Laser speckle rheology (LSR) is an optical technique for assessing the viscoelastic properties of materials with several industrial, biological, and medical applications. In LSR, the viscoelastic modulus, G*(ω), of a material is quantified by analyzing the temporal fluctuations of speckle patterns. However, the size of scattering particles within the material also influences the rate of speckle fluctuations, independent of sample mechanical properties, and complicates the accurate estimation of G*(ω). Here, we demonstrate that the average particle size may be retrieved from the azimuth-angle dependence of time-averaged speckle intensities, permitting the accurate quantification of the viscoelastic moduli of materials with unknown particle size distribution using LSR.

  3. Breeding phenology in Rana temporaria. Local variation is due to pond temperature and population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loman, Jon

    2016-09-01

    Frog breeding phenology in temperate zones is usually compared to progress of spring temperatures at a regional scale. However, local populations may differ substantially in phenology. To understand this, local climate and other aspects must be studied. In this study, breeding phenology of the common frog, Rana temporaria, in a set of ponds in southern Sweden is analyzed. There was within year a variation of up to 3 weeks in start of breeding among local populations. Water temperature was measured in the ponds, and breeding tended to be earlier in warmer ponds (surprise!). Breeding was also earlier in ponds with a large breeding congregation. Alternative reasons for these patterns are suggested and discussed. There was a large residual variation. The common frog has a wide range of acceptable wintering sites, and I hypothesize that the particular choice by a local population may explain part of this residual variation.

  4. Micro-finite element simulation of trabecular-bone post-yield behaviour--effects of material model, element size and type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulp, E; Van Rietbergen, B; Muller, R; Huiskes, R

    2008-08-01

    Micro-finite element (micro-FE) analysis became a standard tool for the evaluation of trabecular bone mechanical properties. The accuracy of micro-FE models for linear analyses is well established. However, the accuracy of recently developed nonlinear micro-FE models for simulations of trabecular bone failure is not known. In this study, a trabecular bone specimen was compressed beyond the apparent yield point. The experiment was simulated using different micro-FE meshes with different element sizes and types, and material models based on cortical bone. The results from the simulations were compared with experimental results to study the effects of the different element and material models. It was found that a decrease in element size from 80 to 40 mum had little effect on predicted post-yield behaviour. Element type and material model had significant effects. Nevertheless, none of the established material models for cortical bone were able to predict the typical descent in the load-displacement curve seen during compression of trabecular bone.

  5. Bioresorbable scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: optimal design, fabrication, mechanical testing and scale-size effects analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Pedro G; Hollister, Scott J; Flanagan, Colleen L; Fernandes, Paulo R

    2015-03-01

    Bone scaffolds for tissue regeneration require an optimal trade-off between biological and mechanical criteria. Optimal designs may be obtained using topology optimization (homogenization approach) and prototypes produced using additive manufacturing techniques. However, the process from design to manufacture remains a research challenge and will be a requirement of FDA design controls to engineering scaffolds. This work investigates how the design to manufacture chain affects the reproducibility of complex optimized design characteristics in the manufactured product. The design and prototypes are analyzed taking into account the computational assumptions and the final mechanical properties determined through mechanical tests. The scaffold is an assembly of unit-cells, and thus scale size effects on the mechanical response considering finite periodicity are investigated and compared with the predictions from the homogenization method which assumes in the limit infinitely repeated unit cells. Results show that a limited number of unit-cells (3-5 repeated on a side) introduce some scale-effects but the discrepancies are below 10%. Higher discrepancies are found when comparing the experimental data to numerical simulations due to differences between the manufactured and designed scaffold feature shapes and sizes as well as micro-porosities introduced by the manufacturing process. However good regression correlations (R(2) > 0.85) were found between numerical and experimental values, with slopes close to 1 for 2 out of 3 designs.

  6. Linking differential domain functions of the GS3 protein to natural variation of grain size in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hailiang; Sun, Shengyuan; Yao, Jialing; Wang, Chongrong; Yu, Sibin; Xu, Caiguo; Li, Xianghua; Zhang, Qifa

    2010-11-09

    Grain yield in many cereal crops is largely determined by grain size. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of GS3, a major quantitative trait locus for grain size. It functions as a negative regulator of grain size and organ size. The wild-type isoform is composed of four putative domains: a plant-specific organ size regulation (OSR) domain in the N terminus, a transmembrane domain, a tumor necrosis factor receptor/nerve growth factor receptor (TNFR/NGFR) family cysteine-rich domain, and a von Willebrand factor type C (VWFC) in the C terminus. These domains function differentially in grain size regulation. The OSR domain is both necessary and sufficient for functioning as a negative regulator. The wild-type allele corresponds to medium grain. Loss of function of OSR results in long grain. The C-terminal TNFR/NGFR and VWFC domains show an inhibitory effect on the OSR function; loss-of-function mutations of these domains produced very short grain. This study linked the functional domains of the GS3 protein to natural variation of grain size in rice.

  7. Seasonal variation in soil seed bank size and species composition of selected habitat types in Maputaland, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. S. Kellerman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal variation in seed bank size and species composition of five selected habitat types within the Tembe Elephant Park. South Africa, was investigated. At three-month intervals, soil samples were randomly collected from five different habitat types: a, Licuati forest; b, Licuati thicket; c, a bare or sparsely vegetated zone surrounding the forest edge, referred to as the forest/grassland ecotone; d, grassland; and e, open woodland. Most species in the seed bank flora were either grasses, sedges, or forbs, with hardly any evidence of woody species. The Licuati forest and thicket soils produced the lowest seed densities in all seasons.  Licuati forest and grassland seed banks showed a two-fold seasonal variation in size, those of the Licuati thicket and woodland a three-fold variation in size, whereas the forest/grassland ecotone maintained a relatively large seed bank all year round. The woodland seed bank had the highest species richness, whereas the Licuati forest and thicket soils were poor in species. Generally, it was found that the greatest correspondence in species composition was between the Licuati forest and thicket, as well as the forest/grassland ecotone and grassland seed bank floras.

  8. Variation of Particle Size and Pretreatment Temperature to the Crystallinity of Leucaena Leucocephala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Safaai Nor Sharliza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to determine the effect of different particle size and pretreatment temperature to the crystallinity of leucaena leucocephala. The leucaena was pretreated by ionic liquid [1-ethyl-3 methylimidazolium acetate [Emim]Ac. There were three different particle sizes that have been tested in this experiment; less than 0.3 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm. In the other hand, the pretreatment temperature tested were 30°C, 60°C and 90°C. The effect of particle size and pretreatment temperature to the crystallinity of leucaena was investigated by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The crystallinity index of the sample represents the percentage of crystalline materials. A lower in the cristallinity index indicated that the material has lower crystillinity, hence give more benefit to the cellulose hydrolysis. From XRD analysis, it shows that the cristallinity index of leucaena decreased with decreasing particle size and increasing pretreatment temperature. SEM analysis also shows that the structure of leucaena has more irregular, porous and destroyed structure with decreasing particle size and increasing pretreatment temperature. Thus, the result from this experiment shows that the smaller particle size and higher pretreatment temperature would provide a more accessible surface area to enhance the cellulose hydrolysis.

  9. Does physical activity in adolescence have site-specific and sex-specific benefits on young adult bone size, content, and estimated strength?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckham, Rachel L; Baxter-Jones, Adam D G; Johnston, James D; Vatanparast, Hassanali; Cooper, David; Kontulainen, Saija

    2014-02-01

    The long-term benefits of habitual physical activity during adolescence on adult bone structure and strength are poorly understood. We investigated whether physically active adolescents had greater bone size, density, content, and estimated bone strength in young adulthood when compared to their peers who were inactive during adolescence. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was used to measure the tibia and radius of 122 (73 females) participants (age mean ± SD, 29.3 ± 2.3 years) of the Saskatchewan Pediatric Bone Mineral Accrual Study (PBMAS). Total bone area (ToA), cortical density (CoD), cortical area (CoA), cortical content (CoC), and estimated bone strength in torsion (SSIp ) and muscle area (MuA) were measured at the diaphyses (66% tibia and 65% radius). Total density (ToD), trabecular density (TrD), trabecular content (TrC), and estimated bone strength in compression (BSIc ) were measured at the distal ends (4%). Participants were grouped by their adolescent physical activity (PA) levels (inactive, average, and active) based on mean PA Z-scores obtained from serial questionnaire assessments completed during adolescence. We compared adult bone outcomes across adolescent PA groups in each sex using analysis of covariance followed by post hoc pairwise comparisons with Bonferroni adjustments. When adjusted for adult height, MuA, and PA, adult males who were more physically active than their peers in adolescence had 13% greater adjusted torsional bone strength (SSIp , p adolescence had 10% larger adjusted CoA (p adolescence seemed to persist into young adulthood, with greater ToA and SSIp in males, and greater CoA, CoC, and TrC in females.

  10. Lost in Jupiter's Shadow: Can Resonant Charge Variations Explain Dust Grain Sizes in the Main Ring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Hamilton, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    Interplanetary impacts onto the tiny moons Metis and Adrastea replenish Jupiter's main ring with dusty ejecta of all sizes. The equilibrium size distribution present in the rings at a given time is a function of production and loss mechanisms, both of which may be vary with particle size. Loss mechanisms include collisions and dynamical processes. Here we explore some of the latter. Grains tend to pick up negative electric charges due to motion through Jupiter's plasma environment, and positive charges from the photoelectric effect of sunlight. The periodic interruption of sunlight in Jupiter's shadow causes the equilibrium electric charge, and hence the Lorentz force, to resonate with the Kepler orbital frequency. The eccentricity increases for grains moving radially inwards during the shadow transit, and decreases when grains move outward in the shadow, hence the azimuthal location of pericenter is important. For smaller grains, the eccentricity increases monotonically until they collide with Jupiter. For much larger grains, precession due to both the Lorentz force and planetary oblateness causes the eccentricity to oscillate periodically. We explore the shadow instability in the main ring for a variety of uniform plasma density models, comparing numerical data with a semi-analytic approximation. We find that the effect of the shadow dwindles in importance for plasma that is either too sparse or too dense. In sparse plasma, the charging timescale slows, limiting the change in electric potential from sunlight to shadow. In dense plasma, charging currents from the plasma overwhelm the photoelectric effect in sunlight, also resulting in a small change in electric potential. Between these two regimes, the shadow resonance efficiently removes grains up to a particular size threshold in the main ring. This size-dependent loss mechanism may contribute to the observed flattening in the size distribution index for smaller grains.

  11. An elevational trend of body size variation in a cold-climate agamid lizard,Phrynocephalus theobaldi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanting JIN; Pinghu LIAO

    2015-01-01

    The pattern that many ectotherms have smaller body sizes in cold environments follows the converse to Bergmann’s rule and is most frequently found in lizards. Allen’s rule predicts animals from warm climates usually have longer tails and limbs, while these traits tend to be shorter in individuals from cold climates. We examined body size variation in an endemic Chinese lizardPhrynocephalus theobaldi along a broad elevational gradient (3,600–5,000 m on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau). Female body size showed a U-shaped cline, decreasing with increased elevation within the range 3,600–4,200 m, but increasing at eleva-tions > 4200 m. Male body size continued to increase with increasing elevations. Both sexes showed an increased pattern of ex-tremity length with elevation that does not conform to Allen’s rule. Limb length and tail length increased along the elevational gradients. In terms of color pattern, an abdominal black speckled area appears at elevations >4,200 m. This trait increases in size with increased elevation. Unlike most studies, our results indicated that annual sunshine hours corresponding to the activity pe-riod of the lizards could play an important role on the positive body size cline in environments at very high elevations > 4200 m [Current Zoology 61 (3): 444–453, 2015].

  12. Variation, evolution, and correlation analysis of C+G content and genome or chromosome size in different kingdoms and phyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Du, Donglei

    2014-01-01

    C+G content (GC content or G+C content) is known to be correlated with genome/chromosome size in bacteria but the relationship for other kingdoms remains unclear. This study analyzed genome size, chromosome size, and base composition in most of the available sequenced genomes in various kingdoms. Genome size tends to increase during evolution in plants and animals, and the same is likely true for bacteria. The genomic C+G contents were found to vary greatly in microorganisms but were quite similar within each animal or plant subkingdom. In animals and plants, the C+G contents are ranked as follows: monocot plants>mammals>non-mammalian animals>dicot plants. The variation in C+G content between chromosomes within species is greater in animals than in plants. The correlation between average chromosome C+G content and chromosome length was found to be positive in Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria (but not in other analyzed bacterial phyla), Ascomycota fungi, and likely also in some plants; negative in some animals, insignificant in two protist phyla, and likely very weak in Archaea. Clearly, correlations between C+G content and chromosome size can be positive, negative, or not significant depending on the kingdoms/groups or species. Different phyla or species exhibit different patterns of correlation between chromosome-size and C+G content. Most chromosomes within a species have a similar pattern of variation in C+G content but outliers are common. The data presented in this study suggest that the C+G content is under genetic control by both trans- and cis- factors and that the correlation between C+G content and chromosome length can be positive, negative, or not significant in different phyla.

  13. Natural variation in rosette size under salt stress conditions corresponds to developmental differences between Arabidopsis accessions and allelic variation in the LRR-KISS gene

    KAUST Repository

    Julkowska, Magdalena M.

    2016-02-11

    Natural variation among Arabidopsis accessions is an important genetic resource to identify mechanisms underlying plant development and stress tolerance. To evaluate the natural variation in salinity stress tolerance, two large-scale experiments were performed on two populations consisting of 160 Arabidopsis accessions each. Multiple traits, including projected rosette area, and fresh and dry weight were collected as an estimate for salinity tolerance. Our results reveal a correlation between rosette size under salt stress conditions and developmental differences between the accessions grown in control conditions, suggesting that in general larger plants were more salt tolerant. This correlation was less pronounced when plants were grown under severe salt stress conditions. Subsequent genome wide association study (GWAS) revealed associations with novel candidate genes for salinity tolerance such as LRR-KISS (At4g08850), flowering locus KH-domain containing protein and a DUF1639-containing protein. Accessions with high LRR-KISS expression developed larger rosettes under salt stress conditions. Further characterization of allelic variation in candidate genes identified in this study will provide more insight into mechanisms of salt stress tolerance due to enhanced shoot growth.

  14. Skeletal dosimetry for external exposures to photons based on {mu}CT images of spongiosa: Consideration of voxel resolution, cluster size, and medullary bone surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, R.; Khoury, H. J.; Vieira, J. W.; Brown, K. A. Robson [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Luiz Freire 1000, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 50740-540, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Luiz Freire 500, CEP 50740-540, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil and Escola Politecnica, UPE, Rua Benfica 455, CEP 50751-460, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Imaging Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Bristol, 43 Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UU (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    Skeletal dosimetry based on {mu}CT images of trabecular bone has recently been introduced to calculate the red bone marrow (RBM) and the bone surface cell (BSC) equivalent doses in human phantoms for external exposure to photons. In order to use the {mu}CT images for skeletal dosimetry, spongiosa voxels in the skeletons were replaced at run time by so-called micromatrices, which have exactly the size of a spongiosa voxel and contain segmented trabecular bone and marrow microvoxels. A cluster (=parallelepiped) of 2x2x2=8 micromatrices was used systematically and periodically throughout the spongiosa volume during the radiation transport calculation. Systematic means that when a particle leaves a spongiosa voxel to enter into a neighboring spongiosa voxel, then the next micromatrix in the cluster will be used. Periodical means that if the particle travels through more than two spongiosa voxels in a row, then the cluster will be repeated. Based on the bone samples available at the time, clusters of up to 3x3x3=27 micromatrices were studied. While for a given trabecular bone volume fraction the whole-body RBM equivalent dose showed converging results for cluster sizes between 8 and 27 micromatrices, this was not the case for the BSC equivalent dose. The BSC equivalent dose seemed to be very sensitive to the number, form, and thickness of the trabeculae. In addition, the cluster size and/or the microvoxel resolution were considered to be possible causes for the differences observed. In order to resolve this problem, this study used a bone sample large enough to extract clusters containing up to 8x8x8=512 micromatrices and which was scanned with two different voxel resolutions. Taking into account a recent proposal, this investigation also calculated the BSC equivalent dose on medullary surfaces of cortical bone in the arm and leg bones. The results showed (1) that different voxel resolutions have no effect on the RBM equivalent dose but do influence the BSC equivalent

  15. VARIATION IN JUVENILE COHO SALMON END-OF-SUMMER SIZE: HIERARACHICAL ANALYSIS OF HABITAT EFFECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The size of coho salmon juveniles entering the winter has been shown to influence overwinter survival, and hence may be a useful indicator of linkages between summer habitat conditions and subsequent smolt production. We are investigating habitat-specific demographics of juvenile...

  16. Dental pulp-derived stromal cells exhibit a higher osteogenic potency than bone marrow-derived stromal cells in vitro and in a porcine critical-size bone defect model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs was compared with that of dental pulp-derived stromal cells (DPSCs in vitro and in a pig calvaria critical-size bone defect model. Methods: BMSCs and DPSCs were extracted from the tibia bone marrow and the molar teeth of each pig, respectively. BMSCs and DPSCs were cultured in monolayer and on a three-dimensional (3D polycaprolactone (PCL – hyaluronic acid – tricalcium phosphate (HT-PCL scaffold. Population doubling (PD, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, and calcium deposition were measured in monolayer. In the 3D culture ALP activity, DNA content, and calcium deposition were evaluated. Six non-penetrating critical-size defects were made in each calvarium of 14 pigs. Three paired sub-studies were conducted: (1 empty defects vs. HT-PCL scaffolds; (2 PCL scaffolds vs. HT-PCL scaffolds; and (3 autologous BMSCs on HT-PCL scaffolds vs. autologous DPSCs on HT-PCL scaffolds. The observation time was five weeks. Bone volume fractions (BV/TV were assessed with micro-computed tomography (μCT and histomorphometry. Results and discussion: The results from the in vitro study revealed a higher ALP activity and calcium deposition of the DPSC cultures compared with BMSC cultures. Significantly more bone was present in the HT-PCL group than in both the pure PCL scaffold group and the empty defect group in vivo. DPSCs generated more bone than BMSCs when seeded on HT-PCL. In conclusion, DPSCs exhibited a higher osteogenic potential compared with BMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, making it a potential cell source for future bone tissue engineering.

  17. Mechanisms causing variation in sexual size dimorphism in three sympatric, congeneric lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicom, Carryn; Alford, Ross; Schoener, Thomas W; Schwarzkopf, Lin

    2014-06-01

    Sexual differences in adult body size (sexual size dimorphism, or SSD) ultimately can be favored by selection because larger males are more likely to be successful competitors for females, because larger females bear larger clutches, or because intersexual size differences reduce resource competition. Natural selection during juvenile development can influence sexual dimorphism of adults, and selection on adults and juveniles may differ. Studies that address the relative contributions of adult body shape dimorphism and sexually dimorphic patterns of growth and maturity are particularly useful in understanding the evolution of size dimorphism, yet they are rare. We investigated three sympatric, congeneric lizard species with different degrees and directions of adult sexual dimorphism and compared their growth patterns, survival probabilities, and intersexual trophic niche differences. Different mechanisms, even within these closely related, sympatric species, acted on juvenile lizards to produce species differences in adult SSD. Both degree and direction of dimorphism resulted from differences between the sexes in either the duration of growth or the rate of growth, but not from differences in rates of survival or selection on juvenile growth rate. Species- and sex-specific trade-offs in the allocation of energy to growth and reproduction, as well as differential timing of maturation, thus caused the growth patterns of the sexes to diverge, producing SSD. The differences that we observed in the direction of SSD among these species is consistent with their different social systems, suggesting that differential selection on adult body size has been responsible for the observed species-specific differences in juvenile growth rates and maturational timing.

  18. Litter size variation in hypothalamic gene expression determines adult metabolic phenotype in Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early postnatal environments may have long-term and potentially irreversible consequences on hypothalamic neurons involved in energy homeostasis. Litter size is an important life history trait and negatively correlated with milk intake in small mammals, and thus has been regarded as a naturally varying feature of the early developmental environment. Here we investigated the long-term effects of litter size on metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic neuropeptide mRNA expression involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, using the offspring reared from large (10-12 and small (3-4 litter sizes, of Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii, a rodent species from Inner Mongolia grassland in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hypothalamic leptin signaling and neuropeptides were measured by Real-Time PCR. We showed that offspring reared from small litters were heavier at weaning and also in adulthood than offspring from large litters, accompanied by increased food intake during development. There were no significant differences in serum leptin levels or leptin receptor (OB-Rb mRNA in the hypothalamus at weaning or in adulthood, however, hypothalamic suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 mRNA in adulthood increased in small litters compared to that in large litters. As a result, the agouti-related peptide (AgRP mRNA increased in the offspring from small litters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support our hypothesis that natural litter size has a permanent effect on offspring metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic neuropeptide expression, and suggest central leptin resistance and the resultant increase in AgRP expression may be a fundamental mechanism underlying hyperphagia and the increased risk of overweight in pups of small litters. Thus, we conclude that litter size may be an important and central determinant of metabolic fitness in adulthood.

  19. VKORC1 common variation and bone mineral density in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana C Crawford

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis, defined by low bone mineral density (BMD, is common among postmenopausal women. The distribution of BMD varies across populations and is shaped by both environmental and genetic factors. Because the candidate gene vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1 generates vitamin K quinone, a cofactor for the gamma-carboxylation of bone-related proteins such as osteocalcin, we hypothesized that VKORC1 genetic variants may be associated with BMD and osteoporosis in the general population. To test this hypothesis, we genotyped six VKORC1 SNPs in 7,159 individuals from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III. NHANES III is a nationally representative sample linked to health and lifestyle variables including BMD, which was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA on four regions of the proximal femur. In adjusted models stratified by race/ethnicity and sex, SNPs rs9923231 and rs9934438 were associated with increased BMD (p=0.039 and 0.024, respectively while rs8050894 was associated with decreased BMD (p=0.016 among non-Hispanic black males (n=619. VKORC1 rs2884737 was associated with decreased BMD among Mexican-American males (n=795; p=0.004. We then tested for associations between VKORC1 SNPs and osteoporosis, but the results did not mirror the associations observed between VKORC1 and BMD, possibly due to small numbers of cases. This is the first report of VKORC1 common genetic variation associated with BMD, and one of the few reports available that investigate the genetics of BMD and osteoporosis in diverse populations.

  20. Variations in the pallial organ sizes of the invasive oyster, Crassostrea gigas, along an extreme turbidity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutertre, Mickaël; Barillé, Laurent; Beninger, Peter G.; Rosa, Philippe; Gruet, Yves

    2009-11-01

    Spatial size variations of labial palps, gills and the adductor muscle of the invasive feral oyster, Crassostrea gigas, were studied along two gradients of suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations in the temperate macrotidal Bourgneuf Bay, (annual mean SPM concentration gradient of 21.0-154.0 mg l -1) and the adjacent Loire Estuary (annual mean SPM concentration gradient of 24.1-630.4 mg l -1) on the French Atlantic Coast. The gill-to-palp (G:P) ratios decreased with increasing turbidity, both in the bay and the estuary. Changes in G:P ratios were chiefly related to palp area variations, increasing gradually from low turbidity to very high-turbidity sites, while gill area showed no clear relationship with turbidity conditions. The G:P ratio, showing a significant relationship ( r2 = 0.97) with SPM concentrations, is proposed as a pallial organ index of oyster acclimation to turbidity conditions. The area of the striated part of the adductor muscle was always greater than that of the smooth one, and adductor muscle area tended to decrease when SPM concentration increased. These observations show the morphological capacity of the oyster C. gigas to tolerate SPM concentrations above the feeding cessation thresholds previously determined experimentally. They also suggest that pallial organ size variations could help explain the success of recent feral oyster invasions in temperate turbid ecosystems.

  1. Heterosis and genetic variation in litter size in purebred and crossbred mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, Janne Pia; Larsen, Peter Foged; Pertoldi, Cino

    2014-01-01

    were analyzed and the effects of parity and production year were included in the analyses. Genetic trend and the proportions of the total variance explained by the effects of additive genetics (h2) , common environment (due to repeated litters from the same female; c2), and dam of the female (granddame......Crosses between different mink lines from 3 Danish mink farms that use different breeding strategies were studied to estimate heterosis and variance components for litter size. The study was designed to analyze crosses between lines of the same color type, between different color types, and between...... of the born litter; d2) were estimated. The results showed that mink of the Black color type potentially produced smaller litters compared to mink of the other studied color types. We found significant general maternal effect of heterosis for litter size. Analyses of specific heterosis showed a significant...

  2. A Delphi exercise used to identify potential causes of variation in litter size of Ontario swine

    OpenAIRE

    Dewey, Catherine E.; Martin, S. Wayne; Friendship, Robert M.; Kennedy, Brain

    1992-01-01

    Forty-eight people, considered to the swine experts, were asked to collaborate in a Delphi exercise to identify the factors which they believed affect litter size in Ontario swine. The panel included 16 animal scientists, 16 pork producers, and 16 veterinarians in swine practice. The ten factors with the highest ratings were parity of the sow, mycotoxins in the feed, infections with porcine parvovirus or Leptospira spp., breeding gilts on their second versus first observed estrus, the timing ...

  3. Habitat-specific size structure variations in periwinkle populations ( Littorina littorea) caused by biotic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschweiler, Nina; Molis, Markus; Buschbaum, Christian

    2009-06-01

    Shell size distribution patterns of marine gastropod populations may vary considerably across different environments. We investigated the size and density structure of genetically continuous periwinkle populations ( Littorina littorea) on an exposed rocky and a sheltered sedimentary environment on two nearby islands in the south-eastern North Sea (German Bight). On the sedimentary shore, periwinkle density (917 ± 722 individuals m-2) was about three times higher than on the rocky shore (296 ± 168 individuals m-2). Mean (9.8 ± 3.9 mm) and maximum (22 mm) shell size of L. littorea on the sedimentary shore were smaller than on the rocky shore (21.5 ± 4.2 and 32 mm, respectively), where only few small snails were found. Additionally, periwinkle shells were thicker and stronger on the rocky than on the sedimentary shore. To ascertain mechanisms responsible for differences in population structures, we examined periwinkles in both environments for growth rate, predation pressure, infection with a shell boring polychaete ( Polydora ciliata) and parasitic infestation by trematodes. A crosswise transplantation experiment revealed better growth conditions on the sedimentary than on the rocky shore. However, crab abundance and prevalence of parasites and P. ciliata in adult snails were higher on the sedimentary shore. Previous investigations showed that crabs prefer large periwinkles infested with P. ciliata. Thus, we suggest that parasites and shell boring P. ciliata in conjunction with an increased crab predation pressure are responsible for low abundances of large periwinkles on the sedimentary shore while high wave exposure may explain low densities of juvenile L. littorea on the rocky shore. We conclude that biotic factors may strongly contribute to observed differences in size structure of the L. littorea populations studied on rocky and sedimentary shores.

  4. Extreme size and sequence variation in the ITS rDNA of Bremia lactucae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Joon; Hong, Seung-Boem; Shin, Hyeon-Dong

    2007-02-01

    Bremia lactucae Regel (Chromista, Peronosporaceae) is an economically destructive pathogen, which causes downy mildew disease on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) worldwide. The ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of Bremia lactucae isolates was analyzed for the first time. The ITS region of lettuce downy mildew was observed to have a size of 2458 bp; thereby, having one of the longest ITS sizes recorded to date. The majority of the extremely large sized ITS2 length of 2086 was attributed to the additional presences of nine repetitive elements with lengths of 179-194 bp, which between them shared the low homology of 48-69%. Comparison of the ITS2 sequences with the B. lactucae isolates from other host plants showed that isolates present on Lactuca sativa were distinct from those on L. indica var. laciniata, as well as Hemistepta and Youngia. We suggest the high degree of sequence heterogeneity exhibited in the ITS2 region of B. lactucae may warrant the specific detection and diagnosis of this destructive pathogen or its division into several distinct species.

  5. Genome size variation in Corchorus olitorius (Malvaceae s.l.) and its correlation with elevation and phenotypic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benor, Solomon; Fuchs, Jörg; Blattner, Frank R

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we report genome size variations in Corchorus olitorius L. (Malvaceae s.l.), a crop species known for its morphological plasticity and broad geographical distribution, and Corchorus capsularis L., the second widely cultivated species in the genus. Flow cytometric analyses were conducted with several tissues and nuclei isolation buffers using 69 accessions of C. olitorius and 4 accessions of C. capsularis, representing different habitats and geographical origins. The mean 2C nuclear DNA content (± SD) of C. olitorius was estimated to be 0.918 ± 0.011 pg, with a minimum of 0.882 ± 0.004 pg, and a maximum of 0.942 ± 0.004 pg. All studied plant materials were found to be diploid with 2n = 14. The genome size is negatively correlated with days to flowering (r = -0.29, p genome size and growing elevation (r = 0.59, p genome sizes of C. olitorius and C. capsularis are much smaller, and therewith closer to that of rice. The relatively small genome sizes will be of general advantage for any efforts into genomics or sequencing approaches of these species.

  6. Endopolyploidy as a potential alternative adaptive strategy for Arabidopsis leaf size variation in response to UV-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegas, Vasilis C; Wargent, Jason J; Pesquet, Edouard; Granqvist, Emma; Paul, Nigel D; Doonan, John H

    2014-06-01

    The extent of endoreduplication in leaf growth is group- or even species-specific, and its adaptive role is still unclear. A survey of Arabidopsis accessions for variation at the level of endopolyploidy, cell number, and cell size in leaves revealed extensive genetic variation in endopolyploidy level. High endopolyploidy is associated with increased leaf size, both in natural and in genetically unstructured (mapping) populations. The underlying genes were identified as quantitative trait loci that control endopolyploidy in nature by modulating the progression of successive endocycles during organ development. This complex genetic architecture indicates an adaptive mechanism that allows differential organ growth over a broad geographic range and under stressful environmental conditions. UV-B radiation was identified as a significant positive climatic predictor for high endopolyploidy. Arabidopsis accessions carrying the increasing alleles for endopolyploidy also have enhanced tolerance to UV-B radiation. UV-absorbing secondary metabolites provide an additional protective strategy in accessions that display low endopolyploidy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that high constitutive endopolyploidy is a significant predictor for organ size in natural populations and is likely to contribute to sustaining plant growth under high incident UV radiation. Endopolyploidy may therefore form part of the range of UV-B tolerance mechanisms that exist in natural populations.

  7. Investigation into Variation of Endogenous Metabolites in Bone Marrow Cells and Plasma in C3H/He Mice Exposed to Benzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongli Sun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Benzene is identified as a carcinogen. Continued exposure of benzene may eventually lead to damage to the bone marrow, accompanied by pancytopenia, aplastic anemia or leukemia. This paper explores the variations of endogenous metabolites to provide possible clues for the molecular mechanism of benzene-induced hematotoxicity. Liquid chromatography coupled with time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS and principal component analysis (PCA was applied to investigate the variation of endogenous metabolites in bone marrow cells and plasma of male C3H/He mice. The mice were injected subcutaneously with benzene (0, 300, 600 mg/day once daily for seven days. The body weights, relative organ weights, blood parameters and bone marrow smears were also analyzed. The results indicated that benzene caused disturbances in the metabolism of oxidation of fatty acids and essential amino acids (lysine, phenylalanine and tyrosine in bone marrow cells. Moreover, fatty acid oxidation was also disturbed in plasma and thus might be a common disturbed metabolic pathway induced by benzene in multiple organs. This study aims to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in benzene hematotoxicity, especially in bone marrow cells.

  8. The short-term outcome of the modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure regarding range of motion, carpal bone translation and bony shelf size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Shogo; Tamai, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Atsuto; Hirashima, Toshiko

    2011-02-01

    The Sauvé-Kapandji (S-K) procedure is a common treatment for rheumatoid wrists, but in some cases severe bone destruction makes this operative modality difficult to perform, while also resulting in a poor outcome. A modified S-K procedure for these wrists has been reported, but the clinical outcomes of the modified procedure are unclear. This study evaluated 24 wrists in 20 patients who underwent the modified S-K procedure. The mean follow-up period was 34.5 months. The clinical assessments were range of motion, carpal bone translation and bony shelf size. The range of motion and carpal bone translation were similar to those produced by the S-K procedure. In regard to bony shelf size, wrists with an excessively large bony shelf tended to have a progression of carpal bone translation toward the palmar direction due to the residual malposition of the ECU tendon. The modified S-K procedure appears to be a safe and effective surgical alternative for the treatment of severely destroyed rheumatoid wrists. Although the modified procedure allows for the adjustment of the bony shelf size, it should not be used with wrists that have an excessively large bony shelf.

  9. Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3 multiple banded antigen size variation after chronic intra-amniotic infection/colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Robinson

    Full Text Available Ureaplasma species are the microorganisms most frequently associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The multiple banded antigen (MBA, a surface-exposed lipoprotein, is a key virulence factor of ureaplasmas. The MBA demonstrates size variation, which we have shown previously to be correlated with the severity of chorioamnion inflammation. We aimed to investigate U. parvum serovar 3 pathogenesis in vivo, using a sheep model, by investigating: MBA variation after long term (chronic and short term (acute durations of in utero ureaplasma infections, and the severity of chorioamnionitis and inflammation in other fetal tissues. Inocula of 2 × 10(7 colony-forming-units (CFU of U. parvum serovar 3 (Up or media controls (C were injected intra-amniotically into pregnant ewes at one of three time points: day 55 (69d Up, n = 8; C69, n = 4; day 117 (7d Up, n = 8; C7, n = 2; and day 121 (3d Up, n = 8; C3, n = 2 of gestation (term = 145-150d. At day 124, preterm fetuses were delivered surgically. Samples of chorioamnion, fetal lung, and umbilical cord were: (i snap frozen for subsequent ureaplasma culture, and (ii fixed, embedded, sectioned and stained by haematoxylin and eosin stain for histological analysis. Selected fetal lung clinical ureaplasma isolates were cloned and filtered to obtain cultures from a single CFU. Passage 1 and clone 2 ureaplasma cultures were tested by western blot to demonstrate MBA variation. In acute durations of ureaplasma infection no MBA variants (3d Up or very few MBA variants (7d Up were present when compared to the original inoculum. However, numerous MBA size variants were generated in vivo (alike within contiguous tissues, amniotic fluid and fetal lung, but different variants were present within chorioamnion, during chronic, 69d exposure to ureaplasma infection. For the first time we have shown that the degree of ureaplasma MBA variation in vivo increased with the duration of gestation.

  10. Ureaplasma parvum serovar 3 multiple banded antigen size variation after chronic intra-amniotic infection/colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James W; Dando, Samantha J; Nitsos, Ilias; Newnham, John; Polglase, Graeme R; Kallapur, Suhas G; Pillow, J Jane; Kramer, Boris W; Jobe, Alan H; Payton, Diane; Knox, Christine L

    2013-01-01

    Ureaplasma species are the microorganisms most frequently associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The multiple banded antigen (MBA), a surface-exposed lipoprotein, is a key virulence factor of ureaplasmas. The MBA demonstrates size variation, which we have shown previously to be correlated with the severity of chorioamnion inflammation. We aimed to investigate U. parvum serovar 3 pathogenesis in vivo, using a sheep model, by investigating: MBA variation after long term (chronic) and short term (acute) durations of in utero ureaplasma infections, and the severity of chorioamnionitis and inflammation in other fetal tissues. Inocula of 2 × 10(7) colony-forming-units (CFU) of U. parvum serovar 3 (Up) or media controls (C) were injected intra-amniotically into pregnant ewes at one of three time points: day 55 (69d Up, n = 8; C69, n = 4); day 117 (7d Up, n = 8; C7, n = 2); and day 121 (3d Up, n = 8; C3, n = 2) of gestation (term = 145-150d). At day 124, preterm fetuses were delivered surgically. Samples of chorioamnion, fetal lung, and umbilical cord were: (i) snap frozen for subsequent ureaplasma culture, and (ii) fixed, embedded, sectioned and stained by haematoxylin and eosin stain for histological analysis. Selected fetal lung clinical ureaplasma isolates were cloned and filtered to obtain cultures from a single CFU. Passage 1 and clone 2 ureaplasma cultures were tested by western blot to demonstrate MBA variation. In acute durations of ureaplasma infection no MBA variants (3d Up) or very few MBA variants (7d Up) were present when compared to the original inoculum. However, numerous MBA size variants were generated in vivo (alike within contiguous tissues, amniotic fluid and fetal lung, but different variants were present within chorioamnion), during chronic, 69d exposure to ureaplasma infection. For the first time we have shown that the degree of ureaplasma MBA variation in vivo increased with the duration of gestation.

  11. A variational constitutive model for the distribution and interactions of multi-sized voids

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxing

    2013-07-29

    The evolution of defects or voids, generally recognized as the basic failure mechanism in most metals and alloys, has been intensively studied. Most investigations have been limited to spatially periodic cases with non-random distributions of the radii of the voids. In this study, we use a new form of the incompressibility of the matrix to propose the formula for the volumetric plastic energy of a void inside a porous medium. As a consequence, we are able to account for the weakening effect of the surrounding voids and to propose a general model for the distribution and interactions of multi-sized voids. We found that the single parameter in classical Gurson-type models, namely void volume fraction is not sufficient for the model. The relative growth rates of voids of different sizes, which can in principle be obtained through physical or numerical experiments, are required. To demonstrate the feasibility of the model, we analyze two cases. The first case represents exactly the same assumption hidden in the classical Gurson\\'s model, while the second embodies the competitive mechanism due to void size differences despite in a much simpler manner than the general case. Coalescence is implemented by allowing an accelerated void growth after an empirical critical porosity in a way that is the same as the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model. The constitutive model presented here is validated through good agreements with experimental data. Its capacity for reproducing realistic failure patterns is shown by simulating a tensile test on a notched round bar. © 2013 The Author(s).

  12. Variation in male body size and reproductive allocation in the leafcutter ant Atta colombica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stürup, M.; den Boer, S. P. A.; Nash, David Richard

    2011-01-01

    Remarkably little is known about the traits that determine reproductive success of males in eusocial insects. Their window for mate choice decisions is very short, the actual mating process is very difficult to observe, and their small body sizes have likely prevented systematic studies in many...... are traits directly correlated with reproductive success. However, the much higher heritabilities for total body mass, gaster mass, head width, sperm length and sperm number suggest that these traits are less likely to make direct contributions to male fitness....

  13. Microplastics in the Mediterranean Sea: Deposition in coastal shallow sediments, spatial variation and preferential grain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomar, Carme; Estarellas, Fernando; Deudero, Salud

    2016-04-01

    Marine litter loads in sea compartments are an emergent issue due to their ecological and biological consequences. This study addresses microplastic quantification and morphological description to test spatial differences along an anthropogenic gradient of coastal shallow sediments and further on to evaluate the preferential deposition of microplastics in a given sediment grain fraction. Sediments from Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) contained the highest concentrations of microplastics (MPs): up to 0.90 ± 0.10 MPs/g suggesting the transfer of microplastics from source areas to endpoint areas. In addition, a high proportion of microplastic filaments were found close to populated areas whereas fragment type microplastics were more common in MPAs. There was no clear trend between sediment grain size and microplastic deposition in sediments, although microplastics were always present in two grain size fractions: 2 mm > x > 1 mm and 1 mm > x 0.5 mm.

  14. Wormlike micelles in poly(oxyethylene) surfactant solution: Growth control through hydrophilic-group size variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Toufiq; Aramaki, Kenji

    2008-11-01

    Viscoelastic micellar solutions are formed in poly(oxyethylene) cholesteryl ether (ChEO(m), m=15, 30) aqueous solutions on addition of tri(ethyleneglycol) mono n-dodecyl ether (C(12)EO(3)). The steady-shear and dynamic rheological behavior of the systems is characteristic of wormlike micellar solution. In either system, the plateau modulus (G(0)) and relaxation time (tau) are found to increase with increasing cosurfactant mixing fractions. The plateau modulus of the ChEO(30)-C(12)EO(3) system at the maximum viscosity region is found to be higher than that in the ChEO(15)-C(12)EO(3) system at the maximum viscosity region, whereas for the relaxation time the opposite relation is found. The maximum viscosities obtained in the two systems are of the same order of magnitude. In the ChEO(30)-C(12)EO(3) system, the maximum viscosity is obtained at a higher cosurfactant mixing fraction than that in the ChEO(15)-C(12)EO(3) system. It is concluded that decreasing the head-group size of the hydrophilic surfactant favors micellar growth. Monolaurin, another hydrophobic surfactant known to induce growth in some systems, is found to cause phase separation before significant micellar growth occurs in ChEO(m) solutions, although the effect of head-group size of ChEO(m) is found to be similar to the ChEO(m)-C(12)EO(3) systems.

  15. Spatial and temporal variations of sediment size on a mixed sand and gravel beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Diane P.; Walton, Susan M.

    2007-12-01

    Mixed sand and gravel beaches have been the subject of comparatively few studies in the UK. This paper describes the sediment distribution before, during and after a programme of beach nourishment along a section of mixed sand and gravel beach forming part of the Pevensey Bay Coastal Defences, in East Sussex, UK. The beach was recharged in September 2002, and beach profiles were measured along three cross-shore transects from August 2002 to February 2003. Sediment samples were taken along the transects between August and November 2002, and a total of 147 sediment samples were analysed, 40 before nourishment and 107 after nourishment. The majority of the sediment samples were strongly bimodal, with mean sizes varying between a minimum of 0.18 mm (2.48 ϕ) for the sand fraction and a maximum of 27 mm (- 4.74 ϕ) for the gravel. The recharge material was also bimodal but contained more fine sediment than the natural beach material, particularly on the upper beach. The recharge sediment had grain sizes and sorting similar to some of the natural material but lower bimodality parameters than any of the natural sediment. The sediment distributions after recharge contained significantly more fine sediment, particularly on the upper beach. Over time, the beach profile lowered and fine sediment appeared to be selectively transported seawards from the beachface.

  16. Bet hedging in a warming ocean: predictability of maternal environment shapes offspring size variation in marine sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shama, Lisa N S

    2015-12-01

    Bet hedging at reproduction is expected to evolve when mothers are exposed to unpredictable cues for future environmental conditions, whereas transgenerational plasticity (TGP) should be favoured when cues reliably predict the environment offspring will experience. Since climate predictions forecast an increase in both temperature and climate variability, both TGP and bet hedging are likely to become important strategies to mediate climate change effects. Here, the potential to produce variably sized offspring in both warming and unpredictable environments was tested by investigating whether stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) mothers adjusted mean offspring size and within-clutch variation in offspring size in response to experimental manipulation of maternal thermal environment and predictability (alternating between ambient and elevated water temperatures). Reproductive output traits of F1 females were influenced by both temperature and environmental predictability. Mothers that developed at ambient temperature (17 °C) produced larger, but fewer eggs than mothers that developed at elevated temperature (21 °C), implying selection for different-sized offspring in different environments. Mothers in unpredictable environments had smaller mean egg sizes and tended to have greater within-female egg size variability, especially at 21 °C, suggesting that mothers may have dynamically modified the variance in offspring size to spread the risk of incorrectly predicting future environmental conditions. Both TGP and diversification influenced F2 offspring body size. F2 offspring reared at 21 °C had larger mean body sizes if their mother developed at 21 °C, but this TGP benefit was not present for offspring of 17 °C mothers reared at 17 °C, indicating that maternal TGP will be highly relevant for ocean warming scenarios in this system. Offspring of variable environment mothers were smaller but more variable in size than offspring from constant environment

  17. Intrinsic Sex-Linked Variations in Osteogenic and Adipogenic Differentiation Potential of Bone Marrow Multipotent Stromal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Bone formation and aging are sexually dimorphic. Yet, definition of the intrinsic molecular differences between male and female multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in bone is lacking. This study assessed sex-linked differences in MSC differentiation in 3-, 6-, and 9-month-old C57BL/6J mice. Analysis of tibiae showed that female mice had lower bone volume fraction and higher adipocyte content in the bone marrow compared to age-matched males. While both males and females lost bone mass ...

  18. The erratic mitochondrial clock: variations of mutation rate, not population size, affect mtDNA diversity across birds and mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galtier Nicolas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last ten years, major advances have been made in characterizing and understanding the evolution of mitochondrial DNA, the most popular marker of molecular biodiversity. Several important results were recently reported using mammals as model organisms, including (i the absence of relationship between mitochondrial DNA diversity and life-history or ecological variables, (ii the absence of prominent adaptive selection, contrary to what was found in invertebrates, and (iii the unexpectedly large variation in neutral substitution rate among lineages, revealing a possible link with species maximal longevity. We propose to challenge these results thanks to the bird/mammal comparison. Direct estimates of population size are available in birds, and this group presents striking life-history trait differences with mammals (higher mass-specific metabolic rate and longevity. These properties make birds the ideal model to directly test for population size effects, and to discriminate between competing hypotheses about the causes of substitution rate variation. Results A phylogenetic analysis of cytochrome b third-codon position confirms that the mitochondrial DNA mutation rate is quite variable in birds, passerines being the fastest evolving order. On average, mitochondrial DNA evolves slower in birds than in mammals of similar body size. This result is in agreement with the longevity hypothesis, and contradicts the hypothesis of a metabolic rate-dependent mutation rate. Birds show no footprint of adaptive selection on cytochrome b evolutionary patterns, but no link between direct estimates of population size and cytochrome b diversity. The mutation rate is the best predictor we have of within-species mitochondrial diversity in birds. It partly explains the differences in mitochondrial DNA diversity patterns observed between mammals and birds, previously interpreted as reflecting Hill-Robertson interferences with the W

  19. Variations in the Articular Facets on Superior Surface of Calcaneus in North Indian Population: A Dry Bone Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Gindha

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in the department of anatomy of Gian Sagar Medical College, Ramnagar, Rajpura, District Patiala. 325 dry calcanei were studied. Out of which 167 were of right side and 158 were of left side and are of both sexes. The facet for talus were observed in all the calcanei. The grouping was done on the basis of number of facets present on the superior surface of calcanei. Group-I was having single facet on the two bones only (0.615 %. Group-II was having two facets and this group was further divided into three subgrpoups i.e Group-II (A,B,C, Group-II A (15.69 % of right side and (12.00 % left side. Group-II C (0.31 % of right side only. Group-III was having three facets i.e (20.62%. it was further divided into two subgroups i.e Group-III (A,B. Group-III A (8.62 % of right side and (12.00 % of left side and Group-III B (4.92 % right side and (4.3 % left side . It was concluded that the variations in differences between various types of facets on calcanei can result from differences in gait, habit of shoe wearing, sitting posture, clinical changes and embryological abnormalities of foot. Some of the types of facets can produce the problems in gait and can also cause pain in foot.

  20. [Effects of Pinus armandii seed size on rodents caching behavior and it's spatio-temporal variations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fan; Chen, Jin

    2011-08-01

    Pinus armandii, a native pine species, has large (about 300 mg), wingless seeds, and distributes from central to western China at an altitude of 1000-3300 m. To determine how the seed size affects rodents caching behavior, tagged seed releasing and tracking experiments were conducted at 3 sites in Northwest Yunnan province in 2006 and 2007. Our data indicated that for all sites and both years, compared with the smaller seeds, the proportions of cached large seeds were significantly higher, whereas the consumed ones were significantly lower. Meanwhile, the mean and maximum values of caching distances were also significantly increased in large seeds. Seed fate was different between the two years and within the three sites as there have different rodent community compositions.

  1. Seasonal variation in abundance, diel vertical migration and body size of pelagic tunicate Salpa fusiformis in the Southern Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yongqin; SUN Song; ZHANG Guangtao

    2012-01-01

    Mass occurrence of Salpa fusiformis was observed in the Southern Yellow Sea in May and June 2007.In order to investigate its population recruitment and environmental adaptation,temporal variation of abundance,diel vertical migration (DVM) and length frequency distribution of both aggregate and solitary forms were studied with samples collected from eight months during September 2006 to August 2007.S.fusiformis presented in six months other than September and October 2006,and average abundance of aggregate and solitary forms peaked in June and May,respectively.In December,aggregate forms were absent in the bottom layer and performed irregular DVM from surface to 50 m depth,while solitary forms was too scarce to perform diel vertical distribution analysis.Both aggregate and solitary forms presented reverse DVM in May and June.They migrated upwards during daytime and concentrated in surface layer at sunset.The bimodal distribution of aggregate forms was found in April and the average size was largest in this month.In other months,the smaller aggregate forms (1-5 mm) dominated in populations except for May,when the modal size ranged from 2 to 8 mm.The average size of solitary forms was largest in December,followed by April.The skewed nomal distribution of solitary forms was found in May and June,with the modal size of 2-7 mm and 5-13 mm,respectively.

  2. Size-related variation in arm damage frequency in the crown-of-thorns sea star, Acanthaster planci

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jairo Rivera-Posada; Ciemon F Caballes; Morgan S Pratchett

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine variation in the frequency of arm damage in different sizes of Acanthasterplanci (A. planci), assess how this damage is inflicted by fish predators, and infer the potential role of predation in population regulation. Methods:and arm damage frequency and severity was assessed. Frequency of arm damage was compared between sizes. Feeding behavior of fish predators was also observed in the laboratory. Results:This study demonstrates that sublethal predation by triggerfishes on A. planci result inDiameters of A. planci collected from three sites in the Philippines were measured extensive arm damage. Overall, 60% of A. planci sampled across all sites had sublethal injuries. The frequency of individuals with missing or regenerating arms was highest in medium-sized young adults (11-20 cm), which coincides with the phase where A. planci shift from cryptic to exposed daytime feeding. Conclusions: The high incidence of arm damage within intermediate-sized sea stars indicates that predators exercise some level of regulation on A. planci populations at a local scale. Identification and protection of putative predators that target the most vulnerable life history stages of A. planci are essential in developing population control strategies and reverse sustained declines in coral cover.

  3. Temporal variation in size-assortative mating and male mate choice in a spider with amphisexual care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Rafael R.; Gonzaga, Marcelo O.

    2017-04-01

    Males should be more selective when they have a high investment in reproduction, especially in species with biparental or paternal care. In this context, male mate choice can promote size-assortative mating (SAM) when (1) large males win intrasexual disputes, (2) large females are more fecund, and (3) males prefer larger females to smaller ones. In the spider Manogea porracea, males exhibit high reproductive investment by building their webs above those of females and exhibiting extended care of offspring in the absence of females. Under these circumstances, we expect the occurrence of SAM and male preference for large females. Herein, we performed observations and experiments in the field to evaluate the hypotheses that (1) M. porracea mates assortatively by size and (2) SAM is influenced by male mate choice. Furthermore, we measured variables that could affect mating patterns, the sex ratios, and densities of both sexes. Pairing in M. porracea was positively size-assortative in 2012, but not in 2013. Large males won most disputes for mates and preferred larger females, which produced more eggs. The inconsistency in detection of SAM was due to population dynamics, namely variations in sex ratio and population density across the breeding season. Furthermore, we found that the significance of male mate choice on sexual selection of body size in M. porracea strongly depends on the competition intensity for mating opportunities. The traditional sexual selection hypothesis of SAM needs to be reviewed and must include measures of competition intensity.

  4. On the variation of solar flare coronal x-ray source sizes with energy

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Natasha L S; Bian, Nicolas H; Emslie, A Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Observations with {\\em RHESSI} have enabled the detailed study of the structure of dense hard X-ray coronal sources in solar flares. The variation of source extent with electron energy has been discussed in the context of streaming of non-thermal particles in a one-dimensional cold-target model, and the results used to constrain both the physical extent of, and density within, the electron acceleration region. Here we extend this investigation to a more physically realistic model of electron transport that takes into account the finite temperature of the ambient plasma, the initial pitch-angle distribution of the accelerated electrons, and the effects of collisional pitch-angle scattering. The finite temperature results in the thermal diffusion of electrons, that leads to the observationally-inferred value of the acceleration region volume being an overestimate of its true value. The different directions of the electron trajectories, a consequence of both the non-zero injection pitch-angle and scattering with...

  5. INTRASPECIFIC VARIATION IN ACOUSTIC TRAITS AND BODY SIZE, AND NEW DISTRIBUTIONAL RECORDS FOR PSEUDOPALUDICOLA GIARETTAI CARVALHO, 2012 (ANURA, LEPTODACTYLIDAE, LEIUPERINAE: IMPLICATIONS FOR ITS CONGENERIC DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THIAGO RIBEIRO DE CARVALHO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we provide an updated diagnosis for Pseudopaludicola giarettai based on the morphometric and acoustic variation observed with the assessment of new populations, plus an expansion of its distribution range. Our results support that all acoustic variation observed might be attributed to intraspecific variation. The variation in body size and dorsal stripe patterns observed for Pseudopaludicola giarettai reinforces that the distinctive whistling advertisement call pattern is the most reliable evidence line to diagnose it from its congeners, whereas morphological (robust body, glandular dorsum and morphometric (body size features vary considerably within and among populations so that they should no longer be employed as diagnostic features of Pseudopaludicola giarettai.

  6. Brief communication: Effect of size biases in the coefficient of variation on assessing intraspecific variability in the prosimian skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulwood, Ethan L; Kramer, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    This study examines the effect of a measurement size bias in coefficients of variation on the evaluation of intraspecific skeletal variability in a sample of eight prosimian species (Eulemur fulvus, Hapalemur griseus, Lemur catta, Varecia variegata, Galago senegalensis, Otolemur crassicaudatus, Nycticebus coucang, and Tarsius syrichta). Measurements with smaller means were expected to have higher coefficients of variation (CVs) due to the impact of instrumental precision on the ability to assess variability. This was evaluated by testing for a negative correlation between CVs and means in the total sample, within each species, and within each measurement, and by testing for the leveraging impact of small measurements on the significance of comparisons of variability between regions of the prosimian skeleton. Three comparisons were made: cranial versus postcranial variability, epiphysis versus diaphysis variability, and forelimb versus hindlimb variability. CVs were significantly negatively correlated with means within the total sample (r(2) = 0.208, P < 0.0001) and within each species. CVs and means were significantly correlated within only three of the measurements, which may reflect the relatively low body size range of the species studied. As predicted by the higher variability of smaller measurements, removing the smallest measurements from comparisons of variable classes containing measurements of different mean magnitudes pushed the comparisons below significance. These results indicate caution should be exercised when using CVs to assess variability across sets of measurements with different means.

  7. The effect of life-history variation on the population size structure of a rocky intertidal snail ( Littorina sitkana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Rémy; Dunmall, Karen; Dill, Lawrence M.

    2003-03-01

    On wave-sheltered shores of the northeastern Pacific, the population size structure of Littorina sitkana varies with intertidal height, as larger snails are mostly found only in the upper intertidal. This pattern has been attributed to high predation rates by crabs (and perhaps fish) on large snails inhabiting low-intertidal areas; i.e., large snails are presumed to be rare there simply because predators kill them. In this study we investigate the hypothesis that predation contributes to the shore-level size gradient displayed by L. sitkana by selecting for (or inducing) earlier sexual maturation and reduced somatic growth in low-shore snails relative to high-shore individuals. In the first part of our study, we carried out laboratory dissections, field experiments (mark-release-recapture and caging), and field surveys on a wave-protected shore in Bamfield Inlet, Barkley Sound (British Columbia, Canada). The principal results were: (1) adult survivorship was greater at higher, than at lower, intertidal level, (2) snails displayed a preference for their shore level of origin, (3) immature adults from the high intertidal displayed greater rates of somatic growth relative to immature adults from the low intertidal, and (4) low-shore snails matured at a smaller size than high-shore individuals. In the second part of the study, a large-scale survey showed intra-specific variation in size at sexual maturity (point 4 above) to be relatively consistent over time (winter of 1999 and 2001 for snails from our main study site) and space (13 different sites in winter 2001), although the magnitude of these differences varied greatly from shore to shore. Our results indicate that L. sitkana individuals inhabiting upper and lower parts of their intertidal range allocate resources differently to somatic and gonadal growth, an intra-specific difference that is best interpreted as a response to spatial and size-dependent variation in predation pressure. Taken together, results of

  8. Concentrations, size distributions and temporal variations of fluorescent biological aerosol particles in southern tropical India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Krishna R, Ravi; CV, Biju; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. The Indian tropical region, where large fraction of the world's total population is residing, experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to be very diverse over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the seasons. Here we characterize the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) at a high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) in South India during the South-West monsoon, which constitute around 80 percent of the annual rainfall in Munnar. Continuous three months measurements (from 01 June 2014 to 21 Aug 2104) FBAPs were carried out at Munnar using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) during IMS. The mean number and mass concentration of coarse FBAP averaged over the entire campaign was 1.7 x 10-2 cm-3 and 0.24 µg m-3 respectively, which corresponds to 2 percent and 6 percent of total aerosol particle number and mass concentration. In agreement to other previous measurements the number size distribution of FBAP also peaks at 3.2 micron indicating the strong presence of fungal spores. This was also supported by the Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis of bioaerosols on filter paper. They also displayed a strong diurnal cycle with maximum concentration occurring at early morning hours. During periods of heavy and continuous rain where the wind is consistently blowing from South-West direction it was

  9. Photoevaporation and spatial variation of grain sizes in Orion 114-426

    CERN Document Server

    Miotello, Anna; Potenza, Marco A C; Ricci, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Deep HST broad-band images taken with ACS and WFPC2 of the giant ($\\sim 1000$ AU diameter) dark silhouette proplyd 114-426 in the Orion Nebula show that this system is tilted, asymmetric, warped and photoevaporated. The exquisite angular resolution of ACS allows us to map the distribution of dust grains at the northern translucent edge of the disk, dominated by the photoevaporative flow. Using the Mie theory for standard circumstellar disk grains, we find evidence for a spatial gradient in grain size. The typical dust radius, $\\simeq 0.2-0.7 \\mu$m (less than what reported by previous studies) becomes smaller as the distance from the disk center increases, consistent with the expectations for the dynamic of dust entrained in a gaseous photoevaporative wind. Our analysis of the disk morphology and location within the nebula indicates that this system is photoevaporated by the diffuse radiation field of the Orion Nebula, while being shielded from the radiation coming directly from the central Trapezium stars. We...

  10. [Biochemical markers of bone remodeling: pre-analytical variations and guidelines for their use. SFBC (Société Française de Biologie Clinique) Work Group. Biochemical markers of bone remodeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnero, P; Bianchi, F; Carlier, M C; Genty, V; Jacob, N; Kamel, S; Kindermans, C; Plouvier, E; Pressac, M; Souberbielle, J C

    2000-01-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover have been developed over the past 20 years that are more specific for bone tissue than conventional ones such as total alkaline phosphatase and urinary hydroxyproline. They have been widely used in clinical research and in clinical trials of new therapies as secondary end points of treatment efficacy. Most of the interest has been devoted to their use in postmenopausal osteoporosis, a condition characterized by subtle modifications of bone metabolism that cannot be detected readily by conventional markers of bone turnover. Although several recent studies have suggested that biochemical markers may be used for the management of the individual patient in routine clinical practice, this has not been clearly defined and is a matter of debate. Because of the crucial importance to clarify this issue, the Société Francaise de Biologie Clinique prompted an expert committee to summarize the available data and to make recommendations. The following paper includes a review on the biochemical and analytical aspects of the markers of bone formation and resorption and on the sources of variability such as sex, age, menstrual cycle, pregnancy and lactation, physical activity, seasonal variation and effects of diseases and treatments. We will also describe the effects of pre-analytical factors on the measurements of the different markers. Finally based on that review, we will make practical recommendations for the use of these markers in order to minimize the variability of the measurements and improve the clinical interpretation of the data.

  11. The effect of in situ/in vitro three-dimensional quantitative computed tomography image voxel size on the finite element model of human vertebral cancellous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongtao; Engelke, Klaus; Glueer, Claus-C; Morlock, Michael M; Huber, Gerd

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative computed tomography-based finite element modeling technique is a promising clinical tool for the prediction of bone strength. However, quantitative computed tomography-based finite element models were created from image datasets with different image voxel sizes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is an influence of image voxel size on the finite element models. In all 12 thoracolumbar vertebrae were scanned prior to autopsy (in situ) using two different quantitative computed tomography scan protocols, which resulted in image datasets with two different voxel sizes (0.29 × 0.29 × 1.3 mm(3) vs 0.18 × 0.18 × 0.6 mm(3)). Eight of them were scanned after autopsy (in vitro) and the datasets were reconstructed with two voxel sizes (0.32 × 0.32 × 0.6 mm(3) vs. 0.18 × 0.18 × 0.3 mm(3)). Finite element models with cuboid volume of interest extracted from the vertebral cancellous part were created and inhomogeneous bilinear bone properties were defined. Axial compression was simulated. No effect of voxel size was detected on the apparent bone mineral density for both the in situ and in vitro cases. However, the apparent modulus and yield strength showed significant differences in the two voxel size group pairs (in situ and in vitro). In conclusion, the image voxel size may have to be considered when the finite element voxel modeling technique is used in clinical applications.

  12. Estimation of hominoid ancestral population sizes under bayesian coalescent models incorporating mutation rate variation and sequencing errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ralph; Yang, Ziheng

    2008-09-01

    Estimation of population parameters for the common ancestors of humans and the great apes is important in understanding our evolutionary history. In particular, inference of population size for the human-chimpanzee common ancestor may shed light on the process by which the 2 species separated and on whether the human population experienced a severe size reduction in its early evolutionary history. In this study, the Bayesian method of ancestral inference of Rannala and Yang (2003. Bayes estimation of species divergence times and ancestral population sizes using DNA sequences from multiple loci. Genetics. 164:1645-1656) was extended to accommodate variable mutation rates among loci and random species-specific sequencing errors. The model was applied to analyze a genome-wide data set of approximately 15,000 neutral loci (7.4 Mb) aligned for human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaque. We obtained robust and precise estimates for effective population sizes along the hominoid lineage extending back approximately 30 Myr to the cercopithecoid divergence. The results showed that ancestral populations were 5-10 times larger than modern humans along the entire hominoid lineage. The estimates were robust to the priors used and to model assumptions about recombination. The unusually low X chromosome divergence between human and chimpanzee could not be explained by variation in the male mutation bias or by current models of hybridization and introgression. Instead, our parameter estimates were consistent with a simple instantaneous process for human-chimpanzee speciation but showed a major reduction in X chromosome effective population size peculiar to the human-chimpanzee common ancestor, possibly due to selective sweeps on the X prior to separation of the 2 species.

  13. Isolation and implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with fibrin micro beads to repair a critical-size bone defect in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Alon; Rivkin, Rachel; Frishman, Miryam; Gaberman, Elena; Levdansky, Lilia; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2009-09-01

    Fibrin microbeads (FMBs) made using thermal treatment of fibrin drops in oil can efficiently isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow (BM) and other similar sources and culture them continuously in suspension culture. The pure mesenchymal profile of MSCs isolated using FMBs and their differentiation potency to different mesenchymal lineages were previously described in detail. In the current study, MSCs were isolated from the BM of (GFP+) C57/bl mice using FMBs. Addition of pro-osteogenic medium with 10 mM of ss-glycerolphosphate, 50 microg/mL of ascorbic acid, and 10(-8) M of dexamethasone for 1 month resulted in ossified bone-like solid cellular structures, as seen using fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Such spontaneously formed structures were implanted in full-depth approximately 5-mm-diameter drilled defects in the skulls of wild-type c57/bl mice. Two months later, the excised upper parts of the skulls with the defects were viewed using fluorescence microscopy for green fluorescence protein of the cells in the defect and using SEM. They were also scanned using micro-computed tomography to visualize the formation of new hard tissue. Then the samples were processed and sectioned for hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. Implanted FMBs loaded with (GFP+) MSCs formed partially mature, dense bone-like tissue using a residual moderate inflammatory process containing remnants of FMBs and neo-angiogenesis. The filled defect with bone-like tissue had a Ca/P ratio similar to that of native bone. Limited merging of the implant with the skull indicated that the induced bone regeneration derived from the MSCs that were delivered with the implant. No repair was seen in the control animals without implants or where the defect was filled with FMBs only. Repair scoring (on a 0-5 scale) was found to be 3.38+/-0.35 in the experimental arm, relative to 0 in the controls (p < 0.001).

  14. Morphological and genome size variations within populations of Edraianthus graminifolius “Jugoslavicus” (Campanulaceae from the central Balkan peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakić Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The E. graminifolius complex is widely distributed in the continental part of the central and western Balkan Peninsula and is characterized by pronounced morphological variability. Plants grow on different geological substrates, span a wide altitudinal range and inhabit heterogeneous microclimatic conditions. The aim of this study was to compare morpho-anatomical and genome size variations among 31 populations of E. graminifolius, and to correlate morphoanatomical characteristics of plants with the geomorphologic and bioclimatic characteristics of their habitats. For these purposes, multivariate statistical analyses were performed. Results showed that most of morphological variability could be explained as the adaptive responses of plants to diverse environmental conditions that accompany life at different altitudes. Populations from SE Serbia had larger genome size in respect to other investigated populations. Genome size was bigger in sympatric populations of Edraianthus then in allopatric ones. Apart from the general morphological variability, plants from the Ovčar-Kablar Gorge are particularly morphologically specific. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173030

  15. The effect of SDF-1α on low dose BMP-2 mediated bone regeneration by release from heparinized mineralized collagen type I matrix scaffolds in a murine critical size bone defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwingenberger, Stefan; Langanke, Robert; Vater, Corina; Lee, Geoffrey; Niederlohmann, Eik; Sensenschmidt, Markus; Jacobi, Angela; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Muders, Michael; Rammelt, Stefan; Knaack, Sven; Gelinsky, Michael; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Goodman, Stuart B; Stiehler, Maik

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of critical size bone defects represents a challenge. The growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) is clinically established but has potentially adverse effects when used at high doses. The aim of this study was to evaluate if stromal derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α) and BMP-2 released from heparinized mineralized collagen type I matrix (MCM) scaffolds have a cumulative effect on bone regeneration. MCM scaffolds were functionalized with heparin, loaded with BMP-2 and/or SDF-1α and implanted into a murine critical size femoral bone defect (control group, low dose BMP-2 group, low dose BMP-2 + SDF-1α group, and high dose BMP-2 group). After 6 weeks, both the low dose BMP-2 + SDF-1α group (5.8 ± 0.6 mm³, p = 0.0479) and the high dose BMP-2 group (6.5 ± 0.7 mm³, p = 0.008) had a significantly increased regenerated bone volume compared to the control group (4.2 ± 0.5 mm³). There was a higher healing score in the low dose BMP-2 + SDF-1α group (median grade 8; Q1-Q3 7-9; p = 0.0357) than in the low dose BMP-2 group (7; Q1-Q3 5-9) histologically. This study showed that release of BMP-2 and SDF-1α from heparinized MCM scaffolds allows for the reduction of the applied BMP-2 concentration since SDF-1α seems to enhance the osteoinductive potential of BMP-2. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2126-2134, 2016.

  16. The role of seed size in the non-genetic variation exhibited in salt tolerance studies involving the bread wheat cv. chinese spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this study was to confirm the role of seed size in the non-genetic variation exhibited during salinity tolerance experiments involving the bread wheat cv. Chinese Spring. The nutrient film/rockwool hydroponics technique was utilised. This study concluded that seed size does not play a significant role in the non-genetic variation generated during a study of salinity tolerance of the bread wheat cv. Chinese Spring.

  17. Evolutionary genetics of life-history traits in a structured environment : Understanding variation in clutch size and laying date in great tits (Parus major)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Understanding variation in clutch size and laying date in great tits (Parus major) Some of the key questions evolutionary biology aims to answer are how genetic variation is being maintained in traits that are closely related to fitness, how populations are adapted to their environment, and, if thei

  18. Evolutionary genetics of life-history traits in a structured environment. Understanding variation in clutch size and laying date in great tits (Parus major)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, E.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding variation in clutch size and laying date in great tits (Parus major) Some of the key questions evolutionary biology aims to answer are how genetic variation is being maintained in traits that are closely related to fitness, how populations are adapted to their environment, and, if thei

  19. Intraspecific variation in body size and the rate of reproduction in female insects - adaptive allometry or biophysical constraint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, David; Olofsson, Martin; Friberg, Magne; Karlsson, Bengt; Wiklund, Christer; Gotthard, Karl; Gilburn, Andre

    2012-11-01

    1. A high rate of reproduction may be costly if ecological factors limit immediate reproductive output as a fast metabolism compromises own future survival. Individuals with more reserves need more time and opportunity to realize their reproductive potential. Theory therefore predicts that the reproductive rate, defined as the investment in early reproduction in proportion to total potential, should decrease with body size within species. 2. However, metabolic constraints on body size- and temperature-dependent biological rates may impede biophysical adaptation. Furthermore, the sequential manner resources that are allocated to somatic vs. reproductive tissue during ontogeny may, when juveniles develop in unpredictable environments, further contribute to non-adaptive variation in adult reproductive rates. 3. With a model on female egg laying in insects, we demonstrate how variation in body reserves is predicted to affect reproductive rate under different ecological scenarios. Small females always have higher reproductive rates but shorter lifespans. However, incorporation of female host selectivity leads to more similar reproductive rates among female size classes, and oviposition behaviour is predicted to co-evolve with reproductive rate, resulting in small females being more selective in their choice and gaining relatively more from it. 4. We fed simulations with data on the butterfly Pararge aegeria to compare model predictions with reproductive rates of wild butterflies. However, simulated reproductive allometry was a poor predictor of that observed. Instead, reproductive rates were better explained as a product of metabolic constraints on rates of egg maturation, and an empirically derived positive allometry between reproductive potential and size. However, fitness is insensitive to moderate deviations in reproductive rate when oviposition behaviour is allowed to co-evolve in the simulations, suggesting that behavioural compensation may mitigate putative

  20. Ultrafine particles at eight urban sites in Antwerp. Instrument comparison and spatiotemporal variation in particle number concentration and size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staelens, J.; Matheeussen, C.; Roekens, E. [Department Air, Environment and Communication, Flemish Environment Agency VMM, Antwerp, 2000 (Belgium); Frijns, E.; Berghmans, P. [Flemish Institute for Technological Research VITO, Mol, 2400 (Belgium); Kos, G.P.A.; Weijers, E.P. [Environment and Energy Engineering, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten, 1755 ZG (Netherlands); Panteliadis, P. [Department of Air Quality, Public Health Service ofAmsterdam, Amsterdam, 1000 CE (Netherlands); Bergmans, B. [Air Quality, Institut Scientifique de Service Public (ISSeP), Liege, 4000 (Belgium); Wyche, K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE2 7TG (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    Due to the short atmospheric lifetime of ultrafine particles (UFP) and their strong dependence on local sources, ambient particle number concentrations and size distributions may vary significantly on short spatial and temporal scales. Because UFP are a primary pollutant that is rapidly transformed by physicochemical processes (dispersion, coagulation, deposition, etc.) and emitted mainly by mobile sources, they show a very high spatial variation. The particle number concentration is known to be elevated near roads and to decrease with increasing distance to the road primarily as a result of dispersion. Therefore, UFP measurements at a single urban background air quality monitoring station may not be indicative of the actual exposure in the communities surrounding this station. To address this problem and to more accurately estimate human exposure and subsequent health impacts of UFP, more intensive measurements on finer spatial scales are needed. Therefore, UFP measurements were carried out at eight urban background or hotspot sites in the city of Antwerp (Belgium)

  1. Predatory functional morphology in raptors: interdigital variation in talon size is related to prey restraint and immobilisation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Denver W; Freedman, Elizabeth A; Scannella, John B

    2009-11-25

    Despite the ubiquity of raptors in terrestrial ecosystems, many aspects of their predatory behaviour remain poorly understood. Surprisingly little is known about the morphology of raptor talons and how they are employed during feeding behaviour. Talon size variation among digits can be used to distinguish families of raptors and is related to different techniques of prey restraint and immobilisation. The hypertrophied talons on digits (D) I and II in Accipitridae have evolved primarily to restrain large struggling prey while they are immobilised by dismemberment. Falconidae have only modest talons on each digit and only slightly enlarged D-I and II. For immobilisation, Falconini rely more strongly on strike impact and breaking the necks of their prey, having evolved a 'tooth' on the beak to aid in doing so. Pandionidae have enlarged, highly recurved talons on each digit, an adaptation for piscivory, convergently seen to a lesser extent in fishing eagles. Strigiformes bear enlarged talons with comparatively low curvature on each digit, part of a suite of adaptations to increase constriction efficiency by maximising grip strength, indicative of specialisation on small prey. Restraint and immobilisation strategy change as prey increase in size. Small prey are restrained by containment within the foot and immobilised by constriction and beak attacks. Large prey are restrained by pinning under the bodyweight of the raptor, maintaining grip with the talons, and immobilised by dismemberment (Accipitridae), or severing the spinal cord (Falconini). Within all raptors, physical attributes of the feet trade off against each other to attain great strength, but it is the variable means by which this is achieved that distinguishes them ecologically. Our findings show that interdigital talon morphology varies consistently among raptor families, and that this is directly correlative with variation in their typical prey capture and restraint strategy.

  2. Predatory functional morphology in raptors: interdigital variation in talon size is related to prey restraint and immobilisation technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denver W Fowler

    Full Text Available Despite the ubiquity of raptors in terrestrial ecosystems, many aspects of their predatory behaviour remain poorly understood. Surprisingly little is known about the morphology of raptor talons and how they are employed during feeding behaviour. Talon size variation among digits can be used to distinguish families of raptors and is related to different techniques of prey restraint and immobilisation. The hypertrophied talons on digits (D I and II in Accipitridae have evolved primarily to restrain large struggling prey while they are immobilised by dismemberment. Falconidae have only modest talons on each digit and only slightly enlarged D-I and II. For immobilisation, Falconini rely more strongly on strike impact and breaking the necks of their prey, having evolved a 'tooth' on the beak to aid in doing so. Pandionidae have enlarged, highly recurved talons on each digit, an adaptation for piscivory, convergently seen to a lesser extent in fishing eagles. Strigiformes bear enlarged talons with comparatively low curvature on each digit, part of a suite of adaptations to increase constriction efficiency by maximising grip strength, indicative of specialisation on small prey. Restraint and immobilisation strategy change as prey increase in size. Small prey are restrained by containment within the foot and immobilised by constriction and beak attacks. Large prey are restrained by pinning under the bodyweight of the raptor, maintaining grip with the talons, and immobilised by dismemberment (Accipitridae, or severing the spinal cord (Falconini. Within all raptors, physical attributes of the feet trade off against each other to attain great strength, but it is the variable means by which this is achieved that distinguishes them ecologically. Our findings show that interdigital talon morphology varies consistently among raptor families, and that this is directly correlative with variation in their typical prey capture and restraint strategy.

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of CBCT with Different Voxel Sizes and Intraoral Digital Radiography for Detection of Periapical Bone Lesions: An Ex-Vivo Study

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    Shirin Sakhdari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study sought to assess the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT with different voxel sizes and intraoral digital radiography with photostimulable phosphor (PSP plate for detection of periapical (PA bone lesions.Materials and Methods: In this ex vivo diagnostic study, one-millimeter defects were created in the alveolar sockets of 15 bone blocks, each with two posterior teeth. A no-defect control group was also included. Digital PA radiographs with PSP plates and CBCT scans with 200, 250 and 300μ voxel sizes were obtained. Four observers evaluated the possibility of lesion detection using a 5-point scale. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predicative value (NPV were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s post hoc test. Kappa and weighted kappa statistics were applied to assess intraobserver and interobserver agreements.Results: Cochrane Q test showed no significant difference between PSP and CBCT imaging modalities in terms of kappa and weighted kappa statistics (P=0.675. The complete sensitivity and complete NPV for 200 and 250 μ voxel sizes were higher than those of 300 μ voxel size and digital radiography (P<0.001. No significant difference was noted in other parameters among other imaging modalities (P=0.403.Conclusions: The results showed that high-resolution CBCT scans had higher diagnostic accuracy than PSP digital radiography for detection of artificially created PA bone lesions. Voxel size (field of view must be taken into account to minimize patient radiation dose.Keywords: Diagnosis; Cone-Beam Computed Tomography; Radiography, Dental, Digital; Periapical Periodontitis

  4. A Comparative Effectiveness Study of Bone Density Changes in Women Over 40 Following Three Bone Health Plans Containing Variations of the Same Novel Plant-sourced Calcium

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    Gilbert R. Kaats, Harry G. Preuss, Harry A. Croft, Samuel C. Keith, Patti L. Keith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The US Surgeon General's Report on Bone Health suggests America's bone-health is in jeopardy and issued a “call to action” to develop bone-health plans incorporating components of (1 improved nutrition, (2 increased health literacy, and (3 increased physical activity.Objective: To conduct a Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER study comparing changes in bone mineral density in healthy women over-40 with above-average compliance when following one of three bone health Plans incorporating the SG's three components.Methods: Using an open-label sequential design, 414 females over 40 years of age were tested, 176 of whom agreed to participate and follow one of three different bone-health programs. One Plan contained a bone-health supplement with 1,000 IUs of vitamin D3 and 750 mg of a plant-sourced form of calcium for one year. The other two Plans contained the same plant form of calcium, but with differing amounts of vitamin D3 and other added bone health ingredients along with components designed to increase physical activity and health literacy. Each group completed the same baseline and ending DXA bone density scans, 43-chemistry blood test panels, and 84-item Quality of Life Inventory (QOL. Changes for all subjects were annualized as percent change in BMD from baseline. Using self-reports of adherence, subjects were rank-ordered and dichotomized as “compliant” or “partially compliant” based on the median rating. Comparisons were also made between the treatment groups and two theoretical age-adjusted expected groups: a non-intervention group and a group derived from a review of previously published studies on non-plant sources of calcium.Results: There were no significant differences in baseline BMD between those who volunteered versus those who did not and between those who completed per protocol (PP and those who were lost to attrition. Among subjects completing per protocol, there were no significant differences

  5. Temperature variation of the size effect in dilute AlMg and AlCa alloys: Measurement and theory

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    Gilder, H. M.; Asty, M.; Audit, Ph.

    1980-12-01

    Optical-interferometric-differential-length and x-ray lattice-parameter measurements performed at low temperatures in dilute AlMg and AlCa alloys indicate that the temperature variation of the size effect corresponds to a relatively large difference between the intrinsic coefficient of thermal expansion βi of the solute atom structure and that, β, of the solvent. This result is another example of the surprising expansive properties of point defects previously described by Gilder and co-workers (high-temperature vacancy diffusion) and more recently by Ganne (low-temperature dilatometry on irradiated specimens). Specifically, in the temperature range 0.2AlCa. The calculated values of Δβ(Mg)Ci, Ci being the solute concentration, and βi(Mg) fall between the measured values in the two AlMg alloys studied. The calculation of Δβ(Ca)Ci and βi(Ca) is not possible due to a lack of elastic-constants data for pure, metallic calcium. Inasmuch as, in the case of Mg, solute-solute interactions are apparent in the measured values of the size effect, ΔβCi and βi, even at Ci(Mg)~0.2 at.%, extreme care must be exercised when comparing experimental data for dilute alloys with calculations of infinitely dilute alloy properties.

  6. Geographical distribution of cytotypes in the Chrysanthemum indicum complex as evidenced by ploidy level and genome-size variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Qian WAN; Richard J.ABBOTT; Guang-Yuan RAO

    2013-01-01

    A detailed knowledge of the geographical distribution ofcytotypes within and between species comprising a polyploid complex is critical to our understanding of the history and evolution of such complexes.In the present study we examined the geographical distributions ofcytotypes within six tentatively delimited species comprising the Chrysanthemum indicum complex in China.We determined the ploidy of 188 individuals sampled from 47 populations,based on DNA content using flow cytometry.In addition,chromosome counts were made on samples of each taxon.We confirmed that all samples of C.rhombifolium and C.lavandulifolium were diploid (2n =18),those of C.hypargyrum and C.potentilloides were tetraploid (2n--36),and those of C.vestitum were hexaploid (2n =54).In contrast,we confirmed that C.indicum contained both diploid and tetraploid cytotypes.We found that in addition to marked differences in genome size between ploidy levels,there was a variation in genome size between species of the same ploidy level.Although the diploid,tetraploid,and hexaploid taxa of the complex,as well as the diploid form of C.indicum,occurred only in central and northem China,the tetraploid form of C.indicum was widespread both north and south of the Yangtze River.We suggest that the tetraploid form of C.indicum may have expanded its range southward during recent Quatemary glacial periods when forests retreated in south China as conditions became drier.

  7. Spatial variations in dietary organic matter sources modulate the size and condition of fish juveniles in temperate lagoon nursery sites

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    Escalas, Arthur; Ferraton, Franck; Paillon, Christelle; Vidy, Guy; Carcaillet, Frédérique; Salen-Picard, Chantal; Le Loc'h, François; Richard, Pierre; Darnaude, Audrey Michèle

    2015-01-01

    Effective conservation of marine fish stocks involves understanding the impact, on population dynamics, of intra-specific variation in nursery habitats use at the juvenile stage. In some regions, an important part of the catching effort is concentrated on a small number of marine species that colonize coastal lagoons during their first year of life. To determine the intra-specific variation in lagoon use by these fish and their potential demographic consequences, we studied diet spatiotemporal variations in the group 0 juveniles of a highly exploited sparid, the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.), during their ∼6 months stay in a NW Mediterranean lagoon (N = 331, SL = 25-198 mm) and traced the origin of the organic matter in their food webs, at two lagoon sites with contrasted continental inputs. This showed that the origin (marine, lagoonal or continental) of the organic matter (OM) available in the water column and the sediment can vary substantially within the same lagoon, in line with local variations in the intensity of marine and continental inputs. The high trophic plasticity of S. aurata allows its juveniles to adapt to resulting differences in prey abundances at each site during their lagoon residency, thereby sustaining high growth irrespective of the area inhabited within the lagoon. However, continental POM incorporation by the juveniles through their diet (of 21-37% on average depending on the site) is proportional to its availability in the environment and could be responsible for the greater fish sizes (of 28 mm SL on average) and body weights (of 40.8 g on average) observed at the site under continental influence in the autumn, when the juveniles are ready to leave the lagoon. This suggests that continental inputs in particulate OM, when present, could significantly enhance fish growth within coastal lagoons, with important consequences on the local population dynamics of the fish species that use them as nurseries. As our results indicate that

  8. Double-plating of ovine critical sized defects of the tibia: a low morbidity model enabling continuous in vivo monitoring of bone healing

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    Pearce Alexandra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies using sheep critical sized defect models to test tissue engineered products report high morbidity and complications rates. This study evaluates a large bone defect model in the sheep tibia, stabilized with two, a novel Carbon fibre Poly-ether-ether-ketone (CF-PEEK and a locking compression plate (LCP which could sustain duration for up to 6 month with an acceptable low complication rate. Methods A large bone defect of 3 cm was performed in the mid diaphysis of the right tibia in 33 sheep. The defect was stabilised with the CF - PEEK plate and an LCP. All sheep were supported with slings for 8 weeks after surgery. The study was carried out for 3 months in 6 and for 6 months in 27 animals. Results The surgical procedure could easily be performed in all sheep and continuous in vivo radiographic evaluation of the defect was possible. This long bone critical sized defect model shows with 6.1% a low rate of complications compared with numbers mentioned in the literature. Conclusions This experimental animal model could serve as a standard model in comparative research. A well defined standard model would reduce the number of experimental animals needed in future studies and would therefore add to ethical considerations.

  9. Variations in the vestibular cortical bone of permanent canine teeth in orthodontic patients. a comparative study: linear tomography vs. cbct (3d accuitomo).

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    Mateu, María E; Martínez, M E; Dagum, H; Benítez Rogé, Sandra C; Bruno, Gabriela I; Hecht, Pedro; Folco, Alejandra A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results of measuring the height of the vestibular cortical bone of canine teeth by linear tomography (LT) and 3-D Accuitomo cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) before and after aligning dental arches by orthodontic treatment. LT and CBCT were performed before and after orthodontic alignment on 12 canines in three patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, and the height of the canine vestibular cortical bones measured in mm. Measurements were taken by double-blinded operators. The mean variation in height of the vestibular cortical bone with orthodontic treatment was - 0,33 mm} 0.233 standard error using CBCT and -0,08mm } 0.55 standard error using LT. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to compare the techniques, the patients and upper and lower canines. No significant difference was found for any of the cases. Using LT to evaluate vestibular crest cortical bone in canines is comparable in efficiency to using CBCT. Height in millimeters is less in LT because image resolution is lower and when it is very thin it is not appreciable by this method.

  10. Seasonal variation and secondary formation of size-segregated aerosol water-soluble inorganic ions during pollution episodes in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Zirui; Zhang, Junke; Wen, Tianxue; Ji, Dongsheng; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a serious issue that has aroused great public attention in Beijing. To examine the seasonal characteristics of aerosols in typical pollution episodes, water-soluble inorganic ions (SO42 -, NO3-, NH4+, Cl-, K+, Na+, Ca2 + and Mg2 +) in size-segregated PM collected by an Anderson sampler (equipped with 50% effective cut-off diameters of 9.0, 5.8, 4.7, 3.3, 2.1, 1.1, 0.65, 0.43 μm and an after filter) were investigated in four intensive campaigns from June 2013 to May 2014 in the Beijing urban area. Pronounced seasonal variation of TWSIs in fine particles (aerodynamic diameter less than 2.1 μm) was observed, with the highest concentration in summer (71.5 ± 36.3 μg/m3) and the lowest in spring (28.1 ± 15.2 μg/m3). Different ion species presented different seasonal characteristics of mass concentration and size distribution, reflecting their different dominant sources. As the dominant component, SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ (SNA) in fine particles appeared to play an important role in the formation of high PM pollution since its contribution to the TWSIs and PM2.1 mass increased significantly during pollution episodes. Due to the hygroscopic growth and enhanced secondary formation in the droplet mode (0.65-2.1 μm) from clean days to polluted days, the size distribution peak of SNA in the fine mode tended to shift from 0.43-0.65 μm to 0.65-2.1 μm. Relative humidity (RH) and temperature contributed to influence the secondary formation and regulate the size distributions of sulfates and nitrates. Partial correlation analysis found that high RH would promote the sulfur and nitrogen oxidation rates in the fine mode, while high temperature favored the sulfur oxidation rate in the condensation mode (0.43-0.65 μm) and reduced the nitrogen oxidation rate in the droplet mode (0.65-2.1 μm). The NO3-/SO42 - mass ratio in PM2.1 (73% of the samples) exceeded 1.0, suggesting that vehicle exhaust currently makes a greater contribution to aerosol

  11. Bone turnover markers are associated with higher cortical porosity, thinner cortices, and larger size of the proximal femur and non-vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigdel, Rajesh; Osima, Marit; Ahmed, Luai A; Joakimsen, Ragnar M; Eriksen, Erik F; Zebaze, Roger; Bjørnerem, Åshild

    2015-12-01

    Bone turnover markers (BTM) predict bone loss and fragility fracture. Although cortical porosity and cortical thinning are important determinants of bone strength, the relationship between BTM and cortical porosity has, however, remained elusive. We therefore wanted to examine the relationship of BTM with cortical porosity and risk of non-vertebral fracture. In 211 postmenopausal women aged 54-94 years with non-vertebral fractures and 232 age-matched fracture-free controls from the Tromsø Study, Norway, we quantified femoral neck areal bone mineral density (FN aBMD), femoral subtrochanteric bone architecture, and assessed serum levels of procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP) and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX). Fracture cases exhibited higher PINP and CTX levels, lower FN aBMD, larger total and medullary cross-sectional area (CSA), thinner cortices, and higher cortical porosity of the femoral subtrochanter than controls (p≤0.01). Each SD increment in PINP and CTX was associated with 0.21-0.26 SD lower total volumetric BMD, 0.10-0.14 SD larger total CSA, 0.14-0.18 SD larger medullary CSA, 0.13-0.18 SD thinner cortices, and 0.27-0.33 SD higher porosity of the total cortex, compact cortex, and transitional zone (all p≤0.01). Moreover, each SD of higher PINP and CTX was associated with increased odds for fracture after adjustment for age, height, and weight (ORs 1.49; 95% CI, 1.20-1.85 and OR 1.22; 95% CI, 1.00-1.49, both pfracture after accounting for FN aBMD, cortical porosity or cortical thickness (OR ranging from 1.31 to 1.39, p ranging from 0.005 to 0.028). In summary, increased BTM levels are associated with higher cortical porosity, thinner cortices, larger bone size and higher odds for fracture. We infer that this is produced by increased periosteal apposition, intracortical and endocortical remodeling; and that these changes in bone architecture are predisposing to fracture.

  12. A Quantitative Analysis of Growth and Size Regulation in Manduca sexta: The Physiological Basis of Variation in Size and Age at Metamorphosis.

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    Laura W Grunert

    Full Text Available Body size and development time are important life history traits because they are often highly correlated with fitness. Although the developmental mechanisms that control growth have been well studied, the mechanisms that control how a species-characteristic body size is achieved remain poorly understood. In insects adult body size is determined by the number of larval molts, the size increment at each molt, and the mechanism that determines during which instar larval growth will stop. Adult insects do not grow, so the size at which a larva stops growing determines adult body size. Here we develop a quantitative understanding of the kinetics of growth throughout larval life of Manduca sexta, under different conditions of nutrition and temperature, and for genetic strains with different adult body sizes. We show that the generally accepted view that the size increment at each molt is constant (Dyar's Rule is systematically violated: there is actually a progressive increase in the size increment from instar to instar that is independent of temperature. In addition, the mass-specific growth rate declines throughout the growth phase in a temperature-dependent manner. We show that growth within an instar follows a truncated Gompertz trajectory. The critical weight, which determines when in an instar a molt will occur, and the threshold size, which determines which instar is the last, are different in genetic strains with different adult body sizes. Under nutrient and temperature stress Manduca has a variable number of larval instars and we show that this is due to the fact that more molts at smaller increments are taken before threshold size is reached. We test whether the new insight into the kinetics of growth and size determination are sufficient to explain body size and development time through a mathematical model that incorporates our quantitative findings.

  13. Body size and geographic range do not explain long term variation in fish populations: a Bayesian phylogenetic approach to testing assembly processes in stream fish assemblages.

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    Stephen J Jacquemin

    Full Text Available We combine evolutionary biology and community ecology to test whether two species traits, body size and geographic range, explain long term variation in local scale freshwater stream fish assemblages. Body size and geographic range are expected to influence several aspects of fish ecology, via relationships with niche breadth, dispersal, and abundance. These traits are expected to scale inversely with niche breadth or current abundance, and to scale directly with dispersal potential. However, their utility to explain long term temporal patterns in local scale abundance is not known. Comparative methods employing an existing molecular phylogeny were used to incorporate evolutionary relatedness in a test for covariation of body size and geographic range with long term (1983 - 2010 local scale population variation of fishes in West Fork White River (Indiana, USA. The Bayesian model incorporating phylogenetic uncertainty and correlated predictors indicated that neither body size nor geographic range explained significant variation in population fluctuations over a 28 year period. Phylogenetic signal data indicated that body size and geographic range were less similar among taxa than expected if trait evolution followed a purely random walk. We interpret this as evidence that local scale population variation may be influenced less by species-level traits such as body size or geographic range, and instead may be influenced more strongly by a taxon's local scale habitat and biotic assemblages.

  14. Limb bone morphology, bone strength, and cursoriality in lagomorphs.

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    Young, Jesse W; Danczak, Robert; Russo, Gabrielle A; Fellmann, Connie D

    2014-10-01

    The primary aim of this study is to broadly evaluate the relationship between cursoriality (i.e. anatomical and physiological specialization for running) and limb bone morphology in lagomorphs. Relative to most previous studies of cursoriality, our focus on a size-restricted, taxonomically narrow group of mammals permits us to evaluate the degree to which 'cursorial specialization' affects locomotor anatomy independently of broader allometric and phylogenetic trends that might obscure such a relationship. We collected linear morphometrics and μCT data on 737 limb bones covering three lagomorph species that differ in degree of cursoriality: pikas (Ochotona princeps, non-cursorial), jackrabbits (Lepus californicus, highly cursorial), and rabbits (Sylvilagus bachmani, level of cursoriality intermediate between pikas and jackrabbits). We evaluated two hypotheses: cursoriality should be associated with (i) lower limb joint mechanical advantage (i.e. high 'displacement advantage', permitting more cursorial species to cycle their limbs more quickly) and (ii) longer, more gracile limb bones, particularly at the distal segments (as a means of decreasing rotational inertia). As predicted, highly cursorial jackrabbits are typically marked by the lowest mechanical advantage and the longest distal segments, non-cursorial pikas display the highest mechanical advantage and the shortest distal segments, and rabbits generally display intermediate values for these variables. Variation in long bone robusticity followed a proximodistal gradient. Whereas proximal limb bone robusticity declined with cursoriality, distal limb bone robusticity generally remained constant across the three species. The association between long, structurally gracile limb bones and decreased maximal bending strength suggests that the more cursorial lagomorphs compromise proximal limb bone integrity to improve locomotor economy. In contrast, the integrity of distal limb bones is maintained with increasing

  15. A potential mechanism for allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals.

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    Christen, Patrik; Ito, Keita; van Rietbergen, Bert

    2015-03-01

    Trabecular bone microstructural parameters, including trabecular thickness, spacing, and number, have been reported to scale with animal size with negative allometry, whereas bone volume fraction is animal size-invariant in terrestrial mammals. As for the majority of scaling patterns described in animals, its underlying mechanism is unknown. However, it has also been found that osteocyte density is inversely related to animal size, possibly adapted to metabolic rate, which shows a negative relationship as well. In addition, the signalling reach of osteocytes is limited by the extent of the lacuno-canalicular network, depending on trabecular dimensions and thus also on animal size. Here we propose animal size-dependent variations in osteocyte density and their signalling influence distance as a potential mechanism for negative allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals. Using an established and tested computational model of bone modelling and remodelling, we run simulations with different osteocyte densities and influence distances mimicking six terrestrial mammals covering a large range of body masses. Simulated trabecular structures revealed negative allometric scaling for trabecular thickness, spacing, and number, constant bone volume fraction, and bone turnover rates inversely related to animal size. These results are in agreement with previous observations supporting our proposal of osteocyte density and influence distance variation as a potential mechanism for negative allometric trabecular bone scaling in terrestrial mammals. The inverse relationship between bone turnover rates and animal size further indicates that trabecular bone scaling may be linked to metabolic rather than mechanical adaptations.

  16. Systematic mapping of the subchondral bone 3D microarchitecture in the human tibial plateau: Variations with joint alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Bryant C; Thewlis, Dominic; Solomon, Lucian B; Mercer, Graham; Reynolds, Karen J; Perilli, Egon

    2016-11-07

    Tibial subchondral bone plays an important role in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Microarchitectural characterization of subchondral bone plate (SBP), underlying subchondral trabecular bone (STB) and relationships between these compartments, however, is limited. The aim of this study was to characterize the spatial distribution of SBP thickness, SBP porosity and STB microarchitecture, and relationships among them, in OA tibiae of varying joint alignment. Twenty-five tibial plateaus from end-stage knee-OA patients, with varus (n = 17) or non-varus (n = 8) alignment were micro-CT scanned (17 μm/voxel). SBP and STB microarchitecture was quantified via a systematic mapping in 22 volumes of interest per knee (11 medial, 11 lateral). Significant within-condylar and between-condylar (medial vs. lateral) differences (p volume fraction (BV/TV) was consistently high throughout the medial condyle, whereas in non-varus, medially, it was more heterogeneously distributed. Regions of high SBP thickness were co-located with regions of high STB BV/TV underneath. In varus, BV/TV was significantly higher medially than laterally, however, not so in non-varus. Moreover, region-specific significant associations between the SBP thickness and SBP porosity and the underlying STB microarchitecture were detected, which in general were not captured when considering the values averaged for each condyle. As subchondral bone changes reflect responses to local mechanical and biochemical factors within the joint, our results suggest that joint alignment influences both the medial-to-lateral and the within-condyle distribution of force across the tibia, generating corresponding local bony responses (adaptation) of both the subchondral bone plate and underlying subchondral trabecular bone microarchitecture. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  17. Effects of Abiotic Factors on the Geographic Distribution of Body Size Variation and Chromosomal Polymorphisms in Two Neotropical Grasshopper Species (Dichroplus: Melanoplinae: Acrididae

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    Claudio J. Bidau

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the effects of abiotic factors on body size in two grasshopper species with large geographical distributions: Dichroplus pratensis and D. vittatus, inhabiting Argentina in diverse natural habitats. Geographical spans for both species provide an opportunity to study the effects of changes in abiotic factors on body size. The analyses of body size distribution in both species revealed a converse Bergmannian pattern: body size is positively correlated with latitude, altitude, and seasonality that influences time available for development and growth. Allen’s rule is also inverted. Morphological variability increases towards the ends of the Bergmannian clines and, in D. pratensis, is related with a central-marginal distribution of chromosomal variants that influence recombination. The converse Bergmannian patterns influence sexual size dimorphism in both species but in different fashions. Body size variation at a microspatial scale in D. pratensis is extremely sensitive to microclimatic clines. We finally compare our results with those for other Orthopteran species.

  18. Evidence for small scale variation in the vertebrate brain: mating strategy and sex affect brain size and structure in wild brown trout (Salmo trutta).

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    Kolm, N; Gonzalez-Voyer, A; Brelin, D; Winberg, S

    2009-12-01

    The basis for our knowledge of brain evolution in vertebrates rests heavily on empirical evidence from comparative studies at the species level. However, little is still known about the natural levels of variation and the evolutionary causes of differences in brain size and brain structure within-species, even though selection at this level is an important initial generator of macroevolutionary patterns across species. Here, we examine how early life-history decisions and sex are related to brain size and brain structure in wild populations using the existing natural variation in mating strategies among wild brown trout (Salmo trutta). By comparing the brains of precocious fish that remain in the river and sexually mature at a small size with those of migratory fish that migrate to the sea and sexually mature at a much larger size, we show, for the first time in any vertebrate, strong differences in relative brain size and brain structure across mating strategies. Precocious fish have larger brain size (when controlling for body size) but migratory fish have a larger cerebellum, the structure in charge of motor coordination. Moreover, we demonstrate sex-specific differences in brain structure as female precocious fish have a larger brain than male precocious fish while males of both strategies have a larger telencephalon, the cognitive control centre, than females. The differences in brain size and structure across mating strategies and sexes thus suggest the possibility for fine scale adaptive evolution of the vertebrate brain in relation to different life histories.

  19. Association of genetic variations of genes encoding thrombospondin, type 1, domain-containing 4 and 7A with low bone mineral density in Japanese women with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Seijiro; Kou, Ikuyo; Sato, Hidenori; Emi, Mitsuru; Ito, Hideki; Hosoi, Takayuki; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2008-01-01

    Twins and family studies have shown that genetic factors are important determinants of bone mass. Important aspects of bone mineral density (BMD) regulation are endocrine systems, notably hormonal regulation of adrenal corticoids, as indicated by clinical knowledge of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Glucocorticoid is known to negatively regulate bone mass in vivo, and glucocorticoid increases thrombospondin messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels. We studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding thrombospondin, type 1, domain-containing 4 and 7A (THSD4 and THSD7A) for possible association with lumbar and femoral BMD among 337 Japanese women with osteoporosis who participated in the BioBank Japan project. Genetic variations of THSD4 and THSD7A loci displayed significant association with lumbar and femoral BMD. Most significant correlation was observed for THSD7A SNP rs12673692 with lumbar BMD (P = 0.00017). Homozygous carriers of the major (G) allele had the highest BMD [0.886 +/- 0.011 g/cm2, mean +/- standard deviation (SD)], whereas heterozygous carriers were intermediate (0.872 +/- 0.013 g/cm2) and homozygous A-allele carriers had the lowest (0.753 +/- 0.023 g/cm2). THSD4 SNP rs10851839 also displayed strong association with lumbar BMD (P = 0.0092). In addition, both THSD7A and THSD4 displayed significant association with femoral BMD in a recessive model (P = 0.036 and P = 0.0046, respectively). Results suggest that variations of THSD7A and THSD4 loci may be important determinants of osteoporosis in Japanese women.

  20. Variation in C:N:S stoichiometry and nutrient storage related to body size in a holometabolous insect (Curculio davidi) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Small, Gaston E; Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Donger; Li, Hongwang; Liu, Chunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Body size can be an important factor controlling consumer stoichiometry. In holometabolous insects, body size is typically associated with nutrient storage. Consumer stoichiometry is known to vary within species across a range of body sizes; however, the contribution of nutrient storage to this variation is not well understood. We used the fifth-instar larvae of the oak weevil (Coleoptera: Curculio davidi Fairmaire), which is characterized by a high capacity for nutrient storage, to investigate the effect of shifts in nutrient storage with body mass on variations in larva stoichiometry. Our results showed that weevil larvae with larger body mass had a lower carbon (C) content, reflecting decreases in the sequestration rate of C-rich lipids. Larger larvae had elevated concentrations of nitrogen (N), sulfur (S), and protein. The similar patterns of variation in elemental composition and macromolecule storage with body weight indicate that the shift in nutrient storage is the main factor causing the variation in larval stoichiometry with body weight. This finding was further supported by the low variation in residual larval biomass C, N, and S concentrations after lipid extraction. These results help decipher the physiological mechanism of stoichiometric regulation in growing organisms.

  1. Size variation in early human mandibles and molars from Klasies River, South Africa: comparison with other middle and late Pleistocene assemblages and with modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Danielle F; Lockwood, Charles A; Scott, Jeremiah E; Grine, Frederick E

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies of the Middle Stone Age human remains from Klasies River have concluded that they exhibited more sexual dimorphism than extant populations, but these claims have not been assessed statistically. We evaluate these claims by comparing size variation in the best-represented elements at the site, namely the mandibular corpora and M(2)s, to that in samples from three recent human populations using resampling methods. We also examine size variation in these same elements from seven additional middle and late Pleistocene sites: Skhūl, Dolní Vestonice, Sima de los Huesos, Arago, Krapina, Shanidar, and Vindija. Our results demonstrate that size variation in the Klasies assemblage was greater than in recent humans, consistent with arguments that the Klasies people were more dimorphic than living humans. Variation in the Skhūl, Dolní Vestonice, and Sima de los Huesos mandibular samples is also higher than in the recent human samples, indicating that the Klasies sample was not unusual among middle and late Pleistocene hominins. In contrast, the Neandertal samples (Krapina, Shanidar, and Vindija) do not evince relatively high mandibular and molar variation, which may indicate that the level of dimorphism in Neandertals was similar to that observed in extant humans. These results suggest that the reduced levels of dimorphism in Neandertals and living humans may have developed independently, though larger fossil samples are needed to test this hypothesis.

  2. 3DCT Features of the Pediatric Anatomic Variations of the Interparietal Bone%儿童顶间骨解剖变异的3DCT特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊刚; 李欣; 杨扬

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate 3DCT features of anatomic variations of the interparietal bone. Methods CT imag-ings of 402 patients (exclude recent trauma) who underwent CT examination were analyzed. Maximum intensity projection ( MIP) and volume-rendered image ( VR) reconstructions were performed at workstation. CT features of anatomic variations of the interparietal bone, including appearance, location were analyzed. Results 89 cases of anatomic variation were found,which can be devided into penetrating type and non penetrating type. The penetrating type have multiple manifestations, which can be subdivided into type a to f. The non penetrating type included Suturae Mendosa and superior median fissure. Conclusion The anatomic variations of interparietal bone are numerous, which can be well displayed with 3DCT.%目的 探讨儿童顶间骨解剖变异的3DCT特征.方法 搜集2010年2月至2012年3月间在排除近期明确外伤史而怀疑颅内疾病于我院行螺旋CT检查的患儿402例.采用最大密度投影及容积再现技术观察顶间骨的变异情况,总结其部位、形态及其走行.结果 402例中存在顶间骨变异者89例(22.1%),包括贯通缝型和未贯通缝型.含贯通缝的顶间骨变异表现多样,将最多见者分为a~f型,含未贯通缝的顶间骨变异分为两种类型,假缝19例,上正中裂16例.结论 儿童顶间骨变异类型多样,直观的3D-CT图像可以明确变异位置及形态.

  3. Linking differential domain functions of the GS3 protein to natural variation of grain size in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Hailiang; Sun, Shengyuan; Yao, Jialing; Wang, Chongrong; Yu, Sibin; Xu, Caiguo; Li, Xianghua; Zhang, Qifa

    2010-01-01

    Grain yield in many cereal crops is largely determined by grain size. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of GS3, a major quantitative trait locus for grain size. It functions as a negative regulator of grain size and organ size. The wild-type isoform is composed of four putative domains: a plant-specific organ size regulation (OSR) domain in the N terminus, a transmembrane domain, a tumor necrosis factor receptor/nerve growth factor receptor (TNFR/NGFR) family cysteine-...

  4. Intra- and inter-observer variation in histological criteria used in age at death determination based on femoral cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, N; Thomsen, J L; Frohlich, B

    1998-01-01

    been carried out dealing with the intra- and inter-observer error. Furthermore, when such studies have been completed, the statistical tools for assessing variability have not been adequate. This study presents the results of applying simple quantitative statistics on several counts of microscopic...... elements as observed on photographic images of cortical bone, in order to assess intra- and inter-observer error. Overall, substantial error was present at the level of identifying and counting secondary osteons, osteon fragments and Haversian canals. Only secondary osteons can be reliably identified...

  5. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  6. Grain-to-Grain Variations in NbC Particle Size Distributions in an Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, Claire; Ralph, B.; Silverman, B.;

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative information has been obtained concerning the size distributions of NbC precipitate particles in different grains in a deformed and aged austenitic stainless steel specimen. The precipitate size distributions obtained differ from one grain to another. The average disparity measured be...

  7. Variation in levels of reactive oxygen species is explained by maternal identity, sex and body-size-corrected clutch size in a lizard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Mats; Wilson, Mark; Uller, Tobias; Mott, Beth; Isaksson, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    Many organisms show differences between males and females in growth rate and crucial life history parameters, such as longevity. Considering this, we may expect levels of toxic metabolic by-products of the respiratory chain, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), to vary with age and sex. Here, we analyse ROS levels in female Australian painted dragon lizards ( Ctenophorus pictus) and their offspring using fluorescent probes and flow cytometry. Basal level of four ROS species (singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, superoxide and H2O2) measured with a combined marker, and superoxide measured specifically, varied significantly among families but not between the sexes. When blood cells from offspring were chemically encouraged to accelerate the electron transport chain by mitochondrial uncoupling, net superoxide levels were three times higher in daughters than sons (resulting in levels outside of the normal ROS range) and varied among mothers depending on offspring sex (significant interaction between maternal identity and offspring sex). In offspring, there were depressive effects on ROS of size-controlled relative clutch size, which relies directly on circulating levels of vitellogenin, a confirmed antioxidant in some species. Thus, levels of reactive oxygen species varies among females, offspring and in relation to reproductive investment in a manner that makes its regulatory processes likely targets of selection.

  8. Variations in size, shape and asymmetries of the third frontal convolution in hominids: paleoneurological implications for hominin evolution and the origin of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzeau, Antoine; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Holloway, Ralph L; Prima, Sylvain; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    The study of brain structural asymmetries as anatomical substrates of functional asymmetries in extant humans, great apes, and fossil hominins is of major importance in understanding the structural basis of modern human cognition. We propose methods to quantify the variation in size, shape and bilateral asymmetries of the third frontal convolution (or posterior inferior frontal gyrus) among recent modern humans, bonobos and chimpanzees, and fossil hominins using actual and virtual endocasts. These methodological improvements are necessary to extend previous qualitative studies of these features. We demonstrate both an absolute and relative bilateral increase in the size of the third frontal convolution in width and length between Pan species, as well as in hominins. We also observed a global bilateral increase in the size of the third frontal convolution across all species during hominin evolution, but also non-allometric intra-group variations independent of brain size within the fossil samples. Finally, our results show that the commonly accepted leftward asymmetry of Broca's cap is biased by qualitative observation of individual specimens. The trend during hominin evolution seems to be a reduction in size on the left compared with the right side, and also a clearer definition of the area. The third frontal convolution considered as a whole projects more laterally and antero-posteriorly in the right hemisphere. As a result, the left 'Broca's cap' looks more globular and better defined. Our results also suggest that the pattern of brain asymmetries is similar between Pan paniscus and hominins, leaving the gradient of the degree of asymmetry as the only relevant structural parameter. As the anatomical substrate related to brain asymmetry has been present since the appearance of the hominin lineage, it is not possible to prove a direct relationship between the extent of variations in the size, shape, and asymmetries of the third frontal convolution and the origin of

  9. Genetic variation for bulb size, soluble solids content and pungency in the Spanish sweet onion variety Fuentes de Ebro. Response to selection for low pungency

    OpenAIRE

    Mallor Giménez, Cristina; Balcells Oliván, María; Mallor, F.; Sales, E.

    2011-01-01

    The cultivar ‘Fuentes de Ebro’ is a long-day onion grown in the northeast of Spain, which is characterized by its succulence and low pungency. However, to match the market demand the size, pungency, and storability need to be improved. We have evaluated these quality-related bulb traits in 15 grower’s open-pollinated lines of this cultivar. Phenotypic variation observed for bulb weight, size and soluble solids content was significantly affected by location, growing season and line, while pung...

  10. Deciphering seasonal variations in the diet and drinking water of modern White-Tailed deer by in situ analysis of osteons in cortical bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, T. E.; Longstaffe, F. J.

    2007-12-01

    In situ carbon and oxygen isotope values for bioapatite were obtained from longitudinal slices of cortical bone from modern domesticated sheep and free-range White-Tailed deer. The analyses were obtained using an IR-laser coupled to a GC-IRMS interface. Ablation pits averaged 200 × 50 μm, making it possible to sample individual or small bundles of osteons. Cortical bone is remodeled along osteons throughout a mammal's life. Therefore, data at this scale can record seasonal variations in diet and drinking water during the adult stages of a mammal, whereas teeth provide may provide information about the juvenile years of a mammal. Average δ18O and δ13C values for the sheep from southwestern Ontario, Canada, were 14.0 and -16.1‰, respectively. No trend was observed in the isotopic composition of the sheep's osteons, consistent with its constant diet and water supply. The δ18O (14.2 to 16.6‰) and δ13C (-19.2 to -15.6‰) values of osteons from White-Tailed deer from nearby Pinery Provincial Park, however, varied systematically and were negatively correlated. Oxygen isotope values of the osteons correlated well with changes in the δ18O values of the main water source for these deer: winter average, -10.7‰; summer average, -8.6‰. The variation in δ13C values of the osteons reflects changes in diet; summer diet consisted mainly of leafy C3 vegetation (-28.4‰), whereas winter diet comprised bark (-25.6‰), C4 grasses (δ13C, -12.7‰), and corn stalks and husks (-11.3‰).

  11. Effect of surgeon experience on femoral component size selection during total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sumon; Bono, James V; Froimson, Mark; Jones, Morgan; Bershadsky, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Femoral component size selection during total knee arthroplasty should not vary from surgeon to surgeon for patients with the same bone size. This study explored if systematic variations in femoral component size selection exist. Thirteen surgeons' choices of femoral component size (Duracon, n = 1388; Triathlon, n = 740) were analyzed using a generalized linear model with femoral component size as the dependent variable and surgeon identification, years in practice, and adult reconstruction fellowship training as the independent variables. The model adjusted for differences in bone size. It was found that more experienced surgeons implant larger femoral components. New instruments and training protocols may be necessary to adjust for surgeon experience.

  12. Variation in seed size is structured by dispersal syndrome and cone morphology in conifers and other nonflowering seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Andrew B; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Mathews, Sarah

    2017-02-10

    Seed size varies tremendously in plants and its evolution is influenced by multiple ecological and biological factors that are difficult to disentangle. In this study, we focus on understanding the role of seed dispersal by animals in the evolution of seed size in conifers, the most diverse extant nonflowering seed plant group. Relationships among seed size, dispersal syndrome, climate and cone morphology were analyzed across conifers using quantitative models of character evolution and phylogenetic regression techniques. Dispersal syndrome is a more consistent predictor of seed size within major extant conifer clades than climate. Seeds are generally larger in animal-dispersed than wind-dispersed species, and particular cone morphologies are consistently associated with specific ranges in seed size. Seed size and cone morphology evolve in a correlated manner in many animal-dispersed conifers, following a trade-off that minimizes the total size of the dispersal unit. These relationships are also present in other nonflowering seed plant groups, and have been important in the evolution of seeds and cones at least over the Cenozoic and perhaps over much of the later Mesozoic.

  13. Magnetic properties in an ash flow tuff with continuous grain size variation: a natural reference for magnetic particle granulometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, J.L.; Jackson, M.J.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Solheid, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Tiva Canyon Tuff contains dispersed nanoscale Fe-Ti-oxide grains with a narrow magnetic grain size distribution, making it an ideal material in which to identify and study grain-size-sensitive magnetic behavior in rocks. A detailed magnetic characterization was performed on samples from the basal 5 m of the tuff. The magnetic materials in this basal section consist primarily of (low-impurity) magnetite in the form of elongated submicron grains exsolved from volcanic glass. Magnetic properties studied include bulk magnetic susceptibility, frequency-dependent and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic remanence acquisition, and hysteresis properties. The combined data constitute a distinct magnetic signature at each stratigraphic level in the section corresponding to different grain size distributions. The inferred magnetic domain state changes progressively upward from superparamagnetic grains near the base to particles with pseudo-single-domain or metastable single-domain characteristics near the top of the sampled section. Direct observations of magnetic grain size confirm that distinct transitions in room temperature magnetic susceptibility and remanence probably denote the limits of stable single-domain behavior in the section. These results provide a unique example of grain-size-dependent magnetic properties in noninteracting particle assemblages over three decades of grain size, including close approximations of ideal Stoner-Wohlfarth assemblages, and may be considered a useful reference for future rock magnetic studies involving grain-size-sensitive properties.

  14. Seasonal variation in 25(OHD at Aberdeen (57°N and bone health indicators--could holidays in the sun and cod liver oil supplements alleviate deficiency?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Mavroeidi

    Full Text Available Vitamin D has been linked with many health outcomes. The aim of this longitudinal study, was to assess predictors of seasonal variation of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OHD (including use of supplements and holidays in sunny destinations at a northerly latitude in the UK (57°N in relation to bone health indicators. 365 healthy postmenopausal women (mean age 62.0 y (SD 1.4 had 25(OHD measurements by immunoassay, serum C-telopeptide (CTX, estimates of sunlight exposure (badges of polysulphone film, information regarding holidays in sunny destinations, and diet (from food diaries, including use of supplements such as cod liver oil (CLO at fixed 3-monthly intervals over 15 months (subject retention 88% with an additional 25(OHD assessment in spring 2008. Bone mineral density (BMD at the lumbar spine (LS and dual hip was measured in autumn 2006 and spring 2007 (Lunar I-DXA. Deficiency prevalence (25(OHD<25 nmol/L was reduced in women who went on holiday to sunny destinations 3 months prior to their visit, compared to women who did not go on holidays [5.4% vs. 24.6% in Spring (p<0.001 and 3.8% vs. 25.6% in Winter (p = 0.001, respectively]. Similarly deficiency was lower amongst those who took CLO supplements compared to women that did not consume these supplements [2.0% vs. 23.7% in Spring (p = 0.001 and 4.5% vs. 24.8% in winter (p = 0.005, respectively]. There was no seasonal variation in CTX; 25(OHD predicted a small proportion (1.8% variation of LS BMD in spring 2007 [unstandardized β (SE: 0.039 (0.016, p = 0.017]. Seasonal variation of 25(OHD had little effect on BMD and no effect on CTX. It appears that small increments in vitamin D (e.g. those that can be achieved by cod liver oil supplements of 5 µg/day are sufficient to ensure that 25(OHD is above 25 nmol/L for most people throughout the year. Similarly, holidays in sunny destinations show benefit.

  15. Variation of crystallite size of Al1–InN for different values of and band gap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Naik; R Naik; H Somashekarappa; S S Mahesh; R Somashekar

    2006-02-01

    By using wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) technique, we have characterized the epitaxial Al1–InN films (thickness, 150 nm) with 0 < < 1 grown by plasma source molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire (0001) at the low substrate temperature of 375°C, by computing the crystallite size in these samples. We observe that the crystallite size decreases with increase in the concentration of indium and that the band gap in these samples has a direct correlation with the crystallite size.

  16. The interstitial nuclei of the human anterior hypothalamus: an investigation of sexual variation in volume and cell size, number and density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byne, W; Lasco, M S; Kemether, E; Shinwari, A; Edgar, M A; Morgello, S; Jones, L B; Tobet, S

    2000-02-21

    The four interstitial nuclei of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH) have been considered as candidate human nuclei for homology with the much studied sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area of the rat. Assessment of the INAH for sexual dimorphism has produced discrepant results. This study reports the first systematic examination of all four INAH in the human for sexual variation in volume, neuronal number and neuronal size. Serial Nissl-stained coronal sections through the medial preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus were examined from 18 males and 20 females who died between the ages of 17 and 65 without evidence of hypothalamic pathology or infection with the human immunodeficiency virus. A computer-assisted image-analysis system and commercial stereology software package were employed to assess total volume, neuronal number and mean neuronal size for each INAH. INAH3 occupied a significantly greater volume and contained significantly more neurons in males than in females. No sex differences in volume were detected for any of the other INAH. No sexual variation in neuronal size or packing density was observed in any nucleus. The present data corroborate two previous reports of sexual dimorphism of INAH3 but provide no support for previous reports of sexual variation in other INAH.

  17. Sperm quantity and size variation in un-irradiated and irradiated males of the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis Patton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helinski, M.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Anopheles mosquitoes are important candidates for genetic control strategies. However, little is known about sperm quality and quantity as determinants of male reproductive success. In this study, sperm quantity and length variation were assessed in testes of un-irradiated and irradiated Anopheles a

  18. Preparation and characterization of nano-sized hydroxyapatite/alginate/chitosan composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Lee; Jung, Gil-Yong; Yoon, Jun-Ho; Han, Jung-Suk; Park, Yoon-Jeong; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Zhang, Miqin; Kim, Dae-Joon

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop chitosan composite scaffolds with high strength and controlled pore structures by homogenously dispersed nano-sized hydroxyapatite (nano-HAp) powders. In the fabrication of composite scaffolds, nano-HAp powders distributed in an alginate (AG) solution with a pH higher than 10 were mixed with a chitosan (CS) solution and then freeze dried. While the HAp content increased up to 70 wt.%, the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of the composite scaffolds significantly increased from 0.27 MPa and 4.42 MPa to 0.68 MPa and 13.35 MPa, respectively. Higher content of the HAp also helped develop more differentiation and mineralization of the MC3T3-E1 cells on the composite scaffolds. The uniform pore structure and the excellent mechanical properties of the HAp/CS composite scaffolds likely resulted from the use of the AG solution at pH 10 as a dispersant for the nano-HAp powders.

  19. GaInSn melt flow structure variation with crucible size in an isothermal electromagnetic stirring configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrila, Radu Andrei; Popescu, Alexandra; Vizman, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Based on the idea of melt stirring from electromagnetic Czochralski method, a method for electromagnetic field stirring (EMF) of molten silicon was proposed for a rectangular melt: a configuration with two electrodes in contact with the melt surface in a vertical magnetic field. In order to understand the basic features of the melt flow in such a configuration time-dependent numerical computations were performed with STHAMAS3D for an isothermal model experiment in a rectangular crucible filled with a room temperature GaInSn melt, very similar with liquid silicon. Numerical parametrical studies were performed for different values of I and B using various crucible sizes, for a symmetrical electrode positioning along the diagonal of the free melt surface. The results have revealed that the flow structure can be described in terms of a vortex or a poloidal recirculation dominance or of a transition between the two. It was found that, for a larger crucible size, the transition from the vortex to the poloidal flow structure installs at higher current intensities than in the case of a smaller melt size. The results offer an understanding of the impact of the increase in melt volume on the flow structures and are therefore important for the upscaling of the melt geometry to sizes relevant for industrial application.

  20. Spatial variations in density and size of the echinoid Diadema antillarum Philippi on some Venezuelan coral reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weil, Ernesto; Losada, Freddy; Bone, David

    1984-01-01

    The distribution, population density and size structure of Diadema antillarum Philippi was found to vary with reef locality, food availability and the structural complexity of the reef. Structural complexity was classified according to the growth morphology and abundance of the coral species found i

  1. Shape and size variations of Aegla uruguayana (Anomura, Aeglidae under laboratory conditions: A geometric morphometric approach to the growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria P. Diawol

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crustacean growth studies typically use modal analysis rather than focusing on the growth of individuals. In the present work, we use geometric morphometrics to determine how organism shape and size varies during the life of the freshwater crab, Aegla uruguayana Schmitt, 1942. A total of 66 individuals from diverse life cycle stages were examined daily and each exuvia was recorded. Digital images of the dorsal region of the cephalothorax were obtained for each exuvia and were subsequently used to record landmark configurations. Moult increment and intermoult period were estimated for each crab. Differences in shape between crabs of different sizes (allometry and sexes (sexual dimorphism; SD were observed. Allometry was registered among specimens; however, SD was not statistically significant between crabs of a given size. The intermoult period increased as size increased, but the moult frequency was similar between the sexes. Regarding ontogeny, juveniles had short and blunt rostrum, robust forehead region, and narrow cephalothorax. Unlike juveniles crabs, adults presented a well-defined anterior and posterior cephalothorax region. The rostrum was long and stylised and the forehead narrow. Geometric morphometric methods were highly effective for the analysis of aeglid-individual- growth and avoided excessive handling of individuals through exuvia analysis.

  2. Variation in male body size and reproductive allocation in the leafcutter ant Atta colombica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stürup, M.; den Boer, S. P. A.; Nash, David Richard;

    2011-01-01

    Remarkably little is known about the traits that determine reproductive success of males in eusocial insects. Their window for mate choice decisions is very short, the actual mating process is very difficult to observe, and their small body sizes have likely prevented systematic studies in many...

  3. A size-dependent model for beam-like MEMS driven by electrostatic and piezoelectric forces: A variational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tenghao; Wang, Binglei; Zhou, Shenjie; Zhao, Moli

    2016-10-01

    A size-dependent model of a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) actuated by both electrostatic and piezoelectric forces is proposed based on the modified couple stress. The governing equation and boundary conditions are derived with the help of the Hamilton principle and solved numerically by employing the Galerkin method and Newton downhill method. A material length scale parameter (MLSP) is incorporated in the model to capture the size effect in microstructures. An excellent agreement is found between the results of the present model and the experimental data, providing the validity of this model. The results reveal that the introduction of the MLSP stiffens the system and increases the pull-in voltage. The size-effect is significant when the dimension of the beam is comparable to the MLSP but it becomes smaller as the beam size increases. Besides, the static characteristic of the micro-switch is studied. It is found that the piezoelectric material attached on the beam can reduce the pull-in voltage remarkably, which may guide the design of the micro-structure when the system is on the order of micron or submicron.

  4. Particle size, moisture, and fluidization variations described by indirect in-line physical measurements of fluid bed granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsanen, Tanja; Närvänen, Tero; Räikkönen, Heikki; Antikainen, Osmo; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an instrumentation system for a bench scale fluid bed granulator to determine the parameters expressing the changing conditions during the spraying phase of a fluid bed process. The study focused mainly on four in-line measurements (dependent variables): fluidization parameter (calculated by inlet air flow rate and rotor speed), pressure difference over the upper filters, pressure difference over the granules (lower filter), and temperature of the fluidizing mass. In-line particle size measured by the spatial filtering technique was an essential predictor variable. Other physical process measurements of the automated granulation system, 25 direct and 12 derived parameters, were also utilized for multivariate modeling. The correlation and partial least squares analyses revealed significant relationships between various process parameters highlighting the particle size, moisture, and fluidization effect. Fluidization parameter and pressure difference over upper filters were found to correlate with in-line particle size and therefore could be used as estimates of particle size during granulation. The pressure difference over the granules and the temperature of the fluidizing mass expressed the moisture conditions of wet granulation. The instrumentation system evaluated here is an invaluable aid to gaining more control for fluid bed processing to obtain repeatable granules for further processing.

  5. Synthesis of nano-sized ZnO particles by co-precipitation method with variation of heating time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purwaningsih, S. Y., E-mail: sriyanisaputri@gmail.com; Pratapa, S.; Triwikantoro; Darminto, E-mail: darminto@physics.its.ac.id [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institute of Technology Sepuluh November (ITS), Jl. Arief Rahman Hakim, Surabaya Indonesia 60111 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    Zinc oxide powders have been synthesized by a co-precipitation method at low temperature (85 °C), using zinc acetate dihydrate, ammonia, hydrochloric acid solutions as the reactants. A number of process parameters such as reaction temperature, solution basicity or pH and heating time are the main factors affecting the morphology and physical properties of the ZnO nanostructures. In this work the effect of heating time on the morphology and particles size were studied. The as-synthesized ZnO powders were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The samples were also analyzed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Rietveld refinement of XRD data confirms that ZnO crystallizes in the hexagonal wurtzite structure with high degree of purity and the (101) plane predominant. The XRD results show that the average crystallite sizes were about 66, 27 and 12 nm for 3, 4 and 5 h of heating times, respectively. The XRD analysis indicated that a fraction of nano-sized ZnO powders were in the form of aggregates, which was also verified by TEM image. The TEM photograph demonstrated that the nano-sized ZnO particles were a pseudo-spherical shape.

  6. VARIATION IN JUVENILE COHO SALMON END-OF-SUMMER SIZE AND ABUNDANCE: HIERARCHICAL ANALYSIS OF HABITAT EFFECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The size of coho salmon juveniles entering the winter has been shown to influence overwinter survival, and hence may be a useful indicator of linkages between summer habitat conditions and subsequent smolt production. We are investigating habitat-specific demographics of juvenile...

  7. Discrimination of inland and coastal dunes in Eastern Saudi Arabia desert system: An approach from particle size and textural parameter variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeshidayatullah, Ardiansyah; Chan, Septriandi Asmaidi; Al-Ghamdi, Majed; Akif, Tariq; Al-Ramadan, Khalid

    2016-05-01

    Different particle size parameters have been investigated in this study in order to distinguish the characteristics of different dune morphologies in the Eastern Saudi Arabia. Sand samples were collected from various environments including: the stoss, lee, crest and interdune sides of the inland dunes and foreshore; berm; backshore and backdune of the coastal dunes. Statistical parameters reveal that the majority of inland dune samples are dominated by well sorted fine sand whereas coastal dune samples are mainly dominated by very coarse to medium sand, ranging from well sorted to moderately sorted with a low percentage of silt and clay. The presence of relatively coarser grains in the coastal dunes might be explained by continuous wind deflation along the coast together with wave and tidal activities that concentrate coarser grains. Cross-plots from four statistical parameters and supported by the ANOVA test clearly distinguish the particle variations between these dunes. The log-probability analysis suggest that the main transport mechanism in inland and coastal dunes is dominated by the saltation population, comprising up to 80 percent of the distribution. However, the coastal dunes suspension population is mostly belonging to coarser grained material, whereas the inland dunes population is finer. In comparison with particle size characteristics of dunes in the region, the current study shows a close relationship to mean particle size in Iraq, but is relatively finer compared to the Kuwait dunes. This similarity and difference in particle size variation is mostly controlled by the proximity to the coast and also the wind energy and variation in the wind direction.

  8. Bone grafting: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Joshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafting is the process by which bone is transferred from a source (donor to site (recipient. Due to trauma from accidents by speedy vehicles, falling down from height or gunshot injury particularly in human being, acquired or developmental diseases like rickets, congenital defects like abnormal bone development, wearing out because of age and overuse; lead to bone loss and to replace the loss we need the bone grafting. Osteogenesis, osteoinduction, osteoconduction, mechanical supports are the four basic mechanisms of bone graft. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. An ideal bone graft material is biologically inert, source of osteogenic, act as a mechanical support, readily available, easily adaptable in terms of size, shape, length and replaced by the host bone. Except blood, bone is grafted with greater frequency. Bone graft indicated for variety of orthopedic abnormalities, comminuted fractures, delayed unions, non-unions, arthrodesis and osteomyelitis. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. By adopting different procedure of graft preservation its antigenicity can be minimized. The concept of bone banking for obtaining bone grafts and implants is very useful for clinical application. Absolute stability require for successful incorporation. Ideal bone graft must possess osteogenic, osteoinductive and osteocon-ductive properties. Cancellous bone graft is superior to cortical bone graft. Usually autologous cancellous bone graft are used as fresh grafts where as allografts are employed as an alloimplant. None of the available type of bone grafts possesses all these properties therefore, a single type of graft cannot be recomm-ended for all types of orthopedic abnormalities. Bone grafts and implants can be selected as per clinical problems, the equipments available and preference of

  9. Effects of particle size, ash content, and processing pressure on the bioavailability of phosphorus in meat and bone meal for swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traylor, S L; Cromwell, G L; Lindemann, M D

    2005-11-01

    Meat and bone meal (MBM), when supplemented with tryptophan, is an excellent protein source for pigs. It is also a rich source of Ca and P, but some research has suggested that the bioavailability of P is variable. Three experiments were conducted to determine whether particle size, ash content, or processing pressure of MBM influences the bioavailability of P. Each experiment involved six replications of six treatments with individually penned pigs initially averaging 13 to 17 kg of BW. A low-P basal diet was fed with or without 0.1 or 0.2% added P (as-fed basis) from monosodium phosphate (MSP) or with three types of MBM added at levels that supplied 0.2% P (as-fed basis). The Ca level was 0.70%, and the lysine level was 0.95% in all diets. Pigs were allowed to consume their diets (meal form) on an ad libitum basis. At the end of the study, pigs were killed, and femurs and third and fourth metacarpals and metatarsals were removed for determination of breaking strength and ash content. Bone traits were regressed on added P intake for each P source, and slope-ratio procedures were used to estimate the bioavailability of P in MBM relative to that in MSP. In Exp. 1, a blended source of MBM ground to three particle sizes (amount that passed through 6-, 8-, or 12-mesh screens) was evaluated. In Exp. 2, low-ash MBM of porcine origin, high-ash MBM of bovine origin, and a 1:1 blend of the two sources were assessed. In Exp. 3, normally processed MBM was subjected to an additional 2.1 and 4.2 kg/cm2 of pressure for 20 min to determine whether excessive heat treatment would influence the bioavailability of P. Fineness of grind of MBM or processing pressure did not influence the relative bioavailability of P in this study; however, ash content of MBM affected P bioavailability. The relative availability of P in low-ash MBM of porcine origin (with composition typical of meat meal) was approximately 15 percentage units less than that in high-ash MBM of bovine origin. Overall

  10. Effects of body-size variation on flight-related traits in latitudinal populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Veer Bhan; Ravi Parkash; Dau Dayal Aggarwal

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, we tested the hypothesis whether flight-related traits such as wing area, flight-muscle ratio, wing loading and dispersal yield evidence of geographical variation in nine wild-collected as well as laboratory-reared (at 21°C) latitudinal populations of Drosophila melanogaster from the Indian subcontinent. We observed positive clinal variation in the wing–thorax ratio, wing aspect ratio and wing area, along a latitudinal gradient for both the sexes. In contrast, geographical changes in three parameters of flight ability, i.e. flight-muscle ratio, wing loading and dispersal, showed negative correlation with latitude. On the basis of isofemale line variability, we observed positive correlation of wing loading with flight-muscle ratio as well as dispersal behaviour in both the sexes. We also found positive correlation between duration of development and wing area. Interestingly, southern populations of D. melanogaster from warm and humid habitats exhibited higher flight-muscle ratio as well as the higher wing loading than northern populations which occur in cooler and drier climatic conditions. Laboratory tests for dispersal-related walking behaviour showed significantly higher values for southern populations compared with northern populations of D. melanogaster. Multiple regression analysis of geographical changes in flight-muscle ratio, wing loading as well as walking behaviour as a function of average temperature and relative humidity of the origin of populations in wild-collected flies have suggested adaptive changes in flight-related traits in response to steeper gradients of climatic factors in the Indian subcontinent. Finally, adaptive latitudinal variations in flight-related traits in D. melanogaster are consistent with results of other studies from different continents despite differences due to specific climatic conditions in the Indian subcontinent.

  11. Quantitative genetic analysis of brain size variation in sticklebacks: support for the mosaic model of brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreikiene, Kristina; Herczeg, Gábor; Gonda, Abigél; Balázs, Gergely; Husby, Arild; Merilä, Juha

    2015-07-07

    The mosaic model of brain evolution postulates that different brain regions are relatively free to evolve independently from each other. Such independent evolution is possible only if genetic correlations among the different brain regions are less than unity. We estimated heritabilities, evolvabilities and genetic correlations of relative size of the brain, and its different regions in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). We found that heritabilities were low (average h(2) = 0.24), suggesting a large plastic component to brain architecture. However, evolvabilities of different brain parts were moderate, suggesting the presence of additive genetic variance to sustain a response to selection in the long term. Genetic correlations among different brain regions were low (average rG = 0.40) and significantly less than unity. These results, along with those from analyses of phenotypic and genetic integration, indicate a high degree of independence between different brain regions, suggesting that responses to selection are unlikely to be severely constrained by genetic and phenotypic correlations. Hence, the results give strong support for the mosaic model of brain evolution. However, the genetic correlation between brain and body size was high (rG = 0.89), suggesting a constraint for independent evolution of brain and body size in sticklebacks.

  12. Within-clutch variation in offspring sex determined by differences in sire body size: cryptic mate choice in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calsbeek, Ryan; Sinervo, Barry

    2004-03-01

    Sexual selection theory predicts that paternal quality should drive female investment in progeny. We tested whether polyandrous female side-blotched lizards, Uta stansburiana, would adjust within-clutch progeny investment according to sire phenotypes. In two different years, polyandrous females selectively used sperm from larger sires to produce sons and used sperm from smaller sires to produce daughters. This cryptic sperm choice had significant effects on progeny survival to maturity that were consistent with sexually antagonistic effects associated with sire body size. Large sires produced sons with high viability and small sires produced daughters with high viability. These results are consistent with our previous findings that alleles for male body size have different fitness effects in male and female progeny. Breeding experiments in the laboratory indicate that results from the wild are more likely due to female choice than biased sperm production by males. Our results demonstrate highly refined gender-specific female choice for sperm and indicate that sire body size may signal the quality of sons or daughters that a sire will produce.

  13. Chemical Composition, Seasonal Variation and Size distribution of Atmospheric Aerosols at an Alpine Site in Guanzhong Plain, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    PM10 and size-segregated aerosol samples were collected at Mt. Hua (2065 a.s.m) in central China, and determined for carbonaceous fraction, ions and organic composition. The concentration of most chemical compositions in summer are lower than those in winter, due to decreased emissions of biomass and coal burning for house heating. High temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions are favorable for secondary aerosol formation, resulting in higher concentrations of SO42- and NH4+ in summer. Non-dehydrated sugars are increased in summer because of the enhanced metabolism. Carbon preference index results indicate that n-alkanes at Mt. Hua are derived mostly by plant wax. Low Benzo(a)pyrene/Benzo(a)pyrene ratios indicate that mountain aerosols are more aged. Concentrations of biogenic (BSOA, the isoprene/pinene/caryophyllene oxidation products) and anthropogenic (ASOA, mainly aromatic acids) SOA positively correlated with temperature . However, a decreasing trend of BSOA concentration with an increase in RH was observed during the sampling period, although a clear trend between ASOA and RH was not found. Based on the AIM Model calculation, we found that during the sampling period an increase in RH resulted in a decrease in the aerosol acidity and thus reduced the effect of acid-catalysis on BSOA formation. Size distributions of K+ and NH4+ present as an accumulation mode, in contrast to Ca2+ and Mg2+, which are mainly existed in coarse particles. SO42- and NO3- show a bimodal pattern. Dehydrated sugars, fossil fuel derived n-alkanes and PAHs presented unimode size distribution, whereas non-dehydrated sugars and plant wax derived n-alkanes showed bimodal pattern. Most of the determined BSOA are formed in the aerosol phase and enriched in the fine mode except for cis-pinonic acid, which is formed in the gas phase and subsequently partitioned into aerosol phase and thus presents a bimodal pattern with a major peak in the coarse mode.

  14. Long-term resource variation and group size: A large-sample field test of the Resource Dispersion Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morecroft Michael D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Resource Dispersion Hypothesis (RDH proposes a mechanism for the passive formation of social groups where resources are dispersed, even in the absence of any benefits of group living per se. Despite supportive modelling, it lacks empirical testing. The RDH predicts that, rather than Territory Size (TS increasing monotonically with Group Size (GS to account for increasing metabolic needs, TS is constrained by the dispersion of resource patches, whereas GS is independently limited by their richness. We conducted multiple-year tests of these predictions using data from the long-term study of badgers Meles meles in Wytham Woods, England. The study has long failed to identify direct benefits from group living and, consequently, alternative explanations for their large group sizes have been sought. Results TS was not consistently related to resource dispersion, nor was GS consistently related to resource richness. Results differed according to data groupings and whether territories were mapped using minimum convex polygons or traditional methods. Habitats differed significantly in resource availability, but there was also evidence that food resources may be spatially aggregated within habitat types as well as between them. Conclusions This is, we believe, the largest ever test of the RDH and builds on the long-term project that initiated part of the thinking behind the hypothesis. Support for predictions were mixed and depended on year and the method used to map territory borders. We suggest that within-habitat patchiness, as well as model assumptions, should be further investigated for improved tests of the RDH in the future.

  15. Bailing Out the Milky Way: Variation in the Properties of Massive Dwarfs Among Galaxy-Sized Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Purcell, Chris W

    2012-01-01

    Recent kinematical constraints on the internal densities of the Milky Way's dwarf satellites have revealed a discrepancy with the subhalo populations of simulated Galaxy-scale halos in the standard CDM model of hierarchical structure formation. This has been dubbed the "too big to fail" problem, with reference to the improbability of large and invisible companions existing in the Galactic environment. In this paper, we argue that both the Milky Way observations and simulated subhalos are consistent with the predictions of the standard model for structure formation. Specifically, we show that there is significant variation in the properties of subhalos among distinct host halos of fixed mass and suggest that this can reasonably account for the deficit of dense satellites in the Milky Way. We exploit well-tested analytic techniques to predict the properties in a large sample of distinct host halos with a variety of masses spanning the range expected of the Galactic halo. The analytic model produces subhalo popu...

  16. Spatial and temporal variation in size of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) sexual organs and its use in pollution and climate change studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Born, Erik W; Riget, Frank F; Leifsson, Pall S; Bechshøft, Thea Ø; Kirkegaard, Maja

    2007-11-15

    Sexual organs and their development are susceptible to atmospheric transported environmental xenoendocrine pollutants and climate change (food availability). We therefore investigated sexual organs from 55 male and 44 female East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus) to obtain information about growth/size and sexual maturity. Then, the genitalia size was compared with those previously reported from Canadian and Svalbard polar bears. Growth models showed that East Greenland male polar bears reached sexual maturity around 7 years of age and females around 4 years of age. When comparing East Greenland and Svalbard polar bears, the size of baculum and uterus were significantly lower in the East Greenland polar bears (ANOVA: all p baculum mean values from Canadian polar bears, a similar baculum pattern was found for East Greenland vs. Canadian polar bears. It is speculated whether this could be a result of the general high variation in polar bear body size, temporal distribution patterns of anthropogenic long-range transported persistent organic pollutants or climate change (decreasing food availability). The present investigation represents conservation and background data for future spatial and temporal assessments of hunting, pollution and climate change scenarios.

  17. Comparing the effects of nanosilver size and coating variations on bioavailability, internalization, and elimination, using Lumbriculus variegatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jessica G; Kennedy, Alan J; Bednar, Anthony J; Ranville, James F; Laird, Jennifer G; Harmon, Ashley R; Hayes, Charolett A; Gray, Evan P; Higgins, Christopher P; Lotufo, Guilherme; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2013-09-01

    As the production and applications of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) increase, it is essential to characterize fate and effects in environmental systems. Nanosilver materials may settle from suspension; therefore, the authors' objective was to utilize environmentally relevant bioassays and study the impact, bioaccumulation, tissue distribution, uptake, and depuration of AgNPs on a sediment-dwelling invertebrate, Lumbriculus variegatus. Hydrodynamic diameters of uncoated 30-nm, 80-nm, and 1500-nm AgNP powders and a polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) AgNP suspension were measured utilizing dynamic light scattering in freshwater media (0-280 µS/cm). Aggregation for 30 nm, 80 nm, and 1500 nm silver increased with conductivity but was minimal for PVP silver. Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed to AgNPs or silver nitrate (AgNO3 ) spiked into sediment (nominally 100 mg/kg) and water (PVP 30 nm and 70 nm Ag, nominally 5 mg/L). Uptake was assessed through inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and hyperspectral imaging. Particle sizes were examined through field flow fractionation-ICP-MS (FFF-ICP-MS) and ICP-MS in single particle mode (SP-ICP-MS). Lumbriculus variegatus were also depurated for 6 h, 8 h, 24 h, and 48 h to determine gut clearance. Bioaccumulation factors of sediment-exposed L. variegatus were similar regardless of particle size or coatings. The FFF-ICP-MS and SP-ICP-MS detected AgNPs for up to 48 h post depuration. The present study provides information on bioaccumulation and interactions of AgNPs within biological systems.

  18. Genetic variation in bone morphogenetic proteins and breast cancer risk in hispanic and non-hispanic white women: The breast cancer health disparities study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Martha L; John, Esther M; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Herrick, Jennifer S; Giuliano, Anna R; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Hines, Lisa M; Wolff, Roger K

    2013-06-15

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) are thought to be important in breast cancer promotion and progression. We evaluated genetic variation in BMP-related genes and breast cancer risk among Hispanic (2,111 cases, 2,597 controls) and non-Hispanic White (NHW) (1,481 cases, 1,586 controls) women who participated in the 4-Corner's Breast Cancer Study, the Mexico Breast Cancer Study and the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study. BMP genes and their receptors evaluated include ACVR1, AVCR2A, ACVR2B, ACVRL1, BMP1, BMP2, BMP4, BMP6, BMP7, BMPR1A, BMPR1B, BMPR2, MSTN and GDF10. Additionally, 104 ancestral informative markers were assessed to discriminate between European and native American ancestry. The importance of estrogen on BMP-related associations was suggested through unique associations by menopausal status and estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor status of tumors. After adjustment for multiple comparisons ACVR1 (8 SNPs) was modestly associated with ER+PR+ tumors [odds ratios (ORs) between 1.18 and 1.39 padj breast cancer in this admixed population.

  19. Bone Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Biopsy Bone biopsy uses a needle and imaging ... the limitations of Bone Biopsy? What is a Bone Biopsy? A bone biopsy is an image-guided ...

  20. Seasonal Variation of Fungal Spores in Size-fractionated Ambient Particulate Matter in Beijing, China, Based on Molecular Tracer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L.; Engling, G.; He, K.

    2015-12-01

    Fungal aerosols were found to be the dominant fraction of biological aerosol components in the coarse mode in the atmosphere, influencing human health, the biosphere, atmospheric chemistry and climate. However, the total abundance of fungal spores in the atmosphere is rather uncertain and likely underestimated to a large extent by traditional Colony Forming Units (CFU) assays. Flow cytometry (FCM) was utilized in combination with fluorescent stains for the rapid counting of ambient fungal spores in this study. And, the sugar alcohols, mannitol and arabitol, proposed as molecular tracers for fungal aerosol were measured in PM2.5 and PM10 at an urban site in Beijing, China. The annual average concentrations of arabitol in PM2.5 and PM10 at the urban site were 7.4±9.4 ng m-3 and 21.0±20.4 ng m-3, and the respective mannitol concentrations were 10.3±9.5 ng m-3 and 31.9±26.9 ng m-3. Compared to PM2.5, the seasonal average concentrations of arabitol and mannitol in PM10 were varied more significantly. During summer and autumn higher arabitol and mannitol levels than during spring and winter were observed in coarse particles. Statistics analysis was further grouped into typical dry season (December 2010 to March 2011) and typical wet season (July 2011 to September 2011), revealed the different variation of fungal spores in different seasons. Moreover, the FCM results had significant positive correlation with the concentrations of the fungal tracers (R2 was 0.75 and 0.70 for arabitol and mannitol, respectively), supporting the utility of these sugar alcohols as effective fungal tracers.

  1. [Particle Size Distribution, Seasonal Variation Characteristics and Human Exposure Assessment of Heavy Metals in Typical Settled Dust from Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhi-guo; Yu, Gang; Lü, Xiang-ying; Wang, Meng-lei; Li, Qi-lu; Feng, Jing-lan; Yan, Guang-xuan; Yu, Hao; Sun, Jian-hui

    2016-04-15

    Four types of dust from dormitories, offices, hotels and roads in Beijing were collected and fractionated into 9 fractions, respectively. Totally 36 samples were obtained and analyzed for heavy metals including Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb, Cd and Ni. Particle size distributions of those heavy metals in these four types of dust were investigated and the influencing mechanisms were discussed. Distribution patterns of the same heavy metal in different types of dust showed various characteristics. Also different metals in the same type of dust represented different distribution patterns. Heavy metals in road dust tended to concentrate in finer particles. Two offices from the same building, located in Beijing, China, were selected to study the seasonality of heavy metals in dust. Dust sampling from Office A was conducted at weekly intervals between March 2012 and August 2012, while dust from Office B was sampled fortnightly from March 2012 to December 2012. Generally, levels of all heavy metals remained stable among different seasons, however, Cr and Pb represented more significant fluctuations than other four heavy metals. Based on the geo-accumulation index method, the pollution of Zn, Cu and Pb was more serious in the investigated samples, and dust from offices and hotels were moderately polluted by Zn. According to the risk assessment results, the carcinogenic health risks of the six heavy metals in the four types of dust were negligible.

  2. Architecture of the subendothelial elastic fibers of small blood vessels and variations in vascular type and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinaoka, Akira; Momota, Ryusuke; Shiratsuchi, Eri; Kosaka, Mitsuko; Kumagishi, Kanae; Nakahara, Ryuichi; Naito, Ichiro; Ohtsuka, Aiji

    2013-04-01

    Most blood vessels contain elastin that provides the vessels with the resilience and flexibility necessary to control hemodynamics. Pathophysiological hemodynamic changes affect the remodeling of elastic components, but little is known about their structural properties. The present study was designed to elucidate, in detail, the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of delicate elastic fibers in small vessels, and to reveal their architectural pattern in a rat model. The fine vascular elastic components were observed by a newly developed scanning electron microscopy technique using a formic acid digestion with vascular casts. This method successfully visualized the 3D architecture of elastic fibers in small blood vessels, even arterioles and venules. The subendothelial elastic fibers in such small vessels assemble into a sheet of meshwork running longitudinally, while larger vessels have a higher density of mesh and thicker mesh fibers. The quantitative analysis revealed that arterioles had a wider range of mesh density than venules; the ratio of density to vessel size was higher than that in venules. The new method was useful for evaluating the subendothelial elastic fibers of small vessels and for demonstrating differences in the architecture of different types of vessels.

  3. Population variation and individual maximum size in two leech populations: energy extraction from cannibalism or niche widening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Lennart; Elliott, J Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    The theory of cannibal dynamics predicts a link between population dynamics and individual life history. In particular, increased individual growth has, in both modeling and empirical studies, been shown to result from a destabilization of population dynamics. We used data from a long-term study of the dynamics of two leech (Erpobdella octoculata) populations to test the hypothesis that maximum size should be higher in a cycling population; one of the study populations exhibited a delayed feedback cycle while the other population showed no sign of cyclicity. A hump-shaped relationship between individual mass of 1-year-old leeches and offspring density the previous year was present in both populations. As predicted from the theory, the maximum mass of individuals was much larger in the fluctuating population. In contrast to predictions, the higher growth rate was not related to energy extraction from cannibalism. Instead, the higher individual mass is suggested to be due to increased availability of resources due to a niche widening with increased individual body mass. The larger individual mass in the fluctuating population was related to a stronger correlation between the densities of 1-year-old individuals and 2-year-old individuals the following year in this population. Although cannibalism was the major mechanism regulating population dynamics, its importance was negligible in terms of providing cannibalizing individuals with energy subsequently increasing their fecundity. Instead, the study identifies a need for theoretical and empirical studies on the largely unstudied interplay between ontogenetic niche shifts and cannibalistic population dynamics.

  4. Variation of the interphase heterochromatin in Artemia (Crustacea, Anostraca of the Americas is related to changes in nuclear size and ionic composition of hipersaline habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parraguez

    Full Text Available Abstract The populations of Artemia (or brine shrimp from the Americas exhibit a wide variation in the amount of interphase heterochromatin. There is interest in understanding how this variation affects different parameters, from the cellular to the organismal levels. This should help to clarify the ability of this organism to tolerate brine habitats regularly subject to strong abiotic changes. In this study, we assessed the amount of interphase heterochromatin per nucleus based on chromocenter number (N-CHR and relative area of chromocenter (R-CHR in two species of Artemia, A. franciscana (Kellog, 1906 (n=9 populations and A. persimilis (Piccinelli and Prosdocimi, 1968 (n=3 populations, to investigate the effect on nuclear size (S-NUC. The relationship of the R-CHR parameter with the ionic composition (IC of brine habitats was also analysed. Our results indicate a significant variation in the amount of heterochromatin both within and between species (ANOVA, p0.05. The R-CHR and IC parameters were associated significantly for the magnesium ion (r= 0.496, p<0.05 and also for the chloride, sodium and calcium ions (r = from -0.705 to -0.478, p<0.05. At species level, a significant association between both parameters was also found in A. franciscana populations, for the sulphate and calcium ions, in contrast to A. persimilis. These findings suggest that the amount of interphase heterochromatin modifies the nuclear size in Artemia. Our data also indicate that change in the amount of interphase heterochromatin is in line with the ionic composition of brines. This would be a species-specific phenomenon, whose occurrence may be involved in the ability of this organism to survive in these environments.

  5. Suspended particulate variations and mass size distributions of incense burning at Tzu Yun Yen temple in Taiwan, Taichung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Chang, Cheng-Nan; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Yang, Chang-Ju; Chang, Shyh-Chyi; Yang, I-Lin

    2002-11-01

    Ambient suspended particulate concentrations were measured at Tzu Yun Yen temple in this study. This is characteristic place of incense burning and indoor air pollution sampling site. A universal sampler, micro-orifice uniform deposited impactor (MOUDI) sampler and dry deposition plate were used to measure particulate concentrations. Tzu Yun Yen temple is a typical famous Buddhist-Taoist combined temple, where many pilgrims come from different areas and various belief systems indicating the eclecticism of the temple. The average number of people visiting this temple is above 5000 per day. The PM2.5/PM10 ratios ranged between 31.2 and 87.4% and averaged 69.6+/-12.3% during the incense-burning period, respectively. The results also demonstrated that the fine particulates concentrations (PM2.5) constituted the majority of indoor-suspended particulates at Tzu Yun Yen temple. PM10 concentration was 110.1 microg m(-3) for Zhong Yuan Jie (A festival on the seventh full moon in a lunar year, otherwise known as a summer lantern festival and (or) the commemoration of the dead. Almost all temples have maximum pilgrims for the commemoration of the dead on this day.) and the 1st or 15th of nong li (Nong li is a Chinese lunar calendar system in which 1 year is divided into fixed periods, and the beginning and end of a year is determined. The new moon and full moon are the 1st and 15th, respectively of each month in the Chinese lunar calendar. Many pilgrims appeared at each temple for blessing and good luck for themselves on the 1st and 15th of each Chinese lunar month.) with numbers higher than non-Zhong Yuan Jie and non-1st or -15th day of nong li (average = 85.5 microg m(-3)). In general, the average dry deposition flux (49.4 mg m(-2) day(-1)) in the indoor environment is lower than those measured in the outdoor environment (184.0 mg m(-2) day(-1)) in this study. The mean dry deposition flux of indoor/outdoor ratio was 46.2%. The average mass size distributions were bimodal

  6. The implications for dust emission modeling of spatial and vertical variations in horizontal dust flux and particle size in the Bodélé Depression, Northern Chad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Warren, Andrew; O'Donoghue, Alice; Robinson, Andrea; Thomas, Andrew; Bristow, Charlie

    2008-02-01

    The Bodélé Depression has been confirmed as the single largest source of atmospheric mineral dust on Earth. It is a distinctive source because of its large exposure of diatomite and the presence of mega-barchan dunes. Direct measurements of horizontal dust flux and particle size were made to investigate dust emission processes and for comparison with mechanisms of emission assumed in current dust models. More than 50 masts, with traps mounted on each, were located across and downwind of three barchans in 56 km2 study area of the eastern Bodélé. The size-distribution of surface material is bi-modal; there are many fine dust modes and a mixed mineralogy with a particle density three times smaller than quartz. Horizontal fluxes (up to 70 m above the playa) of particles, up to 1000 μm in diameter, are produced frequently from the accelerated flow over and around the barchans, even in below-threshold shear conditions on the diatomite playa. Our data on dust sizes do not conform to retrievals of dust size distributions from radiance measurements made in the same area. Dust emission models for the region may need to be revised to account for: saltators in the Bodélé, which are a mixture of quartz sand and diatomite flakes; the great spatial and vertical variation in the abundance, mass and density of dust and abraders; and the patterns of surface erodibility. All of these have important local effects on the vertical dust flux and its particle sizes.

  7. Water-soluble ions in atmospheric aerosols measured in five sites in the Yangtze River Delta, China: Size-fractionated, seasonal variations and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honglei; Zhu, Bin; Shen, Lijuan; Xu, Honghui; An, Junlin; Xue, Guoqiang; Cao, Jinfei

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate the regional variations of water-soluble ions (WSIs), size-resolved measurement of aerosol particles and WSIs was conducted by using Anderson Sampler and Ion Chromatography at five sites (Nanjing, Suzhou, Lin'an, Hangzhou and Ningbo) in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region, China in the Autumn of 2012 and Winter, Spring and Summer of 2013. WSIs exhibited obvious seasonal variations due to the monsoon conversion, with the highest level in winter and lowest level in summer. The aerosol mass concentrations and WSIs in different size segments varied with four seasons. The dominant ions concentrations in PM2.1 ranked in the order of SO42- > NO3- > NH4+ > Cl- > K+ > Ca2+, and the dominant ions concentrations in PM2.1-10 ranked in the order of Ca2+ > NO3- > SO42- > Cl- > NH4+ > Na+. The size spectra of mass and WSIs concentration peaked mostly at 0.43-0.65 μm in four seasons. The concentration discrepancies of WSIs in different cities were caused by the geographic locations and emission source. It's belonged to ammonium-rich distribution in PM2.1 and ammonium-poor distribution in PM2.1-10 in the YRD region. The impact of temperature on mass concentrations of NO3- and NH4+ in PM2.1 were stronger than those in PM2.1-10. PCA analysis shows that the sources of WSIs dominant by anthropogenic sources, soil particles or falling dust, sea salt and burning process.

  8. Bone mineral density measurement and osteoporosis treatment after a fragility fracture in older adults: regional variation and determinants of use in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégoire Jean-Pierre

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoporosis (OP is a skeletal disorder characterized by reduced bone strength and predisposition to increased risk of fracture, with consequent increased risk of morbidity and mortality. It is therefore an important public health problem. International and Canadian associations have issued clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of OP. In this study, we identified potential predictors of bone mineral density (BMD testing and OP treatment, which include place of residence. Methods Our study was a retrospective population-based cohort study using data from the Quebec Health Insurance Board. The studied population consisted of all individuals 65 years and older for whom a physician claimed a consultation for a low velocity vertebral, hip, wrist, or humerus fracture in 1999 and 2000. Individuals were considered to have undergone BMD testing if there was a claim for such a procedure within two years following a fracture. They were considered to have received an OP treatment if there was at least one claim to Quebec's health insurance plan (RAMQ for OP treatment within one year following a fracture. We performed descriptive analyses and logistic regressions by gender. Predictors included age, site of fracture, social status, comorbidity index, prior BMD testing, prior OP treatment, long-term glucocorticoid use, and physical distance to BMD device. Results The cohort, 77% of which was female, consisted of 25,852 individuals with fragility fractures. BMD testing and OP treatment rates were low and gender dependent (BMD: men 4.6%; women 13.1%; OP treatment: men 9.9%; women 29.7%. There was an obvious regional variation, particularly in BMD testing, ranging from 0 to 16%. Logistic regressions demonstrate that individuals living in long term care facilities received less BMD testing. Patients who had suffered from vertebral fractures, or who had received prior OP treatment or BMD testing, regardless of gender, subsequently

  9. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Densitometry (DEXA) Bone densitometry, also called dual-energy ... limitations of DEXA Bone Densitometry? What is a Bone Density Scan (DEXA)? Bone density scanning, also called ...

  10. Androgens and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderschueren, Dirk; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Boonen, Steven; Lindberg, Marie K; Bouillon, Roger; Ohlsson, Claes

    2004-06-01

    Loss of estrogens or androgens increases the rate of bone remodeling by removing restraining effects on osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, and also causes a focal imbalance between resorption and formation by prolonging the lifespan of osteoclasts and shortening the lifespan of osteoblasts. Conversely, androgens, as well as estrogens, maintain cancellous bone mass and integrity, regardless of age or sex. Although androgens, via the androgen receptor (AR), and estrogens, via the estrogen receptors (ERs), can exert these effects, their relative contribution remains uncertain. Recent studies suggest that androgen action on cancellous bone depends on (local) aromatization of androgens into estrogens. However, at least in rodents, androgen action on cancellous bone can be directly mediated via AR activation, even in the absence of ERs. Androgens also increase cortical bone size via stimulation of both longitudinal and radial growth. First, androgens, like estrogens, have a biphasic effect on endochondral bone formation: at the start of puberty, sex steroids stimulate endochondral bone formation, whereas they induce epiphyseal closure at the end of puberty. Androgen action on the growth plate is, however, clearly mediated via aromatization in estrogens and interaction with ERalpha. Androgens increase radial growth, whereas estrogens decrease periosteal bone formation. This effect of androgens may be important because bone strength in males seems to be determined by relatively higher periosteal bone formation and, therefore, greater bone dimensions, relative to muscle mass at older age. Experiments in mice again suggest that both the AR and ERalpha pathways are involved in androgen action on radial bone growth. ERbeta may mediate growth-limiting effects of estrogens in the female but does not seem to be involved in the regulation of bone size in males. In conclusion, androgens may protect men against osteoporosis via maintenance of cancellous bone mass and

  11. Common Genetic Variation in the DKK1 Gene is Associated with Hip Axis Length but not with Bone Mineral Density and Bone Turnover Markers in Young Adult Men: Results from the Odense Androgen Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piters, Elke; Balemans, Wendy; Nielsen, Torben Leo

    2010-01-01

    LRP5 was recently confirmed as an important susceptibility gene for osteoporosis. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of DKK1 polymorphisms on bone mineral density (BMD), hip geometry, and bone turnover. DKK1 is a secreted protein that binds to LRP5/6 receptors and inhibits canonical Wnt...

  12. Size variation in Tachyoryctes splendens (East African mole-rat) and its implications for late Quaternary temperature change in equatorial East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, J. Tyler; Patterson, David B.; Blegen, Nick; O'Neill, Chris J.; Marean, Curtis W.; Peppe, Daniel J.; Tryon, Christian A.

    2016-05-01

    This study develops a new proxy for Quaternary temperature change in tropical Africa through analysis of size variation in East African mole-rat (Tachyoryctes splendens). In modern mole-rats, mandibular alveolar length is unrelated to annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality, temperature seasonality, or primary productivity. However, it is inversely correlated with mean annual temperature, in agreement with Bergmann's rule. This relationship is observed at temperatures below ˜17.3 °C, but not at higher temperatures. We apply these observations to late Quaternary mole-rats from Wakondo (˜100 ka) and Kisaaka (˜50 ka) in the Lake Victoria region and Enkapune ya Muto (EYM; ˜7.2-3.2 ka) in Kenya's central rift. The Lake Victoria mole-rats are larger than expected for populations from warm climates typical of the area today, implying cooler temperatures in the past. The magnitude of temperature decline needed to drive the size shift is substantial (˜4-6 °C), similar in magnitude to the degree of change between the Last Glacial Maximum and Holocene, but is consistent with regional temperature records and with scenarios linking equatorial African temperature to northern hemisphere summer insolation. Size changes through time at EYM indicate that rising temperatures during the middle Holocene accompanied and potentially contributed to a decline in Lake Naivasha and expansion of grassland vegetation.

  13. Molecular Characterization of Bovine SMO Gene and Effects of Its Genetic Variations on Body Size Traits in Qinchuan Cattle (Bos taurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-Ran; Gui, Lin-Sheng; Li, Yao-Kun; Jiang, Bi-Jie; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zan, Lin-Sen

    2015-07-27

    Smoothened (Smo)-mediated Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway governs the patterning, morphogenesis and growth of many different regions within animal body plans. This study evaluated the effects of genetic variations of the bovine SMO gene on economically important body size traits in Chinese Qinchuan cattle. Altogether, eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: 1-8) were identified and genotyped via direct sequencing covering most of the coding region and 3'UTR of the bovine SMO gene. Both the p.698Ser.>Ser. synonymous mutation resulted from SNP1 and the p.700Ser.>Pro. non-synonymous mutation caused by SNP2 mapped to the intracellular C-terminal tail of bovine Smo protein; the other six SNPs were non-coding variants located in the 3'UTR. The linkage disequilibrium was analyzed, and five haplotypes were discovered in 520 Qinchuan cattle. Association analyses showed that SNP2, SNP3/5, SNP4 and SNP6/7 were significantly associated with some body size traits (p 0.05). Meanwhile, cattle with wild-type combined haplotype Hap1/Hap1 had significantly (p cattle, and the wild-type haplotype Hap1 together with the wild-type alleles of these detected SNPs in the SMO gene could be used to breed cattle with superior body size traits. Therefore, our results could be helpful for marker-assisted selection in beef cattle breeding programs.

  14. Wing size and shape variation of Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae) populations from the south and north slopes of the Atlas Mountains in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudhomme, Jorian; Gunay, Filiz; Rahola, Nil; Ouanaimi, Fouad; Guernaoui, Souad; Boumezzough, Ali; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Sereno, Denis; Alten, Bulent

    2012-06-01

    The wing shape and size morphology of populations of the medically important phlebotomine sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi, were examined in two endemic (south of the Atlas Mountains) and nonendemic (north of the Atlas Mountains) foci of cutaneous leishmaniasis by using geometric morphometrics in Morocco. Although it is present in all of Morocco, P. papatasi is the main vector of Leishmania major in only southern part of the Atlas Mountains. There are four major mountain ranges that serve as geographical barriers for species distribution in the study area and at least four gaps were recognized among these barriers. We found statistically significant differences in wing shape morphology between southern and northern populations. Analysis clearly recognized two main groups of populations on both sides of the mountains. The graphical depiction of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Canonical Variates Analysis (CVA) confirmed our morphometric study suggesting that the difference in wing morphology between the populations indicates that the population of P. papatasi shows phenotypic plasticity in the study area. According to centroid size analyses, which were used as measures of wing size differences among different sites, the north population of P. papatasi had relatively larger wings than the south population.

  15. Reengineering multi tiered enterprise business applications for performance enhancement and reciprocal or rectangular hyperbolic relation of variation of data transportation time with row pre-fetch size of relational database drivers

    CERN Document Server

    Sowmiyanarayanan, Sridhar

    2012-01-01

    Reengineering multi tiered enterprise business applications for performance enhancement and reciprocal or rectangular hyperbolic relation of variation of data transportation time with row pre-fetch size of relational database drivers

  16. Hexadentate hydroxypyridonate iron chelators based on TREN-Me-3,2-HOPO: variation of cap size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jide; O'Sullivan, Brendon; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2002-12-16

    TREN-Me-3,2-HOPO, TR322-Me-3,2-HOPO, TR332-Me-3,2-HOPO, and TRPN-Me-3,2-HOPO correspond to stepwise replacement of ethylene by propylene bridges. A series of tripodal, hexadentate hydroxypyridinone ligands are reported. These incorporate 1-methyl-3,2-hydroxypyridinone (Me-3,2-HOPO) bidentate chelating units for metal binding. They are varied by systematic enlargement of the capping scaffold which connects the binding units. The series of ligands and their iron complexes are reported. Single crystal X-ray structures are reported for the ferric complexes of all four tripodal ligands: FeTREN-Me-3,2-HOPO.0.375C(4)H(10)O.0.5CH(2)Cl(2) [P2(1)/n (No. 14), Z = 8, a = 20.478(3) A, b = 12.353(2) A, c = 27.360(3) A; beta = 91.60(1) degrees ]; FeTR322-Me-3,2-HOPO.CHCl(3).0.5C(6)H(14).CH(3)OH.0.5H(2)O [P2(1)/n (No. 14), Z = 4, a = 12.520(3) A, b = 22.577(5) A, c = 16.525(3) A; beta = 111.37(3) degrees ]; FeTR332-Me-3,2-HOPO.3.5CH(3)OH [C2/c (No. 15), Z = 8, a = 13.5294(3) A, b = 19.7831(4) A, c = 27.2439(4) A; beta = 101.15(3) degrees ]; FeTRPN-Me-3,2-HOPO.C(3)H(7)NO.2C(4)H(10)O [P1 (No. 2), Z = 2, a = 11.4891(2) A, b = 12.3583(2) A, c = 15.0473(2) A; alpha = 86.857(1) degrees, beta = 88.414(1) degrees, gamma = 70.124(1) degrees ]. The structures show the importance of intermolecular hydrogen bonds and the effect of cap enlargement to the stability and geometry of the metal complexes throughout the series. All protonation and iron complex formation constants have been determined from solution thermodynamic studies. The TREN-capped derivative is the most acidic, with a cumulative protonation constant, log beta(014), of 25.95. Corresponding values of 26.35, 26.93, and 27.53 were obtained for the TR322, TR332, and TRPN derivatives, respectively. The protonation constants and NMR spectroscopic data are interpreted as being due to the influence of specific hydrogen-bond interactions. The incremental enlargement of ligand size results in a decrease in iron-chelate stability, as

  17. Deciphering Seasonal Variations of Diet and Water in Modern White-Tailed Deer by In Situ Analysis of Osteons in Cortical Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, T. E.; Longstaffe, F. J.

    2004-12-01

    In situ stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of biogenic apatite were obtained from longitudinally-cut sections of cortical bone from femurs of modern domesticated sheep and free-range White-Tailed deer, using an IR-laser and a GC-continuous flow interface. Ablation pits averaged 200x50 microns, making it possible to analyze individual osteons. Since cortical bone is remodelled along osteons throughout a mammal's lifetime, isotopic data at this resolution provides information about seasonal variations in diet and drinking water. The O-isotope results were calibrated using laser analyses of NBS-18 and NBS-19, which produced a value of 26.39±0.46 permil (n=27) for WS-1 calcite (accepted value, 26.25 permil). C-isotope results were calibrated using a CO2 reference gas, producing a value of 0.76±0.40permil (n=27) for WS-1, also in excellent agreement with its accepted value of 0.74 permil. Average O- and C-isotope values for a local domestic sheep (southwestern Ontario, Canada) were 12.20±0.58 and -15.70±0.35 permil (n=27), respectively. No isotopic trend occurred along or across individual osteons. This pattern is consistent with the sheep's relatively unchanging food and water sources. The free-range White-Tailed deer came from Pinery Provincial Park (PPP), southwestern Ontario. Its O- and C-isotope compositions varied systematically across individual osteons and were negatively correlated (R2=0.56). O-isotope values ranged from 13.4 to 15.5 permil; the highest values correlated with summer and the lowest values, with winter. The O-isotope compositions of the main water source (Old Ausable River Channel) varied similarly during the deer's lifetime: winter average, -10.7±0.5 permil; summer average, -8.6±0.4 permil. The C-isotope results for the deer osteons varied from -19.7 to -15.9 permil. This variation can be explained by changes in food sources. Summer diets of deer in PPP consist mainly of leafy fractions of C3 vegetation, especially sumac, cedar

  18. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF GENETIC EROSION IN THE PROCESS OF EXTINCTION .2. MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATION AND FITNESS COMPONENTS IN POPULATIONS OF VARYING SIZE OF SALVIA-PRATENSIS L AND SCABIOSA-COLUMBARIA L

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OUBORG, NJ; VANTREUREN, R; VANDAMME, JMM

    1991-01-01

    The amount of genetic variation within a population is, among other things, related to population size. In small populations loss of genetic variation due to high levels of genetic drift and inbreeding may result in decline of individual fitness and increase the chance of population extinction. This

  19. STUDY ON VARIATIONS OF SHAPE, SIZE, LOCATION AND POSITION OF MENTAL FORAMEN AND INCIDENCE OF ACCESSORY MENTAL FORAMEN IN HUMAN MANDIBLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM AND OBJECTIVE The present study was conducted with an objective to determine the size, shape, location, position and number of Mental Foramen (MF and Accessory Mental Foramen (AMF on both sides of mandible and incidence of MF and AMF with respect to the surgically encountered important anatomical landmarks and compare with the findings of available literatures. METHODS AND MATERIALS The study was conducted on 50 dry adult human mandibles of unknown sex and age obtained from the Department of Anatomy of Regional Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS, Imphal, Manipur, India. The shape, size, location and position of MF were measured on both sides of mandible by using Digital Vernier Caliper. RESULTS Mental foramen was present in all 50 mandibles and it was bilateral and the incidence of AMF was observed in only four mandibles (8%. In the present study, the round shape MF was observed in 17.05% and the oval shape of MF in 82.95%. Average size of AMF was 1.50 mm ranging from 1.00 mm to 2.00 mm. The location of the MF was found mostly below the apex of second premolar in 74.50 %, while it was 25.50% between the first and second premolars. CONCLUSION The knowledge about variations in size, shape, location and position of MF and presence of AMF will help the Dental Surgeons to determine accurate site of local anaesthesia and in avoiding injury to mental nerve and prevent unwanted spread of infections while performing periodontal or endodontic surgery.

  20. The effects of ion mass variation and domain size on octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field generation in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-15

    Graf von der Pahlen and Tsiklauri [Phys. Plasmas 21, 060705 (2014)] established that the generation of octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field structure in a stressed X-point collapse is due to ion currents. The field has a central region, comprising of the well-known quadrupolar field (quadrupolar components), as well as four additional poles of reversed polarity closer to the corners of the domain (octupolar components). In this extended work, the dependence of the octupolar structure on domain size and ion mass variation is investigated. Simulations show that the strength and spatial structure of the generated octupolar magnetic field is independent of ion to electron mass ratio; thus showing that ion currents play a significant role in out-of-plane magnetic structure generation in physically realistic scenarios. Simulations of different system sizes show that the width of the octupolar structure remains the same and has a spacial extent of the order of the ion inertial length. The width of the structure thus appears to be independent on boundary condition effects. The length of the octupolar structure, however, increases for greater domain sizes, prescribed by the external system size. This was found to be a consequence of the structure of the in-plane magnetic field in the outflow region halting the particle flow and thus terminating the in-plane currents that generate the out-of-plane field. The generation of octupolar magnetic field structure is also established in a tearing-mode reconnection scenario. The differences in the generation of the octupolar field and resulting qualitative differences between X-point collapse and tearing-mode are discussed.

  1. The role of nano-sized manganese coatings on bone char in removing arsenic(V) from solution: Implications for permeable reactive barrier technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; He, Lile; Dong, Faqin; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A

    2016-06-01

    Although the removal of arsenic(V) (As(V)) from solution can be improved by forming metal-bearing coatings on solid media, there has been no research to date examining the relationship between the coating and As(V) sorption performance. Manganese-coated bone char samples with varying concentrations of Mn were created to investigate the adsorption and desorption of As(V) using batch and column experiments. Breakthrough curves were obtained by fitting the Convection-Diffusion Equation (CDE), and retardation factors were used to quantify the effects of the Mn coatings on the retention of As(V). Uncoated bone char has a higher retention factor (44.7) than bone char with 0.465 mg/g of Mn (22.0), but bone char samples with between 5.02 mg/g and 14.5 mg/g Mn have significantly higher retention factors (56.8-246). The relationship between retardation factor (Y) and Mn concentration (X) is Y = 15.1 X + 19.8. Between 0.2% and 0.6% of the sorbed As is desorbed from the Mn-coated bone char at an initial pH value of 4, compared to 30% from the uncoated bone char. The ability of the Mn-coated bone char to neutralize solutions increases with increased amounts of Mn on the char. The results suggest that using Mn-coated bone char in Permeable Reactive Barriers would be an effective method for remediating As(V)-bearing solutions such as acid mine drainage.

  2. U-Th-Ra variations in Himalayan river sediments (Gandak river, India): Weathering fractionation and/or grain-size sorting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosia, Clio; Chabaux, François; Pelt, Eric; France-Lanord, Christian; Morin, Guillaume; Lavé, Jérôme; Stille, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the origin of U-Th-Ra variations in the Ganga river sediments is a prerequisite for correctly using U-series nuclides to constrain the sediment transport times in Himalayan rivers. For this purpose, U, Th, and Ra concentrations, along with 238U-234U-230Th-226Ra radioactive disequilibria, were analyzed in bank, bedload and suspended sediments from the Gandak river, one of the main tributaries of the Ganga river. The data confirm that U and Th budgets of the Himalayan sediments are significantly influenced by minor resistant minerals, such as zircon, garnet and Ti-bearing minerals, the dissolution of which required the use of a high-pressure acid digestion process. Most importantly, the results indicate that the variations in (238U/232Th) and (230Th/232Th) activity ratios and 238U-234U-230Th-226Ra disequilibria in sediments along the river alluvial plain mainly reflect modifications in the mineralogical and grain-size compositions rather than the degree of weathering during transport. The (238U/232Th) and (230Th/232Th) activity ratios in the bank and bed sediments are related to variations in the minor primary minerals strongly enriched in U and Th (i.e., zircon, REE-bearing minerals and Ti-bearing minerals), whereas the activity ratios in the suspended load are related to variations in the proportions of clay, Fe-oxyhydroxides and the silt-sand fraction, which contains U- and Th-bearing minor minerals. The data also indicate that 238U-234U-230Th-226Ra disequilibria are strongly influenced by secondary mineral phases: the 230Th budget is likely mainly controlled by Fe-oxyhydroxides, and the 226Ra budget is likely mainly controlled by clay minerals. Therefore, the variations in the 238U-234U-230Th-232Th system in the sediments of the Gandak river cannot simply be interpreted as the result of fractionation due to chemical transformation of the bulk sediment during its transport within the alluvial plain and/or the result of radioactive decay. Consequently

  3. Biological membrane for repair of different sizes of bone defects surrounding BLB implants%生物膜对不同范围BLB种植体周骨缺损修复的影像学观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟维艳; 周延民; 储顺礼; 杨立明; 蔡青

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:There is often space between implant and bone during immediate implantation.Whether biological membrane is needed to guide bone regeneration remains poorly understood.OBJECTIVE:To createdifferent sizes of space between femurand implantsindogs and to observe the effects of biological membrane on bone regeneration capacity of bone defects surrounding implants.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A self-control animal experiment was performed at the Laboratory Animal Center,Norman Bethune College of Medicine,Jilin University and School of Stomatology,Jilin University between March and December 2005.MATERIALS:BLB hydroxyapatite-coated implant was provided by Beijing Leiden Biomaterial Co.,Ltd.,China;BME-10X collagen membrane was purchased from Fujian Better Biotechnology Co..Ltd.,China.METHODS:BLB implants were installed in the bilateral proximal femoral bone to create standard gradient bone defects with horizontal width 3 mm.vertical depth 5 mm,and horizontal lengths of 0,1,2,3,and 4 mm Bone defects on the left femur were sutured directly and those on the right femur were covered with biological membrane prior to suture.All animals were sacrificed at 3 months after surgery.Specimens containing implants were harvested to prepare tissue blocks for radiological observation.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The quantity,color,and texture of newly formed bone surrounding implants were observed from the surface and profile levels.The implant-bone integration and new bone formation were also examined by soft X-ray photography.RESULTS:Grossobservation results revealed that when the horizontal length of bone defect was 3 mm or less,there was no significant differenee in bone density between the newly formed bone and the host bone no matter whether biological membrane existed or not;when the horizontal length of bone defect was 4 mm the bone density was better when biological membranes were used than not.Soft X-ray photography results revealed that when the horizontal length ofbone defect

  4. Variation in the Oral Processing of Everyday Meals Is Associated with Fullness and Meal Size; A Potential Nudge to Reduce Energy Intake?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Ferriday

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory studies have demonstrated that experimental manipulations of oral processing can have a marked effect on energy intake. Here, we explored whether variations in oral processing across a range of unmodified everyday meals could affect post-meal fullness and meal size. In Study 1, female participants (N = 12 attended the laboratory over 20 lunchtime sessions to consume a 400-kcal portion of a different commercially available pre-packaged meal. Prior to consumption, expected satiation was assessed. During each meal, oral processing was characterised using: (i video-recordings of the mouth and (ii real-time measures of plate weight. Hunger and fullness ratings were elicited pre- and post-consumption, and for a further three hours. Foods that were eaten slowly had higher expected satiation and delivered more satiation and satiety. Building on these findings, in Study 2 we selected two meals (identical energy density from Study 1 that were equally liked but maximised differences in oral processing. On separate days, male and female participants (N = 24 consumed a 400-kcal portion of either the “fast” or “slow” meal followed by an ad libitum meal (either the same food or a dessert. When continuing with the same food, participants consumed less of the slow meal. Further, differences in food intake during the ad libitum meal were not compensated at a subsequent snacking opportunity an hour later. Together, these findings suggest that variations in oral processing across a range of unmodified everyday meals can affect fullness after consuming a fixed portion and can also impact meal size. Modifying food form to encourage increased oral processing (albeit to a lesser extent than in experimental manipulations might represent a viable target for food manufacturers to help to nudge consumers to manage their weight.

  5. Quantifying the effects of genetic selection and genetic variation for body size, carcass composition, and meat quality in the domestic fowl (Gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandercock, D A; Nute, G R; Hocking, P M

    2009-05-01

    A multistrain experiment was conducted to quantify the extent of genetic differences in carcass and muscle yields, muscle quality, support organs, and taste panel assessments of cooked breast muscle of 296 birds from 37 lines of commercial broiler, layer, and traditional chickens. The birds were reared as broilers and 4 males from each line were slaughtered at 6 and 10 wk of age. The extent of genetic variation was measured as the intraclass correlation. The intraclass correlation for live weight; carcass yields; breast, drum, and wing portions; and associated muscle yields were high, whereas those for the thigh portion and yield were low. Broilers had more breast and thigh muscle but similar drum muscle as a proportion of carcass weight compared with layer and traditional lines. Genetic variation for muscle quality (plasma creatine kinase activity) was high; that for muscle color (L, a, and b) and hemorrhage score were moderate in size and were greater at 10 than at 6 wk of age. Broiler lines had greater creatine kinase activity indicative of greater muscle pathology; breast muscle was lighter, less red and yellow in color, and had a greater hemorrhage score than muscle from layer and traditional lines, which were similar. Intraclass correlations for taste panel scores were low and generally not significant except for texture, chicken flavor intensity, flavor liking, and overall liking at 6 wk of age. Significantly greater scores from broiler compared with layer and traditional lines for texture, chicken flavor intensity, and overall liking were observed. At 10 wk of age, chicken flavor intensity did not differ between broiler or layer birds but was significantly greater in both groups than traditional birds. Genetic variation for relative weight of abdominal fat, spleen, and heart was moderately high and greater at 10 than at 6 wk of age. Broiler carcasses had a relatively high proportion of abdominal fat and smaller spleen and heart weights.

  6. Pyrite framboid size distribution as a record for relative variations in sedimentation rate: An example on the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event in Southiberian Palaeomargin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Torres, David; Reolid, Matías; Nieto-Moreno, Vanesa; Martínez-Casado, Francisco Javier

    2015-12-01

    The Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) represents one of the major alterations of the carbon cycle of the Mesozoic period. Despite being globally recognized, and particularly represented within the Tethys realm, its expression in the sedimentary record is highly variable depending on the studied section, which suggests local environmental factors exert a major control on the resulting lithological appearance of the event. We investigated the Fuente Vidriera section, in the eastern External Subbetic of the Betic Cordillera (Spain), where the Lower Jurassic is represented by alternate layers of marls and marly limestones, and the T-OAE is identified by a major δ13C excursion, micropalaeontological, ichnofacies and geochemical evidences. For this study, we analyzed pyrite framboid size distribution of the sedimentary sequence in Fuente Vidriera. The outcome, according to previous studies on pyrite framboid distribution, is contradictory when compared to all other evidences, suggesting oxygen depletion during the T-OAE. The results have been reinterpreted in the light of Crystal Size Distribution Theory and we conclude that not only growth time but also geochemical environment controls pyrite formation. Since growth time is directly related to burial rates, this approach allows us to reconstruct relative variations of sedimentation rates during the Early Jurassic in this location. Based on the obtained results, we provide new evidences for wide-spread transgression during the Early Toarcian in the South Iberian palaeomargin, which induced low sedimentation rate and lower energetic conditions, as well as favored oxygen impoverished bottom waters.

  7. The effects of ion mass variation and domain size on octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field generation in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    von der Pahlen, Jan Graf

    2015-01-01

    J. Graf von der Pahlen and D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plas. 21, 060705 (2014), established that the generation of octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field structure in a stressed $X$-point collapse is due to ion currents. The field has a central region, comprising of the well-known qaudrupolar field (quadrupolar components), as well as four additional poles of reversed polarity closer to the corners of the domain (octupolar components). In this extended work, the dependence of the octupolar structure on domain size and ion mass variation is investigated. Simulations show that the strength and spatial structure of the generated octupolar magnetic field is independent of ion to electron mass ratio. Thus showing that ion currents play a significant role in out-of-plane magnetic structure generation in physically realistic scenarios. Simulations of different system sizes show that the width of the octupolar structure remains the same and has a spacial extent of the order of the ion inertial length. The width of the structu...

  8. Plot size variation to quantify yield of potato clones Variação do tamanho de parcela para acessar o rendimento de clones de batata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilson Antônio Bisognin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to study plot size variation among potato clones to increase experimental precision of yield performance trials. The experiment was carried out at the experimental area of the Horticulture Dept., UFSM, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Tubers of five potato clones were planted in two rows of 60 hills in August 2004. For all ten experimental rows, combined plots were formed adding a different number of adjacent hills of the same row. Soil heterogeneity index and optimum plot size were estimated for each row. Real differences between treatment means for each clone and all clones were estimated using the Hatheway technique. The experimental precision of potato yield trials varied with the evaluated clone because of different optimum plot sizes. Eight-hill plots are the optimum size to quantify yield of potato clones, but experimental precision depends upon adjustments of the number of treatments and replications to the availability of experimental area. Genetic diversity indeed decreases experimental precision and justifies the use of different plot sizes. Practical applicattions and strategies to increase experimental precision of yields performance trials of potato clones are discussed.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a variação do tamanho de parcela entre clones de batata visando aumentar a precisão experimental nos ensaios de avaliação de rendimento. Tubérculos de cinco clones de batata foram plantados em duas fileiras de 60 covas na área experimental do Depto. de Fitotecnia-UFSM, em Santa Maria-RS, em agosto de 2004. Para cada uma das 10 fileiras do experimento foram planejadas parcelas de diferentes tamanhos, agrupando os resultados de covas adjacentes dentro da mesma fileira. Foram estimados o índice de heterogeneidade do solo e o tamanho ótimo da parcela. A diferença verdadeira entre médias de tratamentos, para cada clone e no geral foi estimada pelo método de Hatheway. A precis

  9. Environmental change indicated by grain-size variations and trace elements: An example from the sandy-loess sediments from the Doroshivtsy site (Ukraine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmkuhl, Frank; Schulte, Philipp; Loibl, Christa; Klasen, Nicole; Hauck, Thomas; Kels, Holger

    2014-05-01

    The recently discovered loess section of Doroshivtsy became famous due to archeological findings of the Gravettian. The profile represents a about 9 m sequence of sandy loess, intercalated by more humic horizons. It is situated in a flat gully and at an undercut slope of the Dniester River close to the village Doroshivtsy in the south-western Ukraine. Radiocarbon dating and luminescence ages are conclusive within the expected age range of the Gravettian period (22-28 ka). The loess section is composed mainly of sandy silt and covers the time span from about 26 to 16 ka. This is one of the very few sections in Europe which provides a high resolution sedimentary record including prehistoric finds of the cooling maximum of the last glacial cycle. Based on the field description and the grain size distribution obtained by Laser Diffraction Particle Size Analyzer (Beckman Coulter LS 13 320 PIDS), the profile can be divided into three main genetic units representing changes during the deposition. The upper part (1-3 m) of the profile is characterized by aeolian loess and sand deposition intercalated with a few gravel lines. The middle part (3-6.5 m) of the profile is influenced by aeolian, denudative and weak soil forming processes. The lower part (6.5-9 m) of the section represents a combination of aeolian loess, re-deposited slope material. Additionally, the whole part is affected by hydromorphic conditions. As the sediment is rather homogeneous sandy silt U-ratio and GSI did not show any distinct variations. However, calculations with different grain-size ratios show that a fine silt to fine sand ratio (SiS-ratio) of 3.5 to 8.1 µm and 69.6 to 161.1 µm provide clear peaks. These variations of the SiS-ratio represent environmental changes which are also observed by structures and weak soil formations in the section during field work and fit also to the different archeological layers. In addition, geochemical analysis show comparable results to the SiS-ratio and provide

  10. Spatial pattern of grain-size distribution in surface sediments as a result of variations in the aeolian environment in China's Shapotou railway protective system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaqiong; Zhang, Chunlai; Zhou, Na; Ma, Xiaojie

    2011-12-01

    China's Shapotou railway protective system provides effective protection against the region's mobile sands, but little quantitative evidence is available about how it affects the aeolian environment surrounding the railway. In the present study, we analyzed the grain-size distribution in surface sediments as a result of variations in the aeolian environment at different spatial scales: the scale of a cross-section of the protective system along the prevailing wind direction (from the northwest to southeast), of individual stabilized sand dunes in the area protected by straw checkerboards and unirrigated vegetation, of the area around individual plants in the protective system, and of individual straw checkerboards. Surface sediments were sampled to define the spatial pattern of the grain-size distribution at these four scales. Along the transect from the area of mobile dunes through the protective system, sediment particles became finer (silt and clay contents increased) and sorting decreased. This indicated that the protective system is a deposition-dominated aeolian environment, with sediment characteristics stabilizing with increasing distance inside the protected area. In such an environment, dune topographic relief also played an important role in determining the deposition pattern; the dune top is particularly fragile and subject to wind erosion if the straw checkerboards or planted vegetation are destroyed. The influences of the straw checkerboards and the plant canopies on the grain size of the surface sediments within a single checkerboard or near a single plant were limited. However, the combination of straw checkerboards and planted vegetation has synergistically produced a deposition-dominated aeolian environment.

  11. Unusual sutural bones at pterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayak SB

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The existence of Wormian (sutural bones in the skull is well known. We found three unusual Wormian bones at the right pterion in an adult Indian skull. The variation noted was unilateral. This type of variation has not been reported yet.

  12. Genetic determinism for within-litter birth weight variation and its relationship with litter weight and litter size in the Ripollesa ewe breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas, J; Caja, G; Piedrafita, J

    2007-06-01

    Birth weight plays a central role in lamb survival and growth, and the knowledge of its genetic determinism has become essential in worldwide selection programmes. Within this context, within-litter birth weight variation (BWV) has been suggested as an attractive trait to homogenise litters in prolific species, although it has not been analysed in sheep. The objective of this study was to ascertain whether maternal additive genetic variance exists for BWV in Ripollesa ewes, and to study its genetic, permanent environmental and residual relationships with litter weight (LW) and litter size (LS) at birth. Data were recorded in the Ripollesa experimental flock of the Universitat Autònoma of Barcelona, between 1986 and 2005, and included 1 662 litters from 380 ewes, with 712 records of BWV and 1 530 records of LW. Traits were analysed with a multivariate animal model solved through Bayesian methodologies, and with a threshold characterisation of LS. Additionally, the effect of BWV on lamb survival was studied. Additive genetic variance was observed for BWV (h2 = 0.061), as well as for LW (h2 = 0.200) and LS (h2 = 0.141). Nevertheless, genetic correlations among those traits were not substantial (BWV and LW = 0.151; BWV and LS = - 0.219; LW and LS = - 0.320) and suffered from a high degree of uncertainly, with the null correlation included within the highest posterior interval at 95%. Within-litter birth weight variation and LS showed a negative and large permanent environmental correlation ( - 0.872), and LW and LS were negatively correlated due to residual ( - 0.762) and permanent environmental ( - 0.449) random sources of variation. Within-litter birth weight variation influenced lamb mortality during the first 7 days of life (P 0.05). The low heritability found indicates that slow genetic progress may be expected from selecting for BWV. Close to zero genetic correlations suggest that this selection will probably not affect LS and LW, although

  13. Trabecular bone structure in the primate wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Ann-Marie; Tofanelli, Sergio; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Kivell, Tracy L

    2014-05-01

    Trabecular (or cancellous) bone has been shown to respond to mechanical loading throughout ontogeny and thus can provide unique insight into skeletal function and locomotion in comparative studies of living and fossil mammalian morphology. Trabecular bone of the hand may be particularly functionally informative because the hand has more direct contact with the substrate compared with the remainder of the forelimb during locomotion in quadrupedal mammals. This study investigates the trabecular structure within the wrist across a sample of haplorhine primates that vary in locomotor behaviour (and thus hand use) and body size. High-resolution microtomographic scans were collected of the lunate, scaphoid, and capitate in 41 individuals and eight genera (Homo, Gorilla, Pan, Papio, Pongo, Symphalangus, Hylobates, and Ateles). We predicted that particular trabecular parameters would 1) vary across suspensory, quadrupedal, and bipedal primates based on differences in hand use and load, and 2) scale with carpal size following similar allometric patterns found previously in other skeletal elements across a larger sample of mammals and primates. Analyses of variance (trabecular parameters analysed separately) and principal component analyses (trabecular parameters analysed together) revealed no clear functional signal in the trabecular structure of any of the three wrist bones. Instead, there was a large degree of variation within suspensory and quadrupedal locomotor groups, as well as high intrageneric variation within some taxa, particularly Pongo and Gorilla. However, as predicted, Homo sapiens, which rarely use their hands for locomotion and weight support, were unique in showing lower relative bone volume (BV/TV) compared with all other taxa. Furthermore, parameters used to quantify trabecular structure within the wrist scale with size generally following similar allometric patterns found in trabeculae of other mammalian skeletal elements. We discuss the challenges

  14. Bone within a bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, H.J.; Davies, A.M. E-mail: wendy.turner@roh.nhs.uk; Chapman, S

    2004-02-01

    The 'bone within a bone' appearance is a well-recognized radiological term with a variety of causes. It is important to recognize this appearance and also to be aware of the differential diagnosis. A number of common conditions infrequently cause this appearance. Other causes are rare and some remain primarily of historical interest, as they are no longer encountered in clinical practice. In this review we illustrate some of the conditions that can give the bone within a bone appearance and discuss the physiological and pathological aetiology of each where known.

  15. Evaluation of long bone surface textures as ontogenetic indicators in centrosaurine ceratopsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R

    2009-09-01

    The search for criteria for aging non-mammalian fossil vertebrates has preoccupied paleobiologists in recent years. Previous studies of the long bones of pterosaurs and modern and subfossil birds as well as of cranial material of centrosaurine ceratopsid dinosaurs have documented variations in surface textures that seem to be ontogenetically related. In this study, long bones from the centrosaurine ceratopsid genera Centrosaurus, Einiosaurus, and Pachyrhinosaurus are examined to test the hypothesis that changes in bone surface textures and reduction of surface porosity could be correlated with size (and presumably age) classes, as has been previously documented in pterosaurs and birds. The data set includes 141 bones representing all six long bone elements, collected from monodominant centrosaurine bone beds. Bone surface patterns are documented by macroscopic visual examination, and a sequence of five texture classes ordered by decreasing surface porosity is described based on the common distributions of these patterns. Calculations of Spearman's rank correlation coefficients reveal significant correlations between texture class and size. The smallest bones are invariably associated with porous midshaft textures that grade to fibrous and long-grained patterns proximally and distally [Texture Class (TC) 1]. Post-hoc analysis after Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA on ranks confirms that the mean size of TC1 bones is, in most cases, significantly different than the mean size of bones in other texture classes. Results of this study suggest the presence of an ontogenetic surface textural signal in centrosaurine long bones; however, comparison of texture classes with size-independent maturity criteria is needed to clarify further the potential ontogenetic significance of higher texture classes.

  16. Experimental study on effect of Salvia miltiorrhiza on alveolar bone metabolism and variation in bone mass in diabetic rats%丹参对糖尿病大鼠牙槽骨骨代谢及骨量变化影响的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗波; 王建波; 朱杨; 岳长军; 陈铭

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of Salvia miltiorrhiza on alveolar bone metabolism and variation in bone mass in diabetic rats, in order to detect whether it has an inhibitory effect on alveolar bone osteoporosis caused by diabetics. Method: Intraperitoneal injection of alloxan induced diabetes in rats. After one week of observation and maintenance of stable blood sugar level, they were treated with S. miliorrhiza. The rats were sacrificed at the eighth week after fasting for 12 h and blood samples were collected for analysis of blood glucose and rate of bone metabolism. Meanwhile, their alveolar bones were collected for determining bone mineral density (BMD) and histological sections were made for histomorphology observation. Result: Diabetic rats showed varying degrees of abnormality in bone metabolism indicators and significant reduction in bone mineral density. After treatment with S. miltiorrhiza, their symptoms reduced to some extend and all indicators were improved especially bone density. Conclusion: S. mikiorrhaa has a certain inhibitory effect on alveolar bone osteoporosis in diabetic rats in early stage.%目的:探讨丹参对糖尿病大鼠牙槽骨骨代谢及骨量变化的影响,以研究其对糖尿病导致的牙槽骨骨质疏松是否有抑制作用.方法:腹腔注射四氧嘧啶促使糖尿病大鼠形成,待血糖稳定并观察1周后应用丹参进行治疗观察.8周后所有大鼠禁食12 h后将大鼠处死,即刻空腹采血进行血糖及骨代谢指标测定.同时取大鼠的下颌牙槽骨固定进行骨密度(BMD)测定,并制作硬组织切片进行组织形态学观察.结果:糖尿病大鼠骨代谢指标出现不同程度异常,骨密度显著降低,经丹参治疗后症状有所缓解,各项指标得到改善,骨密度相应增高.结论:丹参对糖尿病大鼠早期的牙槽骨骨质疏松有一定的抑制作用.

  17. Genetic variation in Danish populations of Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei: estimation of gene diversity and effective population size using RFLP data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, C.; Giese, Nanna Henriette

    1996-01-01

    Genetic variation of the barley powdery mildew fungus (Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei) was estimated in three Danish local populations. Genetic variation was estimated from the variation amongst clones of Egh, and was therefore an estimate of the maximum genetic variation in the local populations...

  18. Analysis of the variation of the attenuation curve in function of the radiation field size for k Vp X-ray beams using the MCNP-5C code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: marco@cetea.com.b, E-mail: marfernandes@fmb.unesp.b [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMB/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Ribeiro, Victor A.B. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (IBB/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias; Viana, Rodrigo S.S.; Coelho, Talita S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The paper illustrates the use of the Monte Carlo method, MCNP-5C code, to analyze the attenuation curve behavior of the 50 kVp radiation beam from superficial radiotherapy equipment as Dermopan2 model. The simulations seek to verify the MCNP-5C code performance to study the variation of the attenuation curve - percentage depth dose (PDD) curve - in function of the radiation field dimension used at radiotherapy of skin tumors with 50 kVp X-ray beams. The PDD curve was calculated for six different radiation field sizes with circular geometry of 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 cm in diameter. The radiation source was modeled considering a tungsten target with inclination 30 deg, focal point of 6.5 mm in diameter and energy beam of 50 kVp; the X-ray spectrum was calculated with the MCNP-5C code adopting total filtration (beryllium window of 1 mm and aluminum additional filter of 1 mm). The PDD showed decreasing behavior with the attenuation depth similar what is presented on the literature. There was not significant variation at the PDD values for the radiation field between 1.0 and 4.0 cm in diameter. The differences increased for fields of 5.0 and 6.0 cm and at attenuation depth higher than 1.0 cm. When it is compared the PDD values for fields of 3.0 and 6.0 cm in diameter, it verifies the greater difference (12.6 %) at depth of 5.7 cm, proving the scattered radiation effect. The MCNP-5C code showed as an appropriate procedure to analyze the attenuation curves of the superficial radiotherapy beams. (author)

  19. Morphometric analysis of occipital bone in the domestic cat in comparison with selected skull size parameters and with special regard to skull morphotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasowicz, M; Kupczyńska, M; Wieladek, A; Barszcz, K

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elaborate criteria defining the morphotype and to perform a morphological and morphometric analysis of the squamous part of the occipital bone and of the foramen magnum in the European cat. The study material comprised 50 corpses of European cats of both sexes and of bodyweight from 1.35 to 7.7 kg, aged from 1 year to 17 years. The study material underwent detailed preparation and morphometries of the skull, squamous part of the occipital bone and the foramen magnum were performed. The skull index (IC) data obtained indicate that the European cat represents a mesaticephalic morphotype. In the morphometrical analysis of the foramen magnum the following were included: the foramen magnum index (IFM), the occipital index (IOF), and the index of the squamous part of the occipital bone (ISO). In the morphology of the squamous part of the occipital bone two categories were distinguished: the first was characterized by a form close to an isosceles triangle with its base directed to the bottom. In none of the specimens studied was a dorsal notch in the form of a "keyhole" observed, nor was there any other deformation in the foramen magnum, which takes the form of a slightly crosswise elongated regular oval. The results of this study indicate that in the European cat the foramen magnum is free from any pathology and its shape, in the individual development, is conservative.

  20. Body size accounts for most differences in bone density between Asian and Caucasian women. The EPIC (Early Postmenopausal Interventional Cohort) Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, P D; He, Y; Yates, A J;

    1996-01-01

    We compared bone mineral density (BMD) of the whole body (and subregions: arm, leg, and pelvis), hip, spine, lateral spine, wrist, and forearm among Caucasian and Asian women at four geographic centers (Honolulu, HI; Nottingham, UK; Portland, OR; Copenhagen, Denmark). Data were derived from...

  1. Uncultured marrow mononuclear cells delivered within fibrin glue hydrogels to porous scaffolds enhance bone regeneration within critical-sized rat cranial defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kretlow, J.D.; Spicer, P.P.; Jansen, J.A.; Vacanti, C.A.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    For bone tissue engineering, the benefits of incorporating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into porous scaffolds are well established. There is, however, little consensus on the effects of or need for MSC handling ex vivo. Culture and expansion of MSCs adds length and cost, and likely increases risk a

  2. Role of Within‐individual Variation in Capitulum Size and Achene Mass in the Adaptation of the Annual Centaurea eriophora to Varying Water Supply in a Mediterranean Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    RUIZ DE CLAVIJO, E.

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the adaptive value of variation in capitulum size and achene mass, plants of Centaurea eriophora were studied in a glasshouse and in a natural population. C. eriophora plants consist of a basal leaf rosette from which an erect stem grows, with lateral branches of various orders ending in capitula of different orders. Primary, secondary and tertiary capitula are comparable in size and they produce similar numbers of achenes, which are similar in weight (large achenes). These capitula are formed during April, May and early June, and constitute the normal or primary flowering. Following ripening of tertiary capitula, leaves senesce, but, later during June and the first half of July, a secondary flowering of a variable number of smaller capitula may occur if wet conditions persist for longer than usual. Plants that have almost senesced develop small lateral branches 1–2 cm long bearing a few small leaves and ending in a capitulum about half the diameter of capitula from the primary flowering period. The number of achenes produced in these capitula (small achenes) and their weight are 70 and 30 % less, respectively, than those of capitula formed during primary flowering. These reductions appear to result from restricted availability of resources. Large and small achenes have similar dispersal characteristics and possess similar germination potential. However, large achenes produce seedlings that are capable of emerging from greater burial depths, providing the resulting plants with a potential advantage. The normal flowering period coincides with the optimum time of year for flowering and fruiting in the south of Spain, and only if rainfall lasts longer than usual does secondary flowering occur. Secondary flowering extends the normal flowering and fruiting periods, thereby providing a supplementary crop of smaller, yet viable, fruits. It can be considered to be an adaptive response to the unpredictable Mediterranean climate, optimizing the use of available

  3. A Digital Model to Simulate Effects of Bone Architecture Variations on Texture at Spatial Resolutions of CT, HR-pQCT, and μCT Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lowitz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of changes in the trabecular bone structure induced by musculoskeletal diseases like osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and others by means of a texture analysis is a valuable tool which is expected to improve the diagnosis and monitoring of a disease. The reaction of texture parameters on different alterations in the architecture of the fine trabecular network and inherent imaging factors such as spatial resolution or image noise has to be understood in detail to ensure an accurate and reliable determination of the current bone state. Therefore, a digital model for the quantitative analysis of cancellous bone structures was developed. Five parameters were used for texture analysis: entropy, global and local inhomogeneity, local anisotropy, and variogram slope. Various generic structural changes of cancellous bone were simulated for different spatial resolutions. Additionally, the dependence of the texture parameters on tissue mineralization and noise was investigated. The present work explains changes in texture parameter outcomes based on structural changes originating from structure modifications and reveals that a texture analysis could provide useful information for a trabecular bone analysis even at resolutions below the dimensions of single trabeculae.

  4. Bone densitometry in dogs using gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, A.L.B.; Costa, V.E.; Rezende, M.A.; Grossklauss, D.B.B.F.; Oliveira, T.B. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Full text. The purpose of this work came from the possibility of joining similar methodologies for determination of density, used in different areas, and provide more precise values of bone density by analyzing the mass attenuation coefficient. For over 20 years, The Applied Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics and Biophysics, IBB- UNESP, Botucatu campus, has been working in the determination of density in different areas, using the methods of immersion and gamma radiation attenuation. The results presented have excellent precision, due to the facility in obtaining and preparing samples, coupled to the large experience in the area. This study aims to determine the bone density of samples of mongrel dogs (dogs without defined breed) by the immersion method; to determine the mass attenuation coefficient of bones samples of mongrel dogs with a gamma radiation source; to discuss and to evaluate the methodological aspects involved in the optic densitometry used nowadays, presenting its advantages and disadvantages and, finally, to examine the effect of animal weight, age and sex on bone densitometry of medium-sized dogs. For this study, we use upper limbs samples, at the joint region humerus-radio-ulnar of after death mongrel dogs, assigned by the Department of Pathology, Faculty of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine (UNESP-Botucatu) and by the Kennel of the city of Araras, Sao Paulo. This work is performed in three stages. In the first step is determined the density by the method of immersion in water, in the second step, is obtained the mass coefficient attenuation and, finally, in the third step are discussed the implemented methods and evaluate the density bone samples to establish correlations with the age, weight and sex parameters of each group of animals. Based on this methodology , we can find the average value for the mass attenuation coefficient of gamma radiation with energy 59,6, find variations in the values of bone densitometry in the same bone

  5. Comparison of Demineralized Dentin and Demineralized Freeze Dried Bone as Carriers for Enamel Matrix Proteins in a Rat Critical Size Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    usually requires resorption prior to the formation of new bone. At this early two weeks stage it is possible that there was insufficient time for the... resorptive and formative processes to be completed. At eight weeks the mean RIDIT values for all groups were greater than 0.5, 49 indicating that the...non-collageous proteins of rat incisors dentin. Calcified Tissue Research 1978;25:169-178. Finkelman R., Mohan S., Jennings J., Taylor A., Jepsen S

  6. Effect of Adipose Tissue-Derived Osteogenic and Endothelial Cells on Bone Allograft Osteogenesis and Vascularization in Critical-Sized Calvarial Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    Tsai, C.Y., and Wei, F.C. Har nessing the potential of the free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap in mandible reconstruction. Plast Reconstr Surg 125...REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12...Magner, M., Isner, J.M., and Asahara, T. Ischemia and cytokine induced mobilization of bone mar row derived endothelial progenitor cells for neovascular

  7. Biochemical markers identify influences on bone and cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis - the effect of sex, Kellgren-Lawrence (KL score, Body Mass Index (BMI, oral salmon calcitonin (sCT treatment and diurnal variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriksen K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA involves changes in both bone and cartilage. These processes might be associated under some circumstances. This study investigated correlations between bone and cartilage degradation in patients with OA as a function of sex, Kellgren-Lawrence (KL score, Body Mass Index (BMI, oral salmon calcitonin (sCT treatment and diurnal variation. Methods This study was a 2-week, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized study including 37 postmenopausal women and 36 men, aged 57-75 years, with painful knee OA, and a KL-score of I - III. Subjects were allocated to one of three treatment arms: 0.6 mg or 0.8 mg oral sCT, or placebo given twice-daily for 14 days. Correlations between gender, KL score, or BMI and the bone resorption marker, serum C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I (CTX-I, or the cartilage degradation marker, urine C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II (CTX-II were investigated. Results At baseline, biomarkers indicated women with OA experienced higher bone and cartilage degradation than men. CTX-I levels were significantly higher, and CTX-II levels only marginally higher, in women than in men (p = 0.04 and p = 0.06, respectively. Increasing KL score was not correlated with bone resorption, but was significantly associated with the cartilage degradation CTX-II marker in both men and women (p = 0.007. BMI was significantly and negatively correlated to the bone resorption marker CTX-I, r = -0.40 (p = 0.002, but showed only a borderline positive correlation to CTX-II, r = 0.25 (p = 0.12. Before morning treatments on days 1 and 14, no correlation was seen between CTX-I and CTX-II in either the sCT or placebo group. However, oral sCT and food intake induced a clear correlation between these bone and cartilage degradation markers. Four hours after the first sCT dose on treatment days 1 and 14, a significant correlation (r = 0.71, p p = 0.02, but not on day 14. Conclusion Bone resorption was higher in

  8. What Is Paget's Disease of Bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size | S S M M L L Bone Basics Osteoporosis Osteogenesis Imperfecta Paget’s Disease of Bone Related Topics News Glossary ... focus(); */ } //--> Print-Friendly Page Home Bone Basics Osteoporosis Osteogenesis Imperfecta Paget’s Disease of Bone Related Topics About Us ...

  9. How Is Paget's Disease of Bone Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size | S S M M L L Bone Basics Osteoporosis Osteogenesis Imperfecta Paget’s Disease of Bone Related Topics News Glossary ... focus(); */ } //--> Print-Friendly Page Home Bone Basics Osteoporosis Osteogenesis Imperfecta Paget’s Disease of Bone Related Topics About Us ...

  10. Bone Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... markers may be seen in conditions such as: Osteoporosis Paget disease Cancer that has spread to the bone (metastatic bone disease) Hyperparathyroidism Hyperthyroidism Osteomalacia in adults and rickets in children—lack of bone mineralization, ...

  11. Bone scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... legs, or spine fractures) Diagnose a bone infection (osteomyelitis) Diagnose or determine the cause of bone pain, ... 2015:chap 43. Read More Broken bone Metabolism Osteomyelitis Review Date 12/10/2015 Updated by: Jatin ...

  12. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  13. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly ... childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about ...

  14. Osteocyte lacunae features in different chicken bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenis L., Squadrone S., Marchis D., Abete MC.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Directive 2003/126/EC defines the method for the determination of constituents of animal origin for official control of feedingstuffs. One of the hardest problems for microscopist is the differentiation between mammalian and poultry bones on the basis of some characteristics as colour and borders of the fragments, shape and density of osteocyte lacunae. The shape of osteocyte lacuna in poultry and mammals is often described in different way, elliptic or roundish according with the Author(s. The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of lacunae in chicken bones of different type. For this purpose, smashed fragments and histological sections of the same bone were compared in order to evaluate the microscopic aspect of lacunae in different breaking and trimming planes. According to the observations carried out, it was possible to infer that chicken osteocyte has a biconvex lens shape; however the different arrangement and some size variation of the osteocytes in the several bone segments influence the microscopic features of corresponding lacunae. Chicken bone is made of a parallel-fibered tissue, without osteons. This structure probably determines the plane fracture of the bone and consequently the different aspect of lacunae (from spindle-shaped to elliptic-roundish we can see in chicken derived PAP (processed animal protein. For example, in the fragments obtained from smashed diaphysis, the prevalence of spindle-shaped lacunae is depending on the preferential breaking of the bone along longitudinal plane. Likewise, for the epiphysis, being made mostly by bone trabeculae with strange directions, the breaking happens along different planes, creating lacunae of various shape. Performing the official check of animal feedingstuffs, the presence of bone fragments with roundish or elliptic osteocyte lacunae induces the analyst to thinking that the meat and bone meal comes respectively from mammals and poultry or vice versa depending to

  15. 乌饭树果实大小的地理变异研究%Study on geographic variation of fruit sizes in Vaccinium bracteatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘仁林; 胡明娇; 李江; 刘江华

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinium bracteatum distributes widely in subtropical hilly and low mountains areas of China. Berry in V. bracteatum is a nutrition-rich and healthful food, and is most commonly used to eat as a traditional food in Chinese folks. In order to provide some scientific basis for selecting an breeding in V. bracteatum, fruits were collected from Jiangxi province (Huichang, Longnan, Ruijin, Jinggang Mountain, Pingxiang), Hunan province (Liuyang), and Jiangsu province (Yixing), fruit sizes and mass were determined, and the law of geographic variation was analyzed. The results showed that the fruit was of a type of small berry, average diameter of fruits was 0.790 2 cm, average mass of 1 000 seeds was 0.698 g. Diameter (y) and mass (x) of the fruit had significant relation of linear regression, and the equation was y = 0.603x -0.241. The results of variance analysis showed that sizes of the mixed fruits had no obvious differences among the areas at different latitudes, and fruit sizes from superior trees had significant differences among the areas at different latitudes, which indicated individual plant in V. bracteatum had a independent inheritance background. The results of multiple linear regression analysis showed that sizes of the mixed fruits collected from different latitudes had no significant linear regression relation with environment factors, and fruit sizes from superior trees had significant multiple linear regression relation with environment factors, for example, annual average temperature (x2) and frost free period (x4), and the linear regression equation was y = - 0.038x2 + 0.004x4 + 0.674. In a word, selecting and breeding of V. bracteatum plants with large fruit type should paid attention to the areas of Jinggang Mountain, Longnan and Pingxiang.%乌饭树广泛分布于我国亚热带丘陵—低山地区,是中国民间传统的健康食品“乌饭”的原料,其浆果酸甜可口,营养丰富,含有多种有益于人体健康的成分。为

  16. Size polymorphism of chicken major histocompatibility complex-encoded B-G molecules is due to length variation in the cytoplasmic heptad repeat region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K;

    1990-01-01

    that the extracellular regions of these molecules are very similar and that the length polymorphism is due to variations in the cytoplasmic regions. Inspection of the cDNA-derived protein sequence in this region shows many heptad repeats, which may allow variation in length by step deletion and alternative splicing...

  17. Genetic regulation of bone strength: a review of animal model studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Douglas J; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L

    2015-01-01

    Population- and family-based studies have established that fragility fracture risk is heritable; yet, the genome-wide association studies published to date have only accounted for a small fraction of the known variation for fracture risk of either the femur or the lumbar spine. Much work has been carried out using animal models toward finding genetic loci that are associated with bone strength. Studies using animal models overcome some of the issues associated with using patient data, but caution is needed when interpreting the results. In this review, we examine the types of tests that have been used for forward genetics mapping in animal models to identify loci and/or genes that regulate bone strength and discuss the limitations of these test methods. In addition, we present a summary of the quantitative trait loci that have been mapped for bone strength in mice, rats and chickens. The majority of these loci co-map with loci for bone size and/or geometry and thus likely dictate strength via modulating bone size. Differences in bone matrix composition have been demonstrated when comparing inbred strains of mice, and these matrix differences may be associated with differences in bone strength. However, additional work is needed to identify loci that act on bone strength at the materials level.

  18. Morphological characteristics of frontal sinus and nasal bone focusing on bone resorption and apposition in hypophosphatemic rickets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, H; Kjaer, I; Sonnesen, Liselotte;

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the size and the morphology of the frontal sinus (i.e., structure evolved by bone resorption) and the nasal bone (i.e., structure evolved by bone formation) in adults with hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) compared with controls.......To characterize the size and the morphology of the frontal sinus (i.e., structure evolved by bone resorption) and the nasal bone (i.e., structure evolved by bone formation) in adults with hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) compared with controls....

  19. Size and Political Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, David Dreyer; Serritzlew, Søren

    This paper uses a novel research design to re-examine the causal effect of jurisdiction size on political participation. Two waves of municipal consolidation in Denmark, in 1970 and in 2005, provide exogenous variation in jurisdiction size.......This paper uses a novel research design to re-examine the causal effect of jurisdiction size on political participation. Two waves of municipal consolidation in Denmark, in 1970 and in 2005, provide exogenous variation in jurisdiction size....

  20. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of DXA Bone Densitometry? What is a Bone Density Scan (DXA)? Bone density scanning, also called dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry ( ... is today's established standard for measuring bone mineral density (BMD). An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  1. Determinants of bone mass and bone geometry in adolescent and young adult women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Hoorneman, G.; Väänänen, K.; Charles, P.; Ando, S.; Maggiolini, M.; Charzewska, J.; Rotily, M.; Deloraine, A.; Heikkinen, J.; Juvin, R.; Schaafsma, G.

    2000-01-01

    Bone mass and bone geometry are considered to have independent effects on bone strength. The purpose of this study was to obtain data on bone mass and geometry in young female populations and how they are influenced by body size and lifestyle factors. In a cross-sectional, observational study in six

  2. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  3. Variation of TTC Repeat Pattern In The Dna of Mycobacterium Leprae Isolates Obtained from Archeological Bones and Leprosy Patients From East Nusa Tenggara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinar Adriaty

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence of leprosy or kusta or Morbus Hansen or Hansen’s disease has been known for years, including in Indonesia. Starting from the discovery of Mycobacterium leprae isolates from ancient bone (about 1.000 years B.C, the archaeological excavations results in East Nusa Tenggara, interesting questions arise about how the development of leprosy in eastern Indonesia is. Biology molecular study would become a powerful tool to investigate the presence of leprosy bacillary whether there are similarities between the genomes of M. leprae isolates in the primeval and the present. PCR examinations were performed on mandibular bone fragments from ancient human who lived 1000 years B.C. discovered in archaeological surveys on the island of Lembata and three leprosy patients from East Nusa Tenggara. The DNA extraction was performed using a kit from Qiagen products and its TTC repeating pattern was seen with the method of direct sequencing. It turned out that the TTC profile obtained from samples of archaeological was as many as 13 copies, while the repetition of TTC in three samples of leprosy patients were 15, 17 and 26 copies. The different number of TTC repetition shows the different isolates of M. leprae between in the ancient times and the present. Further studies are needed to verify the differences in the genome that occur, for example from the study of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a Potent Cell Source for Bone Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Elham Zomorodian; Mohamadreza Baghaban Eslaminejad

    2012-01-01

    While small bone defects heal spontaneously, large bone defects need surgical intervention for bone transplantation. Autologous bone grafts are the best and safest strategy for bone repair. An alternative method is to use allogenic bone graft. Both methods have limitations, particularly when bone defects are of a critical size. In these cases, bone constructs created by tissue engineering technologies are of utmost importance. Cells are one main component in the manufacture of bone construct...

  5. Adaptive re-tracking algorithm for retrieval of water level variations and wave heights from satellite altimetry data for middle-sized inland water bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Lebedev, Sergey; Soustova, Irina; Rybushkina, Galina; Papko, Vladislav; Baidakov, Georgy; Panyutin, Andrey

    by the improved threshold algorithm. The possibility of determination of significant wave height (SWH) in the lakes through a two-step adaptive retracking is also studied. Calculation of the parameter SWH for Gorky Reservoir from May 2010 to March 2014 showed the anomalously high values of SWH, derived from altimetry data [15], which means that the calibration of this SWH for inland waters is required. Calibration ground measurements were performed at Gorky reservoir in 2011-2013, when wave height, wind speed and air temperature were collected by equipment placed on a buoy [15] collocated with Jason-1 and Jason-2 altimetry data acquisition. The results obtained on the basis of standard algorithm and method for adaptive re-tracking at Rybinsk , Gorky , Kuibyshev , Saratov and Volgograd reservoirs and middle-sized lakes of Russia: Chany, Segozero, Hanko, Oneko, Beloye, water areas of which are intersected by the Jason-1,2 tracks, were compared and their correlation with the observed data of hydrological stations in reservoirs and lakes was investigated. It was noted that the Volgograd reservoir regional re-tracking to determine the water level , while the standard GDR data are practically absent. REFERENCES [1] AVISO/Altimetry. User Handbook. Merged TOPEX/ POSEIDON Products. Edition 3.0. AVISO. Toulouse., 1996. [2] C.M. Birkett et al., “Surface water dynamics in the Amazon Basin: Application of satellite radar altimetry,” J. Geophys. Res., vol. 107, pp. 8059, 2002. [3] G. Brown, “The average impulse response of a rough surface and its applications,” IEEE Trans. Antennas Propagat., vol. 25, pp. 67-74, 1977. [4] I.O. Campos et al., “Temporal variations of river basin waters from Topex/Poseidon satellite altimetry. Application to the Amazon basin,” Earth and Planetary Sciences, vol. 333, pp. 633-643, 2001. [5] A.V. Kouraev et al., “Ob’ river discharge from TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimetry (1992-2002),” Rem. Sens. Environ., vol. 93, pp. 238-245, 2004

  6. Mean proloculus size, delta super(13) C and delta super(18) O variations in recent benthic foraminifera from the west coast of India and their climatic implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Sarkar, A.

    The interrelationship between mean proloculus size (MPS), delta super(18) O and delta super(13) C vatiations in benthic foraminiferal species Rotalidium annectens and their relation with temperature (T) and salinity (S) have been studied in samples...

  7. Normalization of nano-sized TiO2-induced clastogenicity, genotoxicity and mutagenicity by chlorophyllin administration in mice brain, liver, and bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghor, Akmal A; Noshy, Magda M; Galal, Ahmad; Mohamed, Hanan Ramadan H

    2014-11-01

    The intensive uses of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in sunscreens, toothpaste, sweats, medications, etc. making humans exposed to it daily by not little amounts and also increased its risks including genotoxicity. Thus, the present study was designed as one way to reduce nano-titanium-induced clastogenicity, genotoxicity, and mutagenicity in mice by co-administration of the free radical scavenger chlorophyllin (CHL). In addition, markers of oxidative stress were detected to shed more light on mechanism(s) underlying nano-sized TiO2 genotoxicity. Male mice were exposed to multiple injection into the abdominal cavity for five consecutive days with either CHL (40 mg/kg bw/day), or each of three dose levels of nano-sized TiO2 (500, 1000, or 2000 mg/kg bw/day) alone, or both simultaneously and sacrificed by cervical dislocation 24 h after the last treatment. After CHL co-administration, the observed dose-dependent genotoxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles indicated by the significant elevations in frequencies of both micronuclei and DNA damage induction was significantly decreased and returned to the negative control level. The observed induced mutations in p53 exons 5, 7, & 8 and 5 & 8 in the liver and brain, respectively, were declined in most cases. Moreover, CHL significantly decreased hepatic malondialdehyde level and significantly increased glutathione level and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities that were significantly disrupted in animal groups treated with nano-TiO2 alone. In conclusion, the evidenced in vivo genotoxicity of nano-TiO2 in the present study was normalized after CHL co-administration which supports the previously suggested oxidative stress as the possible mechanism for titanium toxicity.

  8. Inca bones at asterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant E Natekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical approach towards asterion has to be done with caution as many surgeons are unfamiliar with the anatomical variations. The asterion corresponds to the site of the posterolateral (mastoid fontanelle of the neonatal skull which closes at the end of the first year. Inca bones provide information as markers for various diseases, and can mislead in the diagnosis of fractures. Observation and Results: 150 dry skull bones from the Department of Anatomy at Goa Medical College, India and other neighboring medical colleges by examining the asterion, and its sutural articulations with parietal, temporal and occipital bones and also anatomical variations if any in adults. Discussion: The anatomical landmarks selected must be reliable and above all easy to identify. Bony structures are more suitable than soft tissue or cartilaginous landmarks because of their rigid and reliable location. Presence of these bones provides false impressions of fractures or the fractures may be interpreted for inca bones especially in the region of asterion either radiologically or clinically which may lead to complications during burr hole surgeries.

  9. Short-term effects of avian predation variation on population size and local survival of the multimammate rat, Mastomys natalensis (Rodentia, Muridae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulck, T. van; Stocks, R.; Verhagen, Ron;

    1998-01-01

    was not true but this might be due to the small size of the experimental fields. Analysis of weekly collected raptor pellets, over a 15 month period, showed an overrepresentation of M. natalensis as prey and a strong positive correlation between the density of M. natalensis and the avian predation intensity....

  10. Variations on a theme - the evolution of hydrocarbon solids: III. Size-dependent properties - the optEC(s)(a) model

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, A P

    2015-01-01

    Context. The properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) dust evolve in response to the local radiation field in the interstellar medium and the evolution of these properties is particularly dependent upon the particle size. Aims. A model for finite-sized, low-temperature amorphous hydrocarbon particles, based on the microphysical properties of random and defected networks of carbon and hydrogen atoms, with surfaces passivated by hydrogen atoms, has been developed. Methods. The eRCN/DG and the optEC(s) models have been combined, adapted and extended into a new optEC(s)(a) model that is used to calculate the optical properties of hydrocarbon grain materials down into the sub-nanometre size regime, where the particles contain only a few tens of carbon atoms. Results. The optEC(s)(a) model predicts a continuity in properties from large to small (sub-nm) carbonaceous grains. Tabulated data of the size-dependent optical constants (from EUV to cm wavelengths) for a-C:H (nano-)particles as a function of the ...

  11. Is the ANOVA F-Test Robust to Variance Heterogeneity When Sample Sizes are Equal?: An Investigation via a Coefficient of Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Joanne C.; Keselman, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of variance heterogeneity on the empirical probability of a Type I error for the analysis of variance (ANOVA) F-test are examined. The rate of Type I error varies as a function of the degree of variance heterogeneity, and the ANOVA F-test is not always robust to variance heterogeneity when sample sizes are equal. (Author/JAC)

  12. Decellularized bone matrix grafts for calvaria regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Joon; Diachina, Shannon; Lee, Yan Ting; Zhao, Lixing; Zou, Rui; Tang, Na; Han, Han; Chen, Xin; Ko, Ching-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Decellularization is a promising new method to prepare natural matrices for tissue regeneration. Successful decellularization has been reported using various tissues including skin, tendon, and cartilage, though studies using hard tissue such as bone are lacking. In this study, we aimed to define the optimal experimental parameters to decellularize natural bone matrix using 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate and 0.1% NH4OH. Then, the effects of decellularized bone matrix on rat mesenchymal stem cell proliferation, osteogenic gene expression, and osteogenic differentiations in a two-dimensional culture system were investigated. Decellularized bone was also evaluated with regard to cytotoxicity, biochemical, and mechanical characteristics in vitro. Evidence of complete decellularization was shown through hematoxylin and eosin staining and DNA measurements. Decellularized bone matrix displayed a cytocompatible property, conserved structure, mechanical strength, and mineral content comparable to natural bone. To study new bone formation, implantation of decellularized bone matrix particles seeded with rat mesenchymal stem cells was conducted using an orthotopic in vivo model. After 3 months post-implantation into a critical-sized defect in rat calvaria, new bone was formed around decellularized bone matrix particles and also merged with new bone between decellularized bone matrix particles. New bone formation was analyzed with micro computed tomography, mineral apposition rate, and histomorphometry. Decellularized bone matrix stimulated mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo, achieving effective bone regeneration and thereby serving as a promising biological bone graft. PMID:28228929

  13. WNT16 influences bone mineral density, cortical bone thickness, bone strength, and osteoporotic fracture risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-Feng Zheng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify genetic variants associated with cortical bone thickness (CBT and bone mineral density (BMD by performing two separate genome-wide association study (GWAS meta-analyses for CBT in 3 cohorts comprising 5,878 European subjects and for BMD in 5 cohorts comprising 5,672 individuals. We then assessed selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for osteoporotic fracture in 2,023 cases and 3,740 controls. Association with CBT and forearm BMD was tested for ∼2.5 million SNPs in each cohort separately, and results were meta-analyzed using fixed effect meta-analysis. We identified a missense SNP (Thr>Ile; rs2707466 located in the WNT16 gene (7q31, associated with CBT (effect size of -0.11 standard deviations [SD] per C allele, P = 6.2 × 10(-9. This SNP, as well as another nonsynonymous SNP rs2908004 (Gly>Arg, also had genome-wide significant association with forearm BMD (-0.14 SD per C allele, P = 2.3 × 10(-12, and -0.16 SD per G allele, P = 1.2 × 10(-15, respectively. Four genome-wide significant SNPs arising from BMD meta-analysis were tested for association with forearm fracture. SNP rs7776725 in FAM3C, a gene adjacent to WNT16, was associated with a genome-wide significant increased risk of forearm fracture (OR = 1.33, P = 7.3 × 10(-9, with genome-wide suggestive signals from the two missense variants in WNT16 (rs2908004: OR = 1.22, P = 4.9 × 10(-6 and rs2707466: OR = 1.22, P = 7.2 × 10(-6. We next generated a homozygous mouse with targeted disruption of Wnt16. Female Wnt16(-/- mice had 27% (P<0.001 thinner cortical bones at the femur midshaft, and bone strength measures were reduced between 43%-61% (6.5 × 10(-13variation in humans and targeted disruption in mice demonstrate that WNT16 is an important determinant of CBT, BMD, bone strength, and risk of fracture.

  14. Influence of bone microstructure on the mechanical properties of skull cortical bone - A combined experimental and computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruah, Sourabh; Subit, Damien L; Paskoff, Glenn R; Shender, Barry S; Crandall, Jeff R; Salzar, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    The strength and compliance of the dense cortical layers of the human skull have been examined since the beginning of the 20th century with the wide range in the observed mechanical properties attributed to natural biological variance. Since this variance may be explained by the difference in structural arrangement of bone tissue, micro-computed tomography (µCT) was used in conjunction with mechanical testing to study the relationship between the microstructure of human skull cortical coupons and their mechanical response. Ninety-seven bone samples were machined from the cortical tables of the calvaria of ten fresh post mortem human surrogates and tested in dynamic tension until failure. A linear response between stress and strain was observed until close to failure, which occurred at 0.6% strain on average. The effective modulus of elasticity for the coupons was 12.01 ± 3.28GPa. Porosity of the test specimens, determined from µCT, could explain only 51% of the variation of their effective elastic modulus. Finite element (FE) models of the tested specimens built from µCT images indicated that modeling the microstructural arrangement of the bone, in addition to the porosity, led to a marginal improvement of the coefficient of determination to 54%. Modulus for skull cortical bone for an element size of 50µm was estimated to be 19GPa at an average. Unlike the load bearing bones of the body, almost half of the variance in the mechanical properties of cortical bone from the skull may be attributed to differences at the sub-osteon (< 50µm) level. ANOVA tests indicated that effective failure stress and strain varied significantly between the frontal and parietal bones, while the bone phase modulus was different for the superior and inferior aspects of the calvarium. The micro FE models did not indicate any anisotropy attributable to the pores observable under µCT.

  15. Mercury accumulation in selected tissues of shrimp Penaeus merguiensis from Musa estuary, Persian Gulf: variations related to sex, size, and season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mehdi; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Parsa, Yaghoob; Ardashir, Rashid Alijani

    2014-09-01

    The levels of mercury in tissues of Penaeus merguiensis from Musa estuary, northwest of the Persian Gulf, were investigated. This study assessed the relationship between mercury levels in hepatopancrea, gill, and muscle with sex, size, and season. The order of mercury concentrations in tissues of the shrimp P. merguiensis was as follows: hepatopancreas > gill > muscle. There was a positive correlation between mercury concentrations in shrimp species with sex and size of its food items. We expected to see higher mercury levels in tissues of female species because they are larger and can eat larger food items. Also, there was a positive correlation between mercury concentrations in shrimp species with its food source. Therefore, female species feed more on shrimp and plant and are contaminated with high levels of mercury. There was significant difference (p mercury levels between different seasons; higher mercury levels were found in July (summer season).

  16. Androgen and bone mass in men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AnnieW.C.Kung

    2003-01-01

    Androgens have multiple actions on the skeleton throughout life. Androgens promote skeletal growth and accumulation of minerals during puberty and adolescence and stimulate osteoblast but suppress osteoclast function,activity and lifespan through complex mechanisms. Also androgens increase periosteal bone apposition, resulting in larger bone size and thicker cortical bone in men. There is convincing evidence to show that aromatization to estrogens was an important pathway for mediating the action of testosterone on bone physiology. Estrogen is probably the dominant sex steroid regulating bone resorption in men, but both testosterone and estrogen are important in maintaining bone formation. ( Asian J Androl 2003 Jun; 5: 148-154)

  17. Morphological characteristics of leaf epidermis and size variation of leaf, flower and fruit in different ploidy levels in Buddleja macrostachya (Buddlejaceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao CHEN; Wei-Bang SUN; Hang SUN

    2009-01-01

    Buddleja macrostachya (Buddlejaceae) is a widespread shrub native to the Sino-Himalayan mountains and beyond. It has been found to occur at two ploidy levels, hexaploid, 2n=6x=114 and dodecaploid, 2n=12x=228. To determine if morphological characters might be used as indicators of ploidy levels, we measured floral and fruit length, relative and absolute leaf size, trichome density on both leaf surfaces, and stomatal density and length in different populations of B. macrostachya. In general, flower and fruit length, absolute leaf size, and stomatal length increased with an increase at ploidy level (P0.05) in different populations. Other characters studied such as trichome type, cuticular membrane and ornamentation of stomata, cell and stomatal shape, and anticlinal wall pattern were quite constant in this species. Thus it appears that flower and fruit length, absolute leaf size, and stomatal frequency and length can be used to distinguish hexaploid from dodecaploid cytotypes either in the field or in herbarium specimens.

  18. Variation in grain size and morphology of an inland parabolic dune during the incipient phase of stabilization in the Hobq Desert, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meiping; Hasi, Eerdun; Sun, Yu

    2016-05-01

    A significant increase in rainfall in the summer of 2012 on the southern fringe of the Hobq Desert, Inner Mongolia, resulted in the vegetation and thus stability of dunes in this area. Our research focuses on a typical parabolic dune, which was active in 2011 and became stabilized after vegetation colonization. Topographic surveys and surface sediment analysis of the morphology and surface sands of the parabolic dune indicate that decreasing mean grain size and sorting values (better sorting), slightly more positive skewness and increasing kurtosis occurred over the dune surface during the incipient phase of stabilization. There was a strong relationship between grain size sorting and dune mobility. Surface sand from the stabilized dune was generally finer and better sorted than at the same location when the dune was active. During 2011-2012 the dune head had moved eastwards (by approximately 2.3 m) while its two arms expanded outward (by approximately 3.2 m), the height of the dune decreased, and the dune became larger with a decreasing volume. Once anchored (2013-2014), the overall morphology, and the grain size and sorting characteristics of the dune became more constant and quite different than when the dune was active.

  19. Genetic and environmental components of phenotypic variation in immune response and body size of a colonial bird, Delichon urbica (the house martin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, P; Moller, A P; Saino, N; De Lope, F

    2000-07-01

    Directional selection for parasite resistance is often intense in highly social host species. Using a partial cross-fostering experiment we studied environmental and genetic variation in immune response and morphology in a highly colonial bird species, the house martin (Delichon urbica). We manipulated intensity of infestation of house martin nests by the haematophagous parasitic house martin bug Oeciacus hirundinis either by spraying nests with a weak pesticide or by inoculating them with 50 bugs. Parasitism significantly affected tarsus length, T cell response, immunoglobulin and leucocyte concentrations. We found evidence of strong environmental effects on nestling body mass, body condition, wing length and tarsus length, and evidence of significant additive genetic variance for wing length and haematocrit. We found significant environmental variance, but no significant additive genetic variance in immune response parameters such as T cell response to the antigenic phytohemagglutinin, immunoglobulins, and relative and absolute numbers of leucocytes. Environmental variances were generally greater than additive genetic variances, and the low heritabilities of phenotypic traits were mainly a consequence of large environmental variances and small additive genetic variances. Hence, highly social bird species such as the house martin, which are subject to intense selection by parasites, have a limited scope for immediate microevolutionary response to selection because of low heritabilities, but also a limited scope for long-term response to selection because evolvability as indicated by small additive genetic coefficients of variation is weak.

  20. Variation of chemical composition of high strength low alloy steels with different groove sizes in multi-pass conventional and pulsed current gas metal arc weld depositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Devakumaran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available 25 mm thick micro-alloyed HSLA steel plate is welded by multi-pass GMAW and P-GMAW processes using conventional V-groove and suitably designed narrow gap with 20 mm (NG-20 and 13 mm (NG-13 groove openings. The variation of weld metal chemistry in the multi pass GMA and P-GMA weld depositions are studied by spark emission spectroscopy. It is observed that the narrow groove GMA weld joint shows significant variation of weld metal chemistry compared to the conventional V-groove GMA weld joint since the dilution of base metal extends from the deposit adjacent to groove wall to weld center through dissolution by fusion and solid state diffusion. Further, it is noticed that a high rate of metal deposition along with high velocity of droplet transfer in P-GMAW process enhances the dilution of weld deposit and accordingly varies the chemical composition in multi-pass P-GMA weld deposit. Lower angle of attack to the groove wall surface along with low heat input in NG-13 weld groove minimizes the effect of dissolution by fusion and solid state diffusion from the deposit adjacent to groove wall to weld center. This results in more uniform properties of NG-13 P-GMA weld in comparison to those of NG-20 and CG welds.

  1. Interspecific variation in the relationship between clutch size, laying date and intensity of urbanization in four species of hole-nesting birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaugoyeau, Marie; Adriaensen, Frank; Artemyev, Alexandr; Bańbura, Jerzy; Barba, Emilio; Biard, Clotilde; Blondel, Jacques; Bouslama, Zihad; Bouvier, Jean-Charles; Camprodon, Jordi; Cecere, Francesco; Charmantier, Anne; Charter, Motti; Cichoń, Mariusz; Cusimano, Camillo; Czeszczewik, Dorota; Demeyrier, Virginie; Doligez, Blandine; Doutrelant, Claire; Dubiec, Anna; Eens, Marcel; Eeva, Tapio; Faivre, Bruno; Ferns, Peter N; Forsman, Jukka T; García-Del-Rey, Eduardo; Goldshtein, Aya; Goodenough, Anne E; Gosler, Andrew G; Grégoire, Arnaud; Gustafsson, Lars; Harnist, Iga; Hartley, Ian R; Heeb, Philipp; Hinsley, Shelley A; Isenmann, Paul; Jacob, Staffan; Juškaitis, Rimvydas; Korpimäki, Erkki; Krams, Indrikis; Laaksonen, Toni; Lambrechts, Marcel M; Leclercq, Bernard; Lehikoinen, Esa; Loukola, Olli; Lundberg, Arne; Mainwaring, Mark C; Mänd, Raivo; Massa, Bruno; Mazgajski, Tomasz D; Merino, Santiago; Mitrus, Cezary; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Morin, Xavier; Nager, Ruedi G; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Nilsson, Sven G; Norte, Ana C; Orell, Markku; Perret, Philippe; Perrins, Christopher M; Pimentel, Carla S; Pinxten, Rianne; Richner, Heinz; Robles, Hugo; Rytkönen, Seppo; Senar, Juan Carlos; Seppänen, Janne T; Pascoal da Silva, Luis; Slagsvold, Tore; Solonen, Tapio; Sorace, Alberto; Stenning, Martyn J; Tryjanowski, Piotr; von Numers, Mikael; Walankiewicz, Wieslaw; Møller, Anders Pape

    2016-08-01

    The increase in size of human populations in urban and agricultural areas has resulted in considerable habitat conversion globally. Such anthropogenic areas have specific environmental characteristics, which influence the physiology, life history, and population dynamics of plants and animals. For example, the date of bud burst is advanced in urban compared to nearby natural areas. In some birds, breeding success is determined by synchrony between timing of breeding and peak food abundance. Pertinently, caterpillars are an important food source for the nestlings of many bird species, and their abundance is influenced by environmental factors such as temperature and date of bud burst. Higher temperatures and advanced date of bud burst in urban areas could advance peak caterpillar abundance and thus affect breeding phenology of birds. In order to test whether laying date advance and clutch sizes decrease with the intensity of urbanization, we analyzed the timing of breeding and clutch size in relation to intensity of urbanization as a measure of human impact in 199 nest box plots across Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East (i.e., the Western Palearctic) for four species of hole-nesters: blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus), great tits (Parus major), collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis), and pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca). Meanwhile, we estimated the intensity of urbanization as the density of buildings surrounding study plots measured on orthophotographs. For the four study species, the intensity of urbanization was not correlated with laying date. Clutch size in blue and great tits does not seem affected by the intensity of urbanization, while in collared and pied flycatchers it decreased with increasing intensity of urbanization. This is the first large-scale study showing a species-specific major correlation between intensity of urbanization and the ecology of breeding. The underlying mechanisms for the relationships between life history and

  2. Spatial variation of bed material grain size over a large dune in the Jade Bay tidal channel, German Wadden Sea (preliminary results)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. A.; Ernstsen, V. B.

    2007-12-01

    High-resolution bathymetry of a large dune with a height of ~4 m, a length of ~70 m and a cross- channel width of ~400 m was measured in the Jade Bay tidal channel, German Wadden Sea, using a multibeam echosounder (MBES) system. A total of 34 bed material samples were collected along 5 transects (trough-crest-trough) across the dune using a ShipekTM grab sampler. High-resolution flow velocity measurements, by means of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), were conducted along 3 of these transects during a tidal cycle. Along the channel, mean grain sizes increase from trough to crest along all 5 transects. This increase is most pronounced in the center of the channel (trough ~340 μm, crest ~610 μm) compared to near the channel sides (trough ~425 μm, crest ~500 μm). Across the channel, mean grain sizes decrease along the crest (center ~610 μm, sides ~500 μm), but increase along the trough (center ~340 μm, sides ~425 μm) from the channel center toward the channel sides. The along-channel increase in mean grain size from trough to crest is coherent with an increase in the maximum near-bed flow velocity (calculated as the average flow velocity in the interval from 1 to 2 m above the bed). Moreover, this increase in near-bed flow velocity from trough to crest is more pronounced in the center of the channel (trough ~0.7 m/s, crest ~1.1 m/s) than near the channel sides (trough ~0.9 m/s, crest ~1.1 m/s), which is in line with the larger gradients in mean grain size in the center than along the sides. The higher flow velocities recorded at the crest relative to the trough is due to flow continuity. The across-track increase in mean grain size in the trough from the channel center toward the channel sides is consistent with an increase in the maximum near-bed flow velocity (center ~0.7 m/s, sides ~0.9 m/s). The decrease in mean grain size on the crest from the channel center toward the channel sides cannot simply be explained by lower near-bed flow velocities

  3. Effective population size, genetic variation, and their relevance for conservation: the bighorn sheep in Tiburon Island and comparisons with managed artiodactyls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gasca-Pineda

    Full Text Available The amount of genetic diversity in a finite biological population mostly depends on the interactions among evolutionary forces and the effective population size (N(e as well as the time since population establishment. Because the N(e estimation helps to explore population demographic history, and allows one to predict the behavior of genetic diversity through time, N(e is a key parameter for the genetic management of small and isolated populations. Here, we explored an N(e-based approach using a bighorn sheep population on Tiburon Island, Mexico (TI as a model. We estimated the current (N(crnt and ancestral stable (N(stbl inbreeding effective population sizes as well as summary statistics to assess genetic diversity and the demographic scenarios that could explain such diversity. Then, we evaluated the feasibility of using TI as a source population for reintroduction programs. We also included data from other bighorn sheep and artiodactyl populations in the analysis to compare their inbreeding effective size estimates. The TI population showed high levels of genetic diversity with respect to other managed populations. However, our analysis suggested that TI has been under a genetic bottleneck, indicating that using individuals from this population as the only source for reintroduction could lead to a severe genetic diversity reduction. Analyses of the published data did not show a strict correlation between H(E and N(crnt estimates. Moreover, we detected that ancient anthropogenic and climatic pressures affected all studied populations. We conclude that the estimation of N(crnt and N(stbl are informative genetic diversity estimators and should be used in addition to summary statistics for conservation and population management planning.

  4. Effective population size, genetic variation, and their relevance for conservation: the bighorn sheep in Tiburon Island and comparisons with managed artiodactyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasca-Pineda, Jaime; Cassaigne, Ivonne; Alonso, Rogelio A; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    The amount of genetic diversity in a finite biological population mostly depends on the interactions among evolutionary forces and the effective population size (N(e)) as well as the time since population establishment. Because the N(e) estimation helps to explore population demographic history, and allows one to predict the behavior of genetic diversity through time, N(e) is a key parameter for the genetic management of small and isolated populations. Here, we explored an N(e)-based approach using a bighorn sheep population on Tiburon Island, Mexico (TI) as a model. We estimated the current (N(crnt)) and ancestral stable (N(stbl)) inbreeding effective population sizes as well as summary statistics to assess genetic diversity and the demographic scenarios that could explain such diversity. Then, we evaluated the feasibility of using TI as a source population for reintroduction programs. We also included data from other bighorn sheep and artiodactyl populations in the analysis to compare their inbreeding effective size estimates. The TI population showed high levels of genetic diversity with respect to other managed populations. However, our analysis suggested that TI has been under a genetic bottleneck, indicating that using individuals from this population as the only source for reintroduction could lead to a severe genetic diversity reduction. Analyses of the published data did not show a strict correlation between H(E) and N(crnt) estimates. Moreover, we detected that ancient anthropogenic and climatic pressures affected all studied populations. We conclude that the estimation of N(crnt) and N(stbl) are informative genetic diversity estimators and should be used in addition to summary statistics for conservation and population management planning.

  5. Plant size and abiotic factors determine the intra-specific variation in the multi-stemmed architecture of Prunus lusitanica in the Northeast limit of its global distribution

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    A. Muñoz Costa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The present work provides novel insights on factors (either intrinsic or extrinsic that trigger sprouting in woody species living at range margins. We aim to explain the inter-individual variability in the multi-stemmed architecture of Prunus lusitanica L., an Iberian evergreen relict tree related to the Tertiary flora.Area of study: Northeastern Mediterranean mountains of the Iberian Peninsula, the Northeast limit of the global distribution of the species.Material and Methods: We gathered data on two modes of vegetative reproduction, basal and layering sprouts, in 288 clumps of Prunus lusitanica from four populations. We modeled and analyzed the effect of environmental factors (topography, canopy cover, soil moisture and disturbances and plant size (diameter at breast height on sprouting by means of Generalized Linear Model and other statistical approaches.Main results: Plant size arises as the principal factor to explain the variability of the numbers of both types of sprouts yet it is not a trigger factor. Natural and anthropogenic disturbances promote basal and layering shoots, while tree canopy is mainly relevant for basal shoots, and slope and soil moisture are significant factors for layering shoots.Research highlights: The multi-stemmed architecture of P. lusitanica at the Northeastern limit of its worldwide distribution is triggered by local environmental factors and disturbances. Each external factor shows different levels of influence on the variability and type of vegetative reproduction yet the intensity of the response is driven by the size of the largest trunk of each clump.Key words: vegetative reproduction; sprouting; disturbances; woody plants; relict tree; subtropical; Iberian Peninsula.

  6. Investigating the impact of variations in particle size on heat flow from chaparral fires into soils using a laboratory based wildfire simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, Adam Joseph

    It has been well established that under certain circumstances wildfire is capable of producing water repellent or hydrophobic soils. Hydrophobic soils can dramatically alter runoff and erosion processes and as such have been the subject of considerable research activity. Wildfires in chaparral vegetation are recognized as being particularly susceptible to hydrophobic soil development. A comparison of chaparral fire soil heat profiles from DeBano (1989) and Weirich (unpublished) indicates that under higher fire intensity situations in chaparral a different soil heating mechanism other than just conduction heating may be at work. In contrast to the slow moving low temperature increases expected in conduction heating a much faster heat pulse resulting in more rapid temperature rises and higher temperatures at depth can also occur in chaparral wildland fires. This suggests that a better understanding of the heat transfer processes that occur at extreme fire intensities is both important and is needed. The specific aim of this study was to observe heat flow under a variety of particle sizes using a laboratory based wildfire simulator operating at intensities and durations similar to those experienced in chaparral wildfires. The wildfire simulator system consisted of a propane burner array, an array of thermocouples to measure temperatures at varying locations and depths, and a data logging system to record the results of the heating experiments. Using the simulator homogenous sand, silt, clay, and heterogeneous clay loam were subjected to 600°C, 900°C, and 1200°C peak intensities with two different heating durations or treatments (H1 and H2). The heating levels and durations used were based on data from field based chaparral fire experimental temperature data previously collected by Weirich (unpublished). The system design allowed the user to control the intensity and duration of the heat treatments and the thermocouple sensor arrays measured temperatures at the

  7. Size distributions and temporal variations of biological aerosol particles in the Amazon rainforest characterized by microscopy and real-time UV-APS fluorescence techniques during AMAZE-08

    OpenAIRE

    J. A. Huffman; Sinha, B.; R. M. Garland; A. Snee-Pollmann; Gunthe, S. S.; Artaxo, P.; S. T. Martin; Andreae, M. O.; U. Pöschl

    2012-01-01

    As a part of the AMAZE-08 campaign during the wet season in the rainforest of central Amazonia, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) was operated for continuous measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP). In the coarse particle size range (> 1 μm) the campaign median and quartiles of FBAP number and mass concentration were 7.3 × 104 m−3 (4.0–13.2 × 104 m−3&...

  8. Bone cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, J Y; Villemin, S; Darmana, R; Cahuzac, J P; Autefage, A; Morucci, J P

    1991-02-01

    Bone cutting has always been a problem for surgeons because bone is a hard living material, and many osteotomes are still very crude tools. Technical improvement of these surgical tools has first been their motorization. Studies of the bone cutting process have indicated better features for conventional tools. Several non-conventional osteotomes, particularly ultrasonic osteotomes are described. Some studies on the possible use of lasers for bone cutting are also reported. Use of a pressurised water jet is also briefly examined. Despite their advantages, non-conventional tools still require improvement if they are to be used by surgeons.

  9. Size distributions and temporal variations of biological aerosol particles in the Amazon rainforest characterized by microscopy and real-time UV-APS fluorescence techniques during AMAZE-08

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As a part of the AMAZE-08 campaign during the wet season in the rainforest of central Amazonia, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS was operated for continuous measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP. In the coarse particle size range (> 1 μm the campaign median and quartiles of FBAP number and mass concentration were 7.3 × 104 m−3 (4.0–13.2 × 104 m−3 and 0.72 μg m−3 (0.42–1.19 μg m−3, respectively, accounting for 24% (11–41% of total particle number and 47% (25–65% of total particle mass. During the five-week campaign in February–March 2008 the concentration of coarse-mode Saharan dust particles was highly variable. In contrast, FBAP concentrations remained fairly constant over the course of weeks and had a consistent daily pattern, peaking several hours before sunrise, suggesting observed FBAP was dominated by nocturnal spore emission. This conclusion was supported by the consistent FBAP number size distribution peaking at 2.3 μm, also attributed to fungal spores and mixed biological particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, light microscopy and biochemical staining. A second primary biological aerosol particle (PBAP mode between 0.5 and 1.0 μm was also observed by SEM, but exhibited little fluorescence and no true fungal staining. This mode may have consisted of single bacterial cells, brochosomes, various fragments of biological material, and small Chromalveolata (Chromista spores. Particles liquid-coated with mixed organic-inorganic material constituted a large fraction of observations, and these coatings contained salts likely from primary biological origin. We provide key support for the suggestion that real-time laser-induce fluorescence (LIF techniques using 355 nm excitation provide size-resolved concentrations of FBAP as a lower limit for the atmospheric abundance of biological particles in a pristine

  10. Size distributions and temporal variations of biological aerosol particles in the Amazon rainforest characterized by microscopy and real-time UV-APS fluorescence techniques during AMAZE-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, J. A.; Sinha, B.; Garland, R. M.; Snee-Pollmann, A.; Gunthe, S. S.; Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2012-12-01

    As a part of the AMAZE-08 campaign during the wet season in the rainforest of central Amazonia, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) was operated for continuous measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP). In the coarse particle size range (> 1 μm) the campaign median and quartiles of FBAP number and mass concentration were 7.3 × 104 m-3 (4.0-13.2 × 104 m-3) and 0.72 μg m-3 (0.42-1.19 μg m-3), respectively, accounting for 24% (11-41%) of total particle number and 47% (25-65%) of total particle mass. During the five-week campaign in February-March 2008 the concentration of coarse-mode Saharan dust particles was highly variable. In contrast, FBAP concentrations remained fairly constant over the course of weeks and had a consistent daily pattern, peaking several hours before sunrise, suggesting observed FBAP was dominated by nocturnal spore emission. This conclusion was supported by the consistent FBAP number size distribution peaking at 2.3 μm, also attributed to fungal spores and mixed biological particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy and biochemical staining. A second primary biological aerosol particle (PBAP) mode between 0.5 and 1.0 μm was also observed by SEM, but exhibited little fluorescence and no true fungal staining. This mode may have consisted of single bacterial cells, brochosomes, various fragments of biological material, and small Chromalveolata (Chromista) spores. Particles liquid-coated with mixed organic-inorganic material constituted a large fraction of observations, and these coatings contained salts likely from primary biological origin. We provide key support for the suggestion that real-time laser-induce fluorescence (LIF) techniques using 355 nm excitation provide size-resolved concentrations of FBAP as a lower limit for the atmospheric abundance of biological particles in a pristine environment. We also show some limitations of using the instrument for ambient monitoring of

  11. Maximizing the photo catalytic and photo response properties of multimodal plasmonic Ag/WO(3-x) heterostructure nanorods by variation of the Ag size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sirshendu; Saha, Manas; Paul, Sumana; De, S K

    2015-11-21

    High quality nearly monodisperse colloidal WO3-x nanorods with an aspect ratio ∼18 were synthesized using the thermal decomposition technique. The effects of a capping agent and an activating agent on the nanorod aspect ratio have been studied. Excess carrier concentration due to large oxygen vacancy and smaller width of the nanorods compared to the Bohr exciton radius gives rise to an increase of the band gap. Shape anisotropy in nanorods results in two plasmonic absorbance bands at about 890 nm and 5900 nm corresponding to short axis and long axis plasmon modes. The short axis mode reveals an excellent plasmonic sensitivity of ∼345 nm per refractive index. A plasmonic photocatalysis process based on WO3-x nanorods has been developed to synthesize Ag/WO3-x heterostructures consisting of multiple Ag dots with ∼2 nm size, randomly decorated on the surface of the WO3-x nanorods. Long time irradiation leads to an increase in the size (5 nm) of Ag nanocrystals concomitant with decrease in the number of Ag nanocrystals attached per WO3-x nanorod. Plasmonic photocatalysis followed by thermal annealing produces only one Ag nanocrystal of size ∼10 nm on each WO3-x nanorod. Red shifting and broadening of plasmon bands of Ag nanocrystals and WO3-x nanorods confirm the formation of heterostructures between the metal and semiconductor. Detailed transmission electron micrograph analysis indicates the epitaxial growth of Ag nanocrystals onto WO3-x nanorods. A high photocurrent gain of about 4000 is observed for Ag (10 nm)/WO3-x heterostructures. The photodegradation rate for Rhodamine-B and methylene blue is maximum for Ag (10 nm)/WO3-x heterostructures due to efficient electron transfer from WO3-x nanorods to Ag nanocrystals. Metal plasmon-semiconductor exciton coupling, prominent plasmon absorbance of metal nanoparticles, and formation of an epitaxial interface are found to be the important factors to achieve the maximum photocatalytic activity and fabrication of a

  12. Temporal/seasonal variations of size-dependent airborne fungi indoor/outdoor relationships for a wind-induced naturally ventilated airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chung-Min; Luo, Wen-Chang; Chen, Szu-Chieh; Chen, Jein-Wen; Liang, Huang-Min

    With the use of published temporal/seasonal size characteristics of fungal spores and meteorological data in the subtropical climate, we estimated the airborne fungal concentration indoor/outdoor (I/O) ratios in a wind-induced naturally ventilated home. We expanded previous size-dependent indoor air quality model based on a hygroscopic growth factor as a function of relative humidity (RH) on aerodynamic diameter and concentration of fungal spores. The average geometric mean diameters of airborne fungi decreased from outdoor 2.58±0.37 to indoor 1.91±0.12 μm in summer, whereas decreased from outdoor 2.79±0.32 to indoor 1.73±0.10 μm in winter, resulting from the effect of hygroscopicity of airborne fungi. The higher indoor airborne fungal concentrations occurred in early and late afternoon in which median values were 699.29 and 626.20 CFU m -3 in summer as well as 138.71 and 99.01 CFU m -3 in winter, respectively, at 2 a.m. and 8 p.m. In the absence of indoor sources, summer has higher mean I/O ratios of airborne fungal concentration (0.29 - 0.58) than that in winter (0.12 - 0.16). Parsimoniously, our proposed RH-corrected I/O ratio model could be used to estimate the indoor source concentrations of bioaerosols provided that the actual measured fungus-specific I/O ratios are available.

  13. Variation of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions at the urban and downwind regional sites in the Pearl River Delta during summertime pollution episodes

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    D. L. Yue

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize the features of particulate pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD in the summer, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were simultaneously performed at Guangzhou urban site (GZ and Back-garden downwind regional site (BG in July 2006. Particle number concentration from 20 nm to 10 μm at BG was (1.7±0.8×104 cm−3, about 40% lower than that at GZ, (2.9±1.1×104 cm−3. The total particle volume concentration at BG was 94±34 μm3 cm−3, similar to that at GZ, 96±43 μm3 cm−3. More 20–100 nm particles, significantly affected by the traffic emissions, were observed at GZ, while 100–660 nm particle number concentrations were similar at both sites as they are more regional. PM2.5 values were similar at GZ (69±43 μg m−3 and BG (69±58 μg m−3 with R2 of 0.71 for the daily average PM2.5 at these two sites, indicating the fine particulate pollution in the PRD region to be regional. Two kinds of pollution episodes, the accumulation pollution episode and the regional transport pollution episode, were observed. Fine particles over 100 nm dominated both number and volume concentrations of total particles during the late periods of these pollution episodes. Accumulation and secondary transformation are the main reasons for the nighttime accumulation pollution episode. SO42−, NO3 accounted for about 60% in 100–660 nm particle mass and PM2.5 increase. When south or southeast wind prevailed in the PRD region, regional transport of pollutants took place. Regional transport contributed about 30% to fine particulate pollution at BG during a regional transport case. Secondary transformation played an important role during regional transport, causing higher increase

  14. Variation of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions at the urban and downwind regional sites in the Pearl River Delta during summertime pollution episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Yue

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize the features of particulate pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD in the summer, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were simultaneously performed at Guangzhou urban site (GZ and Back-garden downwind regional site (BG in July 2006. Particle number concentration from 20 nm to 10 μm at BG was (1.7±0.8×104 cm−3, about 40% lower than that at GZ, (2.9±1.1×104 cm−3 with intensive traffic emissions. The total particle volume concentration at BG was 94±34 μm3 cm−3, similar to that at GZ, 96±43 μm3 cm−3. More 20–100 nm particles, significantly affected by the traffic emissions, were observed at GZ, while 100–660 nm particle number concentrations were similar at both sites as they are more regional. PM2.5 values were also similar at GZ (69±43 μg m−3 and BG (69±58 μg m−3, indicating the fine particulate pollution in the PRD region to be regional. Two kinds of pollution episodes, the accumulation pollution episode and the regional transport pollution episode, were observed. Fine particles over 100 nm dominated both number and volume concentrations of total particles during the late periods of these pollution episodes. Accumulation and secondary transformations are two main reasons for the nighttime accumulation pollution episode. SO4−2, NO3, and NH4+ accounted for about 60% in 100–660 nm particle mass and PM2.5. When south or south-southeast wind prevailed in the PRD region, regional transport of pollutants takes place. Regional transport contributed about 30% to fine particulate pollution at BG during a regional transport case. Secondary transformation played an important role during regional transport, causing higher increase rates of secondary

  15. Machining characteristics of the haversian and plexiform components of bovine cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conward, Michael; Samuel, Johnson

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the characteristic differences observed while machining the haversian and plexiform components of a bovine cortical femoral bone. To this end micro-milling slotting experiments are performed on both the components by varying both the cutting velocity and the feed-per-tooth values. The scale of machining is chosen specifically to ensure sensitivity to the microstructural variations in the bone. The material properties of the microstructural components and their size-scale relative to the feed-per-tooth values are seen to dictate the failure mechanisms encountered during machining. The cutting force, surface roughness, and tool wear are all uniquely affected by the plexiform and haversian components of the cortical bone. In general, plexiform bone requires a higher cutting force than the haversian bone. While a higher cutting velocity can lower the surface roughness of haversian bone, it typically results in the most surface damage. The cutting force and surface roughness values for both the components show strain rate sensitivity. The tool wear is seen to be the highest while cutting parallel to the lamellar structures seen in the plexiform bone.

  16. DXA measurements in rett syndrome reveal small bones with low bone mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roende, Gitte; Ravn, Kirstine; Fuglsang, Kathrine

    2011-01-01

    Low bone mass is reported in growth-retarded patients harboring mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene causing Rett syndrome (RTT). We present the first study addressing both bone mineral density (BMD) and bone size in RTT. Our object was to determine whether patients...

  17. Seasonal and spatial variation of trace elements in multi-size airborne particulate matters of Beijing, China: Mass concentration, enrichment characteristics, source apportionment, chemical speciation and bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiajia; Tian, Hezhong; Cheng, Ke; Lu, Long; Wang, Yuxuan; Wu, Ye; Zhu, Chuanyong; Liu, Kaiyun; Zhou, Junrui; Liu, Xingang; Chen, Jing; Hao, Jiming

    2014-12-01

    The seasonal and spatial variation characteristics of 19 elements (Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Se, Zn) in TSP/PM10/PM2.5 samples were investigated, which were collected from April 2011 to January 2012 simultaneously at an urban downtown site, a traffic roadside site, a suburban site, and a rural site in Beijing. The elevated concentrations of several toxic trace elements (As, Cd, Mn, Ni, Pb, etc.) in particles revealed that the contamination of toxic elements in Beijing could not be neglected. Positive matrix factorization method (PMF) was applied for source apportionment of trace elements in PM, and three factors (crust related sources, combustion sources, and traffic and steel industrial related sources) were identified. Furthermore, the chemical speciation and bioavailability of various elements were identified by applying European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) procedure. Our results showed that eight toxic elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn) exhibited higher mobility in PM2.5 than in PM10. Notably, elements of As, Cd, Pb and Zn were presented with higher mobility than the other elements, and these elements were lightly to release into the environment and easily available to human body. Additionally, As, Cd, Pb and Zn also accounted for higher percentages in the bound to mobile fractions at the central urban areas of Beijing. Therefore, special concerns should be paid to these toxic trace elements which had relatively high mobility in fine particles, when planning and implementing the comprehensive air pollution mitigation policies in Beijing.

  18. Chromium Distribution and Spatial Variations in the Finer Sediment Grain Size Fraction and Unfractioned Surficial Sediments on Nyanza Gulf, of Lake Victoria (East Africa

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    Job Mwamburi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surficial sediments collected from the Nyanza Gulf of Lake Victoria (East Africa were used to determine spatial concentrations of Cr and determine differences in contents of the unfractioned (whole sediment and the finer grain size sediments, establishing any changes in Cr enrichment and potential ecological risks using sediment quality guidelines. A single pollution index was also used to evaluate level of Cr contamination. The spatial mean Cr contents in the <63 µm (silt-clay fraction were found to be significantly lower than those in the unfractioned sediments, but with a strong linear positive correlation. The study results show decreasing spatial amounts of Cr in surficial sediments of the Nyanza Gulf, when compared to a study done 20 years earlier. However, the 95% confidence limits of the overall mean Cr in unfractioned sediments exceed the threshold effect concentration (TEC, indicating the potential for Cr remobilization from sediments. In general the sediment enrichment is evidence of possible dominance of lithogenous sources of Cr in the surface lake sediments, with potential anthropogenic sources from the drainage system and nearshore urban areas. The sediments are unpolluted with respect to geoaccumulation index, and sediment enrichment factors suggest a minor to moderate enrichment of Cr in surficial sediments of three sites around the Nyanza Gulf zones and around the river mouth in the main lake.

  19. A note on the variation in sealworm (Pseudoterranova decipiens infection in shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius with host age and size at two locations in Norwegian inshore waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Andersen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 540 shorthorn sculpins were collected between 1991 and 1996 from Hvaler and Vega in Norway. The sculpins were caught in traps or by gillnets near seal haul-out sites in both areas. Size, age and intensity of P. decipiens infection were recorded for most fish sampled. Stomach contents of a subsample from each area were examined and the frequencies of occurrence of prey items were determined. Sealworm abundance (mean number of worms in all fish examined increased significantly with host age and length within given age groups of sculpins from both areas. Sealwormabundance and mean intensity (mean number of worms per infected fish in sculpins from Vega were lower than those found in the more rapidly growing fish from Hvaler. Abundance of sealworm peaked in 6 year old fish from Vega and in 4 year old fish from Hvaler. Fish and amphipods were the prey items found most frequently in the stomach of fish from Hvaler, while fish and decapods were found most frequently at Vega.

  20. Interparietal bone in forensic practice: Case report

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    Nikolić Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In forensic autopsy, pathologists pay attention to skull fracture lines. They are not much interested in the anatomical morphological variations of the skull bones, as long as the variations are not present. The interparietal bone is one of the anatomical variations that could be of interest for forensic pathologists. Case Outline. We present a case of a 54-year-old man who, after a fall overlived a head injury for six weeks. By chance, autopsy revealed an undivided interparietal bone. Its lateral sutures were fused with parietal bones and unrecognizable from the anterior skull bones, while the sutura mendosa was clearly visible. Conclusion. The forensic pathologist should be able to recognize anatomic morphological variations, including those of skull bones. The interparietal bone could be interpreted wrongly as belonging to the fractured occipital bone, i.e. as a broken fragment. This is of particular significance in the cases, for example, of murder or child abuse. Its inferior suture can be seen by X-ray and possibly wrongly interpreted as a fracture line. The presence of this variation may be occasionally useful in the identification of an unknown or lost person.

  1. Bone x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or broken bone Bone tumors Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection) ... Multiple myeloma Osgood-Schlatter disease Osteogenesis imperfecta Osteomalacia Osteomyelitis Paget disease of the bone Rickets X-ray ...

  2. Genome Size and Variation Analysis of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) Germplasms in Yunnan by Flow Cytometry%云南芒果种质基因组大小测定与变异分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳觐; 李开雄; 孔广红; 倪书邦

    2015-01-01

    为了解云南芒果(Mangifera indica L.)种质资源的基因组的变异情况,采用流式细胞术对35份云南芒果种质资源的基因组大小进行了测定和变异分析。结果表明,云南芒果种质资源的基因组大小存在一定差异,基因组的平均C值是0.445110 pg,0.4353177×109 bp,最小的是采自景洪的半栽培种YSM-44(0.434567 pg,0.4250060×109 bp),最大的是采自红河的野生种YSM-25(0.458679 pg,0.4485881×109 bp)。基因组C值变异程度最大的是野生种(CV=1.65%),其次为半野生种(CV=1.26%)、半栽培种(CV=1.21%)和栽培种(CV=0.11%)。与芒果具有相近基因组大小的多为苔藓植物,与“C值悖论”观点相一致。因此,应用流式细胞术能准确、快捷地测定芒果基因组大小,而且云南野生、半野生及半栽培芒果种质资源遗传变异类型丰富,有较大的挖掘利用潜力。%In order to understand the variation of mango (Mangifera indica L.) germplasms in Yunnan, the genome size of 35 germplasms was determined by lfow cytometry and their variation was analyzed. The results showed that the mean genome size among the 35 germplasms was 0.445110 pg and 0.4353177×109 bp, which the minimum one (0.434567 pg, 0.4250060×109 bp) was YSM-44 from Jinghong, and the maximum one (0.458679 pg, 0.44485881×109 bp) was YSM-25 from Honghe. The genome size variation of wild germplasms was the largest (CV=1.65%), followed by semi-wild germplasms (CV=1.26%), semi-cultivated germplasms (CV=1.21%) and cultivated germplasms (CV=0.11%). The bryophytes had similar genome size to mango, which is consistent with the“C-value paradox”theory. Therefore, lfow cytometry method could accurately and fastly measure genome size of mango, and the genetic variation in wild, semi-wild and semi-cultivated germplasms was rich, these could be used for mango breeding.

  3. Gradients in pore size enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Luca, Andrea; Ostrowska, Barbara; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Lepedda, Antonio; Swieszkowski, Wojcech; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Small fractures in bone tissue can heal by themselves, but in case of larger defects current therapies are not completely successful due to several drawbacks. A possible strategy relies on the combination of additive manufactured polymeric scaffolds and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). The architecture of bone tissue is characterized by a structural gradient. Long bones display a structural gradient in the radial direction, while flat bones in the axial direction. Such gradient presents a variation in bone density from the cancellous bone to the cortical bone. Therefore, scaffolds presenting a gradient in porosity could be ideal candidates to improve bone tissue regeneration. In this study, we present a construct with a discrete gradient in pore size and characterize its ability to further support the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Furthermore, we studied the behaviour of hMSCs within the different compartments of the gradient scaffolds, showing a correlation between osteogenic differentiation and ECM mineralization, and pore dimensions. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content increased with increasing pore dimensions. Our results indicate that designing structural porosity gradients may be an appealing strategy to support gradual osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells.

  4. A Design Method for FES Bone Health Therapy in SCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Andrews

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available FES assisted activities such as standing, walking, cycling and rowing induce forces within the leg bones and have been proposed to reduce osteoporosis in spinal cord injury (SCI. However, details of the applied mechanical stimulus for osteogenesis is often not reported. Typically, comparisons of bone density results are made after costly and time consuming clinical trials. These studies have produced inconsistent results and are subject to sample size variations. Here we propose a design process that may be used to predict the clinical outcome based on biomechanical simulation and mechano-biology. This method may allow candidate therapies to be optimized and quantitatively compared. To illustrate the approach we have used data obtained from a rower with complete paraplegia using the RowStim (III system.

  5. A Design Method for FES Bone Health Therapy in SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Brian; Shippen, James; Armengol, Monica; Gibbons, Robin; Holderbaum, William; Harwin, William

    2016-01-01

    FES assisted activities such as standing, walking, cycling and rowing induce forces within the leg bones and have been proposed to reduce osteoporosis in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, details of the applied mechanical stimulus for osteogenesis is often not reported. Typically, comparisons of bone density results are made after costly and time consuming clinical trials. These studies have produced inconsistent results and are subject to sample size variations. Here we propose a design process that may be used to predict the clinical outcome based on biomechanical simulation and mechano-biology. This method may allow candidate therapies to be optimized and quantitatively compared. To illustrate the approach we have used data obtained from a rower with complete paraplegia using the RowStim (III) system. PMID:28078075

  6. Bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Charlotte Ørsted; Hansen, Rikke Rie; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal conditions are common causes of chronic pain and there is an unmet medical need for improved treatment options. Bone pain is currently managed with disease modifying agents and/or analgesics depending on the condition. Disease modifying agents affect the underlying pathophysiology...... of the disease and reduce as a secondary effect bone pain. Antiresorptive and anabolic agents, such as bisphosphonates and intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34), respectively, have proven effective as pain relieving agents. Cathepsin K inhibitors and anti-sclerostin antibodies hold, due to their disease...... modifying effects, promise of a pain relieving effect. NSAIDs and opioids are widely employed in the treatment of bone pain. However, recent preclinical findings demonstrating a unique neuronal innervation of bone tissue and sprouting of sensory nerve fibers open for new treatment possibilities....

  7. Bone graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around the area. The bone graft can be held in place with pins, plates, or screws. Why ... Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francosco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the ...

  8. 雅鲁藏布江米林宽谷段爬升沙丘粒度分异特征研究%Variation of grain sizes on a mountain climbing dune in Mainling wide valley, Yarlung Zangbo River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周娜; 张春来; 刘永刚

    2012-01-01

    Mountain climbing dunes are widely distributed in the Mainling wide valley of Yarlung Zangbo River, southern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The climbing dunes studied are located on the right bank of Yarlung Zangbo River at an S-shaped meander, west of Wolong town. Samples are collected according to dune climbing height and sites of super- imposed dunes along prevailing wind (NE). As parts of the aeolian sand dune system in the valley, sediments are also sampled on dunes developing on the alluvial flat and terrace. Grain size analysis shows that sediments of the mountain climbing dune are generally char- acterized by fine and very fine sands (2.07 to 3.71φ), moderately well sorting (0.20 to 1.41φ), fine skewness (-0.33 to 0.61) and multi-mode grain size distribution with kurto- sis ranging from 0.66 to 3.09, exhibiting some features of both succession and variation from those of sand dunes on the upwind marginal alluvial flat and river terrace. Grain size parameters vary with height in NE-SW wind direction from the toe to the top of the climb- ing dune with mean grain size getting finer, sorting better, skewness coarser and kurtosis lower. Also, grains on super-imposed dunes grow coarser and sorting poorer from toe to dune top. There are some correlations between grain size and height, which shows a posi tive correlation for very fine sands with height and a negative relation for fine sands and height. The variation of grain sizes with height reflects different climbing ability for grains with different sizes. There exist differences in grain size characteristics between ridges and inter-ridge grooves of strip-shaped dunes.%雅鲁藏布江米林宽谷段爬升沙丘分布广泛。选择卧龙镇西侧雅鲁藏布江右岸典型爬升沙丘,根据沙丘爬升高度和叠置沙丘地貌部位对其表面沉积物进行了系统采样。作为河谷风沙地貌的重要组成部分,相应采集了河漫滩、阶地沙丘沙样品。粒度分析表明,

  9. A simple genetic architecture underlies morphological variation in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Boyko

    Full Text Available Domestic dogs exhibit tremendous phenotypic diversity, including a greater variation in body size than any other terrestrial mammal. Here, we generate a high density map of canine genetic variation by genotyping 915 dogs from 80 domestic dog breeds, 83 wild canids, and 10 outbred African shelter dogs across 60,968 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Coupling this genomic resource with external measurements from breed standards and individuals as well as skeletal measurements from museum specimens, we identify 51 regions of the dog genome associated with phenotypic variation among breeds in 57 traits. The complex traits include average breed body size and external body dimensions and cranial, dental, and long bone shape and size with and without allometric scaling. In contrast to the results from association mapping of quantitative traits in humans and domesticated plants, we find that across dog breeds, a small number of quantitative trait loci (< or = 3 explain the majority of phenotypic variation for most of the traits we studied. In addition, many genomic regions show signatures of recent selection, with most of the highly differentiated regions being associated with breed-defining traits such as body size, coat characteristics, and ear floppiness. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of mapping multiple traits in the domestic dog using a database of genotyped individuals and highlight the important role human-directed selection has played in altering the genetic architecture of key traits in this important species.

  10. Variations of Baterial Population Size in Water Sources for Aquaculture of Doumen County%斗门地区养殖水源细菌数量的变化动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    晏荣军; 林小涛; 许忠能; 梁郁强; 朱建洪

    2002-01-01

    Biotechnology, Jinan University, G-uangzhou 510632), Zhu Jianhong (Giant Freshwater Shrimp Breed Multiplication Farm of Doumen , Zhuhai 519100). Chinese Journal of Ecology, 2002,21 (6) :65 ~67.Microbiological survey in the Luozhou River and a pond of Doumen County Guangdong Porvina from March to July in 2001 provided the data for study in the variations of heterotrophic bacteria and vibrio population size with some environmental factors. The results showed that heterotrophic bacteria and vibrio population densities in Luozhou River and pond increased with water temperature. But when COD increased, these densities in the pond appeard to decline. The popula tion densities of heterotrophic bacteria in Luozhou River and pond ranged from 2300cells@ ml-1 to 9.7 × 104 cells@ ml- 1,and those of vibrio ranged from 800 cells@ ml-1 to 1.97 × 104 cells@ ml-1.

  11. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information › Bone Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your ... compared to people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine ...

  12. Assessment of bone loss with repeated bone mineral measurements: Application to measurements on the individual patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahner, H.W.

    1987-02-01

    Longitudinal measurements on lumbar spine and mid-radius were made by bone absorptiometry techniques in 139 normal women. Bone mineral was measured every 6 months over an median interval of 2.1 years. The results revealed that bone loss at different skeletal sites is non-uniform with equal bone loss patterns in all patients and relatively small variations in bone loss rate between normal women. For achieving these results there is strong demand on high precision and properly spaced measuring intervals for long-term rate of loss measurements. For exclusion of progressive degenerative disease a radiographic evaluation of the spine in the beginning and at the end of the study is mandatory as compression fractures or trauma reveal bone mineral changes independent from the agerelated bone loss. These repeated bone mineral measurements are useful for monitoring and follow-up studies during different therapeutic regimens.

  13. Bone marrow transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  14. Bone histology of the stegosaur Kentrosaurus aethiopicus (Ornithischia: Thyreophora) from the Upper Jurassic of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelstorff, Ragna; Hübner, Tom R; Chinsamy, Anusuya; Sander, P Martin

    2013-06-01

    Using bone histology, a slow growth rate, uncommon for most dinosaurs, has been interpreted for the highly derived stegosaur Stegosaurus (Ornithischia: Thyreophora) and the basal thyreophoran Scutellosaurus. In this study, we examine whether this slow growth rate also occurs in the more basal stegosaur Kentrosaurus from the Tendaguru beds of Tanzania. The bone histology of six femora of Kentrosaurus representing an ontogenetic series from subadult to adult was studied, as well as one scapula. The primary bone is mainly highly vascularized fibro-lamellar bone with some reticular organization of the vascular canals. In addition to LAGs and annuli, distinctive shifts in the pattern of vascularization occur, which have been interpreted as potential growth marks. The variation in the development of growth marks may reflect annual climatic fluctuations. The overall bone depositional rate, and hence growth rate in Kentrosaurus appears to be higher than in Stegosaurus and Scutellosaurus. Considering that Stegosaurus is the larger-sized of the two stegosaurs, this would be contrary to an earlier supposition that small-bodied dinosaurs have slower growth rates than larger ones. Our finding of rapid rates of bone deposition in Kentrosaurus suggests that slow growth rates previously reported in Scutellosaurus and Stegosaurus are not a phylogenetic characteristic of the Thyreophora. Thus, slow growth rates are not plesiomorphic for the Thyreophora. We propose that the slow growth rates documented in the highly derived Stegosaurus could have been secondarily derived or alternatively that Kentrosaurus is the exception having increased growth rates.

  15. Bone mineral content and bone metabolism in young adults with severe periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wowern von, N.; Westergaard, J.; Kollerup, G.

    2001-01-01

    Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis......Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis...

  16. The Effects of Obesity on Murine Cortical Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sophi

    This dissertation details the effects of obesity on the mechanical properties and structure of cortical bone. Obesity is associated with greater bone mineral content that might be expected to protect against fracture, which has been observed in adults. Paradoxically however, the incidence of bone fractures has been found to increase in overweight and obese children and adolescents. Femora from adolescent and adult mice fed a high-fat diet are investigated for changes in shape, tissue structure, as well as tissue-level and whole-bone mechanical properties. Results indicate increased bone size, reduced size-independent mechanical properties, but maintained size-dependent mechanical properties. Other changes in cortical bone response to obesity are observed with advancing age. This study indicates that bone quantity and bone quality play important compensatory roles in determining fracture risk, and that fracture risk may not be lessened for adults as previously thought.

  17. [Bone transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Julián, M; Valentí, A

    2006-01-01

    We describe the methodology of the Bone and Soft Tissue Bank, from extraction and storage until use. Since the year 1986, with the creation of the Bone Bank in the University Clinic of Navarra, more than 3,000 grafts have been used for very different types of surgery. Bone grafts can be classified into cortical and spongy; the former are principally used in surgery to save tumour patients, in large post-traumatic reconstructions and in replacement surgery where there are massive bone defects and a structural support is required. The spongy grafts are the most used due to their numerous indications; they are especially useful in filling cavities that require a significant quantity of graft when the autograft is insufficient, or as a complement. They are also of special help in treating fractures when there is bone loss and in the treatment of delays in consolidation and pseudoarthrosis in little vascularized and atrophic zones. They are also used in prosthetic surgery against the presence of cavity type defects. Allografts of soft tissues are specially recognised in multiple ligament injuries that require reconstructions. Nowadays, the most utilised are those employed in surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament although they can be used for filling any ligament or tendon defect. The principal difficulties of the cortical allografts are in the consolidation of the ends with the bone itself and in tumour surgery, given that these are patients immunodepressed by the treatment, the incidence of infection is increased with respect to spongy grafts and soft tissues, which is irrelevant. In short, the increasingly widespread use of allografts is an essential therapeutic weapon in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. It must be used by expert hands.

  18. Bone biopsy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  19. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... needle is gently pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  20. Facts about Broken Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Broken Bones KidsHealth > For Kids > Broken Bones Print A A ... sticking through the skin . What Happens When a Bone Breaks? It hurts to break a bone! It's ...

  1. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  2. Broken Bones (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Broken Bones KidsHealth > For Parents > Broken Bones Print A A ... bone fragments in place. When Will a Broken Bone Heal? Fractures heal at different rates, depending upon ...

  3. Bone densitometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Alexandersen, P; Møllgaard, A

    1999-01-01

    The bisphosphonates have been introduced as alternatives to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for the treatment and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The expected increasing application in at clinical practice demands cost-effective and easily handled methods to monitor the effect on bone...

  4. Statistical shape and appearance models of bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkalkan, Nazli; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2014-03-01

    When applied to bones, statistical shape models (SSM) and statistical appearance models (SAM) respectively describe the mean shape and mean density distribution of bones within a certain population as well as the main modes of variations of shape and density distribution from their mean values. The availability of this quantitative information regarding the detailed anatomy of bones provides new opportunities for diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of skeletal diseases. The potential of SSM and SAM has been recently recognized within the bone research community. For example, these models have been applied for studying the effects of bone shape on the etiology of osteoarthritis, improving the accuracy of clinical osteoporotic fracture prediction techniques, design of orthopedic implants, and surgery planning. This paper reviews the main concepts, methods, and applications of SSM and SAM as applied to bone.

  5. Microscopic and radiographic analysis of the effect of particle size of demineralized bovine cancellous bone matrix on the repair of bone defects in femurs of rabbits Análise microscópica e radiográfica do efeito do tamanho das partículas de matriz de osso medular bovino desmineralizado na reparação de defeito ósseo em fêmures de coelhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everdan Carneiro

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The bone tissue has a great regenerative potential, with ability to completely restore its structure and original functions. In some situations, though, bone defects cannot be self-repaired, thus requiring the use of grafts for a correct treatment and good prognosis. This work aimed at microscopically analyzing the effect of the particle size of demineralized bovine cancellous bone matrix in micro and macrogranular forms on the repair of bone defects in femurs of rabbits, with blood clot used as control. A