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Sample records for bone screws

  1. Strength comparison of allogenic bone screws, bioabsorbable screws, and stainless steel screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rano, James A; Savoy-Moore, Ruth T; Fallat, Lawrence M

    2002-01-01

    Allogenic bone screws are new to the fixation market and have yet to be tested against current fixation materials. An in vitro comparison of the same sizes of stainless steel, bioabsorbable, and allogenic bone screws was undertaken to assess screw resistance to the forces of bending, pullout, and shear. Using aluminum plates to support the screws, forces up to 1000 Newtons were applied to six to eight samples of each type of screw. During each test, stainless steel screws withstood the maximum force that could be exerted by the testing apparatus without failing (bending, 113.9 +/- 11.8 N mean +/- SE; pullout 999.1 +/- 33.7 N; and shear, 997.5 +/- 108.8 N). In each test, compared to bioabsorbable screws, allogenic bone screws failed faster (pullout, allogenic: 12.4 +/- 1.1 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 120.6 +/- 13.8 seconds; p = .001; bending, allogenic: 53.4 +/- 4.8 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 201.9 +/- 11.1 seconds; p = .001; shear, allogenic 13.5 +/- 1.4 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 43.8 +/- 0.9 seconds; p = .001) under equivalent (pullout: bioabsorbable, 385.0 +/- 18.4 N vs. allogenic, 401.0 +/- 35.9 N; p = .001) or lower (bending, allogenic: 4.7 +/- 0.2 N vs. bioabsorbable, 11.0 +/- 0.9 N; p = .675; shear, allogenic: 312.1 +/- 15.5 N vs. bioabsorbable 680.9 +/- 8.5 N; p = .001) loads, and in a highly variable fashion. Overall, the bioabsorbable screws withstood the forces of bending, pullout, and shear better than the allogenic screws, and stainless steel screws outperformed both bioabsorbable and allogenic screws. Despite these results, allogenic screws could still be useful in compliant patients who would benefit from their osteoconductive properties.

  2. Biomechanical study of pedicle screw fixation in severely osteoporotic bone.

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    Cook, Stephen D; Salkeld, Samantha L; Stanley, Tom; Faciane, Albert; Miller, Scot D

    2004-01-01

    Obtaining adequate purchase with standard pedicle screw techniques remains a challenge in poor quality bone. The development of alternate insertion techniques and screw designs was prompted by recognition of potential fixation complications. An expandable pedicle screw design has been shown to significantly improve fixation compared to a conventional screw in poor quality bone. The purpose of this study was to determine if polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement augmentation of an expandable pedicle screw can further improve fixation strength compared to the expandable screw alone in severely osteoporotic bone. A technique for cement insertion into the pedicle by means of the cannulated central portion of the expandable screw is also described. The axial pullout strength, stiffness and energy absorbed of cemented and noncemented expandable pedicle screws was determined in cadaveric vertebrae. Twenty-one fresh unembalmed vertebrae from the thoracolumbar spine were used. Radiographs and bone mineral density measurements (BMD) were used to characterize bone quality. Paired cemented and noncemented pedicle screw axial pullout strength was determined through mechanical testing. Mechanical pullout strength, stiffness and energy to failure was correlated with BMD. Overall, there was a 250% increase in mean pullout strength with the cemented expandable screw compared with a noncemented expandable screw including a greater than twofold increase in pullout strength in the most severely osteoporotic bone. The mean stiffness and energy absorbed to failure was also significantly increased. A cemented conventional screw achieved a pullout strength similar to the noncemented expandable screw. PMMA cement augmentation of the expandable pedicle screw may be a viable clinical option for achieving fixation in severely osteoporotic bone.

  3. Inadvertent Screw Stripping During Ankle Fracture Fixation in Elderly Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinah, A. Feroz; Mears, Simon C.; Knight, Trevor A.; Soin, Sandeep P.; Campbell, John T.; Belkoff, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Poor screw purchase because of osteoporosis presents difficulties in ankle fracture fixation. The aim of our study was to determine if cortical thickness, unicortical versus bicortical purchase, and bone mineral density are predictors of inadvertent screw stripping and overtightening. Ten paired cadaver ankles (average donor age, 81.7 years; range, 50-97 years) were used for the study. Computed tomography scanning with phantoms of known density was used to determine the bone density along the distal fibula. A standard small-fragment, 7-hole, one-third tubular plate was applied to the lateral surface of the fibula, with 3 proximal bicortical cortical screws and 2 distal unicortical cancellous screws. A posterior plate, in which all 5 screws were cortical and achieved bicortical purchase, was subsequently applied to the same bones and positioned so that the screw holes did not overlap. A torque sensor was used to measure the torque of each screw during insertion (Ti) and then stripping (Ts). The effect of bone density, screw location, cortical thickness, and unicortical versus bicortical purchase on Ti and Ts was checked for significance (P screws were inadvertently stripped and 12% were overtightened. Despite 21% of the screws being stripped or being at risk for stripping, we found no significant predictors to warn of impending screw stripping. Additional work is needed to identify clinically useful predictors of screw stripping. PMID:23569675

  4. Interfacial sliding properties of bone screw materials and their effect on screw fixation strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koistinen, Arto P; Korhonen, Hannu; Kröger, Heikki; Lappalainen, Reijo

    2014-09-05

    This study examined the effect of interfacial sliding and test material properties on the fixation strength and insertional properties of self-tapping bone screws. Various substitute materials (polyacetal [POM], poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] and E-glass-filled Epoxy [Sawbones®]) for human bone were evaluated, and the results were compared with the findings for cadaver bone.
 Initial coefficient of friction (CoF) of the screw material stainless steel AISI316 was tested using a pin-on-disk apparatus, and the screws were exposed to pullout tests after insertion torque tests. The effect of a smooth diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating was studied by applying the coating on both CoF test balls and bone screws.
 Mechanical properties of test blocks strongly correlated to both pullout strength and insertion torque of the screws: for noncoated 2.7-mm screws, tensile strength correlated to pullout strength and insertion torque, with Pearson correlation coefficients r=0.977 and r=0.738, respectively. In contrast, CoF correlated strongly to screw insertion torque but not to pullout strength in bone substitute materials (for noncoated 2.7-mm screws, r=0.652 and r=0.248, respectively). There were no significant differences in CoF using noncoated and DLC-coated screw materials against bone substitutes.
 Proper materials for in vitro testing help in evaluating the biomechanics of the implants in advance. However, choosing the material needs attention, as their ability to model human bone depends on test type.

  5. Pedicle screw augmentation with bone cement enforced Vicryl mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Samuel L; Bachmann, Elias; Fischer, Michael; Meyer, Dominik C; Gerber, Christoph A; Snedeker, Jess G; Farshad, Mazda

    2018-01-01

    Achieving sufficient mechanical purchase of pedicle screws in osteoporotic or previously instrumented bone is technically and biologically challenging. Techniques using different kinds of pedicle screws or methods of cement augmentation have been used to address this challenge, but are associated with difficult revisions and complications. The purpose of this biomechanical trial was to investigate the use of biocompatible textile materials in combination with bone cement to augment pullout strength of pedicle screws while reducing the risk of cement extrusion. Pedicle screws (6/40 mm) were either augmented with standard bone-cement (Palacos LV + G) in one group (BC, n = 13) or with bone-cement enforced by Vicryl mesh in another group (BCVM, n = 13) in osteoporosis-like saw bone blocks. Pullout testing was subsequently performed. In a second experimental phase, similar experiments were performed using human cadaveric lumbar vertebrae (n = 10). In osteoporosis-like saw bone blocks, a mean screw pullout force of 350 N (±125) was significantly higher with the Bone cement (BC) compared to bone-cement enforced by Vicryl mesh (BCVM) technique with 240 N (±64) (p = 0.030). In human cadaveric lumbar vertebrae the mean screw pullout force was 784 ± 366 N with BC and not statistically different to BCVM with 757 ± 303 N (p = 0.836). Importantly, cement extrusion was only observed in the BC group (40%) and never with the BCVM technique. In vitro textile reinforcement of bone cement for pedicle screw augmentation successfully reduced cement extrusion compared to conventionally delivered bone cement. The mechanical strength of textile delivered cement constructs was more reproducible than standard cementing. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:212-216, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Repair of microdamage in osteonal cortical bone adjacent to bone screw.

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    Lei Wang

    Full Text Available Up to date, little is known about the repair mode of microdamage in osteonal cortical bone resulting from bone screw implantation. In this study, self-tapping titanium cortical bone screws were inserted into the tibial diaphyses of 24 adult male rabbits. The animals were sacrificed at 1 day, 2 weeks, 1 month and 2 months after surgery. Histomorphometric measurement and confocal microscopy were performed on basic fuchsin stained bone sections to examine the morphological characteristics of microdamage, bone resorption activity and spatial relationship between microdamage and bone resorption. Diffuse and linear cracks were coexisted in peri-screw bone. Intracortical bone resorption was significantly increased 2 weeks after screw installation and reach to the maximum at 1 month. There was no significant difference in bone resorption between 1-month and 2-months groups. Microdamage was significantly decreased within 1 month after surgery. Bone resorption was predisposed to occur in the region of <100 µm from the bone-screw interface, where had extensive diffuse damage mixed with linear cracks. Different patterns of resorption cavities appeared in peri-screw bone. These data suggest that 1 the complex microdamage composed of diffuse damage and linear cracks is a strong stimulator for initiating targeted bone remodeling; 2 bone resorption activities taking place on the surfaces of differently oriented Haversian and Volkmann canals work in a team for the repair of extensive microdamage; 3 targeted bone remodeling is a short-term reaction to microdamage and thereby it may not be able to remove all microdamage resulting from bone screw insertion.

  7. Biomechanical analysis of an interference screw and a novel twist lock screw design for bone graft fixation.

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    Asnis, S; Mullen, J; Asnis, P D; Sgaglione, N; LaPorta, T; Grande, D A; Chahine, N O

    2017-12-01

    Malpositioning of an anterior cruciate ligament graft during reconstruction can occur during screw fixation. The purpose of this study is to compare the fixation biomechanics of a conventional interference screw with a novel Twist Lock Screw, a rectangular shaped locking screw that is designed to address limitations of graft positioning and tensioning. Synthetic bone (10, 15, 20lb per cubic foot) were used simulating soft, moderate, and dense cancellous bone. Screw push-out and graft push-out tests were performed using conventional and twist lock screws. Maximum load and torque of insertion were measured. Max load measured in screw push out with twist lock screw was 64%, 60%, 57% of that measured with conventional screw in soft, moderate and dense material, respectively. Twist lock max load was 78% and 82% of that with conventional screw in soft and moderate densities. In the highest bone density, max loads were comparable in the two systems. Torque of insertion with twist lock was significantly lower than with conventional interference screw. Based on geometric consideration, the twist lock screw is expected to have 35% the holding power of a cylindrical screw. Yet, results indicate that holding power was greater than theoretical consideration, possibly due to lower friction and lower preloaded force. During graft push out in the densest material, comparable max loads were achieved with both systems, suggesting that fixation of higher density bone, which is observed in young athletes that require reconstruction, can be achieved with the twist lock screw. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Resorbable screws for fixation of autologous bone grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar, GM; Liem, RSB; Bos, RRM; van der Wal, JE; Vissink, A

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of resorbable screws made of poly (D,L-lactide) acid (PDLLA) for fixation of autologous bone grafts related to graft regeneration and osseointegration of dental implants. In eight edentulous patients suffering from insufficient retention of their

  9. Development and Testing of X-Ray Imaging-Enhanced Poly-L-Lactide Bone Screws.

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    Wei-Jen Chang

    Full Text Available Nanosized iron oxide particles exhibit osteogenic and radiopaque properties. Thus, iron oxide (Fe3O4 nanoparticles were incorporated into a biodegradable polymer (poly-L-lactic acid, PLLA to fabricate a composite bone screw. This multifunctional, 3D printable bone screw was detectable on X-ray examination. In this study, mechanical tests including three-point bending and ultimate tensile strength were conducted to evaluate the optimal ratio of iron oxide nanoparticles in the PLLA composite. Both injection molding and 3D printing techniques were used to fabricate the PLLA bone screws with and without the iron oxide nanoparticles. The fabricated screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. Bone blocks containing the PLLA screws were resected 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the surrounding bone and the radiopacity of the iron-oxide-containing PLLA screws were evaluated. Our results indicated that addition of iron oxide nanoparticles at 30% significantly decreased the ultimate tensile stress properties of the PLLA screws. The screws with 20% iron oxide exhibited strong radiopacity compared to the screws fabricated without the iron oxide nanoparticles. Four weeks after surgery, the average bone volume of the iron oxide PLLA composite screws was significantly greater than that of PLLA screws without iron oxide. These findings suggested that biodegradable and X-ray detectable PLLA bone screws can be produced by incorporation of 20% iron oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, these screws had significantly greater osteogenic capability than the PLLA screws without iron oxide.

  10. CT-based bone density assessment for iliosacral screw trajectories

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    Andreas Schicho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sacroiliac screw placement is one standard treatment option for stabilization of posterior pelvic ring injuries encountering high intra- and inter-individual variations of bone stock quality as well as a vast variety and prevalence of sacral dysmorphism. An individual, easy-to-use preoperative bone stock quality estimation would be of high value for the surgeon. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 36 standard computed tomography datasets with the uninjured pelvic ring. Using a two-plane cross-referencing technique, we assessed the Hounsfield unit (HU mean values as well as standard deviation and minimum/maximum values within selected region of interests (ROIs at five key areas: os ilium left and right, massa lateralis of os sacrum left and right, and central vertebral body on levels S1 and S2. Results: Results showed no difference in mean HU at any ROI when comparing male and female data. For all ROIs set on S1 and S2, there was an age-related decline of HU with a calculated slope significantly different from zero. There was no statistical difference of slopes when comparing S1- and S2-level with respect to any distinct ROI. Comparison of levels S1 and S2 revealed differences at the vertebral body and at the right os ilium. The right and left massa lateralis of os sacrum had lower bone density than the center of the vertebral body, the right, or left os ilium on S1; right and left massa lateralis density did not differ significantly. On level S2, results were comparable with no difference of massa lateralis density. Conclusion: With our easy-to-use preoperative assessment of bone density of five key areas of sacroiliac screw anchoring we were able to find the lowest bone density in both the left and right massa lateralis on levels S1 and S2 with high inter- and intra-individual variations. Significantly lower bone density was found in the center of the vertebral bodies S2 in comparison to S1, which both are crucial for iliosacral

  11. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

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    Jan Wieding

    Full Text Available The use of finite element analysis (FEA has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with

  12. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieding, Jan; Souffrant, Robert; Fritsche, Andreas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The use of finite element analysis (FEA) has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with screws in the adjacent

  13. The head to foot screw fixation. A new technique of percutaneous screw fixation of the scaphoid bone.

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    Zaraa, Mourad; Ben Slama, Safouane; Mahjoub, Sabri; Sehli, Heithem; Hadj Salah, Méhdi; Mbarek, Mondher

    2017-01-01

    Many techniques have been described for screw fixation of the scaphoid bone. The approach is either proximal or dorsal. A new percutaneous technique is presented by the authors called the head to foot screw fixation. Indications and results are evaluated. It is a percutaneous technique with fixation of the scaphoid bone by two screws introduced in an opposite direction: a proximal screw and a distal screw. No postoperative immobilization was necessary. A prospective study was conducted in 40 patients over a period of three years. The average age was 25 years with extremes of 14 and 44 years. This technique was practiced in fractures (30 cases) and nonunion (10 cases) in which the localization was proximal, corresponding to Schernberg types I, II and III. Forms associated with perilunate dislocation of the carpus were excluded from the study. The results were analysed with a mean of 8 months (6-30). Union was obtained in all the cases. No tendon injury related to percutaneous approach was noted. The technique required a learning curve with progressive decrease in operative time from 45 to 15 minutes. It was necessary in two cases to change protruding screws which were not diagnosed during the first intervention. Percutaneous screw fixation was achieved again in both cases.   Conclusions: The combination in our experience of two screws allowed us to prevent rotation around the unthreated area of a single screw. Our technique, bringing together the head to the foot of the screw, reduces the crowding at the proximal part of the scaphoid bone. This non-invasive method permitted early mobilization with no pain until biological union.

  14. Augmentation of anterior vertebral body screw fixation by an injectable, biodegradable calcium phosphate bone substitute.

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    Bai, B; Kummer, F J; Spivak, J

    2001-12-15

    A biomechanical study to evaluate the effects of a biodegradable calcium phosphate (Ca-P) bone substitute on the fixation strength and bending rigidity of vertebral body screws. To determine if an injectable, biodegradable Ca-P bone substitute provides significant augmentation of anterior vertebral screw fixation in the osteoporotic spine. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmented screws have been used clinically; however, there is concern about thermal damage to the neural elements during polymerization of the PMMA as well as its negative effects on bone remodeling. Injectable, biodegradable Ca-P bone substitutes have shown enhanced fixation of pedicle screws. Sixteen fresh cadaveric thoracolumbar vertebrae were randomly divided into two groups: control (no augmentation) (n = 8) and Ca-P bone substitute augmentation (n = 8) groups. Bone-screw fixation rigidity in bending was determined initially and after 10(5) cycles, followed by pullout testing of the screw to failure to determine pullout strength and stiffness. The bone-screw bending rigidity for the Ca-P bone substitute group was significantly greater than the control group, initially (58%) and after cyclic loading (125%). The pullout strength for Ca-P bone substitute group (1848 +/- 166 N) was significantly greater than the control group (665 +/- 92 N) (P pullout for the Ca-P bone substitute groups (399 +/- 69 N/mm) was significantly higher than the control group (210 +/- 51 N/mm) (P screw fixation with a biodegradable Ca-P bone substitute is a potential alternative to the use of PMMA cement.

  15. Torsional stability of interference screws derived from bovine bone - a biomechanical study

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    Schmitt Jan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present biomechanical study, the torsional stability of different interference screws, made of bovine bone, was tested. Interference screws derived from bovine bone are a possible biological alternative to conventional metallic or bioabsorbable polymer interference screws. Methods In the first part of the study we compared the torsional stability of self-made 8 mm Interference screws (BC and a commercial 8 mm interference screw (Tutofix®. Furthermore, we compared the torsional strength of BC screws with different diameters. For screwing in, a hexagon head and an octagon head were tested. Maximum breaking torques in polymethyl methacrylate resin were recorded by means of an electronic torque screw driver. In the second part of the study the tibial part of a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was fixed in porcine test specimens using an 8 mm BC screw and the maximum insertion torques were recorded. Each interference screw type was tested 5 times. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the different 8 mm interference screws (p = 0.121. Pairwise comparisons did not reveal statistically significant differences, either. It was demonstrated for the BC screws, that a larger screw diameter significantly leads to higher torsional stability (p = 9.779 × 10-5. Pairwise comparisons showed a significantly lower torsional stability for the 7 mm BC screw than for the 8 mm BC screw (p = 0.0079 and the 9 mm BC screw (p = 0.0079. Statistically significant differences between the 8 mm and the 9 mm BC screw could not be found (p = 0.15. During screwing into the tibial graft channel of the porcine specimens, insertion torques between 0.5 Nm and 3.2 Nm were recorded. In one case the hexagon head of a BC screw broke off during the last turn. Conclusions The BC screws show comparable torsional stability to Tutofix® interference screws. As expected the torsional strength of the screws increases significantly with the

  16. Torsional stability of interference screws derived from bovine bone - a biomechanical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In the present biomechanical study, the torsional stability of different interference screws, made of bovine bone, was tested. Interference screws derived from bovine bone are a possible biological alternative to conventional metallic or bioabsorbable polymer interference screws. Methods In the first part of the study we compared the torsional stability of self-made 8 mm Interference screws (BC) and a commercial 8 mm interference screw (Tutofix®). Furthermore, we compared the torsional strength of BC screws with different diameters. For screwing in, a hexagon head and an octagon head were tested. Maximum breaking torques in polymethyl methacrylate resin were recorded by means of an electronic torque screw driver. In the second part of the study the tibial part of a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was fixed in porcine test specimens using an 8 mm BC screw and the maximum insertion torques were recorded. Each interference screw type was tested 5 times. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the different 8 mm interference screws (p = 0.121). Pairwise comparisons did not reveal statistically significant differences, either. It was demonstrated for the BC screws, that a larger screw diameter significantly leads to higher torsional stability (p = 9.779 × 10-5). Pairwise comparisons showed a significantly lower torsional stability for the 7 mm BC screw than for the 8 mm BC screw (p = 0.0079) and the 9 mm BC screw (p = 0.0079). Statistically significant differences between the 8 mm and the 9 mm BC screw could not be found (p = 0.15). During screwing into the tibial graft channel of the porcine specimens, insertion torques between 0.5 Nm and 3.2 Nm were recorded. In one case the hexagon head of a BC screw broke off during the last turn. Conclusions The BC screws show comparable torsional stability to Tutofix® interference screws. As expected the torsional strength of the screws increases significantly with the diameter. The safety

  17. In Vivo Evaluation of Immediately Loaded Stainless Steel and Titanium Orthodontic Screws in a Growing Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluate...

  18. Interfragmentary compression profile of 4 headless bone screws: an analysis of the compression lost on reinsertion.

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    Gardner, A W; Yew, Y T; Neo, P Y; Lau, C C; Tay, S C

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the interfragmentary compression force generated by 4 different types of headless compression screws and to examine the effects of removal and reinsertion of the screw. We chose foot bones rather than scaphoids for the model because they were larger and would enable comparison of 2 screw designs in the same bone, thereby controlling for the effect of interspecimen variability. A transverse osteotomy was made in 10 fresh-frozen cadaveric navicular bones and 10 medial cuneiforms. A load cell was used to measure compression between the 2 fragments as a screw was inserted across the fracture. Each bone was tested twice, with an Acutrak Mini (Acumed, Hillsboro, OR; n = 10) and an SBi AutoFIX screw (SBi, Morrisville, PA; n = 10) or an Extremifix (Osteomed, Addison, TX; n = 10) and a Barouk screw (Depuy, Warsaw, IN; n = 10). Compression was recorded at initial insertion and on removal and reinsertion of the screw twice to the same position. Compression was also measured after one additional full turn further than the initial position. The mean interfragmentary compression generated by the Acutrak Mini screw was greater than that of the SBi AutoFIX screw (96 N vs 22 N). There was a trend toward a greater mean compression generated by the Extremifix screw compared to the Barouk screw (85 N vs 22 N). There was a significant loss of compression upon removal and reinsertion of the screws. An additional full turn of the screw was able to re-establish a large proportion of the original compression. The compression forces achieved by headless screw systems appeared to vary according to the screw design, depth of insertion, and the quality of the bone. Substantial compression was lost if the screw was removed and replaced. Some screw designs appeared to require a greater depth of insertion to achieve effective compression, and the number of additional turns required to re-establish compression might vary according to the thread design. Surgeons should be aware of the

  19. The Effect of Transpedicular Screw Design on Its Performance in Vertebral Bone Under Tensile Loads: A Parametric Study.

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    Alkaly, Ron N; Bader, Dan L

    2016-12-01

    A biomechanical study using bovine thoracolumbar spines. To study investigated whether thread design parameters aimed at altering the state of stress at the screw-bone interface increase the screw's holding power. Internal spinal fixators utilizing transpedicular screw fixation are used to achieve early stabilization of the injured spine in a range of clinical conditions. Despite advances in the design of internal spinal fixation systems, implant loosening, and catastrophic failures at the screw-bone interface remains a serious complication in adult spine surgery. Although the performance of the screws in the vertebral bone critically depends on ability of screw thread design to provide and maintain adequate bone purchase, the effect of individual thread design parameters on screw performance and the failure process of the screw-bone interface, remains unclear. On the basis of the AO Schanz thread, this parametric study used 96 lumbar bovine vertebrae instrumented with 19 screw designs to investigate the effects of pitch, ratio of major to minor diameter, screw insertion depth, and major diameter, on screw performance under pure tensile loading. The effect of vertebral morphometry on screw performance and the extent of damage within the failed screw-bone interface were evaluated. The increase in screw insertion depth, screw pitch, and the ratio of major to minor diameter, significantly affected screw performance under tensile loads. Complex interactions existed between the major diameter and each of the design variables. Vertebral morphometry had little effect on screw performance while the damage within the failed bone-screw interface confined to the immediate region of the screw threads. Design variables, able to reduce shear stresses or modify the complex stress profile at the bone-screw interface, are more effective in preventing early failure of the interface.

  20. Is there enough evidence to regularly apply bone screws for intermaxillary fixation in mandibular fractures?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bins, A.; Oomens, M.A.E.; Boffano, P.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) is traditionally achieved with arch bars; however, this method has several well-known disadvantages and other techniques, such as bone screws, are available. This study evaluated current evidence regarding these IMF screws (IMFSs) for mandibular trauma and to

  1. Is There Enough Evidence to Regularly Apply Bone Screws for Intermaxillary Fixation in Mandibular Fractures?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bins, A.; Oomens, M.A.E.; Boffano, P.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) is traditionally achieved with arch bars; however, this method has several well-known disadvantages and other techniques, such as bone screws, are available. This study evaluated current evidence regarding these IMF screws (IMFSs) for mandibular trauma and to

  2. Midline lumbar fusion using cortical bone trajectory screws. Preliminary report.

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    Bielecki, Mateusz; Kunert, Przemysław; Prokopienko, Marek; Nowak, Arkadiusz; Czernicki, Tomasz; Marchel, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF) using cortical bone trajectory is an alternative method of transpedicular spinal fusion for degenerative disease. The new entry points' location and screwdriving direction allow the approach-related morbidity to be reduced. To present our preliminary experience with the MIDLF technique on the first 5 patients with lumbar degenerative disease and with follow-up of at least 6 months. Retrospective analysis was performed on the first 5 patients with foraminal (4) or central (1) stenosis operated on between December 2014 and February 2015. Three patients were fused at L4-L5 and two at the L5-S1 level. No intra- or post-operative complications occurred with this approach. An improvement regarding the leading symptom in the early postoperative period (sciatica 4/4, claudication 1/1) was achieved in all patients. The mean improvements in the visual analogue scale for low back and leg pain were 2.2 and 4.8 respectively. The mean Oswestry Disability Index scores were 52% (range: 16-82%) before surgery and 33% (range: 12-56%) at 3-month follow-up (mean improvement 19%). At the most recent follow-up, 4 patients reported the maintenance of the satisfactory result. The early standing and follow-up X-rays showed satisfactory screw placement in all patients. In our initial experience, the MIDLF technique seems to be an encouraging alternative to traditional transpedicular trajectory screws when short level lumbar fusion is needed. Nevertheless, longer observations on larger groups of patients are needed to reliably evaluate the safety of the method and the sustainability of the results.

  3. Midline lumbar fusion using cortical bone trajectory screws. Preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Bielecki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF using cortical bone trajectory is an alternative method of transpedicular spinal fusion for degenerative disease. The new entry points’ location and screwdriving direction allow the approach-related morbidity to be reduced. Aim: To present our preliminary experience with the MIDLF technique on the first 5 patients with lumbar degenerative disease and with follow-up of at least 6 months. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis was performed on the first 5 patients with foraminal (4 or central (1 stenosis operated on between December 2014 and February 2015. Three patients were fused at L4–L5 and two at the L5–S1 level. Results: No intra- or post-operative complications occurred with this approach. An improvement regarding the leading symptom in the early postoperative period (sciatica 4/4, claudication 1/1 was achieved in all patients. The mean improvements in the visual analogue scale for low back and leg pain were 2.2 and 4.8 respectively. The mean Oswestry Disability Index scores were 52% (range: 16–82% before surgery and 33% (range: 12–56% at 3-month follow-up (mean improvement 19%. At the most recent follow-up, 4 patients reported the maintenance of the satisfactory result. The early standing and follow-up X-rays showed satisfactory screw placement in all patients. Conclusions : In our initial experience, the MIDLF technique seems to be an encouraging alternative to traditional transpedicular trajectory screws when short level lumbar fusion is needed. Nevertheless, longer observations on larger groups of patients are needed to reliably evaluate the safety of the method and the sustainability of the results.

  4. A study of the bone healing kinetics of plateau versus screw root design titanium dental implants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, Gary

    2009-03-01

    This study was designed to compare the bone healing process around plateau root from (PRF) and screw root from (SRF) titanium dental implants over the immediate 12 week healing period post implant placement.

  5. Pullout strength of thoracic pedicle screws improved with cortical bone ratio: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Kai; Chien, Andy; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2014-11-01

    The application of pedicle screw constructs for the osteoporotic vertebrae remains a serious clinical challenge for spinal surgeons and has been intensely studied recently. However, the exact role of the pedicular cortical bone composition and the screw-bone gap on the screw fixation failure has yet to be quantitatively documented. The current study aims to address this gap in our knowledge and elucidate possible relationships. Twelve fresh-frozen human cadaveric thoracic spine vertebrae (T9-T12) were harvested from six human cadavers (five males; one female; 63.5 ± 17 years). A three-dimensional reconstruction of the individual vertebrae was firstly rendered from computed tomography (CT) scan images to allow calculation of the cortical bone ratio. Specimens were then subdivided into three groups: Intact, 1-mm screw-bone gap, and 2-mm screw-bone gap. The gap groups were subjected to a standard cyclic fatigue-loading protocol. The pullout strength of the pedicle screws for all specimens were then determined. The pullout strength of the 1-mm and 2-mm groups were significantly reduced when compared with the intact group. A moderate to excellent positive correlation was identified between the cortical bone area ratio and pullout strength for all groups (r > 0.55). A cortical shell ratio of 0.73 or higher was also found to be a safe cut-off index for screw fixation failure, even with an observable 1-mm screw-bone gap. The current in vitro cadaveric spine study identified a significant correlation between cortical bone area ratio and the thoracic pedicle screw pullout strength. The presented results also demonstrate that the fatigue-loading-induced screw-bone gap of 1-mm was sufficient to cause a significant decrease in the pullout strength. However, a cortical bone area ratio of 0.73 or higher in this group was able to preserve most of the screw-bone interfacial strength, and subsequently may prevent a complete implant failure.

  6. Bioactive ceramic coating of cancellous screws improves the osseointegration in the cancellous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Nam, Hwa; Ryu, Hyun-Seung; Seo, Jun-Hyuk; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki

    2011-05-01

    A number of methods for coating implants with bioactive ceramics have been reported to improve osseointegration in bone, but the effects of bioactive ceramic coatings on the osseointegration of cancellous screws are not known. Accordingly, biomechanical and histomorphometric analyses of the bone-screw interface of uncoated cancellous screws and cancellous screws coated with four different bioactive ceramics were performed. After coating titanium alloy cancellous screws with calcium pyrophosphate (CPP), CaO-SiO(2)-B(2)O(3) glass-ceramics (CSG), apatite-wollastonite 1:3 glass-ceramics (W3G), and CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-B(2)O(3) glass-ceramics (BGS-7) using an enameling method, the coated and the uncoated screws were inserted into the proximal tibia and distal femur metaphysis of seven male mongrel dogs. The torque values of the screws were measured at the time of insertion and at removal after 8 weeks. The bone-screw contact ratio was analyzed by histomorphometry. There was no significant difference in the insertion torque between the uncoated and coated screws. The torque values of the CPP and BGS-7 groups measured at removal after 8 weeks were significantly higher than those of the uncoated group. Moreover, the values of the CPP and BGS-7 groups were significantly higher than the insertion torques. The fraction of bone-screw interface measured from the undecalcified histological slide showed that the CPP, W3G, and BGS-7 groups had significantly higher torque values in the cortical bone area than the uncoated group, and the CPP and BGS-7 groups had significantly higher torque values in the cancellous bone area than the uncoated group. In conclusion, a cancellous screw coated with CPP and BGS-7 ceramic bonds directly to cancellous bone to improve the bone-implant osseointegration. This may broaden the indications for cancellous screws by clarifying their contribution to improving osseointegration, even in the cancellous bone area.

  7. Effect of bone material properties on effective region in screw-bone model: an experimental and finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Qi, Wei; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Zi-Xiang; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2014-06-21

    There have been numerous studies conducted to investigate the pullout force of pedicle screws in bone with different material properties. However, fewer studies have investigated the region of effect (RoE), stress distribution and contour pattern of the cancellous bone surrounding the pedicle screw. Screw pullout experiments were performed from two different foams and the corresponding reaction force was documented for the validation of a computational pedicle screw-foam model based on finite element (FE) methods. After validation, pullout simulations were performed on screw-bone models, with different bone material properties to model three different age groups (75 years old). At maximum pullout force, the stress distribution and average magnitude of Von Mises stress were documented in the cancellous bone along the distance beyond the outer perimeter pedicle screw. The radius and volume of the RoE were predicted based on the stress distribution. The screw pullout strengths and the load-displacement curves were comparable between the numerical simulation and experimental tests. The stress distribution of the simulated screw-bone vertebral unit showed that the radius and volume of the RoE varied with the bone material properties. The radii were 4.73 mm, 5.06 mm and 5.4 mm for bone properties of ages >75, 75 > ages >50 and ages injection cement for augmentation could be estimated based on the RoE in the treatment of osteoporosis patients to avoid leakage in spine surgery.

  8. Comparison of the Pullout Strength of Different Pedicle Screw Designs and Augmentation Techniques in an Osteoporotic Bone Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyak, Gorkem; Balikci, Tevfik; Heydar, Ahmed Majid; Bezer, Murat

    2018-02-01

    Mechanical study. To compare the pullout strength of different screw designs and augmentation techniques in an osteoporotic bone model. Adequate bone screw pullout strength is a common problem among osteoporotic patients. Various screw designs and augmentation techniques have been developed to improve the biomechanical characteristics of the bone-screw interface. Polyurethane blocks were used to mimic human osteoporotic cancellous bone, and six different screw designs were tested. Five standard and expandable screws without augmentation, eight expandable screws with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or calcium phosphate augmentation, and distal cannulated screws with PMMA and calcium phosphate augmentation were tested. Mechanical tests were performed on 10 unused new screws of each group. Screws with or without augmentation were inserted in a block that was held in a fixture frame, and a longitudinal extraction force was applied to the screw head at a loading rate of 5 mm/min. Maximum load was recorded in a load displacement curve. The peak pullout force of all tested screws with or without augmentation was significantly greater than that of the standard pedicle screw. The greatest pullout force was observed with 40-mm expandable pedicle screws with four fins and PMMA augmentation. Augmented distal cannulated screws did not have a greater peak pullout force than nonaugmented expandable screws. PMMA augmentation provided a greater peak pullout force than calcium phosphate augmentation. Expandable pedicle screws had greater peak pullout forces than standard pedicle screws and had the advantage of augmentation with either PMMA or calcium phosphate cement. Although calcium phosphate cement is biodegradable, osteoconductive, and nonexothermic, PMMA provided a significantly greater peak pullout force. PMMA-augmented expandable 40-mm four-fin pedicle screws had the greatest peak pullout force.

  9. In vitro evaluation of allogeneic bone screws for use in internal fixation of transverse fractures created in proximal sesamoid bones obtained from equine cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Naoki; Takakuwa, Jun; Yamada, Haruo; Mori, Ryuji

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate effectiveness of allogeneic bone screws and pins for internal fixation of midbody transverse fractures of equine proximal sesamoid bones (PSBs) in vitro. 14 forelimbs from cadavers of 3-year-old Thoroughbreds. Allogeneic cortical bone fragments were collected from the limbs of a male Thoroughbred, and cortical bone screws were prepared from the tissue by use of a precision desktop microlathe programmed with the dimensions of a metal cortical bone screw. A midbody transverse osteotomy of each PSB was performed by use of a bone-shaping oscillating saw and repaired via 1 of 3 internal fixation techniques: 1 allogeneic bone screw with 1 allogeneic bone pin (type I; n = 6 PSBs), 2 allogeneic bone screws (type II; 8), or 1 stainless steel cortical bone screw (control repair; 6). Mechanical tension measurements were obtained by use of a commercially available materials testing system. Mean +/- SD tensile strength (TS) was 668.3 +/- 216.6 N for type I repairs, 854.4 +/- 253.2 N for type II repairs, and 1,150.0 +/- 451.7 N for control repairs. Internal fixation of PSB fractures by the use of allogeneic bone screws and bone pins was successful. Although mean TS of control repairs with stainless steel cortical bone screws was greater than the mean TS of type I and type II repairs, the difference between type II and control repairs was not significant. Allogeneic screws may advance healing and result in fewer complications in a clinical setting.

  10. Enhancing pedicle screw fixation in the lumbar spine using allograft bone plug interference fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrea, Bopha; Malempati, Harsha; Campbell, Jeffrey R; Khan, Sonja; Ching, Randal P; Lee, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    A within-subjects controlled laboratory study. To examine a biological alternative to cement augmentation for pedicle screw fixation comparing bilateral axial pullout tests of augmented and nonaugmented (controls) pedicle screws. Fixation in the osteoporotic spine remains a difficult challenge with failure by loosening or backout. Pedicle screw augmentation has been attempted using polymethylmethacrylate and bioabsorbable calcium cements; however, the potential for extravasation and embolization of cement are becoming increasingly concerning and merit the search for alternative methods to improve screw-anchoring strength. Twenty-four (24) fresh human lumbar vertebrae were tested to compare the pullout strength of augmented and nonaugmented pedicle screws. Two different augmentation strategies were employed using allograft bone plugs (ABPs) and evaluated using 12 specimens per group. Bone mineral density of each specimen was obtained using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The augmented versus nonaugmented pedicle was randomized for each vertebra, and bilateral testing enabled paired statistical analyses. Axial pullout tests were performed using an materials testing system servohydraulic test system, and peak force, failure displacement, and stiffness was obtained for each test and correlated with bone mineral density. Augmentation using 6-mm-diameter ABPs with 6.25-mm-diameter pedicle screws resulted in statistically weaker average pullout strength (775±455 N) than the nonaugmented controls (1233±826 N). When using smaller (5 mm diameter) AGPs with the same diameter screws, there was no statistical difference between average pullout strength for the augmented pedicle screws (1772±652 N) and the nonaugmented screws (1780±575 N). Preliminary study of pedicle screw augmentation using cannulated ABPs showed no improvement of fixation with pedicles in the spine. This was even true in osteoporotic specimens, where augmentation would seem to be of considerable benefit.

  11. Treatment of screw hole defects using bone graft materials: a histologic and biomechanic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, M J; Hutton, W C

    1996-01-01

    We surgically applied compression plates, secured with cortical screws, to the anterolateral surface of each radius in 20 dogs. Five weeks later, the plates and screws were removed. The dogs were then divided into four groups of 5, and each group had the screw holes in the left radii filled with a different form of bone graft material. The screw holes in the right radii received no graft material and served as controls. Five weeks later the dogs were euthanized, and the radii were removed and torqued to failure. All bones failed through a previous screw hole. An analysis of variance comparing all grafted radii to the ungrafted controls revealed no significant difference in torque to failure. This suggests that both grafted and ungrafted screw holes still increase stress at 5 weeks, and any period of protection after plate removal should be longer than 5 weeks. However, histology revealed that the holes filled with graft material had, in every case, more bone in the screw holes than did the holes in the ungrafted controls.

  12. Computer-assisted surgery for screw insertion into the distal sesamoid bone in horses: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gygax, Diego; Lischer, Christoph; Auer, Joerg A

    2006-10-01

    To compare the precision of computer-assisted surgery with a conventional technique (CV) using a special guiding device for screw insertion into the distal sesamoid bone in horses. In vitro experimental study. Cadaveric forelimb specimens. Insertion of a 3.5 mm cortex screw in lag fashion along the longitudinal axis of intact (non-fractured) distal sesamoid bones was evaluated in 2 groups (8 limbs each): CV and computer-assisted surgery (CAS). For CV, the screw was inserted using a special guiding device and fluoroscopy, whereas for CAS, the screw was inserted using computer-assisted navigation. The accuracy of screw placement was verified by radiography, computed tomography, and specimen dissection. Surgical precision was better in CAS compared with CV. CAS improves the accuracy of lateromedial screw insertion, in lag fashion, into the distal sesamoid bone. The CAS technique should be considered for improved accuracy of screw insertion in fractures of the distal sesamoid bone.

  13. Biomechanical competence of six different bone screws for reconstructive surgery in three different transplants: Fibular, iliac crest, scapular and artificial bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Arnold P; Raith, Stefan; Ode, Jan-Eric; Teichmann, Jan; Lethaus, Bernd; Möhlhenrich, Stephan C; Hölzle, Frank; Duda, Georg N; Steiner, Timm

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine a combination of screw and transplantation type that offers optimal primary stability for reconstructive surgery. Fibular, iliac crest, and scapular transplants were tested along with artificial bone substrate. Six different kinds of bone screws (Medartis(©)) were compared, each type utilized with one of six specimens from human transplants (n = 6). Controlled screw-in-tests were performed and the required torque was protocolled. Subsequently, pull-out-tests were executed to determine the retention forces. The artificial bone substitute material showed significantly higher retention forces than real bone samples. The self-drilling screws achieved the significantly highest retention values in the synthetic bone substitute material. Cancellous screws achieved the highest retention in the fibular transplants, while self-drilling and cancellous screws demonstrated better retention than cortical screws in the iliac crest. In the scapular graft, no significant differences were found between the screw types. In comparison to the human transplant types, the cortical screws showed the significantly highest values in the fibula and the lowest values in the iliac crest. The best retention was found in the combination of cancellous screws with fibular graft (514.8 N + -252.3 N). For the flat bones (i.e., scapular and illiac crest) we recommend the cancellous screws. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of Screw Length and Bone Thickness on the Stability of Temporary Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Jogaib Fernandes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to study the influence of screw length and bone thickness on the stability of temporary implants. A total of 96 self-drilling temporary screws with two different lengths were inserted into polyurethane blocks (n = 66, bovine femurs (n = 18 and rabbit tibia (n = 12 with different cortical thicknesses (1 to 8 mm. Screws insertion in polyurethane blocks was assisted by a universal testing machine, torque peaks were collected by a digital torquemeter and bone thickness was monitored by micro-CT. The results showed that the insertion torque was significantly increased with the thickness of cortical bone from polyurethane (p < 0.0001, bovine (p = 0.0035 and rabbit (p < 0.05 sources. Cancellous bone improved significantly the mechanical implant stability. Insertion torque and insertion strength was successfully moduled by equations, based on the cortical/cancellous bone behavior. Based on the results, insertion torque and bone strength can be estimate in order to prevent failure of the cortical layer during temporary screw placement. The stability provided by a cortical thickness of 2 or 1 mm coupled to cancellous bone was deemed sufficient for temporary implants stability.

  15. Influence of Screw Length and Bone Thickness on the Stability of Temporary Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Daniel Jogaib; Elias, Carlos Nelson; Ruellas, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the influence of screw length and bone thickness on the stability of temporary implants. A total of 96 self-drilling temporary screws with two different lengths were inserted into polyurethane blocks (n = 66), bovine femurs (n = 18) and rabbit tibia (n = 12) with different cortical thicknesses (1 to 8 mm). Screws insertion in polyurethane blocks was assisted by a universal testing machine, torque peaks were collected by a digital torquemeter and bone thickness was monitored by micro-CT. The results showed that the insertion torque was significantly increased with the thickness of cortical bone from polyurethane (p < 0.0001), bovine (p = 0.0035) and rabbit (p < 0.05) sources. Cancellous bone improved significantly the mechanical implant stability. Insertion torque and insertion strength was successfully moduled by equations, based on the cortical/cancellous bone behavior. Based on the results, insertion torque and bone strength can be estimate in order to prevent failure of the cortical layer during temporary screw placement. The stability provided by a cortical thickness of 2 or 1 mm coupled to cancellous bone was deemed sufficient for temporary implants stability. PMID:28793582

  16. Biomechanical evaluation of a novel fenestrated pedicle screw augmented with bone cement in osteoporotic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Philippe E; Chappuis, James L; Rampersaud, Raja; Agarwala, Amit O; Perra, Joseph H; Erkan, Serkan; Wu, Chunhui

    2011-08-15

    Comparative biomechanical study was conducted in osteoporotic human cadaveric spines. Determine the influence of the volume of polymethyl methacrylate injected through a fenestrated pedicle screw on the pullout strength and on the ability to safely remove the implant. Pedicle screw fixation in the osteoporotic spine can be improved by the addition of bone cement. Various injection techniques have been used. While improvement has been shown for the pullout strength, the optimal volume of cement to inject has not been previously studied. Seven osteoporotic spines were instrumented with a standard and a fenestrated pedicle screw augmented with polymethyl methacrylate at each level (T7-L5). Three volumes of bone cement were randomly injected and stratified to the thoracic (0.5 cc, 1.0 cc, and 1.5 cc) and lumbar spine (1.5 cc, 2.0 cc, and 2.5 cc). Axial pullout strength and removal torque of the pedicle screws were quantified. The pullout strength of the fenestrated screw was normalized with respect to its contralateral control. Student paired t tests were conducted and a statistically significant increase was noted for 1.0 cc (186 ± 45%) and 1.5 cc (158 ± 46%) in the thoracic spine and for 1.5 cc (264 ± 193%), 2.0 cc (221 ± 93%), and 2.5 cc (198 ± 42%) in the lumbar spine. There was no significant difference with higher volumes of cement. The median removal torque was 0.34 Nm for the standard and 1.83 Nm for the augmented screws. When the augmented implants were removed, the bone cement sheared completely off at the fenestrations in 15 of the 17 cases. Significant increases in pullout strength can be accomplished by injecting a limited quantity of bone cement through a fenestrated screw while minimizing the risks associated with higher volume. The majority of implants were removed without damaging the vertebra as the bone cement sheared off at the fenestrations.

  17. Application of bioabsorbable screw fixation for anterior cervical decompression and bone grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the application of bioabsorbable screws for anterior cervical decompression and bone grafting fixation and to study their clinical effects in the treatment of cervical spondylosis. METHODS: From March 2007 to September 2012, 56 patients, 36 males and 20 females (38-79 years old, average 58.3±9.47 years, underwent a novel operation. Grafts were fixed by bioabsorbable screws (PLLA, 2.7 mm in diameter after anterior decompression. The bioabsorbable screws were inserted from the midline of the graft bone to the bone surface of the upper and lower vertebrae at 45 degree angles. Patients were evaluated post-operatively to observe the improvement of symptoms and evaluate the fusion of the bone. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA score was used to evaluate the recovery of neurological functions. RESULTS: All screws were successfully inserted, with no broken screws. The rate of symptom improvement was 87.5%. All of the grafts fused well with no extrusion. The average time for graft fusion was 3.8±0.55 months (range 3-5 months. Three-dimensional reconstruction of CT scans demonstrated that the grafts fused with adjacent vertebrae well and that the screws were absorbed as predicted. The MRI findings showed that the cerebrospinal fluid was unobstructed. No obvious complications appeared in any of the follow-up evaluations. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical spondylosis with one- or two-level involvement can be effectively treated by anterior decompression and bone grafting with bioabsorbable screw fixation. This operative method is safe and can avoid the complications induced by metal implants.

  18. Symptomatic non-union of the carpal scaphoid: Matti-Russe bone grafting versus Herbert screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, R W; Hodgkinson, J P; Hargadon, E J

    1989-05-01

    We have reviewed 19 patients who have had Matti-Russe bone grafting and 16 patients who have had Herbert screw fixation for symptomatic non-union of the carpal scaphoid. The success rate in both groups was similar, 74 per cent in the Matti-Russe group and 71 per cent in the Herbert screw group. Only five patients in the Herbert screw group had bone grafts. The advantages and disadvantages of both methods of treatment are discussed.

  19. Degradation behaviour of LAE442-based plate–screw-systems in an in vitro bone model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolters, Leonie [Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany); Besdo, Silke [Institute of Continuum Mechanics, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstraße 11, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Angrisani, Nina [Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany); Wriggers, Peter [Institute of Continuum Mechanics, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstraße 11, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Hering, Britta [Institute of Production Engineering and Machine Tools, Leibniz Universität Hannover, An der Universität 2, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Seitz, Jan-Marten [Institute of Materials Science, Leibniz Universität Hannover, An der Universität 2, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Reifenrath, Janin, E-mail: janin.reifenrath@tiho-hannover.de [Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    The use of absorbable implant materials for fixation after bone fracture helps to avoid a second surgery for implant removal and the risks and costs involved. Magnesium (Mg) is well known as a potential metallic material for degradable implants. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate if degradable LAE442-based magnesium plate–screw-systems are suitable candidates for osteosynthesis implants in load-bearing bones. The corrosion behaviour was tested concerning the influence of different surface treatments, coatings and screw torques. Steel plates and screws of the same size served as control. Plates without special treatment screwed on up to a specified torque of 15 cNm or 7 cNm, NaOH treated plates (15 cNm), magnesium fluoride coated plates (15 cNm) and steel plates as control (15 cNm) were examined in pH-buffered, temperature-controlled SBF solution for two weeks. The experimental results indicate that the LAE442 plates and screws coated with magnesium fluoride revealed a lower hydrogen evolution in SBF solution as well as a lower weight loss and volume decrease in μ-computed tomography (μCT). The nanoindentation and SEM/EDX measurements at several plate areas showed no significant differences. Summarized, the different screw torques did not affect the corrosion behaviour differently. Also the NaOH treatment seemed to have no essential influence on the degradation kinetics. The plates coated with magnesium fluoride showed a decreased corrosion rate. Hence, it is recommended to consider this coating for the next in vivo study. - Highlights: • Mg-based plate screw systems were examined in an in vitro corrosion setup. • Different screw torques did not affect the corrosion behaviour. • Pretreatment with NaOH showed no increase in corrosion resistance. • Fluoride coating slowed down the corrosion rate of plates. • Fluoride coating might be an alternative for decrease of corrosion rate in vivo.

  20. A simplified application (APP) for the parametric design of screw-plate fixation of bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chen-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Screw and plate fixation is commonly used to treat bone fractures. A prototype application (APP) for presurgical simulation was developed and validated by comparing it with current analytical approach and other models. In this APP, alternative plate designs and materials to limit the effects of stress shielding could be tested. In addition, the number and position of screws and the gap between bone and plate that achieved acceptable stability were predicted. The fixation stability providing a situation of interfragmentary strain between 2% and 10% is necessary for callus formation. However, improving the fixation stability leads to a stress shielding effect. The simultaneous alleviation of stress shielding and maintenance of stability are important in fracture healing. In this study, the feasibility of creating a specialized APP to evaluate different screw-plate configurations for diaphyseal femoral fractures was investigated. The ultimate goal is to extend this technique to computer-assisted preoperative planning for orthopedic surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Benefits of Cement Augmentation of Pedicle Screw Fixation Are Increased in Osteoporotic Bone: A Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhai; Baran, George R; Garg, Hitesh; Betz, Randal R; Moumene, Missoum; Cahill, Patrick J

    2014-07-01

    Biomechanical study using a finite element model of a normal and osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae comparing resistance with axial pullout and bending forces on polymethylmethacrylate-augmented and non-augmented pedicle screws. To compare the effect of cement augmentation of pedicle screw fixation in normal and osteoporotic bone with 2 different techniques of cement delivery. Various clinical and biomechanical studies have addressed the benefits of cement augmentation of pedicle screws, but none have evaluated whether this effect is similar, magnified, or attenuated in osteoporotic bone compared with normal bone. In addition, no study has compared the biomechanical strength of augmented pedicle screws using cement delivery through the pedicle screw with delivery through a pilot hole. This study was funded by a grant from DePuy Synthes Spine. Normal and osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae with pedicle screws were simulated. The models were tested for screw pullout strength with and without cement augmentation. Two methods of cement delivery were also tested. Both methods were tested using 1 and 2.5 cm 3 volume of cement infiltrated in normal and osteoporotic bone. The increase in screw pullout force was proportionally greater in osteoporotic bone with equivalent volumes of cement delivered. The researchers found that 1 and 2.5 cm 3 of cement infiltrated bone volume resulted in an increase in pullout force by about 50% and 120% in normal bone, and by about 64% and 156% in osteoporotic bone, respectively. The delivery method had only a minimal effect on pullout force when 2.5 cm 3 of cement was injected (strength of pedicle screws, and this effect is proportionately greater in osteoporotic bone. Cement delivery through fenestrated screws and delivery through a pilot hole result in comparable pullout strength at higher cement volumes. Copyright © 2014 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. In vivo evaluation of immediately loaded stainless steel and titanium orthodontic screws in a growing bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Gritsch

    Full Text Available The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluated the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" and static and dynamic bone parameters in the vicinity of the devices (test zone and in a bone area located 1.5 cm posterior to the devices (control zone. Both systems exhibit similar responses for the survival rate; 87.5% and 81.3% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.64; 4-week period, and 62.5% and 50.0% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.09; 12-week period. No significant differences between the devices were found regarding the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" (p = 0.1 or the static and dynamic bone parameters. However, the 5% threshold of "bone-to-implant contact" was obtained after 4 weeks with the stainless steel devices, leading to increased survival rate values. Bone in the vicinity of the miniscrew implants showed evidence of a significant increase in bone trabecular thickness when compared to bone in the control zone (p = 0.05. In our study, it is likely that increased trabecular thickness is a way for low density bone to respond to the stress induced by loading.

  3. In vivo evaluation of immediately loaded stainless steel and titanium orthodontic screws in a growing bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluated the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" and static and dynamic bone parameters in the vicinity of the devices (test zone) and in a bone area located 1.5 cm posterior to the devices (control zone). Both systems exhibit similar responses for the survival rate; 87.5% and 81.3% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.64; 4-week period), and 62.5% and 50.0% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.09; 12-week period). No significant differences between the devices were found regarding the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" (p = 0.1) or the static and dynamic bone parameters. However, the 5% threshold of "bone-to-implant contact" was obtained after 4 weeks with the stainless steel devices, leading to increased survival rate values. Bone in the vicinity of the miniscrew implants showed evidence of a significant increase in bone trabecular thickness when compared to bone in the control zone (p = 0.05). In our study, it is likely that increased trabecular thickness is a way for low density bone to respond to the stress induced by loading.

  4. Poly (1,8 Octanediol-co-Citrate) Hydroxyapatite Composite as Antibacterial Biodegradable Bone Screw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiyanti, P.; Sholikhah, I.; Isfandiary, A.; Hasbiyani, NAF; Lazuardi, M. B.; Laksana, R. D.

    2017-05-01

    The high bone fracture rates reaching up to 300-400 cases per month have been treated with surgical procedure of internal fixation. Nevertheless, the commonly used metal screw has shown several weaknesses. Therefore, it is required bone screw of which primary characteristics include being biocompatible, bio-functional, biodegradable, and anticorrosive. The study aimed to synthesize Antibacterial Poly 1,8-Octanediol-co-Citrate (POC) and investigated the effect of chitosan on the antibacterial and compatibility characteristics of POC-HA composite as antibacterial biodegradable bone screw. The characterization were conducted on POC-HA composite to assess its functional cluster, antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity, degradation capacity, and morphology. Pre-polymer POC was composited with 62% nano-HA, followed by post-polymerization treatment. The sample then coated by chitosan with composition variations of 1%, 3%, and 5%. The nano-HA marked with the appearance of phosphate cluster on the wavenumber of 872.17 cm-1 and 559.51 cm-1, while the chitosan marked with C=O stretch cluster of esther at 1729 cm-1 from Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) measurement. The best result was obtained with 3% chitosan coating. The POC-HA composites showed bacterial inhibiting ability of 16.92 mm with non-toxic characteristics. These results indicated that chitosan coating Poly 1,8-Octanediol-co-Citrate (POC)-Nano Hydroxyapatite composite is a potential candidate for an antibacterial biodegradable bone screw.

  5. Ergotropic effect of bone cement on pedicle screw fixation in treatment of osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the ergotropic effect of bone cement on pedicle screw fixation in treatment of osteopo¬rotic thoracolumbar fracture. Methods Fifty-three patients with osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture, admitted from Jun. 2013 to Dec. 2014, were included for treatment by augmentation of pedicle screw fixation with bone cement. All patients underwent pre-operative examination of bone mineral density with T-score ≤-2.5 and augmentation of pedicle screw fixation with injection of 1.5 ml bone cement in adjacent to fractured vertebra. All patients were treated with anti-osteoporosis therapy pre- and post-operation, ob¬served and recorded with basic conditions and complications. At pre-operation, one-week post-operation and last follow-up, pain vi¬sual analogue scale (VAS and neurological function score (ASIA of all patients were recorded, and the compression rats of anterior and posterior edge of fractured vertebra, and compression rats of spinal canal and Cobb angel of all patients were measured. Results All the 53 patients were successfully undergone operation in about 90-140 min with blood loss of about 150-350 ml. No spinal cord or nerve injury, dural tear and obvious leakage of bone cement and screw loosening occurred during operation. All patients were followed up for 12 to 36 months and the neurological function obviously recovered contrasted with pre-operation. X-ray and CT examination at last follow-up showed good fractures healing, good position and non-loosening of internal fixation device and non-leakage of bone cement. At one week post-operation and last follow-up, VAS, compression rats of anterior edge and posterior edge of fractured vertebra, compression rats of spinal canal and Cobb angel were significantly lower than those at pre-operation (P0.05. Conclusions Augmentation of pedicle screw fixation with bone cement can effectively strengthen the initial stability of pedicle screw in osteo¬porosis, restore the

  6. Evaluation of the trauma and bone metabolism after internal absorbable screw and metal screw fixation treatment of tibia-fibula fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Bin Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the trauma and bone metabolism after internal absorbable screw and metal screw fixation treatment of tibia-fibula fracture. Methods: 78 patients with tibia-fibula fracture who received internal fixation surgery in our hospital between May 2013 and October 2015 were selected and randomly divided into absorbable group and metal group (n=39 who accepted internal absorbable screw fixation and internal metal screw fixation respectively. 3 d after operation, serum was collected to determine the levels of inflammatory factors, pain mediators, stress hormones and bone metabolism indexes. Results: Serum inflammatory mediators procalcitonin (PCT, Resistin, C-reactive protein (CRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, pain mediators substance P (SP, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and NPY, stress hormones norepinephrine (NE, epinephrine (E and cortisol (Cor as well as bone resorption marker molecules C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX-I and C-terminal telopeptides of type II collagen (CTX-II levels of absorbable group were significantly lower than those of metal group (P<0.05 while bone formation marker molecules N-MID osteocalcin (N-MID and N-terminal propeptide of procollagen type I (PINP levels were significantly higher than those of metal group (P<0.05. Conclusions: The trauma degree of internal absorbable screw fixation treatment of tibia-fibula fracture is weaker than that of internal metal screw fixation, and the bone metabolism activity is better than that of internal metal screw fixation.

  7. Fully Threaded Versus Partially Threaded Screws: Determining Shear in Cancellous Bone Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Michael W; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Carpenter, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers have studied and compared various forms of intraosseous fixation. No studies have examined the effects of shear through stiffness and failure strength of a fully threaded versus a partially threaded screw. Our hypothesis was that the fully threaded lag screw technique would provide greater shear strength and resistance. Thirty-six synthetic sawbone blocks were used to test screw fixation. In group 1 (n = 9), 2 blocks were fixed together using a fully threaded 4.0-mm stainless steel cancellous bone screw and the lag technique. In group 2 (n = 8), 2 blocks were fixed together using the standard manufacturer-recommended method for inserting 4.0-mm partially threaded stainless steel cancellous bone screws. The constructs were then mechanically tested. Shear was applied by compressing each construct at an axial displacement rate of 0.5 mm/s until failure. The fully threaded screw had a significantly greater (p = .026) initial stiffness (106.4 ± 15.8 N/mm) than the partially threaded screw (80.1 ± 27.5 N/mm). The yield load and displacement for the fully threaded group (429.4 ± 11.7 N and 7.2 ± 0.35 mm) were 64% and 67% greater than those for the partially threaded screw group (261.4 ± 26.1 N and 4.3 ± 1.03 mm), respectively. The results of the present study have demonstrated the importance of a full-thread construct to prevent shear and to decrease strain at the fracture. The confirmation of our hypothesis questions the future need and use of partially threaded screws for cancellous bone fixation. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cortical bone trajectory for lumbosacral fixation: penetrating S-1 endplate screw technique: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Keitaro; Yato, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Takashi; Imabayashi, Hideaki; Asazuma, Takashi; Nemoto, Koichi

    2014-08-01

    A cortical bone trajectory (CBT) is a new pedicle screw trajectory that maximizes the thread contact with cortical bone surface, providing enhanced screw purchase. Despite the increased use of the CBT in the lumbar spine, little is known about the insertion technique for the sacral CBT. The aim of this study was to introduce a novel sacral pedicle screw trajectory. This trajectory engages with denser bone maximally by the screw penetrating the S-1 superior endplate through a more medial entry point than the traditional technique, and also has safety advantages, with the protrusion of the screw tip into the intervertebral disc space carrying no risk of neurovascular injury. In this study, the CT scans of 50 adults were studied for morphometric measurement of the new trajectory. The entry point was supposed to be the junction of the center of the superior articular process of S-1 and approximately 3 mm inferior to the most inferior border of the inferior articular process of L-5. The direction was straight forward in the axial plane without convergence, angulated cranially in the sagittal plane penetrating the middle of the sacral endplate. The cephalad angle to the sacral endplate, length of trajectory, and safety of the trajectory were investigated. Next, the insertional torque of pedicle screws using this technique was measured intraoperatively in 19 patients and compared with the traditional technique. The mean cephalad angle in these 50 patients was 30.7° ± 5.1°, and the mean length of trajectory was 31.5 ± 3.5 mm. The CT analysis revealed that the penetrating S-1 endplate technique did not cause any neurovascular injury anteriorly in any case. The new technique demonstrated an average of 141% higher insertional torque than the traditional monocortical technique. The penetrating S-1 endplate technique through the medial entry point is suitable for the connection of lumbar CBT, has revealed favorable stability for lumbosacral fixation, and has reduced the

  9. [Polymethylmethacrylate augmentation of bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screws for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H L; Li, C D; Yang, Z C; Yi, X D; Liu, H; Lu, H L; Li, H; Wang, Y

    2016-12-18

    To describe the application of polymethylmethacrylate augmentation of bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screws for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis. Observation group included 14 cases of degenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis received polymethylmethacrylate augmentation of bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screws from November 2014 to July 2015, control group included 12 cases of degenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis received polymethylmethacrylate augmentation with traditional pedicle screws.The operation time, blood loss, number of pedicle screws and number of augmented pedicle screws in the two groups were compared. The bone cement leakage and pulmonary bone cement embolism in the two groups were also compared. The fusion rate and pedicle screws loosening by lumbar X ray and dynamic X ray were evaluated. The clinical results were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) of pain on lumbar and lower limbers, lumbar Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores (JOA), Prolo functional scores and Oswestry disability (ODI) scores. Differences of operation time and blood loss in the two groups were not statistically significant. The average number of pedicle screws was 9.9±4.7 and the average number of augmented pedicle screws was 5.9±2.6 in observation group while the average number of pedicle screws was 7.1±2.8 and the average number of augmented pedicle screws was 3.0±1.9 in control group. The ratio of augmented pedicle screws was higher in observation group than in control group (0.69±0.30 vs.0.47±0.30,Pdegenerative lumbar diseases with osteoporosis was effective, with simple working processes and lower risk of bone cement leakage. The short-term clinical result was good.

  10. [Image-guided bone consolidation in oncology: Cementoplasty and percutaneous screw fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buy, Xavier; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Catena, Vittorio; Roubaud, Guilhem; Kind, Michele; Palussiere, Jean

    2017-05-01

    Bone metastases are a common finding in oncology. They often induce pain but also fractures which impair quality of life, especially when involving weight-bearing bones. Percutaneous image-guided consolidation techniques play a major role for the management of bone metastases. Cementoplasty aims to stabilize bone and control pain by injecting acrylic cement into a weakened bone. This minimally invasive technique has proven its efficacy for bones submitted to compression forces: vertebra, acetabular roof, and condyles. However, long bone diaphysis should be treated with caution due to lower resistance of the cement subject to torsional forces. The recent improvements of navigation systems allow percutaneous image-guided screw fixation without requiring open surgery. This fast-track procedure avoids postponing introduction of systemic therapies. If needed, cementoplasty can be combined with screw insertion to ensure better anchoring in major osteolysis. Interventional radiology bone consolidation techniques increase the therapeutic field in oncology. A multidisciplinary approach remains mandatory to select the best indications. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. One versus two titanium screw fixation of autologous onlay bone grafts in the anterior maxilla: a randomised histological pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, Evita A. C.; Meshkini, Hamid; Lindeboom, Jerome A. H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the histological presentation of local mandibular bone grafts fixed with one screw or two screws in buccal anterior maxillary augmentation procedures. Local buccal defects of the anterior maxilla were reconstructed in 12 patients (mean age 47 ± 17 years, range 18

  12. In vivo degradation of a new concept of magnesium-based rivet-screws in the minipig mandibular bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, Benoit; Saulacic, Nikola; Beck, Stefan; Imwinkelried, Thomas; Goh, Bee Tin; Nakahara, Ken; Hofstetter, Willy; Iizuka, Tateyuki

    2016-01-01

    Self-tapping of magnesium screws in hard bone may be a challenge due to the limited torsional strength of magnesium alloys in comparison with titanium. To avoid screw failure upon implantation, the new concept of a rivet-screw was applied to a WE43 magnesium alloy. Hollow cylinders with threads on the outside were expanded inside drill holes of minipig mandibles. During the expansion with a hexagonal mandrel, the threads engaged the surrounding bone and the inside of the screw transformed into a hexagonal screw drive to allow further screwing in or out of the implant. The in vivo degradation of the magnesium implants and the performance of the used coating were studied in a human standard-sized animal model. Four magnesium alloy rivet-screws were implanted in each mandible of 12 minipigs. Six animals received the plasmaelectrolytically coated magnesium alloy implants; another six received the uncoated magnesium alloy rivet-screws. Two further animals received one titanium rivet-screw each as control. In vivo radiologic examination was performed at one, four, and eight weeks. Euthanasia was performed for one group of seven animals (three animals with coated, three with uncoated magnesium alloy implants and one with titanium implant) at 12 weeks and for the remaining seven animals at 24 weeks. After euthanasia, micro-computed tomography and histological examination with histomorphometry were performed. Significantly less void formation as well as higher bone volume density (BV/TV) and bone-implant contact area (BIC) were measured around the coated implants compared to the uncoated ones. The surface coating was effective in delaying degradation despite plastic deformation. The results showed potential for further development of magnesium hollow coated screws for bone fixation. - Highlights: • A new concept of rivet screws as an alternative to classical screws is presented • The rivet screw concept was tested in vivo in a mini-pig pilot study • Un-coated and

  13. Effect of diameter of the drill hole on torque of screw insertion and pushout strength for headless tapered compression screws in simulated fractures of the lateral condyle of the equine third metacarpal bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Ryan S; Galuppo, Larry D; Stover, Susan M

    2006-05-01

    To compare variables for screw insertion, pushout strength, and failure modes for a headless tapered compression screw inserted in standard and oversize holes in a simulated lateral condylar fracture model. 6 pairs of third metacarpal bones from horse cadavers. Simulated lateral condylar fractures were created, reduced, and stabilized with a headless tapered compression screw by use of a standard or oversize hole. Torque, work, and time for drilling, tapping, and screw insertion were measured during site preparation and screw implantation. Axial load and displacement were measured during screw pushout. Effects of drill hole size on variables for screw insertion and screw pushout were assessed by use of Wilcoxon tests. Drill time was 59% greater for oversize holes than for standard holes. Variables for tapping (mean maximum torque, total work, positive work, and time) were 42%, 70%, 73%, and 58% less, respectively, for oversize holes, compared with standard holes. Variables for screw pushout testing (mean yield load, failure load, failure displacement, and failure energy) were 40%, 40%, 47%, and 71% less, respectively, for oversize holes, compared with standard holes. Screws could not be completely inserted in 1 standard and 2 oversize holes. Enlarging the diameter of the drill hole facilitated tapping but decreased overall holding strength of screws. Therefore, holes with a standard diameter are recommended for implantation of variable pitch screws whenever possible. During implantation, care should be taken to ensure that screw threads follow tapped bone threads.

  14. Midline lumbar fusion using cortical bone trajectory screws. Preliminary report

    OpenAIRE

    Bielecki, Mateusz; Kunert, Przemys?aw; Prokopienko, Marek; Nowak, Arkadiusz; Czernicki, Tomasz; Marchel, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF) using cortical bone trajectory is an alternative method of transpedicular spinal fusion for degenerative disease. The new entry points’ location and screwdriving direction allow the approach-related morbidity to be reduced. Aim: To present our preliminary experience with the MIDLF technique on the first 5 patients with lumbar degenerative disease and with follow-up of at least 6 months. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis was...

  15. Internal fixation of proximal fractures of the 2nd and 4th metacarpal and metatarsal bones using bioabsorbable screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mageed, M; Steinberg, T; Drumm, N; Stubbs, N; Wegert, J; Koene, M

    2018-03-01

    Fractures involving the proximal one-third of the splint bone are relatively rare and are challenging to treat. A variety of management techniques have been reported in the literature. The aim of this retrospective case series was to describe the clinical presentation and evaluate the efficacy of bioabsorbable polylactic acid screws in internal fixation of proximal fractures of the 2nd and 4th metacarpal and metatarsal bones in horses. The medical records, diagnostic images and outcome of all horses diagnosed with a proximal fracture of the splint bones and treated with partial resection and internal fixation of the proximal stump using bioabsorbable polylactic acid screws between 2014 and 2015 were reviewed. Eight horses met the inclusion criteria. The results showed that there were no complications encountered during screw placement or postoperatively. Six horses returned to full work 3 months after the operation and two horses remained mildly lame. On follow-up radiographs 12 months postoperatively (n = 2) the screws were not completely absorbed. The screws resulted in a cone-shaped radiolucency, which was progressively replaced from the outer margins by bone sclerosis. The use of bioabsorbable screws for fixation of proximal fractures of the splint bone appears to be a safe and feasible technique and may offer several advantages over the use of traditional metallic implants. © 2018 Australian Veterinary Association.

  16. Enhancing pedicle screw fixation in the aging spine with a novel bioactive bone cement: an in vitro biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingan; Kingwell, Stephen; Li, Zhaoyang; Pan, Haobo; Lu, William W; Oxland, Thomas R

    2012-08-01

    A paired biomechanical study of pedicle screws augmented with bone cement in a human cadaveric and osteoporotic lumbar spine model. OBJECTIVES.: To evaluate immediate strength and stiffness of pedicle screw fixation augmented with a novel bioactive bone cement in an osteoporotic spine model and compare it with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. A novel bioactive bone cement, containing nanoscale particles of strontium and hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA), can promote new bone formation and osteointegration and provides a promising reinforcement to the osteoporotic spine. Its immediate mechanical performance in augmenting pedicle screw fixation has not been evaluated. Two pedicle screws augmented with Sr-HA and PMMA cement were applied to each of 10 isolated cadaveric L3 vertebrae. Each screw was subjected to a toggling test and screw kinematics were calculated. The pedicle screw was subjected to a pullout test until failure. Finally, the screw coverage with cement was measured on computed tomographic images. Screw translations in the toggling test were consistently larger in the Sr-HA group than in the PMMA group (1.4 ± 1.2 mm vs. 1.0 ± 1.1 mm at 1000 cycles). The rotation center was located closer to the screw tip in the Sr-HA group (19% of screw length) than in the PMMA group (37%). The only kinematic difference between Sr-HA and PMMA cements was the screw rotation at 1000 cycles (1.5° ± 0.9° vs. 1.3° ± 0.6°; P = 0.0026). All motion parameters increased significantly with more loading cycles. The pullout force was higher in the PMMA group than the Sr-HA group (1.40 ± 0.63 kN vs. 0.93 ± 0.70 kN), and this difference was marginally significant (P = 0.051). Sr-HA cement covered more of the screw length than PMMA cement (79 ± 19% vs. 43 ± 19%) (P = 0.036). This paired-design study identified some subtle but mostly nonsignificant differences in immediate biomechanical fixation of pedicle screws augmented with the Sr-HA cement compared with the PMMA cement.

  17. Biomechanical analysis of pedicle screws in osteoporotic bone with bioactive cement augmentation using simulated in vivo multicomponent loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choma, Theodore J; Frevert, Wesley F; Carson, William L; Waters, Nicole P; Pfeiffer, Ferris M

    2011-03-15

    Biomechanical analysis of bioactive cements augmenting pedicle screw resistance to loosening in osteoporotic synthetic bone. To simulate in vivo loading-loosening of pedicle screws in osteoporotic vertebrae; and to compare biomechanical efficacy of the following bioactive cements: calcium phosphate (CP), calcium sulfate (CS), and proprietary mixture (M). Pedicle screw instrumentation in osteoporotic spines is limited by poor bone-screw interface strength, resulting in screw loosening fixation failure. Previous in vivo studies evaluated augmented pedicle screw resistance to pure pullout, not simulating in vivo loading/failure. A pedicle screw-instrumented osteoporotic thoracic vertebra subjected to combined pullout, transverse, moment loading was simulated. Unconstrained 3-dimensional screw motion relative to vertebra was optically measured during quasi-static, and dynamic loading. Augmented groups (CP, CS, M) produced (P CS > M failure initiation force (P < 0.006) was because of differences in cement distribution. Animal studies may be required to characterize the remodeling activity of bioactive cements and their longer term efficacies.

  18. Screw fixation via diploic bone paralleling to occiput table: anatomical analysis of a new technique and report of 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingsheng, Tan; Huimin, Wang; Xin, Jiang; Ping, Yi; Hongyu, Wei; Feng, Yang; Wu, Wang; Guangbo, Zhang

    2007-12-01

    Several types of posterior approaches have been adopted for occipitocervical fusion. Prior to this study, Foerater et al. in 1927 used a fibular strut graft in the site between the occiput and the lower cervical spine to achieve fusion. Since then, various techniques including wrings, Hartshill loop, AO reconstructive plate, and AXIS occipital plate were described and used widely. As far as we know, all these techniques involve the screw placement vertical to the diploic bone; however none has ever addressed the feasibility of screw placement in occiput parallelling to the diploic bone. In our study, 30 dry specimens of human occiputs were measured manually using vernier calipers and protractors. The intradiploic screw was first supposed to be inserted inferiorly to the superior nuchal line (SNL) prominence. The entry point located at the superior edge of the SNL prominence. Afterward, the measurements of extracranial occiput in SNL area on midline and bilateral 15 mm to the midline saggital-cutting planes of the occiput were conducted. The thickness of the occipital bone at the location of SNL prominence, the entry point, the exit point and the screw orientation were measured, respectively. Afterward, 11 patients with craniocervical malformation were treated surgically using this alternative and their X-ray radiographs and CT scans were evaluated postoperatively. The data showed that the occipital at the site of SNL prominence was the thickest. The thickest point was external occipital protuberance (EOP), which was up to 14 mm. The thickness decreased gradually from the site of SNL to the superior border of surgical decompressed area. The actual length of screw channel was about 26 mm. The mean thickness for safe screw insertion ranged from 5.73 to 14.14 mm. A total of 22 intraocciput screws parallel to diploic bone were placed precisely, without injury to the cerebral and inner occipital venous sinus. The results confirm that occiput is available for holding

  19. Treatment of subchondral lucencies in the medial proximal radius with a bone screw in 8 horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquet, Imma; Lane Easter, J; Coomer, Richard P C; Ezquerra, Luis J; Marsh, Chad A; Trostle, Steve S; Santschi, Elizabeth M

    2017-05-01

    To describe the results of screw placement through subchondral lucencies (SCL) of the proximal radius in 8 horses. Retrospective clinical study. Horses with cubital SCL causing lameness (n=8). Medical record review and clinical follow-up. Eight horses with SCL in the proximal radius causing lameness were treated with a screw placed across the lucency. The horses range in age from 1 to 20 years. In 4 of 8 horses, the lameness had been intermittently severe (apparent at the walk). Lameness was isolated to the cubital joint by intra-articular anesthesia in 5 horses and diagnosed radiographically in all 8. All horses had a 4.5 mm cortical bone screw placed from medial to lateral (6 lag, 2 neutral) across the SCL using fluoroscopic or radiographic control. Postoperative care included stall confinement with hand walking for 30-60 days, followed by an additional 30-60 days of pasture turnout. Radiographic SCL healing (reduction in SCL size) was demonstrated at 3-4 months after surgery in all horses, and 7/8 horses (87.5%) were used as intended (4 performance, 3 pasture turn-out) within 6 months. Lameness in the remaining horse improved initially (dressage) but returned. A screw placed through the SCL of the proximal-medial radius was effective in reducing or resolving lameness associated with the elbow joint in 7/8 horses (88%). Screw placement in the proximal radius should be considered for horses with lameness caused by an SCL when a quick return to exercise is desired or conservative therapy is ineffective. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  20. A Biomechanical Analysis of Interference Screw Versus Bone Tunnel Fixation of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfers to the Calcaneus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, George T; Balldin, B Christian; Zide, Jacob R; Chen, Christopher T

    The flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer is commonly used to restore function in chronic Achilles tendon ruptures and chronic Achilles tendinopathy. The tendon is often secured to the calcaneus either through a bone tunnel or by an interference screw. We hypothesized that tenodesis using the bone tunnel method would be mechanically superior to interference screw fixation for flexor hallucis longus transfers. Eight matched pairs of cadaveric specimens were assigned randomly to the bone tunnel or interference screw technique and were loaded to failure. Biomechanical analysis was performed to evaluate the ultimate strength, peak stress, Young's modulus, failure strain, and strain energy. Unpaired comparison, paired comparison, and linear regression analyses were used to determine statistical significance. A slight 22% ± 9% decrease in Young's modulus and a 52% ± 18% increase of strain energy were found in the interference screw group. However, no differences in ultimate strength, peak stress, or failure strain were seen between the 2 groups on paired comparison. Our findings suggest that interference screw fixation provides similar spontaneous biomechanical properties to the use of a bone tunnel for flexor hallucis longus transfer to the calcaneus. The interference screw is a practical option for fixation of the flexor hallucis longus tendon to the calcaneus and can be performed through a single incision approach. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A biomechanical comparison of headless tapered variable pitch and AO cortical bone screws for fixation of a simulated slab fracture in equine third carpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Aloisio C D; Galuppo, Larry D; Taylor, Kenneth T; Jensen, David G; Stover, Susan M

    2003-01-01

    To compare the mechanical shear strengths and stiffnesses obtained from in vitro testing of a simulated complete third carpal bone (C3) frontal plane radial facet slab fracture (osteotomy) stabilized with either a 4/5 Acutrak (AT) compression screw or a 4.5-mm AO cortical bone (AO) screw inserted in lag fashion. Drilling, tapping, and screw insertion torques, forces, and times also were compared between AT and AO implants. In vitro biomechanical assessment of site preparation, screw insertion, and shear failure test variables of bone screw stabilized simulated C3 slab fracture in paired cadaveric equine carpi. Eight pairs of cadaveric equine C3 without orthopedic abnormalities. Standardized simulated C3 slab fractures were repaired with either AO or AT screws (AO/C3 and AT/C3 groups, respectively). Drilling, tapping, and screw insertion torques, forces, and times were measured with a materials testing machine for each screw type. Repaired specimens were tested in axially oriented shear until failure. Paired Students t-tests were used to assess differences between site preparation, screw insertion, and shear testing variables. Significance was set at P bone fragment measurements of the standardized simulated C3 slab fractures created for AO or AT screws. There were no significant differences for mean and maximum drilling torques; however, the tapered AT drill had greater maximum drilling force compared with the 3.2-mm and 4.5-mm AO drill bits. Mean insertion torque and force measured from the self-tapping AT screw were not significantly different compared with the 4.5-mm AO tap. There were no significant differences in maximum screw torque among constructs. Total procedure time was significantly longer for the AT group (5.8 +/- 1.6 minutes) compared with the AO group (2.9 +/- 1.1 minutes; P =.001). AT stabilized specimens had significantly greater mean +/- SD initial shear stiffness (3.64 +/- 1.08 kN/mm) than AO specimens (1.64 +/- 0.73 kN/mm; P =.005). All other

  2. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with cortical bone trajectory screw fixation versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion using traditional pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Several biomechanical studies have demonstrated the favorable mechanical properties of the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw. However, no reports have examined surgical outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with CBT screw fixation for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) compared with those after PLIF using traditional pedicle screw (PS) fixation. The purposes of this study were thus to elucidate surgical outcomes after PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS and to compare these results with those after PLIF using traditional PS fixation. METHODS Ninety-five consecutive patients underwent PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS (CBT group; mean followup 35 months). A historical control group consisted of 82 consecutive patients who underwent PLIF with traditional PS fixation (PS group; mean follow-up 40 months). Clinical status was assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale score. Fusion status was assessed by dynamic plain radiographs and CT. The need for additional surgery and surgery-related complications was also evaluated. RESULTS The mean JOA score improved significantly from 13.7 points before surgery to 23.3 points at the latest follow-up in the CBT group (mean recovery rate 64.4%), compared with 14.4 points preoperatively to 22.7 points at final follow-up in the PS group (mean recovery rate 55.8%; p 0.05). Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease developed in 3 patients from the CBT group (3.2%) compared with 9 patients from the PS group (11.0%, p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS PLIF with CBT screw fixation for DS provided comparable improvement of clinical symptoms with PLIF using traditional PS fixation. However, the successful fusion rate tended to be lower in the CBT group than in the PS group, although the difference was not statistically significant between the 2 groups.

  3. Delayed Union of a Sacral Fracture: Percutaneous Navigated Autologous Cancellous Bone Grafting and Screw Fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huegli, R. W.; Messmer, P.; Jacob, A. L.; Regazzoni, P.; Styger, S.; Gross, T.

    2003-01-01

    Delayed or non-union of a sacral fracture is a serious clinical condition that may include chronic pain, sitting discomfort, gait disturbances, neurological problems, and inability to work. It is also a difficult reconstruction problem. Late correction of the deformity is technically more demanding than the primary treatment of acute pelvic injuries. Open reduction, internal fixation (ORIF), excision of scar tissue, and bone grafting often in a multi-step approach are considered to be the treatment of choice in delayed unions of the pelvic ring. This procedure implies the risk of neurological and vascular injuries, infection, repeated failure of union, incomplete correction of the deformity, and incomplete pain relief as the most important complications. We report a new approach for minimally invasive treatment of a delayed union of the sacrum without vertical displacement. A patient who suffered a Malgaigne fracture (Tile C1.3) was initially treated with closed reduction and percutaneous screw fixation (CRPF) of the posterior pelvic ring under CT navigation and plating of the anterior pelvic ring. Three months after surgery he presented with increasing hip pain caused by a delayed union of the sacral fracture. The lesion was successfully treated percutaneously in a single step procedure using CT navigation for drilling of the delayed union, autologous bone grafting, and screw fixation

  4. When Planning Screw Fracture Fixation Why the 5.5 mm Screw is the Goldilocks Screw. An Observational Computer Tomographic Study of Fifth Metatarsal Bone Anatomy in a Sample of Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iselin, Lukas D; Ramawat, Sunil; Hanratty, Brian; Klammer, Georg; Stavrou, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We wanted to verify our clinical experience that the 5.5 mm screw was ideal in the majority of fifth metatarsal fracture fixation. The size of a screw is important for the successful surgical treatment of these fractures in order to obtain the maximal stability while reducing the risk for iatrogenic fracture.A sample of patients undergoing computer tomographic imaging of the foot for investigation other than fifth metatarsal pathology were recruited. The parameters of the fifth metatarsal bone anatomy were measured.These parameters of the 5.5 mm screw were correlated with this data. The upper parameter (the diameter of the threads) was 5.5 and the lower parameter (the diameter of the shank) was 4.0 mm.Twenty seven patients were recruited.The proximal third internal diameter ranged from 3.6 to 7.0 mm with a mean of 5.0 mm. 93% of the metatarsals could easily accommodate the 5.5 mm screw. Two of the metatarsals had an internal diameter of screw may be used safely in the majority of patients with fifth metatarsal fractures.

  5. Effect on pedicle screw stability of polymethylmethacrylate volume and distribution in synthetic bone block for patients with osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun LIU

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the stability of injectable pedicle screw with different lateral holes augmented with different volume of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA in synthetic bone block used for patients with osteoporosis, and analyze the relationship between screw stability and injected volume and distribution pattern of PMMA. Methods The synthetic bone blocks used for patients with osteoporosis were randomly divided into groups A, B, C and D according to the screw difference, and the blocks in each group were then randomly divided again into subgroups 0, 1, 2 and 3 according to the difference of PMMA volume. A pilot hole was prepared in advance using the same method in all samples. Pedicle screws of type A–C were directly inserted into vertebrae of groups A–C respectively, and then different volumes of PMMA (0, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0ml were injected through screw into the blocks of subgroups 0, 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The pilot hole was filled with different volumes of PMMA (0, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0ml followed by insertion of screw in groups D0, D1, D2 and D3 respectively. X-ray examination was performed to evaluate the screw position and PMMA distribution, and axial pull-out test was performed to measure the maximum axial pullout strength (Fmax. Results X-ray examination revealed that PMMA wrapt the anterior 1/3 part of screw in groups A1–A3, wrapt the middle 1/3 part of screw in groups B1–B3 and groups C1–C3, and evenly wrapt the full length of screw in groups D1–D3. Two factor ANOVA showed that both volume and distribution of PMMA significantly influenced Fmax (P0.05, but the Fmax was significantly higher in groups with injection of 2.0ml PMMA than that in groups with injection of 1.0ml PMMA (P0.05. The Fmax was significantly lower in group A1 than in group D1 (P=0.026, and no significant differences existed between the other two groups injected with the same volume of PMMA (P>0.05. Conclusion PMMA can significantly enhance the stability of

  6. The effect of pilot hole size on the insertion torque and pullout strength of self-tapping cortical bone screws in osteoporotic bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battula, Suneel; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Sahai, Vivek; Vrabec, Gregory A; Tank, Jason; Njus, Glen O

    2008-04-01

    All surgical screws can experience failure if the torsional, tensile, and flexion loads exerted on the screws are excessively high. The use of self-tapping screws (STS) results in higher insertion torques (IT) as these screws cut their own threads in the pilot hole drilled in the bone. In this study, the torque for inserting the STS into an osteoporotic bone block for different pilot hole sizes (PHS) was measured and the pullout strength (PS) for extraction of the screws was determined for different depths of insertion, 0 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm beyond the far cortex. Seventy-two Synthes stainless steel STS (40 mm length and 3.5 mm diameter) were inserted into pilot holes of sizes 2.55 (A: 73% OD), 2.50 (B: 71.5%), 2.45 (C: 70%), and 2.8 mm (D: 80%). Using a digital torque screwdriver, screws were inserted to 0 mm, 1 mm or 2 mm past the far cortex. Pullout tests were conducted with an Instron materials testing system. Analysis of variance and Student-Neuman-Keuls tests were performed to determine the effect of DOI and PHS on the loading energy, PS, and IT. Results demonstrated that IT of the screws inserted into pilot holes A, B, and C were higher than those in D. It was also observed that PS and loading energy for 1 mm and 2 mm penetration past the far cortex were higher than those for 0 mm regardless of PHS. This study also found that an increase in PHS to 2.8 mm will reduce IT but will also reduce the PS relative to a PHS of 2.5 mm, the current standard for 3.5 mm screws. The results of previously published studies regarding the effect of pilot hole size on PS in healthy cortical bone cannot be applied to the osteoporotic environment. The findings presented in this research support using PHS no larger than 71.5% of the screw outer diameter (i.e., pilot hole size of 2.5 mm for 3.5 mm screws) and inserting screws at least 2 mm beyond the far cortex to maximize PS and minimize iatrogenic damage in osteoporotic bone.

  7. Simulation of mechanical behavior and optimization of simulated injection molding process for PLA based antibacterial composite and nanocomposite bone screws using central composite design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Behzad Shiroud; Oliaei, Erfan; Shayesteh, Hadi; Davachi, Seyed Mohammad; Hejazi, Iman; Seyfi, Javad; Bahrami, Mozhgan; Rashedi, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    In this study, injection molding of three poly lactic acid (PLA) based bone screws was simulated and optimized through minimizing the shrinkage and warpage of the bone screws. The optimization was carried out by investigating the process factors such as coolant temperature, mold temperature, melt temperature, packing time, injection time, and packing pressure. A response surface methodology (RSM), based on the central composite design (CCD), was used to determine the effects of the process factors on the PLA based bone screws. Upon applying the method of maximizing the desirability function, optimization of the factors gave the lowest warpage and shrinkage for nanocomposite PLA bone screw (PLA9). Moreover, PLA9 has the greatest desirability among the selected materials for bone screw injection molding. Meanwhile, a finite element analysis (FE analysis) was also performed to determine the force values and concentration points which cause yielding of the screws under certain conditions. The Von-Mises stress distribution showed that PLA9 screw is more resistant against the highest loads as compared to the other ones. Finally, according to the results of injection molding simulations, the design of experiments (DOE) and structural analysis, PLA9 screw is recommended as the best candidate for the production of biomedical materials among all the three types of screws. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cortical bone trajectory screw fixation versus traditional pedicle screw fixation for 2-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion: comparison of surgical outcomes for 2-level degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw technique is a new nontraditional pedicle screw (PS) insertion method. However, the biomechanical behavior of multilevel CBT screw/rod fixation remains unclear, and surgical outcomes in patients after 2-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using CBT screw fixation have not been reported. Thus, the purposes of this study were to examine the clinical and radiological outcomes after 2-level PLIF using CBT screw fixation for 2-level degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DS) and to compare these outcomes with those after 2-level PLIF using traditional PS fixation. METHODS The study included 22 consecutively treated patients who underwent 2-level PLIF with CBT screw fixation for 2-level DS (CBT group, mean follow-up 39 months) and a historical control group of 20 consecutively treated patients who underwent 2-level PLIF using traditional PS fixation for 2-level DS (PS group, mean follow-up 35 months). Clinical symptoms were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system. Bony union was assessed by dynamic plain radiographs and CT images. Surgery-related complications, including symptomatic adjacent-segment disease (ASD), were examined. RESULTS The mean operative duration and intraoperative blood loss were 192 minutes and 495 ml in the CBT group and 218 minutes and 612 ml in the PS group, respectively (p 0.05, respectively). The mean JOA score improved significantly from 12.3 points before surgery to 21.1 points (mean recovery rate 54.4%) at the latest follow-up in the CBT group and from 12.8 points before surgery to 20.4 points (mean recovery rate 51.8%) at the latest follow-up in the PS group (p > 0.05). Solid bony union was achieved at 90.9% of segments in the CBT group and 95.0% of segments in the PS group (p > 0.05). Symptomatic ASD developed in 2 patients in the CBT group (9.1%) and 4 patients in the PS group (20.0%, p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Two-level PLIF with CBT screw fixation

  9. The use of first stage bone augmentation screws to stabilize the surgical template in the second stage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhamme, L.M.; Meijer, G.J.; Berge, S.J.; Maal, T.J.J.

    2015-01-01

    A new method is presented in which the osteosynthesis screws from a first stage bone augmentation of the maxilla are used to stabilize the surgical template during implant placement in the second stage. This method was evaluated in one patient and the results compared to those of previous studies.

  10. The use of first stage bone augmentation screws to stabilize the surgical template in the second stage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhamme, L. M.; Meijer, G. J.; Bergé, S. J.; Maal, T. J J

    2015-01-01

    A new method is presented in which the osteosynthesis screws from a first stage bone augmentation of the maxilla are used to stabilize the surgical template during implant placement in the second stage. This method was evaluated in one patient and the results compared to those of previous studies.

  11. Cortical bone trajectory screws fixation in lumbar adjacent segment disease: A technique note with case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Hsuan; Huang, Hsieng-Ming; Chen, Der-Cherng; Wu, Chih-Ying; Lee, Han-Chun; Cho, Der-Yang

    2018-02-01

    Lumbar adjacent segment disease after lumbar fusion surgery often requires surgical intervention. However, subsequent surgical treatment often needs to expose and remove all of the previous instruments. This additional surgery leads to significant post-operative pain, muscular fibrosis, poor wound healing and infection, etc. From October 2015 to March 2016, we collected six cases underwent cortical bone trajectory screws fixation with minimal invasive inter-body cage fusion for lumbar adjacent segment disease. Patients in the study all had improvement after surgery without recurrence or instruments failure during follow-up. The technique negates removal of pre-existing instruments and when combined with minimal invasive fusion surgery, the wound length, blood loss and soft tissue damage could be reduced compared with traditional surgery. We introduce the surgical procedures in detail and wish this technique could be an option for spine surgeons who encounter a similar situation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Operative technique of two parallel compression screws and autologous bone graft for ankle arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehan, Shah; Hill, Simon O

    2012-09-01

    The management of failed total ankle replacement (TAR) depends on the primary indication, presence of infection, condition of adjacent joints, and available bone stock. In addition, the patient's expectations, age, and general health should also be taken into account. This article describes a technique of arthrodesis in failed TAR with two parallel screws inserted in opposite directions and autologous cancellous bone graft. Four patients were managed using this technique. The subtalar joint and both malleoli were preserved. The average time for radiological union was 14.8 weeks. There were no hardware-related complications or infections. One patient developed subsequent subtalar arthritis and is waiting for subtalar joint fusion. The results from this small series of patients suggest that arthrodesis following failed total ankle replacement with two parallel screws and bone graft may be an effective technique.

  13. Traditional Versus Congruent Arc Latarjet Technique: Effect on Surface Area for Union and Bone Width Surrounding Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Guillaume D; Vopat, Bryan G; Parada, Stephen; Cohn, Randy; Makani, Amun; Sanchez, George; Golijanin, Petar; Beaulieu-Jones, Brendin R; Sanchez, Anthony; Provencher, Matthew T

    2017-05-01

    To compare the surface area available for bony contact and the width of bone on each side of the Latarjet fixation screws in the traditional Latarjet technique versus the congruent arc modification of the Latarjet technique. Computed tomographic scans of 24 shoulders in patients with glenohumeral instability who underwent multiplanar reconstruction measurements with multiple dimensions of the coracoid. The surface area of the coracoid available for bony contact with the anterior glenoid and width of bone on each side of a 3.5-mm screw was compared for the traditional Latarjet technique versus the congruent arc modification. The surface area available for bony contact to the anterior glenoid was 5.65 ± 1.08 cm 2 using the traditional Latarjet technique compared with 3.64 ± 0.93 cm 2 using the congruent arc modification of the Latarjet technique (P Latarjet technique compared with 4.1 ± 1.0 mm using the congruent arc modification (P Latarjet technique has greater bony contact with the glenoid and greater bone width on each side of the screws compared with the congruent arc modification of the Latarjet technique. This potentially allows for a larger surface for healing in the traditional Latarjet technique. Moreover, because of smaller width of the bone around the screw, the congruent arc modification is potentially less tolerant of screw-positioning error compared with the traditional Latarjet technique. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Interfragmentary Compression Forces Vary Based on Scaphoid Bone Screw Type and Fracture Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Samik; Tiedeken, Nathan; Qvick, Lars; Debski, Richard E; Kaufmann, Robert; Fowler, John R

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the interfragmentary compression forces generated in a foam model as a function of headless compression screw type (fully threaded and central threadless) and fracture location. Eighty-eight polyurethane foam models were fixed across a simulated transverse fracture with either a fully threaded screw or a central threadless screw. The location of the transverse fracture varied along the length of the foam model in 2 mm increments for 11 fracture locations. The force generated at the fracture site upon fixation was utilized to determine the interfragmentary compression. Interfragmentary compression was compared using a paired t test and 2-way analysis of variance, with significance set at P compression was found to vary based on fracture location and screw type. The fully threaded screw generated significantly greater compression for fracture locations at 12 mm and 18 mm from the top edge of the foam model, while the central threadless screw generated significantly greater compression for fractures located 2 mm from the top edge of the foam model. The central threadless screw and the fully threaded screw had different fracture locations where maximum compression force occurred. The fully threaded screw generated greater compression force toward the screw center due to greater thread purchase. However, the central threadless screw generated greater compression at the most proximal fracture location due to its greater thread pitch toward the screw head. Maximizing interfragmentary compression may aid in reducing nonunion rates associated with the internal fixation of proximal scaphoid fractures.

  15. Compressive forces achieved in simulated equine third metacarpal bone lateral condylar fractures of varying fragment thickness with Acutrak Plus screw and 4.5 mm AO cortical screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew J; Sod, Gary A; Burba, Daniel J; Mitchell, Colin F

    2010-01-01

    To compare compression pressure (CP) of 6.5 mm Acutrak Plus (AP) and 4.5 mm AO cortical screws (AO) when inserted in simulated lateral condylar fractures of equine 3rd metacarpal (MC3) bones. Paired in vitro biomechanical testing. Cadaveric equine MC3 bones (n=12 pair). Complete lateral condylar osteotomies were created parallel to the midsagittal ridge at 20, 12, and 8 mm axial to the epicondylar fossa on different specimens grouped accordingly. Interfragmentary compression was measured using a pressure sensor placed in the fracture plane before screw placement for fracture fixation. CP was acquired and mean values of CP for each fixation method were compared between the 6.5 mm (AP) and 4.5 mm (AO) for each group using a paired t-test within each fracture fragment thickness group with statistical significance set at Pfractures, especially complete fractures. Because interfragmentary compression plays a factor in the overall stability of a repair, it is recommended for use only in patients with thin lateral condyle fracture fragments, as the compression tends to decrease with an increase in thickness.

  16. Clinical efficacy of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system combined with intervertebral fusion in treatment of lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-yi DAI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the therapeutic effect of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system combined with intervertebral fusion for lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis. Methods  The clinical data were analyzed retrospectively of 21 patients with lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis who received treatment of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system and intervertebral fusion from Aug. 2013 to Nov. 2015. The 21 patients (9 males and 12 females aged from 60 to 80 years (mean 64 years old; 6 of them presented degenerative spondylolysis, 15 with isthmic spondylolisthesis; 2 cases had I degree slippage, 13 had Ⅱdegree slippage, 6 had Ⅲdegree slippage, and all the cases were unisegmental slippage including 9 cases in L4 and 12 cases in L5. Bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae (L2-L5 was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and T values conforming to the diagnostic criteria of osteoporosis were less than or equal to -2.5; All patients were operated with whole lamina resection for decompression, bone cement injectable pedicle screws system implantation, propped open reduction and fixation intervertebral fusion. The clinical outcomes were determined by the radiographic evaluation including intervertebral height, height of intervertebral foramen, slip distance, slip rate and slip angle, and Oswestry disability index (ODI on preoperative, 3 months after operation and the end of the time, and the interbody fusion were followed up. Results  Cerebrospinal fluid leakage of incision was observed in two cases after operation, compression and dressing to incision, Trendelenburg position, dehydration and other treatments were taken, and the stitches of incisions were taken out on schedule. Slips in the 21 patients were reset to different extent, and lumbar physiological curvatures were recovered. The intervertebral height and height of intervertebral foramen were obviously higher 3 months after operation than that before operation (P0

  17. Intramedullary screw fixation with bone autografting to treat proximal fifth metatarsal metaphyseal-diaphyseal fracture in athletes: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukada Sachiyuki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed unions or refractures are not rare following surgical treatment for proximal fifth metatarsal metaphyseal-diaphyseal fractures. Intramedullary screw fixation with bone autografting has the potential to resolve the issue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the result of the procedure. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed 15 athletes who underwent surgical treatment for proximal fifth metatarsal metaphyseal-diaphyseal fracture. Surgery involved intramedullary cannulated cancellous screw fixation after curettage of the fracture site, followed by bone autografting. Postoperatively, patients remain non weight-bearing in a splint or cast for two weeks and without immobilization for an additional two weeks. Full weight-bearing was allowed six weeks postoperatively. Running was permitted after radiographic bone union, and return-to-play was approved after gradually increasing the intensity. Results All patients returned to their previous level of athletic competition. Mean times to bone union, initiation of running, and return-to-play were 8.4, 8.8, and 12.1 weeks, respectively. Although no delayed unions or refractures was observed, distal diaphyseal stress fractures at the distal tip of the screw occurred in two patients and a thermal necrosis of skin occurred in one patient. Conclusions There were no delayed unions or refractures among patients after carrying out a procedure in which bone grafts were routinely performed, combined with adequate periods of immobilization and non weight-bearing. These findings suggest that this procedure may be useful option for athletes to assuring return to competition level.

  18. [Effectiveness of U-shape titanium screw-rod fixation system with bone autografting for lumbar spondylolysis of young adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xiaobing; Yang, Shuangshi; Cao, Haiquan; Jing, Xingquan; Yin, Jun

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of U-shape titanium screw-rod fixation system with bone autografting for lumbar spondylolysis of young adults. Between January 2008 and December 2011, 32 patients with lumbar spondylolysis underwent U-shape titanium screw-rod fixation system with bone autografting. All patients were male with an average age of 22 years (range, 19-32 years). The disease duration ranged from 3 to 24 months (mean, 14 months). L3 was involved in spondylolysis in 2 cases, L4 in 10 cases, and L5 in 20 cases. The preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores were 8.0 +/- 1.1 and 75.3 +/- 11.2, respectively. The operation time was 80-120 minutes (mean, 85 minutes), and the blood loss was 150-250 mL (mean, 210 mL). Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients without complications of infection and nerve symptom. Thirty-two patients were followed up 12-24 months (mean, 14 months). Low back pain was significantly alleviated after operation. The VAS and ODI scores at 3 months after operation were 1.0 +/- 0.5 and 17.6 +/- 3.4, respectively, showing significant differences when compared with preoperative ones (t = 30.523, P = 0.000; t = 45.312, P = 0.000). X-ray films and CT showed bone fusion in the area of isthmus defects, with the bone fusion time of 6-12 months (mean, 9 months). During follow-up, no secondary lumbar spondyloly, adjacent segment degeneration, or loosening or breaking of internal fixator was found. The U-shape titanium screw-rod fixation system with bone autografting is a reliable treatment for lumbar spondylolysis of young adults because of a high fusion rate, minimal invasive, and maximum retention of lumbar range of motion.

  19. Arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: is optimal positioning of the bone block and screws possible? A prospective computed tomography scan analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kany, Jean; Flamand, Olivier; Grimberg, Jean; Guinand, Régis; Croutzet, Pierre; Amaravathi, Rajkumar; Sekaran, Padmanaban

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure could be performed with accurate bone block positioning and screw fixation with a similar rate of complications to the open Latarjet procedure. In this prospective study, 105 shoulders (104 patients) underwent the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure performed by the same senior surgeon. The day after surgery, an independent surgeon examiner performed a multiplanar bidimensional computed tomography scan analysis. We also evaluated our learning curve by comparing 2 chronologic periods (30 procedures performed in each period), separated by an interval during which 45 procedures were performed. Of the 105 shoulders included in the study, 95 (90.5%) (94 patients) were evaluated. The coracoid graft was accurately positioned relative to the equator of the glenoid surface in 87 of 95 shoulders (91.5%). Accurate bone-block positioning on the axial view with "circle" evaluation was obtained for 77 of 95 shoulders (81%). This procedure was performed in a lateralized position in 7 of 95 shoulders (7.3%) and in a medialized position in 11 shoulders (11.6%). The mean screw angulation with the glenoid surface was 21°. One patient had transient axillary nerve palsy. Of the initial 104 patients, 3 (2.8%) underwent revision. The analysis of our results indicated that the screw-glenoid surface angle significantly predicted the accuracy of the bone-block positioning (P = .001). Our learning curve estimates showed that, compared with our initial period, the average surgical time decreased, and the risk of lateralization showed a statistically significant decrease during the last period (P = .006). This study showed that accurate positioning of the bone block onto the anterior aspect of the glenoid is possible, safe, and reproducible with the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure without additional complications compared with open surgery. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc

  20. [Treatment of calcaneal fractures by fixation of Kirschner needle and thread cancellous bone screw through sinus tarsi interstice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cong-Xiang; Shi, Zheng-Yang; Xu, Yi-Min; Yang, Meng; Wang, Jia-Lin; Chen, Xiao-Jian; Zhang, Wei; Zhi, Shao-Xin

    2014-07-01

    To explore the effect of fixation of Kirschner needle and thread cancellous bone screw through the sinus tarsi interstice for the treatment of calcaneal fractures. From January 2009 to December 2012,20 patients with calcaneal fracture were treated by minimally invasive Kirschner wire and threaded cancellous bone screw fixation and bone graft,including 12 males and 8 females with an average age of 39 years old ranging from 21 to 65. Among them, 8 cases were left foot, 12 were right foot. According to Sanders's classification, 8 cases were type II, 10 cases were type III, 2 cases were type IV. All patients were followed up from 6 to 16 months with an average of 12 months. The incision were healed. Böhler angle were increased from preoperative (17.75 +/- 4.22) degrees to postoperative (26.85 +/- 7.37) degrees (t = 4.308, P = 0.000). Gissane angle were reduced from preoperative (137.05 +/- 24.91) degrees to postoperative (113.75 +/- 13.17) degrees (t = 7.083, P = 0.000). At 3 months after operation, the scores of AOFAS were 85.50 +/- 7.99; the results were excellent in 5 feet and good in 11 feet, fair in 3 feet, and poor in 1 foot. Minimally invasive fixation of Kirschner needle and thread cancellous bone screw fixation is a simple operation, it can get reliable fixation, easy to remove, low cost, less postoperative complications, and it is a good treatment of calcaneal fracture.

  1. Accuracy of bone SPECT/CT for identifying hardware loosening in patients who underwent lumbar fusion with pedicle screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudyana, Hendrah; Maes, Alex [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); University Hospital Leuven, Department of Morphology and Medical Imaging, Leuven (Belgium); Vandenberghe, Thierry; Fidlers, Luc [AZ Groeninge, Department of Neurosurgery, Kortrijk (Belgium); Sathekge, Mike [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Nicolai, Daniel [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the accuracy of bone SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography)/CT (computed tomography) in diagnosing loosening of fixation material in patients with recurrent or persistent back pain that underwent lumbar arthrodesis with pedicle screws using surgery and clinical follow-up as gold standard A total of 48 patients (median age 49 years, range 21-81 years; 17 men) who had undergone lumbar spinal arthrodesis were included in this retrospective analysis. SPECT/CT results were compared to the gold standard of surgical evaluation or clinical follow-up. Positive SPECT/CT results were considered true positives if findings were confirmed by surgery or if clinical and other examinations were completely consistent with the positive SPECT/CT finding. They were considered false positives if surgical evaluation did not find any loose pedicle screws or if symptoms subsided with non-surgical therapy. Negative SPECT/CT scans were considered true negatives if symptoms either improved without surgical intervention or remained stable over a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. Negative SPECT/CT scans were determined to be false negatives if surgery was still required and loosening of material was found. The median length of time from primary surgery to bone SPECT/CT referral was 29.5 months (range 12-192 months). Median follow-up was 18 months (range 6-57) for subjects who did not undergo surgery. Thirteen of the 48 patients were found to be positive for loosening on bone SPECT/CT. Surgical evaluation (8 patients) and clinical follow-up (5 patients) showed that bone SPECT/CT correctly predicted loosening in 9 of 13 patients, while it falsely diagnosed loosening in 4 patients. Of 35 negative bone SPECT/CT scans, 12 were surgically confirmed. In 18 patients, bone SPECT/CT revealed lesions that could provide an alternative explanation for the symptoms of pain (active facet degeneration in 14 patients, and disc and sacroiliac

  2. The quantity of bone cement influences the anchorage of augmented pedicle screws in the osteoporotic spine: A biomechanical human cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishnamaz, Miguel; Lange, Henning; Herren, Christian; Na, Hong-Sik; Lichte, Philipp; Hildebrand, Frank; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Kobbe, Philipp

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this comparative biomechanical human cadaveric study was to investigate the anchorage of augmented screws with two different volumes of bone cement. For this purpose the effect of cranio-caudal loadings on pedicle screws was evaluated and axial pullout tests were performed. A total of 50 pedicle screws (25 augmented/25 non-augmented) were instrumented into osteoporotic vertebra of fresh human cadavers. The augmented screws were grounded by two different volumes of bone cement (1.5cm 3 vs 4cm 3 ). Biomechanical performance was assessed by performing a cyclic loading protocol (frequency: 3Hz, load range: 20-200N, number of cycles: 100,000), followed by axial pullout (13 augmented/11 non-augmented) or by either directly measuring axial pullout strength (12 augmented/12 non-augmented). The median T-score of the specimens was -4.25 (range: -6.38 to -2.4). Pullout tests with and without cyclic preloading showed significantly increased pullout strength in augmented screws (Fmax: augmented: 1159N (SD 395N); non-augmented: 532N (SD 297N); p0.05). The pullout strength significantly decreased in high-volume augmented screws after cyclic loading (Fmax (4.0cm 3 ): direct pullout 1463N (SD 307N); cyclic preload: 902N (SD 435N); p<0.05). Biomechanical advantages of augmented pedicle screws can also be found after cyclic preload. However, our results indicate that the anchoring stability of high-volume augmented pedicle screws after cyclic loading is disadvantageous compared to moderate augmented screws; thus high-volume augmentation should be avoided. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical experience with the screw extraction set for broken screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Titanium plate systems are used frequently for bone fractures and postosteotomy fixation in craniomaxillofacial surgery. However, sometimes the head of the screw for plate fixation is deformed or the screw breaks in the bone. Screw removal can be difficult in these cases. In this study, we examined the utility of the Screw Extraction Set (Synthes Inc) in facilitating the removal of screws broken in craniomaxillofacial bones. In the past, we often encountered screw head sockets that had become deformed. In the removal of such a screw, the extraction screw tip did not engage well with the deformed screw head socket because the extraction screw tip was angled obtusely. Thus, its removal was difficult, and this method was clearly problematic. Using the Screw Extraction Set, the removal method for a screw broken in the bone was relatively easy. In particular, it was very convenient in removing broken screws in the mandibular angle and ramus, where surgery is difficult under direct vision. This system was thought to be useful for craniofacial surgeons if proper patient selection is performed.

  4. Lag screw fixation of dorsal cortical stress fractures of the third metacarpal bone in 116 racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalim, S L; McIlwraith, C W; Goodman, N L; Anderson, G A

    2010-10-01

    The effectiveness and best method to manage dorsal cortical stress fractures is not clear. This study was performed to evaluate the success of lag screw fixation of such fractures in a population of Thoroughbred racehorses. Lag screw fixation of dorsal cortical stress fractures is an effective surgical procedure allowing racehorses to return to their preoperative level of performance. The records of 116 racehorses (103 Thoroughbreds) admitted to Equine Medical Centre, California between 1986 and 2008 were assessed. Information obtained from medical records included subject details, limb(s) affected, fracture configuration, length of screw used in repair and presence of concurrent surgical procedures performed. Racing performance was evaluated relative to these factors using Fisher's exact test and nonparametric methods with a level of significance of Phorses, 83% raced preoperatively and 83% raced post operatively, with 63% having ≥5 starts. There was no statistically significant association between age, gender, limb affected, fracture configuration or presence of concurrent surgery and likelihood of racing post operatively or of having 5 or more starts. The mean earnings per start and the performance index for the 3 races following surgery were lower compared to the 3 races prior to surgery; however, 29 and 45% of horses either improved or did not change their earnings per start and performance index, respectively. Data show that lag screw fixation is successful at restoring ability to race in horses suffering from dorsal cortical stress fractures. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  5. The Effect of Polymethyl Methacrylate Augmentation on the Primary Stability of Cannulated Bone Screws in an Anterolateral Plate in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: A Human Cadaver Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüger, Matthias; Sellei, Richard M.; Stoffel, Marcus; von Rüden, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Objective Expandable anterolateral plates facilitate the reduction of posttraumatic deformities of thoracolumbar spine injuries and are commonly used in cases of unstable injuries or compromised bone quality. In this in vitro study, the craniocaudal yield load of the osseous fixation of an anterior angular stable plate fixation system and the effect of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) screw augmentation on the primary stability of the screw–bone interface during kyphosis reduction was evaluated in 12 osteoporotic human thoracolumbar vertebrae. Methods The anterolateral stabilization device used for this study is comprised of two swiveling flanges and an expandable midsection. It facilitates the controlled reduction of kyphotic deformities in situ with a geared distractor. Single flanges were attached to 12 thoracolumbar vertebrae. Six specimens were augmented with PMMA by means of cannulated bone screws. The constructs were subjected to static, displacement-controlled craniocaudal loading to failure in a servohydraulic testing machine. Results The uncemented screws cut out at a mean 393 ± 66 N, whereas the cemented screws showed significantly higher yield load of 966 ± 166 N (p < 0.02). We detected no significant correlation between bone mineral density and yield load in this setting. Conclusion Our results indicate that PMMA augmentation is an effective method to increase two- to threefold the primary stability of the screw–bone interface of an anterolateral spine stabilization system in osteoporotic bone. We recommend it in cases of severely compromised bone quality to reduce the risk of screw loosening during initial kyphosis correction and to increase long-term construct stability. PMID:26835201

  6. Mechanical analysis of transversal iliac fracture stabilization using dynamic compression plate or screws and PMM in polyurethane bone model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.C. Prada

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Pelvic fractures correspond to 20 to 30 % of the fractures observed in dogs. Complete fractures, especially with bone axis deviation should be surgically treated. The mechanical study of surgical techniques is of utmost importance to assess the best way of treating these injuries. This study compared, biomechanically, the use of a dynamic compression plate (DCP and screws (group 1 or screws and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA (group 2 to stabilize an iliac fracture using a static test. Sixteen canine synthetic hemi-pelvises (test specimens with a transverse iliac osteotomy were used. After fixation with implants, a load was applied to the acetabulum until failure. Group 1 maximal compressive load was 133.9±18.60 N, displacement at yield 21.10±3.59mm and stiffness 125.22±12.25N/mm. Group 2 maximal compressive load was 183.50±27.38N, displacement at yield 16.66±5.42mm and stiffness 215.68±33.34N/mm. The stabilization with polymethylmethacrylate was stronger than dynamic compression plate since it resisted a greater load in all test specimens.

  7. In vitro osteogenic potential of bone debris resulting from placement of titanium screw-type implants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhore, C.R.; Snel, S.J.; Jacques, S.V.; Naert, I.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Histological sections of preclinical animal studies have shown that new bone formation around dental implants frequently contains debris derived from the original bone. Whether such debris by itself is osteogenic, i.e., can influence the process of new bone formation after implant

  8. A biomechanical comparison of headless tapered variable pitch compression and ao cortical bone screws for fixation of a simulated midbody transverse fracture of the proximal sesamoid bone in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Alison L; Galuppo, Larry D; Stover, Susan M; Taylor, Kenneth T; Jensen, David G

    2004-01-01

    To compare mechanical properties and failure characteristics of 2 methods of fixation for repair of a transverse, midbody fracture of the proximal sesamoid bone (PSB): 4.5-mm AO cortical bone screw (AO) placed in lag fashion and 4/5-mm Acutrak (AT) self-compressing screw. An in vitro biomechanical evaluation of intact forelimb preparations and forelimb preparations with a simulated midbody PSB fracture stabilized by a bone screw. Sixteen paired and 8 unilateral cadaveric equine forelimbs. A midbody transverse osteotomy was created in the medial PSB of bilateral forelimbs of 8 equine cadavers. The osteotomized PSB in 1 forelimb from each cadaver was repaired with an AO screw. The osteotomized PSB in each contralateral limb was repaired with an AT screw. Eight unilateral intact control limbs were also studied. Mechanical properties were determined from axial compression, single cycle to failure, load-deformation curves. Failure characteristics were determined by evaluation of video images and radiographs. No statistically significant differences were found between repair groups. Both AO and AT groups had significantly lower mechanical properties than intact limbs except for stiffness. AO and AT constructs were mechanically comparable when used to stabilize a simulated midbody fracture of the medial PSB. Both constructs were mechanically inferior to intact limbs. Clinical Relevance- The AT screw should be considered for clinical use because of the potential for less soft tissue impingement and superior biocompatibility compared with the stainless-steel AO screw. However, postoperative external coaptation is necessary to augment initial fracture stability for either fixation method, and to maintain a standing metacarpophalangeal joint dorsiflexion angle between 150 degrees and 155 degrees.

  9. Quantitative dual-energy CT for phantomless evaluation of cancellous bone mineral density of the vertebral pedicle: correlation with pedicle screw pull-out strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichmann, Julian L.; Booz, Christian; Bauer, Ralf W.; Kerl, J.M.; Fischer, Sebastian; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J.; Khan, M.F. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wesarg, Stefan [Fraunhofer IGD, Cognitive Computing and Medical Imaging, Darmstadt (Germany); Kafchitsas, Konstantinos [Spine Center, Asklepios Klinik Lindenlohe, Schwandorf (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate quantitative dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) for phantomless analysis of cancellous bone mineral density (BMD) of vertebral pedicles and to assess the correlation with pedicle screw pull-out strength. Twenty-nine thoracic and lumbar vertebrae from cadaver specimens were examined with DECT. Using dedicated post-processing software, a pedicle screw vector was mapped (R1, intrapedicular segment of the pedicle vector; R2, intermediate segment; R3, intracorporal segment; global, all segments) and BMD was calculated. To invasively evaluate pedicle stability, pedicle screws were drilled through both pedicles and left pedicle screw pull-out strength was measured. Resulting values were correlated using the paired t test and Pearson's linear correlation. Average pedicle screw vector BMD (R1, 0.232 g/cm{sup 3}; R2, 0.166 g/cm{sup 3}; R3, 0.173 g/cm{sup 3}; global, 0.236 g/cm{sup 3}) showed significant differences between R1-R2 (P < 0.002) and R1-R3 (P < 0.034) segments while comparison of R2-R3 did not reach significance (P > 0.668). Average screw pull-out strength (639.2 N) showed a far stronger correlation with R1 (r = 0.80; P < 0.0001) than global BMD (r = 0.42; P = 0.025), R2 (r = 0.37; P = 0.048) and R3 (r = -0.33; P = 0.078) segments. Quantitative DECT allows for phantomless BMD assessment of the vertebral pedicle. BMD of the intrapedicular segment shows a significantly stronger correlation with pedicle screw pull-out strength than other segments. (orig.)

  10. When Planning Screw Fracture Fixation Why the 5.5 mm Screw is the Goldilocks Screw. An Observational Computer Tomographic Study of Fifth Metatarsal Bone Anatomy in a Sample of Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Iselin, Lukas D.; Ramawat, Sunil; Hanratty, Brian; Klammer, Georg; Stavrou, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We wanted to verify our clinical experience that the 5.5 mm screw was ideal in the majority of fifth metatarsal fracture fixation. The size of a screw is important for the successful surgical treatment of these fractures in order to obtain the maximal stability while reducing the risk for iatrogenic fracture. A sample of patients undergoing computer tomographic imaging of the foot for investigation other than fifth metatarsal pathology were recruited. The parameters of the fifth meta...

  11. A STUDY OF POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION WITH LOCALLY HARVESTED SPINOLAMINECTOMY BONE GRAFT AND PEDICLE SCREW FIXATION IN SPONDYLOLISTHESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardhasaradhi M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF create intervertebral fusion by means of a posterior approach. Successful results have been reported with allograft, various cages (for interbody support, autograft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein‐2. Interbody fusion techniques facilitate reduction and enhance fusion. Corticocancellous laminectomy bone chips alone can be used as a means of spinal fusion in patients with single level instrumented PLIF. This has got a good fusion rate. PLIF with cage gives better fusion on radiology than PLIF with iliac bone graft, but no statistical difference in the clinical outcome. Cage use precludes complications associated with iliac bone harvesting. The reported adjacent segment degeneration was 40.5% and reoperation was 8.1% after 10 years of follow up. MATERIALS AND METHODS 30 cases of spondylolisthesis who attended the Orthopaedic Outpatient Department of Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam, from 2014 to 2016 were taken up for study. All the cases were examined clinically and confirmed radiologically. The patient’s age, sex, symptoms and duration were noted and were examined clinically for the status of the spine. Straight leg raising test was done and neurological examination of the lower limbs performed. All the patients were subjected to the radiological examination of the lumbosacral spine by taking anteroposterior, lateral (flexion and extension views, oblique views to demonstrate spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. MRI and x-rays studies were done in all the cases to facilitate evaluation of the root compression disk changes and spinal cord changes. RESULTS In our study, we followed all the 30 patients after the surgery following procedure of removal of loose lamina, spinous process and fibrocartilaginous mass, PLIF with only the laminectomy bone mass and CD screw system fixation up to 2 years. 12 patients (40% had excellent

  12. Do Newer-Generation Bioabsorbable Screws Become Incorporated into Bone at Two Years After ACL Reconstruction with Patellar Tendon Graft?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Charles L.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Leonard, James P.; Morris, Brent J.; Dunn, Warren R.; Reinke, Emily K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bioabsorbable interference screws are used frequently for graft fixation in ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) reconstruction. The resorption properties of many available screws that are marketed as bioabsorbable are not well defined. The CALAXO (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy) and MILAGRO (DePuy Synthes) bioabsorbable screws contain polymers of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) plus additives to encourage osseointegration over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) properties and compare patient-reported outcomes at a minimum of two years of follow-up after ACL reconstruction using CALAXO or MILAGRO bioabsorbable interference screws. Methods: A cohort of patients who underwent ACL reconstruction in which the fixation used was either CALAXO or MILAGRO screws returned for repeat radiographs for evaluation of tunnel widening, repeat MRI for evaluation of graft integrity and screw breakdown, and completion of the pain and symptom items of the KOOS (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score) questionnaire. Results: At a mean of three years (range, 2.5 to 4.0 years) after surgery, thirty-one patients with sixty-two CALAXO screws and thirty-six patients with seventy-two MILAGRO screws returned for repeat evaluation. Two blinded, independent reviewers found no significant differences between the two screw types when comparing radiographs for tibial or femoral tunnel widening or MRIs for graft integrity, tibial and femoral foreign body reactions, or femoral screw degradation. Both reviewers found a significant difference between the two screw types when comparing tibial screw degradation properties (p MILAGRO screws were more likely to be rated as intact. No significant differences were noted between the two screw types when comparing the two KOOS subscales. Conclusions: CALAXO screws in the tibial tunnel were more likely to be rated as degraded or partially degraded compared with MILAGRO screws at a mean

  13. Slab fractures of the third tarsal bone: Minimally invasive repair using a single 3.5 mm cortex screw placed in lag fashion in 17 Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, W H J; Wright, I M

    2017-03-01

    A technique for minimally invasive repair of slab fractures of the third tarsal bone has not previously been reported. Results of third tarsal bone slab fracture repair in Thoroughbred racehorses are lacking. To report the outcomes of repair of uniplanar frontal slab factures of the third tarsal bone using a single 3.5 mm cortex screw in lag fashion. Retrospective case series. Case records of horses that had undergone this procedure were reviewed. Seventeen horses underwent surgery. Eighteen percent of cases had wedge shaped third tarsal bones. A point midway between the long and lateral digital extensor tendons and centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints created a suitable entry site for implants. The fracture location, configuration and curvature of the third tarsal bone and associated joints requires a dorsolateral proximal-plantaromedial distal trajectory for the screw, which was determined by preplaced needles. There were no complications and fractures healed in all cases at 4-6 months post surgery. Seventy-nine percent of horses returned to racing and, at the time of reporting, 3 are in post operative rehabilitation programmes. The technique reported provides a safe, appropriate and repeatable means of repairing slab fractures of the third tarsal bone. Surgical repair is a viable alternative to conservative management. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  14. End-threaded intramedullary positive profile screw ended self-tapping pin (Admit pin - A cost-effective novel implant for fixing canine long bone fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitin Chanana

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The current study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical efficacy of end-threaded intramedullary pinning for management of various long bone fractures in canines. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in two phases, managing 25 client-owned dogs presented with different fractures. The technique of application of end-threaded intramedullary pinning in long bone fractures was initially standardized in 6 clinical patients presented with long bone fractures. In this phase, end-threaded pins of different profiles, i.e., positive and negative, were used as the internal fixation technique. On the basis of results obtained from standardization phase, 19 client-owned dogs clinically presented with different fractures were implanted with end-threaded intramedullary positive profile screw ended self-tapping pin in the clinical application phase. Results: The patients, allocated randomly in two groups, when evaluated postoperatively revealed slight pin migration in Group-I (negative profile, which resulted in disruption of callus site causing delayed union in one case and large callus formation in other two cases whereas no pin migration was observed in Group-II (positive profile. Other observations in Group-I was reduced muscle girth and delayed healing time as compared to Group-II. In clinical application, phase 21st and 42nd day post-operative radiographic follow-up revealed no pin migration in any of the cases, and there was no bone shortening or fragment collapse in end-threaded intramedullary positive profile screw ended self-tapping pin. Conclusion: The end-threaded intramedullary positive profile screw ended self-tapping pin used for fixation of long bone fractures in canines can resist pin migration, pin breakage, and all loads acting on the bone, i.e., compression, tension, bending, rotation, and shearing to an extent with no post-operative complications.

  15. Does a trochanteric lag screw improve fixation of vertically oriented femoral neck fractures? A biomechanical analysis in cadaveric bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawks, Michael A; Kim, Hyunchul; Strauss, Joseph E; Oliphant, Bryant W; Golden, Robert D; Hsieh, Adam H; Nascone, Jason W; O'Toole, Robert V

    2013-10-01

    We assessed the biomechanical performances of a trochanteric lag screw construct and a traditional inverted triangle construct in the treatment of simulated Pauwels type 3 femoral neck fractures. An inverted triangle construct (three 7.3-mm cannulated screws placed in inverted triangle orientation) and a trochanteric lag screw construct (two 7.3-mm cannulated screws placed across the superior portion of the femoral neck and one 4.5-mm lag screw placed perpendicular to the fracture in superolateral to inferomedial orientation) were tested in nine matched pairs of non-osteoporotic human cadaveric femora. We used a previously described vertically oriented femoral neck fracture model and testing protocol that incrementally loaded the constructs along the mechanical axis of the femur to 1400 N. Specimens that survived incremental loading underwent cyclic loading. Apparent construct stiffness, force at 3mm of displacement, and survival of incremental loading were recorded. The trochanteric lag screw group had a 70% increase in stiffness (261 N/mm [29 standard deviation] versus 153 N/mm [16 standard deviation]; P=0.026) and a 43% increase in force required for displacement (620 N versus 435 N; P=0.018) compared with the inverted triangle group. One trochanteric lag screw and no inverted triangle specimen survived incremental loading. A trochanteric lag screw construct applied to vertically oriented femoral neck fractures provides marked improvement in mechanical performance compared with the inverted triangle construct. © 2013.

  16. Percutaneous internal fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal jones fractures (Zones II and III) with Charlotte Carolina screw and bone marrow aspirate concentrate: an outcome study in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, Christopher D; Kennedy, John G

    2011-06-01

    Internal fixation is a popular first-line treatment method for proximal fifth metatarsal Jones fractures in athletes; however, nonunions and screw breakage can occur, in part because of nonspecific fixation hardware and poor blood supply. To report the results from 26 patients who underwent percutaneous internal fixation with a specialized screw system of a proximal fifth metatarsal Jones fracture (zones II and III) and bone marrow aspirate concentrate. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Percutaneous internal fixation for a proximal fifth metatarsal Jones fracture (zones II and III) was performed on 26 athletic patients (mean age, 27.47 years; range, 18-47). All patients were competing at some level of sport and were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score and SF-12 outcome scores. The mean follow-up time was 20.62 months (range, 12-28). Of the 26 fractures, 17 were traditional zone II Jones fractures, and the remaining 9 were zone III proximal diaphyseal fractures. The mean Foot and Ankle Outcome Score significantly increased, from 51.15 points preoperatively (range, 14-69) to 90.91 at final follow-up (range, 71-100; P fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal Jones fractures, with a Charlotte Carolina screw and bone marrow aspirate concentrate, provides more predictable results while permitting athletes a return to sport at their previous levels of competition, with few complications.

  17. CT-guided percutaneous screw fixation plus cementoplasty in the treatment of painful bone metastases with fractures or a high risk of pathological fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusceddu, Claudio; Ballicu, Nicola; Fele, Rosa Maria; Sotgia, Barbara; Melis, Luca [Oncological Hospital ' ' A. Businco' ' , Regional Referral Center for Oncologic Diseases, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Oncological Radiology, Cagliari (Italy); Fancellu, Alessandro [University of Sassari, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Sassari (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous screw fixation plus cementoplasty (PSFPC), for either treatment of painful metastatic fractures or prevention of pathological fractures, in patients who are not candidates for surgical stabilization. Twenty-seven patients with 34 metastatic bone lesions underwent CT-guided PSFPC. Bone metastases were located in the vertebral column, femur, and pelvis. The primary end point was the evaluation of feasibility and complications of the procedure, in addition to the length of hospital stay. Pain severity was estimated before treatment and 1 and 6 months after the procedure using the visual analog scale (VAS). Functional outcome was assessed by improved patient walking ability. All sessions were completed and well tolerated. There were no complications related to either incorrect positioning of the screws during bone fixation or leakage of cement. All patients were able to walk within 6 h after the procedure and the average length of hospital stay was 2 days. The mean VAS score decreased from 7.1 (range, 4-9) before treatment to 1.6 (range, 0-6), 1 month after treatment, and to 1.4 (range 0-6) 6 months after treatment. Neither loosening of the screws nor additional bone fractures occurred during a median follow-up of 6 months. Our results suggest that PSFPC might be a safe and effective procedure that allows the stabilization of the fracture and the prevention of pathological fractures with significant pain relief and good recovery of walking ability, although further studies are required to confirm this preliminary experience. (orig.)

  18. Pedicle screws with a thin hydroxyapatite coating for improving fixation at the bone-implant interface in the osteoporotic spine: experimental study in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohe, Makoto; Moridaira, Hiroshi; Inami, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Daisaku; Nohara, Yutaka; Taneichi, Hiroshi

    2018-03-30

    OBJECTIVE Instrumentation failure caused by the loosening of pedicle screws (PSs) in patients with osteoporosis is a serious problem after spinal surgery. The addition of a thin hydroxyapatite (HA) surface coating applied by using a sputtering process was reported recently to be a promising method for providing bone conduction around an implant without a significant risk of coating-layer breakage. In this study, the authors evaluated the biomechanical and histological features of the bone-implant interface (BII) of PSs with a thin HA coating in an in vivo porcine osteoporotic spine model. METHODS Three types of PSs (untreated/standard [STPS], sandblasted [BLPS], and HA-coated [HAPS] PSs) were implanted into the thoracic and lumbar spine (T9-L6) of 8 mature Clawn miniature pigs (6 ovariectomized [osteoporosis group] and 2 sham-operated [control group] pigs). The spines were harvested from the osteoporosis group at 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, or 24 weeks after PS placement and from the control group at 0 or 24 weeks. Their bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by peripheral quantitative CT. Histological evaluation of the BIIs was conducted by performing bone volume/tissue volume and bone surface/implant surface measurements. The strength of the BII was evaluated with extraction torque testing. RESULTS The BMD decreased significantly in the osteoporosis group (p surface/implant surface ratio was significantly higher for HAPSs than for STPSs after 2 weeks (p surface was maintained until 24 weeks with no detachment of the coating layer. In contrast, the bone volume/tissue volume ratio was significantly higher for HAPSs than for BLPSs or STPSs only at 4 weeks. CONCLUSIONS Using PSs with a thin HA coating applied using a sputtering process strengthens bonding at the BII, which might improve early implant fixation after spinal surgery for osteoporosis. However, the absence of increased bone mass around the screw remains a concern; prescribing osteoporosis treatment to improve bone

  19. Lumbar pedicle screw salvage: pullout testing of three different pedicle screw designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, R F; Fry, M F; Moseley, T A; Sharkey, N A

    1995-02-01

    Although research has determined pedicle screw pullout strengths for normal and osteoporotic bone, this study provides the first biomechanical analysis of pedicle screw salvage. Ten fresh frozen human lumbar spines were separated into individual vertebrae; 6.0 x 40 mm pedicle screws were placed in each pedicle; and an axial pullout test was performed to establish control values. Ultimate load, initial stiffness, work, and displacement data were calculated. Each vertebra was reinstrumented with one 7.0 x 40 mm variable screw placement (VSP) screw side by side with either a 7.0 mm Cotrel Dubousset sacral screw (CD) or a 7.0 mm Compact Cotrel Dubousset pedicle screw (CCD). Pullout tests were repeated and compared to control data for individual screws and for each VSP/CD or VSP/CCD pair. Vertebrae were then reinstrumented with 8.0 mm VSP and CD screws and paired pullouts repeated. Statistical analysis was carried out using a paired T test. Analysis of intravertebral and intergroup variation of controls was carried out using a Paired Two Sample T test. The 7.0 mm CCD screws restored pullout strength to 62% of control pullouts; 7.0 mm CD screws, to 85%; 7.0 mm VSP screws, to 99%; 8.0 mm CD screws, to 109%; and 8.0 mm VSP screws, to 148% of control pullouts. The 7.0 mm VSP salvage screws exceeded CD screws in ultimate load by 22.5% (p screws by 33.5% (p screws significantly increased pullout relative to both controls and all 7.0 mm salvage screws, with 8.0 mm VSP exceeding 8.0 mm CD by 34% (p screws. Although applied in a smaller number of vertebrae, 8.0 mm screws sufficiently outperformed smaller screws to provide statistically significant differences. The 7.0 mm VSP salvage screws restored pullout to control levels, roughly equivalent to outcomes previously obtained with unpressurized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA).

  20. Improving the pullout strength of pedicle screws by screw coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Abe, E; Okuyama, K; Sato, K

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of pedicle screw coupling on the pullout strength of pedicle screws in the osteoporotic spine. The vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) of 33 cadaveric lumbar vertebrae were measured by quantitative computed tomography. Pedicle screws were inserted into each pedicle. The pullout strength and displacement of the screws, without coupling and with single or double couplers, were studied, and the relationship between pullout strength and BMD was analyzed. The average pullout strength of the pedicle screws without screw coupling was 909.3 +/- 188.6 N (n = 9), that coupled with a single coupler was 1,409.0 +/- 469.1 N (n = 9), and that with double couplers was 1,494.0 +/- 691.6 N (n = 9). The pullout strength of the screws coupled with single or double couplers was significantly greater than that of screws without couplers (p pullout strength by screw coupling was significant in a test group with BMD of more than 90 mg/ml (p pedicle screws improves pullout strength; however, the effect tends to be less significant in severely osteoporotic spines.

  1. Outcome of lag-screw treatment of incomplete fractures of the frontal plane of the radial facet of the third carpal bone in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, D J; Bladon, B; Rogers, C W

    2007-04-01

    To describe outcomes for horses diagnosed with incomplete, non-displaced fractures of the frontal plane of the radial facet (INFR) of the third carpal bone (C3) treated by placement of a lag screw across the fracture under arthroscopic guidance. Horses (n=13) diagnosed with INFR and treated between December 1999 and January 2005 using a lag screw placed over the fracture were studied. For each case, five horses matched for sire, age and sex which were not known to have INFR were sought for comparison. Racing performance data were collected from a commercial online database. The racing performance of cases pre- and post-operatively, and of cases and matched horses in the post-operative period was compared. Sixteen INFR were found in the 13 horses. Radiographic evidence of healed fracture lines 2-4 months after surgery was seen in 11/16 (69%) fractures; 11/13 (85%) cases raced again after a median recovery period of 292 (range 149-681) days. Treatment was considered successful in 9/13 (69%) cases, which were still in training or had been retired for reasons other than lameness localised to the middle carpal joint at the end of the study period. Just 6/13 (46%) cases had raced prior to injury. The racing ability pre- and post-operatively of five cases was compared, three (60%) of which performed better post-operatively than they had before. There was no significant difference in racing longevity or ability post-operatively between patients and matched (control) horses. Post-operatively, there was little difference in the racing performance between horses diagnosed with INFR which had a lag screw placed across the fracture line and horses matched for sire, age and sex which were not known to have INFR. Horses which were diagnosed with INFR of C3 and had a lag screw placed across the fracture had a good prognosis for future racing performance.

  2. Bone Height Changes of the Mandibular Edentulous Ridge in Screw Retained Versus Telescopic Restorations for Completely Edentulous Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Helal

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Up to the limitations of this study both treatment options the screw retained and telescopic overdenture can be used for rehabilitation of completely edentulous patients. These cases must be followed for a longer period to have a definite answer regarding their efficiency in the long run.

  3. Therapeutic efficacy of pedicle screw-rod internal fixation after one-stage posterior transforaminal lesion debridement and non-structural bone grafting for tuberculosis of lumbar vertebra

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    Jia-ming LIU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pedicle screw-rod internal fixation after one-stage posterior transforaminal lesion debridement and non-structural bone grafting in the treatment of tuberculosis of mono-segmental lumbar vertebra. Methods From January 2010 to April 2013, 21 patients (9 males and 12 females with an average age of 49.1 years with mono-segmental tuberculosis of lumbar vertebra underwent surgery in our hospital were included. Eight patients had neurological deficit. The focus of tuberculosis was located on one side of the vertebral body, and all the patients had obvious signs of bone destruction on CT and MRI. All the patients were given anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy for 2-3 weeks before surgery. The local bone chips and autologous iliac cancellous bone were used as the intervertebral bone graft. Postoperative plain radiographs and CT were obtained to evaluate the fusion rate and degree of lumbar lordosis. The visual analogue scale score (VAS, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, and C-reactive protein (CRP before and after operation, and at final follow-up date were recorded. Results All the patients were followed up for 25.3±4.2 months. The mean operation time was 157±39 minutes, and the average blood loss was 470±143ml. The fusion rate of the interbody bone graft was 95.2%, with an average fusion period of 6.1±2.5 months. The neurological function was improved by 100%, and no severe complication or neurological injury occured. The preoperative and postoperative lordosis angles of the lumbar spine were 21.4°±5.7° and 33.6°±3.1°, respectively, and it was 31.3°±2.7° at the final follow up. The preoperative and postoperative VAS scores were 7.8±2.6 and 2.4±1.7 respectively, and it was 0.9±0.7 at the final follow up. The ESR and CRP were significantly decreased 3 months after surgery, and they became normal at 6 months. Conclusion Pedicle screw-rod internal fixation after one-stage posterior

  4. Influence of screw holes and gamma sterilization on properties of phosphate glass fiber-reinforced composite bone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na; Ahmed, Ifty; Parsons, Andrew J; Harper, Lee; Scotchford, Colin A; Scammell, Brigitte E; Rudd, Chris D

    2013-05-01

    Polymers prepared from polylactic acid (PLA) have found a multitude of uses as medical devices. For a material that degrades, the main advantage is that an implant would not necessitate a second surgical event for removal. In this study, fibers produced from a quaternary phosphate-based glass (PBG) in the system 50P2O5-40CaO-5Na2O-5Fe2O3 were used to reinforce PLA polymer. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of screw holes in a range of PBG-reinforced PLA composites with varying fiber layup and volume fraction. The flexural properties obtained showed that the strength and modulus values increased with increasing fiber volume fraction; from 96 MPa to 320 MPa for strength and between 4 GPa and 24 GPa for modulus. Furthermore, utilizing a larger number of thinner unidirectional (UD) fiber prepreg layers provided a significant increase in mechanical properties, which was attributed to enhanced wet out and thus better fiber dispersion during production. The effect of gamma sterilization via flexural tests showed no statistically significant difference between the sterilized and nonsterilized samples, with the exception of the modulus values for samples with screw holes. Degradation profiles revealed that samples with screw holes degraded faster than those without screw holes due to an increased surface area for the plates with screw holes in PBS up to 30 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis revealed fiber pullout before and after degradation. Compared with various fiber impregnation samples, with 25% volume fraction, 8 thinner unidirectional prepreg stacked samples had the shortest fiber pull-out lengths in comparison to the other samples investigated.

  5. Central tarsal bone fractures in horses not used for racing: Computed tomographic configuration and long-term outcome of lag screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunst, S; Del Chicca, F; Fürst, A E; Kuemmerle, J M

    2016-09-01

    There are no reports on the configuration of equine central tarsal bone fractures based on cross-sectional imaging and clinical and radiographic long-term outcome after internal fixation. To report clinical, radiographic and computed tomographic findings of equine central tarsal bone fractures and to evaluate the long-term outcome of internal fixation. Retrospective case series. All horses diagnosed with a central tarsal bone fracture at our institution in 2009-2013 were included. Computed tomography and internal fixation using lag screw technique was performed in all patients. Medical records and diagnostic images were reviewed retrospectively. A clinical and radiographic follow-up examination was performed at least 1 year post operatively. A central tarsal bone fracture was diagnosed in 6 horses. Five were Warmbloods used for showjumping and one was a Quarter Horse used for reining. All horses had sagittal slab fractures that began dorsally, ran in a plantar or plantaromedial direction and exited the plantar cortex at the plantar or plantaromedial indentation of the central tarsal bone. Marked sclerosis of the central tarsal bone was diagnosed in all patients. At long-term follow-up, 5/6 horses were sound and used as intended although mild osteophyte formation at the distal intertarsal joint was commonly observed. Central tarsal bone fractures in nonracehorses had a distinct configuration but radiographically subtle additional fracture lines can occur. A chronic stress related aetiology seems likely. Internal fixation of these fractures based on an accurate diagnosis of the individual fracture configuration resulted in a very good prognosis. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  6. Isolated olecranon fractures in children affected by osteogenesis imperfecta type I treated with single screw or tension band wiring system: Outcomes and pitfalls in relation to bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persiani, Pietro; Ranaldi, Filippo M; Graci, Jole; De Cristo, Claudia; Zambrano, Anna; D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Martini, Lorena; Villani, Ciro

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the results of 2 techniques, tension band wiring (TBW) and fixation with screws, in olecranon fractures in children affected with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. Between 2010 and 2014, 21 olecranon fractures in 18 children with OI (average age: 12 years old) were treated surgically. Ten patients were treated with the screw fixation and 11 with TBW. A total of 65% of olecranon fractures occurred as a result of a spontaneous avulsion of the olecranon during the contraction of the triceps muscle. The average follow-up was 36 months. Among the children treated with 1 screw, 5 patients needed a surgical revision with TBW due to a mobilization of the screw. In this group, the satisfactory results were 50%. In patients treated with TBW, the satisfactory results were 100% of the cases. The average Z-score, the last one recorded in the patients before the trauma, was -2.53 in patients treated with screw fixation and -2.04 in those treated with TBW. TBW represents the safest surgical treatment for patients suffering from OI type I, as it helps to prevent the rigidity of the elbow through an earlier recovery of the range of motion, and there was no loosening of the implant. In analyzing the average Z-score before any fracture, the fixation with screws has an increased risk of failure in combination with low bone mineral density.

  7. A new variant of scaphoid reconstruction: Treatment of scaphoid non-union with avascular bone interponate and high compression screw (Synthes

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    Eder, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Scaphoid fractures as frequently overseen injuries often result in scaphoid non-unions, that need to be treated to prevent carpal collapse and secondary cartilage damage. Vital bone tissue and compression of fracture and bone graft ends seem to be crucial in for ossification and final bone healing. In the present study we compare our results using a high compression screw (HCS Synthes to results in the literature using different kinds of internal fixation including compression screws of various types. We present 22 patients with scaphoid non-unions treated with a bone graft and a HCS Synthes. We evaluated our post-operative results. The Manchester-Modified Disability of the Shoulder, Arm and Hand–Score (M-Dash imposed with an average of 29.8 points (MD=29 / SD=9.46 / MIN=18 / MAX=48. None of the re-evaluated patients sorrowed for pain in rest. Five patients stated pain (ranging from 4 to 8 on numeric analogue scale after heavy burden (e.g. boxing, weight lifting.In exploring the range of motion of the operated hand we deliver the following results: dorsal extension: average 72.73° (MD=80° / SD=17.23° / MIN=30° / MAX=85°, flexion: average 73.64° (MD=80° / SD=8.97° / MIN=60° / MAX=80°, ulnar deviation: average 39.09°, (MD=40° / SD=2.02° / MIN=35° / MAX=40°, radial deviation: average 29.09°, (MD=30° / SD=3.01° / MIN=20° / MAX=30°. Additionally a performance testing was conducted: fist clenching sign: complete without pain in 100%, pinch grip: complete in 100%, moderate pain in n=1 (8.33%, opposition digitus manus I–V complete in 100%, moderate pain n=2 (16.67%. Three patients with persisting fracture gap had a scaphoid bone fractured in the proximal third; one patient even with a very small proximal fragment. One persisting non-union was localized in the middle third (period between injury and operation = . In conclusion, our patients showed better healing rates compared to results presented in the literature. Non

  8. Desenvolvimento de parafusos de osso bovino: método de usinagem e estudo metrológico com projetor de perfil Bovine bone screws development: machining method and metrological study with profile projector

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    Davi P. Haje

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Parafusos confeccionados de osso são pouco estudados na literatura. Aspectos estruturais, mecânicos e relativos a osteointegração e osteoindução são importantes tópicos de pesquisa a serem abrangidos previamente ao uso in vivo de implantes de osso. Entretanto, o fator inicial a ser avaliado é a usinabilidade do tecido ósseo. Outro ponto de relevância é a verificação da praticabilidade de confeccionar parafusos ósseos de dimensões pré-estabelecidas. Nestas pesquisas, os parafusos foram confeccionados a partir de amostras de osso cortical retiradas de forma padronizada da porção médio-diafisária da tíbia bovina. A usinagem do osso foi realizada em torno horizontal com uso de duas ferramentas: bits de aço e rebolo de ponta montada de óxido de alumínio, produzindo-se 22 parafusos. A avaliação das dimensões dos parafusos ósseos foi realizada em projetor de perfil, tendo-se como referência 10 parafusos metálicos. De forma geral a análise metrológica não mostrou variações significativas dentro do grupo dos parafusos ósseos e metálicos. Os principais problemas dimensionais encontrados nos dois grupos de parafusos foram: ângulos alfa muito elevados nos implantes ósseos e os similares metálicos apresentaram um diâmetro de corpo com valor muito abaixo do esperado. Concluímos que o tecido ósseo foi usinável e a confecção de parafusos de dimensões pré-estabelecidas, mostrou-se possível no osso.Screws made of bone are little studied in literature. Structural, mechanical and osseointegration/ osteoinduction-related aspects are important research topics to be addressed prior to the use of in vivo bone grafts. However, the first issue that should be addressed is the machineability of bone tissues. Another relevant issue is regarding the feasibility of building bone screws in pre-determined dimensions. In those researches, screws were made of cortical bone samples removed from the medial-diaphyseal portion of

  9. A comparison of screw insertion torque and pullout strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, William M; Tornetta, Paul; Petteys, Timothy; Gerlach, Darin; Cartner, Jacob; Walker, Zakiyyah; Russell, Thomas A

    2010-06-01

    Pullout strength of screws is a parameter used to evaluate plate screw fixation strength. However, screw fixation strength may be more closely related to its ability to generate sufficient insertion because stable nonlocked plate-screw fracture fixation requires sufficient compression between plate and bone such that no motion occurs between the plate and bone under physiological loads. Compression is generated by tightening of screws. In osteoporotic cancellous bone, sufficient screw insertion torque may not be generated before screw stripping. The effect of screw thread pitch on generation of maximum insertion torque (MIT) and pullout strength (POS) was investigated in an osteoporotic cancellous bone model and the relationship between MIT and POS was analyzed. Stainless steel screws with constant major (5.0 mm) and minor (2.7 mm) diameters but with varying thread pitches (1, 1.2, 1.5, 1.6, and 1.75 mm) were tested for MIT and POS in a validated osteoporotic surrogate for cancellous bone (density of 160 kg/m(3) [10 lbs/ft(3)]). MIT was measured with a torque-measuring hex driver for screws inserted through a one-third tubular plate. POS was measured after insertion of screws to a depth of 20 mm based on the Standard Specification and Test Methods for Metallic Medical Bone Screws (ASTM F 543-07). Five screws were tested for each failure mode and screw design. The relationship between MIT and compressive force between the plate and bone surrogate was evaluated using pressure-sensitive film. There was a significant difference in mean MIT based on screw pitch (P compression between the plate and bone surrogate was found for increasing screw torque (R(2) = 0.97). These results indicate that the ability of different screw designs to generate high screw insertion torque in a model of osteoporotic cancellous bone is unrelated to their pullout strength. Therefore, extrapolation of results for POS to identify optimal screw design for osteoporotic bone may not be valid

  10. Peri-implant conditions and marginal bone loss around cemented and screw-retained single implant crowns in posterior regions: A retrospective cohort study with up to 4 years follow-up.

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    Jun-Yu Shi

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify the peri-implant conditions (bleeding on probing (BOP, pocket probing depth (PPD, modified plaque index (mPI and marginal bone loss (MBL, marginal bone level change between follow-up and occlusal loading around cemented and screw-retained posterior single crowns on tissue-level implants. The study was a retrospective cohort study with up to 4 years (mean 2.5 years follow-up. Patients with either cemented or screw-retained crowns in posterior regions were included. Implant survival, technical complications, BOP, PPD, mPI, MBL, biologic complications (peri-implant mocositis and peri-implantitis were evaluated. Mann-Whitney U test was used to test the difference between the screw-retained group (SG and cemented group (CG. 176 patients (SG: 94, CG: 82 were included. The implant survival rates were 100% in SG and 98.8% in CG. Prosthetic screw loosening was found in 8 restorations (8.7% at follow-up visit. Peri-implant mucositis rate was significantly higher in the SG group (42.1% than that in the CG group (32.2% (P = 0.04. Six patients (6.38% in the screw-retained group and 5 patients (6.10% in the cemented group were diagnosed with peri-implantitis, the difference did not reach statistical significance (P>0.05. No significant difference of PPD, mPI and MBL were found between two groups (P = 0.11, 0.13 and 0.08, respectively. High implant survival rates were achieved in both groups. Cemented single crowns on tissue-level implants showed comparable peri-implant conditions in comparison with two-piece screw-retained crowns. Well-designed prospective cohort or randomized controlled clinical trials with longer follow-up are needed to confirm the result.

  11. Peri-implant conditions and marginal bone loss around cemented and screw-retained single implant crowns in posterior regions: A retrospective cohort study with up to 4 years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun-Yu; Jie-Ni; Zhuang, Long-Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Meng; Fan, Lin-Feng; Lai, Hong-Chang

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the peri-implant conditions (bleeding on probing (BOP), pocket probing depth (PPD), modified plaque index (mPI)) and marginal bone loss (MBL, marginal bone level change between follow-up and occlusal loading) around cemented and screw-retained posterior single crowns on tissue-level implants. The study was a retrospective cohort study with up to 4 years (mean 2.5 years) follow-up. Patients with either cemented or screw-retained crowns in posterior regions were included. Implant survival, technical complications, BOP, PPD, mPI, MBL, biologic complications (peri-implant mocositis and peri-implantitis) were evaluated. Mann-Whitney U test was used to test the difference between the screw-retained group (SG) and cemented group (CG). 176 patients (SG: 94, CG: 82) were included. The implant survival rates were 100% in SG and 98.8% in CG. Prosthetic screw loosening was found in 8 restorations (8.7%) at follow-up visit. Peri-implant mucositis rate was significantly higher in the SG group (42.1%) than that in the CG group (32.2%) (P = 0.04). Six patients (6.38%) in the screw-retained group and 5 patients (6.10%) in the cemented group were diagnosed with peri-implantitis, the difference did not reach statistical significance (P>0.05). No significant difference of PPD, mPI and MBL were found between two groups (P = 0.11, 0.13 and 0.08, respectively). High implant survival rates were achieved in both groups. Cemented single crowns on tissue-level implants showed comparable peri-implant conditions in comparison with two-piece screw-retained crowns. Well-designed prospective cohort or randomized controlled clinical trials with longer follow-up are needed to confirm the result.

  12. Laser-treated stainless steel mini-screw implants: 3D surface roughness, bone-implant contact, and fracture resistance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, He-Kyong; Chu, Tien-Min; Dechow, Paul; Stewart, Kelton; Kyung, Hee-Moon; Liu, Sean Shih-Yao

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the biomechanical properties and bone-implant intersurface response of machined and laser surface-treated stainless steel (SS) mini-screw implants (MSIs). Forty-eight 1.3mm in diameter and 6mm long SS MSIs were divided into two groups. The control (machined surface) group received no surface treatment; the laser-treated group received Nd-YAG laser surface treatment. Half in each group was used for examining surface roughness (Sa and Sq), surface texture, and facture resistance. The remaining MSIs were placed in the maxilla of six skeletally mature male beagle dogs in a randomized split-mouth design. A pair with the same surface treatment was placed on the same side and immediately loaded with 200 g nickel-titanium coil springs for 8 weeks. After killing, the bone-implant contact (BIC) for each MSI was calculated using micro computed tomography. Analysis of variance model and two-sample t test were used for statistical analysis with a significance level of P titanium alloy MSIs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Surgical repair of propagating condylar fractures of the third metacarpal/metatarsal bones with cortical screws placed in lag fashion in 26 racehorses (2007-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, N; François, I; Coté, N; Alford, C; Cleary, O; Desjardins, M R

    2018-01-19

    Despite the recommendation of plate fixation for propagating condylar fractures of the third metacarpal (McIII) or third metatarsal bone (MtIII), lag screw fixation can be a viable surgical option. To evaluate short-term outcome and long-term racing performance of horses that underwent lag screw fixation of long condylar fractures of the McIII/MtIII. Retrospective case series. Medical records, post-surgical racing performance and outcome of 26 horses with propagating fractures of the medial and/or lateral condyle of McIII/MtIII were reviewed. Medical information included were age, breed, sex, physical examination at admission, circumstances of fracture, radiographic evaluation, anaesthesia and recovery records, surgical and post-operative management, as well as complications. Outcome included racing data and information from telephone interviews. Twenty-six horses (9 Standardbreds and 17 Thoroughbreds) were admitted with a long condylar fracture of the McIII/MtIII. Fore- and hindlimbs were equally represented with the left hindlimb being more frequently involved. Most of the fractures had a spiralling component (76%) and four (15%) were comminuted. Fifteen (58%) horses raced post-surgery including nine Standardbreds (100%) and six Thoroughbreds (35%). Twelve of them were placed in at least one race and 11 won at least once. One horse sustained a severe complication in recovery. No significant difference was observed in the racing performances before and after surgery. Follow-up method and duration were not standardised and there is a low number of cases with six surgeons. Long condylar fractures can be repaired using lag fashion technique combined with a half-limb or full-limb tight cast for recovery as a good surgical alternative. Similar results to plate fixation can be expected, with a return to racing of more than 50%, and the prognosis being even better for pacers. © 2018 EVJ Ltd.

  14. Assessment of different screw augmentation techniques and screw designs in osteoporotic spines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanne, A.; Spitaler, R.; Kropik, K.; Aigner, N.; Ogon, M.; Redl, H.

    2008-01-01

    This is an experimental study on human cadaver spines. The objective of this study is to compare the pullout forces between three screw augmentation methods and two different screw designs. Surgical interventions of patients with osteoporosis increase following the epidemiological development. Biomechanically the pedicle provides the strongest screw fixation in healthy bone, whereas in osteoporosis all areas of the vertebra are affected by the disease. This explains the high screw failure rates in those patients. Therefore PMMA augmentation of screws is often mandatory. This study involved investigation of the pullout forces of augmented transpedicular screws in five human lumbar spines (L1–L4). Each spine was treated with four different methods: non-augmented unperforated (solid) screw, perforated screw with vertebroplasty augmentation, solid screw with vertebroplasty augmentation and solid screw with balloon kyphoplasty augmentation. Screws were augmented with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The pullout forces were measured for each treatment with an Instron testing device. The bone mineral density was measured for each vertebra with Micro-CT. The statistical analysis was performed with a two-sided independent student t test. Forty screws (10 per group and level) were inserted. The vertebroplasty-augmented screws showed a significant higher pullout force (mean 918.5 N, P = 0.001) than control (mean 51 N), the balloon kyphoplasty group did not improve the pullout force significantly (mean 781 N, P > 0.05). However, leakage occurred in some cases treated with perforated screws. All spines showed osteoporosis on Micro-CT. Vertebroplasty-augmented screws, augmentation of perforated screws and balloon kyphoplasty augmented screws show higher pullout resistance than non-augmented screws. Significant higher pullout forces were only reached in the vertebroplasty augmented vertebra. The perforated screw design led to epidural leakage due to the position of the

  15. A processing method for orthodontic mini-screws reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Noorollahian

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Cleaning of used mini-screws with phosphoric acid 37% (10 minutes and sodium hypochlorite 5.25% (30 minutes reduces tissue remnants to the level of as-received mini-screws. So it can be suggested as a processing method of used mini-screws. Previous insertion of mini-screws into the bone and above-mentioned processing method and resterilization with autoclave had no adverse effects on insertion, removal, and fracture torque values as mechanical properties indices.

  16. Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with 3D-Navigation Guided Cortical Bone Trajectory Screws for L4/5 Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: 1-Year Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Ibrahim; Virk, Michael S; Link, Thomas W; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Elowitz, Eric

    2018-02-01

    We describe our technique and evaluate clinical and radiographic outcomes for patients undergoing L4/5 posterior lumbar interbody fusion with 3D-navigation guided cortical bone trajectory screws (PLIF-CBT) for grade 1 or 2 degenerative spondylolisthesis with a minimum follow-up time of 12 months. A single-institution series of 18 patients was evaluated with data prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed. Pain and disability scores were collected preoperatively and at a minimum of 12 months postoperatively, including back and bilateral leg pain visual analog scores (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. Radiographic fusion was assessed as complete, partial, or none based on the presence of bridging bones across the disc space, posterior elements, or both. Patients demonstrated statistically significant reductions in back pain VAS (P = 0.0025), leg pain VAS (P fusion at an average of 14.9 months postoperatively was available for 16/18 patients, with 6 patients demonstrating fusion (4/6 with complete fusion; 2/6 with partial fusion). There were no instances of intraoperative complications or delayed complications requiring subsequent interventions. PLIF-CBT can be performed in a safe and reproducible fashion with excellent clinical outcomes at 1 year postoperatively. The outcomes did not correlate with fusion status, which was unexpectedly low at 37.5% without significant hardware abnormalities necessitating reoperations. PLIF-CBT offers several perioperative advantages compared with traditional open PLIF and requires longer-term studies to demonstrate its durability with regard to improvement in clinical pain and radiographic endpoints, including anterior and/or posterior element fusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Removal and Reinsertion of Headless Compression Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Simon M; Niu, Rui; Jones, Christopher W; Smith, Belinda J; Clarke, Elizabeth C; Lawson, Richard D

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates the loss of compression when 3 commonly used headless compression screws are backed out (reversed), and assesses the ability to re-establish compression with screws of greater diameter. Two investigators tested 3 screw designs (Acutrak 2, Synthes HCS, Medartis SpeedTip CCS) in 2 diameters and lengths. Each design had 10 test cycles in a polyurethane foam bone model with compression recorded using a washer load cell. A 28-mm screw of the narrower diameter was inserted until 2 mm recessed and then reversed 30°, 60°, 90°, 180°, 270°, 360°, and 720°. After this the screw was removed completely and a 24-mm screw of greater diameter inserted until recessed 2 mm with the compressive force again recorded. All screws showed an immediate, statistically significant loss of compression at 30° of reversing. The Acutrak 2 Micro screw demonstrated not only the greatest mean compressive force, but also the fastest compressive loss. Insertion of the shorter screw of greater diameter was associated with re-establishment of compression to levels comparable with the original screw. This study reaffirms the importance of establishing the correct screw length before insertion due to the immediate loss of compression with reversal of these devices. If a headless compression screw penetrates the far joint surface, the screw should be completely removed and replaced with a shorter screw of greater diameter. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Coracoid bone graft osteolysis after Latarjet procedure: A comparison study between two screws standard technique vs mini-plate fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomo, Giovanni Di; Costantini, Alberto; de Gasperis, Nicola; De Vita, Andrea; Lin, Bernard K. H.; Francone, Marco; Beccaglia, Mario A. Rojas; Mastantuono, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Aims: One of the reason for Latarjet procedure failure may be coracoid graft osteolysis. In this study, we aimed to understand if a better compression between the coracoid process and the glenoid, using a mini-plate fixation during the Latarjet procedure, could reduce the amount of coracoid graft osteolysis. Materials and Methods: A computed tomography scan analysis of 26 prospectively followed-up patients was conducted after modified Latarjet procedure using mini-plate fixation technique to determine both the location and the amount of coracoid graft osteolysis in them. We then compared our current results with results from that of our previous study without using mini-plate fixation to determine if there is any statistical significant difference in terms of corcacoid bone graft osteolysis between the two surgical techniques. Results: The most relevant osteolysis was represented by the superficial part of the proximal coracoid, whereas the deep part of the proximal coracoid graft is least involved in osteolysis and has best bone healing. The current study showed a significant difference only for the deep part of the distal coracoid with our previous study (P Latarjet procedure. Conclusion: Our study suggests that there is a significant difference only for the deep part of the distal coracoid in terms of osteolysis. At clinical examination, this difference did not correspond with any clinical findings. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Clinical Relevance: Prospective case series, Treatment study. PMID:23858288

  19. Comparative study of the pullout strength of the 2.4-mm AO locking screw, 2.0-mm AO cortical screw and Herbert screw in sawbones: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiyatrakul, Arkaphat; Sompan, Soon; Luenam, Suriya

    2014-02-01

    Headless screw is a standard implant for an osteochondral fragment fixation. With a threaded design, the screw head can be buried under the articular cartilage to prevent a post-traumatic arthritis. However, the screw is expensive and maybe not available in the emergency situation. The 2.4-mm AO locking screw also has a threaded head which is able to advance underneath the cartilage. This has been usedfor fixation of the osteochondal fracture clinically. We compared the pullout strength of 2.4-mm AO locking screw with those ofHerbert screw and 2.0-mm AO cortical screw. The studies pemformed by using Instron 4502 to measure the pullout strength in 12 models for each type of the screw. The pullout strength of the 2.4-mm AO locking screw from a corticocancellous bone model was compared with the pullout strength of the Herbert screw from a cancellous bone model and the 2.0-mm AO cortical screw ifom the corticocancellous bone model. The differences in pullout strength between the 2.4-mm AO locking screw and the other two screws were determined by independent t-test. The pullout strength of the 2.4-mm AO locking screw, Herbert screw and 2.0-mm AO cortical screw were 143.49+46.18 N, 72.83 +/- 16.64 N, and 80.38 +/- 1.42 N, respectively. The pullout strength of2.4-mm AO locking screw was signi2ficantly higher than those ofHerbert screw and 2.0-mm AO cortical screw (pAO locking screw in the corticocancellous bone model had pullout strength higher than the Herbert screw in the cancellous bone model and the 2.0-mm AO cortical screw in corticocancellous bone model. The 2.4-mm AO locking screw may use instead of headless screw for intra-articular fixation in a specific situation, such as when the headless screw is unavailable.

  20. An in vitro biomechanical comparison of hydroxyapatite coated and uncoated ao cortical bone screws for a limited contact: dynamic compression plate fixation of osteotomized equine 3rd metacarpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Myra E; Sod, Gary A; Riggs, Laura M; Mitchell, Colin F

    2015-02-01

    To compare the monotonic biomechanical properties of a broad 4.5 mm limited contact-dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) fixation secured with hydroxyapatite (HA) coated cortical bone screws (HA-LC-DCP) versus uncoated cortical bone screws (AO-LC-DCP) to repair osteotomized equine 3rd metacarpal (MC3) bones. Experimental. Adult equine cadaveric MC3 bones (n = 12 pair). Twelve pairs of equine MC3 were divided into 3 test groups (4 pairs each) for: (1) 4 point bending single cycle to failure testing; (2) 4 point bending cyclic fatigue testing; and (3) torsional single cycle to failure testing. For the HA-LC-DCP-MC3 construct, an 8-hole broad LC-DCP (Synthes Ltd, Paoli, PA) was secured on the dorsal surface of each randomly selected MC3 bone with a combination of four 5.5 mm and four 4.5 mm HA-coated cortical screws. For the AO-LC-DCP-MC3 construct, an 8-hole 4.5 mm broad LC-DCP was secured on the dorsal surface of the contralateral MC3 bone with a combination of four 5.5 mm and four 4.5 mm uncoated cortical screws. All MC3 bones had mid-diaphyseal osteotomies. Mean test variable values for each method were compared using a paired t-test within each group. Significance was set at P < .05. Mean yield load, yield bending moment, composite rigidity, failure load, and failure bending moment, under 4 point bending, single cycle to failure, of the HA-LC-DCP fixation were significantly greater than those of the AO-LC-DCP fixation. Mean ± SD values for the HA-LC-DCP and the AO-LC-DCP fixation techniques, respectively, in single cycle to failure under 4 point bending were: yield load, 26.7 ± 2.15 and 16.3 ± 1.38 kN; yield bending moment, 527.4 ± 42.4 and 322.9 ± 27.2 N-m; composite rigidity, 5306 ± 399 and 3003 ± 300 N-m/rad; failure load, 40.6 ± 3.94 and 26.5 ± 2.52 kN; and failure bending moment, 801.9 ± 77.9 and 522.9 ± 52.2 N-m. Mean cycles to failure in 4 point bending of the HA

  1. Screw Versus Plate Fixation for Chevron Osteotomy: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Boyd J; Fallat, Lawrence M; Kish, John P

    2016-01-01

    The chevron osteotomy is a popular procedure used for the correction of moderate hallux abducto valgus deformity. Fixation is typically accomplished with Kirschner wires or bone screws; however, in cystic or osteoporotic bone, these could be inadequate, resulting in displacement of the capital fragment. We propose using a locking plate and interfragmental screw for fixation of the chevron osteotomy that could reduce the healing time and decrease the incidence of displacement. We performed a retrospective cohort study for chevron osteotomies on 75 feet (73 patients). The control groups underwent fixation with 1 screw in 30 feet (40%) and 2 screws in 30 feet (40%). A total of 15 feet (20%) were included in the locking plate and interfragmental screw group. The patients were followed up until bone healing was achieved at a median of 7 (range 6 to 14) weeks. Our hypothesis was that those treated with the locking plate and interfragmental screw would have a faster healing time and fewer incidents of capital fragment displacement compared with the 1- or 2-screw groups. The corresponding mean intervals to healing for the 1-screw group was 7.71 ± 1.28 (range 6 to 10) weeks, for the 2-screw group was 7.27 ± 1.57 (range 6 to 14) weeks, and for the locking plate and interfragmental screw group was 7.01 ± 1.00 (range 6 to 9) weeks. One case of capital fragment displacement occurred in the single screw group and one in the 2-screw group. No displacement occurred in the locking plate and interfragmental screw group. Neither finding was statistically significant. However, we believe the locking plate and interfragmental screw could be a viable option in patients with osteoporotic and cystic bone changes for correction of hallux abducto valgus. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Characteristics of immediate and fatigue strength of a dual-threaded pedicle screw in cadaveric spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasiliense, Leonardo B C; Lazaro, Bruno C R; Reyes, Phillip M; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Turner, Joseph L; Crandall, Dennis G; Crawford, Neil R

    2013-08-01

    Novel dual-threaded screws are configured with overlapping (doubled) threads only in the proximal shaft to improve proximal cortical fixation. Tests were run to determine whether dual-threaded pedicle screws improve pullout resistance and increase fatigue endurance compared with standard pedicle screws. In vitro strength and fatigue tests were performed in human cadaveric vertebrae and in polyurethane foam test blocks. Seventeen cadaveric lumbar vertebrae (14 pedicles) and 40 test sites in foam blocks were tested. Measures for comparison between standard and dual-threaded screws were bone mineral density (BMD), screw insertion torque, ultimate pullout force, peak load at cyclic failure, and pedicular side of first cyclic failure. For each vertebral sample, dual-threaded screws were inserted in one pedicle and single-threaded screws were inserted in the opposite pedicle while recording insertion torque. In seven vertebrae, axial pullout tests were performed. In 10 vertebrae, orthogonal loads were cycled at increasing peak values until toggle exceeded threshold for failure. Insertion torque and pullout force were also recorded for screws placed in foam blocks representing healthy or osteoporotic bone porosity. In bone, screw insertion torque was 183% greater with dual-threaded than with standard screws (pscrews pulled out at 93% of the force required to pull out dual-threaded screws (p=.42). Of 10 screws, five reached toggle failure first on the standard screw side, two screws failed first on the dual-threaded side, and three screws failed on both sides during the same round of cycling. In the high-porosity foam, screw insertion torque was 60% greater with the dual-threaded screw than with the standard screw (p=.005), but 14% less with the low-porosity foam (p=.07). Pullout force was 19% less with the dual-threaded screw than with the standard screw in the high-porosity foam (p=.115), but 6% greater with the dual-threaded screw in the low-porosity foam (p=.156

  3. Results of screw fixation combined with cortical drilling for treatment of dorsal cortical stress fractures of the third metacarpal bone in 56 Thoroughbred racehorses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallap, B.L.; Bramlage, L.R.; Embertson, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate screw fixation with cortical drilling as a surgical treatment for dorsal cortical stress fractures of MCIII in the Thoroughbred racehorse. Details of age, sex, limb affected, fracture assessment, and post operative recommendations were obtained from medical records and radiographs. Fracture healing was assessed radiographically at the time of screw removal. Performance evaluation was determined from race records obtained from The Jockey Club Information System, Lexington, Kentucky. Fifty-six Thoroughbred racehorses were treated surgically for stress fracture of MCIII with screw fixation and cortical drilling. Stress fractures occurred primarily in the left front limb of the male 3-year-olds, in the dorsolateral cortex of the middle third of MCIII. Ninety-seven percent of the fractures travelled in a dorsodistal to palmaroproximal direction. Median period to screw removal was 2.0 months. Evaluation at time of screw removal revealed 98% of single stress fractures of the left front limb were healed radiographically. Median period to resume training was 2.75 months (single stress fractures); median period to race was 7.62 months. There was no statistically significant difference in earnings/start before and after surgical intervention. Of the 63 fractures treated, two recurred. There were no catastrophic failures, and no incisional infections

  4. Measurement of Tip Apex Distance and Migration of Lag Screws and Novel Blade Screw Used for the Fixation of Intertrochanteric Fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Chieh-Szu Yang

    Full Text Available Fixation with a dynamic hip screw (DHS is one of the most common methods for stabilizing intertrochanteric fractures, except for unstable and reverse oblique fracture types. However, failure is often observed in osteoporotic patients whereby the lag screw effectively 'cuts out' through the weak bone. Novel anti-migration blades have been developed to be used in combination with a lag screw ('Blade Screw' to improve the fixation strength in osteoporotic intertrochanteric fractures. An in-vitro biomechanical study and a retrospective clinical study were performed to evaluate lag screw migration when using the novel Blade Screw and a traditional threaded DHS. The biomechanical study showed both the Blade Screw and DHS displayed excessive migration (≥10 mm before reaching 20,000 loading cycles in mild osteoporotic bone, but overall migration of the Blade Screw was significantly less (p ≤ 0.03. Among the patients implanted with a Blade Screw in the clinical study, there was no significant variation in screw migration at 3-months follow-up (P = 0.12. However, the patient's implanted with a DHS did display significantly greater migration (P<0.001 than those implanted with the Blade Screw. In conclusion, the Blade Screw stabilizes the bone fragments during dynamic loading so as to provide significantly greater resistance to screw migration in patients with mild osteoporosis.

  5. [Positions of Sustentacular Screw in Osteosynthesis of Calcaneal Fractures: Clinical and Radiographic Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazour, J; Křivohlávek, M; Lukáš, R

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The aim of the study was to analyse the options for sustentacular screw placement in osteosynthesis of intra-articular fractures of the heel bone and to assess the effect of various screw positions on failure to maintain the reduction in the postoperative period. In addition, problems related to screw-end protrusion over the medial cortical bone or to screw penetration into the talocalcaneal joint were assessed. MATERIAL AND METHODS The group comprised 23 patients with a total of 25 intra-articular fractures of the heel bone treated by surgery. The procedure involved insertion of a sustentacular screw under fluoroscopic guidance. Post-operatively, screw position in the sustentacular fragment was evaluated on CT scans. During follow-up, attention was focused on the effect of screw placement on maintenance of fracture reduction, and clinical symptoms potentially associated with screw malposition were recorded. RESULTS All sustentacular screws were fixed sustentacular fragments. Seven screws (28%) were inserted in the talar shelf, seven (28%) were placed under and nine (36%) over the sustentaculum tali. Two screws penetrated into the talocalcaneal joint (8%). The end of a screw projecting by 2 mm over the medial wall of the calcaneus was found in 11 cases (44%). Two patients with screws penetrating into the talocalcaneal joint had problems. On the other hand, no clinical effect of a screw extending over the medial wall of the calcaneus was recorded. No significant association of screw position with late //delayed failure of fracture reduction was detected. DISCUSSION Although the ideal trajectory for a sustentacular screw have been defined using a model of the calcaneus, it is not easy to achieve optimal screw placement due to the complex anatomy of the calcaneus and limited possibilities of intra-operative control of screw insertion. Any sustentacular screw malposition is a potential risk factor, particularly if the screw has penetrated into the

  6. Achieving interfragmentary compression without special drilling technique or screw design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jonathan; Deafenbaugh, Bradley; Christiansen, Blaine; Garcia-Nolen, Tanya; Lee, Mark

    2017-09-08

    Traditional fracture fixation teaching suggests that fully threaded screws do not provide interfragmentary compression unless placed through a glide hole. Based on this assumption, pelvic surgeons typically use fully threaded screws in the treatment of comminuted transforaminal sacral fractures to limit iatrogenic neuroforaminal stenosis. Clinical experience with fully threaded screws suggests that interfragmentary compression actually does occur. We hypothesized that the use of a fully threaded screw does not produce any interfragmentary compression and that there is no difference in insertional torque between partially threaded and fully threaded screws. To test this hypothesis, fully and partially threaded 7.0 millimeter (mm) cannulated screws were placed across two synthetic bone blocks fabricated to simulate normal and osteoporotic bone. We compared two groups of normal and osteoporotic blocks for compression achieved and maximal insertional torque generated with fully threaded and partially threaded screw insertion. A micro computed tomography (CT) scan of the composite blocks was obtained to investigate for structural changes created during screw insertion. For both groups, compression was achieved with fully threaded screws and the maximal insertional torque was higher using fully threaded screws. Micro CT analysis demonstrated local bone damage with structural disruption in the near segment of the fully threaded screw path in comparison to the partially threaded. this study demonstrates that compression is generated using fully threaded screws without using a predrilled glide hole. The insertional torque required to generate compression with fully threaded screws is increased but is clinically applicable. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Research and application of absorbable screw in orthopedics: a clinical review comparing PDLLA screw with metal screw in patients with simple medial malleolus fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANG Jin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of absorbable screw in medial malleolus fracture and discuss its clinical application in orthopedics. Methods: A total of 129 patients with simple medial malleolus fracture were studied. Among them, 64 patients were treated with poly-D, L-lactic acid (PDLLA absorbable screws, while the others were treated with metal screws. All the patients were followed up for 12-20 months (averaged 18.4 months and the therapeutic effect was evaluated ac-cording to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Soci-ety clinical rating systems. Results: In absorbable screw group, we obtained excel-lent and good results in 62 cases (96.88%; in steel screw group, 61 cases (93.85% achieved excellent and good results. There was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: In the treatment of malleolus fracture, absorbable screw can achieve the same result compared with metal screw fixation. Absorbable screw is preferred due to its advantages of safety, cleanliness and avoiding the removal procedure associated with metallic implants. Key words: Ankle; Bone screws; Fractures, bone

  8. Pullout strength of misplaced pedicle screws in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae - A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam K Saraf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this cadaveric study was to analyze the effects of iatrogenic pedicle perforations from screw misplacement on the mean pullout strength of lower thoracic and lumbar pedicle screws. We also investigated the effect of bone mineral density (BMD, diameter of pedicle screws, and the region of spine on the pullout strength of pedicle screws. Materials and Methods: Sixty fresh human cadaveric vertebrae (D10-L2 were harvested. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA scan of vertebrae was done for BMD. Titanium pedicle screws of different diameters (5.2 and 6.2 mm were inserted in the thoracic and lumbar segments after dividing the specimens into three groups: a standard pedicle screw (no cortical perforation; b screw with medial cortical perforation; and c screw with lateral cortical perforation. Finally, pullout load of pedicle screws was recorded using INSTRON Universal Testing Machine. Results: Compared with standard placement, medially misplaced screws had 9.4% greater mean pullout strength and laterally misplaced screws had 47.3% lesser mean pullout strength. The pullout strength of the 6.2 mm pedicle screws was 33% greater than that of the 5.2 mm pedicle screws. The pullout load of pedicle screws in lumbar vertebra was 13.9% greater than that in the thoracic vertebra ( P = 0.105, but it was not statistically significant. There was no significant difference between pullout loads of vertebra with different BMD ( P = 0.901. Conclusion: The mean pullout strength was less with lateral misplaced pedicle screws while medial misplaced pedicle screw had more pullout strength. The pullout load of 6.2 mm screws was greater than that of 5.2 mm pedicle screws. No significant correlation was found between bone mineral densities and the pullout strength of vertebra. Similarly, the pullout load of screw placed in thoracic and lumbar vertebrae was not significantly different.

  9. Percutaneous Image-Guided Screw Fixation of Bone Lesions in Cancer Patients: Double-Centre Analysis of Outcomes including Local Evolution of the Treated Focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Buy, Xavier, E-mail: x.buy@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Ramamurthy, Nitin, E-mail: nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: georgia.tsoumakidou@chru-strasbourg.fr; Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Catena, Vittorio, E-mail: v.catena@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juleiengarnon@gmail.com [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Palussiere, Jean, E-mail: j.palussiere@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France)

    2016-10-15

    AimTo review outcomes and local evolution of treated lesions following percutaneous image-guided screw fixation (PIGSF) of pathological/insufficiency fractures (PF/InF) and impeding fractures (ImF) in cancer patients at two tertiary centres.Materials and methodsThirty-two consecutive patients (mean age 67.5 years; range 33–86 years) with a range of tumours and prognoses underwent PIGSF for non/minimally displaced PF/InF and ImF. Screws were placed under CT/fluoroscopy or cone-beam CT guidance, with or without cementoplasty. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a simple 4-point scale (1 = worse; 2 = stable; 3 = improved; 4 = significantly improved). Local evolution was reviewed on most recent follow-up imaging. Technical success, complications, and overall survival were evaluated.ResultsThirty-six lesions were treated with 74 screws mainly in the pelvis and femoral neck (58.2 %); including 47.2 % PF, 13.9 % InF, and 38.9 % ImF. Cementoplasty was performed in 63.9 % of the cases. Technical success was 91.6 %. Hospital stay was ≤3 days; 87.1 % of lesions were improved at 1-month follow-up; three major complications (early screw-impingement radiculopathy; accelerated coxarthrosis; late coxofemoral septic arthritis) and one minor complication were observed. Unfavourable local evolution at imaging occurred in 3/24 lesions (12.5 %) at mean 8.7-month follow-up, including poor consolidation (one case) and screw loosening (two cases, at least 1 symptomatic). There were no cases of secondary fractures.ConclusionsPIGSF is feasible for a wide range of oncologic patients, offering good short-term efficacy, acceptable complication rates, and rapid recovery. Unfavourable local evolution at imaging may be relatively frequent, and requires close clinico-radiological surveillance.

  10. Influence of screw augmentation in posterior dynamic and rigid stabilization systems in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae: a biomechanical cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Sven; Sven, Hoppe; Loosli, Yannick; Yannick, Loosli; Baumgartner, Daniel; Daniel, Baumgartner; Heini, Paul; Paul, Heini; Benneker, Lorin; Lorin, Benneker

    2014-03-15

    Biomechanical cadaveric study. To determine whether augmentation positively influence screw stability or not. Implantation of pedicle screws is a common procedure in spine surgery to provide an anchorage of posterior internal fixation into vertebrae. Screw performance is highly correlated to bone quality. Therefore, polymeric cement is often injected through specifically designed perforated pedicle screws into osteoporotic bone to potentially enhance screw stability. Caudocephalic dynamic loading was applied as quasi-physiological alternative to classical pull-out tests on 16 screws implanted in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae and 20 screws in nonosteoporotic specimen. Load was applied using 2 different configurations simulating standard and dynamic posterior stabilization devices. Screw performance was quantified by measurement of screwhead displacement during the loading cycles. To reduce the impact of bone quality and morphology, screw performance was compared for each vertebra and averaged afterward. All screws (with or without cement) implanted in osteoporotic vertebrae showed lower performances than the ones implanted into nonosteoporotic specimen. Augmentation was negligible for screws implanted into nonosteoporotic specimen, whereas in osteoporotic vertebrae pedicle screw stability was significantly increased. For dynamic posterior stabilization system an increase of screwhead displacement was observed in comparison with standard fixation devices in both setups. Augmentation enhances screw performance in patients with poor bone stock, whereas no difference is observed for patients without osteoporosis. Furthermore, dynamic stabilization systems have the possibility to fail when implanted in osteoporotic bone.

  11. Stability of medial locking plate and compression screw versus two crossed screws for lapidus arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, Kajetan; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Mückley, Thomas; Fröber, Rosemarie; Hofmann, Gunther O; Schwieger, Karsten; Windolf, Markus

    2010-02-01

    Lapidus (first metatarsocuneiform joint) arthrodesis is an established procedure for the management of hallux valgus. This study investigated the utility of fixation with a medial locking plate with adjunct compression screw versus fixation with two crossed screws. Eight pairs of fresh-frozen human specimens were used in a matched pair test. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Fixation with two 4-mm-diameter crossed screws was compared versus a medial locking plate (X-Locking Plate 2.4/2.7; Synthes, Solothurn, Switzerland) with adjunct 4-mm-diameter compression screw. The specimens were tested in a four-point bending test. Parameters obtained were initial stiffness; plantar joint-line gapping after one cycle, 100 and 1000 cycles; and number of cycles to failure. Failure was defined as more than or equal to 3 mm plantar gapping. The groups did not differ significantly with regard to BMD (p = 0.866) and initial stiffness (p = 0.889). The plate-and-screw construct showed significantly less movement during testing, and significantly (p = 0.001) more cycles to failure than did the crossed-screw construct. There was a significant correlation (crossed-screw construct: p = 0.014; plate-and-screw construct: p = 0.010) between BMD and the number of cycles to failure. Under cyclic loading conditions, the construct using a medial locking plate with adjunct compression screw was superior to the construct using two crossed screws. The medial locking-plate technique described could help shorten the period of nonweightbearing and reduce the risk of non-union.

  12. Primary stability of three different iliosacral screw fixation techniques in osteoporotic cadaver specimens-a biomechanical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberkircher, Ludwig; Masaeli, Adrian; Bliemel, Christopher; Debus, Florian; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Krüger, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of osteoporotic and insufficiency fractures of the pelvic ring is increasing. Closed reduction and percutaneous fixation with cannulated sacroiliac screws is well-established in the operative treatment of osteoporotic posterior pelvic ring fractures. However, osteoporotic bone quality might lead to the risk of screw loosening. For this reason, cement augmentation of the iliosacral screws is more frequently performed and recommended. The aim of the present biomechanical study was to evaluate the primary stability of three methods of iliosacral screw fixation in human osteoporotic sacrum specimens. This study used methodical cadaver study. A total of 15 fresh frozen human cadaveric specimens with osteoporosis were used (os sacrum). After matched pair randomization regarding bone quality (T-score), three operation technique groups were generated: screw fixation (cannulated screws) without cement augmentation (Group A); screw fixation with cement augmentation before screw placement (cannulated screws) (Group B); and screw fixation with perforated screws and cement augmentation after screw placement (Group C). In all specimens both sides of the os sacrum were used for operative treatment, resulting in a group size of 10 specimens per group. One operation technique was used on each side of the sacral bone to compare biomechanical properties in the same bone quality. Pull-out tests were performed with a rate of 6 mm/min. A load versus displacement curve was generated. Subgroup 1 (Group A vs. Group B): Screw fixation without cement augmentation: 594.4 N±463.7 and screw fixation with cement augmentation before screw placement: 1,020.8 N±333.3; values were significantly different (p=.025). Subgroup 2 (Group A vs. Group C): Screw fixation without cement augmentation: 641.8 N±242.0 and perforated screw fixation with cement augmentation after screw placement: 1,029.6 N±326.5; values were significantly different (p=.048). Subgroup 3 (Group B vs. Group C): Screw

  13. [Finite element analysis of the initial stability of subtalar arthrodesis with double-screw fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhuang; Yu, Bin; Li, Xue; Xu, Changpeng; Song, Jinqi; Ouyang, Hanbin; Diao, Xicai; Chen, Liguang

    2012-11-01

    To assess the optimal configuration of double-screw fixation for subtalar arthrodesis using finite element analysis. Three-dimensional finite element double-screw models of subtalar arthrodesis were reconstructed using Mimics 13.0, Geomagic 10.0 and solid works software based on the 3-D images of the volunteer's right foot. The external and internal rotation torques of 4 N·m were applied, and the micromotion at the bone-to-bone interface were measured to evaluate the initial stability of subtalar arthrodesis. A neck screw plus an anterolateral dome screw was the most stable model. The peak micromotion at the fusion site of this fixation configuration were 41.67mnplus;0.49 and 42.64mnplus;0.75 µm in response to the respectively. A neck screw plus a posteromedial dome screw was the least stable model, with peak micromotion at the bone-to-bone interface of 61.76mnplus;1.00 and 62.32mnplus;0.90 µm, respectively. A neck screw plus an anterolateral dome screw is the best fixation configuration while a neck screw plus a posteromedial screw provides the least stability of subtalar arthrodesis. Three-dimensional finite element models allow effective preoperative planning of the screw number and placement.

  14. Biomechanical analysis of differential pull-out strengths of bone screws using cervical anterior transpedicular technique in normal and osteoporotic cervical cadaveric spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changfu; Chen, Chun; Wu, Weidong; Zhao, Weidong; Sun, Peidong; Fan, Jihong; Bi, Zhenyu; Zhang, Jinyuan; Ouyang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical in vitro study. To determine whether the peak pull-out force (PPF) of cervical anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixed in osteoporotic vertebrae positively influence screw stability or not before and after fatigue. Multilevel cervical spine procedures with osteoporosis can challenge the stability of current screw-and-plate systems. A second surgical posterior approach is coupled with potential risks of increased morbidity and complications. Hence, anterior cervical instrumentation that increases primary construct stability, while avoiding the need for posterior augmentation, would be valuable. Sixty formalin-fixed vertebrae at different levels were randomly selected. The vertebrae were divided into healthy controls (groups A1, A2), osteoporotic controls (B1, B2), healthy ATPS groups (C1, C2), osteoporotic ATPS groups (D1, D2), and osteoporotic restoration controls (E1, E2). The procedure of ATPS insertion was simulated with 2 pilot holes being drilled on each side of 20 vertebral bodies that were implanted with either vertebral screw or polymethylmethacrylate. Each side randomly received either instant PPF or PPF beyond fatigue (2.5 Hz; 20,000 times). The prefatigue PPFs were significantly higher than the postfatigue PPFs in all groups (group A: 366.06 ± 58.78 vs. 248.93 ± 57.21 N; group B: 275.58 ± 23.18 vs. 142.79 ± 44.78 N; group C: 635.99 ± 185.28 vs. 542.57 ± 136.58 N; group D: 519.22 ± 122.12 vs. 393.16 ± 192.07 N, and group E: 431.78 ± 75.77 vs. 325.74 ± 95.10 N). The postfatigue PPFs were reduced by 32.00% (group A), 48.19% (group B), 14.69% (group C), 24.28% (group D), and 24.72% (group E). The acute and postfatigue PPFs of both control groups were significantly lower than that of ATPS groups (P osteoporotic vertebrae.

  15. [The biomechanics of screws, cerclage wire and cerclage cable].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, C; Woiczinski, M; Utzschneider, S; Kraxenberger, M; Weber, P; Jansson, V

    2013-05-01

    In contrast to fracture fixation, when performing an osteotomy the surgeon is able to plan preoperatively. The resulting fixation and compression of the bone fragments are the most important points. A stable osteosynthesis should prevent dislocation of bone fragments and improve bone healing. Beside plates, cerclages can be used for tension band or diaphysis bone fixation. Moreover, cortical or cancellous screws can be used for osteotomy fixation. This work describes biomechanical principles for fixation after an osteotomy with cerclages and cortical or cancellous screws. It also summarizes the materials and geometries used, as well as their influence on the stability of the osteosynthesis.

  16. Randomized controlled trial of osteoconductive fixation screws for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a comparison of the Calaxo and Milagro screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Henry E; Salmon, Lucy J; Waller, Alison; Winalski, Carl S; Williams, Heidi A; Linklater, James M; Vasanji, Amit; Roe, Justin P; Pinczewski, Leo A

    2013-01-01

    To compare the outcome of 2 bioabsorbable screws for tibial interference fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with reference to rate of absorption, osteoconductive properties, and clinical outcome. Patients undergoing primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring autograft in a single unit were invited to participate in this study. Patients were randomized to receive either the Calaxo screw (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA) or Milagro screw (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) for tibial fixation. Patients were reviewed with subjective and objective evaluation by use of the International Knee Documentation Committee form, Lysholm score, KT-1000 arthrometry (MEDmetric, San Diego, CA), and clinical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 1 year and computed tomography scanning at 1 week and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Sixty patients agreed to participate in the study, with 32 patients randomized to the Calaxo screw and 28 to the Milagro screw for tibial fixation. There was no significant difference in subjective or objective clinical outcome between the 2 groups. At 24 months, 88% of Calaxo screws showed complete screw resorption compared with 0% of Milagro screws (P Milagro group (P = .001). At 24 months, the mean volume of new bone formation for the Calaxo group was 21% of original screw volume. Ossification of the Milagro screw was unable to be accurately assessed as a result of incomplete screw resorption. Both screws showed similar favorable objective and subjective outcomes at 2 years. The Calaxo screw resorbed completely over a period of 6 months and was associated with a high incidence of intra-tunnel cyst formation. The Milagro screw increased in volume over a period of 6 months, followed by a gradual resorption, which was still ongoing at 2 years. Both screws were associated with tunnel widening, and neither showed evidence of significant tunnel ossification. We conclude that, despite satisfactory clinical outcomes, the

  17. PMMA-augmentation of incompletely cannulated pedicle screws: a cadaver study to determine the benefits in the osteoporotic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goost, H; Deborre, C; Wirtz, D C; Burger, C; Prescher, A; Fölsch, C; Pflugmacher, R; Kabir, K

    2014-01-01

    Pedicle screw pullout due to poor bone quality, mainly caused by osteoporosis, is a common problem in spine surgery. Special implants and techniques, especially PMMA augmentation, were developed to improve the fixation of pedicle screws. PMMA injection into a pilot hole or through a screw involves the same risks as vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, regardless of the technique used. Especially when using fully cannulated screws anterior leakage is possible. To prove PMMA injection is safe and possible without leakage through an incompletely cannulated screw and also increases pullout forces in the osteoporotic vertebra. Incompletely cannulated pedicle screws were tested by axial pullout in human cadavers, divided into osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic groups. Non-augmented and PMMA-augmented pedicle screws were compared. Twenty-five human vertebrae were measured by DEXA and divided into osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic groups. In each vertebra both pedicles were instrumented with the new screw (WSI-Expertise 6×45 mm, Peter Brehm Inc. Germany); the right screw was augmented with a 3 mL PMMA injection through the screw. On each screw axial pullout was performed after X-ray and CT scan. Radiographs and CT scans excluded PMMA leakage. Cement was distributed in the middle and posterior third of the vertebrae. Pullout forces were significantly higher after pedicle screw augmentation, especially in the osteoporotic bone. All augmented pedicle screws showed higher pullout forces compared with the unaugmented screws. We minimized the risk of leakage by using a screw with a closed tip. On the whole, PMMA augmentation through an incompletely cannulated pedicle screw is safe and increases pullout forces in osteoporotic bone to the level of healthy bone. Therefore the new incompletely cannulated screw can be used for pedicle screw augmentation.

  18. Biomechanical evaluation of fixation strength of conventional and expansive pedicle screws with or without calcium based cement augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingxuan; Lei, Wei; Wu, Zixiang; Liu, Da; Shi, Lei

    2011-03-01

    The expansive pedicle screw was originally developed to be installed in the bone of compromised quality, but there are some concerns whether it can provide enough fixation strength in the spine with osteoporosis or severe osteoporosis. Twelve fresh human cadaver spines were stratified into four levels: normal, osteopenia, osteoporosis and severe osteoporosis. The vertebra was bilaterally instrumented with pedicle screws according to four protocols, including conventional pedicle screw without augmentation, expansive pedicle screw without augmentation, conventional screw with augmentation and expansive screw with augmentation. Screw pullout tests were conducted. Given the same specimen, the fixation strength of expansive screw was significantly higher than that of the conventional screw. When the same type of screw was used, the fixation strength of the calcium based cement augmented group was stronger than that of the non-augmented group. The pullout strength and stiffness of the expansive screw, augmented conventional screw and augmented expansive screw groups at the osteoporotic level were comparable to those of the conventional pedicle screw group at the osteopenic level. However, under the severely osteoporotic bone environment, the pullout strength of pedicle screw with whatever placement protocol was significantly lower than that of the conventional screw group at the osteopenic level. Our results demonstrate that (i) the expansive pedicle screw appears feasible and safe in either osteopenic or osteoporotic spine; (ii) calcium based cement augmentation can offer improved initial fixation strength of pedicle screws.; and (iii) no screw placement protocol we examined is efficacious in the bone at the severely osteoporotic level. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biomechanical evaluation and preliminary clinical experience with an expansive pedicle screw design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, S D; Salkeld, S L; Whitecloud, T S; Barbera, J

    2000-06-01

    The advantages of pedicle screw fixation depend on their ability to retain bony purchase until the fusion mass is stable. Osteoporotic bone and removal and replacement of pedicle screws in revision procedures substantially reduce screw mechanical fixation strength and can lead to clinical failure. The objective of this study was to determine if an expansive pedicle screw design could be used to improve biomechanical fixation in bone of compromised quality. Axial mechanical pullout testing was performed on paired expansive and conventional pedicle screws placed in fresh, unembalmed cadaveric vertebrae. Bone mineral density measurements (made using a dual-energy X-ray absorption meter) were used to characterize bone quality. A preliminary clinical and radiographic evaluation of 14 patients was also performed at a minimum 2-year follow-up. The mean axial pullout force in bone of all qualities was increased 30% when the expansive pedicle screw design was used. This included an appropriate 50% increase in pullout force in bone of poor quality (low bone mineral density). The preliminary clinical and radiographic results were supportive of the biomechanical design rationale and mechanical testing. The results were similar to those expected for spinal instrumentation using pedicle screws, even though compromised bone was present in two thirds of the cases in which the expansive screw was used.

  20. Accurate and Simple Screw Insertion Procedure With Patient-Specific Screw Guide Templates for Posterior C1-C2 Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Taku; Higashiyama, Naoki; Kaneyama, Shuichi; Sumi, Masatoshi

    2017-03-15

    Prospective clinical trial of the screw insertion method for posterior C1-C2 fixation utilizing the patient-specific screw guide template technique. To evaluate the efficacy of this method for insertion of C1 lateral mass screws (LMS), C2 pedicle screws (PS), and C2 laminar screws (LS). Posterior C1LMS and C2PS fixation, also known as the Goel-Harms method, can achieve immediate rigid fixation and high fusion rate, but the screw insertion carries the risk of injury to neuronal and vascular structures. Dissection of venous plexus and C2 nerve root to confirm the insertion point of the C1LMS may also cause problems. We have developed an intraoperative screw guiding method using patient-specific laminar templates. Preoperative bone images of computed tomography (CT) were analyzed using three-dimensional (3D)/multiplanar imaging software to plan the trajectories of the screws. Plastic templates with screw guiding structures were created for each lamina using 3D design and printing technology. Three types of templates were made for precise multistep guidance, and all templates were specially designed to fit and lock on the lamina during the procedure. Surgery was performed using this patient-specific screw guide template system, and placement of the screws was postoperatively evaluated using CT. Twelve patients with C1-C2 instability were treated with a total of 48 screws (24 C1LMS, 20 C2PS, 4 C2LS). Intraoperatively, each template was found to exactly fit and lock on the lamina and screw insertion was completed successfully without dissection of the venous plexus and C2 nerve root. Postoperative CT showed no cortical violation by the screws, and mean deviation of the screws from the planned trajectories was 0.70 ± 0.42 mm. The multistep, patient-specific screw guide template system is useful for intraoperative screw navigation in posterior C1-C2 fixation. This simple and economical method can improve the accuracy of screw insertion, and reduce operation time and

  1. Compressive Force With 2-Screw and 3-Screw Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis With Headless Compression Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takumi; Glisson, Richard R; Reidl, Markus; Easley, Mark E

    2016-12-01

    Joint compression is an essential element of successful arthrodesis. Although subtalar joint compression generated by conventional screws has been quantified in the laboratory, compression obtainable with headless screws that rely on variable thread pitch to achieve bony contact has not been assessed. This study measured subtalar joint compression achieved by 2 posteriorly placed contemporary headless, variable-pitch screws, and quantified additional compression gained by placing a third screw anteriorly. Ten, unpaired fresh-frozen cadaveric subtalar joints were fixed sequentially using 2 diverging posterior screws (one directed into the talar dome, the other into the talar neck), 2 parallel posterior screws (both ending in the talar dome), and 2 parallel screws with an additional anterior screw inserted from the plantar calcaneus into the talar neck. Joint compression was quantified directly during screw insertion using a novel custom-built measuring device. The mean compression generated by 2 diverging posterior screws was 246 N. Two parallel posterior screws produced 294 N of compression, and augmentation of that construct with a third, anterior screw increased compression to 345 N (P screw fixation was slightly less than that reported previously for subtalar joint fixation with 2 conventional lag screws, but was comparable when a third screw was added. Under controlled testing conditions, 2 tapered, variable-pitch screws generated somewhat less compression than previously reported for 2-screw fixation with conventional headed screws. A third screw placed anteriorly increased compression significantly. Because headless screws are advantageous where prominent screw heads are problematic, such as the load-bearing surface of the foot, their effectiveness compared to other screws should be established to provide an objective basis for screw selection. Augmenting fixation with an anterior screw may be desirable when conditions for fusion are suboptimal. © The Author

  2. Central tarsal bone fractures in horses not used for racing: Computed tomographic configuration and long-term outcome of lag screw fixation

    OpenAIRE

    Gunst, S; Del Chicca, Francesca; Fürst, Anton; Kuemmerle, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: There are no reports on the configuration of equine central tarsal bone fractures based on cross-sectional imaging and clinical and radiographic long-term outcome after internal fixation. OBJECTIVES: To report clinical, radiographic and computed tomographic findings of equine central tarsal bone fractures and to evaluate the long-term outcome of internal fixation. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case series. METHODS: All horses diagnosed with a central tarsa...

  3. Structural characteristics of the pedicle and its role in screw stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, T; Hasegawa, K; Takahashi, H E; Uchiyama, S; Hara, T; Washio, T; Sugiura, T; Yokaichiya, M; Ikeda, M

    1997-11-01

    Cross-sectional regional bone mineral density of the pedicle was measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Biomechanical tests were performed to clarify the role of the pedicle in screw stability. To identify the structural characteristics of the pedicle that supports pedicle screw stability and the differences in these characteristics between normal and osteoporotic vertebrae. The pedicle screw is an essential component of many systems used to align the spine. The contribution of the pedicle to screw stability, however, has not been fully investigated. Trabecular, subcortical, and cortical bone mineral density and the area of the pedicle were measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Bone mineral density also was recalculated in four circumferential layers. These parameters were compared between normal and osteoporotic individuals. The relative contribution of the pedicle to screw stability was evaluated by caudocephalad and pull-out loading in a vertebra with or without its body. Inner trabecular, middle subcortical, and outer cortical bone mineral density and cortical bone area in the pedicle were significantly lower in osteoporotic vertebrae than those in normal vertebrae. In the pedicle, bone mineral density increased close to the outer layer. Bone mineral density not as thick even in the outer layer in osteoporotic subjects. Approximately 80% of the caudocephalad stiffness and 60% of the pullout strength of the pedicle screw depended on the pedicle rather than on the vertebral body. Screw stability depends on the structural characteristics of the pedicle. The pedicle was denser in the subcortical bone, in which the threads of the screw engage, than in trabecular bone. In osteoporosis, bone mineral density was not as dense even in the outer layer, and the cortex was thinner than normal. A larger screw would not enhance screw stability and may break the thin cortex in osteoporotic vertebrae.

  4. Insertion profiles of 4 headless compression screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Adam; Harvey, Edward J; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Barthelat, Francois; Rabiei, Reza; Martineau, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    In practice, the surgeon must rely on screw position (insertion depth) and tactile feedback from the screwdriver (insertion torque) to gauge compression. In this study, we identified the relationship between interfragmentary compression and these 2 factors. The Acutrak Standard, Acutrak Mini, Synthes 3.0, and Herbert-Whipple implants were tested using a polyurethane foam scaphoid model. A specialized testing jig simultaneously measured compression force, insertion torque, and insertion depth at half-screw-turn intervals until failure occurred. The peak compression occurs at an insertion depth of -3.1 mm, -2.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.5 mm for the Acutrak Mini, Acutrak Standard, Herbert-Whipple, and Synthes screws respectively (insertion depth is positive when the screw is proud above the bone and negative when buried). The compression and insertion torque at a depth of -2 mm were found to be 113 ± 18 N and 0.348 ± 0.052 Nm for the Acutrak Standard, 104 ± 15 N and 0.175 ± 0.008 Nm for the Acutrak Mini, 78 ± 9 N and 0.245 ± 0.006 Nm for the Herbert-Whipple, and 67 ± 2N, 0.233 ± 0.010 Nm for the Synthes headless compression screws. All 4 screws generated a sizable amount of compression (> 60 N) over a wide range of insertion depths. The compression at the commonly recommended insertion depth of -2 mm was not significantly different between screws; thus, implant selection should not be based on compression profile alone. Conically shaped screws (Acutrak) generated their peak compression when they were fully buried in the foam whereas the shanked screws (Synthes and Herbert-Whipple) reached peak compression before they were fully inserted. Because insertion torque correlated poorly with compression, surgeons should avoid using tactile judgment of torque as a proxy for compression. Knowledge of the insertion profile may improve our understanding of the implants, provide a better basis for comparing screws, and enable the surgeon to optimize compression. Copyright

  5. Biomechanical analysis of titanium fixation plates and screws in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: It was concluded that the use of double 4-hole straight plates provided the sufficient stability on the osteotomy site when compared with the other rigid fixation methods used in this study. Key words: Bone plates, bone screws, finite element analysis, jaw fixation techniques, mandible, mandibular osteotomy ...

  6. Pull out Strength of Dual Outer Diameter Pedicle Screws Compared to Uncemented and Cemented Standard Pedicle Screws: A Biomechanical in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Andrea; Leichtle, Carmen I; Frantz, Sandra; Bumann, Marte; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Shiozawa, Thomas; Leichtle, Ulf G

    2017-05-01

    To analyze the potential of the dual outer diameter screw and systematically evaluate the pull-out force of the dual outer diameter screw compared to the uncemented and cemented standard pedicle screws with special regard to the pedicle diameter and the vertebra level. Sixty vertebrae of five human spines (T 6 -L 5 ) were sorted into three study groups for pairwise comparison of the uncemented dual outer diameter screw, the uncemented standard screw, and the cemented standard screw, and randomized with respect to bone mineral density (BMD) and vertebra level. The vertebrae were instrumented, insertion torque was determined, and pull-out testing was performed using a material testing machine. Failure load was evaluated in pairwise comparison within each study group. The screw-to-pedicle diameter ratio was determined and the uncemented dual outer diameter and standard screws were compared for different ratios as well as vertebra levels. Significantly increased pull-out forces were measured for the cemented standard screw compared to the uncemented standard screw (+689 N, P dual outer diameter screw (+403 N, P dual outer diameter screw to the uncemented standard screw in the total study group, a distinct but not significant increase was measured (+149 N, P = 0.114). Further analysis of these two screws, however, revealed a significant increase of pull-out force for the dual outer diameter screw in the lumbar region (+247 N, P = 0.040), as well as for a screw-to-pedicle diameter ratio between 0.6 and 1 (+ 488 N, P = 0.028). For clinical application, cement augmentation remains the gold standard for increasing screw stability. According to our results, the use of a dual outer diameter screw is an interesting option to increase screw stability in the lumbar region without cement augmentation. For the thoracic region, however, the screw-to-pedicle diameter should be checked and attention should be paid to screw cut out, if the dual outer diameter screw is considered.

  7. Entry zone of iliac screw fixation to maintain proper entry width and screw length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-An; Kwak, Dai-Soon; You, Sung-Lim

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the entry zone of iliac screw fixation to maintain proper entry width and screw length. Computed tomography images of pelvic bones from 90 human cadavers were reconstructed into 3-dimensional models. In each model, a sectional image crossing the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS) and anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) and consecutive sectional images up to 20 mm superiorly and inferiorly from the PSIS with 1-mm intervals aiming the AIIS were obtained. One virtual iliac screw with 10-mm diameter was introduced onto the PSIS at the middle and at the lateral and medial 1/4 points on the prominence of the posterior iliac spine. The entry width of the bony prominence and the corresponding maximal screw length available were evaluated for each entry point. The entry width was smallest on the inferior 20 mm (4.7 ± 3.0 mm) and gradually increased up to the superior 10 mm (19.1 ± 3.9 mm) sectional images. The maximal screw length was smallest on the superior 20 mm (76.7 ± 39.7 mm) and gradually increased down to the inferior 10 mm (112.3 ± 15.1 mm) sectional images. The maximal screw lengths were significantly greatest at the most medial point and smallest at the most lateral point on the superior 20- and 10-mm sectional images and at the PSIS. The iliac screw fixation entry zone to maintain proper screw length and entry width is outlined from 20 mm superiorly to 10 mm inferiorly from the PSIS and is located more medially from the prominence of the posterior iliac spine.

  8. A biomechanical study of two different pedicle screw methods for fixation in osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Kosaku; Kim, Jin Hwan; Horton, William C; Hutton, William C

    2012-01-01

    In reconstruction of the osteoporotic spine, patients often show poor outcome because of pedicle screw failure. This study used osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic vertebrae to determine the difference in fixation strength between pedicle screws inserted straight forward and pedicle screws inserted in an upward trajectory toward the superior end plate (i.e., end-plate screws). There is some evidence to suggest that end-plate screws have a strength advantage. The particular focus was on osteoporotic vertebrae. Thirty-three vertebrae (T10-L2) were harvested. The bone mineral density (BMD) was measured: 15 vertebrae were greater than 0.8 g/cm(2) and designated as nonosteoporotic (average BMD 1.146 ± 0.186 g/cm(2)) and 18 vertebrae were designated as osteoporotic (average BMD 0.643 ± 0.088 g/cm(2)). On one pedicle the screw was inserted straight forward and on the other pedicle the screw was inserted as an end-plate screw. The torque of insertion was measured (Proto 6106 torque screwdriver). Using an MTS Mini Bionix, two types of mechanical testing were carried out on each pedicle: (a) cephalocaudad toggling was first carried out to simulate some physiological type loading: 500 cycles at 0.3 Hz, at ±50 N; and (b) then each pedicle screw was pulled out at a displacement rate of 12.5 cm/min.There was no difference in pullout force between the pedicle screws inserted straight forward and the pedicle screws inserted as end-plate screws. This result applies whether the vertebrae were osteoporotic or nonosteoporotic. For both the straight-forward screws and the end-plate screws, a statistically significant correlation was observed between torque of insertion and pullout force. The results of this experiment indicate that pedicle screws inserted as end-plate screws do not provide a strength advantage over pedicle screws inserted straight forward, whether the vertebrae are osteoporotic or not.

  9. DLC screw preload. Loosening prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mattias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The screw loosening is a reason to prosthetic rehabilitation failure. However, the DLC (Diamond-like carbon screw treatment lead thefriction decrease and sliding between the components, which increases the screw preload benefit and decreases the chance of looseningoccurrence. This case shows a clinical indication of the association of the correct preload applied and the DLC screw, which can be considered an optimized protocol to solve screw loosening recidivate of unitary prosthesis in anterior maxillary site.

  10. Horizontal alveolar ridge augmentation using autologous press fit bone cylinders and micro-lag-screw fixation: technical note and initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streckbein, Philipp; Kähling, Christopher; Wilbrand, Jan-Falco; Malik, Christoph-Yves; Schaaf, Heidrun; Howaldt, Hans-Peter; Streckbein, Roland

    2014-07-01

    The use of autologous block bone grafts for horizontal alveolar ridge augmentation in dental implantology is a common surgical procedure. Typically, bone grafts are individually moulded. The aim of this paper is to introduce an innovative procedure in lateral bone augmentation, where the recipient side is adjusted to the graft, not vice versa as in common procedures. Our initial clinical experience of twenty-five consecutive cases is presented. Adjusted trephine drills were used to harvest partly cylindrical grafts from the retromolar region of the mandible. After preparing the recipient site with accurately fitting grinding drills, the bone grafts were transplanted. The horizontally compromised alveolar ridges were successfully augmented and treated with dental implants. No major complication occurred during transplantation, the healing period, and subsequent implant therapy in our experimental setting with 25 patients and 38 augmentation procedures. One out of twenty-five patients presented with temporary dysaesthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve. The new method presented is an effective treatment option for horizontal alveolar ridge augmentation prior to single implant installation. Further studies should evaluate the donor site morbidity and long-term outcome on a larger population. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Safe zone for placement of talar screws when fusing the ankle with an anterior plating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Andrew; Dedini, Russell; Dini, Monara

    2015-06-01

    Ankle fusions fixed with anterior plates use fluoroscopic guidance to direct screws toward the subtalar joint. Special imaging views that visualize the subtalar joint are difficult to use and can be unreliable. This study evaluated whether a single lateral ankle view would provide adequate information to judge whether a screw penetrated the subtalar joint and identified strategies that would improve this technique. In 5 cadaveric ankles fixed with anterior plates, talar screws were placed up to the subtalar joint without penetration using lateral fluoroscopy to guide screw length. After dissection, the true distance from the screw tip to subchondral surface was measured. In addition, 4 readers measured the perceived distance from screw tip to subchondral surface using direct lateral, 10 degrees cephalad tilt lateral, and 10 degrees caudal tilt lateral fluoroscopic images on 2 separate occasions. Nineteen (63%) of 30 screws penetrated the subchondral bone, and screw length determined using fluoroscopy was significantly longer than screw length measured directly (29.4 ± 5.5 mm vs 27.3 ± 8.5 mm, P = .014). Measurement of screw tip to bone distance demonstrated a high level of within-reader (kappa = .871, P plates may minimize screw penetration into the subtalar joint and diminish development of subtalar arthropathy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Pedicle screw design and cement augmentation in osteoporotic vertebrae: effects of fenestrations and cement viscosity on fixation and extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choma, Theodore J; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Swope, Ryan W; Hirner, Jesse P

    2012-12-15

    Experimental, human cadaveric study. To assess the fixation effects of injecting cement augmentation before screw insertion or after insertion of fenestrated screws; the effect of modulating cement viscosity; and the effects of these techniques on screw removal. It seems clear that cement augmentation can enhance pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic bone. What remains to be demonstrated is the aspects of optimal technique such that fixation is enhanced with the greatest safety profile. Part I: Human osteoporotic vertebrae were instrumented with solid (nonaugmented) screws, solid screws with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), partially cannulated fenestrated (Pfen) screws, or fully cannulated fenestrated (Ffen) screws through which PMMA was injected. Screw fixation was tested in pullout. Part II: Ffen screws were augmented with standard low-viscosity PMMA versus high-viscosity PMMA. Part III: Sample cohorts were extracted from vertebrae to assess required torque and characterize difficulty of extraction. Part I: Pfen screws demonstrated the greatest fixation with mean failure force of 690 ± 182 N. All methods of cement augmentation demonstrated significant increases in screw fixation. Part II: Ffen screws did not demonstrate a significant difference in pullout strength when high-viscosity PMMA was used as compared with low-viscosity PMMA. Part III: Mean extraction torque values for solid augmented screws, Ffen screws, and Pfen screws were 1.167, 1.764, and 1.794 Nm, respectively, but these differences did not reach significance. None of the osteoporotic vertebrae sustained catastrophic failure during augmented screw extraction. Polymethylmethacrylate cement augmentation clearly enhances pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic vertebrae when tested in pure pullout. The technique used for cement injection and choice of specialty screws can have a significant impact on the magnitude of this effect. Fenestrated screws have the capacity to confine cement placement in the

  13. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  14. Biomechanical comparison of two locking plate constructs under cyclic torsional loading in a fracture gap model. Two screws versus three screws per fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilmont, A; Palierne, S; Verset, M; Swider, P; Autefage, A

    2015-01-01

    The number of locking screws required per fragment during bridging osteosynthesis in the dog has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to assess the survival of two constructs, with either two or three screws per fragment, under cyclic torsion. Ten-hole 3.5 mm stainless steel locking compression plates (LCP) were fixed 1 mm away from bone surrogates with a fracture gap of 47 mm using two bicortical locking screws (10 constructs) or three bicortical locking screws (10 constructs) per fragment, placed at the extremities of each LCP. Constructs were tested in cyclic torsion (range: 0 to +0.218 rad) until failure. The 3-screws constructs (29.65 ± 1.89 N.m/rad) were stiffer than the 2-screws constructs (23.73 ± 0.87 N.m/rad), and therefore, were subjected to a greater torque during cycling (6.05 ± 1.33 N.m and 4.88 ± 1.14 N.m respectively). The 3-screws constructs sustained a significantly greater number of cycles (20,700 ± 5,735 cycles) than the 2-screws constructs (15,600 ± 5,272 cycles). In most constructs, failure was due to screw damage at the junction of the shaft and head. The remaining constructs failed because of screw head unlocking, sometimes due to incomplete seating of the screw head prior to testing. Omitting the third innermost locking screw during bridging osteosynthesis led to a reduction in fatigue life of 25% and construct stiffness by 20%. Fracture of the screws is believed to occur sequentially, starting with the innermost screw that initially shields the other screws.

  15. Treatment Outcomes for Isolated Maxillary Complex Fractures with Maxillomandibular Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorka, Rahul; Gohil, Amish Jayantilal; Gupta, Ashish Kumar; Koshy, Santosh

    2017-12-01

    Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) is a basic and fundamental principle in the management of patients with fractures of the maxillomandibular complex. There are several shortcomings related to the conventionally recommended tooth-mounted devices that are used to achieve IMF. To circumvent these, the use of bone-borne screws has been advocated. We present a series of maxillary fractures treated with IMF screws. Over a 12-month period, 15 cases of maxillary fracture were managed with open reduction and bone plate fixation. IMF screws were used to achieve IMF intraoperatively and for a short duration postoperatively. Eight cortical titanium screws were inserted transmucosally, two for each quadrant at the junction of the attached and mobile mucosa. Satisfactory occlusion was achieved in all the patients with few complications. IMF screw fixation was observed to be a safe and quick method for open reduction of maxillary fractures. Tooth-borne devices are associated with problems such as poor oral hygiene and periodontal health, extrusion of teeth, loss of tooth vitality, traumatic ulcers of buccal and labial mucosa, and needle stick injury to the operator. These procedures are also time consuming. The use of cortical bone screws is a quicker and safe alternative for achieving satisfactory IMF.

  16. Superior cortical screw in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae: A biomechanics and microstructure-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianming; Zhang, Xuyang; Liu, Junhui; Li, Shengyun; Shan, Zhi; Fan, Shunwu; Zhao, Fengdong

    2018-01-31

    Osteoporosis reduces the bone-screw purchase, potentially reducing pullout strength and other biomechanical properties. However, the existing pedicle screw approach may not compensate for the detrimental effects of decreased vertebral bone mineral density. Two methods of screw insertion were performed in thirteen cadaveric osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae: Magerl's method in the left pedicle, and superior cortical screw method in the right (its entry point located vertically 3 mm above Magerl's point). Before screw fixations, the pedicle and its corresponding vertebral body were divided into six equal layers from cranial to caudal by performing micro-CT and tested for microstructure properties, such as bone mineral density, trabecular bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, trabecular separation and trabecular number. Further, pedicle was horizontally divided into three regions and tested. After screw fixations, microstructure properties of the bone surrounding the screws were analyzed. Finally, the screw pullout strength was tested biomechanically. The bone structure is denser in the upper third of the pedicle and its corresponding vertebral body. A similar microstructure is seen within the pedicle. This study reveals that the pullout strength is significantly correlated to the bone mineral density, trabecular bone volume fraction and trabecular thickness. Biomechanical test showed pullout strength in the superior cortical screw group with mean 613.3 N (SD 200.4) was 22.4% higher than that in the Magerl group with mean 501.2 N (SD 256.6). The superior cortical screw method can be a reliable alternative, to provide better pullout strength for posterior lumbar instrumentation, especially in osteoporotic patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biomechanical comparison of pure magnesium interference screw and polylactic acid polymer interference screw in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction—A cadaveric experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Song

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: As there are no commercially available Mg-based interference screws for ACL reconstruction clinically and the in vivo degradation of pure Mg promotes bone formation, our cadaveric study supports its clinical tests for ACL reconstruction.

  18. Latarjet Fixation: A Cadaveric Biomechanical Study Evaluating Cortical and Cannulated Screw Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, Hasham M; Monroe, Emily J; Muriuki, Muturi; Verma, Rajat N; Marra, Guido; Saltzman, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Attritional bone loss in patients with recurrent anterior instability has successfully been treated with a bone block procedure such as the Latarjet. It has not been previously demonstrated whether cortical or cancellous screws are superior when used for this procedure. To assess the strength of stainless steel cortical screws versus stainless steel cannulated cancellous screws in the Latarjet procedure. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen matched-pair shoulder specimens were randomized into 2 separate fixation groups: (1) 3.5-mm stainless steel cortical screws and (2) 4.0-mm stainless steel partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Shoulder specimens were dissected free of all soft tissue and a 25% glenoid defect was created. The coracoid process was osteomized, placed at the site of the glenoid defect, and fixed in place with 2 parallel screws. All 10 specimens failed by screw cutout. Nine of 10 specimens failed by progressive displacement with an increased number of cycles. One specimen in the 4.0-mm screw group failed by catastrophic failure on initiation of the testing protocol. The 3.5-mm screws had a mean of 274 cycles (SD, ±171 cycles; range, 10-443 cycles) to failure. The 4.0-mm screws had a mean of 135 cycles (SD, ±141 cycles; range, 0-284 cycles) to failure. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 types of screws for cycles required to cause failure (P = .144). There was no statistically significant difference in energy or cycles to failure when comparing the stainless steel cortical screws versus partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Latarjet may be performed using cortical or cancellous screws without a clear advantage of either option.

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of a second generation headless compression screw for ankle arthrodesis in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somberg, Andrew Max; Whiteside, William K; Nilssen, Erik; Murawski, Daniel; Liu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Many types of screws, plates, and strut grafts have been utilized for ankle arthrodesis. Biomechanical testing has shown that these constructs can have variable stiffness. More recently, headless compression screws have emerged as an evolving method of achieving compression in various applications but there is limited literature regarding ankle arthrodesis. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical stability provided by a second generation fully threaded headless compression screw compared to a standard headed, partially threaded cancellous screw in a cadaveric ankle arthrodesis model. Twenty fresh frozen human cadaver specimens were subjected to simulated ankle arthrodesis with either three standard cancellous-bone screws (InFix 7.3mm) or with three headless compression screws (Acumed Acutrak 2 7.5mm). The specimens were subjected to cyclic loading and unloading at a rate of 1Hz, compression of 525 Newtons (N) and distraction of 20N for a total of 500 cycles using an electromechanical load frame (Instron). The amount of maximum distraction was recorded as well as the amount of motion that occurred through 1, 10, 50, 100, and 500 cycles. No significant difference (p=0.412) was seen in the amount of distraction that occurred across the fusion site for either screw. The average maximum distraction after 500 cycles was 201.9μm for the Acutrak 2 screw and 235.4μm for the InFix screw. No difference was seen throughout each cycle over time for the Acutrak 2 screw (p-value=0.988) or the InFix screw (p-value=0.991). Both the traditional InFix type screw and the second generation Acumed Acutrak headless compression screws provide adequate fixation during ankle arthrodesis under submaximal loads. There is no demonstrable difference between traditional cannulated partially threaded screws and headless compression screws studied in this model. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bioresorbable screws reinforced with phosphate glass fibre: manufacturing and mechanical property characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfel, R M; Ahmed, I; Parsons, A J; Rudd, C D

    2013-01-01

    Use of bioresorbable screws could eliminate disadvantages associated with metals such as removal operations, corrosion, MRI interference and stress shielding. Mechanical properties of bioresorbable polymers alone are insufficient for load bearing applications application as screws. Thus, reinforcement is necessary to try and match or surpass the mechanical properties of cortical bone. Phosphate based glass fibres were used to reinforce polylactic acid (PLA) in order to produce unidirectionally aligned (UD) and unidirectionally plus randomly distributed (UD/RM) composite screws (P40 UD and P40 UD/RM). The maximum flexural and push-out properties for the composite screws (P40 UD and P40 UD/RM) increased by almost 100% in comparison with the PLA screws. While the pull-out strength and stiffness of the headless composite screws were ∼80% (strength) and ∼130% (stiffness) higher than for PLA, those with heads exhibited properties lower than those for PLA alone as a result of failure at the heads. An increase in the maximum shear load and stiffness for the composite screws (∼30% and ∼40%) in comparison to the PLA screws was also seen. Maximum torque for the PLA screws was ∼1000 mN m, while that for the composite screws were slightly lower. The SEM micrographs for P40 UD and P40 UD/RM screws revealed small gaps around the fibres, which were suggested to be due to buckling of the UD fibres during the manufacturing process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Four quadrant parallel peripheral screw fixation for displaced femoral neck fractures in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhava RJ Satish

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Closed reduction and cannulated cancellous screw fixation gives satisfactory functional results in large group of elderly patients. The four quadrant parallel peripheral (FQPP screw fixation technique gives good stability, allows controlled collapse, avoids fixation failure and achieves predictable bone healing in displaced femoral neck fracture in patients ≥50 years of age.

  2. Distal biceps brachii tendon repairs: a single-incision technique using a cortical button with interference screw versus a double-incision technique using suture fixation through bone tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Edward; Olsen, Joshua R; Williams, Richard B; Rouse, Lucien; Maloney, Michael; Voloshin, Ilya

    2015-05-01

    Distal biceps brachii tendon repairs performed with a tension slide technique using a cortical button (CB) and interference screw are stronger than those based on suture fixation through bone tunnels (BTs) in biomechanical studies. However, clinical comparison of these 2 techniques is lacking in the literature. To perform a clinical comparison of the single-incision CB and double-incision BT techniques. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Distal biceps tendon ruptures repaired through either the single-incision CB or double-incision BT technique were retrospectively identified at a single institution. Patients>1 year out from surgery were assessed for range of motion, strength, and complications, and they completed a DASH questionnaire (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand). Patients in the CB group (n=20) were older (52±9.5 vs 43.7±8.7 years; P=.008), had a shorter interval from surgery to evaluation (17.7±5 vs 30.8±16.5 months; P=.001), and were less likely to smoke (0% vs 28.5%; P=.02) compared with the BT patients (n=21). DASH scores were similar between groups (4.46±4.4 [CB] vs 5.7±7.5 [BT]; P=.65). Multivariate analysis revealed no differences in range of motion or strength between groups. More CB patients (30%; n=6) experienced a complication compared with those in the BT group (4.8%; n=1) (P=.04), and these complications were predominantly paresthesias of the superficial radial nerve that did not resolve. There were no reoperations or repair failures in either group. Both the single-incision CB and double-incision BT techniques provided excellent clinical results. Complications were more common in the single-incision CB group and most commonly involved paresthesias of the superficial radial nerve. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. SU-E-T-609: Perturbation Effects of Pedicle Screws On Radiotherapy Dose Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Deroma, R; Borzov, E; Nevelsky, A [Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy in conjunction with surgical implant fixation is a common combined treatment in case of bone metastases. However, metal implants generally used in orthopedic implants perturb radiation dose distributions. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced (CFR) PEEK material has been recently introduced for production of intramedullary screws and plates. Gold powder can be added to the CFR-PEEK material in order to enhance visibility of the screws during intraoperative imaging procedures. In this work, we investigated the perturbation effects of the pedicle screws made of CFR-PEEK, CFR-PEEK with added gold powder (CFR-PEEK-AU) and Titanium (Ti) on radiotherapy dose distributions. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using the EGSnrc code package for 6MV beams with 10×10 fields at SSD=100cm. By means of MC simulations, dose distributions around titanium, CFR- PEEK and CFR-PEEK-AU screws (manufactured by Carbo-Fix Orthopedics LTD, Israel) placed in a water phantom were calculated. The screw axis was either parallel or perpendicular to the beam axis. Dose perturbation (relative to dose in homogeneous water phantom) was assessed. Results: Maximum overdose due to backscatter was 10% for the Ti screws, 5% for the CFR-PEEK-AU screws and effectively zero for the CFR-PEEK screws. Maximum underdose due to attenuation was 25% for the Ti screws, 15% for the CFR-PEEK-AU screws and 5% for the CFR-PEEK screws. Conclusion: Titanium screws introduce the largest distortion on the radiation dose distribution. The gold powder added to the CFR-PEEK material improves visibility at the cost of increased dose perturbation. CFR-PEEK screws caused minimal alteration on the dose distribution. This can decrease possible over and underdose of adjacent tissue and thus favorably influence treatment efficiency. The use of such implants has potential clinical advantage in the treatment of neoplastic bone disease.

  4. The biomechanical effect of pedicle screw hubbing on pullout resistance in the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Haines; Dmitriev, Anton E; Lehman, Ronald A; Gaume, Rachel E; Ambati, Divya V; Kang, Daniel G; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2012-05-01

    The biomechanical fixation strength afforded by pedicle screws has been strongly correlated with bone mineral density. It has been postulated that "hubbing" the head of the pedicle screw against the dorsal laminar cortex provides a load-sharing effect, thereby limiting cephalocaudad toggling and improving the pullout resistance of the pedicle screw. To evaluate the pullout strength (POS) of monoaxial hubbed pedicle screws versus standard fixation in the thoracic spine. Biomechanical investigation. Twenty-two human cadaveric thoracic vertebrae were acquired and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanned. Osteoporotic (n = 16) and normal (n = 6) specimens were instrumented with a 5.0 × 35-mm pedicle screw on one side in a standard fashion. In the contralateral pedicle, 5.0 × 30-mm screw was inserted with hubbing of the screw into the dorsal lamina. A difference in screw length was used to achieve equivalent depth of insertion. After 2,000 cycles of cephalocaudad toggling, screws were pulled out with the tensile force oriented to the midline of the spine and peak POS measured in newtons (N). Four additional specimens were subjected to microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis to evaluate internal pedicle architecture after screw insertion. Hubbed screws resulted in significantly lower POS (290.5 ± 142.4 N) compared with standard pedicle screws (511.5 ± 242.8 N; p = .00). This finding was evident in both normal and osteoporotic vertebrae based on independent subgroup post hoc analyses (pscrews with and without fracture; however, further micro-CT analysis revealed the presence of internal fracture propagation for those specimens that did not have any external signs of failure. Hubbing pedicle screws results in significantly decreased POS compared with conventional pedicle screws. Hubbing predisposes toward iatrogenic fracture of the dorsal lamina, transverse process, or SAF during insertion. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Biomechanical Evaluation of Strength and Stiffness of Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis Screw Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastifer, James R; Alrafeek, Saif; Howard, Peter; Gustafson, Peter A; Coughlin, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Subtalar arthrodesis is a common treatment for end-stage subtalar joint arthritis as well as many other clinical problems. The best method of subtalar arthrodesis fixation is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the strength of subtalar arthrodesis fixation methods including a single posterior screw (SP), 2 posterior minimally divergent screws (MD) and a 2 screw highly divergent screw (HD) construct for subtalar arthrodesis. A biomechanical study was performed including the three different screw configurations (SP, MD, HD). These surrogate bone specimens were subjected to applied inversion and eversion torques about the subtalar joint axis on a servo-hydraulic load frame. Torsional stiffness of the construct and the maximum torque for each configuration were measured. Additionally, a cadaver study was performed using 5 fresh-frozen cadaver specimens. The perpendicular distance from the divergent screw guide-wire placement was measured from anatomic structures. The HD screw configuration was found to have the highest torsional stiffness in both inversion and eversion, followed by the MD construct and then the SP construct. Similarly, the HD construct had the highest maximum torque versus the MD and SP constructs. All between-group differences were statistically significant (P screw included the sural nerve (13 mm), peroneus brevis tendon (18 mm), tibialis anterior tendon (8 mm), and tibialis posterior tendon (21 mm). This biomechanical and cadaver study supports the use of 2 screws for fixation of subtalar arthrodesis over a single posterior screw. Additionally, we describe a biomechanically superior and potentially safe, alternative 2-screw divergent construct. This study gives biomechanical support for 2 screw, divergent fixation of subtalar arthrodesis or a single over a single screw or two screw minimally divergent construct. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Comparison of migration behavior between single and dual lag screw implants for intertrochanteric fracture fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katonis Pavlos G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lag screw cut-out failure following fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in osteoporotic bone remains an unsolved challenge. This study tested if resistance to cut-out failure can be improved by using a dual lag screw implant in place of a single lag screw implant. Migration behavior and cut-out resistance of a single and a dual lag screw implant were comparatively evaluated in surrogate specimens using an established laboratory model of hip screw cut-out failure. Methods Five dual lag screw implants (Endovis, Citieffe and five single lag screw implants (DHS, Synthes were tested in the Hip Implant Performance Simulator (HIPS of the Legacy Biomechanics Laboratory. This model simulated osteoporotic bone, an unstable fracture, and biaxial rocking motion representative of hip loading during normal gait. All constructs were loaded up to 20,000 cycles of 1.45 kN peak magnitude under biaxial rocking motion. The migration kinematics was continuously monitored with 6-degrees of freedom motion tracking system and the number of cycles to implant cut-out was recorded. Results The dual lag screw implant exhibited significantly less migration and sustained more loading cycles in comparison to the DHS single lag screw. All DHS constructs failed before 20,000 cycles, on average at 6,638 ± 2,837 cycles either by cut-out or permanent screw bending. At failure, DHS constructs exhibited 10.8 ± 2.3° varus collapse and 15.5 ± 9.5° rotation around the lag screw axis. Four out of five dual screws constructs sustained 20,000 loading cycles. One dual screw specimens sustained cut-out by medial migration of the distal screw after 10,054 cycles. At test end, varus collapse and neck rotation in dual screws implants advanced to 3.7 ± 1.7° and 1.6 ± 1.0°, respectively. Conclusion The single and double lag screw implants demonstrated a significantly different migration resistance in surrogate specimens under gait loading simulation with

  7. Evaluation of cyanoacrylate augmentation of transpedicular screw pullout strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milcan, Abtullah; Ayan, Irfan; Zeren, Adalet; Sinmazcelik, Tamer; Yilmaz, Ali; Zeren, Muzaffer; Kuyurtar, Fehmi

    2005-12-01

    Pedicle screw fixation of osteoporotic bone in the elderly is a challenge. Various augmentation methods have been studied by many authors. Although polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation is believed to be a standard method, its usage is fraught with complications. Butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is an alternative to PMMA as it is bioresorbable, biocompatible, inexpensive, and noninfective. The objective of the current study was to determine the pullout strength of the pedicle screws when butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is used for augmentation. Fresh calf lumbar vertebrae were obtained from male calves weighing 100-120 kg and implanted with pedicle screws. The screws were placed in native, unaugmented bone (group 1), butyl-2-cyanoacrylate-augmented bone (group 2), and PMMA-augmented bone (group 3). Axial pullout tests were done by an Instron 4411 universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 9.0 for Windows program. Paired samples t test was used, and P vertebrae was 1.6 +/- 0.1 g/cm2. The mean pullout strengths were 1.55 +/- 0.23 kN for group 1, 1.62 +/- 0.42 kN for group 2, and 2.55 +/- 0.22 kN for group 3. There was no statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2. PMMA augmentation increased the pullout strength significantly when compared with butyl-2-cyanoacrylate augmentation and native bone (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, respectively). The results of this study show that butyl-2-cyanoacrylate has no contribution to the augmentation of pedicle screw fixation in a calf model when compared with native bone or PMMA augmentation. Further studies are required to evaluate the effectiveness of butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in osteoporotic specimens and under cyclic loading in calf vertebra and animal and cadaver models before dispensing with its utility as an augmentation method in the clinical setting.

  8. Ball tip method for thoracic pedicle screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kota; Matsumoto, Morio; Iizuka, Shingo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ball tip method for thoracic pedicle screw placements in idiopathic scoliosis patients. 24 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were included in this study. Conventional method was performed in 12 patients. Ball tip method was performed in 12 patients. Accuracy of the pedicle screw placement was evaluated based on the postoperative CT. In the ball tip method, a probe which was consisted of ball tip with flexible shaft was used. After removing of cortical bone at a starting point, the probe was inserted manually or sometimes with gently tapping by hammer. During the maneuver, the probe will gradually progress into cancellous bone in the pedicle, without perforating cortical bone in the pedicle. Following expansion of the hole by a rigid gear shift probe, screw was placed in the pedicle. 65.1% of screws were located within pedicle in the conventional group and 86.5% in the ball tip group. 5.3% of screws were located out of pedicle within 2 mm in the conventional group and 8.2% in the ball tip group. 15.8% of screws were located out of pedicle beyond 2 mm and 1.8% in the ball tip group. The ball tip method enhanced the accuracy of thoracic pedicle screw placements in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients. The ball tip method may be effective for accurate pedicle screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. (author)

  9. Screw depth sounding in proximal humerus fractures to avoid iatrogenic intra-articular penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengard, Matthew J; Gardner, Michael J

    2011-10-01

    Unstable and displaced proximal humerus fractures remain a treatment challenge. The use of locked plates has improved construct stability, but complication rates remain high. Biomechanical studies have emphasized the importance of anchoring screws in the subchondral bone of the humeral head to improve implant stability. However, the spherical shape of the proximal humerus and the limited tactile sensation of its soft cancellous bone make determining accurate screw length difficult, and reported rates of intraoperative screw penetration are high. Iatrogenic screw penetration, even if recognized and corrected before leaving the operating room, may lead to late failure. We present a simple technique of quickly and safely determining screw length using a blunt-tipped Kirschner wire and instruments found in basic orthopaedic sets.

  10. SPECT-CT Assessment of Pseudarthrosis after Spinal Fusion: Diagnostic Pitfall due to a Broken Screw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rager, Olivier; Amzalag, Gaël; Varoquaux, Arthur; Schaller, Karl; Ratib, Osman; Tessitore, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old drug addicted female was referred for a L5-S1 posterolateral in situ fixation with autologous graft because of an L5/S1 severe discopathy with listhesis. After six months, low back pain recurred. A Tc-99m HDP SPECT-CT diagnosed a pseudarthrosis with intense uptake of the L5-S1 endplates and a fracture of the right S1 screw just outside the metal-bone interface without any uptake or bone resorption around the screw. The absence of uptake around a broken screw is a pitfall that the physician should be aware of. PMID:24159394

  11. SPECT-CT Assessment of Pseudarthrosis after Spinal Fusion: Diagnostic Pitfall due to a Broken Screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Rager

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year-old drug addicted female was referred for a L5-S1 posterolateral in situ fixation with autologous graft because of an L5/S1 severe discopathy with listhesis. After six months, low back pain recurred. A Tc-99m HDP SPECT-CT diagnosed a pseudarthrosis with intense uptake of the L5-S1 endplates and a fracture of the right S1 screw just outside the metal-bone interface without any uptake or bone resorption around the screw. The absence of uptake around a broken screw is a pitfall that the physician should be aware of.

  12. Influence of the screw augmentation technique and a diameter increase on pedicle screw fixation in the osteoporotic spine: pullout versus fatigue testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueny, Rebecca A; Kolb, Jan P; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Püschel, Klaus; Morlock, Michael M; Huber, Gerd

    2014-10-01

    For posterior spinal stabilization, loosening of pedicle screws at the bone-screw interface is a clinical complication, especially in the osteoporotic population. Axial pullout testing is the standard pre-clinical testing method for new screw designs although it has questioned clinical relevance. The aim of this study was to determine the fixation strength of three current osteoporotic fixation techniques and to investigate whether or not pullout testing results can directly relate to those of the more physiologic fatigue testing. Thirty-nine osteoporotic, human lumbar vertebrae were instrumented with pedicle screws according to four treatment groups: (1) screw only (control), (2) prefilled augmentation, (3) screw injected augmentation, and (4) unaugmented screws with an increased diameter. Toggle testing was first performed on one pedicle, using a cranial-caudal sinusoidal, cyclic (1.0 Hz) fatigue loading applied at the screw head. The initial compressive forces ranged from 25 to 75 N. Peak force increased stepwise by 25 N every 250 cycles until a 5.4-mm screw head displacement. The contralateral screw then underwent pure axial pullout (5 mm/min). When compared to the control group, screw injected augmentation increased fatigue force (27 %, p = 0.045) while prefilled augmentation reduced fatigue force (-7 %, p = 0.73). Both augmentation techniques increased pullout force compared to the control (ps osteoporotic spine, screw injected augmentation showed the best biomechanical stability. Although pullout testing was more sensitive, the differences observed were not reflected in the more physiological fatigue testing, thus casting further doubt on the clinical relevance of pullout testing.

  13. Influence of sizes of abutments and fixation screws on dental implant system: a non-linear finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhihong; Yi, Dake; Cao, Guo

    2017-08-28

    The purpose of this study is to discuss the influence of sizes of abutments and fixation screws on immediately loaded dental implants in mandibular bones using nonlinear finite element methods. Abutments with three unilateral wall thicknesses and fixation screws with three diameters are analyzed to compare the stresses and deformations under a vertical or oblique force of 130 N. The nonlinearity due to friction contacts between the fixation screw, the abutment, the implant, and the bone is taken into account. The results showed that improper sizes of abutments and fixation screws would increase the stress and deformation of the dental implant system. If possible, the diameter of fixation screw should not be smaller than Φ1.0 mm, the diameter between Φ1.0 mm and Φ1.2 mm is acceptable. The fixation screw diameter preferably exceeds Φ1.4 mm. The unilateral wall thickness >0.5 mm is optimal selection for abutments.

  14. ROTARY SCREW SYSTEMS IN CEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Taratuta V. D.; Belokur K. A.; Serga G. V.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results of research of rotary-screw systems in relation to the creation of rotary kilns for the annealing of-cuttings in the preparation of cement clinker. Using the proposed design, in comparison with known designs of similar purpose, it significantly improves performance, reduces size and power consumption through the use of rotary screw systems in the form of screw rotors and drums made hollow with sidewalls assembled from separate strips or plates of different geometr...

  15. Influência do macheamento na interface do parafuso e do tecido ósseo na fase imediata pós-implante Influencia del taladramiento en la interfase del tornillo y del tejido óseo durante la fase inmediata post implante The influence of tapping techniques on the interface bone screw/bone tissue in immediate postoperative period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Pinheiro de Lemos Masson

    2009-06-01

    el orificio proximal derecho fue realizado el taladramiento antes de la inserción del tornillo cortical de 3.5 mm (Grupo A, en el orificio proximal izquierdo el tornillo fue insertado sin taladramiento (Grupo B y los otros dos orificios distales fueron utilizados como controles (Grupo C. Las alteraciones de la interfase entre el hueso y el implante fueron analizadas por medio de un estudio histomorfométrico, teniendo en cuenta el número de trabéculas fracturadas entre los filetes de rosca; la mayor distancia de la fractura trabecular transversal provocada por la inserción del tornillo; la mayor extensión de la fractura trabecular longitudinal provocada por la inserción del tornillo y la línea de contacto en la interfase hueso-tornillo. RESULTADOS: taladrar el orificio piloto ha provocado alteraciones de la microestructura del tejido óseo alrededor del implante cuando comparado con las alteraciones producidas por la inserción del tornillo sin el taladramiento o el orificio piloto. La evaluación del contacto entre el hueso y el implante fue el parámetro que presentó diferencia estadística en la comparación entre la colocación del implante con o sin taladramiento. CONCLUSIÓN: al comparar con el orificio control, todos los parámetros presentaron diferencia estadística.OBJECTIVE: to analyze experimentally the early alterations of the bone-screw interface with tapping techniques in the cancellous bone of the cervical vertebrae. METHODS: five wooless sheep (Santa Inês were analyzed. Pilot holes of 2.5 mm were performed at both sides of the third cervical vertebrae in the proximal and distal portion. The tapping process was done in the right proximal hole before the 3.5 mm screw insertion (Group A, while the left proximal hole was not tapped (Group B and the two distal holes were used as control (Group C. The interface alterations between bone and screw were analyzed through histomorphometric study, considering the number of trabeculae fractures between

  16. The biomechanical consequences of rod reduction on pedicle screws: should it be avoided?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Haines; Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A; Gaume, Rachel E; Ambati, Divya V; Dmitriev, Anton E

    2013-11-01

    Rod contouring is frequently required to allow for appropriate alignment of pedicle screw-rod constructs. When residual mismatch is still present, a rod persuasion device is often used to achieve further rod reduction. Despite its popularity and widespread use, the biomechanical consequences of this technique have not been evaluated. To evaluate the biomechanical fixation strength of pedicle screws after attempted reduction of a rod-pedicle screw mismatch using a rod persuasion device. Fifteen 3-level, human cadaveric thoracic specimens were prepared and scanned for bone mineral density. Osteoporotic (n=6) and normal (n=9) specimens were instrumented with 5.0-mm-diameter pedicle screws; for each pair of comparison level tested, the bilateral screws were equal in length, and the screw length was determined by the thoracic level and size of the vertebra (35 to 45 mm). Titanium 5.5-mm rods were contoured and secured to the pedicle screws at the proximal and distal levels. For the middle segment, the rod on the right side was intentionally contoured to create a 5-mm residual gap between the inner bushing of the pedicle screw and the rod. A rod persuasion device was then used to engage the setscrew. The left side served as a control with perfect screw/rod alignment. After 30 minutes, constructs were disassembled and vertebrae individually potted. The implants were pulled in-line with the screw axis with peak pullout strength (POS) measured in Newton (N). For the proximal and distal segments, pedicle screws on the right side were taken out and reinserted through the same trajectory to simulate screw depth adjustment as an alternative to rod reduction. Pedicle screws reduced to the rod generated a 48% lower mean POS (495±379 N) relative to the controls (954±237 N) (ppedicle screws had failed during the reduction attempt with visible pullout of the screw. After reduction, decreased POS was observed in both normal (posteoporotic (pscrew resulted in no significant

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis of the bioabsorbable Milagro interference screw for graft fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, K-H; Sawallich, T; Schütze, G; Losch, A; Walde, T; Balcarek, P; Konietschke, F; Stürmer, K M

    2009-10-01

    Ligament graft fixation with bioabsorbable interference screws is a standard procedure in cruciate ligament replacement. Previous screw designs may resorb incompletely, and can cause osteolysis and sterile cysts despite being implanted for several years. The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo degradation and biocompatibility of the new Milagro interference screw (Mitek, Norderstedt, Germany). The Milagro interference screw is made of 30% ss-TCP (TriCalcium phosphate) and 70% PLGA (Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid). In the period between June 2005 and February 2006, 38 patients underwent graft fixation with Milagro screws in our hospital. Arthroscopic ACL reconstruction was performed using hamstring tendon grafts in all the patients. MR imaging was performed on 12 randomly selected patients out of the total of 38 at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. During the examination, the volume loss of the screw, tunnel enlargement, presence of osteolysis, fluid lines, edema and postoperative screw replacement by bone tissue were evaluated. There was no edema or signs of inflammation around the bone tunnels. At 3, 6 and 12 months, the tibial screws showed an average volume loss of 0, 8.1% (+/-7.9%) and 82.6% (+/-17.2%, P Milagro screw is closely linked to the graft healing process. The screws were rapidly resorbed after 6 months and, at 12 months, only the screw remnants were detectable. Moreover, the Milagro screw is biocompatible and osteoconductive, promoting bone ingrowth during resorption. Tunnel enlargement is not prevented in the first months but is reduced by bone ingrowth after 12 months.

  18. Biomechanical Comparisons of Pull Out Strengths After Pedicle Screw Augmentation with Hydroxyapatite, Calcium Phosphate, or Polymethylmethacrylate in the Cadaveric Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Seong; Rim, Dae-Cheol; Park, Seoung Woo; Murovic, Judith A; Lim, Jesse; Park, Jon

    2015-06-01

    In vertebrae with low bone mineral densities pull out strength is often poor, thus various substances have been used to fill screw holes before screw placement for corrective spine surgery. We performed biomechanical cadaveric studies to compare nonaugmented pedicle screws versus hydroxyapatite, calcium phosphate, or polymethylmethacrylate augmented pedicle screws for screw tightening torques and pull out strengths in spine procedures requiring bone screw insertion. Seven human cadaveric T10-L1 spines with 28 vertebral bodies were examined by x-ray to exclude bony abnormalities. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans evaluated bone mineral densities. Twenty of 28 vertebrae underwent ipsilateral fluoroscopic placement of 6-mm holes augmented with hydroxyapatite, calcium phosphate, or polymethylmethacrylate, followed by transpedicular screw placements. Controls were pedicle screw placements in the contralateral hemivertebrae without augmentation. All groups were evaluated for axial pull out strength using a biomechanical loading frame. Mean pedicle screw axial pull out strength compared with controls increased by 12.5% in hydroxyapatite augmented hemivertebrae (P = 0.600) and by 14.9% in calcium phosphate augmented hemivertebrae (P = 0.234), but the increase was not significant for either method. Pull out strength of polymethylmethacrylate versus hydroxyapatite augmented pedicle screws was 60.8% higher (P = 0.028). Hydroxyapatite and calcium phosphate augmentation in osteoporotic vertebrae showed a trend toward increased pedicle screw pull out strength versus controls. Pedicle screw pull out force of polymethylmethacrylate in the insertion stage was higher than that of hydroxyapatite. However, hydroxyapatite is likely a better clinical alternative to polymethylmethacrylate, as hydroxyapatite augmentation, unlike polymethylmethacrylate augmentation, stimulates bone growth and can be revised. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. SCREW SELECTION FOR SCREW OPERATION USING EXPERT SYSTEM APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüdayim BAŞAK

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a expert system has been developed using Leonardo expert system package programming for screw operation, According to DIN standard norm. The designed program decide the most suitable screw type considering to material, cutting speed, working condition etc. This program also directs to user.

  20. A comparison of pullout strength for pedicle screws of different designs: a study using tapped and untapped pilot holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Abernathie, Dennis L; Smith, Douglas E

    2006-11-01

    The pullout strengths of various pedicle screw designs are compared using tapped and untapped pilot holes. The objective of this study is to compare the pullout strength of various pedicle screw designs. The designs are compared using tapped and untapped pilot holes. By using several different screw designs, it is possible to gain an understanding of whether there is a correlation between tapping a pilot hole and the ultimate pullout strength. Most bone screws originally developed were intended to be installed in a pretapped pilot hole. This same technology has been carried over to the development of more modern bone screws for use in spinal fixation applications. Many pedicle screws in use today are still intended to be installed in a tapped hole. Preparing the vertebrae and tapping of a pilot hole involve additional trauma to the patient as well as increased operating time. Pedicle screws from various manufacturers are installed in tapped and untapped pilot holes and then loaded to failure. A uniform synthetic material was used to provide a consistent test of each screw design by eliminating variability seen in bone. Tapping pilot holes did not increase the pullout strength of the screws tested in this study. It was observed during testing that tapping some of the holes degraded the material. This degradation led to pullout strengths that were lower than in the untapped case, and generally larger standard deviations. The pullout strength was not increased by tapping for the screws in this study. Screws placed in untapped holes generally had higher pullout strengths and lower standard deviations. The results of this study suggest that tapping does not increase pullout strength in bone with densities near 20 lb/ft3, which correlates with low density cancellous or osteoporotic bone.

  1. Cement embolism into the venous system after pedicle screw fixation: case report, literature review, and prevention tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan Kerry

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The strength of pedicle screws attachment to the vertebrae is an important factor affecting their motion resistance and long term performance. Low bone quality, e.g. in osteopenic patients, keeps the screw bone interface at risk for subsidence and dislocation. In such cases, bone cement could be used to augment pedicle screw fixation. But its use is not free of risk. Therefore, clinicians, especially spine surgeons, radiologists, and internists should become increasingly aware of cement migration and embolism as possible complications. Here, we present an instructive case of cement embolism into the venous system after augmented screw fixation with fortunately asymptomatic clinical course. In addition we discuss pathophysiology and prevention methods as well as therapeutic management of this potentially life-threatening complication in a comprehensive review of the literature. However, only a few case reports of cement embolism into the venous system were published after augmented screw fixation.

  2. Frictional performance of ball screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Katuhiro; Takafuji, Kazuki

    1985-01-01

    As feed screws, ball screws have become to be adopted in place of trapezoidal threads. The structure of ball screws is complex, but those are the indispensable component of NC machine tools and machining centers, and are frequently used for industrial robots. As the problems in the operation of ball screws, there are damage, life and the performance related to friction. As to the damage and life, though there is the problem of the load distribution on balls, the results of the research on rolling bearings are applied. The friction of ball screws consists of the friction of balls and a spiral groove, the friction of a ball and a ball, the friction in a ball-circulating mechanism and the viscous friction of lubricating oil. It was decided to synthetically examine the frictional performance of ball screws, such as driving torque, the variation of driving torque, efficiency, the formation of oil film and so on, under the working condition of wide range, using the screws with different accuracy and the nuts of various circuit number. The experimental setup and the processing of the experimental data, the driving performance of ball screws and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  3. Preoperative CT planning of screw length in arthroscopic Latarjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Alexandre; Gerometta, Antoine; Granger, Benjamin; Massein, Audrey; Casabianca, Laurent; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Loriaut, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    The Latarjet procedure has shown its efficiency for the treatment of anterior shoulder dislocation. The success of this technique depends on the correct positioning and fusion of the bone block. The length of the screws that fix the bone block can be a problem. They can increase the risk of non-union if too short or be the cause of nerve lesion or soft tissue discomfort if too long. Suprascapular nerve injuries have been reported during shoulder stabilisation surgery up to 6 % of the case. Bone block non-union depending on the series is found around 20 % of the cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of this CT preoperative planning to predict optimal screws length. The clinical importance of this study lies in the observation that it is the first study to evaluate the efficiency of CT planning to predict screw length. Inclusion criteria were patients with chronic anterior instability of the shoulder with an ISIS superior to 4. Exclusion criteria were patients with multidirectional instability or any previous surgery on this shoulder. Thirty patients were included prospectively, 11 of them went threw a CT planning, before their arthroscopic Latarjet. Optimal length of both screws was calculated, adding the size of the coracoid at 5 and 15 mm from the tip to the glenoid. Thirty-two-mm screws were used for patients without planning. On a post-operative CT scan with 3D reconstruction, the distance between the screw tip and the posterior cortex was measured. A one-sample Wilcoxon test was used to compare the distance from the tip of the screw to an acceptable positioning of ±2 mm from the posterior cortex. In the group without planning, screw 1 tended to differ from the acceptable positioning: mean 3.44 mm ± 3.13, med 2.9 mm, q1; q3 [0.6; 4.75] p = 0.1118, and screw 2 differed significantly from the acceptable position: mean 4.83 mm ± 4.11, med 3.7 mm, q1; q3 [1.7; 5.45] p = 0.0045. In the group with planning, position of

  4. Surgical management of proximal splint bone fractures in the horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, P.R.; Pascoe, J.R.; Wheat, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Fractures of Metacarpal and Metatarsal II and IV (the splint bones) were treated in 283 horses over an 11 year period. In 21 cases the proximal portion of the fractured bone was stabilized with metallic implants. One or more cortical bone screws were used in 11 horses, and bone plates were applied in 11 horses. One horse received both treatments. Complications of screw fixation included bone failure, implant failure, radiographic lucency around the screws, and proliferative new bone at the ostectomy site. Only two of the horses treated with screw fixation returned to their intended use. Complications of plate fixation included partial fixation failure (backing out of screws), wound drainage, and proliferative bony response around the plate. Six of the 11 horses treated by plate fixation returned to their intended use. The authors recommend consideration of plate fixation techniques for repair of fractures in the proximal third of the splint bone

  5. Enhanced biocompatibility and osseointegration of calcium titanate coating on titanium screws in rabbit femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Li; He, Rong-Zhen; Tu, Bin; Cao, Xu; He, Jin-Shen; Xia, Han-Song; Liang, Chi; Zou, Min; Wu, Song; Wu, Zhen-Jun; Xiong, Kun

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the biocompatibility of calcium titanate (CaTiO 3 ) coating prepared by a simplified technique in an attempt to assess the potential of CaTiO 3 coating as an alternative to current implant coating materials. CaTiO 3 -coated titanium screws were implanted with hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated or uncoated titanium screws into medial and lateral femoral condyles of 48 New Zealand white rabbits. Imaging, histomorphometric and biomechanical analyses were employed to evaluate the osseointegration and biocompatibility 12 weeks after the implantation. Histology and scanning electron microscopy revealed that bone tissues surrounding the screws coated with CaTiO 3 were fully regenerated and they were also well integrated with the screws. An interfacial fibrous membrane layer, which was found in the HA coating group, was not noticeable between the bone tissues and CaTiO 3 -coated screws. X-ray imaging analysis showed in the CaTiO 3 coating group, there was a dense and tight binding between implants and the bone tissues; no radiation translucent zone was found surrounding the implants as well as no detachment of the coating and femoral condyle fracture. In contrast, uncoated screws exhibited a fibrous membrane layer, as evidenced by the detection of a radiation translucent zone between the implants and the bone tissues. Additionally, biomechanical testing revealed that the binding strength of CaTiO 3 coating with bone tissues was significantly higher than that of uncoated titanium screws, and was comparable to that of HA coating. The study demonstrated that CaTiO 3 coating in situ to titanium screws possesses great biocompatibility and osseointegration comparable to HA coating.

  6. Intra-operative computer navigation guided cervical pedicle screw insertion in thirty-three complex cervical spine deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rajasekaran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical pedicle screw fixation is challenging due to the small osseous morphometrics and the close proximity of neurovascular elements. Computer navigation has been reported to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement. There are very few studies assessing its efficacy in the presence of deformity. Also cervical pedicle screw insertion in children has not been described before. We evaluated the safety and accuracy of Iso-C 3D-navigated pedicle screws in the deformed cervical spine. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients including 15 children formed the study group. One hundred and forty-five cervical pedicle screws were inserted using Iso-C 3D-based computer navigation in patients undergoing cervical spine stabilization for craniovertebral junction anomalies, cervico-thoracic deformities and cervical instabilities due to trauma, post-surgery and degenerative disorders. The accuracy and containment of screw placement was assessed from postoperative computerized tomography scans. Results: One hundred and thirty (89.7% screws were well contained inside the pedicles. Nine (6.1% Type A and six (4.2% Type B pedicle breaches were observed. In 136 levels, the screws were inserted in the classical description of pedicle screw application and in nine deformed vertebra, the screws were inserted in a non-classical fashion, taking purchase of the best bone stock. None of them had a critical breach. No patient had any neurovascular complications. Conclusion: Iso-C navigation improves the safety and accuracy of pedicle screw insertion and is not only successful in achieving secure pedicle fixation but also in identifying the best available bone stock for three-column bone fixation in altered anatomy. The advantages conferred by cervical pedicle screws can be extended to the pediatric population also.

  7. Influence of screw length and diameter on tibial strain energy density distribution after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Kuang, Guan-Ming; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Niu, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2014-04-01

    Postoperative tunnel enlargement has been frequently reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Interference screw, as a surgical implant in ACL reconstruction, may influence natural loading transmission and contribute to tunnel enlargement. The aims of this study are (1) to quantify the alteration of strain energy den sity (SED) distribution after the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction; and (2) to characterize the influence of screw length and diameter on the degree of the SED alteration. A validated finite element model of human knee joint was used. The screw length ranging from 20 to 30mm with screw diameter ranging from 7 to 9 mm were investigated. In the post-operative knee, the SED increased steeply at the extra-articular tunnel aperture under compressive and complex loadings, whereas the SED decreased beneath the screw shaft and nearby the intra-articular tunnel aperture. Increasing the screw length could lower the SED deprivation in the proximal part of the bone tunnel; whereas increasing either screw length or diameter could aggravate the SED deprivation in the distal part of the bone tunnel. Decreasing the elastic modulus of the screw could lower the bone SED deprivation around the screw. In consideration of both graft stability and SED alteration, a biodegradable interference screw with a long length is recommended, which could provide a beneficial mechanical environment at the distal part of the tunnel, and meanwhile decrease the bone-graft motion and synovial fluid propagation at the proximal part of the tunnel. These findings together with the clinical and histological factors could help to improve surgical outcome, and serve as a preliminary knowledge for the following study of biodegradable interference screw. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Development of an optically-based tension-indicating implanted orthopedic screw with a luminescent spectral ruler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Nakul; Rogalski, Melissa M.; Benza, Donny; Lake, Joshua; Urban, Matthew; Pelham, Hunter; Anker, Jeffrey N.; DesJardins, John D.

    2017-03-01

    An orthopaedic screw was designed with an optical tension-indicator to non-invasively quantify screw tension and monitor the load sharing between the bone and the implant. The screw both applies load to the bone, and measures this load by reporting the strain on the screw. The screw contains a colorimetric optical encoder that converts axial strain into colorimetric changes visible through the head of the screw, or luminescent spectral changes that are detected through tissue. Screws were tested under cyclic mechanical loading to mimic in-vivo conditions to verify the sensitivity, repeatability, and reproducibility of the sensor. In the absence to tissue, color was measured using a digital camera as a function of axial load on a stainless steel cannulated (hollow) orthopedic screw, modified by adding a passive colorimetric strain gauge through the central hole. The sensor was able to quantify clinically-relevant bone healing strains. The sensor exhibited good repeatability and reproducibility but also displayed hysteresis due to the internal mechanics of the screw. The strain indicator was also modified for measurement through tissue by replacing the reflective colorimetric sensor with a low-background X-ray excited optical luminescence signal. Luminescent spectra were acquired through 6 mm of chicken breast tissue. Overall, this research shows feasibility for a unique device which quantifies the strain on an orthopedic screw. Future research will involve reducing hysteresis by changing the mechanism of strain transduction in the screw, miniaturizing the luminescent strain gauge, monitoring bending as well as tension, using alternative luminescent spectral rulers based upon near infrared fluorescence or upconversion luminescence, and application to monitoring changes in pretension and load sharing during bone healing.

  9. Finite element analysis of the equivalent stress distribution in Schanz screws during the use of a femoral fracture distractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Giordano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To evaluate the mechanical stress and elastic deformation exercised in the thread/shaft transition of Schanz screws in assemblies with different screw anchorage distances in the entrance to the bone cortex, through the distribution and location of tension in the samples. An analysis of 3D finite elements was performed to evaluate the distribution of the equivalent stress (triple stress state in a Schanz screw fixed bicortically and orthogonally to a tubular bone, using two mounting patterns: (1 thread/shaft transition located 20 mm from the anchorage of the Schanz screws in the entrance to the bone cortex and (2 thread/shaft transition located 3 mm from the anchorage of the Schanz screws in entrance to the bone cortex. The simulations were performed maintaining the same direction of loading and the same distance from the force vector in relation to the center of the hypothetical bone. The load applied, its direction, and the distance to the center of the bone were constant during the simulations in order to maintain the moment of flexion equally constant. The present calculations demonstrated linear behavior during the experiment. It was found that the model with a distance of 20 mm between the Schanz screws anchorage in the entrance to the bone cortex and the thread/shaft transition reduces the risk of breakage or fatigue of the material during the application of constant static loads; in this model, the maximum forces observed were higher (350 MPa. The distance between the Schanz screws anchorage at the entrance to the bone cortex and the smooth thread/shaft transition of the screws used in a femoral distractor during acute distraction of a fracture must be farther from the entrance to the bone cortex, allowing greater degree of elastic deformation of the material, lower mechanical stress in the thread/shaft transition, and minimized breakage or fatigue. The suggested distance is 20 mm.

  10. Minimally invasive treatment of clavicular fractures with cannulated screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-zhan; Zheng, Guo-hai; Zhao, Ke-yi

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate minimally invasive treatment of clavicular fractures with cannulated screw. Data of 65 patients who had undergone minimally invasive treatment with cannulated screws for clavicular fractures from April 2009 to October 2010 were retrospectively analyzed and compared with those of 65 patients with clavicular fractures who had been treated by the same surgeons with plates. In the study group, there were 41 males and 24 females, aged from 19-67 years (mean, 35.8 years). According to Craig's classification, there were 29 group 1 and 36 of group 2-II. Neer scores were used to evaluate shoulder function and radiographs to assess fracture union. The incision length was 4-5 cm in the cannulated screw group (CSG) and 10-11 cm in the reconstructive plate group (RPG). Radiographs showed bone union was achieved in both groups, the bone healing time being 13.2 ± 6.9 weeks in the CSG and 16.3 ± 8.7 weeks in the RPG. All patients were followed up for 6 to 20 months (average, 10.6 months). The average Neer score was 96.6 ± 3.4 in the CSG and 94.2 ± 5.8 in the RPG. In the CSG, screw loosening occurred in five, and fracture displacement in three. There was a significant difference in fracture healing time between two groups but not in Neer score. Minimally invasive treatment of clavicular fractures with cannulated screws has the advantages of minimal invasion, short bone healing time, good clinical outcomes, and being relatively inexpensive. © 2014 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Fixação de fraturas ilíacas em cães com parafusos, fios de aço e cimento ósseo de polimetilmetacrilato Canine iliac fracture fixation with screws, orthopedic wire and polymethylmethacrylate bone cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Roehsig

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo verificar a recuperação da locomoção e o tempo para cicatrização óssea de fraturas ilíacas fixadas com parafusos, fios de aço e cimento ósseo de polimetilmetacrilato. Dezesseis cães de ambos os sexos, com peso de 1,8 a 16kg e idade entre sete meses e 11 anos, foram submetidos à osteossíntese da fratura de ílio, provocadas por acidente automobilístico. Em dois animais, realizou-se osteossíntese bilateral, totalizando 18 ossos ilíacos operados. A abordagem ao ílio foi lateral e quando necessária estendida caudalmente através da osteotomia do trocanter maior. As fraturas foram reduzidas e, em cada segmento ósseo, foram implantados dois a três parafusos e banda de tensão com fio de aço entre os parafusos adjacentes à linha de fratura. Sobre esses implantes aplicou-se cimento ósseo misturado com cefazolina sódica e após o endurecimento prosseguiu-se com a síntese dos tecidos moles com suturas rotineiramente utilizadas na clinica cirúrgica. No período pós-operatório, foram realizadas avaliações até 90 dias após a osteossíntese e observou-se locomoção apropriada em 15 animais. Avaliações radiográficas demonstraram sinais de completa consolidação óssea entre 60 e 90 dias. Falha da estabilização ocorreu em dois casos, obrigando a reintervenção cirúrgica em um deles. A partir dos resultados obtidos, é possível concluir que, em cães com até 16kg de peso, a fixação de fraturas ilíacas utilizando parafusos cimentados com PMMA constitui uma eficiente técnica, que proporciona adequada estabilidade, precoce recuperação funcional e cicatrização óssea.The present study aimed to verify the time for locomotion recovery and bone healing in canine iliac fractures fixated with screws, orthopedic wires and methylmetacrylate bone cement. Sixteen dogs from both genders accidentally hit by a car and showing iliac fractures were included. Dogs aged from 7 months to 11

  12. Early clinical results with cortically based pedicle screw trajectory for fusion of the degenerative lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennie, R Andrew; Dea, Nicolas; Kwon, Brian K; Street, John T

    2015-06-01

    This study reviews the outcomes and revision rates of degenerative lumbar fusion surgery using cortical trajectory pedicle screws in lieu of traditional pedicle screw instrumentation. Pedicle screw fixation can be a challenge in patients with low bone mineral density. Wide posterior approaches to the lumbar spine exposing lateral to the facet joints and onto transverse processes causes an additional degree of muscular damage and blood loss not present with a simple laminectomy. A cortical bone trajectory pedicle screw has been proposed as an alternative to prevent screw pullout and decrease the morbidity associated with the wide posterior approach to the spine. We present a series of eight consecutive patients using a cortical bone trajectory instead of traditional pedicle screw fixation for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. A retrospective review of our institutional registry data identified eight patients who had cortical screws placed with the assistance of O-arm Stealth navigation (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) from 2010-2013. We analyzed the need for revision, the maintenance of reduction and the incidence of screw pullout or breakage. Our review demonstrated that two of eight patients were revised at an average of 12months. The reasons for these revisions were pseudarthrosis and caudal adjacent segment failure. All patients who were revised had frank screw loosening. We present early clinical results of a new technique that has been shown to have a better fixation profile in laboratory testing. Our less than favorable early clinical results should be interpreted with caution and highlight important technical issues which should be considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Is Polymethyl Methacrylate a Viable Option for Salvaging Lateral Mass Screw Failure in the Subaxial Cervical Spine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallizzi, Michael A.; Kuhns, Craig A.; Jenkins, Tyler J.; Pfeiffer, Ferris M.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Biomechanical analysis of lateral mass screw pullout strength. Objective We compare the pullout strength of our bone cement–revised lateral mass screw with the standard lateral mass screw. Methods In cadaveric cervical spines, we simulated lateral mass screw “cutouts” unilaterally from C3 to C7. We salvaged fixation in the cutout side with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) or Cortoss cement (Orthovita, Malvern, Pennsylvania, United States), allowed the cement to harden, and then drilled and placed lateral mass screws back into the cement-augmented lateral masses. On the contralateral side, we placed standard lateral mass screws into the native, or normal lateral, masses and then compared pullout strength of the cement-augmented side to the standard lateral mass screw. For pullout testing, each augmentation group was fixed to a servohydraulic load frame and a specially designed pullout fixture was attached to each lateral mass screw head. Results Quick-mix PMMA-salvaged lateral mass screws required greater force to fail when compared with native lateral mass screws. Cortoss cement and PMMA standard-mix cement-augmented screws demonstrated less strength of fixation when compared with control-side lateral mass screws. Attempts at a second round of cement salvage of the same lateral masses led to more variations in load to failure, but quick-mix PMMA again demonstrated greater load to failure when compared with the nonaugmented control lateral mass screws. Conclusion Quick-mix PMMA cement revision equips the spinal surgeon with a much needed salvage option for a failed lateral mass screw in the subaxial cervical spine. PMID:25649421

  14. The pullout performance of pedicle screws

    CERN Document Server

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-01-01

    This brief book systematically discusses all subjects that affect the pullout strength of pedicle screws. These screws are used in spinal surgeries to stabilize the spine. The holding strength of the pedicle screw is vital since loosening of the pedicle screws can cause revision surgeries. Once the pedicle screw is pulled out, it is harder to obtain same stabilization for the fused vertebrae. The book reviews the effect of screw designs, application techniques, cement augmentation, coating of the screw and test conditions on the pullout strength. The studies with finite element analysis were also included.

  15. Clinical and radiological effect of medialized cortical bone trajectory for lumbar pedicle screw fixation in patients with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (mPACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschugg, Anja; Kavakebi, Pujan; Hartmann, Sebastian; Lener, Sara; Wipplinger, Christoph; Löscher, Wolfgang N; Neururer, Sabrina; Wildauer, Matthias; Thomé, Claudius

    2018-02-20

    Spinal fusion with pedicle screw fixation represents the gold standard for lumbar degenerative disc disease with instability. Although it is an established technique, it is nevertheless an invasive intervention with high complication rates. Therefore, minimally invasive approaches have been developed, the medialized bilateral screw pedicel fixation (mPACT) being one of them. The study objective is to evaluate prospectively the efficacy and safety of the mPACT technique compared with the traditional trajectory for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. This is a single-center, randomized, controlled, parallel group, superiority trial. A total of 154 adult patients are allocated in a ratio of 1:1. Sample size and power calculation were performed to detect the minimal clinically important difference of 10%, with an expected standard deviation of 20% in the primary outcome parameter, the Oswestry Disability Index, with power of 80%, based on an assumed maximal dropout rate of 20%. Secondary outcome parameters include the EuroQoL 5-Dimension questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, the painDETECT questionnaire and the "timed up and go" test. Furthermore, radiological and health economic outcomes will be evaluated. Follow up is performed until 5 years after surgery. Major inclusion criteria are lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis with Meyerding grade I or II, which qualifies for decompression and fusion by medialised posterior screw placement with cortical trajectory (mPACT) or by a traditional trajectory for lumbar pedicle screw placement. This trial will contribute to the understanding of the short-term and long-term clinical and radiological postoperative course in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease, in which the mPACT technique is used. ISRCTN registry, ISRCTN99263604 . Registered on 3 November 2016.

  16. Designing screws for polymer compounding in twin-screw extruders =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Cristina Ferreira

    Considering its modular construction, co-rotating twin screw extruders can be easily adapted to work with polymeric systems with more stringent specifications. However, their geometrical flexibility makes the performance of these machines strongly dependent on the screw configuration. Therefore, the definition of the adequate screw geometry to use in a specific polymer system is an important process requirement which is currently achieved empirically or using a trial-and-error basis. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic optimization methodology able to define the best screw geometry/configuration to use in a specific compounding/reactive extrusion operation, reducing both cost and time. This constitutes an optimization problem where a set of different screw elements are to be sequentially positioned along the screw in order to maximize the extruder performance. For that, a global modeling program considering the most important physical, thermal and rheological phenomena developing along the axis of an intermeshing co-rotating twin screw extruder was initially developed. The accuracy and sensitivity of the software to changes in the input parameters was tested for different operating conditions and screw configurations using a laboratorial Leistritz LSM 30.34 extruder. Then, this modeling software was integrated into an optimization methodology in order to be possible solving the Twin Screw Configuration Problem. Multi-objective versions of local search algorithms (Two Phase Local Search and Pareto Local Search) and Ant Colony Optimization algorithms were implemented and adapted to deal with the combinatorial, discrete and multi-objective nature of the problem. Their performance was studied making use of the hypervolume indicator and Empirical Attainment Function, and compared with the Reduced Pareto Search Genetic Algorithm (RPSGA) previously developed and applied to this problem. In order to improve the quality of the results and/or to decrease the

  17. The meniscus Arrow or metal screw for treatment of osteochondritis dissecans? In vitro comparison of their effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, DB; Bos, RRM; Mouton, LJ; van Horn, [No Value

    Three draw bench tests in axial direction were conducted of the pull out forces in predrilled human condylar bone of one single meniscus Arrow, one single metal screw, and three Meniscus Arrows in one bone block, the Arrows being inserted using the standard hand instruments. Bone blocks with three

  18. A new technique for insertion of barrel plate over dy-namic hip/compression lag screw: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naranje Sameer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Dynamic hip/compression screw (DHS/ DCS is one of the most commonly performed surgeries in orthopaedic practice. Sliding barrel plate over the DHS/DCS lag screw is one of the very crucial and at times uncomfor-table and time consuming steps of DHS/DCS surgery espe-cially when it comes to inexperienced surgeons and residents. Also in developing countries where not all stan-dard instrumentation is always available, this crucial step becomes more time consuming. Here we present a case re-port of 58-year-old male patient with intertrochanteric fracture, in which we used a new device for insertion of barrel plate over DHS/DCS lag screw and found that a small DHS/DCS lag screw extension (sliding jig of barrel plate can be very helpful to slide barrel plate over the DHS/DCS lag screw. Key words: Bone screws; Intertrochanteric fracture; Femoral fracture

  19. Lag screw stabilization of a cervical vertebral fracture by use of computed tomography in a horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, H.G.; Tucker, R.L.; Grant, B.D.; Roberts, G.D.; Prades, M.

    1995-01-01

    A traumatic fracture of C2 was diagnosed radiographically in a 1-year-old German Warm-blood stallion. Fracture configuration was difficult to see on survey radiographs. Computed tomography yielded a more accurate assessment of the fracture and facilitated fracture repair with cortical lag screws. Precise screw placement, to avoid spinal cord damage, was obtained by use of computed tomography. Follow-up radiography revealed normal bone healing, and the horse was in dressage schooling 24 months after surgery

  20. Evidence-based support for S1 transpedicular screw entry point modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In the literature, ‘below and lateral to the superior S1 facet’ is defined as the basic technique for screw introduction. Until a recently published modification, no analysis for alternative starting point has been proposed nor evaluated, although some surgeons claim to use some modifications. In this study, we analyse the data from anatomical and radiological studies for optimal starting point in transpedicular S1 screw placement. Methods A Medline search for key word combination: sacrum, anatomy, pedicle, screws and bone density resulted in 26 publications relevant to the topic. After a review of literature, two articles were chosen, as those including the appropriate set of data. The data retrieved from the articles is used for the analysis. The spatial relation of S1 facet, pedicles and vertebral body with cortical thickness and bone density in normal, osteopenic and osteoporotic sacrum is analysed. Results Presented data advocates for more medial placement of the screws due to higher bone density and lower bone loss in osteoporosis. Medial shift of the starting point does not increase the risk of spinal canal perforation. Osteoarthritic changes within the facet can augment the posterior supporting point for screw. The facet angular orientation is similar to convergent screw trajectory. Conclusions Modified technique for S1 screw placement takes advantage of latest anatomical and clinical data. In our opinion, technique modification improves the reproducibility and may increase stability and the screws within the posterior cortex of the S1 vertebra. Further biomechanical and clinical study should be performed to prove its superiority to classical technique. PMID:24708681

  1. Radiation-free Insertion of Distal Interlocking Screw in Tibial and Femur Nailing: A Simple Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Soni, Ritesh Kumar; Mehta, Surender Mohan; Awasthi, Bhanu; Singh, Janith Lal; Kumar, Amit; Thakur, Lokesh; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Distal interlocking screw insertion in intramedullary nailing of long-bone fracture is a challenging task for orthopedic surgeons. It is difficult particularly when the surgeon is in his learning stage or when image intensifier is not available. We describe a radiation-free technique of distal interlocking screw insertion which is easy and practicable. Materials and Methods: In this technique, a same length nail is placed over the skin (outer nail) and through its distal-most scre...

  2. Possible vascular injury due to screw eccentricity in minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant Kumar Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular injury during minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty (THA is uncommon, yet a well-recognized and serious issue. It emerges because of non-visibility of vascular structures proximal to the pelvic bone during reaming, drilling holes, and fixing of screws. Numerous studies have found that screw fixation during cementless THA is beneficial for the initial stability of cup; yet, no anatomical guidelines support angular eccentric screw fixation. Materials and Methods: In this study, we obtained the pelvic arterial-phase computed tomographic data of thirty eight humans and reconstructed the three-dimensional models of osseous and vessel structures. We performed the surgical simulation to fix these structures with cementless cups and screws with angular eccentricities. Results: The effect of screw eccentricities (angular eccentricities of ±17° and ±34° on the vascular injury was determined. Measurement between screw and adjoining vessels was performed and analyzed statistically to ascertain a comparative risk study for blood vessels that are not visible during surgery. Conclusion: Authors similarly discussed the significant absence of appreciation of quadrant systems proposed by Wasielewski et al. on eccentric screws. Adjustment of quadrant systems provided by Wasielewski et al. is required for acetabular implants with eccentric holes for fixation of acetabular screws.

  3. Revision of the failed pedicle screw in osteoporotic lumbar spine: biomechanical comparison of kyphoplasty versus transpedicular polymethylmethacrylate augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derinçek, Alihan; Türker, Mehmet; Cinar, Murat; Cetik, Ozgür; Kalaycioğlu, Bariş

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare of kyphoplasty versus transpedicular polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation biomechanically in the revision of the failed pedicle screw in osteoporotic lumbar spine. Bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar vertebrae collected from four bovines were measured. Each vertebra was decalcified with hydrochloric acid solution to obtain osteoporotic specimens. Primary polyaxial pedicle screws were inserted into the pedicles and pulled out until they failed. The pullout strength results of all specimens were recorded. Revision pedicle screws were randomly inserted into the same pedicles by either pedicle hole PMMA augmented (group 1) or kyphoplasty (Xvoid™) PMMA augmented pedicle screws (group 2). The pullout strength results of all specimens were re-recorded. The mean BMD significantly decreased from 1.686 ± 227.9 g/cm(2) to 1.432 ± 157.1 g/cm(2) following decalcification (posteoporotic bone, kyphoplasty augmented pedicle screw seems to be more effective method increasing the pullout strength.

  4. A 2-screw fixation technique for subtalar joint fusion: a retrospective case series introducing a novel 2-screw fixation construct with operative pearls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffeli, Troy J; Reinking, Ryan R

    2012-01-01

    A variety of fixation methods are used in fusion of the subtalar joint (STJ) including 1 screw and 2 screw constructs. The rate of union is generally high for STJ fusion, regardless of the fixation method, provided the joint surfaces have been properly prepared and compressed and the patient avoids premature stress on the fusion site. Certain populations are known to have an increased risk of nonunion or delayed union including diabetics, smokers, and those undergoing revision of failed fusion. In this high-risk patient population, we propose that our novel 2-screw construct might have advantages over traditional fixation constructs without identified disadvantages. The technique is simple enough to be used in all primary and revision STJ fusion procedures, and this has become our practice. In the present study, 15 feet in 15 consecutive patients who underwent STJ fusion using a novel 2-screw fixation construct were retrospectively reviewed to assess the fusion outcome and complications. Specifically, we offer a novel 2-screw construct that offers the stability of the traditional parallel 2-screw construct while maintaining a maximum raw bone surface area at the posterior facet achieved by single-screw fixation. A retrospective review of radiographs taken 10 weeks postoperatively indentified a 100% fusion rate (15 of 15). All patients in our series achieved fusion, including several high-risk cases, and no significant complications were identified. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Usefulness and radiological evaluation of accuracy of innovative "Smart" hand technique for pedicle screw placement: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comert, Ayhan; Dogan, İhsan; Çaglar, Y Sukru

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study is to use a smartphone application during pedicle screw placement navigation and examine the accuracy of this application on anatomical dry vertebrae model. 76 dry vertebrae were used for this study and pedicle entry points, projections of pedicle screw trajectory lines in lateral and superior aspect of vertebral body were identified and drawn for each vertebra bilaterally. In each position, all angulations were measured directly before the procedure manually. 152 pedicle screws were inserted as a simulation of screw placement with the guidance of angle-meter smart app. Accuracy of the method was tested according to the occurrence of bone penetration and angular deviation of the inserted screws was evaluated in computed tomography images. Mean deviation of pedicle screws of 76 pedicle screws in right side in horizontal plane was measured 2.30°±1.78°; in sagittal plane 2.17°±1.57° and in left side in horizontal plane 3.01°±1.83°; in sagittal plane 2.38°±1.68°. No bone penetration was occurred during 152 pedicle screw placements. According to the t-test results, there were significant differences between two groups in craniocaudal direction of the right side pedicle screws and in craniocaudal direction of left side pedicle screws. The free smartphone application presented here as angle-meter can be interpreted as a safe digital device for spinal instrumentation procedures. As a prototype of future pedicle screw fixation systems, it should be improved in terms of its feasibility and compatibility with screw probes. This may lead to apply mobile digital angle meter in spinal procedure.

  6. External jig in the placement of distal interlocking screws | Ikem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retrograde (52.2%) was the commonest surgical approach used for femur. The main indication for SIGN interlocking surgery was recent fracture 77.8%. Open reduction 97.8% was the commonest method of reduction used. The mean±SD bone union time was 3.58±0.56 months and range 3-5 months. Distal screw insertion ...

  7. Comparison of interfaces of different pedicle screws with micro-CT technique in lumbar vertebrae with osteoporosis of sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da LIU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the changes in interfaces of expandable pedicle screw (EPS and polymethylmethacrylateenhanced pedicle screw (PMMA-PS after being used in osteoporotic sheep lumbar vertebrae with micro-CT technique. Methods Six lumbar vertebrae (L1-L6 in each sheep were randomly divided into three different screw-insertion groups (two vertebrae with four pedicles in each group after reproduction of osteoporosis in sheep. After making the pilot hole using the same method, CPS was inserted through the pilot hole into vertebral body in CPS group, while PMMA (1.0ml was injected into the pilot hole prior to the insertion of CPS in PMMA-PS group, and EPS was inserted through pedicle into vertebral body in EPS group. All the sheep were sacrificed, and lumbar vertebrae (L1-L6 were harvested respectively at the 6- and 12-week postoperatively. The micro-CT three dimensional reconstruction and histomorphometric analysis were performed to evaluate the interfacial conditions. Results  It was clearly demonstrated that interface was formed where the bone trabeculae was directly in contact with the screw to form "screw-bone" interface in both CPS and EPS groups both 6 weeks and 12 weeks after the operation. The screw was fully surrounded by PMMA and formed "screw-PMMA-bone" interface in PMMA-PS group. The anterior part of EPS expanded in vertebral body to form a clawlike structure, pressing against the surrounding bone trabeculae, thus significantly improved the local bone quality (amount and density of bone trabeculae. From 6 weeks to 12 weeks after the operation, there was no visual difference in bone quality around the screw in both CPS and PMMA-PS groups. There was no degradation and absorption of PMMA, and it led to form the second non-biological interface in PMMA-PS group. Nevertheless, bone quality around expanding part of EPS at 12-week post-operation was significantly improved compared with that at 6-week post-operation, thus forming a good

  8. Biomechanical Comparison of External Fixation and Compression Screws for Transverse Tarsal Joint Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latt, L Daniel; Glisson, Richard R; Adams, Samuel B; Schuh, Reinhard; Narron, John A; Easley, Mark E

    2015-10-01

    Transverse tarsal joint arthrodesis is commonly performed in the operative treatment of hindfoot arthritis and acquired flatfoot deformity. While fixation is typically achieved using screws, failure to obtain and maintain joint compression sometimes occurs, potentially leading to nonunion. External fixation is an alternate method of achieving arthrodesis site compression and has the advantage of allowing postoperative compression adjustment when necessary. However, its performance relative to standard screw fixation has not been quantified in this application. We hypothesized that external fixation could provide transverse tarsal joint compression exceeding that possible with screw fixation. Transverse tarsal joint fixation was performed sequentially, first with a circular external fixator and then with compression screws, on 9 fresh-frozen cadaveric legs. The external fixator was attached in abutting rings fixed to the tibia and the hindfoot and a third anterior ring parallel to the hindfoot ring using transverse wires and half-pins in the tibial diaphysis, calcaneus, and metatarsals. Screw fixation comprised two 4.3 mm headless compression screws traversing the talonavicular joint and 1 across the calcaneocuboid joint. Compressive forces generated during incremental fixator foot ring displacement to 20 mm and incremental screw tightening were measured using a custom-fabricated instrumented miniature external fixator spanning the transverse tarsal joint. The maximum compressive force generated by the external fixator averaged 186% of that produced by the screws (range, 104%-391%). Fixator compression surpassed that obtainable with screws at 12 mm of ring displacement and decreased when the tibial ring was detached. No correlation was found between bone density and the compressive force achievable by either fusion method. The compression across the transverse tarsal joint that can be obtained with a circular external fixator including a tibial ring exceeds that

  9. Pedicle screw rupture: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio E.O. Giacaglia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a technical description related to the rupture of a titanium alloy pedicle screw and connecting bar implanted in dorsal vertebras of a patient. Only metallurgical facts are described, with no attempt to identify any imperfections in the clinical aspects related to the rupture. The results described here are based on extensive analysis of the broken materials in a material sciences specialized laboratory. Excluding an incorrect prosthesis implantation in the surgical procedure and a possible low bone density, an information not available to the research team, with high probability the rupture of metallic pieces used in the prosthetic implant, was produced by the low fatigue resistance resulting by an improper machining process and excessive bending of the connecting bar prior to implant.

  10. Krag versus Caudad trajectory technique for pedicle screw insertion in osteoporotic vertebrae: biomechanical comparison and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qiang; Han, Xiaoguang; Han, Xiao; He, Da; Liu, Bo; Tian, Wei

    2014-12-15

    To compare in detail the effects of pedicle screw insertion in osteoporotic vertebrae via Krag and Caudad trajectory techniques. To compare the biomechanical stability of 2 pedicle screw fixation techniques and to correlate the stability of the pedicle screw with quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Pedicle screw fixation is commonly used to facilitate fusion and postoperative rehabilitation. Fixation failure and loosening in the metal-bone interface are frequent, with osteoporosis usually a major factor. Pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic spines is of particular concern regarding implant failure. Few reports have addressed which fixation method provides better biomechanical strength and thus presents less risk of failure. Eleven cadaveric vertebrae were harvested and subjected to dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and QCT to assess bone mineral density. Matched, polyaxial pedicle screws were inserted into the left and right pedicles of each vertebra. Screws were randomly assigned to the Caudad or Krag group by right or left side. They were inserted under 3-dimensional navigation system assistance. Cyclic loading tests were performed (maximum load 250 N, 3 Hz, up to 30,000 cycles) while recording load and displacement. Pullout tests were performed if the cyclic loading test was completed. Stiffness quotients were calculated. Cycle-displacement curves showed more pedicle screw dislodgement in the Krag than the Caudad group (P osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae using the Caudad trajectory displayed significantly higher biomechanical strength than those inserted using the Krag trajectory, especially during early fixation. Stability of pedicle screw fixation using the Caudad trajectory technique can be estimated by QCT.

  11. Radiation-free Insertion of Distal Interlocking Screw in Tibial and Femur Nailing: A Simple Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Ritesh Kumar; Mehta, Surender Mohan; Awasthi, Bhanu; Singh, Janith Lal; Kumar, Amit; Thakur, Lokesh; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Distal interlocking screw insertion in intramedullary nailing of long-bone fracture is a challenging task for orthopedic surgeons. It is difficult particularly when the surgeon is in his learning stage or when image intensifier is not available. We describe a radiation-free technique of distal interlocking screw insertion which is easy and practicable. In this technique, a same length nail is placed over the skin (outer nail) and through its distal-most screw hole, a 3.2 mm drill bit is inserted to drill the distal locking screw hole of the intramedullary nail (inner nail). With a small skin incision over the distal screw holes, the distal-most screw hole is identified; the bone window overlying the screw hole is widened with an awl and a locking bolt is inserted with a washer under direct visualization. The other distal interlocking screw is simply drilled by matching the other three holes of the outer and inner nails. We have operated 86 patients (39 femoral shaft fracture and 47 tibial shaft fracture) in 1 year where this technique was used. There were 41 open fracture and 45 closed fracture. Within 6 months of follow-up, bony union was achieved in 36 of 39 femur fractures and 45 of 47 tibial fractures. No unwanted complications were observed during the postoperative period and in follow-up. This method of radiation-free distal interlocking screw insertion is simple and can be used in third world country where image intensifier facility is not available. However, surgeons are encouraged to use image intensifier facility where the facility is available.

  12. Biomechanical Comparison of Intramedullary Screw Versus Low-Profile Plate Fixation of a Jones Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jeannie; Glisson, Richard R; Matsumoto, Takumi; Easley, Mark E

    2016-04-01

    Intramedullary screw fixation of fifth metatarsal Jones fractures often produces satisfactory results, however, nonunion and refracture rates are not negligible. The low-profile "hook" plate is an alternative fixation method that has been promoted to offer improved rotational control at the fracture site, but this remains to be proven. The purpose of this study was to document biomechanical performance differences between this type of plate and a contemporary solid, dual-pitch intramedullary screw in a cadaveric Jones fracture model. Simulated Jones fractures were created in 8 matched pairs of fresh-frozen cadaveric fifth metatarsals. One bone from each pair was stabilized using an intramedullary TriMed Jones Screw and the other using a TriMed Jones Fracture Plate (TriMed, Inc, Santa Clarita, CA). Controlled bending and torsional loads were applied. Bending stiffness and fracture site angulation, as well as torsional stiffness, peak torque, and fracture site rotation were quantified and compared. Intramedullary screw fixation demonstrated greater bending stiffness and less fracture site angulation than plate fixation during plantar-to-dorsal and lateral-to-medial bending. Torsional stiffness of screw-fixed metatarsals exceeded that of plate-fixed bones at initial loading; however, as rotation progressed, the plate resisted torque better than the screw. No difference in peak torque was demonstrable between fixation methods, but it was reached earlier in specimens fixed with screws and later in those fixed with plates as rotation progressed. In this cadaveric Jones fracture model, intramedullary screw fixation demonstrated bending stiffness and resistance to early torsional loading that was superior to that offered by plate fixation. Although low-profile "hook" plates offer an alternative for fixation of fifth metatarsal Jones fractures, intramedullary screw fixation may provide better resistance to bending and initiation of fracture site rotation. The influence of

  13. Misplaced Cervical Screws Requiring Reoperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeremy C; Arnold, Paul M; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Fehlings, Michael G; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Nassr, Ahmad; Rahman, Ra'Kerry K; Tannoury, Chadi A; Tannoury, Tony; Mroz, Thomas E; Currier, Bradford L; De Giacomo, Anthony F; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Jobse, Bruce C; Massicotte, Eric M; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter, retrospective case series. In the past several years, screw fixation of the cervical spine has become commonplace. For the most part, this is a safe, low-risk procedure. While rare, screw backout or misplaced screws can lead to morbidity and increased costs. We report our experiences with this uncommon complication. A multicenter, retrospective case series was undertaken at 23 institutions in the United States. Patients were included who underwent cervical spine surgery from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2011, and had misplacement of screws requiring reoperation. Institutional review board approval was obtained at all participating institutions, and detailed records were sent to a central data center. A total of 12 903 patients met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There were 11 instances of screw backout requiring reoperation, for an incidence of 0.085%. There were 7 posterior procedures. Importantly, there were no changes in the health-related quality-of-life metrics due to this complication. There were no new neurologic deficits; a patient most often presented with pain, and misplacement was diagnosed on plain X-ray or computed tomography scan. The most common location for screw backout was C6 (36%). This study represents the largest series to tabulate the incidence of misplacement of screws following cervical spine surgery, which led to revision procedures. The data suggest this is a rare event, despite the widespread use of cervical fixation. Patients suffering this complication can require revision, but do not usually suffer neurologic sequelae. These patients have increased cost of care. Meticulous technique and thorough knowledge of the relevant anatomy are the best means of preventing this complication.

  14. Fretting corrosion tests on orthopedic plates and screws made of ASTM F138 stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Teodoro dos Santos

    Full Text Available Introduction Although there has been significant progress in the design of implants for osteosynthesis, the occurrence of failures in these medical devices are still frequent. These implants are prone to suffer from fretting corrosion due to micromotion that takes place between the screw heads and plate holes. Consequently, fretting corrosion has been the subject of research in order to understand its influence on the structural integrity of osteosynthesis implants. The aim of this paper is to correlate the surface finish characteristics of bone plate-screw systems with fretting corrosion. Methods The surface finish (machined and polished of five specimens taken from three commercial dynamic compression plates (DCP were evaluated. For testing, the specimens were fixed with bone screws, immersed in a solution of 0.90% NaCl and subjected to a rocking motion with an amplitude of 1.70 mm and frequency of 1.0 Hz for 1.0 × 106 cycles, according to the ASTM F897 standard. Both, plate and screws were manufactured in Brazil with ASTM F138 stainless steel. Results Flaws on the hole countersink area and on the screw thread of some specimens were identified stereoscopically. At the end of the test all the specimens showed evidence of fretting corrosion with an average metal loss of 4.80 mg/million cycles. Conclusion An inadequate surface finish in some areas of the plates and screws may have favored the incidence of damage to the passive film, accelerating the fretting corrosion at the interfaces between the plate hole countersink and the screw head. Keywords Osteosynthesis, DCP, Bone plate, Screw, Fretting corrosion, Stainless steel.

  15. Influence of Diamondlike Carbon Coating of Screws on Axial Tightening Force and Stress Distribution on Overdenture Bar Frameworks with Different Fit Levels and Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Bacchi, Atais; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the axial tightening force applied by conventional and diamondlike carbon (DLC)-coated screws and to verify, through three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA), the stress distribution caused by different framework materials and prosthetic screws in overdenture frameworks with different misfit levels. The axial tightening force applied by the screw was evaluated by means of a titanium matrix connected to a load cell. Conventional titanium or DLC-coated screws were tightened with a digital torque wrench, and the load values were recorded. The values were applied in an FEA to a bar-clip attachment system connected to two 4.0 × 11-mm external-hexagon titanium implants placed in an anterior edentulous arch. DLC-coated and conventional screws were modeled with their respective axial forces obtained on the experimental evaluation for three bar framework materials (titanium, nickel-chromium, and cobalt-chromium) and three levels of misfit (100, 150, and 200 μm). Von Mises stresses for prosthetic components and maximum principal stress and microstrains (maximum principal strains) for bone tissue were measured. The mean force applied by the conventional screw was 25.55 N (± 1.78); the prosthetic screw coated with a DLC layer applied a mean force of 31.44 N (± 2.11), a statistically significant difference. In the FEA, the DLC screw led to higher stresses on the framework; however, the prosthetic screw suffered lower stress. No influence of screw type was seen in the bone tissue. Titanium frameworks reduced the stress transmitted to the bone tissue and the bar framework but had no influence on the screws. Higher misfit values resulted in an increased stress/strain in bone tissue and bar framework, which was not the case for retention screws.

  16. Novel free-hand T1 pedicle screw method: Review of 44 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Rivkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary of Background Data: Multilevel posterior cervical instrumented fusions are becoming more prevalent in current practice. Biomechanical characteristics of the cervicothoracic junction may necessitate extending the construct to upper thoracic segments. However, fixation in upper thoracic spine can be technically demanding owing to transitional anatomy while suboptimal placement facilitates vascular and neurologic complications. Thoracic instrumentation methods include free-hand, fluoroscopic guidance, and CT-based image guidance. However, fluoroscopy of upper thoracic spine is challenging secondary to vertebral geometry and patient positioning, while image-guided systems present substantial financial commitment and are not readily available at most centers. Additionally, imaging modalities increase radiation exposure to the patient and surgeon while potentially lengthening surgical time. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of 44 consecutive patients undergoing a cervicothoracic fusion by a single surgeon using the novel free-hand T1 pedicle screw technique between June 2009 and November 2012. A starting point medial and cephalad to classic entry as well as new trajectory were utilized. No imaging modalities were employed during screw insertion. Postoperative CT scans were obtained on day 1. Screw accuracy was independently evaluated according to the Heary classification. Results: In total, 87 pedicle screws placed were at T1. Grade 1 placement occurred in 72 (82.8% screws, Grade 2 in 4 (4.6% screws and Grade 3 in 9 (10.3% screws. All Grade 2 and 3 breaches were <2 mm except one Grade 3 screw breaching 2-4 mm laterally. Only two screws (2.3% were noted to be Grade 4, both breaching medially by less than 2 mm. No new neurological deficits or returns to operating room took place postoperatively. Conclusions: This modification of the traditional starting point and trajectory at T1 is safe and effective. It attenuates additional bone

  17. Comparison of tibial plateau angle changes after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy fixation with conventional or locking screw technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkling, Amanda L; Fagin, Bennett; Daye, R Mark

    2010-06-01

    To compare the effects of locking and conventional screws on postoperative tibial plateau angle (TPA), osteotomy healing, and complication rate after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) in dogs treated for naturally occurring cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Prospective clinical study. Dogs (n=118) with CCL rupture. Dogs (> or =20 kg) with unilateral CCL rupture and sufficient bone stock for TPLO and use of a 3.5-mm-broad or -narrow TPLO plate were sequentially allocated to have plate fixation with locking or conventional screws. Data analyzed included breed, age, sex, body weight, body condition score, limb operated, implants used, meniscal status, operative time, and days to recheck. Preoperative, immediate postoperative, and 8-week recheck mediolateral radiographs were reviewed, and TPA, complications, and healing status were evaluated. Stifles in the locking screw group had significantly less change in postoperative TPA than stifles in the conventional screw group. Locking screw fixation also had significantly higher grades of osteotomy healing, assessed on a mediolateral radiographic view. TPLO plates secured with locking screws are acceptable when compared with those secured with conventional screws; osteotomy healing is improved and TPA better conserved when using locking screws. Locking screw fixation serves to increase stabilization of TPA during TPLO healing and provides improved radiographic evidence of osteotomy healing.

  18. Effect of surface coating on the screw loosening of dental abutment screws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Ik; Choe, Han-Cheol; Chung, Chae-Heon

    2004-12-01

    Regardless of the type of performed restoration, in most cases, a screw connection is employed between the abutment and implant. For this reason, implant screw loosening has remained a problem in restorative practices. The purpose of this study was to compare the surface of coated/plated screws with titanium and gold alloy screws and to evaluate the physical properties of coated/plated material after scratch tests via FE-SEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy) investigation. GoldTite, titanium screws provided by 3i (Implant Innovation, USA) and TorqTite, titanium screws by Steri-Oss (Nobel Biocare, USA) and gold screws and titanium screws by AVANA (Osstem Implant, Korea) were selected for this study. The surface, crest, and root of the abutment screws were observed by FE-SEM. A micro-diamond needle was also prepared for the scratch test. Each abutment screw was fixed, and a scratch on the surface of the head region was made at constant load and thereafter the fine trace was observed with FE-SEM. The surface of GoldTite was smoother than that of other screws and it also had abundant ductility and malleability compared with titanium and gold screws. The scratch tests also revealed that teflon particles were exfoliated easily in the screw coated with teflon. The titanium screw had rough surface and low ductility. The clinical use of gold-plated screws is recommended as a means of preventing screw loosening.

  19. [Cerclage using hollow screws for internal arthrodesis in cases of pronounced osteoporosis and osteopenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, C; Quentmeier, A

    2008-07-01

    Osteosynthesis of osteoporotic or osteopenic bone poses a considerable challenge for the surgeon, the type of osteosynthesis performed, and the osteosynthesis material employed. In osteoporotic and osteopenic bone, especially when circulation is decreased or sensitivity reduced, the principle of tension banding places great demands on the bone and surgeon since insufficient tightening of the wire results in inadequate immobilization while overtightening of the tension band can cause the wire to cut through the soft bone. This contribution describes a surgical technique, which prevents the wire from cutting through the bone. Cannulated screws are inserted vertically into the bone in the traction direction and the wire of the tension banding is passed through the cannulated screws. This ensures that the wire traction is distributed across the entire cross section of the bone. Thus, it is possible to completely tighten the tension band in osteopenic and osteoporotic bone. This technique is illustrated using the example of internal screw and tension band arthrodesis of the ankle joint, which achieved stable arthrodesis with weight bearing and recovered ambulation in a patient with pronounced diabetic foot syndrome and peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

  20. The principles of interference screw fixation: application to foot and ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Kent A

    2005-01-01

    Based on the success of the anterior cruciate ligament model, interference screw fixation is now being applied to a wide variety of orthopedic conditions that require the fixation of tendon or ligament to bone. The primary focus of this article is to present the principles of interference screw fixation. By understanding the principles of interference screw fixation, the foot and ankle surgeon will be able to apply this fixation technique to a wide variety of surgical applications for tendon transfers or ligament repairs. The surgical technique, history, principles of fixation, studies of fixation strength, tissue healing, and foot and ankle indications are reviewed. A modified Girdlestone digital flexor tendon transfer procedure description is included to illustrate how interference screw techniques may be applied to foot surgery.

  1. Using Ultrasound to Prevent Screw Penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, George W

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound is a readily available, inexpensive, easy-to-use, and rapid diagnostic tool. Physicians can use ultrasound to identify excessively long screws or screw penetration into joints. This article illustrates ultrasound identification of problem screws. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Designs and Techniques That Improve the Pullout Strength of Pedicle Screws in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Thomas M.; Laun, Jake; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A.; Doulgeris, James J.; Lee, William E.; Vrionis, Frank D.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a medical condition affecting men and women of different age groups and populations. The compromised bone quality caused by this disease represents an important challenge when a surgical procedure (e.g., spinal fusion) is needed after failure of conservative treatments. Different pedicle screw designs and instrumentation techniques have been explored to enhance spinal device fixation in bone of compromised quality. These include alterations of screw thread design, optimization of pilot hole size for non-self-tapping screws, modification of the implant's trajectory, and bone cement augmentation. While the true benefits and limitations of any procedure may not be realized until they are observed in a clinical setting, axial pullout tests, due in large part to their reproducibility and ease of execution, are commonly used to estimate the device's effectiveness by quantifying the change in force required to remove the screw from the body. The objective of this investigation is to provide an overview of the different pedicle screw designs and the associated surgical techniques either currently utilized or proposed to improve pullout strength in osteoporotic patients. Mechanical comparisons as well as potential advantages and disadvantages of each consideration are provided herein. PMID:24724097

  3. Designs and Techniques That Improve the Pullout Strength of Pedicle Screws in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: Current Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Shea

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a medical condition affecting men and women of different age groups and populations. The compromised bone quality caused by this disease represents an important challenge when a surgical procedure (e.g., spinal fusion is needed after failure of conservative treatments. Different pedicle screw designs and instrumentation techniques have been explored to enhance spinal device fixation in bone of compromised quality. These include alterations of screw thread design, optimization of pilot hole size for non-self-tapping screws, modification of the implant’s trajectory, and bone cement augmentation. While the true benefits and limitations of any procedure may not be realized until they are observed in a clinical setting, axial pullout tests, due in large part to their reproducibility and ease of execution, are commonly used to estimate the device’s effectiveness by quantifying the change in force required to remove the screw from the body. The objective of this investigation is to provide an overview of the different pedicle screw designs and the associated surgical techniques either currently utilized or proposed to improve pullout strength in osteoporotic patients. Mechanical comparisons as well as potential advantages and disadvantages of each consideration are provided herein.

  4. Designs and techniques that improve the pullout strength of pedicle screws in osteoporotic vertebrae: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Thomas M; Laun, Jake; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A; Doulgeris, James J; Lee, William E; Aghayev, Kamran; Vrionis, Frank D

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a medical condition affecting men and women of different age groups and populations. The compromised bone quality caused by this disease represents an important challenge when a surgical procedure (e.g., spinal fusion) is needed after failure of conservative treatments. Different pedicle screw designs and instrumentation techniques have been explored to enhance spinal device fixation in bone of compromised quality. These include alterations of screw thread design, optimization of pilot hole size for non-self-tapping screws, modification of the implant's trajectory, and bone cement augmentation. While the true benefits and limitations of any procedure may not be realized until they are observed in a clinical setting, axial pullout tests, due in large part to their reproducibility and ease of execution, are commonly used to estimate the device's effectiveness by quantifying the change in force required to remove the screw from the body. The objective of this investigation is to provide an overview of the different pedicle screw designs and the associated surgical techniques either currently utilized or proposed to improve pullout strength in osteoporotic patients. Mechanical comparisons as well as potential advantages and disadvantages of each consideration are provided herein.

  5. Biomechanical evaluation of pedicle screws versus pedicle and laminar hooks in the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordista, Andrew; Conrad, Bryan; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Walters, Sheri; Rechtine, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    Pedicle screws have been shown to be superior to hooks in the lumbar spine, but few studies have addressed their use in the thoracic spine. The objective of this study was to biomechanically evaluate the pullout strength of pedicle screws in the thoracic spine and compare them to laminar hooks. STUDY DESING/SETTING: Twelve vertebrae (T1-T12) were harvested from each of five embalmed human cadavers (n=60). The age of the donors averaged 83+8.5 years. After bone mineral density had been measured in the vertebrae (mean=0.47 g/cm(3)), spines were disarticulated. Some pedicles were damaged during disarticulation or preparation for testing, so that 100 out of a possible 120 pullout tests were performed. Each vertebra was secured using a custom-made jig, and a posteriorly directed force was applied to either the screw or the claw. Constructs were ramped to failure at 3 mm/min using a Mini Bionix II materials testing machine (MTS, Eden Prairie, MN). Pedicle claws had an average pullout strength of 577 N, whereas the pullout strength of pedicle screws averaged 309 N. Hooks installed using the claw method in the thoracic spine had an overwhelming advantage in pullout strength versus pedicle screws. Even in extremely osteoporotic bone, the claw withstood 88% greater pullout load. The results of this study indicate that hooks should be considered when supplemental instrumentation is required in thoracic vertebrae, especially in osteoporotic bone.

  6. Simple New Screw Insertion Technique without Extraction for Broken Pedicle Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Jin-Sang; Park, Jong-Tae

    2018-05-01

    Spinal transpedicular screw fixation is widely performed. Broken pedicle screw rates range from 3%-7.1%. Several techniques have been described for extraction of broken pedicle screws. However, most of these techniques require special instruments. We describe a simple, modified technique for management of broken pedicle screws without extraction. No special instruments or drilling in an adjacent pedicle are required. We used a high-speed air drill with a round burr. With C-arm fluoroscopy guidance, the distal fragment of a broken pedicle screw was palpated using free-hand technique through the screw entry hole. A high-speed air drill with a round burr (not a diamond burr) was inserted through the hole. Drilling began slowly and continued until enough space was obtained for new screw insertion. Using this space, we performed new pedicle screw fixation medially alongside the distal fragment of the broken pedicle screw. We performed the insertion with a previously used entry hole and pathway in the pedicle. The same size pedicle screw was used. Three patients were treated with this modified technique. New screw insertion was successful in all cases after partial drilling of the distal broken pedicle screw fragment. There were no complications, such as screw loosening, dural tears, or root injury. We describe a simple, modified technique for management of broken pedicle screws without extraction. This technique is recommended in patients who require insertion of a new screw. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Dorsal bridge plating or transarticular screws for Lisfranc fracture dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirzner, N; Zotov, P; Goldbloom, D; Curry, H; Bedi, H

    2018-04-01

    Aims The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the functional and radiological outcomes of bridge plating, screw fixation, and a combination of both methods for the treatment of Lisfranc fracture dislocations. Patients and Methods A total of 108 patients were treated for a Lisfranc fracture dislocation over a period of nine years. Of these, 38 underwent transarticular screw fixation, 45 dorsal bridge plating, and 25 a combination technique. Injuries were assessed preoperatively according to the Myerson classification system. The outcome measures included the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, the validated Manchester Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) functional tool, and the radiological Wilppula classification of anatomical reduction. Results Significantly better functional outcomes were seen in the bridge plate group. These patients had a mean AOFAS score of 82.5 points, compared with 71.0 for the screw group and 63.3 for the combination group (p Foot Questionnaire score was 25.6 points in the bridge plate group, 38.1 in the screw group, and 45.5 in the combination group (p plate fixation is associated with a better anatomical reduction (p = 0.06). Myerson types A and C2 significantly predicted a poorer functional outcome, suggesting that total incongruity in either a homolateral or divergent pattern leads to worse outcomes. The greater the number of columns fixed the worse the outcome (p plating have better functional and radiological outcomes than those treated with transarticular screws or a combination technique. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:468-74.

  8. Application of IMF screws to assist internal rigid fixation of jaw fractures: our experiences of 168 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhenxi; Gao, Zhibiao; Xiao, Xia; Zhang, Wenjuan; Fan, Xing; Wang, Zhaoling

    2015-01-01

    Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) screws were first introduced to achieve IMF as a kind of bone borne appliance for jaw fractures in 1989. Because this method can overcome many disadvantages associated with tooth borne appliance, IMF screws have been popularly used for jaw fractures since then. From March 2011 to February 2014, we treated 168 cases with single or multiple jaw fractures by open reduction and a total of 705 IMF screws were intraoperatively applied in all the cases to achieve IMF and maintain dental occlusion as an adjuvant to open reduction. The numbers, implantation sites and complications of IMF screws were retrospectively analyzed. In our experience, we found that IMF screws were important to assist open reduction of jaw fractures but their roles should be objectively assessed and the reliability of open reduction and internal rigid fixation must be emphasized. Much attention should be paid when implanting.

  9. Comparison of pullout strength between 3.5-mm fully threaded, bicortical screws and 4.0-mm partially threaded, cancellous screws in the fixation of medial malleolar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Jason D; Deyhim, Ali; Rigby, Ryan B; Dau, Nathan; King, Christy; Fallat, Lawrence M; Bir, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Displaced medial malleolus fractures are considered unstable and typically require open reduction and internal fixation for anatomic reduction and early joint range of motion. These fractures are usually fixated with either compression lag screws or tension band wiring depending on the fracture pattern, size of the distal fragment, and bone quality. When fracture fixation fails, it is typically in pullout strength. Failure of primary bone healing can result in nonunion, malunion, and need for revision surgery. The current study wished to explore a potentially stronger fixation technique in regard to pullout strength for medial malleolar fractures compared with traditional cancellous screws. This was a comparative study of the relative pullout strength of 2 fully threaded 3.5-mm bicortical screws versus 2 partially threaded 4.0-mm cancellous screws for the fixation of medial malleolar fractures. Ten fresh-frozen limbs from 5 cadavers, mean age 79 years (range of 65-97 years), were tested using the Instron 8500 Plus system. The median force recorded at 2 mm of distraction using unicortical partially threaded cancellous screws was 116.2 N (range 70.2 to 355.5N) compared with 327.6 N (range 117.5 to 804.3 N) in the fully threaded bicortical screw (P = .04). The unicortical screw fixation displayed only 64.53% of the median strength noted with the bicortical screw fixation at clinical failure. The current study demonstrated statistically significantly greater pullout strength for 3.5-mm bicortical screws when compared with 4.0-mm partially threaded cancellous screws used to fixate medial malleolar fractures in a cadaveric model. Copyright 2010 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Metallurgical examination of gun barrel screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, E.L.; Clift, T.L.

    1996-06-01

    The examination was conducted to determine the extent of degradation that had occurred after a series of firings; these screws prevent live rounds of ammunition from being loaded into the firing chamber. One concern is that if the screw tip fails and a live round is accidentally loaded into the chamber, a live round could be fired. Another concern is that if the blunt end of the screw begins to degrade by cracking, pieces could become small projectiles during firing. All screws used in firing 100 rounds or more exhibited some degree degradation, which progressively worsened as the number of rounds fired increased. (SEM, metallography, x-ray analysis, and microhardness were used.) Presence of cracks in these screws after 100 fired rounds is a serious concern that warrants the discontinued use of these screws. The screw could be improved by selecting an alloy more resistant to thermal and chemical degradation.

  11. Comparison between two pedicle screw augmentation instrumentations in adult degenerative scoliosis with osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The operative treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis combined with osteoporosis increase following the epidemiological development. Studies have confirmed that screws in osteoporotic spines have significant lower-screw strength with more frequent screw movements within the vertebra than normal spines. Screws augmented with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA or with autogenous bone can offer more powerful corrective force and significant advantages. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on 31 consecutive patients with degenerative lumbar scoliosis combined with osteoporosis who had surgery from December 2000. All had a minimum of 2-year follow-up. All patients had posterior approach surgery. 14 of them were fixed with pedicle screw by augmentation with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA and the other 17 patients with autogenous bone. Age, sex and whether smoking were similar between the two groups. Surgical time, blood loss, blood transfusion, medical cost, post surgery ICU time, hospital day, length of oral pain medicines taken, Pre-and postoperative Oswestry disability index questionnaire and surgical revision were documented and compared. Preoperative, postoperative and final follow up Cobb angle, sagittal lumbar curve, correction rate, and Follow up Cobb loss were also compared. Results No significant differences were found between the autogenous bone group and Polymethylmethacrylate group with regards to all the targets above except for length of oral pain medicines taken and surgery cost. 2 patients were seen leakage during operation, but there is neither damage of nerve nor symptom after operation. No revision was needed. Conclusion Both augmentation pedicle screw with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA and autogenous bone treating degenerative lumbar scoliosis combined with osteoporosis can achieve a good surgical result. Less oral pain medicines taken are the potential benefits of Polymethylmethacrylate augmentation, but

  12. Simple mathematical model of sacroiliac screws safe-zone-Easy to implement by pelvic inlet and outlet views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Amir; Keener, Emily; Dubose, Candice; Lowe, Jason A

    2017-07-01

    Percutaneous sacral screw fixation is the mainstay of posterior pelvic ring fixation. This study quantifies the accuracy of fluoroscopic screw placement using post-operative CT scans and redefines the fluoroscopic safe zone using a mathematical calculation obtained from Inlet and outlet images. The authors hypothesized that a mathematical calculation of screw placement within the ala will improve accuracy of screw placement. A retrospective review of consecutive patients admitted to a level 1 trauma center with pelvic fractures fixed with iliosacral screws from January 2011 to December 2014 was performed. Accuracy of screw placement was determined by comparing fluoroscopy to post-operative CT scans. A mathematical calculation of screw position within the sacral ala was applied to determine assess screw position and compared to CT findings. Ninety-four patients with 156 screws met inclusion criteria, of which 50 (32.0%) had a cortical breech on CT. The sensitivity and specificity of the inlet-outlet safe zone using mathematical calculation were 97.1% and 84.0%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 92.7% and 93.3%, respectively. Overall accuracies of the radiographic inlet-outlet and lateral safe zones were 92.9% and 70.0%, respectively (p-value = 0.004). Sacral dysmorphism was not found to be associated with sacral cortical breech. A Simple mathematical calculation (screw position relative to percentage of bone width) on the inlet-outlet provides an accurate way to predict the accuracy of sacroiliac screws. The method is easy to implement, part of the surgery work-flow, and provides higher accuracy than relying on subjective interpretation of inlet, outlet, and lateral images. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1478-1484, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Percutaneous Cement-Augmented Screws Fixation in the Fractures of the Aging Spine: Is It the Solution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Pesenti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Management of elderly patients with thoracolumbar fractures is still challenging due to frequent osteoporosis and risk of screws pull-out. The aim of this study was to evaluate results of a percutaneous-only procedure to treat these fragile patients using cement-augmented screws. Methods. 12 patients diagnosed with a thoracolumbar fracture associated with an important loss of bone stock were included in this prospective study. Surgical procedure included systematically a percutaneous osteosynthesis using cemented fenestrated screws. When necessary, additional anterior support was performed using a kyphoplasty procedure. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed using CT scan. Results. On the whole series, 15 fractures were diagnosed and 96 cemented screws were inserted. The difference between the pre- and postoperative vertebral kyphosis was statistically significant (12.9° versus 4.4°, P=0.0006. No extrapedicular screw was reported and one patient was diagnosed with a cement-related pulmonary embolism. During follow-up period, no infectious complications, implant failures, or pull-out screws were noticed. Discussion. Aging spine is becoming an increasing public health issue. Management of these patients requires specific attention due to the augmented risk of complications. Using percutaneous-only screws fixation with cemented screw provides satisfactory results. A rigorous technique is mandatory in order to achieve best outcomes.

  14. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction.

  15. Biomechanical Comparison of Inter-fragmentary Compression Pressures: Lag Screw versus Herbert Screw for Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Sung, Joo-Kyung; Park, Seong-Hyun; Seong, Ki-Woong; Cho, Dae-Chul

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare inter-fragmentary compression pressures after fixation of a simulated type II odontoid fracture with the headless compression Herbert screw and a half threaded cannulated lag screw. We compared inter-fragmentary compression pressures between 40- and 45-mm long 4.5-mm Herbert screws (n=8 and n=9, respectively) and 40- and 45-mm long 4.0-mm cannulated lag screws (n=7 and n=10, respectively) after insertion into rigid polyurethane foam test blocks (Sawbones, Vashon, WA, USA). A washer load cell was placed between the two segments of test blocks to measure the compression force. Because the total length of each foam block was 42 mm, the 40-mm screws were embedded in the cancellous foam, while the 45-mm screws penetrated the denser cortical foam at the bottom. This enabled us to compare inter-fragmentary compression pressures as they are affected by the penetration of the apical dens tip by the screws. The mean compression pressures of the 40- and 45-mm long cannulated lag screws were 50.48±1.20 N and 53.88±1.02 N, respectively, which was not statistically significant (p=0.0551). The mean compression pressures of the 40-mm long Herbert screw was 52.82±2.17 N, and was not statistically significant compared with the 40-mm long cannulated lag screw (p=0.3679). However, 45-mm Herbert screw had significantly higher mean compression pressure (60.68±2.03 N) than both the 45-mm cannulated lag screw and the 40-mm Herbert screw (p=0.0049 and p=0.0246, respectively). Our results showed that inter-fragmentary compression pressures of the Herbert screw were significantly increased when the screw tip penetrated the opposite dens cortical foam. This can support the generally recommended surgical technique that, in order to facilitate maximal reduction of the fracture gap using anterior odontoid screws, it is essential to penetrate the apical dens tip with the screw.

  16. Restoration of divergent implants with a 2-piece screw-retained fixed, complete dental implant prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelekanos, Stavros; Pozidi, Georgia; Kourtis, Stefanos

    2016-04-01

    Restoring a severely resorbed maxilla is challenging because of poor bone quality and the resorptive pattern that follows tooth loss. When bone augmentation is not possible, implants are placed in suboptimal positions, making the prosthetic rehabilitation more complex. This report presents the steps used to rehabilitate a severely resorbed maxilla with divergent implants, using an implant-supported 2-piece screw-retained prosthesis. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  18. Accuracy of Latarjet graft and screw position after using novel drill guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatte, T O; Hartel, M J; Weiser, L; Hoffmann, M; Wehrenberg, U; Heinemann, A; Rueger, J M; Briem, D

    2017-10-01

    For the success of Latarjet procedure a correct graft positioning is mandatory. Furthermore, the correct screw placement is important to avoid cartilage damage and soft tissue irritation. Due to a cadaveric experimental study, the accuracy of graft and screw positioning utilizing a novel drill guide for a minimal-invasive Latarjet procedure was analyzed. Five human fresh-frozen shoulder specimens have been treated in accordance with the Congruent-Arc Latarjet technique using the glenoid bone loss set (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) with 3.75 mm cannulated screws throughout a 5 cm skin incision without detachment of the scapularis tendon. All procedures were performed by one single, experienced shoulder surgeon. The accuracy of graft and screw positioning was assessed due to a CT scan. A noticeable learning curve was noted during the study period as the first surgery took 45 min and the last 33 min. All grafts were correctly positioned with regard to the articular line of the glenoid surface. Impingement with the maximum head circumference was not encountered. The screw positions did not affect the suprascapular nerve. A damage of the graft was not noticed. The authors can recommend the usage of the new drill guide tested in this study. It seems to be beneficial in the Latarjet procedure and may ease correct graft positioning and prevent screw misplacement. Compared to fully arthroscopically performed Latarjet procedures it provides much steeper learning curve and seems technically easier and quicker to handle.

  19. May "Dubel" be a solution for pullout problem of the pedicle screws at osteoporotic spine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Ertugrul; Eyuboglu, Eylem Eren; Yazar, Ugur; Gazioglu, Gurkan; Guvercin, Ali Riza; Baykal, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    To improve the strength of stabilization systems currently used in osteoporotic spinal fractures, essentially by increasing the fixation force of pedicle screws. Six human cadaveric vertebrae were used. Bone mineral densities of the specimens were measured with Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry in order to assess the osteoporosis. All vertebrae were found to be severely osteoporotic. Standard pedicle screws were applied to left pedicles of vertebrae. Pedicle screws reinforced by fixing plugs "Dubel" were applied to right pedicles of vertebrae. Afterwards the vertebrae were embedded in acrylic casts to prevent possible fracture of the osteoporotic vertebrae and to obtain a correct vertical pull-out vector. The biomechanical pullout tests were performed with biomechanical testing machine. Pullout forces in each group were recorded and compared with Mann-Whitney U test. The pedicle screws strengthened by "Dubel" were found to be four times stronger than the standard pedicle screws, in the osteoporotic human cadaveric vertebrae. "Dubel"-augmented pedicle screws may contribute to developing better stabilization systems for osteoporotic thoracolumbar fractures needing surgery and in the revision of the previous fusion surgeries of the spine.

  20. [A method to avoid the fixator failure by using pedicle screw combined vertebroplasty for spine fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Sheng; Mao, Ke-ya; Liu, Bao-wei; Wang, Yan; Liang, Yu-tian; Tang, Pei-fu; Wang, Hui-xian

    2006-08-15

    To study a new implant material (carbonated hydroxyapatite, CHA) united pedicle screw to cure spine fracture. Thirty-two cases of spine compressed fracture were used with pedicle screw fixator and vertebroplasty. Before operation, patients' vertebral body were compressed (46 + 21)% (20% approximately 70%) on average. In operation, broken vertebral body was reposition through pedicle screw technique, then used self-made syringe to inject CHA into anterior and central column of broken vertebral body through pedicle. And all of patients were not given any bone-graft. In 6 - 26 months followed-up, no immunologic rejection was found about hydroxyapatite, and no any broken of the screws and shafts was found, no loosing and other complications either. All the patients could move in 3 - 5 days after operation. The height of the broken vertebral body were reduced 97% compared with pre-operation. And CHA in vertebral body was degraded gradually, and at the same time it was replace by new bone in vertebral body. After operation, VAS score was 61 +/- 32, and there was significant difference compared with pre-operation. The pedicle screw fixation united vertebroplasty is an efficient way to prevent the failure of the treatment of spine fracture.

  1. Increased pedicle screw pullout strength with vertebroplasty augmentation in osteoporotic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzier, John S; Evans, Avery J; Cahill, David W

    2002-04-01

    The authors conducted a biomechanical study to evaluate pedicle screw pullout strength in osteoporotic cadaveric spines. Nonaugmented hemivertebrae were compared with pressurized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-augmented hemivertebrae. Six formalin-fixed cadaveric thoracolumbar spines at least two standard deviations below the mean bone mineral density (BMD) for age were obtained. Radiographic and BMD studies were correlated to grades I, II, and III osteoporosis according to the Jekei scale. Each of the 21 vertebrae underwent fluoroscopic placement of 6-mm transpedicular screws with each hemivertebra serving as the control for the contralateral PMMA-augmented hemivertebra. Pedicle screws were then evaluated for biomechanical axial pullout resistance. Augmented hemivertebrae axial pullout forces were increased (p = 0.0005). The mean increase in pullout force was 181% for Grade I, 206% for Grade II, and 213% for Grade III osteoporotic spines. Augmented Grade I osteoporotic spines demonstrated axial pullout forces near those levels reported in the literature for nonosteoporotic specimens. Augmented Grade II osteoporotic specimens demonstrated increases to levels found in nonaugmented vertebrae with low-normal BMD. Augmented Grade III osteoporotic specimens had increases to levels equal to those found in nonaugmented Grade I vertebrae. Augmentation of osteoporotic vertebrae in PMMA-assisted vertebroplasty can significantly increase pedicle screw pullout forces to levels exceeding the strength of cortical bone. The maximum attainable force appears to be twice the pullout force of the nonaugmented pedicle screw for each osteoporotic grade.

  2. Role of Appositional Screw Fixation in Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis for Distal Tibial Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kyu-Hyun; Won, Yougun; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Oh, Jin-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2015-09-01

    To determine the effect of interfragmentary appositional (gap-closing) screw fixation in minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) for distal tibial fractures on the clinical and radiologic results. Prospective nonrandomized study. Level I trauma center. Sixty patients who were diagnosed as distal metadiaphyseal oblique or spiral tibial fracture without displaced articular fragment. Thirty patients (group A) of the 60 patients were treated with MIPO without appositional screw fixation, and the other 30 (group B) were treated with the screw. Radiologic union, clinical union, clinical functional score [American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score], and complications. The time for initial callus formation and radiologic union was significantly longer in group A than those in group B (76.8 vs. 58.0 days, P = 0.044; 409 vs. 258.7 days, P = 0.002, respectively). The rate of clinical union during 1 year was significantly higher in group B than in group A (P = 0.0063). Four nonunion patients in group A achieved bone union after placement of an additional bone graft. None of the patients in group B diagnosed with delayed union or nonunion (P screw fixation in distal tibia MIPO for the fixation of oblique or spiral fracture promoted callus formation and union rate compared with MIPO without appositional screw fixation. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  3. Compression screw fixation of the syndesmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Husam H; Glisson, Richard R; DeOrio, James K

    2012-10-01

    Screw fixation of syndesmotic injuries facilitates ligament healing and restoration of ankle stability, but little information regarding screw performance is available. This study quantified the reduction obtained with three common 2-screw configurations using different methods of reduction and novel methods of subsequently provoking and measuring diastasis. Seven fresh-frozen lower extremities were subjected to 100 N medial and lateral tibia loads with the talus restrained. Tibia displacement, indicative of ankle clear space, was recorded. The syndesmosis and distal interosseous ligament were disrupted and measurements repeated. A pressure sensor was inserted into the syndesmosis and three 2-screw fixation methods were evaluated in each specimen: 3.5-mm screws engaging both fibula cortices and the lateral tibial cortex, inserted while using a clamp to achieve syndesmosis reduction; 3.5-mm lag screws engaging both tibia cortices; and 4.5-mm lag screws engaging both tibia cortices. One thousand 100 N medial and lateral loads were applied and clear space and syndesmosis compression were quantified every 100 cycles. Normal ankle clear space averaged 1.98 mm and increased to 3.02 mm after syndesmosis disruption. Fixation decreased the clear space to 1.36 mm, 1.22 mm, and 1.19 mm for the 3.5-mm tricortical, 3.5-mm lag, and 4.5-mm lag screws, respectively, remaining steady throughout cyclic loading. Syndesmosis compression dropped markedly from 61N to 23 N on clamp release after tricortical screw insertion. The 3.5-mm and 4.5-mm lag screws exerted 112 N and 131 N, respectively, after insertion, and maintained compression several-fold greater than the tricortical screws during cyclic loading. No difference was demonstrable between the two lag screw sizes. While all screw configurations successfully reduced ankle clear space, syndesmosis reduction was more effectively maintained by lag screws than by tricortical screws inserted with clamp reduction. The transient nature of

  4. Occipital bone thickness: Implications on occipital-cervical fusion. A cadaveric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Zarghooni

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The measurements demonstrated a great individual variability of bone thickness of the occipital bone. The results emphasize the role of preoperative planning for the feasibility of placement of an occipital screw.

  5. [Intraoperative three-dimensional navigation for pedicle screw placement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grützner, P A; Beutler, T; Wendl, K; von Recum, J; Wentzensen, A; Nolte, L-P

    2004-10-01

    The mobile SIREMOBIL Iso-C(3D) C-arm (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) is the first device permitting intraoperative, three-dimensional representation of bone structures. A high-resolution, isotropic 3D data cube in the isocenter with sides of approximately 12 cm is calculated simultaneously. The SIREMOBIL Iso-C(3D) is linked to the navigation system. This makes it possible to transfer the generated 3D data directly to the linked navigation system without the need for surgeon-dependent registration. In this prospective clinical trial, we evaluated the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using this device. In 61 patients, a total of 302 pedicle screws were placed. Only in five cases (1.7%) were misplacements of > or =2 mm shown in postoperative control CT. The average fluoroscopy time was 1.28+/-0.56 min, and the average operative duration was 103.26+/-23.3 min. There were no postoperative neurological complications in any of the 30 patients. From these data, we conclude that Iso-C(3D) navigation is a very accurate method for the placement of pedicle screws.

  6. Modelling of the Heating Process in a Thermal Screw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Veje, Christian T.; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2012-11-01

    The procedure of separating efficiently dry-stuff (proteins), fat, and water is an important process in the handling of waste products from industrial and commercial meat manufactures. One of the sub-processes in a separation facility is a thermal screw where the raw material (after proper mincing) is heated in order to melt fat, coagulate protein, and free water. This process is very energy consuming and the efficiency of the product is highly dependent on accurate temperature control of the process. A key quality parameter is the time that the product is maintained at temperatures within a certain threshold. A detailed mathematical model for the heating process in the thermal screw is developed and analysed. The model is formulated as a set of partial differential equations including the latent heat for the melting process of the fat and the boiling of water, respectively. The product is modelled by three components; water, fat and dry-stuff (bones and proteins). The melting of the fat component is captured as a plateau in the product temperature. The model effectively captures the product outlet temperature and the energy consumed. Depending on raw material composition, "soft" or "dry", the model outlines the heat injection and screw speeds necessary to obtain optimal output quality.

  7. Surgical treatment of degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases with expandable screws in patients with osteoporosis: 2-year follow-up clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Roperto, Raffaelino; Fiore, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle screw instrumentation of the osteoporotic spine carries an increased risk of screw loosening, pullout, and fixation failure. A variety of techniques have been used clinically to improve pedicle screw fixation in the presence of compromised bone. Pedicle screws may be augmented with cement, but this may lead to cement leakage and result in disastrous consequences. To avoid these complications, a multiaxial expandable pedicle screw has been developed. This was a prospective, single-center study designed to evaluate the clinical results of patients with osteoporosis with traumatic and degenerative spinal diseases treated with expandable pedicle screws. METHODS Thirty-three patients (mean age 61.4 years) with osteoporosis and traumatic or degenerative spinal diseases underwent spinal posterior fixation with expandable screws. Preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire scores were obtained. The immediate postoperative screw position was measured and compared with the final position on lateral plain radiographs and axial CT scans at the 1- and 2-year follow-up examinations. RESULTS A total of 182 pedicle screws were used, including 174 expandable and 8 regular screws. The mean preoperative patient VAS score improved from 8.2 to 3.6 after surgery. The mean ODI score improved from 83.7% before surgery to 29.7% after the operation and to 36.1% at the final follow-up. No screw migration had occurred at the 1-year follow-up, but 1 screw breakage/migration was visualized on spinal radiography at the 2-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study show that the multiaxial expandable pedicle screw is a safe and practical technique for patients with osteoporosis and various spinal diseases and adds a valuable tool to the armamentarium of spinal instrumentation.

  8. Combined Percutaneous Iliosacral Screw Fixation With Sacroplasty Using Resorbable Calcium Phosphate Cement for Osteoporotic Pelvic Fractures Requiring Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinge, Cory A; Crist, Brett D

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporotic sacral fractures, including acute and chronic insufficiency fractures, are increasing in frequency and present a number of management problem. Many of these patients are treated nonoperatively with relative immobility (eg, bedrest, wheelchair, or weight-bearing restrictions) and analgesics, which likely make the osteoporotic component worse. Surgery in this patient population may be desirable in some cases with the goals of improving mobility, relieving pain, and healing in an aligned position while minimizing deformity progression. However, internal fixation of the osteoporotic pelvis can be difficult. Large unicortical lag screws are the workhorse of posterior pelvic fixation, and yet fixation in cancellous bone corridors of an osteoporotic sacrum seems unlikely to achieve optimal fixation. As a result, the operative management and clinical results of these difficult injuries may not be uniformly successful. The authors present a technique for treating osteoporotic patients with a sacral fracture when operative treatment is indicated using percutaneous screw fixation combined with screw augmentation using a resorbable calcium phosphate bone substitute or "cement." The guide wire for a 7.3-mm or other large cannulated lag screw is fully inserted along the desired bony sacral corridor as is standard. The lag screw is then inserted over the wire to the depth where cement is desired. The guide wire is removed, and the aqueous calcium phosphate is injected through the screw's cannulation. For acute fractures, cement was applied to the areas distant to the fracture; whereas in insufficiency fractures, the cement was inserted along most of the screw path. The guide wire then can be reinserted and the lag screw fully inserted. The rationale for using these 2 modalities is their synergistic effect: the cannulated screw provides typical screw fixation and also a conduit for cement application. The cement augments the lag screw's purchase in osteoporotic bone

  9. Optimal trajectory for the atlantooccipital transarticular screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Yeom, Jin S; Lee, Joon Oh; Buchowski, Jacob M; Park, Kun-Woo; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Riew, K Daniel

    2010-07-15

    Radiologic evaluation of computed tomography (CT) scans using screw insertion simulation software. To investigate the optimal entry point and trajectory of atlantooccipital transarticular screws. To our knowledge, no large series focusing on the placement of atlantooccipital transarticular screws have been published. We used 1.0-mm sliced CT scans and 3-dimensional screw trajectory software to simulate 4.0-mm screw placement. Four entry points were evaluated. Screw placement success rate, safe range of medial angulation, and screw length using each entry point were determined. CT scans of 126 patients were evaluated, for a total of 252 screws for each entry point. On simulation, the 2 lateral entry points showed significantly higher success rates and safe range of medial angulation than the 2 middle points. The 2 lateral entry points had similar success rates (98.0% for anteriolateral (AL) point and 97.6% for posteriolateral (PL) point). Although the safe range of medial angulation was significantly wider for the AL point (26.1 degrees) than for the PL point (23.7 degrees), the screw lengths were significantly longer for the PL point (32.6 mm) than for the AL point (29.4 mm). For both points, 30 degrees of medial angulation led to highest rate of successful screw placement, but the rate was only 79.4% and 80.2%, respectively. Although there was no significant difference in success rates between AL and PL points, PL is likely the best entry point. Although 30 degrees medial and approximately 5 degrees upward angulation led to the highest rate of successful screw placement, the rate was only around 80%. Given the wide individual variation, we recommend that a preoperative 3-dimensional CT scan be obtained when attempting atlantooccipital transarticular screw fixation.

  10. Biomechanical Analysis of Latarjet Screw Fixation: Comparison of Screw Types and Fixation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jason J; Hamamoto, Jason T; Leroux, Timothy S; Saccomanno, Maristella F; Jain, Akshay; Khair, Mahmoud M; Mellano, Christen R; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Nicholson, Gregory P; Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-09-01

    To compare the initial fixation stability, failure strength, and mode of failure of 5 different screw types and fixation methods commonly used for the classic Latarjet procedure. Thirty-five fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulder specimens were allocated into 5 groups. A 25% anteroinferior glenoid defect was created, and a classic Latarjet coracoid transfer procedure was performed. All grafts were fixed with 2 screws, differing by screw type and/or fixation method. The groups included partially threaded solid 4.0-mm cancellous screws with bicortical fixation, partially threaded solid 4.0-mm cancellous screws with unicortical fixation, fully threaded solid 3.5-mm cortical screws with bicortical fixation, partially threaded cannulated 4.0-mm cancellous screws with bicortical fixation, and partially threaded cannulated 4.0-mm captured screws with bicortical fixation. All screws were stainless steel. Outcomes included cyclic creep and secant stiffness during cyclic loading, as well as load and work to failure during the failure test. Intergroup comparisons were made by a 1-way analysis of variance. There were no significant differences among different screw types or fixation methods in cyclic creep or secant stiffness after cyclic loading or in load to failure or work to failure during the failure test. Post-failure radiographs showed evidence of screw bending in only 1 specimen that underwent the Latarjet procedure with partially threaded solid cancellous screws with bicortical fixation. The mode of failure for all specimens analyzed was screw cutout. In this biomechanical study, screw type and fixation method did not significantly influence biomechanical performance in a classic Latarjet procedure. When performing this procedure, surgeons may continue to select the screw type and method of fixation (unicortical or bicortical) based on preference; however, further studies are required to determine the optimal method of treatment. Surgeons may choose the screw type and

  11. In vitro validation of a novel mechanical model for testing the anchorage capacity of pedicle screws using physiological load application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Christian; Zimmermann, Julia; Graf, Nicolas; Schilling, Christoph; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Kienle, Annette

    2018-01-01

    Biomechanical in vitro tests analysing screw loosening often include high standard deviations caused by high variabilities in bone mineral density and pedicle geometry, whereas standardized mechanical models made of PU foam often do not integrate anatomical or physiological boundary conditions. The purpose of this study was to develop a most realistic mechanical model for the standardized and reproducible testing of pedicle screws regarding the resistance against screw loosening and the holding force as well as to validate this model by in vitro experiments. The novel mechanical testing model represents all anatomical structures of a human vertebra and is consisting of PU foam to simulate cancellous bone, as well as a novel pedicle model made of short carbon fibre filled epoxy. Six monoaxial cannulated pedicle screws (Ø6.5 × 45mm) were tested using the mechanical testing model as well as human vertebra specimens by applying complex physiological cyclic loading (shear, tension, and bending; 5Hz testing frequency; sinusoidal pulsating forces) in a dynamic materials testing machine with stepwise increasing load after each 50.000 cycles (100.0N shear force + 20.0N per step, 51.0N tension force + 10.2N per step, 4.2Nm bending moment + 0.8Nm per step) until screw loosening was detected. The pedicle screw head was fixed on a firmly clamped rod while the load was applied in the vertebral body. For the in vitro experiments, six human lumbar vertebrae (L1-3, BMD 75.4 ± 4.0mg/cc HA, pedicle width 9.8 ± 0.6mm) were tested after implanting pedicle screws under X-ray control. Relative motions of pedicle screw, specimen fixture, and rod fixture were detected using an optical motion tracking system. Translational motions of the mechanical testing model experiments in the point of load introduction (0.9-2.2mm at 240N shear force) were reproducible within the variation range of the in vitro experiments (0.6-3.5mm at 240N shear force). Screw loosening occurred continuously in

  12. Pedicle screw "hubbing" in the immature thoracic spine: a biomechanical and micro-computed tomography evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A; Bevevino, Adam J; Gaume, Rachel E; Purcell, Richard L; Dmitriev, Anton E; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2014-01-01

    A previous biomechanical study using adult thoracic vertebrae (both normal and osteoporotic bone density) demonstrated the deleterious effect of the pedicle screw hubbing technique. Pedicle screw "hubbing" involves seating and engaging the ventral aspect of the screw head onto the dorsal lamina cortex. This technique is postulated to provide a load-sharing effect by improving pullout resistance, as well as decreasing cephalocaudad toggling and implant loosening. We hypothesized the elastic properties of immature bone may mitigate, and perhaps enhance the purported benefits of the hubbing technique. We set out to evaluate pullout strength of fixed-head pedicle screws after hubbing versus standard insertion in the immature thoracic calf spine. Twenty-two (n=22) single-level disarticulated fresh-frozen immature calf thoracic vertebra specimens (ranging from T2 to T13) were prepared. Twelve specimens were instrumented with pedicle screws in group I (nonhubbed) and group II (hubbed) in the opposite pedicle. Cyclic loading in a cephalocaudad direction was applied for 2000 cycles at a rate of 1 Hz. Pullout testing was performed in-line with the midline of the vertebra and peak pullout strength was measured in Newtons. Ten different specimens underwent micro-computed tomography evaluation to assess for trabecular architecture and incidence of iatrogenic microfractures. Hubbed screws resulted in significantly lower pullout strength (747±197 vs. 922±112 N, P=0.01). With the hubbing technique, the dorsal cortex demonstrated plastic deformation and conformed to the screw head in 83% of cases compared with no visible plastic deformation in the control group. Micro-computed tomography demonstrated microfractures of the dorsal cortex in 10/10 for the hubbed group compared with 1/10 for the control group. This is the largest study ever performed on immature thoracic vertebra to evaluate this topic. Hubbed pedicle screws have significantly decreased pullout strength and

  13. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Integrated Screw Cages: Intrinsic Load Generation, Subsidence, and Torsional Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assem, Yusuf; Pelletier, Matthew H; Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Walsh, William R

    2017-05-01

    To perform a repeatable idealized in vitro model to evaluate the effects of key design features and integrated screw fixation on unloaded surface engagement, subsidence, and torsional stability. We evaluated four different stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages with two, three, and four screw designs. Polyurethane (saw-bone) foam blocks were used to simulate the vertebral bone. Fuji Film was used to measure the contact footprint, average pressure, and load generated by fixating the cages with screws. Subsidence was tested by axially loading the constructs at 10 N/s to 400 N and torsional load was applied +/-1 Nm for 10 cycles to assess stability. Outcome measures included total subsidence and maximal torsional angle range. Cages 1, 2, and 4 were symmetrical and produced similar results in terms of contact footprint, average pressure, and load. The addition of integrated screws into the cage-bone block construct demonstrated a clear trend towards decreased subsidence. Cage 2 with surface titanium angled ridges and a keel produced the greatest subsidence with and without screws, significantly more than all other cages ( P < 0.05). Angular rotation was not significantly affected by the addition of screws ( P < 0.066). A statistically significant correlation existed between subsidence and reduced angular rotation across all cage constructs ( P = 0.018). Each stand-alone cage featured unique surface characteristics, which resulted in differing cage-foam interface engagement, influencing the subsidence and torsional angle. Increased subsidence significantly reduced the torsional angle across all cage constructs. © 2017 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. [Fracture of implant abutment screws and removal of a remaining screw piece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, S.M. van den; Baat, C. de

    2008-01-01

    Fracture of the implant abutment screws is a complication which can render an implant useless. The prevalence of abutment screw fracture does not exceed 2.5% after 10 years. Causes are loosening of implant abutment screw, too few, too short or too narrow implants, implants not inserted perpendicular

  15. Hollow Abutment Screw Design for Easy Retrieval in Case of Screw Fracture in Dental Implant System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Kyun Sim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosthetic component of dental implant is attached on the abutment which is connected to the fixture with an abutment screw. The abutment screw fracture is not frequent; however, the retrieval of the fractured screw is not easy, and it poses complications. A retrieval kit was developed which utilizes screw removal drills to make a hole on the fractured screw that provides an engaging drill to unscrew it. To minimize this process, the abutment screw is modified with a prefabricated access hole for easy retrieval. This study aimed to introduce this modified design of the abutment screw, the concept of easy retrieval, and to compare the mechanical strengths of the conventional and hollow abutment screws by finite element analysis (FEA and mechanical test. In the FEA results, both types of abutment screws showed similar stress distribution in the single artificial tooth system. A maximum load difference of about 2% occurred in the vertical load by a mechanical test. This study showed that the hollow abutment screw may be an alternative to the conventional abutment screws because this is designed for easy retrieval and that both abutment screws showed no significant difference in the mechanical tests and in the FEA.

  16. Outcomes of Distal Femur Fracture Treated with Dynamic Condylar Screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razaq, M. N. U.; Muhammad, T.; Ahmed, A.; Adeel, M.; Ahmad, S.; Ahmad, S.; Sultan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Implants for open reduction and internal fixation of distal femoral fracture includes angle blade plate, rush nails, enders nail and interlocking nails. But all these devices are technically demanding and less effective in providing inter-fragmentary compression in osteoporotic bones. These problems can be solved with dynamic condylar screw (DCS).The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of different outcomes of distal femoral fracture treated with dynamic condylar screw Methods: This case series study was carried out in the Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from 1st October 2014 to August 2015, after approval of the ethical committee of the institution. Data of all patients with distal femoral fractures aged 20-70 years, recruited through emergency, OPD or consultant clinic collected on a proforma. Standard treatment of trauma was given to the patients. Detailed history was taken including the past medical and surgical history. Detailed examination including air-way, breathing and circulation, general physical examination and abdomino-pelvic examination was done in each patient. Investigations including urinalysis, haemoglobin percent, full blood count, X-ray (both AP and lateral view) of the involved femur (including hip and knee) was done. Results: Mean age of the patients was 43.18±14.647 ranging from 20 to 70 years. Mean duration of hospital stay in days was 2.21±1.111 ranging from 1 to 6 days. Patients follow-up assessment after 4 months of surgery for union of femoral fracture treated with dynamic condylar screw was found in 96 (94.1 percent), wound infection was found in 7 (6.9 percent), knee stiffness was found in 21 (20.6 percent) and limb shortening was found in 7 (6.9 percent). Conclusion: Dynamic condylar screw is an easy, scientifically less difficult and satisfying method of treatment for fractures of femur. (author)

  17. Biomechanical comparison of screw versus plate/screw construct for talonavicular fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Shelby E; Owen, John R; Wayne, Jennifer S; Adelaar, Robert S

    2009-02-01

    Talonavicular fusion is performed for a variety of indications. This study examined the effects of fixation techniques on plantar pressures, construct stiffness, and strength. Eight matched pairs of cadaveric lower extremities were axially loaded intact and after talonavicular fixation with a 3.5 reconstruction plate, reconstruction plate plus cancellous screw (plate/screw), or three screws (screws). Recorded plantar pressures were divided into three forefoot, two midfoot, and two hindfoot regions. Cantilevered bending of excised constructs provided stiffness data for plantar and lateral directions, and failure characteristics in plantar bending. Relative to the intact state, all fixations decreased peak pressure in the medial forefoot, while generally increasing it in the lateral forefoot and midfoot. Average pressure shifted laterally for all fixation methods in the forefoot, generally in the hindfoot and the lateral midfoot. Generally, contact areas decreased in the medial forefoot, midfoot, and hindfoot while increasing laterally in the midfoot and hindfoot. The only difference among fixation methods was a decreased medial midfoot contact area for screws. No differences were found between screws and plate/screw in bending stiffness or failure (p screw method averaged approximately 363 N/mm while stiffness of the screw only construct averaged approximately 380 N/mm. The load to failure averaged 946 N for the plate/screw construct and 1099 N for the screw construct. This study showed lateralization of plantar pressures following talonavicular fixation. Minimal differences were found between plate/screw and screws. Fixation across the joint may be key to achieving stability sufficient to resist shear and rotational stresses. Plate/screw or screws would likely be similarly effective in fusing the talonavicular joint. However, the fusion induced lateralization of plantar pressures may unintentionally result in adjacent joint arthritis and foot pain.

  18. Biomechanical comparison of augmented versus non-augmented sacroiliac screws in a novel hemi-pelvis test model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüneweller, Niklas; Raschke, Michael J; Zderic, Ivan; Widmer, Daniel; Wähnert, Dirk; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Richards, Robert Geoff; Fuchs, Thomas; Windolf, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Operative treatment of sacral insufficiency fractures is frequently being complicated by osteopenic bone properties. Cement augmentation of implanted sacroiliac screws may lead to superior construct stability and prevent mechanical complications. A novel hemi-pelvis test model with dissected symphysis was developed. Five fresh-frozen cadaveric pelvises were vertically osteotomized at the sacrum on both sides and fixed with sacroiliac screws in both corridors of the first sacral vertebral body. One side was randomly augmented with bone cement. Cyclic testing consisting of torsional loading (±2.5 Nm) combined with progressively increasing axial loading (+50 N compression, -10 N traction, ±0,01 N/cycle) was performed until failure; simulated physiological loads derived from inverse dynamic calculations. The fixation was analyzed fluoroscopically quantifying screw migrations and assessing failure mechanisms. Failure modes were cut-out, pull-out, screw-out, and washer penetration. Motion at fracture site was analyzed via optical motion tracking. Unscrewing was provoked four times with non-augmented and twice with augmented screws. When focusing on the sacral region only, cement augmentation significantly improved screw fixation in terms of increased number of cycles to failure (p = 0.043). However, when considering overall construct stability, there was no significant difference between augmented and non-augmented state due to washer penetration at the iliac bone. The generated hemi-pelvis model was found to be valid due to the reproduction of the clinically observed failure mode (unscrewing). Unscrewing was not fully prevented by cement augmentation. Augmentation effects stability at the screw tip, but particularly in porotic bone, failure may shift to the next weak point. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1485-1493, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effects of Lateral Mass Screw Rod Fixation to the Stability of Cervical Spine after Laminectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Ruwaida; Kashani, Jamal; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    There are many cases of injury in the cervical spine due to degenerative disorder, trauma or instability. This condition may produce pressure on the spinal cord or on the nerve coming from the spine. The aim of this study was, to analyze the stabilization of the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy via computational simulation. For that purpose, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for the multilevel cervical spine segment (C1-C7) was developed using computed tomography (CT) data. There are various decompression techniques that can be applied to overcome the injury. Usually, decompression procedures will create an unstable spine. Therefore, in these situations, the spine is often surgically restabilized by using fusion and instrumentation. In this study, a lateral mass screw-rod fixation was created to stabilize the cervical spine after laminectomy. Material properties of the titanium alloy were assigned on the implants. The requirements moments and boundary conditions were applied on simulated implanted bone. Result showed that the bone without implant has a higher flexion and extension angle in comparison to the bone with implant under applied 1Nm moment. The bone without implant has maximum stress distribution at the vertebrae and ligaments. However, the bone with implant has maximum stress distribution at the screws and rods. Overall, the lateral mass screw-rod fixation provides stability to the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy.

  20. Pedicle screw anchorage of carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws under cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindtner, Richard A; Schmid, Rene; Nydegger, Thomas; Konschake, Marko; Schmoelz, Werner

    2018-03-01

    Pedicle screw loosening is a common and significant complication after posterior spinal instrumentation, particularly in osteoporosis. Radiolucent carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF/PEEK) pedicle screws have been developed recently to overcome drawbacks of conventional metallic screws, such as metal-induced imaging artifacts and interference with postoperative radiotherapy. Beyond radiolucency, CF/PEEK may also be advantageous over standard titanium in terms of pedicle screw loosening due to its unique material properties. However, screw anchorage and loosening of CF/PEEK pedicle screws have not been evaluated yet. The aim of this biomechanical study therefore was to evaluate whether the use of this alternative nonmetallic pedicle screw material affects screw loosening. The hypotheses tested were that (1) nonmetallic CF/PEEK pedicle screws resist an equal or higher number of load cycles until loosening than standard titanium screws and that (2) PMMA cement augmentation further increases the number of load cycles until loosening of CF/PEEK screws. In the first part of the study, left and right pedicles of ten cadaveric lumbar vertebrae (BMD 70.8 mg/cm 3  ± 14.5) were randomly instrumented with either CF/PEEK or standard titanium pedicle screws. In the second part, left and right pedicles of ten vertebrae (BMD 56.3 mg/cm 3  ± 15.8) were randomly instrumented with either PMMA-augmented or nonaugmented CF/PEEK pedicle screws. Each pedicle screw was subjected to cyclic cranio-caudal loading (initial load ranging from - 50 N to + 50 N) with stepwise increasing compressive loads (5 N every 100 cycles) until loosening or a maximum of 10,000 cycles. Angular screw motion ("screw toggling") within the vertebra was measured with a 3D motion analysis system every 100 cycles and by stress fluoroscopy every 500 cycles. The nonmetallic CF/PEEK pedicle screws resisted a similar number of load cycles until loosening as the contralateral standard

  1. Effects of Immediate Orthodontic and Orthopedic Forces on Peri-Miniscrew Bones: Histomorphologic and Histomorphometric Assessment in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Rismanchian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was histomorphologic and histomorphometric evaluation of peri-screw bone after immediate orthodontic and orthopedic forces and comparing them with a control group. Materials and Methods. 18 dual-top miniscrews were inserted in the premolar region of three Iranian dogs. Screws were divided into three groups: (1 the first group undergoing immediate orthodontic force of 300 cN, (2 the second group undergoing immediate orthopedic force of 600 cN and (3 a control group. Screws were explanted with adequate amount of surrounding bone after three months. Bone-screw contact (BSC, percentage of lamellar bone, and percentage of woven bone were evaluated. Wilcoxon and Man Whitney tests were used to analyze the data using SPSS software ver. 15 (. Results. There was no significant difference among the groups in terms of bone-screw contact (, percentage of lamellar bone (, and percentage of woven bone (. Conclusion. By applying orthodontic and orthopedic forces to mini-screws the quality of surrounding bone and osseointegration will not be affected. Clinical Significance. Application of force to mini-screws is helpful in orthodontic-screw therapies.

  2. Simple Technique for Removing Broken Pedicular Screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Agrawal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The procedure for removing a broken pedicle screw should ideally be technically easy and minimally invasive, as any damage to the pedicle, during removal of the broken screw, may weaken the pedicle, thus compromising on the success of re-instrumentation. We describe the case of a 32-year old man who had undergone surgery for traumatic third lumbar vertebral body fracture three years prior to current admission and had developed the complication of pedicle screw breakage within the vertebral body. The patient underwent re-exploration and removal of the distal screws. Through a paravertebral incision and muscle separation, the screws and rods were exposed and the implants were removed.

  3. Twin screw subsurface and surface multiphase pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dass, P. [CAN-K GROUP OF COMPANIES, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    A new subsurface twin screw multiphase pump has been developed to replace ESP and other artificial lift technologies. This technology has been under development for a few years, has been field tested and is now going for commercial applications. The subsurface twin screw technology consists of a pair of screws that do not touch and can be run with a top drive or submersible motor; and it carries a lot of benefits. This technology is easy to install and its low slippage makes it highly efficient with heavy oil. In addition twin screw multiphase pumps are capable of handling high viscosity fluids and thus their utilization can save water when used in thermal applications. It also induces savings of chemicals because asphaltenes do not break down easily as well as a reduction in SOR. The subsurface twin screw multiphase pump presented herein is an advanced technology which could be used in thermal applications.

  4. [Screw arthrodesis of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, S; Berndt, T; Lipka, W; Rühmann, O

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the procedure is arthrodesis of the shoulder by osteosynthesis of the glenohumeral and the acromiohumeral joint each with three screws, which results in preservation of scapulothoracic motion and pain relief. Traumatic brachial plexus lesions, palsy in infancy, poliomyelitis with preserved or restorable function of the elbow and the hand. Paralysis of the deltoid muscle and the rotator cuff. Nonrestorable vast defect of the rotator cuff with pseudoparalysis. Chronic infectious arthritis resistant to therapy. Unsuccessful attempts to treat glenohumeral instability. Alternative procedure to shoulder arthroplasty in young patients with omarthrosis, who perform hard physical work. Insufficient strength of the scapular muscles (Weaning from the splint after the end of the week 6 postoperatively, full range of motion allowed. In a prospective study from January 2007 to September 2008, 4 patients with a medium age of 35.7 years underwent screw arthrodesis of the shoulder with a follow-up of 1.0 (0.6-1.5) year. Primary fusion of all arthrodesis surfaces was achieved in all patients; no revision surgery was necessary. All patients improved in shoulder function with an average range of motion of 60° abduction and 40° anteversion.

  5. Graft osteolysis and recurrent instability after the Latarjet procedure performed with bioabsorbable screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestro, Jean-Christian; Young, Allan; Maccioni, Cristobal; Walch, Gilles

    2015-05-01

    The Latarjet procedure is a reliable treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The coracoid process is usually fixed with metallic screws; however, these can lead to irritation and the necessity for hardware removal and also can produce artifacts on imaging studies. The use of resorbable screws could avoid these complications. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical results of the Latarjet procedure performed with bioabsorbable screws in addition to healing of the graft and resorption of the screws. In 2009, we performed a prospective study (case series, IV) of 11 patients (12 shoulders) who underwent a Latarjet procedure fixed with resorbable screws. Each patient was observed clinically and had a computed tomography scan at 3 months and 2 years of follow-up. Every graft healed at 3-month follow-up. At 2-year follow-up, 4 patients had at least one instability episode, and one underwent a revision surgery. Three of these 4 patients were unhappy or disappointed. The Walch-Duplay score was excellent or good for 7 shoulders and medium or poor for 5. Screw resorption appeared complete in every case. No drill hole enlargement was observed. Every drill hole was partially filled with bone. Of 12 shoulders, 8 (66.67%) were associated with a severe osteolysis and an almost complete disappearance of the graft. Coracoid graft osteolysis, previously reported after the Latarjet procedure, appears to be exacerbated with a risk of complete disappearance of the graft when the procedure is performed with the bioabsorbable screws used in this study. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Screw fixation diameter for fifth metatarsal jones fracture: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ryan T; Hyer, Christopher F; DeMill, Shyler L

    2015-01-01

    The fifth metatarsal Jones fracture is a well-documented injury occurring at the proximal diaphyseal-metaphyseal junction. Conservative versus surgical intervention has been discussed in published studies for the management of Jones fractures. Solid intramedullary fixation relies on accurate matching of the screw diameter to the intraosseous diameter. The purpose of the present cadaveric study was to determine the average intraosseous diameter of the proximal fifth metatarsal as it relates to screw size selection for Jones fracture stabilization. Twenty fresh-frozen cadaver legs were used for examination. The fifth metatarsal was completely dissected. A transverse osteotomy was performed from laterally to medially along the midline of the metatarsal. A digital caliper was used to measure the diameter of the medullary canal of the fifth metatarsal. The measurement was taken at the narrowest portion of the medullary canal just distal to the proximal metaphysis. The mean dorsal to plantar diameter of the fifth metatarsal was 6.475 ± 1.54 (range 4 to 12) mm and the mean medial to lateral diameter was 4.6 ± 0.85 (range 3 to 6) mm. Intramedullary screw fixation has shown beneficial results in the treatment protocol of fifth metatarsal Jones fractures. Our study has demonstrated that a 4.5-mm cannulated screw is the narrowest diameter screw that can be used in the average fifth metatarsal and still obtain adequate intraosseous purchase. When selecting the appropriate screw, the surgeon must be comfortable selecting the largest screw that will achieve the maximal interface with the dense cortical bone in both the medial to lateral and dorsal to plantar plane. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Biomechanics of transvertebral screw fixation in the thoracic spine: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Martinez, Nestor G; Savardekar, Amey; Nottmeier, Eric W; Pirris, Stephen; Reyes, Phillip M; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Mendes, George A C; Kalb, Samuel; Theodore, Nicholas; Crawford, Neil R

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Transvertebral screws provide stability in thoracic spinal fixation surgeries, with their use mainly limited to patients who require a pedicle screw salvage technique. However, the biomechanical impact of transvertebral screws alone, when they are inserted across 2 vertebral bodies, has not been studied. In this study, the authors assessed the stability offered by a transvertebral screw construct for posterior instrumentation and compared its biomechanical performance to that of standard bilateral pedicle screw and rod (PSR) fixation. METHODS Fourteen fresh human cadaveric thoracic spine segments from T-6 to T-11 were divided into 2 groups with similar ages and bone quality. Group 1 received transvertebral screws across 2 levels without rods and subsequently with interconnecting bilateral rods at 3 levels (T8-10). Group 2 received bilateral PSR fixation and were sequentially tested with interconnecting rods at T7-8 and T9-10, at T8-9, and at T8-10. Flexibility tests were performed on intact and instrumented specimens in both groups. Presurgical and postsurgical O-arm 3D images were obtained to verify screw placement. RESULTS The mean range of motion (ROM) per motion segment with transvertebral screws spanning 2 levels compared with the intact condition was 66% of the mean intact ROM during flexion-extension (p = 0.013), 69% during lateral bending (p = 0.015), and 47% during axial rotation (p < 0.001). The mean ROM per motion segment with PSR spanning 2 levels compared with the intact condition was 38% of the mean intact ROM during flexion-extension (p < 0.001), 57% during lateral bending (p = 0.007), and 27% during axial rotation (p < 0.001). Adding bilateral rods to the 3 levels with transvertebral screws decreased the mean ROM per motion segment to 28% of intact ROM during flexion-extension (p < 0.001), 37% during lateral bending (p < 0.001), and 30% during axial rotation (p < 0.001). The mean ROM per motion segment for PSR spanning 3 levels was 21% of

  8. [A biomechanical comparison of Acutrak headless compression screw and AO cannulated lag screw for the fixation of Hoffa fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jing; Zhang, Shu-Liang; Feng, Pin; Jiang, Yong; Zou, Chang; Zhang, Hui; Tu, Chong-Qi

    2013-03-01

    To compare the stability, strength of Letenneur type I Hoffa fractures fixed by Acutrak headless compression screws and AO cannulated lag screws. 12 models of Letenneur type I Hoffa fractures were randomly divided into 4 groups, which were fixed with two AO cannulated lag screws or Acutrak headless compression screws anteroposteriorly or posteroanteriorly. The stress between two fragments of all specimens was tested. Axial compression test, the cycle load test and the limit load test were successively performed in every specimen. In axial compression test, displacement of Acutrak headless compression screw groups was lower than that of AO cannulated lag screw anteroposteriorly (P AO cannulated lag screws (P AO cannulated lag screw. The direction of screw affects the initial stability for AO cannulated lag screw, other than Acutrak headless compression screw.

  9. Biomechanical study of the funnel technique applied in thoracic pedicle screw replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Jiang; Peng, Mao-Xiu; He, Shao-Qi; Liu, Liang-Le; Dai, Ming-Hai; Tang, Chenxuan

    2014-09-01

    Funnel technique is a method used for the insertion of screw into thoracic pedicle. To evaluate the biomechanical characteristics of thoracic pedicle screw placement using the Funnel technique, trying to provide biomechanical basis for clinical application of this technology. 14 functional spinal units (T6 to T10) were selected from thoracic spine specimens of 14 fresh adult cadavers, and randomly divided into two groups, including Funnel technique group (n = 7) and Magerl technique group (n = 7). The displacement-stiffness and pull-out strength in all kinds of position were tested and compared. Two fixed groups were significantly higher than that of the intact state (P 0.05). The mean pull-out strength in Funnel technique group (789.09 ± 27.33) was lower than that in Magerl technique group (P Funnel technique for the insertion point of posterior bone is a safe and accurate technique for pedicle screw placement. It exhibited no effects on the stiffness of spinal column, but decreased the pull-out strength of pedicle screw. Therefore, the funnel technique in the thoracic spine affords an alternative for the standard screw placement.

  10. Clinical results and functional outcomes after direct intralaminar screw repair of spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menga, Emmanuel N; Kebaish, Khaled M; Jain, Amit; Carrino, John A; Sponseller, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Prospective analysis. Our objective was to analyze clinical and functional results of patients with spondylolysis treated via direct intralaminar screw fixation and autograft, a minimally invasive and motion-preserving surgery. Spondylolysis is usually treated nonoperatively; multiple surgical techniques are available when nonoperative measures fail. No studies evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes and their correlation with pars defect size and disc morphology on magnetic resonance imaging. We reviewed patients with spondylolysis treated with intralaminar screw fixation and bone grafting from 2000 through 2010. Of the 31 patients (mean age, 16 yr; range, 10-37 yr), 25 (81%) were competitive athletes. Preoperative computed tomographic scans were used to measure the pars defect size, and preoperative magnetic resonance images were graded using Pfirrmann classification for correlation with postoperative outcomes. Student t test was used for analysis (significance, P spondylolysis repair for persistent pain starting 18 months after intralaminar screw fixation, 2 patients sustained unilateral intralaminar screw fractures at L5, and 1 patient required irrigation and debridement for a superficial postoperative infection. There was no correlation among preoperative magnetic resonance imaging disc morphology, defect size on computed tomography, patient age, and clinical outcomes. Direct repair of spondylolysis with intralaminar screws offers a low profile, reliable treatment with good functional outcome and a low complication rate in active patients. 4.

  11. Biomechanical comparison of lag screw versus self-drilling screw fixation of oblique metatarsal osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenhorst, Brien M; Smith, Michael P; James, C Roger; Grimes, Jerry S

    2011-08-01

    Several fixation methods for a Weil metatarsal osteotomy have been proposed. Lag screw fixation has been described as the preferred fixation technique. The self-drilling screw has been introduced and can be used for fixation of the Weil osteotomy. The current study compared self-drilling screws with lag screw fixation. A Weil metatarsal osteotomy was performed on the second, third, and fourth metatarsals of five matched pairs of fresh frozen cadaver feet. The feet of each pair were randomly assigned ical to fixation with either a 2.0-mm cortical lag screw or a 2.0-mm self-drilling screw. The second metatarsals were stressed using cantilever bending. The third and fourth metatarsals were stressed under a shear force. Yield load, deformation at yield load, structural stiffness, and energy stored at yield load were recorded. There were no statistically significant differences (p screw. There were no significant differences in the stability of fixation of the self-drilling screw and lag screw. There was a trend toward the lag screw fixation being more stable. The clinical significance of this trend is uncertain but suggests there is not a large difference between the two methods of fixation.

  12. [Research on safe implantation of upper-middle thoracic pedicle screws under the X-ray perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Xing; Chen, Qi-Xin; Li, Fang-Cai

    2008-02-01

    To explore the method of implanting upper-middle thoracic pedicle screws under monitoring by X-ray and evaluate accuracy and safety. (1) Six normal adult thoracic spine samples (T1-T8) were selected, from which single spine units were separated. A surgical probe went in along the pedicle axis. By C-shaped arm X-ray, the four probe positions were recorded: at the entering point, the front end of the probe in the middle of the pedicle, at the pack of the spine, and under the cortex of the front of the spine. The position of the front end of the probe at the entering point, and the front end of the probe at different depth at central-side perspective position were analyzed. The related positions and their corresponding changing rules were also analyzed. (2) Based on the changing rules mentioned above, different steps were adopted under the guidance of the C-shaped arm X-ray, to safely implant upper-middle thoracic pedicle screws. First, six T1-T8 spine samples were used, and under the guidance of the C-shaped arm device, 96 pedicle screws were implanted. After the operation,the sping samples were scanned through CT, and the positions of the screws were determined. According to the result of the CT scanning, the result were excellent (the screw was safely inside the pedicle) in 90 screws; Medium (the screw penetrated a little of the inside or outside bone cortex, within 2 mm) in 6; No one was had (the screw penetrated a lot, more than 2 mm). The implantation of upper-middle thoracic pedicle screw under the guidance of the C-shaped arm X-ray perspective is a simple and feasible method, and improve the accuracy and safety.

  13. Histomorphometric evaluation of the effects of various diode lasers and force levels on orthodontic mini screw stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goymen, Merve; Isman, Eren; Taner, Lale; Kurkcu, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different laser dose and force levels on the stability of orthodontic mini screws used for anchorage, by histomorphometric analyses. Low-level laser therapy speeds up blood flow, improves the mechanism of the revitalization processes, reduces the risk of infection, boosts metabolic activities, and accelerates the healing of the damaged tissue. Although there are many research studies about low-level laser therapy applications in a variety of areas, no investigations were found concerning mini screw stability using various laser dose levels with different force level applications. Seventeen New Zealand white rabbits were used. A total of 68 cylindrical, self-drilling orthodontic mini screws were threaded at the fibula. Experimental subjects were divided into six groups; force application was not performed in the first three groups, whereas 150 g of force was applied via nickel-titanium closed-coil springs placed between two mini screws in the other three groups. Measurements of the initial torque values (10 Ncm) were manipulated by a digital portable torque gauge. Various low-level laser doses were applied to the groups during the postoperative 10 days. After 4 weeks, bone-to-implant contact and cortical bone thickness were histomorphometrically analyzed. In the 150 g force plus 20 J/cm(2) dosage group, the highest bone-to-implant contact values were observed. (p0.05). Low-level laser therapy was noticed to induce the mini screw-bone contact area. Low-level laser therapy may be a supplementary treatment method to increase the stability of the orthodontic mini screw.

  14. Efficacy of radial styloid targeting screws in volar plate fixation of intra-articular distal radial fractures: a biomechanical study in a cadaver fracture model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Toshihiko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The locking screws target the radial styloid, theoretically provide greater stability against radial styloid fragment. However, it is unknown whether the radial styloid locking screws increased the stability of the volar plating system fixation along the entire distal radius or not. In this study, we evaluated the stability of the volar plating system fixation with or without the radial styloid screws using a biomechanical study in a cadaver fracture model. Methods Six matched pairs of fresh-frozen human cadaver wrists complete from the proximal forearm to the metacarpal bones were prepared to simulate standardized 3-part intra-articular and severe comminuted fractures. Specimens were fixed using the volar plating system with or without 2 radial styloid screws. Each specimen was loaded at a constant rate of 20 mm/min to failure. Load data was recorded and, ultimate strength and change in gap between distal and proximal fragments were measured. Data for ultimate strength and screw failure after failure loading were compared between the 2 groups. Results The average ultimate strength at failure of the volar plate fixation with radial styloid screws (913.5 ± 157.1 N was significantly higher than that without them (682.2 ± 118.6 N. After failure loading, the average change in gap between the ulnar and proximal fragment was greater than that between the radial and proximal fragment. The number of bent or broken screws in ulnar fragment was higher than that in radial fragment. The number of specimens with bent or broken screws in cases with radial styloid screws was fewer than that in the fixation without radial styloid screws group. Conclusion The ulnar fragment is more intensively stressed than the radial fragment under axial loading of distal radius at full wrist extension. The radial styloid screws were effective in stable volar plate fixation of distal radial fractures.

  15. Loosening torque of Universal Abutment screws after cyclic loading: influence of tightening technique and screw coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Atais; Regalin, Alexandre; Bhering, Claudia Lopes Brilhante; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tightening technique and the screw coating on the loosening torque of screws used for Universal Abutment fixation after cyclic loading. Forty implants (Titamax Ti Cortical, HE, Neodent) (n=10) were submerged in acrylic resin and four tightening techniques for Universal Abutment fixation were evaluated: A - torque with 32 Ncm (control); B - torque with 32 Ncm holding the torque meter for 20 seconds; C - torque with 32 Ncm and retorque after 10 minutes; D - torque (32 Ncm) holding the torque meter for 20 seconds and retorque after 10 minutes as initially. Samples were divided into subgroups according to the screw used: conventional titanium screw or diamond like carbon-coated (DLC) screw. Metallic crowns were fabricated for each abutment. Samples were submitted to cyclic loading at 10(6) cycles and 130 N of force. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The tightening technique did not show significant influence on the loosening torque of screws (P=.509). Conventional titanium screws showed significant higher loosening torque values than DLC (P=.000). The use of conventional titanium screw is more important than the tightening techniques employed in this study to provide long-term stability to Universal Abutment screws.

  16. [Cement-augmented anterior odontoid screw fixation of a Anderson-D'Alonzo type II fracture with massive osteoporosis. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, M; Schnake, K J; Hoffmann, R; Kandziora, F

    2011-06-01

    Anterior screw fixation is a standard treatment procedure in the case of an uncomplicated Anderson-D'Alonzo type II odontoid fracture in younger patients. Insufficient bony screw hold can cause severe procedure-related complications and result in screw breakouts with secondary fracture dislocation. Hence, the procedure is limited to patients with an adequate bone mineral density. This case report summarises a technical modification of anterior screw fixation in elderly patients suffering from severe osteoporosis to avoid a posterior spondylodesis of C1/2. Two patients with odontoid fractures of Anderson-D'Alonzo type II were operated using anterior screw fixation and additional vertebroplasty of C2 to increase the screw hold. During follow-up a regular bony healing without screw complication was observed. In conclusion, cement-augmented anterior screw fixation of odontoid fractures type II according to Anderson-D'Alonzo and persistent severe osteoporosis can be an alternative to posterior C1/2 spondylodesis in individual cases. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Shortening Oblique Osteotomy with Screw Fixation for Correction of the Lesser Metatarsophalangeal Joints of Rheumatoid Forefoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Keiichiro; Machida, Takahiro; Horita, Masahiro; Hashizume, Kenzo; Nakahara, Ryuichi; Nasu, Yoshihisa; Ohashi, Hideki; Saiga, Kenta; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-12-01

    The metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints are often and predominantly affected in rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of the current study was to describe surgical techniques of shortening oblique osteotomy for lesser metatarsal bone with screw fixation at the osteotomy site, and to investigate the short-term clinical outcomes of our procedure. Twenty-seven feet (78 toes) of 24 RA patients underwent the shortening oblique osteotomy for the correction of deformity at the lesser MTP joints. The average Japanese Society of Surgery of the Foot (JSSF) standard rating system for the RA foot and ankle scale improved significantly from 59.6 points preoperatively to 88.3 points postoperatively (p<0.001). Twenty-four feet (89% ) were free from metatarsalgia and symptomatic callosities at the lesser MTP joint after surgery. Our present findings showed satisfactory early clinical outcomes of the shortening oblique osteotomy of the metatarsal bone with screw fixation for RA forefoot.

  18. Twin Screw Mixer/Fine Grind Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 40-mm Twin-Screw Mixer/Extruder (TSE) pilot plant is a continuous, remotely operated, flexible facility that can significantly enhance safety and environmental...

  19. Shortening Oblique Osteotomy with Screw Fixation for Correction of the Lesser Metatarsophalangeal Joints of Rheumatoid Forefoot

    OpenAIRE

    Nishida, Keiichiro; Machida, Takahiro; Horita, Masahiro; Hashizume, Kenzo; Nakahara, Ryuichi; Nasu, Yoshihisa; Ohashi, Hideki; Saiga, Kenta; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints are often and predominantly affected in rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of the current study was to describe surgical techniques of shortening oblique osteotomy for lesser metatarsal bone with screw fixation at the osteotomy site, and to investigate the short-term clinical outcomes of our procedure. Twenty-seven feet (78 toes) of 24 RA patients underwent the shortening oblique osteotomy for the correction of deformity at the lesser MTP joints. The average Ja...

  20. Cemented and screw-retained implant reconstructions: a systematic review of the survival and complication rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Mühlemann, Sven; Zwahlen, Marcel; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Schneider, David

    2012-10-01

    To assess the 5-year survival rates and incidences of complications of cemented and screw-retained implant reconstructions. An electronic Medline search complemented by manual searching was conducted to identify randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs), and prospective and retrospective studies giving information on cemented and screw-retained single-unit and multiple-unit implant reconstructions with a mean follow-up time of at least 1 year. Assessment of the identified studies and data abstraction were performed independently by three reviewers. Failure rates were analyzed using Poisson regression models to obtain summary estimates and 95% confidence intervals of failure rates and 5-year survival proportions. Fifty-nine clinical studies were selected from an initial yield of 4511 titles and the data were extracted. For cemented single crowns the estimated 5-year reconstruction survival was 96.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 94.8-97.7%), for screw-retained single crowns it was 89.3% (95% CI: 64.9-97.1%) (P = 0.091 for difference). The 5-year survival for cemented partial fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) was 96.9% (95% CI: 90.8-99%), similar to the one for screw-retained partial FDPs with 98% (95% CI: 96.2-99%) (P = 0.47). For cemented full-arch FDPs the 5-year survival was 100% (95% CI: 88.9-100%), which was somewhat higher than that for screw-retained FDPs with 95.8% (95% CI: 91.9-97.9%) (P = 0.54). The estimated 5-year cumulative incidence of technical complications at cemented single crowns was 11.9% and 24.4% at screw-retained crowns. At the partial and full-arch FDPs, in contrast, a trend to less complication at the screw-retained was found than at the cemented ones (partial FDPs cemented 24.5%, screw-retained 22.1%; full-arch FDPs cemented 62.9%, screw-retained 54.1%). Biological complications like marginal bone loss >2 mm occurred more frequently at cemented crowns (5-year incidence: 2.8%) than at screw-retained ones (5-year incidence: 0%). Both types

  1. Embalmed and fresh frozen human bones in orthopedic cadaveric studies: which bone is authentic and feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topp, Tobias; Müller, Thorben; Huss, Sebastian; Kann, Peter Herbert; Weihe, Eberhard; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Zettl, Ralph Peter

    2012-10-01

    The most frequently used bones for mechanical testing of orthopedic and trauma devices are fresh frozen cadaveric bones, embalmed cadaveric bones, and artificial composite bones. Even today, the comparability of these different bone types has not been established. We tested fresh frozen and embalmed cadaveric femora that were similar concerning age, sex, bone mineral density, and stiffness. Artificial composite femora were used as a reference group. Testing parameters were pullout forces of cortex and cancellous screws, maximum load until failure, and type of fracture generated. Stiffness and type of fracture generated (Pauwels III) were similar for all 3 bone types (fresh frozen: 969 N/mm, 95% confidence interval (CI): 897-1,039; embalmed: 999 N/mm, CI: 875-1,121; composite: 946 N/mm, CI: 852-1,040). Furthermore, no significant differences were found between fresh frozen and embalmed femora concerning pullout forces of cancellous screws (fresh frozen: 654 N, CI: 471-836; embalmed: 595 N, CI: 365-823) and cortex screws (fresh frozen: 1,152 N, CI: 894-1,408; embalmed: 1,461 N, CI: 880-2,042), and axial load until failure (fresh frozen: 3,427 N, CI: 2,564-4290; embalmed: 3,603 N, CI: 2,898-4,306). The reference group showed statistically significantly different results for pullout forces of cancellous screws (2,344 N, CI: 2,068-2,620) and cortex screws (5,536 N, CI: 5,203-5,867) and for the axial load until failure (> 7,952 N). Embalmed femur bones and fresh frozen bones had similar characteristics by mechanical testing. Thus, we suggest that embalmed human cadaveric bone is a good and safe option for mechanical testing of orthopedic and trauma devices.

  2. Comparative endurance testing of the Biomet Matthews Nail and the Dynamic Compression Screw, in simulated condylar and supracondylar femoral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Benjamin M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamic compression screw is a plate and screws implant used to treat fractures of the distal femur. The Biomet Matthews Nail is a new retrograde intramedullary nail designed as an alternative surgical option to treat these fractures. The objective of this study was to assess the comparative endurance of both devices. Method The dynamic compression screw (DCS and Biomet Matthews Nail (BMN were implanted into composite femurs, which were subsequently cyclically loaded using a materials testing machine. Simulated fractures were applied to each femur prior to the application of load. Either a Y type fracture or a transverse osteotomy was prepared on each composite femur using a jig to enable consistent positioning of cuts. Results The Biomet Matthews Nail demonstrated a greater endurance limit load over the dynamic compression screw in both fracture configurations. Conclusion The distal locking screws pass through the Biomet Matthews Nail in a unique "cruciate" orientation. This allows for greater purchase in the bone of the femoral condyle and potentially improves the stability of the fracture fixation. As these fractures are usually in weak osteoporotic bone, the Biomet Matthews Nail represents a favourable surgical option in these patients.

  3. Dynamic hip screw with locking side plate: a viable treatment option for intertrochanteric fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barwar Nilesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Dynamic hip screw (DHS is recommended for the fixation of stable intertrochanteric fractures. Its postoperative cut-out rate ranges from 1% to 6%. In osteoporotic bone, normal screws in DHS blade provide less anchorage compared to locking screws. This study aims to compare DHS with locking side plate and conventional side plate. Methods:Fifty consecutive patients with intertrochanteric fractures were randomly allocated for fixation with a standard DHS (group A and locking DHS (Combi plate, group B. We compared the clinical and radiological outcomes for the conventional DHS and locking DHS in intertrochanteric fractures. Functional outcome was evaluated using the Parker mobility score. Results:Coxa valga was found more frequently in group A than in group B (12% vs. 0%, P=0.42. Coxa vara showed the same trend (12% vs. 8%, P=0.81. Rate of restoration of postoperative neck-shaft angle within 20° of sound side was higher in group B (8% cases than in group A (4% cases, P=0.98. The rate of anteversion angle restoration within 10° of sound side was also higher in group B (100% vs. 88%, P=0.85. The average lag screw slippage in group A and group B was 3.2 mm and 4.2 mm, the average fracture union duration was 17.1 weeks and 16.4 weeks, and the mean Parker score was 5.6 and 5.8 respectively. Screw cut-out was seen in one patient in group A. No cut-out was seen in any of the patient in group B. No patient developed deep infection, avascular necrosis, deep vein thrombosis or any other significant complications. Conclusion:The present study demonstrated that treating intertrochanteric fracture with a locking DHS allows sound bone healing and is not associated with any major complications. Although this report is promising, it should be interpreted with caution because only a prospective study with a large sample size would allow definitive conclusion. Key words: Hip fractures; Bone screws; Bone plates

  4. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  5. Physical and mechanical characterization of PLLA interference screws produced by two stage injection molding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Avalshahr, Ali Reza; Khorsand-Ghayeni, Mohammad; Nokhasteh, Samira; Molavi, Amir Mahdi; Sadeghi-Avalshahr, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce and evaluate different mechanical, physical and in vitro cell culture characteristics of poly(L-lactic) acid (PLLA) interference screws. This work will focus on evaluating the effect of two important parameters on operation of these screws, first the tunnel diameter which is one of the most important parameters during the operation and second the thermal behavior, the main effective characteristic in production process. In this work, PLLA screws were produced by a two-stage injection molding machine. For mechanical assessment of the produced screws, Polyurethane rigid foam was used as cancellous bone and polypropylene rope as synthetic graft to simulate bone and ligament in real situation. Different tunnel diameters including 7-10 mm were evaluated for fixation strength. When the tunnel diameter was changed from 10 to 9 mm, the pull-out force has increased to about 12 %, which is probably due to the aforementioned frictional forces, however, by reducing the tunnel diameter to 8 and 7 mm, the pull-out force reduced to 16 and 50 % for 8 and 7 mm tunnel diameter, respectively. The minimum and maximum pull-out force was obtained 160.57 and 506.86 N for 7 and 9 mm tunnel diameters, respectively. For physicochemical assay, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), degradation test and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were carried out. The crystallinity (Xc) of samples were decreased considerably from 64.3 % before injection to 32.95 % after injection with two different crystallographic forms α' and α. probably due to the fast cooling rate at room temperature. In addition, MTT and cell attachment assays were utilized by MG63 osteoblast cell line, to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the produced screws. The results revealed no cytotoxicity effect.

  6. A Current Perspective on Screw-Retained Single-Implant Restorations: A Review of Pertinent Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, George

    2017-05-06

    There is a trend toward increased use of screw-retained single-implant restorations. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken to examine the data related to screw- and cement-retention and to objectively evaluate the innovations in implant dentistry that have led to this resurgence. When comparing the two options, survival and complication rates are similar, bone and soft-tissue levels are comparable, and zirconia offers esthetic advantages for both selections. Zirconia abutments with bonded titanium inserts provide esthetic alternatives to titanium abutments for both choices. Bone- and soft-tissue responses are similar, but residual cement of cement-retained restorations is associated with significant soft- and hard-tissue complications. The potential weakness of ceramic discontinuity of screw-access openings can be lessened by the incorporation of stronger ceramic materials such as zirconia and lithium disilicate. The overriding remaining indication for cement-retained restorations is to compensate for angled implants. Screw-retained single-implant crowns should be reconsidered for many clinical situations for the following reasons: Predictable retention and retrievability No potential for the biologic consequences associated with residual cement As with cement-retained restorations, the choice between metal ceramics or all ceramics Only one margin, at the implant/abutment interface A single abutment/crown ceramic margin that can extend gingivally to the implant interface Nearly imperceptible blend of a composite resin in ceramic abutment access openings One component instead of two, which may simplify the restorative process CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Innovations in implant and ceramic technology now give screw-retained prostheses the potential for esthetic, functional, and biologic outcomes that are comparable to those for cement-retained prostheses, while providing the advantages of predictable retrievability and avoidance of residual cement. Angled

  7. Transarticular screw fixation for atlantoaxial instability - modified Magerl's technique in 38 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhatt Saravdeep S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptomatic atlantoaxial instability needs stabilization of the atlantoaxial joint. Among the various techniques described in literature for the fixation of atlantoaxial joint, Magerl's technique of transarticular screw fixation remains the gold standard. Traditionally this technique combines placement of transarticular screws and posterior wiring construct. The aim of this study is to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes in subjects of atlantoaxial instability who were operated using transarticular screws and iliac crest bone graft, without the use of sublaminar wiring (a modification of Magerl's technique. Methods We evaluated retrospectively 38 subjects with atlantoaxial instability who were operated at our institute using transarticular screw fixation. The subjects were followed up for pain, fusion rates, neurological status and radiographic outcomes. Final outcome was graded both subjectively and objectively, using the scoring system given by Grob et al. Results Instability in 34 subjects was secondary to trauma, in 3 due to rheumatoid arthritis and 1 had tuberculosis. Neurological deficit was present in 17 subjects. Most common presenting symptom was neck pain, present in 35 of the 38 subjects. Postoperatively residual neck and occipital pain was present in 8 subjects. Neurological deficit persisted in only 7 subjects. Vertebral artery injury was seen in 3 subjects. None of these subjects had any sign of neurological deficit or vertebral insufficiency. Three cases had nonunion. At the latest follow up, subjectively, 24 subjects had good result, 6 had fair and 8 had bad result. On objective grading, 24 had good result, 11 had fair and 3 had bad result. The mean follow up duration was 41 months. Conclusions Transarticular screw fixation is an excellent technique for fusion of the atlantoaxial complex. It provides highest fusion rates, and is particularly important in subjects at risk for nonunion. Omitting the

  8. Biofilm formation on titanium alloy and anatase-Bactercline® coated titanium healing screws: an in vivo human study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Scarano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim Bacterial adherence to implants is considered to be an important event in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In fact, this infection process is a first stage of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, and a positive correlation has been found between oral hygiene and marginal bone loss around implants in the edentulous mandible. Surface properties of transgingival implant components are important determinants in bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to characterize the biofilm formation, in vivo, on healing screws made of titanium alloy or coated with a combination of anatase and Bactercline® product. Materials and methods Twenty-five patients, between 21- 37 years, in excellent systemic health, participated in this study. In each of the 25 participants, one anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screw (Test and one titanium alloy (TI6Al4V healing screw (Control were adapted to two different implants. Quantitative and qualitative biofilm formation on healing abutments was analyzed by culture method.Results Bacterial adherence to the two different healing screws used in this study were compared. Statistically significant differences were found between the Control and the Test group for both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts (p<0,05. The microflora consisted both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and displayed a high variability. The anaerobic S. intermedius, potentially “pathogenic”, was isolated only from the Control group. Both healing screws harbored primarily Gram-positive rods as Actinomyces spp, A. naeslundii, A. viscosus and the Gram-negative rods (Fusobacterium spp, Prevotella spp, Capnocythophaga spp were mostly found on the Control healing screws.Conclusion Anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screws reduce the number of initially adhering bacteria, formed mainly of Gram-positive microorgnisms, while, on the contrary, the microflora covering the titanium alloy healing screws was, for the

  9. Axial loading cross screw fixation for the Austin bunionectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Ryan B; Fallat, Lawrence M; Kish, John P

    2011-01-01

    The Austin procedure has become a common method of osteotomy for the correction of hallux abductovalgus when indicated. The V-type configuration is intrinsically stable but not without complications. One complication encountered is rotation and/or displacement of the capital fragment. We present the use of an axial loading screw in conjunction with a dorsally placed compression screw. The benefit to this technique lies in the orientation of the axial loading screw, because it is directed to resist the ground reactive forces while also providing a second point of fixation in a crossing screw design. In a head-to-head biomechanical comparison, we tested single dorsal screw fixation versus double screw fixation, including both the dorsal and the axial loading screws in 10 metatarsal Sawbones(®) (Pacific Research Laboratories Inc, Vashon, WA). Five metatarsals received single dorsal screw fixation and five received the dorsal screw and the additional axial loading screw. The metatarsals were analyzed on an Instron compression device for comparison; 100% of the single screw fixation osteotomies failed with compression at an average peak load of 205 N. Four of five axial loading double screw fixation osteotomies did not fail. This finding suggests that the addition of an axial loading screw providing cross screw orientation significantly increases the stability of the Austin osteotomy, ultimately decreasing the likelihood of displacement encountered in the surgical repair of hallux abductovalgus. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lapidus bunionectomy: Early evaluation of crossed lag screws versus locking plate with plantar lag screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amol; Nguyen, Aidan; Nelsen, Elise

    2009-01-01

    We compared outcomes of the Lapidus bunionectomy fixated with crossed lag screws versus a locking plate with a plantar lag screw. Forty patients who underwent Lapidus bunionectomy between August 2001 and May 2006 were evaluated in a combined retrospective and prospective fashion. Crossed lag screws were used in 19 of the patients, and a locking plate with a plantar lag screw was used in 21 of the patients. Other than fixation, the only interventional difference pertained to postoperative weight bearing, where those receiving the plate initiated full weight bearing on the operated foot at 4 weeks postoperative, as compared to 6 weeks for those receiving crossed screws. Overall, the mean preoperative AOFAS hallux score was 41.75 +/- 2.52, and the postoperative score was 90.48 +/- 8.41 (P fixation, use of an adjunct Akin osteotomy and surgery performed before 2003 were statistically significantly associated with crossed screw fixation, and the preoperative AOFAS score was statistically significantly higher in the locking plate fixation group. There were no statistically significant differences related to postoperative complications between the 2 fixation groups. In conclusion, the Lapidus bunionectomy fixated with a locking plate and a plantar lag screw allows earlier weight bearing in comparison with crossed lag screws, without a difference in complications. 2.

  11. Alveolar bone preservation subsequent to miniscrew implant placement in a canine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melsen, Birte; Huja, Sarandeep; Chien, Hua-Hong

    2015-01-01

    -implant across the healing alveolar process results in increased density not only adjacent to the screws, but also in the region where a potential dental implant would be inserted. In humans, the insertion of transcortical screws may maintain bone when for various reasons insertion of a permanent dental implant......Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of transcortical screws on alveolar (bone) ridge preservation following extraction. DESIGN: Four adult beagle dogs had mandibular premolars extracted bilaterally. After 6 weeks, using a split-mouth design, two transcortical screws were inserted unilaterally...... below the alveolar crest on the experimental side in the region of the extraction. The dogs were killed after 12 weeks. The bone at the extraction sites was analyzed using μCT and 3D analysis. A cylindrical core was placed around the actual and a virtual screw placed in the identical location...

  12. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Screw Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizari, Mahmoud; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn; Barrett, Mel

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental and finite element analysis of tibial screw fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The mechanical properties of the bone and tendon graft are obtained from experiments using porcine bone and bovine tendon. The results of the numerical study are compared with those from mechanical testing. Analysis shows that the model may be used to establish the optimum placement of the tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by predicting mechanical parameters such as stress, strain and displacement at regions in the tunnel wall.

  13. 26-year follow-up of screw-retained fixed dental prostheses supported by machined-surface Brånemark implants: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2011-01-01

    Rough-surface implants have become very popular during the last 10 years due to greater reported bone-implant-contact and bone volume between implant threads compared to machined-surface implants. The aim of this clinical report is to present the 26-year clinical outcomes of machined-surface implants supporting screw-retained fixed dental prostheses in a 77-year-old woman. A 51-year-old woman received five mandibular and six maxillary implants supporting screw-retained fixed dental prostheses. The original machined-surface regular platform Branemark implants were placed using a two-stage surgical approach. No implants were lost, and average marginal bone levels between the implant platform and the first bone-implant contact for maxillary and mandibular implants were 3.3 +/- 0.6 mm and 1.7 +/- 0.3 mm after 26 years. The following prosthetic complications were recorded during the follow up period; a) broken acrylic denture tooth (four times), b) loose prosthetic screw (three times), c) loose abutment screw (two times). This case report shows that machined-surface dental implants can successfully support screw-retained fixed dental prostheses over 26 years, which makes dental implants an important dental treatment option compared to the traditional prosthetic treatment methods, especially in elderly edentulous patients.

  14. Standard Waste Box Lid Screw Removal Option Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    This report provides results from test work conducted to resolve the removal of screws securing the standard waste box (SWB) lids that hold the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) drums. The test work evaluated equipment and process alternatives for removing the 42 screws that hold the SWB lid in place. The screws were secured with a red Loctite thread locker that makes removal very difficult because the rivets that the screw threads into would slip before the screw could be freed from the rivet, making it impossible to remove the screw and therefore the SWB lid.

  15. Effect of pedicle screw diameter on screw fixation efficacy in human osteoporotic thoracic vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Dar-Ming; Shih, Yu-Tang; Chen, Yi-Hsing; Chien, Andy; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2018-03-21

    The selection of an ideal screw size plays a crucial role in the success of spinal instrumentation as larger diameter screws are thought to provide better fixation strength but increase the risk of pedicle failure during insertion. On the other hand, smaller diameter screws are with lesser risk of pedicle breakage but are thought to compromise the stability of the instrumentation. By investigating the relationship between screw diameter and the pullout strength of pedicle screws after fatigue loading, this study seeks to find quantitative biomechanical data for surgeons in determining the most ideal diameter size screws when performing surgical implementations on osteoporotic vertebrae. Twenty-seven osteoporotic (BMD ranged: 0.353-0.848 g/cm 2 ) thoracic vertebrae (T3-T8) were harvested from 5 human cadavers. Two sizes of poly-axial screws (5.0 mm × 35 and 4.35 mm × 35) were implanted into each pedicles of the vertebrae by an experienced surgeon. Specimens were randomly distributed into control group, fatigue group of 5000 and 10,000 cycles with peak-to-peak loadings of 10-100 N at 1 Hz. Each specimen was then axial pullout tested at a constant rate of 5 mm/min. The ultimate pullout strength (N) & stiffness (N/mm) were obtained for analysis. The results showed that although the larger diameter screws achieved superior pullout strength immediately after the implantation, both sizes of screws exhibited comparable pullout strengths post fatigue loading. This indicates that the smaller diameter screws may be considered for surgical techniques performed on osteoporotic vertebrae for reduced risk of pedicle breakage without sacrificing fixation strength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Screw-type implants used as anchorage for lingual orthodontic mechanics: a case of bimaxillary protrusion with second premolar extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Masayoshi; Miyawaki, Shouichi; Noguchi, Haruhiro; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2004-10-01

    We present a case of bialveolar protrusion treated with second premolar extraction. The patient did not agree to placement of a visible labial appliance or to the use of a headgear. Therefore, a lingual orthodontic appliance was used, and titanium screws were placed into the buccal alveolar bone for orthodontic absolute anchorage and support of en masse retraction of the anterior teeth. Cephalometric superimposition and panoramic radiographs showed little anchorage loss and good occlusion at the end of treatment. Our results suggest that lingual treatment combined with a screw-type implant anchorage provides reliable and comfortable results for those seeking invisible treatment.

  17. Perturbation effects of the carbon fiber-PEEK screws on radiotherapy dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevelsky, Alexander; Borzov, Egor; Daniel, Shahar; Bar-Deroma, Raquel

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy, in conjunction with surgical implant fixation, is a common combined treatment in cases of bone metastases. However, metal implants generally used in orthopedic implants perturb radiation dose distributions. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) material has been recently introduced for production of intramedullary nails and plates. The purpose of this work was to investigate the perturbation effects of the new CFR-PEEK screws on radiotherapy dose distributions and to evaluate these effects in comparison with traditional titanium screws. The investigation was performed by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a 6 MV photon beam. The project consisted of two main stages. First, a comparison of measured and MC calculated doses was performed to verify the validity of the MC simulation results for different materials. For this purpose, stainless steel, titanium, and CFR-PEEK plates of various thicknesses were used for attenuation and backscatter measurements in a solid water phantom. For the same setup, MC dose calculations were performed. Next, MC dose calculations for titanium, CFR-PEEK screws, and CFR-PEEK screws with ultrathin titanium coating were performed. For the plates, the results of our MC calculations for all materials were found to be in good agreement with the measurements. This indicates that the MC model can be used for calculation of dose perturbation effects caused by the screws. For the CFR-PEEK screws, the maximum dose perturbation was less than 5%, compared to more than 30% perturbation for the titanium screws. Ultrathin titanium coating had a negligible effect on the dose distribution. CFR-PEEK implants have good prospects for use in radiotherapy because of minimal dose alteration and the potential for more accurate treatment planning. This could favorably influence treatment efficiency and decrease possible over- and underdose of adjacent tissues. The use of such implants has potential clinical advantages

  18. Parafusos bioabsorvíveis na reparação de fraturas experimentais de sesamóides proximais em eqüinos Bioabsorbable screws in the healing of experimentally induced fractures of the proximal sesamoid bone in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Damas Pyles

    2007-10-01

    received bioabsorbable implants (group GI and other four received metallic implants (group GII. Fractures were experimentally induced by means of osteotomy on the midportion of the lateral proximal sesamoid bone. Subsequently, the fragments were fixed with screws and the horses were x-rayed and a fiberglass cast was placed (D0. The cast was removed for radiographic examination on the 30th postoperative day (D30, with radiographic follow up on the 60th (D60, 90th (D90 and 120th (D120 days. Radiographs taken on D30 showed radiodense filling of the fracture site; however, horses from group GII had a less dense fracture line; clinical and radiographic analysis showed a better fracture filling in group GI when compared to Group GII. On D120 radiographic examination revealed radiodense filling of the fracture site in both groups, indicating almost complete fracture healing. However, sclerotic spots were observed around the bioabsorbable implant in GI; on physical examination, horses from group GI were not lame, while horses from group GII had reduced flexion of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint and grade I lameness.

  19. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. A Universal Pedicle Screw and V-Rod System for Lumbar Isthmic Spondylolysis: A Retrospective Analysis of 21 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiong-sheng; Zhou, Sheng-yuan; Jia, Lian-shun; Gu, Xiao-min; Fang, Lei; Zhu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the surgical outcome of a universal pedicle screw-V rod system and isthmic bone grafting for isthmic spondylolysis. Methods Twenty-four patients with isthmic spondylolysis at L5 and grade 0–I spondylolisthesis (Meyerding classification) received isthmic bone graft and stabilization using the universal pedicle screw-V rod system. Back pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) and time to bone healing, improvement in spondylolisthesis and intervertebral space height at L5/S1 and L4/L5 were assessed. Results Twenty-one patients were followed up for 24 months and included in the analysis. Back pain was markedly improved at 3 months postoperatively with a statistical difference in VAS scores compared with preoperative VAS scores (Pspondylolysis and reduces back pain, prevents anterior displacement of the diseased segment and maintains intervertebral space height, thus offering a promising alternative to current approaches for isthmic spondylolysis. PMID:23691090

  1. Pullout strength of pedicle screws augmented with particulate calcium phosphate: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Ata; Bednar, Drew; Ziada, Samir

    2009-05-01

    Pressure-injected and in situ curing bone cements have been studied as alternatives in augmenting lumbar pedicle screw fixation but are frequently found to leak outside the confines of the target vertebra. The objective is set to determine the mechanical efficacy of a porous granular/particulate calcium phosphate (CP) bone augmentation product (Skelite) applied manually without pressurized injection in this application. The biomechanical analysis compared the axial pullout strength and insertional torque of augmented and nonaugmented pedicle screws in cellular polyurethane foams. The insertion torque and pullout strength of 6.5-mm pedicle screws inserted (via 3.5-mm pilot holes) into polyurethane blocks mimicking the porosity of cancellous bone were measured. New pilot holes were then packed with granular particles of Skelite and retested. Last, those blocks initially tested to failure without augmentation were packed with Skelite and retested. Measurements were performed for polyurethane densities of 0.16 and 0.32 g/cc (corresponding to the porosity of osteoporotic and normal bone) and strain rates of 0.5 and 5mm/min. Peak pullout force averaged 2132.5+/-119.3 N and 1840.1+/-216.7 N in high density samples without and with augmentation and 688.2+/-91.4 N and 861.6+/-74.5 N in low density samples without and with augmentation. After failure, approximately 50% and 77% of the peak pullout force of original high and low density samples was regained by augmentation. Statistical analysis revealed significant (ppullout resistance, and insertion torque. Granular CP augmentation improved the pullout strength in both failed (pulledout) samples and low density (porosity of osteoporotic cancellous bone) polyurethane blocks.

  2. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The movement of screw dislocations in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Xiaogeng; Woo Chungho

    2004-03-25

    Using Acland potential for tungsten, the movement of 1/2a<1 1 1> screw dislocation under shear stress was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Equilibrated core structure was obtained by relaxation of screw dislocation with proper boundary conditions. We found that the equilibrium dislocation core has three-fold symmetry and spread out in three <1 1 2> direction on {l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace} planes. The screw dislocation core could not keep the original shape when the shear stress applied. The dislocation could not move until the shear stress became large enough. The dislocation moved in zigzag when the shear stress neared the Peierls stress. When the shear stress became larger, the dislocation moved in zigzag at the beginning and than moved almost in straight line in [2-bar11] direction. The large shear stress applied, the long distance moved before the dislocation stilled in z-direction and the large velocity in y-direction.

  4. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  5. Interfragmentary compression and pull-out properties of 6.5-mm AO cancellous lag screws in a uniform synthetic material during tightening procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peidong; Xu, Daqiang; Zhao, Weidong; Jiao, Peifeng; Li, Zeyu; Liu, Chang; Ouyang, Jun

    2017-04-01

    AO lag screws are widely used in surgical intra-articular fracture treatment for anatomical reduction and rigid fixation. Interfragmentary compressive force (IFCF) and pull-out strength (POS) are two critical parameters generated by AO lag screws during tightening, and both of these parameters could be used to estimate screw insert conditions to prevent screw stripping. The aim of this study is to evaluate the IFCF and POS of AO cancellous screws inserted into uniform synthetic cancellous bone during tightening procedures. Seven synthetic cancellous bone blocks were used for this research. Each test contained two continuous portions as follows: the rotation test portion and the pull-out test portion. IFCF and POS were captured by the pressure transducer and the sensor of the test machine. The properties of IFCF and POS based on tightening degrees were obtained in this study. The ideal balance between POS and IFCF during screw tightening exists, and the peak values of these parameters cannot be simultaneously achieved. Moreover, rotation angles of 100-150° appear to serve as the optimum balance between IFCF and POS in the present study. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Adhesive bone bonding prospects for lithium disilicate ceramic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennila Thirugnanam, Sakthi Kumar

    Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) implants articulating mandible with temporal bone in humans have a very high failure rate. Metallic TMJ implants available in the medical market are not osseointegrated, but bond only by mechanical interlocking using screws which may fail, mandating a second surgery for removal. Stress concentration around fixture screws leads to aseptic loosening or fracture of the bone. It has been proposed that this problem can be overcome by using an all-ceramic TMJ implant bonded to bone with dental adhesives. Structural ceramics are promising materials with an excellent track record in the field of dentis.

  7. OSTEOSYNTHESIS OF FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES: TWO OR THREE SCREWS?

    OpenAIRE

    Basile, Ricardo; Pepicelli, Gustavo Roberto; Takata, Edmilson Takehiro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of osteosynthesis on femoral neck fractures using two instead of three screws. Methods: Thirty-nine fractures were retrospectively evaluated, divided into groups in which two screws were used in parallel (n = 28) or three screws (n =11) in an inverted triangle configuration (in accordance with the AO technique). The patients were then followed up until reaching the outcome of either consolidation or failure. Results: In the group in which two screws were u...

  8. Drag and Torque on Locked Screw Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tabaczek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Few data on drag and torque on locked propeller towed in water are available in literature. Those data refer to propellers of specific geometry (number of blades, blade area, pitch and skew of blades. The estimation of drag and torque of an arbitrary propeller considered in analysis of ship resistance or propulsion is laborious. The authors collected and reviewed test data available in the literature. Based on collected data there were developed the empirical formulae for estimation of hydrodynamic drag and torque acting on locked screw propeller. Supplementary CFD computations were carried out in order to prove the applicability of the formulae to modern moderately skewed screw propellers.

  9. Basic study for ultrasound-based navigation for pedicle screw insertion using transmission and backscattered methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqiang Chen

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to understand the acoustic properties of human vertebral cancellous bone and to study the feasibility of ultrasound-based navigation for posterior pedicle screw fixation in spinal fusion surgery. Fourteen human vertebral specimens were disarticulated from seven un-embalmed cadavers (four males, three females, 73.14 ± 9.87 years, two specimens from each cadaver. Seven specimens were used to measure the transmission, including tests of attenuation and phase velocity, while the other seven specimens were used for backscattered measurements to inspect the depth of penetration and A-Mode signals. Five pairs of unfocused broadband ultrasonic transducers were used for the detection, with center frequencies of 0.5 MHz, 1 MHz, 1.5 MHz, 2.25 MHz, and 3.5 MHz. As a result, good and stable results were documented. With increased frequency, the attenuation increased (P0.05. At about 0.6 cm away from the cortical bone, warning signals were easily observed from the backscattered measurements. In conclusion, the ultrasonic system proved to be an effective, moveable, and real-time imaging navigation system. However, how ultrasonic navigation will benefit pedicle screw insertion in spinal surgery needs to be determined. Therefore, ultrasound-guided pedicle screw implantation is theoretically effective and promising.

  10. Hollow Mill for Extraction of Stripped Titanium Screws: An Easy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Removal of jammed titanium screws can be difficult due to the problem of stripping of the hexagonal heads of the screws. We present a technique of extraction of stripped screws with the use of a standard 4.5 mm stainless steel hollow mill in a patient of peri‑implant fracture of the radius fixed with a titanium locking plate 2 ...

  11. Hollow Mill for Extraction of Stripped Titanium Screws: An Easy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    screws. We present a technique of extraction of stripped screws with the use of a standard 4.5 mm stainless steel hollow mill in a patient of peri-implant fracture of the radius fixed with a titanium locking plate 2 years back. The technique is quick, safe, and cost effective. Key words: Hollow mill, stripped screws, titanium locked.

  12. Dual-worm screw compressors; Compresseurs bi-vis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baleydier, J.P. [Bitzer France, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-12-31

    Low power worm-screw moto-compressors are used in any king of refrigerating machineries and more and more in air conditioning systems. This paper presents the principle of dual-screw moto-compressors: worm-screw technology, role of oil (lubrication, tightness, cooling), compression, internal pressure, power reduction, lubrication, economizer, operation, model selection and accessories. (J.S.)

  13. Favorable outcome of a total hip arthroplasty with insufficient bone coverage of the roof reinforcement ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando M. Judas

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This result can be supported by the good fixation of the metal ring to the pelvis with screws, the adequate orientation of both components of the total hip arthroplasty, and the bone graft incorporation.

  14. Minimum 5-year Follow-up Results for Occipitocervical Fusion Using the Screw-Rod System in Craniocervical Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Kei; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Yagi, Hideki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective clinical study. To evaluate the clinical outcome of patients who had undergone occipitocervical (OC) fusion using pedicle screws and rods over a minimum 5-year follow-up. Few studies have evaluated occipitocervical (OC) fusion using pedicle screws and rods for long-term follow-up. Twenty-seven consecutive patients treated underwent posterior OC fusion using pedicle screws and rods over a minimum 5-year follow-up. The Modified McCormick scale to grade a patient's functional status and the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system were used to evaluate preoperative and postoperative neurological function. We assessed fusion by both direct and indirect evidence; bony trabeculae at the graft-recipient interface on lateral cervical radiographs and sagittal computed tomography reconstruction was considered direct evidence of union. The mean follow-up period was 7.2 years (5-14 y). JOA scores were 8.1±3.8 before surgery and 11.7±3.7 at the final follow-up. The recovery rate calculated from the JOA scores was 42.0±30.0%. Functional status did improve at least 1 grade according to the modified McCormick scale in 18 patients (66.7%). There was no deterioration at the final follow-up.There were postoperative implant-related complications in 8 patients (29.6%): loosening of pedicle screws in 2, rod breakage in 2, plate breakage in 1, screw breakage in 1, pullout of pedicle screws in 1, and wiring induced myelopathy in 1 patient. The average duration between surgery and implant failure was 31.2 months (12-60 mo) except for 2. Sufficient bone grafting, proper decortication of the bone bed, using thicker and high stiffness rods, and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene tape as a fixation or reinforcement of implant may help prevent implant failure.

  15. Proximal instrumented vertebral body chance fracture after pedicle screw instrumentation in a thoracic kyphosis patient with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaobang; Lieberman, Isador H

    2015-02-01

    We present a case of proximal vertebral body chance fracture after pedicle screw instrumentation and fusion in a 67-year-old woman with osteoporosis and thoracic kyphosis. To report the rare and unique complication of proximal vertebral body chance fracture after pedicle screw instrumentation and fusion in a kyphosis patient. Pedicle screw instrumentation has been associated with complications not limited to neurological or vascular injury, loss of curve correction, intraoperative pedicle fracture or loosening, dural laceration, deep infection, and pseudarthrosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports describing a chance-type fracture generated by a pedicle screw fixation at the proximal end of a construct. A 67-year-old woman suffered from progressive thoracic kyphosis and mid thoracic pain presented 2 weeks after pedicle screw instrumentation and correction. She developed a vertebral body fracture at the proximal end of the instrumentation construct. Surgical intervention, including removal of the screws in the fractured vertebrae and extension of the instrumented fusion across the cervicothoracic junction, effectively restored the physiological sagittal alignment. Postoperatively, at 12-month follow-up, the patient is doing exceptionally well with near-complete relief of back pain and an excellent maintenance of correction. Chance fracture in osteoporotic bone at the proximal end of a construct due to a pedicle screw is a rare complication but it may result in catastrophic consequences. Early recognition of this complication, reduction of the fraction-dislocation, and an extension of the instrumentation can be utilized for realignment and long-term stabilization.

  16. Advantages of Direct Insertion of a Straight Probe Without a Guide Tube During Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation of Odontoid Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kang, Dong-Ho; Lee, Moon Kyu; Yoo, Byoungwoo; Jung, Sang Ku; Hwang, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Jeoung Hee; Oh, Sunkyu; Lee, Eun Jung; Jeon, Sang Ryong; Roh, Sung Woo; Rhim, Seung Chul

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to compare the anterior odontoid screw fixation (AOSF) with a guide tube or with a straight probe. AOSF associates with several complications, including malpositioning, fixation loss, and screw breakage. Screw pull-out from the C2 body is the most common complication. All consecutive patients with type II or rostral shallow type III odontoid fractures who underwent AOSFs during the study period were enrolled retrospectively. The guide-tube AOSF method followed the standard published method except C3 body and C2-3 disc annulus rimming was omitted to prevent disc injury; instead, the guide tube was anchored at the anterior inferior C2 vertebra corner. After 2 screw pull-outs, the guide-tube cohort was analyzed to identify the cause of instrument failure. Thereafter, the straight-probe method was developed. A guide tube was not used. A small pilot hole was made on the most anterior side of the inferior endplate, followed by insertion of a 2.5 mm straight probe through the C2 body. Non-union and instrument failure rates and screw-direction angles of the guide-tube and straight-probe groups were recorded. The guide-tube group (n = 13) had 2 screw pull-outs and 1 non-union. The straight-probe group (n = 8) had no complications and significantly larger screw-direction angles than the guide-tube group (60.5 ± 4.63 vs. 54.8 ± 3.82 degrees; P = 0.047). Straight-probe AOSF yielded larger direction angles without injuring bone and disc. Complications were absent. The procedure was easier than guide-tube AOSF and assured sufficient engagement, even in horizontal fracture orientation cases. 3.

  17. The effect of locked screw angulation on the biomechanical properties of the S.P.S. Free-Block plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, M K A; Rahal, S C; Ribeiro, C R; Padovani, C R

    2013-01-01

    Among the locked internal fixators is one denominated S.P.S. (Synthesis Pengo System) Free-Block, which was designed with a locking ring that allows the screw to be locked and positioned obliquely. Due to the paucity of biomechanical studies on this system, the present work aimed to evaluate the influence of locked screw angulation on the resistance of the S.P.S. Free-Block plate. Forty synthetic bone cylinders with 10 mm fracture gap were used. Forty seven-hole 3.5 mm stainless steel plates (two AO-like dynamic compression holes and five locked holes) were assembled according to the orientation of the locked screws: monocortical screws were positioned at 90º to the long axis of the cylinder (Group 1), and monocortical screws were positioned at 70º to its cylinder long axis (Group 2). In both groups, AO-like dynamic compression hole screws were positioned bicortically and neutrally. For each group, six specimens were tested until failure, three in bending and three in compression, to determine the loads for fatigue testing. Subsequently, for each group, 14 specimens were tested for failure - seven by bending and seven in compression. No significant failure differences were observed between Groups 1 and 2 under static-loading or fatigue test. In a fracture gap model the orientation of the locked monocortical screws did not show any influence on the mechanical performance of the S.P.S. Free-Block to tests of axial compression and four-point bending.

  18. Ex vivo evaluation of the biomechanical effect of varying monocortical screw numbers on a plate-rod canine femoral gap model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisser, P J; McCombe, G P; Trask, R S; Etches, J A; German, A J; Holden, S L; Wallace, A M; Burton, N J

    2013-01-01

    To compare the biomechanical behaviour of plate-rod constructs with varying numbers of monocortical screws applied to an ex vivo canine femoral-gap ostectomy model. Twenty Greyhound dog cadaveric femurs. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed with dual x-ray absorptiometry. Bones were assigned to four groups. Bones had a 12-hole 3.5 mm locking compression plate with one bicortical non-locking cortical screw in the most proximal and distal plate holes and an intramedullary Steinmann pin applied across a 20 mm mid-diaphyseal ostectomy. Additionally, one to four monocortical non-locking cortical screws were then placed (Groups 1-4 respectively) in the proximal and distal fragments. Stiffness and axial collapse were determined before and after cyclic axial loading (6000 cycles at 20%, 40%, and 60% of mean bodyweight [total: 18000 cycles]). Constructs subsequently underwent an additional 45000 cycles at 60% of bodyweight (total: 63000 cycles). Loading to failure was then performed and ultimate load and mode of failure recorded. The BMD did not differ significantly between groups. Construct stiffness for group 1 was significantly less than group 4 (p = 0.008). Stiffness showed a linear increase with an increasing number of monocortical screws (p = 0.001). All constructs survived fatigue loading. Load-to-failure was not significantly different between groups. Mean load- to-failure of all groups was >1350N. Ex vivo canine large-breed femurs showed adequate stability biomechanically and gradually increasing stiffness with increasing monocortical screw numbers.

  19. Biopolymer augmentation of the lag screw in the treatment of femoral neck fractures - a biomechanical in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paech A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cut-out of the sliding screw is one of the most common complications in the treatment of intertrochanteric fractures. The reasons for the cut-out are: a suboptimal position of the hip-screw in the femoral head, the type of fracture and poor bone quality. The aim of this study was to reproduce the cut-out event biomechanically and to evaluate the possible prevention of this event by the use of a biopolymer augmentation of the hip screw. Concerning the density and compression force of osteoporotic femoral bone polyurethane foam according to the terms of the Association for Standard Testing Material (ASTMF 1839-97 was used as test material. The polyurethane foam Lumoltan 200 with a compression force of 3.3 Mpa and a density of 0.192 g/cm3 was used to reproduce the osteoporotic bone of the femoral fragment (density 12 lbm/ft3. A cylinder of 50 mm of length and 50 mm of width was produced by a rotary splint raising procedure with planar contact. The axial load of the system was performed by a hydraulic force cylinder of a universal test machine type Zwick 1455, Ulm, Germany. The CCD-angle of the used TGN-System was preset at 130 degrees. The migration pattern of the hip screw in the polyurethane foam was measured and expressed as a curve of the distance in millimeter [mm] against the applied load in Newton [N] up to the cut-out point. During the tests the implants reached a critical changing point from stable to unstable with an increased load progression of steps of 50 Newton. This unstable point was characterized by an increased migration speed in millimeters and higher descending gradient in the migration curve. This peak of the migration curve served as an indicator for the change of the hip screw position in the simulated bone material. The applied load in the non-augmented implant showed that in this group for a density degree of 12 (0,192 g/cm3 the mean force at the failure point was 1431 Newton (± 52 Newton. In the augmented

  20. A New Electromagnetic Navigation System for Pedicle Screws Placement: A Human Cadaver Study at the Lumbar Spine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hahn

    Full Text Available Technical developments for improving the safety and accuracy of pedicle screw placement play an increasingly important role in spine surgery. In addition to the standard techniques of free-hand placement and fluoroscopic navigation, the rate of complications is reduced by 3D fluoroscopy, cone-beam CT, intraoperative CT/MRI, and various other navigation techniques. Another important aspect that should be emphasized is the reduction of intraoperative radiation exposure for personnel and patient. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of a new navigation system for the spine based on an electromagnetic field.Twenty pedicle screws were placed in the lumbar spine of human cadavers using EMF navigation. Navigation was based on data from a preoperative thin-slice CT scan. The cadavers were positioned on a special field generator and the system was matched using a patient tracker on the spinous process. Navigation was conducted using especially developed instruments that can be tracked in the electromagnetic field. Another thin-slice CT scan was made postoperatively to assess the result. The evaluation included the position of the screws in the direction of trajectory and any injury to the surrounding cortical bone. The results were classified in 5 groups: grade 1: ideal screw position in the center of the pedicle with no cortical bone injury; grade 2: acceptable screw position, cortical bone injury with cortical penetration ≤ 2 mm; grade 3: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration 2,1-4 mm, grad 4: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration 4,1-6 mm, grade 5: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration >6 mm.The initial evaluation of the system showed good accuracy for the lumbar spine (65% grade 1, 20% grade 2, 15% grade 3, 0% grade 4, 0% grade 5. A comparison of the initial results with other navigation techniques in literature (CT navigation, 2D fluoroscopic navigation shows that the accuracy of this system is

  1. Carpal scaphoid non-union treatment: a retrospective trial comparing simple retrograde percutaneous screw fixation versus percutaneous screw fixation plus pulsed electromagnetic fields (Physiostim®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Alexis; Hidalgo Díaz, Juan José; Saur, Maurise; Salazar Botero, Santiago; Facca, Sybille; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this retrospective comparative study was to assess whether a complementary treatment by pulsed electromagnetic field could increase the bone-healing rate of scaphoid non-union without SNAC (scaphoid non-union advanced collapse) treated by retrograde percutaneous screw fixation. Eighteen patients with scaphoid non-union were included in this retrospective study. The group 1 was made of nine cases (seven stage IIA and two stage IIB) of scaphoid non-union treated by retrograde percutaneous screw fixation and pulsed electromagnetic fields (Physiostim ® ). The group 2 was made of nine cases (six stage IIA and three stage IIB) treated by simple retrograde percutaneous screw fixation. With a 10-month follow-up in group 1 and a 9.5-month follow-up in group 2, there were three cases of non-union in group 1 and two cases in group 2. Regarding the type of non-union, there was one case among the stage IIB and four cases among the stage IIA. The results of the study did not show any interest in the use of pulsed electromagnetic field for the treatment of carpal scaphoid non-union. They should be dropped. III.

  2. [Iso-C(3D0-assisted) navigated implantation of pedicle screws in thoracic lumbar vertebrae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendl, K; von Recum, J; Wentzensen, A; Grützner, P A

    2003-11-01

    The mobile Siremobil Iso-C(3D) C-arm (Siemens AG, Medical Solutions, Erlangen) is the first device that permits the intraoperative three-dimensional (3D) representation of bone structures. A high-resolution isotropic 3D data cube in the isocenter with an edge length of approximately 12 cm is calculated simultaneously. The Siremobil Iso-C(3D) is linked to navigation with the integrated NaviLink interface (Siemens AG, Medical Solutions, Erlangen). This makes it possible to transfer the generated 3D data directly to the linked navigation system Surgigate (Medivision, Oberndorf, Switzerland). In this prospective clinical trial we evaluated the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using the Siremobil Iso-C(3D) C-arm. The results were compared to the conventional approach and other computer-assisted procedures (CT-based navigation, C-arm-based 2D navigation) in historical control groups. A total of 141 pedicle screws were placed in 30 patients (70 thoracic spine, 71 lumbar spine). Only in one single case was misplacement shown in the postoperative control CT scan (0.71%), the lowest rate of incorrect placements of all techniques. Also the lowest average fluoroscopy time (1.28+/-0.56 min) was achieved during the placement of pedicle screws on the spine with Iso-C(3D) navigation at a comparable average OR duration (103.26+/-23.3 min). There were no postoperative neurological complications in all 30 patients. From these data we conclude that Iso-C(3D) navigation of pedicle screws is a very accurate method in the correct placement of pedicle screws.

  3. VARIANTS OF SPINE OSTEOSYNTESIS AT LOW MINERAL DENSITY OF BONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Usikov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the results of transpedicular screw fixation in the treatment of patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures was done. In the first group (N=27 the polysegmental transpedicular screw fixation was applied. In the second group (N=20 we used short-level stabilization with additional augmentation of transpedicular screws by bone cement. The spinal stability, restoration of function, correction of spine's deformation and pain relief was same in both groups. But in the second group the results was achieved with less traumatization and time of rehabilitation of the patients.

  4. Sacroiliac screw fixation for tile B fractures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, E.W. van den; Zwienen, C.M. van; Hoek van Dijke, G.A.; Snijders, C.J.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this comparative cadaveric study was to investigate whether the stability of partially unstable pelvic fractures can be improved by combining plate fixation of the symphysis with a posterior sacroiliac screw. METHODS: In six specimens, a Tile B1 (open-book) pelvic fracture

  5. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  6. Bone Repair and Military Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation...osseointegration/osseoinduction, this material has potential to be used for screw augmentation, total hip/knee joint replacement, and other orthopedic and dental ...silorane bone cement with commercial cement in a swine femoral implant model Kathleen V Kilway, Donna Pacicca, Rachel A Weiler, Elizabeth M. Menuey

  7. The mechanical benefit of medial support screws in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical advantages of medial support screws (MSSs in the locking proximal humeral plate for treating proximal humerus fractures. METHODS: Thirty synthetic left humeri were randomly divided into 3 subgroups to establish two-part surgical neck fracture models of proximal humerus. All fractures were fixed with a locking proximal humerus plate. Group A was fixed with medial cortical support and no MSSs; Group B was fixed with 3 MSSs but without medial cortical support; Group C was fixed with neither medial cortical support nor MSSs. Axial compression, torsional stiffness, shear stiffness, and failure tests were performed. RESULTS: Constructs with medial support from cortical bone showed statistically higher axial and shear stiffness than other subgroups examined (P<0.0001. When the proximal humerus was not supported by medial cortical bone, locking plating with medial support screws exhibited higher axial and torsional stiffness than locking plating without medial support screws (P ≤ 0.0207. Specimens with medial cortical bone failed primarily by fracture of the humeral shaft or humeral head. Specimens without medial cortical bone support failed primarily by significant plate bending at the fracture site followed by humeral head collapse or humeral head fracture. CONCLUSIONS: Anatomic reduction with medial cortical support was the stiffest construct after a simulated two-part fracture. Significant biomechanical benefits of MSSs in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures were identified. The reconstruction of the medial column support for proximal humerus fractures helps to enhance mechanical stability of the humeral head and prevent implant failure.

  8. [Clinical application of percutaneous iliosacral screws combined with pubic ramus screws in Tile B pelvic fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi-Fei; Lin, Kui-Ran; Zhao, Dai-Jie; Zhang, Song-Qin; Feng, Sheng-Kai; Li, Chen

    2017-03-25

    To investigate the application and effect of minimally invasive percutaneous anterior pelvic pubic ramus screw fixation in Tile B fractures. A retrospective review was conducted on 56 patients with posterior pelvic ring injury combined with fractures of anterior pubic and ischiadic ramus treated between May 2010 and August 2015, including 31 males and 25 females with an average age of 36.8 years old ranging from 35 to 65 years old. Based on the Tile classification, there were 13 cases of Tile B1 type, 28 cases of Tile B2 type and 15 cases of Tile B3 type. Among them, 26 patients were treated with sacroiliac screws combined with external fixation (external fixator group) and the other 30 patients underwent sacroiliac screw fixation combined with anterior screw fixation (pubic ramus screw group). Postoperative complications, postoperative ambulation time, fracture healing, blood loss, Majeed pelvic function score and visual analogue scale(VAS) were compared between two groups. Fifty-four patients were followed up from 3 to 24 months with a mean of 12 months. There were no significant difference in the peri-operative bleeding and operation time between two groups( P >0.05). The postoperative activity time and fracture healing time of pubic ramus screw group were shorter than those of the external fixator group, the differences were statistically significant( P safty treatment method to the Tile B pelvic fracture. It has advantages of early ambulation, relief of the pain and few complications.

  9. Midfoot fusion: a biomechanical comparison of plantar planting vs intramedullary screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Ernest J; Takemoto, Richelle C; Kummer, Frederick J; Mroczek, Kenneth J

    2013-03-01

    Numerous reconstructive techniques for midfoot collapse secondary to Charcot neuroarthropathy have been described, but few have been studied biomechanically. The purpose of this study was to biomechanically compare 2 of the most common techniques. Seven paired below-knee specimens were amputated through the talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints. The nonligamentous soft tissue was stripped proximal to the metatarsal heads and disarticulated through the tarsometatarsal (TMT) joints. For each paired specimen, the TMT joints were fused by plantar plating or intramedullary screw fixation for the contralateral side. The specimens were mounted, loaded, and cycled, and fixation stiffness was determined. Load versus displacement graphs were used to calculate overall construct stiffness, and data were analyzed by Student t tests. There was no failure of hardware. All failures were at the bone-implant interface. Failure was either by screw pull-out, bone fracture, or a combination of the two. There were no notable differences between the 2 fixation techniques with respect to stiffness or loads to failure. There was a trend toward a stiffer first TMT construct using the plantar plating method. Five of the 7 screw fixations failed by pullout of the base of the first metatarsal and the other 2 by pullout of screws from all MT bases. Seven of the 7 plantar plate fixations failed by separation of the fifth to third MT bases originating at the fifth, and 3 showed fracture of the fifth metatarsal base. There was no notable biomechanical difference between the 2 techniques. There was a trend toward a stiffer construct at the first TMT with plantar plating. This study biomechanically analyzes two common Charcot midfoot reconstruction techniques and highlights the need for further study of both techniques and combinations of these techniques.

  10. Spinal pedicle screw planning using deformable atlas registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerres, J.; Uneri, A.; De Silva, T.; Ketcha, M.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Jacobson, M.; Vogt, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Osgood, G.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-04-01

    Spinal screw placement is a challenging task due to small bone corridors and high risk of neurological or vascular complications, benefiting from precision guidance/navigation and quality assurance (QA). Implicit to both guidance and QA is the definition of a surgical plan—i.e. the desired trajectories and device selection for target vertebrae—conventionally requiring time-consuming manual annotations by a skilled surgeon. We propose automation of such planning by deriving the pedicle trajectory and device selection from a patient’s preoperative CT or MRI. An atlas of vertebrae surfaces was created to provide the underlying basis for automatic planning—in this work, comprising 40 exemplary vertebrae at three levels of the spine (T7, T8, and L3). The atlas was enriched with ideal trajectory annotations for 60 pedicles in total. To define trajectories for a given patient, sparse deformation fields from the atlas surfaces to the input (CT or MR image) are applied on the annotated trajectories. Mean value coordinates are used to interpolate dense deformation fields. The pose of a straight trajectory is optimized by image-based registration to an accumulated volume of the deformed annotations. For evaluation, input deformation fields were created using coherent point drift (CPD) to perform a leave-one-out analysis over the atlas surfaces. CPD registration demonstrated surface error of 0.89  ±  0.10 mm (median  ±  interquartile range) for T7/T8 and 1.29  ±  0.15 mm for L3. At the pedicle center, registered trajectories deviated from the expert reference by 0.56  ±  0.63 mm (T7/T8) and 1.12  ±  0.67 mm (L3). The predicted maximum screw diameter differed by 0.45  ±  0.62 mm (T7/T8), and 1.26  ±  1.19 mm (L3). The automated planning method avoided screw collisions in all cases and demonstrated close agreement overall with expert reference plans, offering a potentially valuable tool in support

  11. Assessing accuracy of sustentaculum screw placement during calcaneal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitajn, I Leah; Toussaint, Rull James; Kwon, John Y

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of the Harris heel view to confirm placement of the sustentacular screw during calcaneal fixation. A 4.0 cancellous screw was placed in a cadaveric specimen, from lateral to medial in 5 configurations: (1) within the sustentaculum, (2) misdirected inferiorly to sustentaculum, (3) misdirected superiorly to sustentaculum, (4) misdirected anteriorly to sustentaculum, and (5) misdirected posteriorly to sustentaculum. Harris heel views were obtained at 5 angulations and were analyzed to determine screw placement. A screw placed anatomically was radiographically confirmed by the Harris heel view to be within the sustentaculum in all views. An inferiorly misdirected screw appeared radiographically within the sustentaculum at 30, 40 and 50 degrees but was confirmed misplaced on the 10- and 20-degree views. A posteriorly misdirected screw was confirmed misplaced on all 5 views. An anteriorly misdirected screw appeared radiographically within the sustentaculum on the 10-degree view but was confirmed misplaced on all other views. A superiorly misdirected screw was confirmed misplaced on all views. Clinicians should be aware that several specific axial heel views are required to verify placement of the sustentacular screw. An inferiorly misdirected screw will appear to be within the sustentaculum with the standard Harris heel view. Heel views should be obtained from a range of 10 to 50 degrees to confirm accurate placement of the sustentacular screw.

  12. OSTEOSYNTHESIS OF FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES: TWO OR THREE SCREWS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Ricardo; Pepicelli, Gustavo Roberto; Takata, Edmilson Takehiro

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of osteosynthesis on femoral neck fractures using two instead of three screws. Thirty-nine fractures were retrospectively evaluated, divided into groups in which two screws were used in parallel (n = 28) or three screws (n =11) in an inverted triangle configuration (in accordance with the AO technique). The patients were then followed up until reaching the outcome of either consolidation or failure. In the group in which two screws were used, consolidation was observed in 23 of the 28 fractures (82%). In the group in which three screws were used, consolidation was observed in 6 of the 11 fractures (55%). There was no statistically significant difference between these percentages. There was no difference in the prognosis for these fractures when treated using two screws in parallel or three screws in an inverted triangle in accordance with the AO technique. Further studies are needed in order to establish a definitive conclusion.

  13. Research and application of absorbable screw in orthopedics: a clinical review comparing PDLLA screw with metal screw in patients with simple medial malleolus fracture

    OpenAIRE

    TANG Jin; HU Jin-feng; GUO Wei-chun; YU Ling; ZHAO Sheng-hao

    2013-01-01

    【Abstract】Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of absorbable screw in medial malleolus fracture and discuss its clinical application in orthopedics. Methods: A total of 129 patients with simple medial malleolus fracture were studied. Among them, 64 patients were treated with poly-D, L-lactic acid (PDLLA) absorbable screws, while the others were treated with metal screws. All the patients were followed up for 12-20 months (averaged 18.4 months) and the the...

  14. Osteosynthesis ­of ­femoral ­neck ­fracture ­with­ cannulated ­screws. Prognostic ­factors ­and­ results ­in ­93 ­cases

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastián Pereira; Ximena Calvo; Alfonso Lugones; Gabriel Vindver; Fernando Bidolegui

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Reduction and osteosynthesis with cannulated screws in femoral neck fracture is a valid therapeutic option. Our objective is to identify prognostic factors and risk groups. Methods: We studied retrospectively 93 femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation with cannulated screw between June 1995 and March 2011 (71 non-displaced and 22 displaced). Results: In 82 of the 93 cases we observed bone consolidation of the fracture. Eleven patients presented c...

  15. Cephalomedullary screws as the standard proximal locking screws for nailing femoral shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinge, Cory; Liporace, Frank; Koval, Kenneth; Gilbert, George T

    2010-12-01

    In 2004, we modified our technique for the stabilization of femoral shaft fractures so that all fractures were stabilized using a reconstruction nail with proximal locking screws oriented into the femoral head. The rationale for this was twofold: first, potentially "missed" associated femoral neck fractures would be stabilized. Second, hip fractures that might occur later in life above the intramedullary nail might be avoided. The purpose of this study therefore was to determine whether there were any risks to patients treated for femoral shaft fractures with antegrade nails using cephalomedullary proximal locking screws. Retrospective. Two regional trauma centers. Eighty-seven consecutive patients were treated for a femoral shaft fracture treated with antegrade femoral nailing with a cephalomedullary locked nail. Reamed, trochanteric insertion of an intramedullary nail with proximal locking screws placed in a cephalomedullary direction. Patient and injury data, radiographic analyses, and complications of treatment were assessed at a minimum of 12 months. Sixty-one of 87 patients (70%) were available at a mean of 19.8 months (range, 12-44 months). Sixty of 61 fractures united after the index procedure. Complications included one delayed union successfully treated with exchange nailing, one distal locking screw fracture (allowing dynamization and completion of fracture healing), two patients with postoperative deformity that required a derotation procedure, and two drill bits that broke intraoperatively and were retained. There were no major complications at the hip, no migration or failure of proximal locking screws, and no screws required removal. Using a reconstruction nail and cephalomedullary proximal locking screws for antegrade femoral nailing of femoral shaft fractures was not associated with major complications in this series. This modification of standard femoral nailing offers potential advantages, including fixation of any "missed" associated femoral

  16. Can experimental data in humans verify the finite element-based bone remodeling algorithm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, C.; Gehrchen, P.M.; Kiaer, T.

    2008-01-01

    : The validity of 2 bone remodeling algorithms was evaluated by comparing against prospective bone mineral content measurements. Also, the potential stress shielding effect was examined using the 2 bone remodeling algorithms and the experimental bone mineral data. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In previous studies......STUDY DESIGN: A finite element analysis-based bone remodeling study in human was conducted in the lumbar spine operated on with pedicle screws. Bone remodeling results were compared to prospective experimental bone mineral content data of patients operated on with pedicle screws. OBJECTIVE......, in the human spine, the bone remodeling algorithms have neither been evaluated experimentally nor been examined by comparing to unsystematic experimental data. METHODS: The site-specific and nonsite-specific iterative bone remodeling algorithms were applied to a finite element model of the lumbar spine...

  17. A demineralized calf vertebra model as an alternative to classic osteoporotic vertebra models for pedicle screw pullout studies

    OpenAIRE

    Akbay, Atilla; Bozkurt, Gokhan; Ilgaz, Ozgur; Palaoglu, Selcuk; Akalan, Nejat; Benzel, Edward C.

    2007-01-01

    Screws, clamps and other spinal instrumentation materials are tested using healthy animal and healthy human vertebrae, but the application of similar tests to an osteoporotic vertebra is generally neglected because of high costs and limited availability of high quality and consistent osteoporotic vertebrae. The objective of this study is to develop an in-vitro method to decrease the mineral content of an animal vertebra utilizing decalcifying chemical agents that alters the bone mineral densi...

  18. Biomechanical Analysis of Tapered Integrated Screw and Sensitivity Analysis on Abutment Loosening in Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Farzadi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Different mechanisms have been developed for connecting abutment to implant. One of the most popular mechanisms is Tapered Integrated Screw (TIS, which is a Tapered Interference Fit (TIF with a screw integrated at the bottom of that. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of TIS and effective factors in employing TIS during design and implementation processes using an analytic method.Materials and Methods: Relevant equations were developed to predict tightening and loosening torques, contactpressure and preloads with and without bone tissue in this analysis. The efficiency is defined as the ratio of the loosening torque to the tightening torque. The effects of the change in elastic modulus and thickness of the bone on operation of this mechanism were investigated.Results: In this study, 14 independent parameters such as taper angle, friction coefficient, abutment and implantgeometry that are effective on performance of TIS mechanism were presented. The role of some factors was shown in the performance of ITI implant using sensitivity analysis.Conclusion: It was shown that friction coefficient, contact length, and implant radius play major roles on tightening and loosening torques and efficiency of the mechanism. Furthermore, the results revealed that the change in the elastic modulus and thickness of the bone influenced the efficiency of the mechanism less than 15%.

  19. Twin screw granulation - review of current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) is a new process of interest to the pharmaceutical community that can continuously wet granulate powders, doing so at lower liquid concentrations and with better product consistency than found by a high shear batch mixer. A considerable body of research has evolved over the short time since this process was introduced but generally with little comparison of results. A certain degree of confidence has been developed through these studies related to how process variables and many attributes of machinery configuration will affect granulation but some major challenges still lay ahead related to scalability, variations in the processing regimes related to degree of channel fill and the impact of wetting and granulation of complex powder formulations. This review examines the current literature for wet granulation processes studied in twin screw extrusion machinery, summarizing the influences of operational and system parameters affecting granule properties as well as strives to provide some practical observations to newly interested users of the technique.

  20. Screw as a Bladder Foreign Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Hosseini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies in the bladder are among the strangest differential diagnoses in the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS and may be missed in initial medical evaluations. We present a 63-year-old man who was visited in the emergency department because of obstructive and irritative lower urinary tract symptoms. Two months earlier, he had a pelvic fracture due to motor vehicle accident and underwent an open reduction and internal fixation of the pubic rami and right acetabulum by an anterior ilioinguinal approach. After initial evaluation, an abdominopelvic X-ray revealed a 3 cm screw in the suprapubic area. He underwent urethrocystoscopy and a 3 cm screw was extracted by forceps.

  1. A parametric study of cylindrical pedicle screw design implications on the pullout performance using an experimentally validated finite-element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzistergos, Panagiotis E; Magnissalis, Evangelos A; Kourkoulis, Stavros K

    2010-03-01

    The present study aims to the design of a finite-element model simulating accurately the pullout behaviour of cylindrical pedicle screws and predicting their pullout force. Three commercial pedicle screws, subjected to pure pullout from synthetic bone, were studied experimentally. The results were used for the design, calibration and validation of a finite-element model. Special attention was paid to the accurate simulation of the failure inside the host material under shear. For this purpose, a bilinear cohesive zone material model was adopted, controlling the mode-II debonding of neighbouring elements in the vicinity of the screw. Comparison between experimental and numerical results proved that the implementation of this approach can significantly enhance the accuracy of the numerical simulation of a screw's mechanical behaviour under pure pullout loads. The numerical model was used for the parametric study of various factors affecting the pullout performance of a cylindrical pedicle screw. It was concluded that the major parameter influencing the pullout force is the outer radius (increasing its value by 36% increases the pullout force by 34%). The influence of the purchase length of the screw is of similar quantitative nature. The respective dependence on the thread inclination, depth and pitch was significantly weaker. (c) 2009 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Calculating Characteristics of the Screws with Constant And Variable Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Zotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to creating a technique for calculating power characteristics of the screws with constant and variable step for the centrifugal pumps. The technique feature is that the reverse currents, which are observed in screws working at low flow, are numerically taken into account. The paper presents a diagram of the stream in the screw with flow to the network Q=0, and the static pressure of the screw in this mode is computed according to reverse current parameters. Maximum flow of screw is determined from the known formulas. When calculating the power characteristics and computing the overall efficiency of the screw, for the first time a volumetric efficiency of the screw is introduced. It is defined as a ratio between the flow into the network and the sum of the reverse current flows and a flow into the network. This approach allowed us to determine the efficiency of the screw over the entire range of flows.A comparison of experimental characteristics of the constant step screw with those of calculated by the proposed technique shows their good agreement.The technique is also used in calculating characteristics of the variable step screws. The variable step screw is considered as a screw consisting of two screws with a smooth transition of the blades from the inlet to the outlet. Screws in which the step at the inlet is less than that of at the outlet as well as screws with the step at the inlet being more than that of at the outlet were investigated. It is shown that a pressure of the screw with zero step and the value of the reverse currents depend only on the parameters of the input section of the screw, and the maximum flow, if the step at the inlet is more than the step at the outlet, is determined by the parameters of the output part of the screw. Otherwise, the maximum flow is determined a little bit differently.The paper compares experimental characteristics with characteristics calculated by the technique for variable step

  3. Optimal trajectory for the occipital condyle screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tien V; Vivas, Andrew C; Baaj, Ali A; Vale, Fernando L; Uribe, Juan S

    2014-04-01

    Retrospective analysis. To understand what may constitute an optimal trajectory for an occipital condyle (OC) screw. OC screws are an alternative to standard occipital plates as a cephalad fixation point in occipitocervical fusion. An optimal trajectory for placement of OC screws has not been described. We conducted a computed tomography-based study of 340 human occipital condyls. All computed tomographies were negative for traumatic, degenerative, and neoplastic pathology. On the basis of the current literature, linear measurements of distances were made based on a constant entry point. Medial angulations of 10, 20, and 25 degrees relative to the sagittal midline were used. In addition, 10-, 5-degree cranial, 10- and 30-degree caudal angulations were studied to evaluate the incidence of hypoglossal canal and atlantooccipital joint compromise. Average distances were 17.1±2.8, 20.4±2.8, and 22.2±2.9 for 10, 20, and 25 degrees of medial angulation, respectively. Right-sided and left-sided measurements for each category were not significantly different. However, the difference in the measured distances between 10 versus 20 degrees, 10 versus 25 degrees, and 20 versus 25 degrees was all significantly different (PAtlantooccipital joint compromise incidence was 21.8% and 99.1% for 10- and 30-degree caudal angulation, respectively. The condylar entry point should be medial to the condylar fossa, midcondylar, and ≥2 mm caudal to the skull base. An optimal trajectory for the OC screw should have a medial angulation of ≥20 degrees relative to the sagittal midline, trying to stay parallel to the skull base. Minor adjustments in angulation can be made, but any adjustment approaching 10 degrees cranial or caudal leads to an increased risk of hypoglossal canal cranially or atlantooccipital joint compromise caudally.

  4. 2D and 3D assessment of sustentaculum tali screw fixation with or without Screw Targeting Clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, A Siebe; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Vellekoop, Leonie; Knops, Simon P; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Verhofstad, Michael H J

    2017-12-01

    Precise placement of sustentaculum tali screw(s) is essential for restoring anatomy and biomechanical stability of the calcaneus. This can be challenging due to the small target area and presence of neurovascular structures on the medial side. The aim was to evaluate the precision of positioning of the subchondral posterior facet screw and processus anterior calcanei screw with or without a Screw Targeting Clamp. The secondary aim was to evaluate the added value of peroperative 3D imaging over 2D radiographs alone. Twenty Anubifix™ embalmed, human anatomic lower limb specimens were used. A subchondral posterior facet screw and a processus anterior calcanei screw were placed using an extended lateral approach. A senior orthopedic trauma surgeon experienced in calcaneal fracture surgery and a senior resident with limited experience in calcaneal surgery performed screw fixation in five specimens with and in five specimens without the clamp. 2D lateral and axial radiographs and a 3D recording were obtained postoperatively. Anatomical dissection was performed postoperatively as a diagnostic golden standard in order to obtain the factual screw positions. Blinded assessment of quality of fixation was performed by two surgeons. In 2D, eight screws were considered malpositioned when placed with the targeting device versus nine placed freehand. In 3D recordings, two additional screws were malpositioned in each group as compared to the golden standard. As opposed to the senior surgeon, the senior resident seemed to get the best results using the Screw Targeting Clamp (number of malpositioned screws using freehand was eight, and using the targeting clamp five). In nine out of 20 specimens 3D images provided additional information concerning target area and intra-articular placement. Based on the 3D assessment, five additional screws would have required repositioning. Except for one, all screw positions were rated equally after dissection when compared with 3D examinations

  5. Is the lag screw sliding effective in the intramedullary nailing in A1 and A2 AO-OTA intertrochanteric fractures? A prospective study of Sliding and None-sliding lag screw in Gamma-III nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Meili, Severin; Zhang, Changqing; Luo, Congfeng; Zeng, Bing-fang

    2012-09-01

    To compare the Sliding with Non-sliding lag screw of a gamma nail in the treatment of A1 and A2 AO-OTA intertrochanteric fractures. 80 patients were prospectively collected. In each group, AO/OTA 31-A were classified into group A. AO/OTA 31-A2.1 was classified as group B. We classified the A2.2 and A2.3 as group C. According to the set-screw locking formation of Gamma-III, the cases were randomly allocated to Sliding subgroup and Non-sliding subgroup in A, B and C groups. Follow-ups were performed 1, 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. In the Sliding group, the bone healing rate 3, 6, 12 months postoperatively reached 85.00%, 97.50%, 100% in group A, B and C. Meanwhile, in Non-sliding group, postoperatively, bone healing rate were 90.00%, 95.00% and 97.50% in group A, B and C, respectively. Both differences were not significant. Lower limb discrepancy between Sliding and Non-sliding pattern was significantly different in group C which represent fracture types of AO/OTA 31-A2.2 and A2.3 (0.573 ± 0.019 mm in Non-sliding group, 0.955 mm ± 0.024 mm in Sliding group, P AO-OTA intertrochanteric fractures. For treating these kinds of fractures, the sliding of the lag screw of an Gamma nail does not improve any clinical results and in certain cases, such as highly comminuted A1 and A2 fractures, can therefore even benefit from a locked lag screw by tightening the set-screw.

  6. In vitro evaluation of force-expansion characteristics in a newly designed orthodontic expansion screw compared to conventional screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshagh Morteza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Expansion screws like Hyrax, Haas and other types, produce heavy interrupted forces which are unfavorable for dental movement and could be harmful to the tooth and periodontium. The other disadvantage of these screws is the need for patient cooperation for their regular activation. The purpose of this study was to design a screw and compare its force- expansion curve with other types. Materials and Methods : A new screw was designed and fabricated in the same dimension, with conventional types, with the ability of 8 mm expansion (Free wire length: 12 mm, initial compression: 4.5 mm, spring wire diameter: 0.4 mm, spring diameter: 3 mm, number of the coils: n0 ine, material: s0 tainless steel. In this in vitro study, the new screw was placed in an acrylic orthodontic appliance, and after mounting on a stone cast, the force-expansion curve was evaluated by a compression test machine and compared to other screws. Results : Force-expansion curve of designed screw had a flatter inclination compared to other screws. Generally it produced a light continuous force (two to 3.5 pounds for every 4 mm of expansion. Conclusion : In comparison with heavy and interrupted forces of other screws, the newly designed screw created light and continuous forces.

  7. In vitro evaluation of force-expansion characteristics in a newly designed orthodontic expansion screw compared to conventional screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshagh, Morteza; Momeni Danaei, S H; Hematian, M R; Oshagh, M R; Zade, A Hadiun; Saboori, A A

    2009-01-01

    Expansion screws like Hyrax, Haas and other types, produce heavy interrupted forces which are unfavorable for dental movement and could be harmful to the tooth and periodontium. The other disadvantage of these screws is the need for patient cooperation for their regular activation. The purpose of this study was to design a screw and compare its force- expansion curve with other types. A new screw was designed and fabricated in the same dimension, with conventional types, with the ability of 8 mm expansion (Free wire length: 12 mm, initial compression: 4.5 mm, spring wire diameter: 0.4 mm, spring diameter: 3 mm, number of the coils: n0 ine, material: s0 tainless steel). In this in vitro study, the new screw was placed in an acrylic orthodontic appliance, and after mounting on a stone cast, the force-expansion curve was evaluated by a compression test machine and compared to other screws. Force-expansion curve of designed screw had a flatter inclination compared to other screws. Generally it produced a light continuous force (two to 3.5 pounds) for every 4 mm of expansion. In comparison with heavy and interrupted forces of other screws, the newly designed screw created light and continuous forces.

  8. Pelvic reconstruction with different rod-screw systems following Enneking type I/I + IV resection: a clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huigen; Zhang, Zhengliang; Lin, Haiqing; Wang, Shengdong; Li, Binghao; Li, Hengyuan; Wang, Zhan; Lin, Nong; Ye, Zhaoming

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical outcomes of patients with pelvic bone tumors involving zone I or zone I + IV who received resection and different reconstructions are not clear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of different rod-screw systems in reconstruction for these patients, and evaluate the relative risk of mechanical failure for them. We reviewed 30 patients for a mean duration of 40.4 months of follow-up (range, 13.1–162.2 months), five patients had mechanical complications. The mechanical survival rate of two-rod and four-screw (TRFS) group was significantly higher than one-rod and two-screw (ORTS) group (p = 0.000). The implant survival rate was correlated with ages (p = 0.010), younger people are more likely to fail. Thus, TRFS fixation for pelvic reconstruction after Enneking type I/I + IV resection can provide better short to long-term mechanical stability compared with ORTS fixation, the strength of ORTS fixation is not enough. In addition, biological reconstruction such as autologous bone graft is recommended for the patients who are younger or suffered from benign tumor. As for the patients who are older, with malignant tumors, underwent adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy, functional reconstruction with bone cement is a good choice. PMID:28465495

  9. Late Migration of Threaded Wire (Schanz Screw from Right Distal Clavicle to the Cervical Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hao Tsai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 49-year-old man who had undergone osteosynthesis to treat right distal clavicular fracture with a threaded wire (Schanz screw. The wire could not be removed due to its firm fixation within the bone. Eight years later, migration of the broken wire to the right 7th cervical vertebra punctured the lamina, with no spinal cord injury noted. The threaded wire was extracted from the C7 lamina emergently. No complication occurred after pin removal or during the 1-year postoperative follow-up.

  10. Technical and clinical outcome of percutaneous CT fluoroscopy-guided screw placement in unstable injuries of the posterior pelvic ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobl, Frederik F.; Haeussler, Sophia M.; Paprottka, Philipp M.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Trumm, Christoph G. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Pieske, Oliver [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Trauma Surgery, Munich (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    To evaluate technical success, complications, and effective dose in patients undergoing CT fluoroscopy-guided iliosacral screw placement for the fixation of unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries. Our retrospective analysis includes all consecutive patients with vertical sacral fractures and/or injury of the iliosacral joint treated with CT fluoroscopy-guided screw placement in our department from 11/2005 to 03/2013. Interventions were carried out under general anesthesia and CT fluoroscopy (10-20 mAs; 120 kV; 16- or 128-row scanner, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). Technical outcome, major and minor complications, and effective patient dose were analyzed. We treated 99 consecutive patients (mean age 53.1 ± 21.7 years, 50 male, 49 female) with posterior pelvic ring instability with CT fluoroscopy-guided screw placement. Intervention was technically successful in all patients (n = 99). No major and one minor local complication occurred (1 %, secondary screw dislocation). General complications included three cases of death (3 %) due to pulmonary embolism (n = 1), hemorrhagic shock (n = 1), or cardiac event (n = 1) during a follow-up period of 30 days. General complications were not related to the intervention. Mean effective patient radiation dose per intervention was 12.28 mSv ± 7.25 mSv. Mean procedural time was 72.1 ± 37.4 min. CT fluoroscopy-guided screw placement for the treatment of posterior pelvic ring instabilities can be performed with high technical success and a low complication rate. This method provides excellent intrainterventional visualization of iliac and sacral bones, as well as the sacral neuroforamina for precise screw placement by applying an acceptable effective patient dose. (orig.)

  11. Technical and clinical outcome of percutaneous CT fluoroscopy-guided screw placement in unstable injuries of the posterior pelvic ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl, Frederik F.; Haeussler, Sophia M.; Paprottka, Philipp M.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Trumm, Christoph G.; Pieske, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate technical success, complications, and effective dose in patients undergoing CT fluoroscopy-guided iliosacral screw placement for the fixation of unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries. Our retrospective analysis includes all consecutive patients with vertical sacral fractures and/or injury of the iliosacral joint treated with CT fluoroscopy-guided screw placement in our department from 11/2005 to 03/2013. Interventions were carried out under general anesthesia and CT fluoroscopy (10-20 mAs; 120 kV; 16- or 128-row scanner, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). Technical outcome, major and minor complications, and effective patient dose were analyzed. We treated 99 consecutive patients (mean age 53.1 ± 21.7 years, 50 male, 49 female) with posterior pelvic ring instability with CT fluoroscopy-guided screw placement. Intervention was technically successful in all patients (n = 99). No major and one minor local complication occurred (1 %, secondary screw dislocation). General complications included three cases of death (3 %) due to pulmonary embolism (n = 1), hemorrhagic shock (n = 1), or cardiac event (n = 1) during a follow-up period of 30 days. General complications were not related to the intervention. Mean effective patient radiation dose per intervention was 12.28 mSv ± 7.25 mSv. Mean procedural time was 72.1 ± 37.4 min. CT fluoroscopy-guided screw placement for the treatment of posterior pelvic ring instabilities can be performed with high technical success and a low complication rate. This method provides excellent intrainterventional visualization of iliac and sacral bones, as well as the sacral neuroforamina for precise screw placement by applying an acceptable effective patient dose. (orig.)

  12. Treatment options for unstable trochanteric fractures: Screw or helical proxima femoral nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Jeetendra; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Bajpai, Akansha; Saini, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    To compare treatment outcome of screw proximal femoral nail (PFN) system with that of a helical PFN. The study included 77 patients with closed unstable intertrochanteric fracture classified as AO 31A2&31A3, between June 2008 to August 2011. Inclusion criteria were: all mature skeletons above 50 years of age; closed unstable trochanteric fracture classified as AO 31A2&A3. Exclusion criteria were: immature skeleton, pathological fracture of any cause other than osteoporosis, inability to walk inde- pendently prior to injury. Patients were randomized to 2 treatment groups based on admission sequence. Forty patients were treated with screw PFN and thirty seven were treated with helical PFN. Both groups were similar in respect of time of surgery, blood loss and functional assessment and duration of hospitalization. In screw PFN group 2 patients had superficial wound infection, 1 patient had persistent hip pain and 1 patient had shortening>1 cm buttrochanteric fractures even in Indian patients where the bones are narrow and neck diameter is small. It is an implant of choice for osteoporotic and unstable trochanteric fractures.

  13. Teriparatide increases the insertional torque of pedicle screws during fusion surgery in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Gen; Ueno, Masaki; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Imura, Takayuki; Saito, Wataru; Uchida, Kentaro; Ohtori, Seiji; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2014-09-01

    The object of this study was to examine the efficacy of preoperative teriparatide treatment for increasing the insertional torque of pedicle screws during fusion surgery in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Fusion surgery for the thoracic and/or lumbar spine was performed in 29 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis aged 65-82 years (mean 72.2 years). The patients were divided into 2 groups based on whether they were treated with teriparatide (n = 13) or not (n = 16) before the surgery. In the teriparatide-treated group, patients received preoperative teriparatide therapy as either a daily (20 μg/day, n = 7) or a weekly (56.5 μg/week, n = 6) injection for a mean of 61.4 days and a minimum of 31 days. During surgery, the insertional torque was measured in 212 screws inserted from T-7 to L-5 and compared between the 2 groups. The correlation between the insertional torque and the duration of preoperative teriparatide treatment was also investigated. The mean insertional torque value in the teriparatide group was 1.28 ± 0.42 Nm, which was significantly higher than in the control group (1.08 ± 0.52 Nm, p osteoporosis. Preoperative teriparatide treatment might be an option for maximizing the purchase of the pedicle screws to the bone at the time of fusion surgery.

  14. Tissue reaction to implants of different metals: a study using guide wires in cannulated screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, D M; Leitner, M; Perren, S M; Boure, L P; Pearce, S G

    2009-10-20

    Cannulated screws, along with guide wires, are typically used for surgical fracture treatment in cancellous bone. Breakage or bending deformation of the guide wire is a clinical concern. Mechanically superior guide wires made of Co-Cr alloys such as MP35N and L605 may reduce the occurrence of mechanical failures when used in combination with conventional (316L stainless steel) cannulated screws. However the possibility of galvanic or crevice corrosion and adverse tissue reaction, exists when using dissimilar materials, particularly in the event that a guide wire breaks, and remains in situ. Therefore, we designed an experiment to determine the tissue reaction to such an in vivo environment. Implant devices were designed to replicate a clinical situation where dissimilar metals can form a galvanic couple. Histological and SEM analyses were used to evaluate tissue response and corrosion of the implants. In this experiment, no adverse in vivo effects were detected from the use of dissimilar materials in a model of a broken guide wire in a cannulated screw.

  15. Fluoroscopic freehand and electromagnetic-guided targeting system for distal locking screws of humeral intramedullary nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persiani, P; Gurzi, M; Moreschini, O; Di Giacomo, G; Villani, C

    2017-04-01

    The current techniques used to lock distal screws for the nailing of long bone fractures expose the surgeons, radiologists and patients to a hearty dose of ionizing radiation. The Sureshot™ Distal Targeting System is a new technique that, with the same results, allows for shorter surgery times and, consequently, less exposure to radiation. The study was performed on 59 patients (34 males and 25 females) with a simple humerus fracture diagnosis, type 1.2.A according to the AO classification, who were divided into two groups. Group 1 was treated with ante-grade intramedullary nailing with distal locking screws inserted with a freehand technique. Group 2 was treated with the intramedullary nail using the Sureshot™ Distal Targeting System. Two intra-operative time parameters were evaluated in both groups: the time needed for the positioning of the distal locking screws and the time of exposure to ionizing radiations during this procedure. Group 2 showed a lower average distal locking time compared to group 1 (645.48″ vs. 1023.57″) and also a lower average time of exposure to ionizing radiation than in group 1 (4.35″ vs. 28.96″). The Sureshot™ Distal Targeting System has proven to be equally effective when compared to the traditional techniques, with the added benefits of a significant reduction in both surgical time and risk factors related to the exposure to ionizing radiation for all the operating room staff and the patient.

  16. Hydraulic screw fastening devices - design, maintenance, operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachner.

    1976-01-01

    With hydraulic screw fastening devices, pretension values with a maximum deviation of +-2.5% from the rated value can be achieved. This high degree of pretension accuracy is of considerable importance with regard to the safety factor required for the screw connection between reactor vessel head and reactor vessel. The operating rhythm of a nuclear power station with its refuelling art regular intervals makes further demands on the screw fastening device, in particular in connection with the transport of screws and for nuts. The necessary installations extend the screw fastening device into a combination of a high-pressure hydraulic cylinder system with an electrical or pneumoelectrical driving unit and an electrical control unit. Maintenance work is complicated by the large number of identical, highly stressed structural elements in connection with an unfavourable relation operating time/outage time. The problems have been perpetually reduced by close cooperation between the manufacturers and users of screw fastening devices. (orig./AK) [de

  17. Self-Inflicted Drywall Screws in the Sagittal Sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guppy, Kern H; Ochi, Calvin

    2018-02-01

    A 30-year-old right-handed man with a history of schizophrenia presented with 2 self-inflicted drywall screws in the skull. The patient was sleepy but easily arousable; blood tests showed he had taken methamphetamines. Computed tomography and computed tomography angiography of the head showed the frontal screw abutted left of the superior sagittal sinus, and the posterior screw went through the superior sagittal sinus with no extravasation of contrast material at either site. Both screws were removed with exposure of the sagittal sinus using U-shaped craniectomies. There was no bleeding on the removal of the screws. It appears the posterior screw entered between the leaflets of the sagittal sinus dura mater. The patient had returned to work without any sequelae 1 month after injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tightening techniques for the retaining screws of universal abutment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wittcinski REGALIN

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose This study evaluated the torque maintenance of universal abutment retaining screws using different tightening techniques, and coated or uncoated screws. Material and method The screws were tightened to implants as following: Control – 32 Ncm torque; H20 – holding 32 Ncm torque for 20 s; R – 32 Ncm torque, repeated after 10 min (retorque; and H20+R – combining the two tightening techniques. Titanium and coated screws were also evaluated. Result Statistical analysis showed higher maintained torque for titanium screws (p<0.001. The H20+R technique showed the highest maintained torque (p=0.003, but the H20 technique’s maintained torque was similar. Conclusion Titanium screws associating the two tightening techniques can improve maintained torque.

  19. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bones can also ...

  20. Comparison of revision strategies for failed C2-posterior cervical pedicle screws: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Michael; Zenner, Juliane; Bogner, Robert; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Figl, Markus; von Keudell, Arvind; Stephan, Daniel; Penzkofer, Rainer; Augat, Peter; Korn, Gundobert; Resch, Herbert; Koller, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    With increasing usage within challenging biomechanical constructs, failures of C2 posterior cervical pedicle screws (C2-pCPSs) will occur. The purpose of the study was therefore to investigate the biomechanical characteristics of two revision techniques after the failure of C2-pCPSs. Twelve human C2 vertebrae were tested in vitro in a biomechanical study to compare two strategies for revision screws after failure of C2-pCPSs. C2 pedicles were instrumented using unicortical 3.5-mm CPS bilaterally (Synapse/Synthes, Switzerland). Insertion accuracy was verified by fluoroscopy. C2 vertebrae were potted and fixed in an electromechanical testing machine with the screw axis coaxial to the pullout direction. Pullout testing was conducted with load and displacement data taken continuously. The peak load to failure was measured in newtons (N) and is reported as the pullout resistance (POR). After pullout, two revision strategies were tested in each vertebra. In Group-1, revision was performed with 4.0-mm C2-pCPSs. In Group-2, revision was performed with C2-pedicle bone-plastic combined with the use of a 4-mm C2-pCPSs. For the statistical analysis, the POR between screws was compared using absolute values (N) and the POR of the revision techniques normalized to that of the primary procedures (%). The POR of primary 3.5-mm CPSs was 1,140.5 ± 539.6 N for Group-1 and 1,007.7 ± 362.5 N for Group-2; the difference was not significant. In the revision setting, the POR in Group-1 was 705.8 ± 449.1 N, representing a reduction of 38.1 ± 32.9 % compared with that of primary screw fixation. For Group-2, the POR was 875.3 ± 367.9 N, representing a reduction of 13.1 ± 23.4 %. A statistical analysis showed a significantly higher POR for Group-2 compared with Group-1 (p = 0.02). Although the statistics showed a significantly reduced POR for both revision strategies compared with primary fixation (p plastic, the POR can be significantly increased compared with the use of only an

  1. Translaminar screw fixation in the lumbar spine: technique, indications, results

    OpenAIRE

    Grob, D.; Humke, T.

    1998-01-01

    Translaminar screw fixation of the lumbar spine represents a simple and effective technique for short segment fusion in the degenerative spine. Clinical experience with 173 patients who underwent translaminar screw fixation revealed a fusion rate of 94%. The indications for translaminar screw fixation as a primary fixation procedure are: segmental dysfunction, lumbar spinal stenosis with painful degenerative changes, segmental revision surgery after discectomies, and painful disc-related synd...

  2. The gauge theory of dislocations: A nonuniformly moving screw dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazar, Markus, E-mail: lazar@fkp.tu-darmstadt.d [Emmy Noether Research Group, Department of Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Hochschulstr. 6, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2010-07-05

    We investigate the nonuniform motion of a straight screw dislocation in infinite media in the framework of the translational gauge theory of dislocations. The equations of motion are derived for an arbitrarily moving screw dislocation. The fields of the elastic velocity, elastic distortion, dislocation density and dislocation current surrounding the arbitrarily moving screw dislocation are derived explicitly in the form of integral representations. We calculate the radiation fields and the fields depending on the dislocation velocities.

  3. Cervical Pedicle Screw Placement Using Medial Funnel Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Choi, Byung Kwan; Han, In Ho; Choi, Won Gyu; Nam, Kyoung Hyup; Kim, Hwan Soo

    2017-09-01

    Cervical pedicle screw (CPS) placement is very challenging due to high risk of neurovascular complications. We devised a new technique (medial funnel technique) to improve the accuracy and feasibility of CPS placement. We reviewed 28 consecutive patients undergoing CPS instrumentation using the medial funnel technique. Their mean age was 51.4 years (range, 30-81 years). Preoperative diagnosis included degenerative disease (n=5), trauma (n=22), and infection (n=1). Screw perforations were graded with the following criteria: grade 0 having no perforation, grade 1 having 50% of screw diameter. Grades 0 and 1 were considered as correct position. The degree of perforation was determined by 2 junior neurosurgeons and 1 senior neurosurgeon. A total of 88 CPSs were inserted. The rate of correct placement was 94.3%; grade 0, 54 screws; grade 1, 29 screws; grade 2, 4 screws; and grade 3, 1 screw. No neurovascular complications or failure of instrumentation occurred. In perforated screws (34 screws), lateral perforations were 4 and medial perforations were 30. We performed CPS insertion using medial funnel technique and achieved 94.3% (83 of 88) of correct placement. And it can decrease lateral perforation.

  4. Accuracy of pedicle screw placement in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jun; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Leilei; Liu, Zhen; Sun, Xu; Qian, Bangping; Jiang, Qing; Zhu, Zezhang; Qiu, Yong

    2017-03-21

    There is no study concerning safety and accuracy of pedicle screw placement in Marfan syndrome. The objective of this study is to investigate accuracy and safety of pedicle screw placement in scoliosis associated with Marfan syndrome. CT scanning was performed to analyze accuracy of pedicle screw placement. Pedicle perforations were classified as medial, lateral or anterior and categorized to four grades: ≤ 2 mm as Grade 1, 2.1-4.0 mm as Grade 2, 4.1-6.0 mm as Grade 3, ≥6.1 mm as Grade 4. Fully contained screws or with medial wall perforation ≤ 2 mm or with lateral wall perforation ≤ 6 mm and without injury of visceral organs were considered acceptable, otherwise were unacceptable. 976 pedicle screws were placed, 713 screws (73.1%) were fully contained within the cortical boundaries of the pedicle. 924 (94.7%) screws were considered as acceptable, and 52 (5.3%) as unacceptable. The perforation rate was higher using free-hand technique than O-arm navigation technique (30.8% VS. 11.4%, P Marfan syndrome is accuracy and safe. O-arm navigation was an effective modality to ensure the safety and accuracy of screw placement. Special attention should be paid when screws were placed at the lumber spine and the concave side of spine deformity to avoid the higher rate of complications.

  5. Minimally Invasive Technique for PMMA Augmentation of Fenestrated Screws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Helge Klingler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the minimally invasive technique for cement augmentation of cannulated and fenestrated screws using an injection cannula as well as to report its safety and efficacy. Methods. A total of 157 cannulated and fenestrated pedicle screws had been cement-augmented during minimally invasive posterior screw-rod spondylodesis in 35 patients from January to December 2012. Retrospective evaluation of cement extravasation and screw loosening was carried out in postoperative plain radiographs and thin-sliced triplanar computed tomography scans. Results. Twenty-seven, largely prevertebral cement extravasations were detected in 157 screws (17.2%. None of the cement extravasations was causing a clinical sequela like a new neurological deficit. One screw loosening was noted (0.6% after a mean follow-up of 12.8 months. We observed no cementation-associated complication like pulmonary embolism or hemodynamic insufficiency. Conclusions. The presented minimally invasive cement augmentation technique using an injection cannula facilitates convenient and safe cement delivery through polyaxial cannulated and fenestrated screws during minimally invasive screw-rod spondylodesis. Nevertheless, the optimal injection technique and design of fenestrated screws have yet to be identified. This trial is registered with German Clinical Trials DRKS00006726.

  6. Central tarsal bone fracture in the border collie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilliard, M

    2007-07-01

    Fracture of the plantar process of the central tarsal bone together with a dorsomedial displacement of the body of the bone was seen in six border collies. All injuries occurred during free exercise, with no extrinsic trauma. Three dogs had concomitant tarsal fractures. Primary treatment was by lag screwing the central tarsal bone to the fourth tarsal bone. All cases eventually made an excellent recovery. The superficial radiographic appearance was of a luxation of the bone as reported in a previous series, but appraisal of the radiographs showed evidence of fracture in all cases. A cadaver study to assess the mechanism of luxation showed that it is unlikely to occur naturally.

  7. Insertion torques influenced by bone density and surface roughness of HA–TiO{sub 2} coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, T.; Chen, Y.; Nie, X., E-mail: xnie@uwindsor.ca

    2013-12-31

    Bio-ceramic TiO{sub 2} coatings containing calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) were deposited onto Ti–6Al–4V alloy screws using plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) processes in an alkaline electrolyte with hydroxyapatite (HA) suspension. Coating on each screw had different surface roughness and morphology. Insertion torque (IT) of the coated screws in low (10 pcf, pounds per cubic feet), medium–high (20 pcf), and high (40 pcf) density of artificial bones was measured in comparison with that of the uncoated and sandblasted screws having similar surface roughness. Higher insertion torques and final seating torques were obtained in the coated screws which may result in less micro-movement during the primary implantation stage and thus lower the risk of implant failure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis indicated that all coatings still adhesively remained on the screw surfaces after inserted into the bones with different densities. The relationship between coefficient of friction and surface roughness was also addressed to better understand the results of insertion torque. It was found that a lower density bone (similar to aged bone) would need a surface-rougher coated screw to achieve a high torque while a high density bone can have a wide range of selections for surface roughness of the screw. - Highlights: • The insertion torque of PEO-coated screws is higher than machined and sandblasting implants. • Lower density bone needs a rougher coated implant to increase the insertion torque. • The composite HA–TiO{sub 2} coating could benefit dental implants in both primary and secondary stability stages.

  8. Talonavicular joint fixation: a biomechanical comparison of locking compression plates and lag screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Jaymes D; Berlet, Gregory C; Ghotge, Rahul; Li, Yuan; Kelly, Brian; DiAngelo, Denis

    2014-02-01

    Fusion of the talonavicular (TN) joint is an effective treatment for hindfoot pain and deformity. Nonunion in hindfoot fusion procedures is most common in the TN joint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the mechanical stability of 2 different forms of fixation for isolated fusion of the TN joint. 13 fresh-frozen cadaver foot and ankles were procured and mounted vertically in a robotic biomechanical testing platform and tested before and after operative fixation; 7 specimens received 2 retrograde lag screws (2S), and 6 specimens received a locked compression plate with 1 retrograde lag screw (PS). A constant Achilles tendon load was initially applied followed by internal or external rotation (ER) of the foot and axial compression through the tibia. The relative motion of the talus and navicular bones was tracked using 3-dimensional optoelectric targets. Motion data were recorded in the traditional anatomical reference frame and then transformed into the TN joint frame. In the TN joint frame, relative to the intact (preoperative) state, the plate fixation group PS showed a significant reduction in separation along the long axis of the talus in 3 out of the 4 loading scenarios (P values = .007, .02, and .05). The PS construct also significantly restricted the flexion-extension motion at the joint compared with the 2S construct, during the ER tests (P values = .002 and .001). In our simulated weight-bearing model, a dorsal locked compression plate with 1 retrograde screw was more effective at limiting the 3D motion across the TN joint compared with the traditional construct of 2 retrograde screws.

  9. Stability of biodegradable metal (Mg-Ca-Zn alloy) screws compared with absorbable polymer and titanium screws for sagittal split ramus osteotomy of the mandible using the finite element analysis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Ho; Han, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Yu-Chan; Lee, Jin-Yong; Lee, Bu-Kyu

    2017-10-01

    Mg-Ca-Zn alloy has been suggested for the application of fixation materials during maxillofacial surgery. We investigated the stability of Mg-Ca-Zn alloy for clinical application during orthognathic surgery. The finite element model for the fixation of sagittal split ramus osteotomy was constructed. In the bicortical screw fixation of the mandible setback condition, the stress distributions of Mg-Ca-Za alloy, polylactic acid polymer, and titanium were evaluated using the virtual model with occlusal loading of 132 N. The deformations of the three different materials of fixation screw were observed according to masticatory force ranging from 132 to 1,000 N. When comparing the stress distribution placed on cortical bone between the polymer and magnesium alloy groups, the magnesium alloy screws could bear more stress, thereby decreasing the stress, which might be distributed to other biologic components, such as the condyle and cortical ramus of the mandible. Deformations of the screws according to functional load were minimal, and the deformation remained stability of sagittal split ramus osteotomy setback surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Biomechanical efficacy of monoaxial or polyaxial pedicle screw and additional screw insertion at the level of fracture, in lumbar burst fracture: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Wang

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The addition of intermediate screws at the level of a burst fracture significantly increased the stability of short-segment pedicle screw fixation in both the MPS and PPS groups. However, in short-segment fixation group, monoaxial pedicle screw exhibited more stability in flexion and extension than the polyaxial pedicle screw.

  11. Tangential View and Intraoperative Three-Dimensional Fluoroscopy for the Detection of Screw-Misplacements in Volar Plating of Distal Radius Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Sascha; Marintschev, Ivan; Graul, Isabel; Wilharm, Arne; Klos, Kajetan; Hofmann, Gunther O.; Florian Gras, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background: Volar locking plate fixation has become the gold standard in the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. Juxta-articular screws should be placed as close as possible to the subchondral zone, in an optimized length to buttress the articular surface and address the contralateral cortical bone. On the other hand, intra-articular screw misplacements will promote osteoarthritis, while the penetration of the contralateral bone surface may result in tendon irritations and ruptures. The intraoperative control of fracture reduction and implant positioning is limited in the common postero-anterior and true lateral two-dimensional (2D)-fluoroscopic views. Therefore, additional 2D-fluoroscopic views in different projections and intraoperative three-dimensional (3D) fluoroscopy were recently reported. Nevertheless, their utility has issued controversies. Objectives: The following questions should be answered in this study; 1) Are the additional tangential view and the intraoperative 3D fluoroscopy useful in the clinical routine to detect persistent fracture dislocations and screw misplacements, to prevent revision surgery? 2) Which is the most dangerous plate hole for screw misplacement? Patients and Methods: A total of 48 patients (36 females and 13 males) with 49 unstable distal radius fractures (22 x 23 A; 2 x 23 B, and 25 x 23 C) were treated with a 2.4 mm variable angle LCP Two-Column volar distal radius plate (Synthes GmbH, Oberdorf, Switzerland) during a 10-month period. After final fixation, according to the manufactures' technique guide and control of implant placement in the two common perpendicular 2D-fluoroscopic images (postero-anterior and true lateral), an additional tangential view and intraoperative 3D fluoroscopic scan were performed to control the anatomic fracture reduction and screw placements. Intraoperative revision rates due to screw misplacements (intra-articular or overlength) were evaluated. Additionally, the number of surgeons

  12. In situ comparison of varying composite tibial tunnel interference screws used for ACL soft tissue graft fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, John; Krupp, Ryan; Greene, Joe; Bowles, Richard; Burden, Robert; Caborn, David N M

    2015-12-01

    This mechanical study using an in vitro porcine model compared composite interference screw fixation of soft tissue ACL grafts in tibial tunnels. Forty-eight porcine profundus tendons and tibiae were divided into four groups of 12 closely matched specimens. Equivalent diameter grafts were assigned to each group. Tibial bone tunnels were drilled to 0.5mm greater than graft diameter. Grafts were fixed in tunnels using one 10 × 35 mm composite interference screw designed by four different manufacturers. Maximal insertion torque and perceived within group mechanical testing outcome predictions were recorded. Constructs were potted and loaded into a six degrees of freedom clamp that placed the servohydraulic device tensile loading vector in direct tunnel alignment. Constructs were pre-loaded to 25 N, pre-conditioned between 0 and 50 N for 10 cycles (0.5 Hz), submaximally tested between 50 and 250 N for 500 cycles (one hertz) and load to failure tested at 20mm/min. Statistically significant differences were not observed between groups for displacement during submaximal cyclic loading, yield load, displacement at yield load, stiffness, ultimate load at failure and displacement at ultimate load. One composite screw group displayed a slightly greater proportion of specimens that required use of more than one screw during insertion. Under highly controlled conditions groups displayed comparable fixation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The pedicle screw-rod system is an acceptable method of reconstructive surgery after resection of sacroiliac joint tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jun Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemipelvic resections for primary bone tumours require reconstruction to restore weight bearing along anatomic axes. However, reconstruction of the pelvic arch remains a major surgical challenge because of the high rate of associated complications. We used the pedicle screw-rod system to reconstruct the pelvis, and the purpose of this investigation was to assess the oncology, functional outcome and complication rate following this procedure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the operative indications and technique of the pedicle screw-rod system in reconstruction of the stability of the sacroiliac joint after resection of sacroiliac joint tumours. The average MSTS (Musculoskeletal Tumour Society score was 26.5 at either three months after surgery or at the latest follow-up. Seven patients had surgery-related complications, including wound dehiscence in one, infection in two, local necrosis in four (including infection in two, sciatic nerve palsy in one and pubic symphysis subluxation in one. There was no screw loosening or deep vein thrombosis occurring in this series. Using a pedicle screw-rod after resection of a sacroiliac joint tumour is an acceptable method of pelvic reconstruction because of its reduced risk of complications and satisfactory functional outcome, as well as its feasibility of reconstruction for type IV pelvis tumour resection without elaborate preoperative customisation. Level of evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study.

  14. A lateral approach for screw repair in lag fashion of spiral third metacarpal and metatarsal medial condylar fractures in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lewis C R; Greet, Timothy R C; Bathe, Andrew P

    2009-08-01

    To describe a lateral approach for screw fixation in lag fashion of simple spiral medial condylar fractures of the third metacarpus/metatarsus (MC3/MT3). Case series. Thoroughbred racehorses (n=9). Nondisplaced medial MC3/MT3 condylar fractures (3 thoracic, 6 pelvic limbs), with mean length 126 mm (range, 91-151 mm) were repaired by internal fixation, under general anesthesia, using multiple 4.5 mm cortical screws inserted in lag fashion from the lateral aspect of the limb, using radiographic or fluoroscopic guidance. Horses were recovered from anesthesia in half-limb casts; 7 unassisted and 2 using a rope-recovery system. Horses had 2 months box rest, 1 month in-hand walking, and follow-up radiographic examination at 3 months. Horses recovered uneventfully from anesthesia. Five horses raced; 1 returned to training, was persistently lame, and was retired to stud; 2 were retired directly to stud; and 1 horse was lost to follow-up. MC3/MT3 medial condylar fractures were successfully repaired by screws inserted n lag fashion form the lateral aspect. Use of a lateral approach to medial condylar MC3/MT3 fractures allows screw insertion perpendicular to the fracture plane without interference with palmar/plantar soft tissue structures or from the splint bones. Although repair was performed under general anesthesia, the technique should be adaptable to application in standing horses.

  15. The relationship of proximal locking screws to the axillary nerve during antegrade humeral nail insertion of four commercially available implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Edward J; Breien, Kristoffer M; Fehringer, Edward V; Mormino, Matthew A

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the proximity of proximal interlocking mechanisms in 4 current antegrade humeral nails to the axillary nerve and its branches. Cadaveric study. Anatomy laboratory. Anatomic relationships. Four humeral nail designs (labeled SS, SL, SZ, and SN) were each inserted in successive antegrade fashion in 10 cadaveric upper extremity specimens. Three variables were measured: from acromion to the axillary nerve, from acromion to entry sites of proximal locking devices, and from locking devices to axillary nerves and their branches. In nail SS, the proximally directed oblique locking screw came into contact with the ascending branch of the axillary nerve in 6 of 10 specimens. Mean distance from spiral blades in nails SS and SL were 26 mm to the axillary nerve and 16 mm to its ascending branch. Interlocking screws for nails SZ, SN, and SL did not violate the axillary nerve or its branches in any specimen. Mean distance from lateral acromion to the axillary nerve measured 58.7 mm. Nail SS's oblique locking screw may injure the ascending branch of the axillary nerve. Three of the 4 nails tested did not endanger the axillary nerve. However, when transverse proximal locking screws are inserted from a lateral-to-medial direction, they may endanger an arborized axillary nerve. Blunt dissection should be performed with a visible path to bone before instrumentation to reduce the risk of axillary nerve injury. Copyright 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  16. Effects of pilot hole preparation technique on pedicle screw fixation in different regions of the osteoporotic thoracic and lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmouche, Jonathan J; Molinari, Robert W; Gerlinger, Tad; Devine, John; Patience, Troy

    2005-11-01

    The authors evaluated the effects of pilot hole preparation technique on insertional torque and axial pullout resistance in osteoporotic thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. Using a probe technique and fluoroscopy, 102 pedicle screws were placed in 51 dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry-proven osteoporotic thoracic and lumbar levels. Screws were inserted using the same-size tapping, one-size-under tapping, or no-tapping technique. Insertional torque and axial pullout resistance were measured. Analysis of variance, Fisher exact test, and regression analysis were performed. Same-size tapping decreased pullout resistance in the lumbar spine. There was no effect on pullout resistance in the thoracic spine. Pullout resistance values were lower for all insertion techniques in the upper thoracic spine. Insertional torque and bone mineral density correlated with pullout resistance in the thoracic and lumbar spine. Tapping decreased pedicle screw pullout resistance in the osteoporotic human lumbar spine, although it did not affect pullout strength in the thoracic spine. Tapping decreased insertional torque in upper thoracic levels. Surgeons should optimize overall construct rigidity when placing thoracic pedicle screws in patients with spinal segment osteoporosis.

  17. Robotic versus fluoroscopy-guided pedicle screw insertion for metastatic spinal disease: a matched-cohort comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomiichuk, Volodymyr; Fleischhammer, Julius; Molliqaj, Granit; Warda, Jwad; Alaid, Awad; von Eckardstein, Kajetan; Schaller, Karl; Tessitore, Enrico; Rohde, Veit; Schatlo, Bawarjan

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Robot-guided pedicle screw placement is an established technique for the placement of pedicle screws. However, most studies have focused on degenerative disease. In this paper, the authors focus on metastatic spinal disease, which is associated with osteolysis. The associated lack of dense bone may potentially affect the automatic recognition accuracy of radiography-based surgical assistance systems. The aim of the present study is to compare the accuracy of the SpineAssist robot system with conventional fluoroscopy-guided pedicle screw placement for thoracolumbar metastatic spinal disease. METHODS Seventy patients with metastatic spinal disease who required instrumentation were included in this retrospective matched-cohort study. All 70 patients underwent surgery performed by the same team of experienced surgeons. The decision to use robot-assisted or fluoroscopy-guided pedicle screw placement was based the availability of the robot system. In patients who underwent surgery with robot guidance, pedicle screws were inserted after preoperative planning and intraoperative fluoroscopic matching. In the "conventional" group, anatomical landmarks and anteroposterior and lateral fluoroscopy guided placement of the pedicle screws. The primary outcome measure was the accuracy of screw placement on the Gertzbein-Robbins scale. Grades A and B (fluoroscopy group required a second surgery (0.5%), but no revisions were required in the robot group. There was no difference in surgical site infections between the 2 groups (Group I, 5 patients [14.3%]; Group II, 8 patients [22.9%]) or in the duration of surgery between the 2 groups (Group I, 226.1 ± 78.8 minutes; Group II, 264.1 ± 124.3 minutes; p = 0.13). There was also no difference in radiation time between the groups (Group I, 138.2 ± 73.0 seconds; Group II, 126.5 ± 95.6 seconds; p = 0.61), but the radiation intensity was higher in the robot group (Group I, 2.8 ± 0.2 mAs; Group II, 2.0 ± 0.6 mAs; p < 0

  18. A universal pedicle screw and V-rod system for lumbar isthmic spondylolysis: a retrospective analysis of 21 cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong-sheng Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the surgical outcome of a universal pedicle screw-V rod system and isthmic bone grafting for isthmic spondylolysis.Twenty-four patients with isthmic spondylolysis at L5 and grade 0-I spondylolisthesis (Meyerding classification received isthmic bone graft and stabilization using the universal pedicle screw-V rod system. Back pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS and time to bone healing, improvement in spondylolisthesis and intervertebral space height at L5/S1 and L4/L5 were assessed.Twenty-one patients were followed up for 24 months and included in the analysis. Back pain was markedly improved at 3 months postoperatively with a statistical difference in VAS scores compared with preoperative VAS scores (P<0.001. The VAS scores were 0 to 3 at 6 months postoperatively in all patients and no back pain was reported in all patients except 2 patients who complained of back pain after prolonged sitting. X-ray examination showed a bone graft healing time of 3 to 12 months. Grade I spondylolisthesis improved to grade 0 in 4 patients and no noticeable change was observed in the remaining 17 cases. The intervertebral space height at L5/S1 was statistically increased (P<0.05 while no statistically significant change was seen at L4/L5. There was no statistically significant difference in the ROM of the intervertebral disks of L5/S1 and L4/5 before and after surgery.The universal pedicle screw-V rod system and isthmic bone grafting directly repairs isthmic spondylolysis and reduces back pain, prevents anterior displacement of the diseased segment and maintains intervertebral space height, thus offering a promising alternative to current approaches for isthmic spondylolysis.

  19. The Effect of Implant Screw Coating with Nano-Hydroxyapatite and Magnesium Chloride Mixture on Osseointegration: Biomechanical and Histological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghdaa K Jassim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of modern implantology is fine and fast osseointegration which is a major factor influencing the success of dental implantation, and its largely depend on the implant surface. High-quality osseointegration stand for an accelerated healing process, high stability, and durability of the dental implant. Aim: To evaluate the effect of composite material coating which includes ceramic nano hydroxyapatite and magnesium chloride on the bond strength at bone implant interface and tissue reaction. Methods: In in vitro study, a plate of Cp-Ti was coated with hydroxyapatite and MgCl2 by electrophoretic deposition coating technique. Coating procedure was performed using different proportion of hydroxyapatite and MgCl2 and different coating time at fixed voltage. Then analysis of coated surface was performed. The tibia of white male New Zealand rabbits were chosen as implantation sites of 40 screws for in vivo study. Torque removal test was performed to measure bond strength between implant and bone after 2 and 4 weeks healing periods. Results: The results of Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy shows that 1.9% of Mg and 32.4% Ca contain on Ti substrate. Optical microscope examination showed that 2 minutes is the suitable time used for coating screws at 30 V. Analysis of surface roughness in nanoscale was 86.89 nm and grain size 128 nm while scanning electron microscope showed numerous agglomerations of small spherical particles between 5 nm and 100 nm of hydroxyapatite. The torque mean value at bone-implant interface in coated implants was significantly higher than the uncoated implants at 2nd and 4th week. In histological analysis, there was an interdigitating of well-developed bone close opposing threads of coated implants after 2 and 4 weeks implantation. Coating Cp-Ti screws with mixture of hydroxyapatite and MgCl2 was efficient in increasing bone bonding strength to dental implant at bone implant interface than uncoated implant, which was

  20. Alveolar bone preservation subsequent to miniscrew implant placement in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsen, B; Huja, S S; Chien, H-H; Dalstra, M

    2015-05-01

    To assess the effects of transcortical screws on alveolar (bone) ridge preservation following extraction. Four adult beagle dogs had mandibular premolars extracted bilaterally. After 6 weeks, using a split-mouth design, two transcortical screws were inserted unilaterally below the alveolar crest on the experimental side in the region of the extraction. The dogs were killed after 12 weeks. The bone at the extraction sites was analyzed using μCT and 3D analysis. A cylindrical core was placed around the actual and a virtual screw placed in the identical location on the control side. The bone volume within the cylinders was quantified. An insertion of a dental implant was simulated bilaterally at the insertion site. The height of the clinical crown and the alveolar crest were determined on both sides. The bone turnover was assessed histomorphometrically on un-decalcified bucco-lingual sections stained with basic fuchsine and toluidine blue. Comparison of the two sides revealed a significant difference both with regard to the bone volume and morphology. The transcortical screw caused an increase in bone density and less ridge atrophy. When simulating a dental implant placement on both sides, the bone preservation on the experimental side led to a need for a shorter clinical crown compared to the control side. A higher activity level of the bone in the experimental side was demonstrated histologically. In this dog model the insertion of a mini-implant across the healing alveolar process results in increased density not only adjacent to the screws, but also in the region where a potential dental implant would be inserted. In humans, the insertion of transcortical screws may maintain bone when for various reasons insertion of a permanent dental implant has to be postponed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Immediate loading of titanium hexed screw-type implants in the edentulous patient: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M P; Muller, E; Garg, A K

    2000-01-01

    Histologic and histomorphometric studies in both animals and humans have shown that more rapid and greater bone-to-implant contact can be achieved with implants that incorporate certain surface characteristics compared with the original machined-surface implants. Such findings are significant because various implant designs may allow the fixtures to sufficiently resist functional loading sooner than originally thought. The case report presented here indicates that immediate loading of hexed titanium screw-type implants in the anterior mandible can lead to successful osseointegration and clinical outcome. The number of implants placed, their distribution, and the type of rigid connection are critical considerations for immediate loading. A bone height that can accommodate dental implants > or = 10 mm long is recommended. Biomechanically, the implants to be immediately loaded must be stable and resistant to macromovement to ensure good osseointegration.

  2. Superconstructs in the treatment of charcot foot deformity: plantar plating, locked plating, and axial screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammarco, V James

    2009-09-01

    Management of Charcot's deformity of the foot and ankle continues to challenge physicians. Medical co-morbidity, peripheral neuropathy, vascular disease, and immune impairment cause severe problems for these patients and, when combined with neuroarthropathy, can lead to amputation. Progressive bony deformity and bone resorption, which may accompany neuroarthropathy, only increase the challenge of surgical treatment. These challenges have led physicians to develop "superconstruct" techniques to improve fixation, whereby fusion is extended beyond the zone of injury to include joints that are not affected, bone resection is performed to shorten the extremity to allow for adequate reduction of deformity without undue tension on the soft tissue envelope, the strongest device is used that can be tolerated by the soft tissue envelope; and the devices are applied in a novel position that maximizes mechanical function. This article reviews three techniques designed to achieve lasting deformity correction and successful arthrodesis: plantar plating, locked plating, and axial screw fixation.

  3. Optimization of spinal implant screw for lower vertebra through finite element studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Jayanta; Karmakar, Santanu; Majumder, Santanu; Banerjee, Partha Sarathi; Saha, Subrata; Roychowdhury, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The increasing older population is suffering from an increase in age-related spinal degeneration that causes tremendous pain. Spine injury is mostly indicated at the lumbar spine (L3-L5) and corresponding intervertebral disks. Finite element analysis (FEA) is now one of the most efficient and accepted tools used to simulate these pathological conditions in computer-assisted design (CAD) models. In this study, L3-L5 spines were modeled, and FEA was performed to formulate optimal remedial measures. Three different loads (420, 490.5, and 588.6 N) based on three body weights (70, 90, and 120 kg) were applied at the top surface of the L3 vertebra, while the lower surface of the L5 vertebra remained fixed. Models of implants using stainless steel and titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) pedicle screws and rods with three different diameters (4, 5, and 6 mm) were inserted into the spine models. The relative strengths of bone (very weak, weak, standard, strong, and very strong) were considered to determine the patient-specific effect. A total of 90 models were simulated, and von Mises stress and strain, shear stress, and strain intensity contour at the bone-implant interface were analyzed. Results of these analyses indicate that the 6-mm pedicle screw diameter is optimal for most cases. Experimental and clinical validation are needed to confirm these theoretical results.

  4. Evaluation of two styles of slotted, flat-head screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, C.A. Jr.; Johnson, W.B.

    1979-01-01

    A series of torque tests were performed to evaluate the relative merits of two different flat-head screws fabricated from a uranium--6% niobium alloy. The screws tested were machined with both normal, straight-through slots in the head and with slots having radiused bottoms. Test results indicate that both designs easily surpass the required 20-inch-pound-proof torque

  5. scaphoid dimensions and appropriate screw sizes in a kenyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dimensions will aid in identifying appropriate screw systems. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the dimensions of the scaphoid and its distal pole and relating this to commonly used screw systems. Methods: One hundred and four human scaphoids were studied and their dimensions determined. These.

  6. Biomechanical analysis of titanium fixation plates and screws in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-10

    Aug 10, 2015 ... Materials and Methods: Three different three-dimensional finite element models of the mandible were developed to simulate the biomechanical responses of titanium plates and screws. The fracture lines were fixed with double 4-hole straight, 4-hole square, and 5-hole Y plates with monocortical screws.

  7. Torsion strenght of biodegradable and titanium screws: a comparison.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, Gerrit J.; van der Houwen, Eduard B.; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Bos, Rudolf R.M.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine 1) the differences in maximum torque between 7 biodegradable and 2 titanium screw systems, and 2) the differences of maximum torque between “hand tight” and break of the biodegradable and the titanium osteofixation screw systems. Materials and Methods: Four oral and

  8. Electromagnetic Lead Screw for Potential Wave Energy Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Wu, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new type electromagnetic lead screw (EMLS) intended for wave energy application. Similar to the mechanical lead screw, this electromagnetic version can transfer slow linear motion to high-rotational motion, offering gearing effects. Compared with the existing pure magnetic...

  9. The Analysis of Soil Resistance During Screw Displacement Pile Installation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasinski Adam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of screw displacement piles (SDP is still increasing due to their high efficiency and many advantages. However, one technological problem is a serious disadvantage of those piles. It relates to the generation of very high soil resistance during screw auger penetration, especially when piles are installed in non-cohesive soils. In many situations this problem causes difficulties in creating piles of designed length and diameter. It is necessary to find a proper method for prediction of soil resistance during screw pile installation. The analysis of screw resistances based on model and field tests is presented in the paper. The investigations were carried out as part of research project, financed by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. As a result of tests and analyses the empirical method for prediction of rotation resistance (torque during screw auger penetration in non-cohesive subsoil based on CPT is proposed.

  10. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  11. Posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using a convex pedicle screw technique: a novel concept of deformity correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirikos, A I; Mataliotakis, G; Bounakis, N

    2017-08-01

    We present the results of correcting a double or triple curve adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using a convex segmental pedicle screw technique. We reviewed 191 patients with a mean age at surgery of 15 years (11 to 23.3). Pedicle screws were placed at the convexity of each curve. Concave screws were inserted at one or two cephalad levels and two caudal levels. The mean operating time was 183 minutes (132 to 276) and the mean blood loss 0.22% of the total blood volume (0.08% to 0.4%). Multimodal monitoring remained stable throughout the operation. The mean hospital stay was 6.8 days (5 to 15). The mean post-operative follow-up was 5.8 years (2.5 to 9.5). There were no neurological complications, deep wound infection, obvious nonunion or need for revision surgery. Upper thoracic scoliosis was corrected by a mean 68.2% (38% to 48%, p scoliosis was corrected by a mean 71% (43.5% to 8.9%, p scoliosis was corrected by a mean 72.3% (41% to 90%, p Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire score improved from a mean 3.6 to 4.6 (2.4 to 4, p scoliosis, an improved thoracic kyphosis and normal global sagittal balance. Both patient satisfaction and functional outcomes were excellent. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1080-7. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. Complications associated with thoracic pedicle screws in spinal deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Lv, Guohua; Passias, Peter; Kozanek, Michal; Metkar, Umesh S.; Liu, Zhongjun; Wood, Kirkham B.; Rehak, Lubos

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic pedicle screws have superior anchoring strength compared with other available fixation techniques. However, these are not universally accepted in many developing countries because of the concerns regarding safety and complications. In addition, there is evidence that pedicle morphology is unique in Chinese patients. The goal of this study was to analyze the complications seen at our institution, while using thoracic pedicle screws for the treatment of thoracic deformity, and to determine the safety of our techniques for the treatment of thoracic deformity in a Chinese population. From 1998 to 2005, there were 208 thoracic deformity patients treated at our institution, 70 of whom were male and 138 were female. Their age ranged from 11 to 55 years (mean of 14.9 years). All of them underwent corrective deformity surgery using posterior pedicle screw systems and follow-up was available for at least 3 years. Etiologic diagnoses included adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in 119 patients, congenital kyphoscoliosis in 38, adult scoliosis in 37 and undetermined in 14. Screw positions were evaluated using intraoperative and postoperative radiographs and a CT scan was performed when a concern for screw malposition was present. All radiographic evaluations were carried out in a double-blinded fashion. A total of 1,123 thoracic pedicle screws were inserted (5.4 thoracic screws/patient). The deformity correction rate was 81, 65 and 62% for idiopathic, congenital and adult scoliosis patients, respectively. The overall complication rate was 16.5% at the final follow-up. Complication rates directly and indirectly related to pedicle screws were 7.2 and 9.3%, respectively. There were no significant screw-related neurologic or visceral complications that adversely affected long-term results. The complications seen with thoracic pedicle screws in a Chinese population were similar to other populations and could be utilized safely for the treatment of thoracic deformity in this

  13. The Influence of implant geometry and surface composition on bone response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Farraj Aldosari, A.; Anil, S.; Alasqah, M.; Wazzan, K.A. Al; Jetaily, S.A. Al; Jansen, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The implant design and surface modification are independent conditions that can alter the implant bone response. The objective of this study is to compare the bone response to roughened tapered and cylindrical screw-type implants with and without hydroxyapatite (HA) surface coating in

  14. The use of small (2.7 mm) screws for arthroscopically guided repair of carpal chip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I M; Smith, M R W

    2011-05-01

    Removal of large chip fractures of the carpal bones and the osteochondral deficits that result, have been associated with a worse prognosis than removal of small fragments in similar locations. Reducing the articular defects by repair of large osteochondral fragments may have advantages over removal. Horses with osteochondral chip fractures that were of sufficient size and infrastructure to be repaired with small (2.7 mm diameter) AO/ASIF cortex screws were identified and repair effected by arthroscopically guided internal fixation. Thirty-three horses underwent surgery to repair 35 fractures of the dorsodistal radial carpal bone (n = 25), the dorsal margin of the radial facet of the third carpal bone (n = 9) and the intermediate facet of the distal radius (n = 1). There were no surgical complications and fractures healed satisfactorily in 26 of 28 horses and 23 horses returned to racing performance. Arthroscopically guided repair of carpal chip fractures with small diameter cortex screws is technically feasible and experiences with 33 cases suggest that this may have advantages over fragment removal in managing such cases. Surgeons treating horses with large chip fractures of the carpal bones should consider arthroscopically guided internal fixation as an alternative to removal. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  15. Minimal access direct spondylolysis repair using a pedicle screw-rod system: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohi Eldin Mohamed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Symptomatic spondylolysis is always challenging to treat because the pars defect causing the instability needs to be stabilized while segmental fusion needs to be avoided. Direct repair of the pars defect is ideal in cases of spondylolysis in which posterior decompression is not necessary. We report clinical results using segmental pedicle-screw-rod fixation with bone grafting in patients with symptomatic spondylolysis, a modification of a technique first reported by Tokuhashi and Matsuzaki in 1996. We also describe the surgical technique, assess the fusion and analyze the outcomes of patients. Case presentation At Cairo University Hospital, eight out of twelve Egyptian patients’ acute pars fractures healed after conservative management. Of those, two young male patients underwent an operative procedure for chronic low back pain secondary to pars defect. Case one was a 25-year-old Egyptian man who presented with a one-year history of axial low back pain, not radiating to the lower limbs, after falling from height. Case two was a 29-year-old Egyptian man who presented with a one-year history of axial low back pain and a one-year history of mild claudication and infrequent radiation to the leg, never below the knee. Utilizing a standardized mini-access fluoroscopically-guided surgical protocol, fixation was established with two titanium pedicle screws place into both pedicles, at the same level as the pars defect, without violating the facet joint. The cleaned pars defect was grafted; a curved titanium rod was then passed under the base of the spinous process of the affected vertebra, bridging the loose fragment, and attached to the pedicle screw heads, to uplift the spinal process, followed by compression of the defect. The patients were discharged three days after the procedure, with successful fusion at one-year follow-up. No rod breakage or implant-related complications were reported. Conclusions Where there is no

  16. Nanoscale characterization of bone-implant interface and biomechanical modulation of bone ingrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Paul A. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States)]. E-mail: pclark4@gmail.com; Clark, Andrew M. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Rodriguez, Anthony [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Hussain, Mohammad A. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Mao, Jeremy J. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States)]. E-mail: jmao2@uic.edu

    2007-04-15

    Bone-implant interface is characterized by an array of cells and macromolecules. This study investigated the nanomechancial properties of bone-implant interface using atomic force microscopy in vitro, and the mechanical modulation of implant bone ingrowth in vivo using bone histomorphometry. Upon harvest of screw-type titanium implants placed in vivo in the rabbit maxilla and proximal femur for 4 weeks, nanoindentation was performed in the bone-implant interface at 60-{mu}m intervals radially from the implant surface. The average Young's Moduli (E) of the maxillary bone-implant interface was 1.13 {+-} 0.27 MPa, lacking significant differences at all intervals. In contrast, an increasing gradient of E was observed radially from the femur bone-implant interface: 0.87 {+-} 0.25 MPa to 2.24 {+-} 0.69 MPa, representing significant differences among several 60-{mu}m intervals. In a separate experiment, bone healing was allowed for 6 weeks for proximal femur implants. The right femoral implant received axial cyclic loading at 200 mN and 1 Hz for 10 min/d over 12 days, whereas the left femoral implant served as control. Cyclic loading induced significantly higher bone volume, osteoblast numbers per endocortical bone surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate than controls. These data demonstrate nanoscale and microscale characterizations of bone-implant interface, and mechanical modulation of bone ingrowth surrounding titanium implants.

  17. Nanoscale characterization of bone-implant interface and biomechanical modulation of bone ingrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Paul A.; Clark, Andrew M.; Rodriguez, Anthony; Hussain, Mohammad A.; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2007-01-01

    Bone-implant interface is characterized by an array of cells and macromolecules. This study investigated the nanomechancial properties of bone-implant interface using atomic force microscopy in vitro, and the mechanical modulation of implant bone ingrowth in vivo using bone histomorphometry. Upon harvest of screw-type titanium implants placed in vivo in the rabbit maxilla and proximal femur for 4 weeks, nanoindentation was performed in the bone-implant interface at 60-μm intervals radially from the implant surface. The average Young's Moduli (E) of the maxillary bone-implant interface was 1.13 ± 0.27 MPa, lacking significant differences at all intervals. In contrast, an increasing gradient of E was observed radially from the femur bone-implant interface: 0.87 ± 0.25 MPa to 2.24 ± 0.69 MPa, representing significant differences among several 60-μm intervals. In a separate experiment, bone healing was allowed for 6 weeks for proximal femur implants. The right femoral implant received axial cyclic loading at 200 mN and 1 Hz for 10 min/d over 12 days, whereas the left femoral implant served as control. Cyclic loading induced significantly higher bone volume, osteoblast numbers per endocortical bone surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate than controls. These data demonstrate nanoscale and microscale characterizations of bone-implant interface, and mechanical modulation of bone ingrowth surrounding titanium implants

  18. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filli, Lukas; Finkenstaedt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Marcon, Magda [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Udine, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Udine (Italy); Scholz, Bernhard [Imaging and Therapy Division, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany); Calcagni, Maurizio [University Hospital of Zurich, Division of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was ''almost perfect'' (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography of scaphoid fixation screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filli, Lukas; Finkenstaedt, Tim; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman; Marcon, Magda; Scholz, Bernhard; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype correction algorithm to reduce metal artefacts in flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) of scaphoid fixation screws. FDCT has gained interest in imaging small anatomic structures of the appendicular skeleton. Angiographic C-arm systems with flat detectors allow fluoroscopy and FDCT imaging in a one-stop procedure emphasizing their role as an ideal intraoperative imaging tool. However, FDCT imaging can be significantly impaired by artefacts induced by fixation screws. Following ethical board approval, commercially available scaphoid fixation screws were inserted into six cadaveric specimens in order to fix artificially induced scaphoid fractures. FDCT images corrected with the algorithm were compared to uncorrected images both quantitatively and qualitatively by two independent radiologists in terms of artefacts, screw contour, fracture line visibility, bone visibility, and soft tissue definition. Normal distribution of variables was evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. In case of normal distribution, quantitative variables were compared using paired Student's t tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for quantitative variables without normal distribution and all qualitative variables. A p value of < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistically significant differences. Metal artefacts were significantly reduced by the correction algorithm (p < 0.001), and the fracture line was more clearly defined (p < 0.01). The inter-observer reliability was ''almost perfect'' (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.001). The prototype correction algorithm in FDCT for metal artefacts induced by scaphoid fixation screws may facilitate intra- and postoperative follow-up imaging. (orig.)

  20. Painful knee joint after ACL reconstruction using biodegradable interference screws- SPECT/CT a valuable diagnostic tool? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirschmann Michael T

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the presented case we strive to introduce combined single photon emission computerized tomography and conventional computer tomography (SPECT/CT as new diagnostic imaging modality and illustrate the possible clinical value in patients after ACL reconstruction. We report the case of a painful knee due to a foreign body reaction and delayed degradation of the biodegradable interference screws after ACL reconstruction. The MRI showed an intact ACL graft, a possible tibial cyclops lesion and a patella infera. There was no increased fluid collection within the bone tunnels. The 99mTc-HDP-SPECT/CT clearly identified a highly increased tracer uptake around and within the tibial and femoral tunnels and the patellofemoral joint. On 3D-CT out of the SPECT/CT data the femoral graft attachment was shallow (50% along the Blumensaat's line and high in the notch. At revision arthroscopy a diffuse hypertrophy of the synovium, scarring of the Hoffa fat pad and a cyclops lesion of the former ACL graft was found. The interference screws were partially degraded and under palpation and pressure a grey fluid-like substance drained into the joint. The interference screws and the ACL graft were removed and an arthrolysis performed. In the case presented it was most likely a combination of improper graft placement, delayed degradation of the interference screws and unknown biological factors. The too shallow and high ACL graft placement might have led to roof impingement, chronic intraarticular inflammation and hence the delayed degradation of the screws. SPECT/CT has facilitated the establishment of diagnosis, process of decision making and further treatment in patients with knee pain after ACL reconstruction. From the combination of structural (tunnel position in 3D-CT and metabolic information (tracer uptake in SPECT/CT the patient's cause of the pain was established.

  1. Periodontal ligament formation around different types of dental titanium implants. I. The self-tapping screw type implant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, K; Karring, T; Gotfredsen, K

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a periodontal ligament can form around self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants. Implants were inserted in contact with the periodontal ligament of root tips retained in the mandibular jaws of 7 monkeys. In each side of the mandible, 1 premolar......, a periodontal ligament can form on self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants in areas where a void is present between the surrounding bone and the implant at the time of insertion....... and 2 molars were removed in such a manner that in approximately half the cases, the root tips were retained. Following healing, the experimental areas were examined on radiographs, and sites were selected for the insertion of the implants, so that every second implant would have a close contact...

  2. Evaluation of a customized artificial osteoporotic bone model of the distal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wähnert, Dirk; Hoffmeier, Konrad L; Stolarczyk, Yves; Fröber, Rosemarie; Hofmann, Gunther O; Mückley, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    In the development of new implants biomechanical testing is essential. Since human bones vary markedly in density and geometry their suitability for biomechanical testing is limited. In contrast artificial bones are of great uniformity and therefore appropriate for biomechanical testing. However, the applied artificial bones have to be proved as comparable to human bone. An anatomical shaped artificial bone representing the distal human femur was created by foaming polyurethane. To get a bone model with properties of osteoporotic bone a foam density of 150 kg/m3 was used. The biomechanical properties of our artificial bones were evaluated against eight mildly osteoporotic fresh frozen human femora by mechanical testing. At the artificial bones all tested parameters showed a very small variation. In contrast significant correlation between bone mass density and tested parameters was found for the human bones. The artificial bones reached 39% of the compression strength and 41% of the screw pullout force of the human bone. In indentation testing the artificial bones reached 27% (cancellous) and 59% (cortical) respectively of the human bones strength. Regarding Shore hardness artificial bone and human bone showed comparable results for the cortical layer and at the cancellous layer the artificial bone reached 57% of human bones hardness. Our described method for customizing of artificial bones regarding their shape and bone stock quality provides suitable results. In relation to the as mildly osteoporotic classified human bones we assume that the biomechanical properties matching to serve osteoporotic bone.

  3. Clinical and radiological studies upon a combined method for guided bone regeneration in experimental mandibular defects in dogs - a preliminary communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borissov, I.; Uzunov, N.; Paskalev, M.

    2004-01-01

    The treated bone defects were compared clinically and radiologically. After a 3-month period of survey, the best results were obtained in the group treated with partially demineralized bone matrix, enzymatically processed and lyophilized dura mater and mucoperiosteal flap. The placement of titanium screw dental implants did not impair the guided bone regeneration, that was confirmed by their good osteointegration

  4. Planning, guidance, and quality assurance of pelvic screw placement using deformable image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerres, J.; Uneri, A.; Jacobson, M.; Ramsay, B.; De Silva, T.; Ketcha, M.; Han, R.; Manbachi, A.; Vogt, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Osgood, G.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Percutaneous pelvic screw placement is challenging due to narrow bone corridors surrounded by vulnerable structures and difficult visual interpretation of complex anatomical shapes in 2D x-ray projection images. To address these challenges, a system for planning, guidance, and quality assurance (QA) is presented, providing functionality analogous to surgical navigation, but based on robust 3D-2D image registration techniques using fluoroscopy images already acquired in routine workflow. Two novel aspects of the system are investigated: automatic planning of pelvic screw trajectories and the ability to account for deformation of surgical devices (K-wire deflection). Atlas-based registration is used to calculate a patient-specific plan of screw trajectories in preoperative CT. 3D-2D registration aligns the patient to CT within the projective geometry of intraoperative fluoroscopy. Deformable known-component registration (dKC-Reg) localizes the surgical device, and the combination of plan and device location is used to provide guidance and QA. A leave-one-out analysis evaluated the accuracy of automatic planning, and a cadaver experiment compared the accuracy of dKC-Reg to rigid approaches (e.g. optical tracking). Surgical plans conformed within the bone cortex by 3-4 mm for the narrowest corridor (superior pubic ramus) and  >5 mm for the widest corridor (tear drop). The dKC-Reg algorithm localized the K-wire tip within 1.1 mm and 1.4° and was consistently more accurate than rigid-body tracking (errors up to 9 mm). The system was shown to automatically compute reliable screw trajectories and accurately localize deformed surgical devices (K-wires). Such capability could improve guidance and QA in orthopaedic surgery, where workflow is impeded by manual planning, conventional tool trackers add complexity and cost, rigid tool assumptions are often inaccurate, and qualitative interpretation of complex anatomy from 2D projections is prone to trial

  5. Avaliação radiográfica da absorção de parafusos de osso cortical bovino com bone morphogenetic protein (BMP inseridos em úmero de cão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Ricardo Auada Ferrigno

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Allografts are produced from natural sources and have been used in orthopedic repair procedures for a long time in humans and animals. Since 1952, hundreds of orthopedic surgeries have been performed with success using donated tissues and materials from bone banks. The purpose of the present study was to verify the absorption time of xenografts screws made of bovine cortical bone, inserted in the greater tubercule. The humerus of seven dogs in comparison with stainless steel screws. The results showed that screws made from bovine cortical bone used in the humerus of dogs were incorporated within a period of 30 to 60 days with no severe periosteum reaction.

  6. Positioning of pedicle screws in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Moreira Gavassi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the occurrence of poor positioning of pedicle screws inserted with the aid of intraoperative electromyographic stimulation in the treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS.METHODS: This is a prospective observational study including all patients undergoing surgical treatment for AIS, between March and December 2013 at a single institution. All procedures were monitored by electromyography of the inserted pedicle screws. The position of the screws was evaluated by assessment of postoperative CT and classified according to the specific AIS classification system.RESULTS: Sixteen patients were included in the study, totalizing 281 instrumented pedicles (17.5 per patient. No patient had any neurological deficit or complaint after surgery. In the axial plane, 195 screws were found in ideal position (69.4% while in the sagittal plane, 226 screws were found in ideal position (80.4%. Considering both the axial and the sagittal planes, it was observed that 59.1% (166/281 of the screws did not violate any cortical wall.CONCLUSION: The use of pedicle screws proved to be a safe technique without causing neurological damage in AIS surgeries, even with the occurrence of poor positioning of some implants.

  7. Experiments on screw-pinch plasmas with elongated cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassing, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described carried out with SPICA II, a toroidal screw-pinch plasma device. this device is the last one in a series of plasma machines of the toroidal screw-pinch differing from its predecessor in its race-track shaped section. In devices of the type toroidal screw-pinch stable confinement is possible of plasmas with larger β values than in a tokamak discharge. In a pinch the plasma is screwed up, during the formation, in such a way that in a relatively small volume a plasma is formated with a high pressure. During the screwing up the plasma is heated by shock heating as well as adiabatic compression. With the modified snowplow model the density and temperature after the formation can be calculated, starting from the initial conditions. When all ions arrive into the plasma column, the density in the column is determined by the volume compression. First purpose of the experiments was to find a stable discharge. Subsequently discharges have been made with a high as possible β in order to investigate at which maximum β it is possible to confine screw-pinch plasmas stably. When these had been found, the nature and importance could be investigated of the processes following which the screw-pinch plasma looses its energy. (author), 75 res.; 95 figs.; 8 tabs

  8. Multiaxial pedicle screw designs: static and dynamic mechanical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Ralph Edward; Loefler, Andreas Herman; Stanford, Philip Mark; Walsh, William R

    2004-02-15

    Randomized investigation of multiaxial pedicle screw mechanical properties. Measure static yield and ultimate strengths, yield stiffness, and fatigue resistance according to an established model. Compare these measured properties with expected loads in vivo. Multiaxial pedicle screws provide surgical versatility, but the complexity of their design may reduce their strength and fatigue resistance. There is no published data on the mechanical properties of such screws. Screws were assembled according to a vertebrectomy model for destructive mechanical testing. Groups of five assemblies were tested in static tension and compression and subject to three cyclical loads. Modes of failure, yield, and ultimate strength, yield stiffness, and cycles to failure were determined for six designs of screw. Static compression yield loads ranged from 217.1 to 388.0 N and yield stiffness from 23.7 to 38.0 N/mm. Cycles to failure ranged from 42 x 10(3) to 4,719 x 10(3) at 75% of static ultimate load. There were significant differences between designs in all modes of testing. Failure occurred at the multiaxial link in static and cyclical compression. Bending yield strengths just exceeded loads expected in vivo. Multiaxial designs had lower static bending yield strength than fixed screw designs. Five out of six multiaxial screw designs achieved one million cycles at 200 N in compression bending. "Ball-in-cup" multiaxial locking mechanisms were vulnerable to fatigue failure. Smooth surfaces and thicker material appeared to be protective against fatigue failure.

  9. Cold-Induced Bone Lesions in the Domestic Feline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    drift" enhances bone resorption has not been described, but it may work directly on hydroxyapatite crystals rather than through bone cells or...pan, and a drop of clear epoxy was placed over the head of each screw to restore the smooth inner sur- face of the pan. The best location for the drain...place with epoxy liquid adhesive. For better adhesion, the surfaces of both the pan and the syringe were roughened with fine sandpaper be- fore the

  10. Engineering Aspects of Single- and Twin-screw Extrusion-cooking of Biopolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuilichem, D.J. van; Stolp, W.; Janssen, L.P.B.M.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the properties of single- and twin-screw extruders. The influence on the design of the different leakage gaps existing in co-rotating, counter-rotating, self-wiping, twin-screw extruders and single-screw equipment is discussed. The mixing effects in single- and twin-screw

  11. Screw pyrolysis technology for sewage sludge treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi Morgano, Marco; Leibold, Hans; Richter, Frank; Stapf, Dieter; Seifert, Helmut

    2018-03-01

    Sewage sludge quantities have grown continuously since the introduction of the European Directive (UWWTD 91/271/EEC) relating to the treatment of urban wastewater. In the present, most of the sewage sludge is combusted in single fuels incineration plants or is co-fired in waste incineration or coal power plants. The combustion of sewage sludge is a proven technology. Other treatments, such as fluidized bed gasification, were successfully adopted to produce suitable syngas for power production. Besides, the number of large wastewater treatment plants is relatively small compared to the local rural ones. Moreover, alternative technologies are arising with the main target of nutrients recovery, with a special focus on phosphorus. The aforementioned issues, i.e. the small scale (below 1MW) and the nutrients recovery, suggest that pyrolysis in screw reactors may become an attractive alternative technology for sewage sludge conversion, recovery and recycling. In this work, about 100kg of dried sewage sludge from a plant in Germany were processed at the newly developed STYX Reactor, at KIT. The reactor combines the advantages of screw reactors with the high temperature filtration, in order to produce particle and ash free vapors and condensates, respectively. Experiments were carried out at temperatures between 350°C and 500°C. The yield of the char decreased from 66.7wt.% to 53.0wt.%. The same trend was obtained for the energy yield, while the maximum pyrolysis oil yield of 13.4wt.% was obtained at 500°C. Besides mercury, the metals and the other minerals were completely retained in the char. Nitrogen and sulfur migrated from the solid to the condensate and to the gas, respectively. Based on the energy balance, a new concept for the decentral production of char as well as heat and power in an externally fired micro gas turbine showed a cogeneration efficiency up to about 40%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Inline screw feeding vacuum arc thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronhaus, Igal; Laterza, Matteo; Maor, Yonatan

    2017-04-01

    A new type of micropropulsion device for nanosatellite applications is presented—the inline-screw-feeding vacuum-arc thruster (ISF-VAT). This thruster couples a conventional "triggerless" ignition geometry with a feeding mechanism that maintains a steady state discharge performance. The feeding mechanism implements a screw action on a central cathode rod. At a predetermined rate, a complete and uniform erosion of the cathodes tip is obtained as well as "healing" of the insulator coating. The inline feeding of the cathode forces the arc to emerge on the tip of the cathode, flush with the exit plane of the anode. This enables the plasma plume to efficiently accelerate away from the thruster, eliminating the need for an additional ion acceleration stage. The ISF-VAT feeding mechanism is computer controlled and offers reliable operation of the thruster over a large number of pulses. Characterization of the ISF-VAT performance is presented, conducted on an experimental prototype in the Aerospace Plasma Laboratory, Technion. Measurement results of the mass flow rate, electrical parameters of the discharge, and thrust are presented. Using a Ti cathode at a discharge power of 3 W, a mass flow rate of ≈1.8 ×10-9 kg/s and a thrust level ≈ 7 μN were measured. More than 106 pulses were demonstrated in a single run, accumulating a total impulse of 0.2 Ns. The thruster prototype dimensions are 15 × 15 × 65 mm3 and are ≈ 60 g in mass.

  13. Design of platform for removing screws from LCD display shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zimei; Qin, Qin; Dou, Jianfang; Zhu, Dongdong

    2017-11-01

    Removing the screws on the sides of a shield is a necessary process in disassembling a computer LCD display. To solve this issue, a platform has been designed for removing the screws on display shields. This platform uses virtual instrument technology with LabVIEW as the development environment to design the mechanical structure with the technologies of motion control, human-computer interaction and target recognition. This platform removes the screws from the sides of the shield of an LCD display mechanically thus to guarantee follow-up separation and recycle.

  14. Modelling of porous biomass pyrolysis in screw reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, A. A.; Kozlov, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a model of wood pyrolysis in a screw reactor as the first stage of the multistage gasification process. To prevent clinkering of particles and thermal inhomogeneities, screw-type transportation is used to transport fuel. In order to describe kinetics of pyrolysis and transport of volatiles within the wood particles and their transition to the gas phase we carried out the studies using a complex of synchronous thermal analysis. A detailed numerical modeling of pyrolyzer was performed with the Comsol Multiphysics software which makes it possible to optimize the design and operating parameters of the pyrolysis process in a screw reactor.

  15. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish Reddy Gooty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants.

  16. Can experimental data in humans verify the finite element-based bone remodeling algorithm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, C.; Gehrchen, P.M.; Kiaer, T.

    2008-01-01

    : The validity of 2 bone remodeling algorithms was evaluated by comparing against prospective bone mineral content measurements. Also, the potential stress shielding effect was examined using the 2 bone remodeling algorithms and the experimental bone mineral data. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In previous studies...... operated on with pedicle screws between L4 and L5. The stress shielding effect was also examined. The bone remodeling results were compared with prospective bone mineral content measurements of 4 patients. They were measured after surgery, 3-, 6- and 12-months postoperatively. RESULTS: After 1 year...

  17. In vitro simulation of pathological bone conditions to predict clinical outcome of bone tissue engineered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duong Thuy Thi

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, the geriatric population of ≥65 years of age will increase to 51.5 million in 2020; 40% of white women and 13% of white men will be at risk for fragility fractures or fractures sustained under normal stress and loading conditions due to bone disease, leading to hospitalization and surgical treatment. Fracture management strategies can be divided into pharmaceutical therapy, surgical intervention, and tissue regeneration for fracture prevention, fracture stabilization, and fracture site regeneration, respectively. However, these strategies fail to accommodate the pathological nature of fragility fractures, leading to unwanted side effects, implant failures, and non-unions. Compromised innate bone healing reactions of patients with bone diseases are exacerbated with protective bone therapy. Once these patients sustain a fracture, bone healing is a challenge, especially when fracture stabilization is unsuccessful. Traditional stabilizing screw and plate systems were designed with emphasis on bone mechanics rather than biology. Bone grafts are often used with fixation devices to provide skeletal continuity at the fracture gap. Current bone grafts include autologous bone tissue and donor bone tissue; however, the quality and quantity demanded by fragility fractures sustained by high-risk geriatric patients and patients with bone diseases are not met. Consequently, bone tissue engineering strategies are advancing towards functionalized bone substitutes to provide fracture reconstruction while effectively mediating bone healing in normal and diseased fracture environments. In order to target fragility fractures, fracture management strategies should be tailored to allow bone regeneration and fracture stabilization with bioactive bone substitutes designed for the pathological environment. The clinical outcome of these materials must be predictable within various disease environments. Initial development of a targeted

  18. Spondylolysis outcomes in adolescents after direct screw repair of the pars interarticularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Laura A; Shufflebarger, Harry; O'Brien, Michael F; Thind, Harjot; Theodore, Nicholas; Kakarla, Udaya K

    2014-09-01

    Isthmic spondylolysis can significantly decrease functional abilities, especially in adolescent athletes. Although treatment can range from observation to surgery, direct screw placement through the fractured pars, or Buck's procedure, may be a more minimally invasive procedure than the more common pedicle screw-hook construct. Review of surgical databases identified 16 consecutive patients treated with Buck's procedure from 2004 to 2010. Twelve patients were treated at Miami Children's Hospital and 4 at Barrow Neurological Institute. Demographics and clinical and radiographic outcomes were recorded and analyzed retrospectively. The 16 patients had a median age of 16 years, and 14 were 20 years or younger at the time of treatment. Symptoms included axial back pain in 100% of patients with concomitant radiculopathy in 38%. Pars defects were bilateral in 81% and unilateral in 19% for a total of 29 pars defects treated using Buck's procedure. Autograft or allograft augmented with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein as well as postoperative bracing was used in all cases. Postoperatively, symptoms resolved completely or partially in 15 patients (94%). Of 29 pars defects, healing was observed in 26 (89.6%) prior to 1 revision surgery, and an overall fusion rate of 97% was observed at last radiological follow-up. There were no implant failures. All 8 athletes in this group had returned to play at last follow-up. Direct screw repair of the pars interarticularis defect as described in this series may provide a more minimally invasive treatment of adolescent patients with satisfactory clinical and radiological outcomes, including return to play of adolescent athletes.

  19. Mechanical performance of a screw-type veterinary suture anchor subjected to single load to failure and cyclic loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balara, Jason M; McCarthy, Robert J; Boudrieau, Randy J; Kraus, Karl H

    2004-01-01

    To characterize the mechanical performance of a veterinary bone anchor under static and cyclic loads. Mechanical testing study. Cadaveric canine humeri. Humeri (6 pairs) were collected from skeletally mature dogs (mean [+/-SD] age, 17.2+/-2.1 months; weight, 20.8+/-1.5 kg). Bone anchors were inserted in the proximal metaphysis using nylon, and were longitudinally extracted. For the opposite humerus, anchors were subjected to longitudinal cyclic load (50% of the load at failure of their pair) for 1200 cycles then longitudinally loaded to failure. Anchors were then installed in a similar and adjacent area of these 2(nd) humeri with nylon and cyclically tested perpendicular to the axis of anchor insertion (100% of the longitudinal holding power of their pair) for 1200 cycles, then perpendicularly loaded to failure. Paired t-tests were used to compare holding power before and after longitudinal cyclic testing. Longitudinal holding power of the screw-type anchor in the proximal humerus was 385+/-30 N. Anchor pullout was the only mode of failure. Anchors in the paired humeri did not fail after 1200 cycles of 50% longitudinal loading, and post-cycle holding strength was not different (335+/-87 N; P=.32). Perpendicularly loaded anchors did not fail after 1200 cycles of 100% of opposite longitudinal holding strength, and had post-cycle perpendicular holding strengths of 514+/-72 N. Suture breakage was the mode of failure. Bone anchor holding strength is dependent on orientation of suture load. Screw-type bone anchor holding strength was not affected by longitudinal cyclic loading, and holding strengths of approximately 385 N can be expected in metaphyseal bone of large-breed mature dogs. Perpendicularly loaded anchors have higher failure loads, and holding strength of approximately 514 N can be expected in metaphyseal bone of the proximal humerus.

  20. Lumbar pedicle screw placement: Using only AP plane imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Sethi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Placement of pedicle screws under fluoroscopic guidance using AP plane imaging alone with tactile guidance is safe, fast, and reliable. However, a good understanding of the radiographic landmarks is a prerequisite.

  1. Centrifuging Step-Screw Conveyor for Regolith Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A variety of ISRU operations will utilize lunar regolith as feedstock. The proposed centrifuging step-screw conveyor concept will provide a well controlled robust,...

  2. Kinematic analysis of parallel manipulators by algebraic screw theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gallardo-Alvarado, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the fundamentals of screw theory concerned with velocity analysis of rigid-bodies, confirmed with detailed and explicit proofs. The author additionally investigates acceleration, jerk, and hyper-jerk analyses of rigid-bodies following the trend of the velocity analysis. With the material provided in this book, readers can extend the theory of screws into the kinematics of optional order of rigid-bodies. Illustrative examples and exercises to reinforce learning are provided. Of particular note, the kinematics of emblematic parallel manipulators, such as the Delta robot as well as the original Gough and Stewart platforms are revisited applying, in addition to the theory of screws, new methods devoted to simplify the corresponding forward-displacement analysis, a challenging task for most parallel manipulators. Stands as the only book devoted to the acceleration, jerk and hyper-jerk (snap) analyses of rigid-body by means of screw theory; Provides new strategies to simplify the forward kinematic...

  3. Biomechanical analysis of titanium fixation plates and screws in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hole Y plates with monocortical screws. 150 N incisal occlusal loads were simulated on the models. The commercial ANSYS software was utilized to calculate the Von Mises stresses on fixative appliances. Results: The highest Von Mises stress ...

  4. Does an additional antirotation U-Blade (RC) lag screw improve treatment of AO/OTA 31 A1-3 fractures with gamma 3 nail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, N W; Arthold, C; Joestl, J; Gormasz, A; Boesmueller, S; Hajdu, S; Sarahrudi, K

    2016-12-01

    Poor bone quality and unstable fractures increase the cut-out rate in implants with gliding lag screws. The U-Blade (RC) lag screw for the Gamma3 ® nail was introduced to provide monoaxial rotational stability of the femoral head and neck fragment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the use of the U-Blade (RC) lag screw is associated with reduced cut-out in patients with OTA/AO 31A1-3 fractures. Between 2009 and 2014, 751 patients with OTA/AO 31A1-3 fractures were treated with a Gamma3 ® nail at our institution. Out of this sample 199 patients were treated with U-blade (RC) lag screws. A total of 135 patients (117 female, 18 male) with standard lag screw (treatment group A) were matched equally regarding age (±4 years) sex, fracture type and location to 135 patients with U-blade (RC) lag screw (treatment group B). Within a mean follow up of 9.2 months (range 6-18 months) we assessed the cut-out rate, the calTAD, lag screw migration, the Parker's mobility score and the Parker's ratio at postoperatively, six and 12 months following surgery. Furthermore we recorded all complications, ASA-Score, hospital stay and duration of surgery retrospectively. The most common fracture among group B with a cut-out of the lag screw were AO/OTA 2.3 and 3.2 fractures whereas in group A cut-out was most commonly seen in AO/OTA 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 fractures, there was no significant reduction of the cut-out rate in group B 2.2% (n=3) compared to group A 3.7% (n=5). The duration of surgery was significantly shorter in group A (pAO 31A1-3 fractures at all. Considering the longer duration of surgery and the higher costs of the U-Blade (RC) lag screw, our results do not justify its use. However, further prospective randomized studies will be necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Accelerated Tooth Movement with Orthodontic Mini-Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksakalli, S; Balaban, A; Nazaroglu, K; Saglam, E

    2017-01-01

    This case report outlines the possibility of accelerated tooth movement with the combination of microosteoperforation and mini-screws. A 14-year-old male patient presented Class II malocclusion with maxillary incisor protrusion. Upper first premolars were extracted, and after leveling, accelerated canine distalization started. For pre- and postdistalization times, amount of distalization, periodontal health, and root resorption were assessed. Within the limitations of this case report, micro-osteoperforations with mini-screw have a potential for shortening the treatment time.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking lifetime prediction of spring screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S. K.; Ryu, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    A lifetime prediction of holddown spring screw in nuclear fuel assembly was performed using fracture mechanics approach. The spring screw was designed such that it was capable of sustaining the loads imposed by the initial tensile preload and operational loads. In order to investigate the cause of failure and to predict the stress corrosion cracking life of the screw, a stress analysis of the top nozzle spring assembly was done using finite element analysis. The elastic-plastic finite element analysis showed that the local stresses at the critical regions of head-shank fillet and thread root significantly exceeded than the yield strength of the screw material, resulting in local plastic deformation. Normalized stress intensity factors for PWSCC life prediction was proposed. Primary water stress corrosion cracking life of the Inconel 600 screw was predicted by using integration of the Scott model and resulted in 1.78 years, which was fairly close to the actual service life of the holddown spring screw

  7. Modeling and Analyzing the Slipping of the Ball Screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan Xu

    Full Text Available AbstractThis paper aims to set up the ball systematic slipping model and analyze the slipping characteristics caused by different factors for a ball screw operating at high speeds. To investigate the ball screw slipping mechanism, transformed coordinate system should be established firstly. Then it is used to set up mathematical modeling for the ball slipping caused by the three main reasons and the speed of slipping can be calculated. Later, the influence of the contact angle, helix angle and screw diameter for ball screw slipping will be analyzed according to the ball slipping model and slipping speeds equation and the slipping analysis will be obtained. Finally, curve of slipping analysis and that of mechanical efficiency of the ball screw analysis by Lin are compared, which will indirectly verify the correctness of the slipping model. The slipping model and the curve of slipping analysis established in this paper will provide theory basis for reducing slipping and improving the mechanical efficiency of a ball screw operating at high speeds.

  8. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  9. Fixation strength of biocomposite wedge interference screw in ACL reconstruction: effect of screw length and tunnel/screw ratio. A controlled laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary stability of the graft is essential in anterior cruciate ligament surgery. An optimal method of fixation should be easy to insert and provide great resistance against pull-out forces. A controlled laboratory study was designed to test the primary stability of ACL tendinous grafts in the tibial tunnel. The correlation between resistance to traction forces and the cross-section and length of the screw was studied. Methods The tibial phase of ACL reconstruction was performed in forty porcine tibias using digital flexor tendons of the same animal. An 8 mm tunnel was drilled in each specimen and two looped tendons placed as graft. Specimens were divided in five groups according to the diameter and length of the screw used for fixation. Wedge interference screws were used. Longitudinal traction was applied to the graft with a Servohydraulic Fatigue System. Load and displacement were controlled and analyzed. Results The mean loads to failure for each group were 295,44 N (Group 1; 9 × 23 screw, 564,05 N (Group 2; 9 × 28, 614,95 N (Group 3; 9 × 35, 651,14 N (Group 4; 10 × 28 and 664,99 (Group 5; 10 × 35. No slippage of the graft was observed in groups 3, 4 and 5. There were significant differences in the load to failure among groups (ANOVA/P Conclusions Longer and wider interference screws provide better fixation in tibial ACL graft fixation. Short screws (23 mm do not achieve optimal fixation and should be implanted only with special requirements.

  10. The Influence of Partial Knee Replacement Designs on Tensile Strain at Implant-Bone Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial knee replacement (PKR results in fast recovery and good knee mechanics and is ideal to treat medial knee osteoarthritis. Cementless PKR depends on bone growing into the implant surface for long-term fixation. Implant loosening may occur due to high tensile strain resulted from large mechanical loads during rehab exercises. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether external fixations such as superior screw and frontal flange could reduce the tensile strain at the implant-bone interface. Three medial PKRs were designed. The first PKR had no external fixations. A superior screw and a frontal flange were then added to the first PKR to form the second and third PKR designs, respectively. Finite element analysis was performed to examine the tensile strain at the implant-bone interface during weight-bearing exercises. The PKR with no external fixations exhibited high tensile strain at the anterior implant-bone interface. Both the screwed and flanged PKRs effectively reduced the tensile strain at the anterior implant-bone interface. Furthermore, the flanged PKR resulted in a more uniform reduction of the tensile strain than the screwed PKR. In conclusion, external fixations are necessary to alleviate tensile strain at the implant-bone interface during knee rehab exercises.

  11. A comparative study in fixation methods of medial malleolus fractures between tension bands wiring and screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ayyoub A; Abbas, Khalid Ahmed; Mawlood, Ammar Salah

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare two methods of internal fixations of fractured medial malleolus which are simple screw fixation and tension band wiring. Over 5 years we grouped 20 patients with fractured medial malleolus into two groups of operative treatments, group1 treated by malleolar screw fixation and group2 by tension band wiring. The patients were with same age group, gender, fracture type, and etiology. We use statistical