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Sample records for bone repair biomaterial

  1. [Biomaterials in bone repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puska, Mervi; Aho, Allan J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2013-01-01

    In orthopedics, traumatology, and craniofacial surgery, biomaterials should meet the clinical demands of bone that include shape, size and anatomical location of the defect, as well as the physiological load-bearing stresses. Biomaterials are metals, ceramics, plastics or materials of biological origin. In the treatment of large defects, metallic endoprostheses or bone grafts are employed, whereas ceramics in the case of small defects. Plastics are employed on the artificial joint surfaces, in the treatment of vertebral compression fractures, and as biodegradable screws and plates. Porosity, bioactivity, and identical biomechanics to bone are fundamental for achieving a durable, well-bonded, interface between biomaterial and bone. In the case of severe bone treatments, biomaterials should also imply an option to add biologically active substances.

  2. Biomaterial-mediated strategies targeting vascularization for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José R; García, Andrés J

    2016-04-01

    Repair of non-healing bone defects through tissue engineering strategies remains a challenging feat in the clinic due to the aversive microenvironment surrounding the injured tissue. The vascular damage that occurs following a bone injury causes extreme ischemia and a loss of circulating cells that contribute to regeneration. Tissue-engineered constructs aimed at regenerating the injured bone suffer from complications based on the slow progression of endogenous vascular repair and often fail at bridging the bone defect. To that end, various strategies have been explored to increase blood vessel regeneration within defects to facilitate both tissue-engineered and natural repair processes. Developments that induce robust vascularization will need to consolidate various parameters including optimization of embedded therapeutics, scaffold characteristics, and successful integration between the construct and the biological tissue. This review provides an overview of current strategies as well as new developments in engineering biomaterials to induce reparation of a functional vascular supply in the context of bone repair.

  3. Biomaterials with Antibacterial and Osteoinductive Properties to Repair Infected Bone Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiping; Liu, Yi; Guo, Jing; Wu, Huiling; Wang, Jingxiao; Wu, Gang

    2016-03-03

    The repair of infected bone defects is still challenging in the fields of orthopedics, oral implantology and maxillofacial surgery. In these cases, the self-healing capacity of bone tissue can be significantly compromised by the large size of bone defects and the potential/active bacterial activity. Infected bone defects are conventionally treated by a systemic/local administration of antibiotics to control infection and a subsequent implantation of bone grafts, such as autografts and allografts. However, these treatment options are time-consuming and usually yield less optimal efficacy. To approach these problems, novel biomaterials with both antibacterial and osteoinductive properties have been developed. The antibacterial property can be conferred by antibiotics and other novel antibacterial biomaterials, such as silver nanoparticles. Bone morphogenetic proteins are used to functionalize the biomaterials with a potent osteoinductive property. By manipulating the carrying modes and release kinetics, these biomaterials are optimized to maximize their antibacterial and osteoinductive functions with minimized cytotoxicity. The findings, in the past decade, have shown a very promising application potential of the novel biomaterials with the dual functions in treating infected bone defects. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of novel biomaterials with both antibacterial and osteoinductive properties.

  4. Biomaterials with Antibacterial and Osteoinductive Properties to Repair Infected Bone Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiping Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The repair of infected bone defects is still challenging in the fields of orthopedics, oral implantology and maxillofacial surgery. In these cases, the self-healing capacity of bone tissue can be significantly compromised by the large size of bone defects and the potential/active bacterial activity. Infected bone defects are conventionally treated by a systemic/local administration of antibiotics to control infection and a subsequent implantation of bone grafts, such as autografts and allografts. However, these treatment options are time-consuming and usually yield less optimal efficacy. To approach these problems, novel biomaterials with both antibacterial and osteoinductive properties have been developed. The antibacterial property can be conferred by antibiotics and other novel antibacterial biomaterials, such as silver nanoparticles. Bone morphogenetic proteins are used to functionalize the biomaterials with a potent osteoinductive property. By manipulating the carrying modes and release kinetics, these biomaterials are optimized to maximize their antibacterial and osteoinductive functions with minimized cytotoxicity. The findings, in the past decade, have shown a very promising application potential of the novel biomaterials with the dual functions in treating infected bone defects. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of novel biomaterials with both antibacterial and osteoinductive properties.

  5. Bone substitute biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, K

    2014-01-01

    Bone substitute biomaterials are fundamental to the biomedical sector, and have recently benefitted from extensive research and technological advances aimed at minimizing failure rates and reducing the need for further surgery. This book reviews these developments, with a particular focus on the desirable properties for bone substitute materials and their potential to encourage bone repair and regeneration. Part I covers the principles of bone substitute biomaterials for medical applications. One chapter reviews the quantification of bone mechanics at the whole-bone, micro-scale, and non-scale levels, while others discuss biomineralization, osteoductivization, materials to fill bone defects, and bioresorbable materials. Part II focuses on biomaterials as scaffolds and implants, including multi-functional scaffolds, bioceramics, and titanium-based foams. Finally, Part III reviews further materials with the potential to encourage bone repair and regeneration, including cartilage grafts, chitosan, inorganic poly...

  6. COLOSTRUM-COLLAGEN-HYDROXYAPATITE COMPOSITE, AN EXCELLENT CANDIDATE BIOMATERIAL FOR BONE REPAIR AND BONE INFECTION MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dio Nurdin Setiawan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the case ofbone fracture or defect after surgery, which is common in patients with bone cancer (osteosarcoma, it takes a long time for closure and it may cause an infection problem. The use ofcollagen-hydroxyapatite composite with a blend ofcolostrum as a scaffold is aimed to accelerate the process of osteoblast growth, inhibite the emergence of infections, and act as bone tissue repair material. The method used was the hydrogel formation process and freeze dry process to remove the solvent and to form pores. The composition of scaffold composite manufactured was 15% collagen, 75% hydroxyapatite and 10% colostrum. Combination ofscaffold collagen-hydroxyapatite-colostrum has quite reliable properties because SEM test showed that scaffold could bind to both and could bind to both and could form sufficient pores to provide enough place for bone cells (osteoblats to grow. The results of MTT assay revealed percentage of above 60%, which indicates that the material is not toxic. In conclusion, collagen-hydroxyapatite-colostrum combination is an excellent biomaterial candidate for bone repair and bone infection management.

  7. Fabrication of a two-level tumor bone repair biomaterial based on a rapid prototyping technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai He; Yan Yongnian; Zhang Renji; Wang Xiaohong [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education and Center of Organ Manufacturing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Xinluan; Madhukar, Kumta Shekhar; Qin Ling [Department of Orthoapedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Shatin, NT (Hong Kong)], E-mail: wangxiaohong@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: kumta@cuhk.edu.hk, E-mail: qin@ort.cuhk.edu.hk

    2009-06-01

    After the removal of the giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone, it is necessary to fill the defects with adequate biomaterials. A new functional bone repair material with both stimulating osteoblast growth and inhibiting osteoclast activity has been developed with phosphorylated chitosan (P-chitosan) and disodium (1 {yields} 4)-2-deoxy-2-sulfoamino-{beta}-D-glucopyranuronan (S-chitosan) as the additives of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/calcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds based on a double-nozzle low-temperature deposition manufacturing technique. A computer-assisted design model was used and the optimal fabrication parameters were determined through the manipulation of a pure PLGA/TCP system. The microscopic structures, water absorbability and mechanical properties of the samples with different P-chitosan and S-chitosan concentrations were characterized correspondingly. The results suggested that this unique composite porous scaffold material is a potential candidate for the repair of large bone defects after a surgical removal of GCT.

  8. Biomaterials with Antibacterial and Osteoinductive Properties to Repair Infected Bone Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Haiping; Liu, Yi; Guo, Jing; Wu, Huiling; Wang, Jingxiao; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The repair of infected bone defects is still challenging in the fields of orthopedics, oral implantology and maxillofacial surgery. In these cases, the self-healing capacity of bone tissue can be significantly compromised by the large size of bone defects and the potential/active bacterial activity. Infected bone defects are conventionally treated by a systemic/local administration of antibiotics to control infection and a subsequent implantation of bone grafts, such as autografts and allogra...

  9. Biomaterials with antibacterial and osteoinductive properties to repair infected bone defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, H.; Liu, Y.; Guo, J.; Wu, H.; Wang, J.; Wu, G.

    2016-01-01

    The repair of infected bone defects is still challenging in the fields of orthopedics, oral implantology and maxillofacial surgery. In these cases, the self-healing capacity of bone tissue can be significantly compromised by the large size of bone defects and the potential/active bacterial activity.

  10. Biomaterial strategies for engineering implants for enhanced osseointegration and bone repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rachit; García, Andrés J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue has a remarkable ability to regenerate and heal itself. However, large bone defects and complex fractures still present a significant challenge to the medical community. Current treatments center on metal implants for structural and mechanical support and auto- or allo-grafts to substitute long bone defects. Metal implants are associated with several complications such as implant loosening and infections. Bone grafts suffer from donor site morbidity, reduced bioactivity, and risk of pathogen transmission. Surgical implants can be modified to provide vital biological cues, growth factors and cells in order to improve osseointegration and repair of bone defects. Here we review strategies and technologies to engineer metal surfaces to promote osseointegration with the host tissue. We also discuss strategies for modifying implants for cell adhesion and bone growth via integrin signaling and growth factor and cytokine delivery for bone defect repair. PMID:25861724

  11. Multifunctional bioactive glass and glass-ceramic biomaterials with antibacterial properties for repair and regeneration of bone tissue.

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    Fernandes, João S; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Pires, Ricardo A; Reis, Rui L; Hatton, Paul V

    2017-09-01

    Bioactive glasses (BGs) and related glass-ceramic biomaterials have been used in bone tissue repair for over 30years. Previous work in this field was comprehensively reviewed including by their inventor Larry Hench, and the key features and properties of BGs are well understood. More recently, attention has focused on their modification to further enhance the osteogenic behaviour, or further compositional changes that may introduce additional properties, such as antimicrobial activity. Evidence is emerging that BGs and related glass-ceramics may be modified in such a way as to simultaneously introduce more than one desirable property. The aim of this review is therefore to consider the evidence that these more recent inorganic modifications to glass and glass-ceramic biomaterials are effective, and whether or not these new compositions represent sufficiently versatile systems to underpin the development of a new generation of truly multifunctional biomaterials to address pressing clinical needs in orthopaedic and dental surgery. Indeed, a number of classical glass compositions exhibited antimicrobial activity, however the structural design and the addition of specific ions, i.e. Ag + , Cu + , and Sr 2+ , are able to impart a multifunctional character to these systems, through the combination of, for example, bioactivity with bactericidal activity. In this review we demonstrate the multifunctional potential of bioactive glasses and related glass-ceramics as biomaterials for orthopaedic and craniofacial/dental applications. Therefore, it considers the evidence that the more recent inorganic modifications to glass and glass-ceramic biomaterials are able to impart antimicrobial properties alongside the more classical bone bonding and osteoconduction. These properties are attracting a special attention nowadays that bacterial infections are an increasing challenge in orthopaedics. We also focus the manuscript on the versatility of these systems as a basis to underpin

  12. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikavitsas, V. I.; Temenoff, J. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  13. Thiol-acrylate nanocomposite foams for critical size bone defect repair: A novel biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Leah; Chen, Cong; Kilchrist, Kameron V; Bounds, Christopher; Pojman, John A; Hayes, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Bone tissue engineering approaches using polymer/ceramic composites show promise as effective biocompatible, absorbable, and osteoinductive materials. A novel class of in situ polymerizing thiol-acrylate based copolymers synthesized via an amine-catalyzed Michael addition was studied for its potential to be used in bone defect repair. Both pentaerythritol triacrylate-co-trimethylolpropane tris(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETA-co-TMPTMP) and PETA-co-TMPTMP with hydroxyapatite (HA) composites were fabricated in solid cast and foamed forms. These materials were characterized chemically and mechanically followed by an in vitro evaluation of the biocompatibility and chemical stability in conjunction with human adipose-derived mesenchymal pluripotent stem cells (hASC). The solid PETA-co-TMPTMP with and without HA exhibited compressive strength in the range of 7-20 MPa, while the cytotoxicity and biocompatibility results demonstrate higher metabolic activity of hASC on PETA-co-TMPTMP than on a polycaprolactone control. Scanning electron microscope imaging of hASC show expected spindle shaped morphology when adhered to copolymer. Micro-CT analysis indicates open cell interconnected pores. Foamed PETA-co-TMPTMP HA composite shows promise as an alternative to FDA-approved biopolymers for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley Company.

  14. Biomaterials based strategies for rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Su, Wei; Shah, Vishva; Hobson, Divia; Yildirimer, Lara; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Zhao, Jinzhong; Cui, Wenguo; Zhao, Xin

    2017-09-01

    Tearing of the rotator cuff commonly occurs as among one of the most frequently experienced tendon disorders. While treatment typically involves surgical repair, failure rates to achieve or sustain healing range from 20 to 90%. The insufficient capacity to recover damaged tendon to heal to the bone, especially at the enthesis, is primarily responsible for the failure rates reported. Various types of biomaterials with special structures have been developed to improve tendon-bone healing and tendon regeneration, and have received considerable attention for replacement, reconstruction, or reinforcement of tendon defects. In this review, we first give a brief introduction of the anatomy of the rotator cuff and then discuss various design strategies to augment rotator cuff repair. Furthermore, we highlight current biomaterials used for repair and their clinical applications as well as the limitations in the literature. We conclude this article with challenges and future directions in designing more advanced biomaterials for augmentation of rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Coating of Biomaterial Scaffolds with the Collagen-Mimetic Peptide GFOGER for Bone Defect Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Wojtowicz, Abigail M.; Shekaran, Asha; Oest, Megan E.; Dupont, Kenneth M.; Templeman, Kellie L.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.; Guldberg, Robert E.; García, Andrés J.

    2009-01-01

    Healing large bone defects and non-unions remains a significant clinical problem. Current treatments, consisting of auto- and allografts, are limited by donor supply and morbidity, insufficient bioactivity and risk of infection. Biotherapeutics, including cells, genes and proteins, represent promising alternative therapies, but these strategies are limited by technical roadblocks to biotherapeutic delivery, cell sourcing, high cost, and regulatory hurdles. In the present study, the collagen-m...

  16. Biomaterial applications in neural therapy and repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harmanvir Ghuman; Michel Modo

    2017-01-01

    The use of biomaterials,such as hydrogels,as a scaffold to deliver cells and drugs is becoming increasingly common to treat neurological conditions,including stroke.With a limited intrinsic ability to regenerate after injury,innovative tissue engineering strategies have shown the potential of biomaterials in facilitating neural tissue regeneration and functional recovery.Using biomaterials can not only promote the survival and integration of transplanted cells in the existing circuitry,but also support controlled site specific delivery of therapeutic drugs.This review aims to provide the reader an understanding of the brain tissue microenvironment after injury,biomaterial criteria that support tissue repair,commonly used natural and synthetic biomaterials,benefits of incorporating cells and neurotrophic factors,as well as the potential of endogenous neurogenesis in repairing the injured brain.

  17. Biomaterials in the repair of sports injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducheyne, Paul; Mauck, Robert L.; Smith, Douglas H.

    2012-08-01

    The optimal stimulation of tissue regeneration in bone, cartilage and spinal cord injuries involves a judicious selection of biomaterials with tailored chemical compositions, micro- and nanostructures, porosities and kinetic release properties for the delivery of relevant biologically active molecules.

  18. Clay-Enriched Silk Biomaterials for Bone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Llamas, Jabier Gallego; Vaiana, Christopher A.; Kadakia, Madhavi P.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of silk protein/clay composite biomaterials for bone tissue formation is described. Silk fibroin serves as an organic scaffolding material offering mechanical stability suitable for bone specific uses. Clay montmorillonite (Cloisite ® Na+) and sodium silicate are sources of osteoinductive silica-rich inorganic species, analogous to bioactive bioglass-like bone repair biomaterial systems. Different clay particle-silk composite biomaterial films were compared to silk films doped with sodium silicate as controls for support of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in osteogenic culture. The cells adhered and proliferated on the silk/clay composites over two weeks. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed increased transcript levels for alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and collagen type 1 (Col I) osteogenic markers in the cells cultured on the silk/clay films in comparison to the controls. Early evidence for bone formation based on collagen deposition at the cell-biomaterial interface was also found, with more collagen observed for the silk films with higher contents of clay particles. The data suggest that the silk/clay composite systems may be useful for further study toward bone regenerative needs. PMID:21549864

  19. Silk film biomaterials for ocular surface repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Brian David

    Current biomaterial approaches for repairing the cornea's ocular surface upon injury are partially effective due to inherent material limitations. As a result there is a need to expand the biomaterial options available for use in the eye, which in turn will help to expand new clinical innovations and technology development. The studies illustrated here are a collection of work to further characterize silk film biomaterials for use on the ocular surface. Silk films were produced from regenerated fibroin protein solution derived from the Bombyx mori silkworm cocoon. Methods of silk film processing and production were developed to produce consistent biomaterials for in vitro and in vivo evaluation. A wide range of experiments was undertaken that spanned from in vitro silk film material characterization to in vivo evaluation. It was found that a variety of silk film properties could be controlled through a water-annealing process. Silk films were then generated that could be use in vitro to produce stratified corneal epithelial cell sheets comparable to tissue grown on the clinical standard substrate of amniotic membrane. This understanding was translated to produce a silk film design that enhanced corneal healing in vivo on a rabbit injury model. Further work produced silk films with varying surface topographies that were used as a simplified analog to the corneal basement membrane surface in vitro. These studies demonstrated that silk film surface topography is capable of directing corneal epithelial cell attachment, growth, and migration response. Most notably epithelial tissue development was controllably directed by the presence of the silk surface topography through increasing cell sheet migration efficiency at the individual cellular level. Taken together, the presented findings represent a comprehensive characterization of silk film biomaterials for use in ocular surface reconstruction, and indicate their utility as a potential material choice in the

  20. Bone bonding at natural and biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, John E

    2007-12-01

    Bone bonding is occurring in each of us and all other terrestrial vertebrates throughout life at bony remodeling sites. The surface created by the bone-resorbing osteoclast provides a three-dimensionally complex surface with which the cement line, the first matrix elaborated during de novo bone formation, interdigitates and is interlocked. The structure and composition of this interfacial bony matrix has been conserved during evolution across species; and we have known for over a decade that this interfacial matrix can be recapitulated at a biomaterial surface implanted in bone, given appropriate healing conditions. No evidence has emerged to suggest that bone bonding to artificial materials is any different from this natural biological process. Given this understanding it is now possible to explain why bone-bonding biomaterials are not restricted to the calcium-phosphate-based bioactive materials as was once thought. Indeed, in the absence of surface porosity, calcium phosphate biomaterials are not bone bonding. On the contrary, non-bonding materials can be rendered bone bonding by modifying their surface topography. This paper argues that the driving force for bone bonding is bone formation by contact osteogenesis, but that this has to occur on a sufficiently stable recipient surface which has micron-scale surface topography with undercuts in the sub-micron scale-range.

  1. Mini Review: Biomaterials for Enhancing Neuronal Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangellaris, Olivia V.; Gillette, Martha U.

    2018-04-01

    As they differentiate from neuroblasts, nascent neurons become highly polarized and elongate. Neurons extend and elaborate fine and fragile cellular extensions that form circuits enabling long-distance communication and signal integration within the body. While other organ systems are developing, projections of differentiating neurons find paths to distant targets. Subsequent post-developmental neuronal damage is catastrophic because the cues for reinnervation are no longer active. Advances in biomaterials are enabling fabrication of micro-environments that encourage neuronal regrowth and restoration of function by recreating these developmental cues. This mini-review considers new materials that employ topographical, chemical, electrical, and/or mechanical cues for use in neuronal repair. Manipulating and integrating these elements in different combinations will generate new technologies to enhance neural repair.

  2. Supporting Biomaterials for Articular Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Drescher, Wolf; Rath, Björn; Tingart, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and researchers worldwide are continuously faced with the challenge of regenerating articular cartilage defects. However, until now, it has not been possible to completely mimic the biological and biochemical properties of articular cartilage using current research and development approaches. In this review, biomaterials previously used for articular cartilage repair research are addressed. Furthermore, a brief discussion of the state of the art of current cell printing procedures mimicking native cartilage is offered in light of their use as future alternatives for cartilage tissue engineering. Inkjet cell printing, controlled deposition cell printing tools, and laser cell printing are cutting-edge techniques in this context. The development of mimetic hydrogels with specific biological properties relevant to articular cartilage native tissue will support the development of improved, functional, and novel engineered tissue for clinical application. PMID:26069634

  3. Rectocele repair using biomaterial augmentation: current documentation and clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Daniel; Mellgren, Anders; Zetterström, Jan

    2005-11-01

    Although the etiology of rectocele remains debated, surgical innovations are currently promoted to improve anatomic outcome while avoiding dyspareunia and alleviating rectal emptying difficulties following rectocele surgery. Use of biomaterials in rectocele repair has become widespread in a short time, but the clinical documentation of their effectiveness and complications is limited. Medline and the Cochrane database were searched electronically from 1964 to May 2005 using the Pubmed and Ovid search engines. All English language publications including any of the search terms "rectocele," "implant," "mesh," "biomaterial," "prolapse," "synthetical," "pelvic floor," "biological," and "compatibility" were reviewed. This review outlines the basic principles for use of biomaterials in pelvic reconstructive surgery and provides a condensation of peer-reviewed articles describing clinical use of biomaterials in rectocele surgery. Historical and new concepts in rectocele surgery are discussed. Factors of importance for human in vivo biomaterial compatibility are presented together with current knowledge from clinical studies. Potential risks and problems associated with the use of biomaterials in rectocele and pelvic reconstructive surgery in general are described. Although use of biomaterials in rectocele and other pelvic organ prolapse surgery offers exciting possibilities, it raises treatment costs and may be associated with unknown and potentially severe complications at short and long term. Clinical benefits are currently unknown and need to be proven in clinical studies. Obstetricians & Gynecologists, Family Physicians After completion of this article, the reader should be able to explain that the objective of surgical treatment is to improve anatomic outcome and alleviate rectal emptying difficulties, describe the efficacy of biomaterials in rectocele repair, and summarize the potential risks and problems associated with use of biomaterials in rectocele and pelvic

  4. Bone regeneration with biomaterials and active molecules delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D' Este, Matteo; Eglin, David; Alini, Mauro; Kyllonen, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The combination of biomaterials and drug delivery strategies is a promising avenue towards improved synthetic bone substitutes. With the delivery of active species biomaterials can be provided with the bioactivity they still lack for improved bone regeneration. Recently, a lot of research efforts have been put towards this direction. Biomaterials for bone regeneration have been supplemented with small or biological molecules for improved osteoprogenitor cell recruitment, osteoinductivity, anabolic or angiogenic response, regulation of bone metabolism and others. The scope of this review is to summarize the most recent results in this field.

  5. Biomaterials for intervertebral disc regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Robert D; Setton, Lori A

    2017-06-01

    The intervertebral disc contributes to motion, weight bearing, and flexibility of the spine, but is susceptible to damage and morphological changes that contribute to pathology with age and injury. Engineering strategies that rely upon synthetic materials or composite implants that do not interface with the biological components of the disc have not met with widespread use or desirable outcomes in the treatment of intervertebral disc pathology. Here we review bioengineering advances to treat disc disorders, using cell-supplemented materials, or acellular, biologically based materials, that provide opportunity for cell-material interactions and remodeling in the treatment of intervertebral disc disorders. While a field still in early development, bioengineering-based strategies employing novel biomaterials are emerging as promising alternatives for clinical treatment of intervertebral disc disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomaterial and Cell Based Cartilage Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to human native cartilage tissue are particularly troublesome because cartilage has little ability to heal or regenerate itself. The reconstruction, repair, and regeneration of cartilage tissue continue to be one of the greatest clinical challenges, especially in orthopaedic and plastic

  7. Harnessing the potential of biomaterials for brain repair after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuladhar, Anup; Payne, Samantha L.; Shoichet, Molly S.

    2018-03-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease for which no clinical treatment exists to regenerate lost tissue. Strategies for brain repair in animal models of stroke include the delivery of drug or cell-based therapeutics; however, the complex anatomy and functional organization of the brain presents many challenges. Biomaterials may alleviate some of these challenges by providing a scaffold, localizing the therapy to the site of action, and/or modulating cues to brain cells. Here, the challenges associated with delivery of therapeutics to the brain and the biomaterial strategies used to overcome these challenges are described. For example, innovative hydrogel delivery systems have been designed to provide sustained trophic factor delivery for endogenous repair and to support transplanted cell survival and integration. Novel treatments, such as electrical stimulation of transplanted cells and the delivery of factors for the direct reprogramming of astrocytes into neurons, may be further enhanced by biomaterial delivery systems. Ultimately, improved clinical translation will be achieved by combining clinically relevant therapies with biomaterials strategies.

  8. Characterization of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells on Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Henrich, Dirk; Verboket, René; Schaible, Alexander; Kontradowitz, Kerstin; Oppermann, Elsie; Brune, Jan C.; Nau, Christoph; Meier, Simon; Bonig, Halvard; Marzi, Ingo; Seebach, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP, without coating or ...

  9. Interactions between bone cells and biomaterials: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Sabrina; Drevelle, Olivier; Jann, Jessica; Lauzon, Marc-Antoine; Foruzanmehr, Mohammadreza; Grenier, Guillaume; Roux, Sophie; Faucheux, Nathalie

    2016-06-01

    As the populations of the Western world become older, they will suffer more and more from bone defects related to osteoporosis (non-union fractures, vertebral damages), cancers (malignant osteolysis) and infections (osteomyelitis). Autografts are usually used to fill these defects, but they have several drawbacks such as morbidity at the donor site and the amount and quality of bone that can be harvested. Recent scientific milestones made in biomaterials development were shown to be promising to overcome these limitations. Cell interactions with biomaterials can be improved by adding at their surface functional groups such as adhesive peptides and/or growth factors. The development of such biomimetic materials able to control bone cell responses can only proceed if it is based on a sound understanding of bone cell behavior and regulation. This review focuses on bone physiology and the regulation of bone cell differentiation and function, and how the latest advances in biomimetic materials can be translated within promising clinical outcomes.

  10. Alveolar bone repair with strontium- containing nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Boziki Xavier do Carmo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: This study aimed to evaluate bone repair in rat dental sockets after implanting nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate (CHA and nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate containing 5% strontium microspheres (SrCHA as bone substitute materials. Methods: Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two experimental groups: CHA and SrCHA (n=5/period/group. After one and 6 weeks of extraction of the right maxillary central incisor and biomaterial implantation, 5 μm bone blocks were obtained for histomorphometric evaluation. The parameters evaluated were remaining biomaterial, loose connective tissue and newly formed bone in a standard area. Statistical analysis was performed by Mann-Withney and and Wilcoxon tests at 95% level of significance. Results: The histomorphometric results showed that the microspheres showed similar fragmentation and bio-absorbation (p>0.05. We observed the formation of new bones in both groups during the same experimental periods; however, the new bone formation differed significantly between the weeks 1 and 6 (p=0.0039 in both groups. Conclusion: The CHA and SrCHA biomaterials were biocompatible, osteoconductive and bioabsorbable, indicating their great potential for clinical use as bone substitutes.

  11. Formation of blood clot on biomaterial implants influences bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Hoi Ting; Goss, Ben; Lutton, Cameron; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2014-12-01

    The first step in bone healing is forming a blood clot at injured bones. During bone implantation, biomaterials unavoidably come into direct contact with blood, leading to a blood clot formation on its surface prior to bone regeneration. Despite both situations being similar in forming a blood clot at the defect site, most research in bone tissue engineering virtually ignores the important role of a blood clot in supporting healing. Dental implantology has long demonstrated that the fibrin structure and cellular content of a peri-implant clot can greatly affect osteoconduction and de novo bone formation on implant surfaces. This article reviews the formation of a blood clot during bone healing in relation to the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) gels. It is implicated that PRP gels are dramatically altered from a normal clot in healing, resulting in conflicting effect on bone regeneration. These results indicate that the effect of clots on bone regeneration depends on how the clots are formed. Factors that influence blood clot structure and properties in relation to bone healing are also highlighted. Such knowledge is essential for developing strategies to optimally control blood clot formation, which ultimately alter the healing microenvironment of bone. Of particular interest are modification of surface chemistry of biomaterials, which displays functional groups at varied composition for the purpose of tailoring blood coagulation activation, resultant clot fibrin architecture, rigidity, susceptibility to lysis, and growth factor release. This opens new scope of in situ blood clot modification as a promising approach in accelerating and controlling bone regeneration.

  12. Silk fibroin as biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melke, Johanna; Midha, Swati; Ghosh, Sourabh; Ito, Keita; Hofmann, Sandra

    2016-02-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) is a fibrous protein which is produced mainly by silkworms and spiders. Its unique mechanical properties, tunable biodegradation rate and the ability to support the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells along the osteogenic lineage, have made SF a favorable scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. SF can be processed into various scaffold forms, combined synergistically with other biomaterials to form composites and chemically modified, which provides an impressive toolbox and allows SF scaffolds to be tailored to specific applications. This review discusses and summarizes recent advancements in processing SF, focusing on different fabrication and functionalization methods and their application to grow bone tissue in vitro and in vivo. Potential areas for future research, current challenges, uncertainties and gaps in knowledge are highlighted. Silk fibroin is a natural biomaterial with remarkable biomedical and mechanical properties which make it favorable for a broad range of bone tissue engineering applications. It can be processed into different scaffold forms, combined synergistically with other biomaterials to form composites and chemically modified which provides a unique toolbox and allows silk fibroin scaffolds to be tailored to specific applications. This review discusses and summarizes recent advancements in processing silk fibroin, focusing on different fabrication and functionalization methods and their application to grow bone tissue in vitro and in vivo. Potential areas for future research, current challenges, uncertainties and gaps in knowledge are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Biomaterials for bone filling: comparisons between autograft, hydroxyapatite and one highly purified bovine xenograft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappard, D; Zhioua, A; Grizon, F; Basle, M F; Rebel, A

    1993-12-01

    Bone grafts are becoming increasingly common in orthopaedics, neurosurgery and periodontology. Twenty one New Zealand rabbits were used in the present study comparing several materials usable as bone substitutes. A 4.5 mm hole was drilled in the inner femoral condyles. Holes were filled with either an autograft (from the opposite condyle), an hydroxylapatite (Bioapatite), or a highly purified bovine xenograft (T650 Lubboc). Animals were sacrificed at 1, 3 and 6 months post implantation and a quantitative analysis of newly-formed bone volume (BNF/IV) and remaining biomaterials (BMAT/IV) was done. In addition, some holes were left unfilled and served as controls. At 6 months, there was no tendency for spontaneous repair in the control animals. The autografted animals have repaired their trabecular mass and architecture within the first month. Hydroxylapatite appeared unresorbed at six months and only thin and scanty new trabeculae were observed. The xenograft induced woven bone trabeculae formation on the first month. This was associated with resorption of the material by two multinucleated cell populations. At six months, the epiphyseal architecture was restored and the biomaterial has disappeared in most cases. Xenografts appear a promising alternative to autografts and allografts, whose infectious risks and ethical problems should always be borne in mind.

  14. BIOMATERIAL IMPLANTS IN BONE FRACTURES PRODUCED IN RATS FIBULAS

    OpenAIRE

    Shirane, Henrique Yassuhiro; Oda, Diogo Yochizumi; Pinheiro, Thiago Cerizza; Cunha, Marcelo Rodrigues da

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of collagen and hydroxyapatite in the regeneration of fractures experimentally induced in the fibulas of rats. Method: 15 rats were used. These were subjected to surgery to remove a fragment from the fibula. This site then received a graft consisting of a silicone tubes filled with hydroxyapatite and collagen. Results: Little bone neoformation occurred inside the tubes filled with the biomaterials. There was more neoformation in the tubes with collagen. Conclusion: ...

  15. Tissue engineered bone versus alloplastic commercial biomaterials in craniofacial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucaciu, Ondine; Băciuţ, Mihaela; Băciuţ, G; Câmpian, R; Soriţău, Olga; Bran, S; Crişan, B; Crişan, Liana

    2010-01-01

    This research was developed in order to demonstrate the tissue engineering method as an alternative to conventional methods for bone reconstruction, in order to overcome the frequent failures of alloplastic commercial biomaterials, allografts and autografts. Tissue engineering is an in vitro method used to obtain cell based osteoinductive bone grafts. This study evaluated the feasibility of creating tissue-engineered bone using mesenchymal cells seeded on a scaffold obtained from the deciduous red deer antler. We have chosen mesenchymal stem cells because they are easy to obtain, capable to differentiate into cells of mesenchymal origin (osteoblasts) and to produce tissue such as bone. As scaffold, we have chosen the red deer antler because it has a high level of porosity. We conducted a case control study, on three groups of mice type CD1--two study groups (n=20) and a control group (n=20). For the study groups, we obtained bone grafts through tissue engineering, using mesenchymal stem cells seeded on the scaffold made of deciduous red deer antler. Bone defects were surgically induced on the left parietal bone of all subjects. In the control group, we grafted the bone defects with commercial biomaterials (OsteoSet, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., Arlington, Federal USA). Subjects were sacrificed at two and four months, the healing process was morphologically and histologically evaluated using descriptive histology and the golden standard - histological scoring. The grafts obtained in vivo through tissue engineering using adult stem cell, seeded on the scaffold obtained from the red deer antler using osteogenic medium have proven their osteogenic properties.

  16. Characterization of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells on Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboket, René; Kontradowitz, Kerstin; Oppermann, Elsie; Brune, Jan C.; Nau, Christoph; Meier, Simon; Bonig, Halvard; Marzi, Ingo; Seebach, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, without coating or coated with fibronectin or human plasma), demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and bovine cancellous bone (BS) were assessed. Seeding efficacy on β-TCP was 95% regardless of the surface coating. BMC demonstrated a significantly increased initial adhesion on DBM and β-TCP compared to BS. On day 14, metabolic activity was significantly increased in BMC seeded on DBM in comparison to BMC seeded on BS. Likewise increased VEGF-synthesis was observed on day 2 in BMC seeded on DBM when compared to BMC seeded on BS. The seeding efficacy of BMC on uncoated biomaterials is generally high although there are differences between these biomaterials. Beta-TCP and DBM were similar and both superior to BS, suggesting either as suitable materials for spatial restriction of BMC used for regenerative medicine purposes in vivo. PMID:25802865

  17. Characterization of bone marrow mononuclear cells on biomaterials for bone tissue engineering in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Dirk; Verboket, René; Schaible, Alexander; Kontradowitz, Kerstin; Oppermann, Elsie; Brune, Jan C; Nau, Christoph; Meier, Simon; Bonig, Halvard; Marzi, Ingo; Seebach, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, without coating or coated with fibronectin or human plasma), demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and bovine cancellous bone (BS) were assessed. Seeding efficacy on β-TCP was 95% regardless of the surface coating. BMC demonstrated a significantly increased initial adhesion on DBM and β-TCP compared to BS. On day 14, metabolic activity was significantly increased in BMC seeded on DBM in comparison to BMC seeded on BS. Likewise increased VEGF-synthesis was observed on day 2 in BMC seeded on DBM when compared to BMC seeded on BS. The seeding efficacy of BMC on uncoated biomaterials is generally high although there are differences between these biomaterials. Beta-TCP and DBM were similar and both superior to BS, suggesting either as suitable materials for spatial restriction of BMC used for regenerative medicine purposes in vivo.

  18. Characterization of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells on Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Henrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, without coating or coated with fibronectin or human plasma, demineralized bone matrix (DBM, and bovine cancellous bone (BS were assessed. Seeding efficacy on β-TCP was 95% regardless of the surface coating. BMC demonstrated a significantly increased initial adhesion on DBM and β-TCP compared to BS. On day 14, metabolic activity was significantly increased in BMC seeded on DBM in comparison to BMC seeded on BS. Likewise increased VEGF-synthesis was observed on day 2 in BMC seeded on DBM when compared to BMC seeded on BS. The seeding efficacy of BMC on uncoated biomaterials is generally high although there are differences between these biomaterials. Beta-TCP and DBM were similar and both superior to BS, suggesting either as suitable materials for spatial restriction of BMC used for regenerative medicine purposes in vivo.

  19. Biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mourik, P.; Van Dam, J.; Picken, S.J.; Ursem, B.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic pathways of living organisms produce biomaterials. Hence, in principle biomaterials are fully sustainable. This does not mean that their processing and application have no impact on the environment, e.g. the recycling of natural rubber remains a problem. Biomaterials are applied in a

  20. Production of ascorbic acid releasing biomaterials for pelvic floor repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangır, Naşide; Bullock, Anthony J; Roman, Sabiniano; Osman, Nadir; Chapple, Christopher; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    An underlying abnormality in collagen turnover is implied in the occurrence of complications and recurrences after mesh augmented pelvic floor repair surgeries. Ascorbic acid is a potent stimulant of collagen synthesis. The aim of this study is to produce ascorbic acid releasing poly-lactic acid (PLA) scaffolds and evaluate them for their effects on extracellular matrix production and the strength of the materials. Scaffolds which contained either l-ascorbic acid (AA) and Ascorbate-2-Phosphate (A2P) were produced with emulsion electrospinning. The release of both drugs was measured by UV spectrophotometry. Human dermal fibroblasts were seeded on scaffolds and cultured for 2weeks. Cell attachment, viability and total collagen production were evaluated as well as mechanical properties. No significant differences were observed between AA, A2P, Vehicle and PLA scaffolds in terms of fibre diameter and pore size. The encapsulation efficiency and successful release of both AA and A2P were demonstrated. Both AA and A2P containing scaffolds were significantly more hydrophilic and stronger in both dry and wet states compared to PLA scaffolds. Fibroblasts produced more collagen on scaffolds containing either AA or A2P compared to cells grown on control scaffolds. This study is the first to directly compare the two ascorbic acid derivatives in a tissue engineered scaffold and shows that both AA and A2P releasing electrospun PLA scaffolds increased collagen production of fibroblasts to similar extents but AA scaffolds seemed to be more hydrophilic and stronger compared to A2P scaffolds. Mesh augmented surgical repair of the pelvic floor currently relies on non-degradable materials which results in severe complications in some patients. There is an unmet and urgent need for better pelvic floor repair materials. Our current understanding suggests that the ideal material should be able to better integrate into sites of implantation both biologically and mechanically. The impact of

  1. Small intestinal submucosa: A potential osteoconductive and osteoinductive biomaterial for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mei [Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Ningbo Medical Science Research Institute, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315020 (China); Zhang, Chi; Cheng, Mengjie; Gu, Qiaoqiao [Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Zhao, Jiyuan, E-mail: zhaojiyuan@nbu.edu.cn [Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China)

    2017-06-01

    SIS is an acellular, naturally occurring collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) material with various bioactive factors, which broadly applied in tissue engineering in clinic. Several studies have applied SIS in bone tissue engineering to enhance bone regeneration in animal models. However, the mechanism was rarely investigated. The aim of the current study was to investigate the osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity of SIS scaffold to bone regeneration systematically and the potential mechanism. Our results showed that SIS scaffold with excellent biocompatibility was beneficial for cell attachment, proliferation, migration and osteogenic differentiation of various cells contributing to bone repair. In mouse calvarial defect model, bone regeneration was significantly enhanced in the defects implanted with SIS scaffolds, along with the up-regulation of BMP-2 and CD31 expression. Accordingly, ID-1, the downstream target gene of BMPs, was increased in BMSCs cultured on SIS scaffolds. The results of this study suggest that SIS scaffold is a potential osteoconductive and osteoinductive biomaterial which plays multiple roles to various cells during process of bone regeneration. - Highlights: • SIS facilitates cell adhesion of BMSCs, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. • SIS promotes cell proliferation of osteoblasts and fibroblasts. • SIS promotes osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs and osteoblasts via BMP-2 pathway. • Synergistic effects of SIS to multiple cells enhance bone regeneration in vivo.

  2. Small intestinal submucosa: A potential osteoconductive and osteoinductive biomaterial for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mei; Zhang, Chi; Cheng, Mengjie; Gu, Qiaoqiao; Zhao, Jiyuan

    2017-01-01

    SIS is an acellular, naturally occurring collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) material with various bioactive factors, which broadly applied in tissue engineering in clinic. Several studies have applied SIS in bone tissue engineering to enhance bone regeneration in animal models. However, the mechanism was rarely investigated. The aim of the current study was to investigate the osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity of SIS scaffold to bone regeneration systematically and the potential mechanism. Our results showed that SIS scaffold with excellent biocompatibility was beneficial for cell attachment, proliferation, migration and osteogenic differentiation of various cells contributing to bone repair. In mouse calvarial defect model, bone regeneration was significantly enhanced in the defects implanted with SIS scaffolds, along with the up-regulation of BMP-2 and CD31 expression. Accordingly, ID-1, the downstream target gene of BMPs, was increased in BMSCs cultured on SIS scaffolds. The results of this study suggest that SIS scaffold is a potential osteoconductive and osteoinductive biomaterial which plays multiple roles to various cells during process of bone regeneration. - Highlights: • SIS facilitates cell adhesion of BMSCs, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. • SIS promotes cell proliferation of osteoblasts and fibroblasts. • SIS promotes osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs and osteoblasts via BMP-2 pathway. • Synergistic effects of SIS to multiple cells enhance bone regeneration in vivo.

  3. Biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Migonney , Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Discovered in the 20th century, biomaterials have contributed to many of the incredible scientific and technological advancements made in recent decades. This book introduces and details the tenets of biomaterials, their relevance in a various fields, practical applications of their products, and potential advancements of the years to come. A comprehensive resource, the text covers the reasons that certain properties of biomaterials contribute to specific applications, and students and researchers will appreciate this exhaustive textbook.

  4. Piezoelectric smart biomaterials for bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jaicy; More, Namdev; Kalia, Kiran; Kapusetti, Govinda

    2018-01-01

    Tissues like bone and cartilage are remodeled dynamically for their functional requirements by signaling pathways. The signals are controlled by the cells and extracellular matrix and transmitted through an electrical and chemical synapse. Scaffold-based tissue engineering therapies largely disturb the natural signaling pathways, due to their rigidity towards signal conduction, despite their therapeutic advantages. Thus, there is a high need of smart biomaterials, which can conveniently generate and transfer the bioelectric signals analogous to native tissues for appropriate physiological functions. Piezoelectric materials can generate electrical signals in response to the applied stress. Furthermore, they can stimulate the signaling pathways and thereby enhance the tissue regeneration at the impaired site. The piezoelectric scaffolds can act as sensitive mechanoelectrical transduction systems. Hence, it is applicable to the regions, where mechanical loads are predominant. The present review is mainly concentrated on the mechanism related to the electrical stimulation in a biological system and the different piezoelectric materials suitable for bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

  5. A new platelet cryoprecipitate glue promoting bone formation after ectopic mesenchymal stromal cell-loaded biomaterial implantation in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouillas, Marina; Prat, Marie; Doucet, Christelle; Ernou, Isabelle; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne; Blancard, Patrick Saint; Holy, Xavier; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-04

    This study investigated the promising effect of a new Platelet Glue obtained from Cryoprecipitation of Apheresis Platelet products (PGCAP) used in combination with Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC) loaded on ceramic biomaterials to provide novel strategies enhancing bone repair. PGCAP growth factor content was analyzed by ELISA and compared to other platelet and plasma-derived products. MSC loaded on biomaterials (65% hydroxyapatite/35% beta-TCP or 100% beta-TCP) were embedded in PGCAP and grown in presence or not of osteogenic induction medium for 21 days. Biomaterials were then implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient mice for 28 days. Effect of PGCAP on MSC was evaluated in vitro by proliferation and osteoblastic gene expression analysis and in vivo by histology and immunohistochemistry. We showed that PGCAP, compared to other platelet-derived products, allowed concentrating large amount of growth factors and cytokines which promoted MSC and osteoprogenitor proliferation. Next, we found that PGCAP improves the proliferation of MSC and osteogenic-induced MSC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PGCAP up-regulates the mRNA expression of osteogenic markers (Collagen type I, Osteonectin, Osteopontin and Runx2). In vivo, type I collagen expressed in ectopic bone-like tissue was highly enhanced in biomaterials embedded in PGCAP in the absence of osteogenic pre-induction. Better results were obtained with 65% hydroxyapatite/35% beta-TCP biomaterials as compared to 100% beta-TCP. We have demonstrated that PGCAP is able to enhance in vitro MSC proliferation, osteoblastic differentiation and in vivo bone formation in the absence of osteogenic pre-induction. This clinically adaptable platelet glue could be of interest for improving bone repair.

  6. Strontium borate glass: potential biomaterial for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, H B; Zhao, X L; Zhang, X; Zhang, K B; Li, L C; Li, Z Y; Lam, W M; Lu, W W; Wang, D P; Huang, W H; Lin, K L; Chang, J

    2010-07-06

    Boron plays important roles in many life processes including embryogenesis, bone growth and maintenance, immune function and psychomotor skills. Thus, the delivery of boron by the degradation of borate glass is of special interest in biomedical applications. However, the cytotoxicity of borate glass which arises with the rapid release of boron has to be carefully considered. In this study, it was found that the incorporation of strontium into borate glass can not only moderate the rapid release of boron, but also induce the adhesion of osteoblast-like cells, SaOS-2, thus significantly increasing the cyto-compatibility of borate glass. The formation of multilayers of apatite with porous structure indicates that complete degradation is optimistic, and the spread of SaOS-2 covered by apatite to form a sandwich structure may induce bone-like tissue formation at earlier stages. Therefore, such novel strontium-incorporated borosilicate may act as a new generation of biomaterial for bone regeneration, which not only renders boron as a nutritious element for bone health, but also delivers strontium to stimulate formation of new bones.

  7. Bone grafting with granular biomaterial in segmental maxillary osteotomy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orion Luiz Haas Junior

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the first report of bone grafting with a granular biomaterial in segmental maxillary osteotomy. Successful formation of new bone with density greater than that of the surrounding tissue was achieved, preventing pseudarthrosis and postoperative instability.

  8. Characterization of powdered fish heads for bone graft biomaterial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteyaka, Mustafa Ozgür; Unal, Hasan Hüseyin; Bilici, Namık; Taşçı, Eda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the chemical composition, morphology and crystallography of powdered fish heads of the species Argyrosomus regius for bone graft biomaterial applications. Two sizes of powder were prepared by different grinding methods; Powder A (coarse, d50=68.5 µm) and Powder B (fine, d50=19.1 µm). Samples were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetry (TG), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The powder was mainly composed of aragonite (CaCO3) and calcite (CaCO3). The XRD pattern of Powder A and B matched standard aragonite and calcite patterns. In addition, the calcium oxide (CaO) phase was found after the calcination of Powder A. Thermogravimetry analysis confirmed total mass losses of 43.6% and 47.3% in Powders A and B, respectively. The microstructure of Powder A was mainly composed of different sizes and tubular shape, whereas Powder B showed agglomerated particles. The high quantity of CaO and other oxides resemble the chemical composition of bone. In general, the powder can be considered as bone graft after transformation to hydroxyapatite phase.

  9. Cell-based and biomaterial approaches to connective tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalling, Simone Suzette

    Connective tissue injuries of skin, tendon and ligament, heal by a reparative process in adults, filling the wound site with fibrotic, disorganized scar tissue that poorly reflects normal tissue architecture or function. Conversely, fetal skin and tendon have been shown to heal scarlessly. Complete regeneration is not intrinsically ubiquitous to all fetal tissues; fetal diaphragmatic and gastrointestinal injuries form scars. In vivo studies suggest that the presence of fetal fibroblasts is essential for scarless healing. In the orthopaedic setting, adult anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) heals poorly; however, little is known about the regenerative capacity of fetal ACL or fetal ACL fibroblasts. We characterized in vitro wound healing properties of fetal and adult ACL fibroblasts demonstrating that fetal ACL fibroblasts migrate faster and elaborate greater quantities of type I collagen, suggesting the healing potential of the fetal ACL may not be intrinsically poor. Similar to fetal ACL fibroblasts, fetal dermal fibroblasts also exhibit robust cellular properties. We investigated the age-dependent effects of dermal fibroblasts on tendon-to-bone healing in rat supraspinatus tendon injuries, a reparative injury model. We hypothesized delivery of fetal dermal fibroblasts would increase tissue organization and mechanical properties in comparison to adult dermal fibroblasts. However, at 1 and 8 weeks, the presence of dermal fibroblasts, either adult or fetal, had no significant effect on tissue histology or mechanical properties. There was a decreasing trend in cross-sectional area of repaired tendons treated with fetal dermal fibroblasts in comparison to adult, but this finding was not significant in comparison to controls. Finally, we synthesized a novel polysaccharide, methacrylated methylcellulose (MA-MC), and fabricated hydrogels using a well-established photopolymerization technique. We characterized the physical and mechanical properties of MA-MC hydrogels in

  10. "Repair of cranial bone defects using endochondral bone matrix gelatin in rat "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Sobhani A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone matrix gelatin (BMG has been used for bone induction intramuscularly and subcutaneously by many investigators since 1965. More recently, some of the researchers have used BMG particles for bone repair and reported various results. In present study for evaluation of bone induction and new bone formation in parital defects, BMG particles were used in five groups of rats. The BMG was prepared as previously described using urist method. The defects wee produced with 5 –mm diameter in pariteal bones and filled by BMG particles. No BMG was used in control group.For evaluation of new bone formation and repair, the specimens were harvested on days 7 , 14 , 21 and 28 after operation. The samples were processed histologically, stained by H& E, alizarin red S staining, and Alcian blue, and studied by a light microscope.The results are as follows:In control group: Twenty-eight days after operation a narrow rim of new bone was detectable attached to the edge of defect.In BMG groups: At day 7 after operation young chondroblast cells appeared in whole area of defect. At 14th day after operation hypertrophic chondrocytes showed by Alcian blue staining and calcified cartilage were detectable by Alizarin red S staining. The numerous trabeculae spicules, early adult osteocytes and highly proliferated red bone marrow well developed on dayd 21 . finally typic bone trabeculae with regulated osteoblast cells and some osteoclast cells were detectable at day 28 after operation. In conclusion,BMG could stimulate bone induction and new bone formation in bony defects. So, it seems that BMG could be a godd biomaterial substance for new bone inducation in bone defects

  11. BoneSource hydroxyapatite cement: a novel biomaterial for craniofacial skeletal tissue engineering and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, C D; Costantino, P D; Takagi, S; Chow, L C

    1998-01-01

    BoneSource-hydroxyapatite cement is a new self-setting calcium phosphate cement biomaterial. Its unique and innovative physical chemistry coupled with enhanced biocompatibility make it useful for craniofacial skeletal reconstruction. The general properties and clinical use guidelines are reviewed. The biomaterial and surgical applications offer insight into improved outcomes and potential new uses for hydroxyapatite cement systems.

  12. A Bone-Implant Interaction Mouse Model for Evaluating Molecular Mechanism of Biomaterials/Bone Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenlong; Dan, Xiuli; Wang, Ting; Lu, William W; Pan, Haobo

    2016-11-01

    The development of an optimal animal model that could provide fast assessments of the interaction between bone and orthopedic implants is essential for both preclinical and theoretical researches in the design of novel biomaterials. Compared with other animal models, mice have superiority in accessing the well-developed transgenic modification techniques (e.g., cell tracing, knockoff, knockin, and so on), which serve as powerful tools in studying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we introduced the establishment of a mouse model, which was specifically tailored for the assessment of bone-implant interaction in a load-bearing bone marrow microenvironment and could potentially allow the molecular mechanism study of biomaterials by using transgenic technologies. The detailed microsurgery procedures for developing a bone defect (Φ = 0.8 mm) at the metaphysis region of the mouse femur were recorded. According to our results, the osteoconductive and osseointegrative properties of a well-studied 45S5 bioactive glass were confirmed by utilizing our mouse model, verifying the reliability of this model. The feasibility and reliability of the present model were further checked by using other materials as objects of study. Furthermore, our results indicated that this animal model provided a more homogeneous tissue-implant interacting surface than the rat at the early stage of implantation and this is quite meaningful for conducting quantitative analysis. The availability of transgenic techniques to mechanism study of biomaterials was further testified by establishing our model on Nestin-GFP transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the distribution of Nestin + cells was demonstrated to be recruited to the surface of 45S5 glass as early as 3 days postsurgery, indicating that Nestin + lineage stem cells may participate in the subsequent regeneration process. In summary, the bone-implant interaction mouse model could serve as a potential candidate to evaluate the early stage tissue

  13. Chitosan(PEO)/silica hybrid nanofibers as a potential biomaterial for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toskas, Georgios; Cherif, Chokri; Hund, Rolf-Dieter; Laourine, Ezzeddine; Mahltig, Boris; Fahmi, Amir; Heinemann, Christiane; Hanke, Thomas

    2013-05-15

    New hybrid nanofibers prepared with chitosan (CTS), containing a total amount of polyethylene oxide (PEO) down to 3.6wt.%, and silica precursors were produced by electrospinning. The solution of modified sol-gel particles contained tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and the organosilane 3-glycidyloxypropyltriethoxysilane (GPTEOS). This is rending stable solution toward gelation and contributing in covalent bonding with chitosan. The fibers encompass advantages of biocompatible polymer template silicate components to form self-assembled core-shell structure of the polymer CTS/PEO encapsulated by the silica. Potential applicability of this hybrid material to bone tissue engineering was studied examining its cellular compatibility and bioactivity. The nanofiber matrices were proved cytocompatible when seeded with bone-forming 7F2-cells, promoting attachment and proliferation over 7 days. These found to enhance a fast apatite formation by incorporation of Ca(2+) ions and subsequent immersion in modified simulated body fluid (m-SBF). The tunable properties of these hybrid nanofibers can find applications as active biomaterials in bone repair and regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Current Therapeutic Strategies for Adipose Tissue Defects/Repair Using Engineered Biomaterials and Biomolecule Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Mahoney

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineered scaffolds for adipose restoration/repair has significantly evolved in recent years. Patients requiring soft tissue reconstruction, caused by defects or pathology, require biomaterials that will restore void volume with new functional tissue. The gold standard of autologous fat grafting (AFG is not a reliable option. This review focuses on the latest therapeutic strategies for the treatment of adipose tissue defects using biomolecule formulations and delivery, and specifically engineered biomaterials. Additionally, the clinical need for reliable off-the-shelf therapies, animal models, and challenges facing current technologies are discussed.

  15. Current Therapeutic Strategies for Adipose Tissue Defects/Repair Using Engineered Biomaterials and Biomolecule Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Christopher M; Imbarlina, Cayla; Yates, Cecelia C; Marra, Kacey G

    2018-01-01

    Tissue engineered scaffolds for adipose restoration/repair has significantly evolved in recent years. Patients requiring soft tissue reconstruction, caused by defects or pathology, require biomaterials that will restore void volume with new functional tissue. The gold standard of autologous fat grafting (AFG) is not a reliable option. This review focuses on the latest therapeutic strategies for the treatment of adipose tissue defects using biomolecule formulations and delivery, and specifically engineered biomaterials. Additionally, the clinical need for reliable off-the-shelf therapies, animal models, and challenges facing current technologies are discussed.

  16. Preparation of hybrid biomaterials for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Conceição Costa

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering has evolved from the use of biomaterials for bone substitution that fulfill the clinical demands of biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-immunogeneity, structural strength and porosity. Porous scaffolds have been developed in many forms and materials, but few reached the need of adequate physical, biological and mechanical properties. In the present paper we report the preparation of hybrid porous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/bioactive glass through the sol-gel route, using partially and fully hydrolyzed polyvinyl alcohol, and perform structural characterization. Hybrids containing PVA and bioactive glass with composition 58SiO2-33CaO-9P2O5 were synthesized by foaming a mixture of polymer solution and bioactive glass sol-gel precursor solution. Sol-gel solution was prepared from mixing tetraethoxysilane (TEOS, triethylphosphate (TEP, and calcium chloride as chemical precursors. The hybrid composites obtained after aging and drying at low temperature were chemically and morphologically characterized through infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The degree of hydrolysis of PVA, concentration of PVA solution and different PVA-bioglass composition ratios affect the synthesis procedure. Synthesis parameters must be very well combined in order to allow foaming and gelation. The hybrid scaffolds obtained exhibited macroporous structure with pore size varying from 50 to 600 µm.

  17. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the marine sponge skeleton as a bone mimicking biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Samit K; Kundu, Biswanath; Mahato, Arnab; Thakur, Narsinh L; Joardar, Siddhartha N; Mandal, Biman B

    2015-02-01

    This investigation was carried out to identify and characterize marine sponges as potential bioscaffolds in bone tissue engineering. The marine sponge (Biemna fortis) samples were collected from the rocky intertidal region of Anjuna, Goa, India, freeze-dried and converted to pure cristobalite at low temperature. After thorough evaluation of sponge samples by DTA-TGA thermography, XRD, FTIR, SEM and cell cytotoxicity by MTT assay, bare sponge scaffolds were fabricated by firing at 1190 °C. These scaffolds were loaded with growth factors (IGF-1 and BMP-2), checked for quasi-dynamic in vitro release kinetics and finally implanted into femoral bone defects in rabbits for up to 90 days, by keeping an empty defect as a control. The in vivo bone healing process was evaluated and compared using chronological radiology, histology, SEM and fluorochrome labeling studies. SEM revealed that the sponge skeleton possesses a collagenous fibrous network consisting of highly internetworked porosity in the size range of 10-220 μm. XRD and FTIR analysis showed a cristobalite phase with acicular crystals of high aspect ratio, and crystallinity was found to increase from 725 to 1190 °C. MTT assay demonstrated the non-cytotoxicity of the samples. A combination of burst and sustained release profile was noticed for both the growth factors and about 74.3% and 83% total release at day 28. In the radiological, histological, scanning electron microscopy and fluorochrome labeling analysis, the IGF-1 impregnated converted sponge scaffold promoted excellent osseous tissue formation followed by the BMP-2 loaded and bare one. These observations suggest that the marine sponge alone and in combination with growth factors is a promising biomaterial for bone repair and bone augmentation.

  18. Titanium biomaterials with complex surfaces induced aberrant peripheral circadian rhythms in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Nathaniel; McCarville, Kirstin; Morinaga, Kenzo; Mengatto, Cristiane M; Langfelder, Peter; Hokugo, Akishige; Tahara, Yu; Colwell, Christopher S; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms maintain a high level of homeostasis through internal feed-forward and -backward regulation by core molecules. In this study, we report the highly unusual peripheral circadian rhythm of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) induced by titanium-based biomaterials with complex surface modifications (Ti biomaterial) commonly used for dental and orthopedic implants. When cultured on Ti biomaterials, human BMSCs suppressed circadian PER1 expression patterns, while NPAS2 was uniquely upregulated. The Ti biomaterials, which reduced Per1 expression and upregulated Npas2, were further examined with BMSCs harvested from Per1::luc transgenic rats. Next, we addressed the regulatory relationship between Per1 and Npas2 using BMSCs from Npas2 knockout mice. The Npas2 knockout mutation did not rescue the Ti biomaterial-induced Per1 suppression and did not affect Per2, Per3, Bmal1 and Clock expression, suggesting that the Ti biomaterial-induced Npas2 overexpression was likely an independent phenomenon. Previously, vitamin D deficiency was reported to interfere with Ti biomaterial osseointegration. The present study demonstrated that vitamin D supplementation significantly increased Per1::luc expression in BMSCs, though the presence of Ti biomaterials only moderately affected the suppressed Per1::luc expression. Available in vivo microarray data from femurs exposed to Ti biomaterials in vitamin D-deficient rats were evaluated by weighted gene co-expression network analysis. A large co-expression network containing Npas2, Bmal1, and Vdr was observed to form with the Ti biomaterials, which was disintegrated by vitamin D deficiency. Thus, the aberrant BMSC peripheral circadian rhythm may be essential for the integration of Ti biomaterials into bone.

  19. Bone Repair and Military Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    yl) propyl ]trimethoxysilane (3TOSU); and 2-(3,4-epoxycyclohexyl)- ethyltrimethoxysilane (ECHE). SilMix [1:1 combination of bis[2-(3{7- oxabicyclo...dissertation entitled, " Synthesis and Analysis of Siloranes for use as a Biomaterial and Extended Twisted Molecular Ribbons" in December 2013. He was...BCIP (5-bromo-4- chloro-3-indolyl phosphate) in ALP buffer (100 mM sodium chloride , 5 mM magnesium chloride , 100 mM Tris-HCl, pH 9.5) was added to the

  20. Bone fracture repair - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the following methods: a) one or more screws inserted across the break to hold it. b) a steel plate held by screws drilled into the bone. c) a long fluted metal pin with holes in it, is driven down the shaft of the bone ...

  1. Laser-activated nano-biomaterials for tissue repair and controlled drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Rossi, F; Pini, R

    2014-01-01

    We present recent achievements of minimally invasive welding of biological tissue and controlled drug release based on laser-activated nano-biomaterials. In particular, we consider new advancements in the biomedical application of near-IR absorbing gold nano-chromophores as an original solution for the photothermal repair of surgical incisions and as nanotriggers of controlled drug release from hybrid biopolymer scaffolds. (laser biophotonics)

  2. Alterations of the subchondral bone in osteochondral repair – translational data and clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Orth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Alterations of the subchondral bone are pathological features associated with spontaneous osteochondral repair following an acute injury and with articular cartilage repair procedures. The aim of this review is to discuss their incidence, extent and relevance, focusing on recent knowledge gained from both translational models and clinical studies of articular cartilage repair. Efforts to unravel the complexity of subchondral bone alterations have identified (1 the upward migration of the subchondral bone plate, (2 the formation of intralesional osteophytes, (3 the appearance of subchondral bone cysts, and (4 the impairment of the osseous microarchitecture as potential problems. Their incidence and extent varies among the different small and large animal models of cartilage repair, operative principles, and over time. When placed in the context of recent clinical investigations, these deteriorations of the subchondral bone likely are an additional, previously underestimated, factor that influences the long-term outcome of cartilage repair strategies. Understanding the role of the subchondral bone in both experimental and clinical articular cartilage repair thus holds great promise of being translated into further improved cell- or biomaterial-based techniques to preserve and restore the entire osteochondral unit.

  3. Biochemical changes on the repair of surgical bone defects grafted with biphasic synthetic micro-granular HA + β-tricalcium phosphate induced by laser and LED phototherapies assessed by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B.; Soares, Luiz Guilherme P.; Marques, Aparecida Maria C.; Silveira, Landulfo

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed the assessment of the biochemical changes during bone mineralization induced by laser and LED irradiation in an animal model of bone repair using a spectral model based on Raman spectroscopy. Six groups were studied: Clot, Laser (λ780 nm, 70 mW), LED (λ850 nm +/- 10 nm, 150 mW), Biomaterial (biphasic synthetic microgranular hydroxyapatite (HA) + β-tricalcium phosphate), Laser + Biomaterial and LED + Biomaterial. When indicated, defects were further irradiated at 48 h interval during 2 wks, 20 J/cm2 per session. At 15th and 30th days, femurs were dissected and spectra of the defects were collected. Raman spectra were submitted to a model to estimate the relative amount of collagen, phosphate HA and carbonate HA, by using spectra of pure collagen, biomaterial and basal bone, respectively. At 15th days, the use of biomaterial associated to phototherapy reduced the collagen formation, whereas the amount of carbonate HA was not different in all groups. The phosphate HA was higher in the groups that received biomaterial grafts. At 30th days, it was observed an increase of collagen for the group Laser + Biomaterial, and a reduction in the carbonate HA for the LED + Biomaterial. The phosphate HA was higher for the groups LED + Biomaterial and Laser + Biomaterial, while decreased for the group Biomaterial. These results indicated that the use of Laser and LED phototherapies improved the repair of bone defects grafted with the biomaterial by increasing the collagen deposition and phosphate HA.

  4. Consortium for Bone and Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    develop the next generation of biomaterials and biosensors. • Developing joint programs to train the next generation of biomedical and biomaterials...nonunions. Clin Orthop Relat Res 205:299-308. Wolfe SA (1982). Autogenous bone grafts versus alloplastic material in maxillofacial surgery. Clin Plast

  5. Biomaterials and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anu; Sharma, Gayatri

    2018-05-01

    There is a growing demand for novel biomaterials for the replacement and repairing of soft and hard tissues such as bones, cartilage and blood vessels, decaying teeth, arthritic hips, injured tissues or even entire organs. The main aim of biomaterial research is to find the appropriate combination of chemical and physical properties matched with tissues replaced in the host. It improves the quality of life. On increasing number of people each year with increasing demands on these materials with higher expectations related to quality of life arising from an aging population. Now a day there is an ever-increasing search for novel biomaterials as the material requirements for complex biomedical devices increases with time. Many materials such as metals, ceramics, polymers, and glasses are being investigated as biomaterials. They are very useful in various fields due to their excellent bioactivity and biocompatibility. This paper includes various eco-friendly biomaterials and their application in various fields.

  6. A degradable soybean-based biomaterial used effectively as a bone filler in vivo in a rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merolli, Antonio [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The Catholic University in Rome, Complesso Columbus, via Moscati 31, 00168 Rome (Italy); Nicolais, Luigi; Ambrosio, Luigi [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Piazzale Tecchio 80, 80130 Napoli (Italy); Santin, Matteo [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, Cockcroft Building, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4 GJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The 'gold standard' for bone filling is currently the bone autograft, but its use is limited by material availability and by the possible risks of infection or other donor site morbidity. Materials proposed so far as bone fillers do not show all the characteristics which are desirable. These are (a) osteoconductivity, (b) controlled biodegradation and (c) ease of adaptation to the implantation site. Recently, a new class of biodegradable material based on soybeans has been presented which shows good mechanical properties and an intrinsic bioactivity on inflammatory and tissue cells in vitro. The authors investigated the morphology in vivo of bone response in repairing a surgical lesion in the presence of granules of a novel soybean-based biomaterial (SB), comparing it with a sham-operated contralateral lesion of critical size (non-healing model); 26 operations were performed in New Zealand White rabbits, with back scattered electron microscopy as the analysis technique of choice. Implantation of SB granules over 8 weeks produced bone repair with features distinct from those obtained by healing in a non-treated defect. New and progressively maturing trabeculae appeared in the animal group where SB granules were implanted, while sham operation produced only a rim of pseudo-cortical bone still featuring a large defect. The trabeculae forming in the presence of SB granules had features typical of reticular bone. These findings suggest that the bone regeneration potential of SB granules and their intrinsic bioactivity, combined with their relatively easy and cost-effective preparation procedures, make them suitable candidates as a bone filler in clinical applications.

  7. A degradable soybean-based biomaterial used effectively as a bone filler in vivo in a rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merolli, Antonio; Nicolais, Luigi; Ambrosio, Luigi; Santin, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    The 'gold standard' for bone filling is currently the bone autograft, but its use is limited by material availability and by the possible risks of infection or other donor site morbidity. Materials proposed so far as bone fillers do not show all the characteristics which are desirable. These are (a) osteoconductivity, (b) controlled biodegradation and (c) ease of adaptation to the implantation site. Recently, a new class of biodegradable material based on soybeans has been presented which shows good mechanical properties and an intrinsic bioactivity on inflammatory and tissue cells in vitro. The authors investigated the morphology in vivo of bone response in repairing a surgical lesion in the presence of granules of a novel soybean-based biomaterial (SB), comparing it with a sham-operated contralateral lesion of critical size (non-healing model); 26 operations were performed in New Zealand White rabbits, with back scattered electron microscopy as the analysis technique of choice. Implantation of SB granules over 8 weeks produced bone repair with features distinct from those obtained by healing in a non-treated defect. New and progressively maturing trabeculae appeared in the animal group where SB granules were implanted, while sham operation produced only a rim of pseudo-cortical bone still featuring a large defect. The trabeculae forming in the presence of SB granules had features typical of reticular bone. These findings suggest that the bone regeneration potential of SB granules and their intrinsic bioactivity, combined with their relatively easy and cost-effective preparation procedures, make them suitable candidates as a bone filler in clinical applications.

  8. New injectable elastomeric biomaterials for hernia repair and their biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrobot, J; Zair, L; Ostrowski, M; El Fray, M

    2016-01-01

    Complications associated with implantation of polymeric hernia meshes remain a difficult surgical challenge. We report here on our work, developing for the first time, an injectable viscous material that can be converted to a solid and elastic implant in vivo, thus successfully closing herniated tissue. In this study, long-chain fatty acids were used for the preparation of telechelic macromonomers end-capped with methacrylic functionalities to provide UV curable systems possessing high biocompatibility, good mechanical strength and flexibility. Two different systems, comprising urethane and ester bonds, were synthesized from non-toxic raw materials and then subjected to UV curing after injection of viscous material into the cavity at the abdominal wall during hernioplasty in a rabbit hernia model. No additional fixation or sutures were required. The control group of animals was treated with commercially available polypropylene hernia mesh. The observation period lasted for 28 days. We show here that artificially fabricated defect was healed and no reherniation was observed in the case of the fatty acid derived materials. Importantly, the number of inflammatory cells found in the surrounding tissue was comparable to these found around the standard polypropylene mesh. No inflammatory cells were detected in connective tissues and no sign of necrosis has been observed. Collectively, our results demonstrated that new injectable and photocurable systems can be used for minimally invasive surgical protocols in repair of small hernia defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Improved repair of bone defects with prevascularized tissue-engineered bones constructed in a perfusion bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, De-Qiang; Li, Ming; Liu, Pei-Lai; Zhang, Yuan-Kai; Lu, Jian-Xi; Li, Jian-Min

    2014-10-01

    Vascularization of tissue-engineered bones is critical to achieving satisfactory repair of bone defects. The authors investigated the use of prevascularized tissue-engineered bone for repairing bone defects. The new bone was greater in the prevascularized group than in the non-vascularized group, indicating that prevascularized tissue-engineered bone improves the repair of bone defects. [Orthopedics. 2014; 37(10):685-690.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Reconstruction of radial bone defect in rat by calcium silicate biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, Ahmad; Alidadi, Soodeh

    2018-05-15

    Despite many attempts, an appropriate therapeutic method has not yet been found to enhance bone formation, mechanical strength and structural and functional performances of large bone defects. In the present study, the bone regenerative potential of calcium silicate (CS) biomaterials combined with chitosan (CH) as calcium silicate/chitosan (CSC) scaffold was investigated in a critical radial bone defect in a rat model. The bioimplants were bilaterally implanted in the defects of 20 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were euthanized and the bone specimens were harvested at the 56th postoperative day. The healed radial bones were evaluated by three-dimensional CT, radiology, histomorphometric analysis, biomechanics, and scanning electron microscopy. The XRD analysis of the CS biomaterial showed its similarity to wollastonite (β-SiCO 3 ). The degradation rate of the CSC scaffold was much higher and it induced milder inflammatory reaction when compared to the CH alone. More bone formation and higher biomechanical performance were observed in the CSC treated group in comparison with the CH treated ones in histological, CT scan and biomechanical examinations. Scanning electron microscopic observation demonstrated the formation of more hydroxyapatite crystals in the defects treated with CSC. This study showed that the CSC biomaterials could be used as proper biodegradable materials in the field of bone reconstruction and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immobilization of Murine Anti-BMP-2 Monoclonal Antibody on Various Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Ansari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials are widely used as scaffolds for tissue engineering. We have developed a strategy for bone tissue engineering that entails application of immobilized anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to capture endogenous BMPs in vivo and promote antibody-mediated osseous regeneration (AMOR. The purpose of the current study was to compare the efficacy of immobilization of a specific murine anti-BMP-2 mAb on three different types of biomaterials and to evaluate their suitability as scaffolds for AMOR. Anti-BMP-2 mAb or isotype control mAb was immobilized on titanium (Ti microbeads, alginate hydrogel, and ACS. The treated biomaterials were surgically implanted in rat critical-sized calvarial defects. After 8 weeks, de novo bone formation was assessed using micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses. Results showed de novo bone regeneration with all three scaffolds with immobilized anti-BMP-2 mAb, but not isotype control mAb. Ti microbeads showed the highest volume of bone regeneration, followed by ACS. Alginate showed the lowest volume of bone. Localization of BMP-2, -4, and -7 antigens was detected on all 3 scaffolds with immobilized anti-BMP-2 mAb implanted in calvarial defects. Altogether, these data suggested a potential mechanism for bone regeneration through entrapment of endogenous BMP-2, -4, and -7 proteins leading to bone formation using different types of scaffolds via AMOR.

  12. Biology and augmentation of tendon-bone insertion repair

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, PPY; Zhang, P; Chan, KM; Qin, L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Surgical reattachment of tendon and bone such as in rotator cuff repair, patellar-patella tendon repair and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction often fails due to the failure of regeneration of the specialized tissue ("enthesis") which connects tendon to bone. Tendon-to-bone healing taking place between inhomogenous tissues is a slow process compared to healing within homogenous tissue, such as tendon to tendon or bone to bone healing. Therefore special attention must be ...

  13. Muscle as an osteoinductive niche for local bone formation with the use of a biphasic calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite biomaterial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raina, D. B.; Gupta, A.; Petersen, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We have observed clinical cases where bone is formed in the overlaying muscle covering surgically created bone defects treated with a hydroxyapatite/calcium sulphate biomaterial. Our objective was to investigate the osteoinductive potential of the biomaterial and to determine if growth...... factors secreted from local bone cells induce osteoblastic differentiation of muscle cells. Materials and Methods: We seeded mouse skeletal muscle cells C2C12 on the hydroxyapatite/calcium sulphate biomaterial and the phenotype of the cells was analysed. To mimic surgical conditions with leakage of extra...

  14. Biomaterial delivery of morphogens to mimic the natural healing cascade in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Manav; Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Duda, Georg N; Mooney, David J

    2012-09-01

    Complications in treatment of large bone defects using bone grafting still remain. Our understanding of the endogenous bone regeneration cascade has inspired the exploration of a wide variety of growth factors (GFs) in an effort to mimic the natural signaling that controls bone healing. Biomaterial-based delivery of single exogenous GFs has shown therapeutic efficacy, and this likely relates to its ability to recruit and promote replication of cells involved in tissue development and the healing process. However, as the natural bone healing cascade involves the action of multiple factors, each acting in a specific spatiotemporal pattern, strategies aiming to mimic the critical aspects of this process will likely benefit from the usage of multiple therapeutic agents. This article reviews the current status of approaches to deliver single GFs, as well as ongoing efforts to develop sophisticated delivery platforms to deliver multiple lineage-directing morphogens (multiple GFs) during bone healing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A tissue regeneration approach to bone and cartilage repair

    CERN Document Server

    Dunstan, Colin; Rosen, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing exhaustively the current state of the art of tissue engineering strategies for regenerating bones and joints through the use of biomaterials, growth factors and stem cells, along with an investigation of the interactions between biomaterials, bone cells, growth factors and added stem cells and how together skeletal tissues can be optimised, this book serves to highlight the importance of biomaterials composition, surface topography, architectural and mechanical properties in providing support for tissue regeneration. Maximizing reader insights into the importance of the interplay of these attributes with bone cells (osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts) and cartilage cells (chondrocytes), this book also provides a detailed reference as to how key signalling pathways are activated. The contribution of growth factors to drive tissue regeneration and stem cell recruitment is discussed along with a review the potential and challenges of adult or embryonic mesenchymal stem cells to further enhance the...

  16. [Progress of Masquelet technique to repair bone defect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qudong; Sun, Zhenzhong; Gu, Sanjun

    2013-10-01

    To summarize the progress of Masquelet technique to repair bone defect. The recent literature concerning the application of Masquelet technique to repair bone defect was extensively reviewed and summarized. Masquelet technique involves a two-step procedure. First, bone cement is used to fill the bone defect after a thorough debridement, and an induced membrane structure surrounding the spacer formed; then the bone cement is removed after 6-8 weeks, and rich cancellous bone is implanted into the induced membrane. Massive cortical bone defect is repaired by new bone forming and consolidation. Experiments show that the induced membrane has vascular system and is also rich in vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta1, bone morphogenetic protein 2, and bone progenitor cells, so it has osteoinductive property; satisfactory results have been achieved in clinical application of almost all parts of defects, various types of bone defect and massive defect up to 25 cm long. Compared with other repair methods, Masquelet technique has the advantages of reliable effect, easy to operate, few complications, low requirements for recipient site, and wide application. Masquelet technique is an effective method to repair bone defect and is suitable for various types of bone defect, especially for bone defects caused by infection and tumor resection.

  17. Biodegradable Magnesium Alloys Developed as Bone Repair Materials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone repair materials are rapidly becoming a hot topic in the field of biomedical materials due to being an important means of repairing human bony deficiencies and replacing hard tissue. Magnesium (Mg alloys are potentially biocompatible, osteoconductive, and biodegradable metallic materials that can be used in bone repair due to their in situ degradation in the body, mechanical properties similar to those of bones, and ability to positively stimulate the formation of new bones. However, rapid degradation of these materials in physiological environments may lead to gas cavities, hemolysis, and osteolysis and thus, hinder their clinical orthopedic applications. This paper reviews recent work on the use of Mg alloy implants in bone repair. Research to date on alloy design, surface modification, and biological performance of Mg alloys is comprehensively summarized. Future challenges for and developments in biomedical Mg alloys for use in bone repair are also discussed.

  18. Giant cells around bone biomaterials: Osteoclasts or multi-nucleated giant cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Richard J; Zohdi, Hamoon; Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Bosshardt, Dieter D

    2016-12-01

    Recently accumulating evidence has put into question the role of large multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) around bone biomaterials. While cells derived from the monocyte/macrophage lineage are one of the first cell types in contact with implanted biomaterials, it was originally thought that specifically in bone tissues, all giant cells were bone-resorbing osteoclasts whereas foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) were found associated with a connective tissue foreign body reaction resulting in fibrous encapsulation and/or material rejection. Despite the great majority of bone grafting materials routinely found with large osteoclasts, a special subclass of bone biomaterials has more recently been found surrounded by large giant cells virtually incapable of resorbing bone grafts even years after their implantation. While original hypotheses believed that a 'foreign body reaction' may be taking place, histological data retrieved from human samples years after their implantation have put these original hypotheses into question by demonstrating better and more stable long-term bone volume around certain bone grafts. Exactly how or why this 'special' subclass of giant cells is capable of maintaining long-term bone volume, or methods to scientifically distinguish them from osteoclasts remains extremely poorly studied. The aim of this review article was to gather the current available literature on giant cell markers and differences in expression patterns between osteoclasts and MNGCs utilizing 19 specific markers including an array of CD-cell surface markers. Furthermore, the concept of now distinguishing between pro-inflammatory M1-MNGCs (previously referred to as FBGCs) as well as wound-healing M2-MNGCs is introduced and discussed. This review article presents 19 specific cell-surface markers to distinguish between osteoclasts and MNGCs including an array of CD-cell surface markers. Furthermore, the concept of now distinguishing between pro-inflammatory M1-MNGCs (often

  19. Strategies to engineer tendon/ligament-to-bone interface: Biomaterials, cells and growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font Tellado, Sonia; Balmayor, Elizabeth R; Van Griensven, Martijn

    2015-11-01

    Integration between tendon/ligament and bone occurs through a specialized tissue interface called enthesis. The complex and heterogeneous structure of the enthesis is essential to ensure smooth mechanical stress transfer between bone and soft tissues. Following injury, the interface is not regenerated, resulting in high rupture recurrence rates. Tissue engineering is a promising strategy for the regeneration of a functional enthesis. However, the complex structural and cellular composition of the native interface makes enthesis tissue engineering particularly challenging. Thus, it is likely that a combination of biomaterials and cells stimulated with appropriate biochemical and mechanical cues will be needed. The objective of this review is to describe the current state-of-the-art, challenges and future directions in the field of enthesis tissue engineering focusing on four key parameters: (1) scaffold and biomaterials, (2) cells, (3) growth factors and (4) mechanical stimuli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An animal model in sheep for biocompatibility testing of biomaterials in cancellous bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Katja M R; Auer, Joerg A; Boos, Alois; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2006-08-15

    The past years have seen the development of many synthetic bone replacements. To test their biocompatibility and ability for osseointegration, osseoinduction and -conduction requires their placement within bone preferably in an animal experiment of a higher species. A suitable experimental animal model in sheep with drill holes of 8 mm diameter and 13 mm depth within the proximal and distal humerus and femur for testing biocompatibility issues is introduced. This present sheep model allows the placing of up to 8 different test materials within one animal and because of the standardization of the bone defect, routine evaluation by means of histomorphometry is easily conducted. This method was used successfully in 66 White Alpine Sheep. When the drill holes were correctly placed no complications such as spontaneous fractures were encountered. This experimental animal model serves an excellent basis for testing the biocompatibility of novel biomaterials to be used as bone replacement or new bone formation enhancing materials.

  1. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa'ad, Farah; Giannì, Aldo Bruno; Giannobile, William V.; Rasperini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the quality of bone formation. To overcome the drawbacks of routinely employed grafting materials, bone graft substitutes such as 3D scaffolds have been recently investigated in the dental field. In this review, we highlight different biomaterials suitable for 3D scaffold fabrication, with a focus on “3D-printed” ones as bone graft substitutes that might be convenient for various applications related to implant therapy. We also briefly discuss their possible adoption for periodontal regeneration. PMID:27366149

  2. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Asa’ad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the quality of bone formation. To overcome the drawbacks of routinely employed grafting materials, bone graft substitutes such as 3D scaffolds have been recently investigated in the dental field. In this review, we highlight different biomaterials suitable for 3D scaffold fabrication, with a focus on “3D-printed” ones as bone graft substitutes that might be convenient for various applications related to implant therapy. We also briefly discuss their possible adoption for periodontal regeneration.

  3. An animal model in sheep for biocompatibility testing of biomaterials in cancellous bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Katja MR; Auer, Joerg A; Boos, Alois; Rechenberg, Brigitte von

    2006-01-01

    Background The past years have seen the development of many synthetic bone replacements. To test their biocompatibility and ability for osseointegration, osseoinduction and -conduction requires their placement within bone preferably in an animal experiment of a higher species. Methods A suitable experimental animal model in sheep with drill holes of 8 mm diameter and 13 mm depth within the proximal and distal humerus and femur for testing biocompatibility issues is introduced. Results This present sheep model allows the placing of up to 8 different test materials within one animal and because of the standardization of the bone defect, routine evaluation by means of histomorphometry is easily conducted. This method was used successfully in 66 White Alpine Sheep. When the drill holes were correctly placed no complications such as spontaneous fractures were encountered. Conclusion This experimental animal model serves an excellent basis for testing the biocompatibility of novel biomaterials to be used as bone replacement or new bone formation enhancing materials. PMID:16911787

  4. Strontium borate glass: potential biomaterial for bone regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, H. B.; Zhao, X. L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, K. B.; Li, L. C.; Li, Z. Y.; Lam, W. M.; Lu, W. W.; Wang, D. P.; Huang, W. H.; Lin, K. L.; Chang, J.

    2009-01-01

    Boron plays important roles in many life processes including embryogenesis, bone growth and maintenance, immune function and psychomotor skills. Thus, the delivery of boron by the degradation of borate glass is of special interest in biomedical applications. However, the cytotoxicity of borate glass which arises with the rapid release of boron has to be carefully considered. In this study, it was found that the incorporation of strontium into borate glass can not only moderate the rapid relea...

  5. Piezoelectricity and absorption of water in biomaterials: bone and tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilardi Netto, T.

    1973-01-01

    A new application of the Fabry-Perot interferometer has been developed, capable of measuring variations in length with a precision of the order of one angstrom. The method has been applied to the determination of some of the inverse piezoelectric coefficients of bovine bone and tendon. The effect of water in these materials was carefully measured and shown to decrease the piezoelectricity. Correlations between the piezoelectricity and length, weight, and volume and surface resistivity were made during the absorption of water [pt

  6. Hyperelastic "bone": A highly versatile, growth factor-free, osteoregenerative, scalable, and surgically friendly biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakus, Adam E; Rutz, Alexandra L; Jordan, Sumanas W; Kannan, Abhishek; Mitchell, Sean M; Yun, Chawon; Koube, Katie D; Yoo, Sung C; Whiteley, Herbert E; Richter, Claus-Peter; Galiano, Robert D; Hsu, Wellington K; Stock, Stuart R; Hsu, Erin L; Shah, Ramille N

    2016-09-28

    Despite substantial attention given to the development of osteoregenerative biomaterials, severe deficiencies remain in current products. These limitations include an inability to adequately, rapidly, and reproducibly regenerate new bone; high costs and limited manufacturing capacity; and lack of surgical ease of handling. To address these shortcomings, we generated a new, synthetic osteoregenerative biomaterial, hyperelastic "bone" (HB). HB, which is composed of 90 weight % (wt %) hydroxyapatite and 10 wt % polycaprolactone or poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), could be rapidly three-dimensionally (3D) printed (up to 275 cm(3)/hour) from room temperature extruded liquid inks. The resulting 3D-printed HB exhibited elastic mechanical properties (~32 to 67% strain to failure, ~4 to 11 MPa elastic modulus), was highly absorbent (50% material porosity), supported cell viability and proliferation, and induced osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells cultured in vitro over 4 weeks without any osteo-inducing factors in the medium. We evaluated HB in vivo in a mouse subcutaneous implant model for material biocompatibility (7 and 35 days), in a rat posterolateral spinal fusion model for new bone formation (8 weeks), and in a large, non-human primate calvarial defect case study (4 weeks). HB did not elicit a negative immune response, became vascularized, quickly integrated with surrounding tissues, and rapidly ossified and supported new bone growth without the need for added biological factors. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Magnetic forces and magnetized biomaterials provide dynamic flux information during bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Alessandro; Bianchi, Michele; Sartori, Maria; Parrilli, Annapaola; Panseri, Silvia; Ortolani, Alessandro; Sandri, Monica; Boi, Marco; Salter, Donald M; Maltarello, Maria Cristina; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Dediu, Valentin; Tampieri, Anna; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-03-01

    The fascinating prospect to direct tissue regeneration by magnetic activation has been recently explored. In this study we investigate the possibility to boost bone regeneration in an experimental defect in rabbit femoral condyle by combining static magnetic fields and magnetic biomaterials. NdFeB permanent magnets are implanted close to biomimetic collagen/hydroxyapatite resorbable scaffolds magnetized according to two different protocols . Permanent magnet only or non-magnetic scaffolds are used as controls. Bone tissue regeneration is evaluated at 12 weeks from surgery from a histological, histomorphometric and biomechanical point of view. The reorganization of the magnetized collagen fibers under the effect of the static magnetic field generated by the permanent magnet produces a highly-peculiar bone pattern, with highly-interconnected trabeculae orthogonally oriented with respect to the magnetic field lines. In contrast, only partial defect healing is achieved within the control groups. We ascribe the peculiar bone regeneration to the transfer of micro-environmental information, mediated by collagen fibrils magnetized by magnetic nanoparticles, under the effect of the static magnetic field. These results open new perspectives on the possibility to improve implant fixation and control the morphology and maturity of regenerated bone providing "in site" forces by synergically combining static magnetic fields and biomaterials.

  8. Exercise enhance the ectopic bone formation of calcium phosphate biomaterials in muscles of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lijia; Yan, Shuo; Zhu, Jiang; Cai, Peiling; Wang, Ting; Shi, Zheng

    2017-08-01

    To investigate whether exercise can enhance ectopic bone formation of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) biomaterials in muscles of mice. Firstly, ten transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1) knockout mice (group KO) and ten C57BL/6 mice (group WT) were randomly chosen, 10μg Ca-P biomaterials were implanted into the thigh muscle pouch of each mouse which was far away from femur; after that, all animals were kept in open field for free exploration 5min, and the movement time and distance were automatically analyzed. Ten weeks later, the Ca-P samples were harvested for histological staining and immunochemistry. Secondly, the Ca-P biomaterials were implanted into the thigh muscle pouch of C57BL/6 mice the same as previous operation, and then randomly divided into two groups: running group and non-running group (n=10); in running group, all mice run 1h as a speed of 6m/h in a treadmill for 10weeks. Ten weeks later, the blood was collected to detect the interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-12 levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the samples were harvested for histological staining. In groups KO and WT, both the movement time and distance were significant higher in group KO than that in group WT (Pstronger athletic ability of mice, causing better osteoinductivity of Ca-P biomaterials both in TRPV1 -/- mice and running mice; according to this, we want to offer a proposal to patients who suffer from bone defects and artificial bone transplantation: do moderate exercise, don't convalesce all the time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Titanium-Based Biomaterials for Preventing Stress Shielding between Implant Devices and Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Niinomi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available β-type titanium alloys with low Young's modulus are required to inhibit bone atrophy and enhance bone remodeling for implants used to substitute failed hard tissue. At the same time, these titanium alloys are required to have high static and dynamic strength. On the other hand, metallic biomaterials with variable Young's modulus are required to satisfy the needs of both patients and surgeons, namely, low and high Young's moduli, respectively. In this paper, we have discussed effective methods to improve the static and dynamic strength while maintaining low Young's modulus for β-type titanium alloys used in biomedical applications. Then, the advantage of low Young's modulus of β-type titanium alloys in biomedical applications has been discussed from the perspective of inhibiting bone atrophy and enhancing bone remodeling. Further, we have discussed the development of β-type titanium alloys with a self-adjusting Young's modulus for use in removable implants.

  10. Bone regeneration: Biomaterials as local delivery systems with improved osteoinductive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Victor; Bettencourt, Ana

    2018-01-01

    Bone is a mineralized conjunctive tissue, with a unique trauma healing capability. However, the replacement or regeneration of lost bone is not always successful and becomes more difficult the wider the bone defect. A significant growth in the demand for orthopedic and maxillofacial surgical procedures as a result of population aging and increase in chronic diseases as diabetes is a fact and successful approaches for bone regeneration are still needed. Until today, autogenous bone graft continues to be the best solution even with important limitations, as quantity and the requirement of a donator area. Alternatively, local delivery systems combining an osteoconductive biomaterial with osteoinductive compounds as hormones, growth factors or drugs is a popular approach aiming to replace the need for autogenous bone grafts. Nevertheless, in spite of the intense research in the area, presently there is no system that can mimic all the biological functions of the autogenous bone grafts. In this context, the present work provides an overview of the most recent advances in the field of synthetic bone grafts. The opportunities and limitations are detailed along with the remaining gaps in the research that are still preventing the successful translation of more products into the market able to be a valuable option in comparison to the autogenous bone grafts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Diode λ830nm laser associated with hydroxyapatite and biological membranes: bone repair in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Vanda S. M.; Limeira, Francisco d. A.; Gerbi, Marleny E. M.; Menezes, Rebeca F. d.; Santos-Neto, Alexandrino P. d.; Araújo, Natália C.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to histologically assess the effect of laser therapy (AsGaAl, 830nm, 40mW, CW, φ ~0,6mm, 16J/cm2 per session, four points of 4J/cm2) on the repair of surgical defects created in the femur of Wistar rats. Background data: Several techniques have been proposed for the correction of bone defects, including the use of grafts and membranes. Despite the increase in the use of laser therapy for the biomodulation of bone repair, very few studies have assessed the associations between laser light and biomaterials. Method: The defects were filled with synthetic micro granular hydroxyapatite (HA) Gen-phos® implants and associated with bovine bone membranes (Gen-derm®). Surgical bone defects were created in 48 rats and divided into four groups: Group IA (control, n=12); Group IB (laser, n=12); Group IIA (HA + membrane, n=12); Group IIB (HA + membrane + laser, n=12). The irradiated groups received the first irradiation immediately after surgery. This radiation was then repeated seven times every 48h. The animals were sacrificed after 15, 21, and 30 days. Results: When comparing the groups irradiated with implants and membranes, it was found that the repair of the defects submitted to laser therapy occurred more quickly, starting 15 and 21 days after surgery. By the 30th day, the level of repair of the defects was similar in the irradiated and the non-irradiated groups. New bone formation was confirmed inside the cavity by the implant's osteoconduction. In the irradiated groups, there was an increment of this new bone formation. Conclusions: In conclusion, the use of laser therapy, particularly when associated with hydroxyapatite and biological membranes, produced a positive biomodulation effect on the healing process of bone defects on the femurs of rats.

  12. Experimental aspect of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biomaterials such as bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandan; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Sinha, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is increasingly becoming a popular technique to probe micro-structural details of biomaterial such as bone with pico-meter resolution. Due to high-resolution structural details probed by SSNMR methods, handling of bone samples and experimental protocol are very crucial aspects of study. We present here first report of the effect of various experimental protocols and handling methods of bone samples on measured SSNMR parameters. Various popular SSNMR experiments were performed on intact cortical bone sample collected from fresh animal, immediately after removal from animal systems, and results were compared with bone samples preserved in different conditions. We find that the best experimental conditions for SSNMR parameters of bones correspond to preservation at -20 °C and in 70% ethanol solution. Various other SSNMR parameters were compared corresponding to different experimental conditions. Our study has helped in finding best experimental protocol for SSNMR studies of bone. This study will be of further help in the application of SSNMR studies on large bone disease related animal model systems for statistically significant results. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Potential effects of a low-molecular-weight fucoidan extracted from brown algae on bone biomaterial osteoconductive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changotade, S Igondjo Tchen; Korb, G; Bassil, J; Barroukh, B; Willig, C; Colliec-Jouault, S; Durand, P; Godeau, G; Senni, K

    2008-12-01

    In this work, we first tested the influence of low-molecular-weight (LMW) fucoidan extracted from pheophicae cell wall on bidimensional cultured normal human osteoblasts' behaviors. Second, by impregnation procedure with LMW fucoidan of bone biomaterial (Lubboc), we explored in this bone extracellular matrix context its capabilities to support human osteoblastic behavior in 3D culture. In bidimensionnal cultures, we evidenced that LMW fucoidan promotes human osteoblast proliferation and collagen type I expression and favors precocious alkaline phosphatase activity. Furthermore, with LMW fucoidan, von Kossa's staining was positive at 30 days and positive only at 45 days in the absence of LMW fucoidan. In our three-dimensional culture models with the biomaterial pretreated with LMW fucoidan, osteoblasts promptly overgrew the pretreated biomaterial. We also evidenced that osteoblasts increased proliferation with pretreated biomaterial when compared with untreated biomaterial. Osteoblasts secreted osteocalcin and expressed BMP2 receptor on control material as well as with LMW fucoidan impregnated biomaterial. In conclusion, in our experimental conditions, LMW fucoidan stimulated expression of osteoblastic markers differentiation such as alkaline phosphatase activity, collagen type I expression, and mineral deposition; furthermore, cell proliferation was favored. These findings suggest that fucoidan could be clinically useful for bone regeneration and bone substitute design. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2008.

  14. Virus immobilization on biomaterial scaffolds through biotin-avidin interaction for improving bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei-Wen; Wang, Zhuo; Krebsbach, Paul H

    2016-02-01

    To spatially control therapeutic gene delivery for potential tissue engineering applications, a biotin-avidin interaction strategy was applied to immobilize viral vectors on biomaterial scaffolds. Both adenoviral vectors and gelatin sponges were biotinylated and avidin was applied to link them in a virus-biotin-avidin-biotin-material (VBABM) arrangement. The tethered viral particles were stably maintained within scaffolds and SEM images illustrated that viral particles were evenly distributed in three-dimensional (3D) gelatin sponges. An in vivo study demonstrated that transgene expression was restricted to the implant sites only and transduction efficiency was improved using this conjugation method. For an orthotopic bone regeneration model, adenovirus encoding BMP-2 (AdBMP2) was immobilized to gelatin sponges before implanting into critical-sized bone defects in rat calvaria. Compared to gelatin sponges with AdBMP2 loaded in a freely suspended form, the VBABM method enhanced gene transfer and bone regeneration was significantly improved. These results suggest that biotin-avidin immobilization of viral vectors to biomaterial scaffolds may be an effective strategy to facilitate tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Potential of Osteoblastic Cells Derived from Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue Associated with a Polymer/Ceramic Composite to Repair Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Gileade P; Lopes, Helena B; Almeida, Adriana L G; Abuna, Rodrigo P F; Gimenes, Rossano; Souza, Lucas E B; Covas, Dimas T; Beloti, Marcio M; Rosa, Adalberto L

    2017-09-01

    One of the tissue engineering strategies to promote bone regeneration is the association of cells and biomaterials. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate if cell source, either from bone marrow or adipose tissue, affects bone repair induced by osteoblastic cells associated with a membrane of poly(vinylidene-trifluoroethylene)/barium titanate (PVDF-TrFE/BT). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were isolated from rat bone marrow and adipose tissue and characterized by detection of several surface markers. Also, both cell populations were cultured under osteogenic conditions and it was observed that MSC from bone marrow were more osteogenic than MSC from adipose tissue. The bone repair was evaluated in rat calvarial defects implanted with PVDF-TrFE/BT membrane and locally injected with (1) osteoblastic cells differentiated from MSC from bone marrow, (2) osteoblastic cells differentiated from MSC from adipose tissue or (3) phosphate-buffered saline. Luciferase-expressing osteoblastic cells derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue were detected in bone defects after cell injection during 25 days without difference in luciferin signal between cells from both sources. Corroborating the in vitro findings, osteoblastic cells from bone marrow combined with the PVDF-TrFE/BT membrane increased the bone formation, whereas osteoblastic cells from adipose tissue did not enhance the bone repair induced by the membrane itself. Based on these findings, it is possible to conclude that, by combining a membrane with cells in this rat model, cell source matters and that bone marrow could be a more suitable source of cells for therapies to engineer bone.

  16. Design of polymer-biopolymer-hydroxyapatite biomaterials for bone tissue engineering: Through molecular control of interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Devendra

    In this dissertation, novel biomaterials are designed for bone biomaterials and bone tissue engineering applications. Novel biomaterials of hydroxyapatite with synthetic and natural polymers have been fabricated using a combination of processing routes. Initially, we investigated hydroxyapatite-polycaprolactone-polyacrylic acid composites and observed that minimal interfacial interactions between polymer and mineral led to inadequate improvement in the mechanical properties. Bioactivity experiments on these composites showed that the presence of functional groups, such as carboxylate groups, influence bioactivity of the composites. We have developed and investigated composites of hydroxyapatite with chitosan and polygalacturonic acid (PgA). Chitosan and PgA are biocompatible, biodegradable, and also electrostatically complementary to each other. This strategy led to significant improvement in mechanical properties of new composites. The nanostructure analysis using atomic force microscopy revealed a multilevel organization in these composites. Enhancement in mechanical response was attributed to stronger interfaces due to strong electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged chitosan and PgA. Further analysis using the Rietveld method showed that biopolymers have marked impact on hydroxyapatite crystal growth and also on its crystal structure. Significant changes were observed in the lattice parameters of hydroxyapatite synthesized by following biomineralization method (organics mediated mineralization). For scaffold preparation, chitosan and PgA were mixed first, and then, nano-hydroxyapatite was added. Oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, such as chitosan and PgA, spontaneously form complex upon mixing. The poly-electrolyte complex exists as nano-sized particles. Chitosan/PgA scaffolds with and without hydroxyapatite were prepared by the freeze drying method. By controlling the rate of cooling and concentration, we have produced both fibrous and sheet

  17. Involvement of sensory neurons in bone defect repair in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henmi, Akiko; Nakamura, Megumi; Echigo, Seishi; Sasano, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated bone repair in sensory-denervated rats, compared with controls, to elucidate the involvement of sensory neurons. Nine-week-old male Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of capsaicin to denervate sensory neurons. Rats treated with the same amount of vehicle served as controls. A standardized bone defect was created on the parietal bone. We measured the amount of repaired bone with quantitative radiographic analysis and the mRNA expressions of osteocalcin and cathepsin K with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Quantitative radiographic analysis showed that the standard deviations and coefficients of variation for the amount of repaired bone were much higher in the capsaicin-treated group than in the control group at any time point, which means that larger individual differences in the amount of repaired bone were found in capsaicin-treated rats than controls. Furthermore, radiographs showed radiolucency in pre-existing bone surrounding the standardized defect only in the capsaicin-treated group, and histological observation demonstrated some multinuclear cells corresponding to the radiolucent area. Real-time PCR indicated that there was no significant difference in the mRNA expression levels of osteocalcin and cathepsin K between the control group and the capsaicin-treated group. These results suggest that capsaicin-induced sensory denervation affects the bone defect repair. (author)

  18. Hydroxyapatite nanorod and microsphere functionalized with bioactive lactoferrin as a new biomaterial for enhancement bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pujie; Wang, Qun; Yu, Cuiping; Fan, Fengjiao; Liu, Meng; Tu, Maolin; Lu, Weihong; Du, Ming

    2017-07-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) has been recently recognized as a promising new novel bone growth factor for the beneficial effects on bone cells and promotion of bone growth. Currently, it has been attracted wide attention in bone regeneration as functional food additives or a potential bioactive protein in bone tissue engineering. The present study investigated the possibility that hydroxyapatite (HAP) particles, a widely used bone substitute material for high biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, functionalized with lactoferrin as a composite material are applied to bone tissue engineering. Two kinds of hydroxyapatite samples with different sizes, including nanorods and microspheres particles, were functionalized with lactoferrin molecules, respectively. A detailed characterization of as-prepared HAP-LF complex is presented, combining thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). Zeta potential and the analysis of electrostatic surface potential of lactoferrin were carried to reveal the mechanism of adsorption. The effects of HAP-LF complex on MC3T3-E1 osteoblast proliferation and morphology were systematically evaluated at different culture time. Interestingly, results showed that cell viability of HAP-LF group was significantly higher than HAP group indicating that the HAP-LF can improve the biocompatibility of HAP, which mainly originated from a combination of HAP-LF interaction. These results indicated that hydroxyapatite particles can work as a controlled releasing carrier of lactoferrin successfully, and lactoferrin showed better potentiality on using in the field of bone regeneration by coupling with hydroxyapatite. This study would provide a new biomaterial and might offer a new insight for enhancement of bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Calcium citrate: a new biomaterial that can enhance bone formation in situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Li-ming

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To investigate the effect of a new biomaterial combining calcium citrate and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2 on bone regeneration in a bone defect rabbit model. Methods: Totally 30 male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly and equally divided into calcium citrate-rhBMP-2 (CC-rhBMP-2 group and rhBMP-2 only group. Two 10 mm-long and 5 mm-deep bone defects were respec-tively created in the left and right femoral condyles of the rabbits. Subsequently 5 pellets of calcium citrate (10 mg combined with rhBMP-2 (2 mg or rhBMP-2 alone were im-planted into the bone defects and compressed with cotton swab. Bone granules were obtained at 2, 4 and 6 weeks after procedure and received histological analysis. LSD t-test and a subsequent t-test were adopted for statistical analysis. Results: Histomorphometric analysis revealed newly formed bones, and calcium citrate has been absorbed in the treatment group. The percent of newly formed bone area in femoral condyle in control group and CC-rhBMP-2 group was respectively 31.73%±1.26% vs 48.21%±2.37% at 2 weeks; 43.40%±1.65% vs 57.32%±1.47% at 4 weeks, and 51.32%±7.80% vs 66.74%±4.05% at 6 weeks (P<0.05 for all. At 2 weeks, mature cancellous bone was observed to be already formed in the treatment group. Conclusion: From this study, it can be concluded that calcium citrate combined with rhBMP-2 signifcantly en-hances bone regeneration in bone defects. This synthetic gelatin matrix stimulates formation of new bone and bone marrow in the defect areas by releasing calcium ions. Key words: Bone morphogenetic protein-2; Biocompatible materials; Calcium citrate; Gelatin

  20. Carbon nanotubes functionalized with sodium hyaluronate restore bone repair in diabetic rat sockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, M A; Andrade, V B; Mendes, R M; Caliari, M V; Ladeira, L O; Silva, E E; Silva, G A B; Corrêa-Júnior, J D; Ferreira, A J

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of sodium hyaluronate (HY) and carbon nanotubes functionalized with HY (HY-CNT) on bone repair in the tooth sockets of diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (50 mg kg(-1) i.v.), and the sockets were divided into normal control, diabetic control, diabetic treated with HY (1%), and diabetic treated with HY-CNT (100 μg ml(-1)) groups. The sockets were analyzed according to the percentage of bone formation and the number of cell nuclei. The percentage of bone trabeculae was lower in diabetic control animals (11.16 ± 5.10% vs 41.92 ± 6.34% in normal animals) after 14 days. Treating diabetic animals with HY or HY-CNT significantly increased the percentage of neoformed trabeculae (HY: 29.43 ± 3.29%; HY-CNT: 36.90 ± 3.07%). Moreover, the sockets of diabetic animals had an increased number of cell nuclei and HY or HY-CNT reduced this parameter. Our results indicate that HY and HY-CNT restore bone repair in the tooth sockets of diabetic rats, suggesting that these biomaterials are potential adjuvant therapies for the management of diabetes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Fabrication and Characterization of Novel Willemite Nanobioceramic for Bone Defect Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mohammadi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The positive effect of Si and Zn ions on bone formation and metabolism has already been confirmed. The aim of this study was preparation and characterization of Willemite (Zn2SiO4 for the repair of bone defects. Willemite was prepared through solid state reaction. Phase analysis and chemical compositions were investigated. The zeta potential of the nanoparticles was determined in physiological saline, and compressive strength and Young's modulus of the samples were measured. The ability of hydroxyapatite formation was investigated in simulated body fluid (SBF and cytotoxicity of the particles was evaluated in contact with human bone marrow stem cells. The results of this study showed that Willemite nanobioceramic is obtained with the expected chemical composition and negative zeta potential. The results also showed that the hydroxyapatite forming ability in SBF was not strong. MTT assay confirmed the cell proliferation and availability in contact with a specific concentration of Willemite nanoparticles. All these findings indicate that Willemite nanobioceramic with proper biocompatibility can be suggested as a novel biomaterial for the repair of bone defects.

  2. Applied Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Combination With Biomaterials in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza

    2017-10-01

    Due to increasing of the orthopedic lesions and fractures in the world and limitation of current treatment methods, researchers, and surgeons paid attention to the new treatment ways especially to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Innovation in stem cells and biomaterials accelerate during the last decade as two main important parts of the tissue engineering. Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) introduced as cells with highly proliferation and differentiation potentials that hold great promising features for used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. As another main part of tissue engineering, synthetic, and natural polymers have been shown daily grow up in number to increase and improve the grade of biopolymers that could be used as scaffold with or without stem cells for implantation. One of the developed areas of tissue engineering is bone tissue engineering; the aim of this review is present studies were done in the field of bone tissue engineering while used iPSCs in combination with natural and synthetic biomaterials. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3034-3042, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. An animal model in sheep for biocompatibility testing of biomaterials in cancellous bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boos Alois

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The past years have seen the development of many synthetic bone replacements. To test their biocompatibility and ability for osseointegration, osseoinduction and -conduction requires their placement within bone preferably in an animal experiment of a higher species. Methods A suitable experimental animal model in sheep with drill holes of 8 mm diameter and 13 mm depth within the proximal and distal humerus and femur for testing biocompatibility issues is introduced. Results This present sheep model allows the placing of up to 8 different test materials within one animal and because of the standardization of the bone defect, routine evaluation by means of histomorphometry is easily conducted. This method was used successfully in 66 White Alpine Sheep. When the drill holes were correctly placed no complications such as spontaneous fractures were encountered. Conclusion This experimental animal model serves an excellent basis for testing the biocompatibility of novel biomaterials to be used as bone replacement or new bone formation enhancing materials.

  4. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic

  5. Tailoring of new polymeric biomaterials for the repair of medium-sized corneal perforations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruining, MJ; Blaauwgeers, HGT; Kuijer, R; Jongsma, FHM; de Brabander, J; Nuijts, RMMA; Koole, LH

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether polymeric biomaterials can be designed such that they become suitable for surgical closure of medium-sized perforations in the cornea, the transparent tissue in the front of the eye. Such a biomaterial must meet stringent requirements in terms of

  6. Hydrogel derived from porcine decellularized nerve tissue as a promising biomaterial for repairing peripheral nerve defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Liu, Sheng; Chen, Shihao; Qiu, Shuai; Rao, Zilong; Liu, Jianghui; Zhu, Shuang; Yan, Liwei; Mao, Haiquan; Zhu, Qingtang; Quan, Daping; Liu, Xiaolin

    2018-06-01

    Decellularized matrix hydrogels derived from tissues or organs have been used for tissue repair due to their biocompatibility, tunability, and tissue-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components. However, the preparation of decellularized peripheral nerve matrix hydrogels and their use to repair nerve defects have not been reported. Here, we developed a hydrogel from porcine decellularized nerve matrix (pDNM-G), which was confirmed to have minimal DNA content and retain collagen and glycosaminoglycans content, thereby allowing gelatinization. The pDNM-G exhibited a nanofibrous structure similar to that of natural ECM, and a ∼280-Pa storage modulus at 10 mg/mL similar to that of native neural tissues. Western blot and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the pDNM-G consisted mostly of ECM proteins and contained primary ECM-related proteins, including fibronectin and collagen I and IV). In vitro experiments showed that pDNM-G supported Schwann cell proliferation and preserved cell morphology. Additionally, in a 15-mm rat sciatic nerve defect model, pDNM-G was combined with electrospun poly(lactic-acid)-co-poly(trimethylene-carbonate)conduits to bridge the defect, which did not elicit an adverse immune response and promoted the activation of M2 macrophages associated with a constructive remodeling response. Morphological analyses and electrophysiological and functional examinations revealed that the regenerative outcomes achieved by pDNM-G were superior to those by empty conduits and closed to those using rat decellularized nerve matrix allograft scaffolds. These findings indicated that pDNM-G, with its preserved ECM composition and nanofibrous structure, represents a promising biomaterial for peripheral nerve regeneration. Decellularized nerve allografts have been widely used to treat peripheral nerve injury. However, given their limited availability and lack of bioactive factors, efforts have been made to improve the efficacy

  7. A new Fe–Mn–Si alloplastic biomaterial as bone grafting material: In vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fântânariu, Mircea, E-mail: mfantanariu@uaiasi.ro [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Str. Aleea M. Sadoveanu, no. 8, 700489, Iasi (Romania); Trincă, Lucia Carmen, E-mail: lctrinca@uaiasi.ro [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Horticulture, Str. Aleea M. Sadoveanu, no. 3, 700490, Iasi (Romania); Solcan, Carmen, E-mail: csolcan@yahoo.com [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Str. Aleea M. Sadoveanu, no. 8, 700489, Iasi (Romania); Trofin, Alina, E-mail: aetrofin@yahoo.com [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Horticulture, Str. Aleea M. Sadoveanu, no. 3, 700490, Iasi (Romania); Strungaru, Ştefan, E-mail: strungaru_stefan@yahoo.com [“Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University, Faculty of Biology, Bulevardul Carol I, Nr.11, 700506, Iasi (Romania); Şindilar, Eusebiu Viorel, E-mail: esindilar@uaiasi.ro [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Str. Aleea M. Sadoveanu, no. 8, 700489, Iasi (Romania); Plăvan, Gabriel, E-mail: gabriel.plavan@uaic.ro [“Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University, Faculty of Biology, Bulevardul Carol I, Nr.11, 700506, Iasi (Romania); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A Fe–Mn–Si alloy was obtained as alloplastic graft material for bone implants. • Fe–Mn–Si alloy degradation rate was preliminary evaluate with SEM and EDAX techniques. • Biochemical, histological, RX and CT investigations were done in rats with subcutaneous and tibiae implants. • Fe–Mn–Si alloy assured an ideal compromise between degradation and mechanical integrity during bone regeneration. - Abstract: Designing substrates having suitable mechanical properties and targeted degradation behavior is the key's development of bio-materials for medical application. In orthopedics, graft material may be used to fill bony defects or to promote bone formation in osseous defects created by trauma or surgical intervention. Incorporation of Si may increase the bioactivity of implant locally, both by enhancing interactions at the graft–host interface and by having a potential endocrine like effect on osteoblasts. A Fe–Mn–Si alloy was obtained as alloplastic graft materials for bone implants that need long recovery time period. The surface morphology of the resulted specimens was investigated using scanning electrons microscopy (VegaTescan LMH II, SE detector, 30 kV), X-ray diffractions (X’Pert equipment) or X-ray dispersive energy analyze (Bruker EDS equipment). This study objective was to evaluate in vivo the mechanisms of degradation and the effects of its implantation over the main metabolic organs. Biochemical, histological, plain X radiography and computed tomography investigations showed good compatibility of the subcutaneous implants in the rat organism. The implantation of the Fe–Mn–Si alloy, in critical size bone (tibiae) defect rat model, did not induced adverse biological reactions and provided temporary mechanical support to the affected bone area. The biodegradation products were hydroxides layers which adhered to the substrate surface. Fe–Mn–Si alloy assured the mechanical integrity in rat tibiae defects

  8. Is bone transplantation the gold standard for repair of alveolar bone defects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio Eduardo Raposo-Amaral

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New strategies to fulfill craniofacial bone defects have gained attention in recent years due to the morbidity of autologous bone graft harvesting. We aimed to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of bone tissue engineering strategy using mesenchymal stem cells associated with two matrices (bovine bone mineral and α-tricalcium phosphate, compared to an autologous bone transfer. A total of 28 adult, male, non-immunosuppressed Wistar rats underwent a critical-sized osseous defect of 5 mm diameter in the alveolar region. Animals were divided into five groups. Group 1 (n = 7 defects were repaired with autogenous bone grafts; Group 2 (n = 5 defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral free of cells; Group 3 (n = 5 defects were repaired with bovine bone mineral loaded with mesenchymal stem cells; Group 4 (n = 5 defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate free of cells; and Group 5 (n = 6 defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate loaded with mesenchymal stem cells. Groups 2–5 were compared to Group 1, the reference group. Healing response was evaluated by histomorphometry and computerized tomography. Histomorphometrically, Group 1 showed 60.27% ± 16.13% of bone in the defect. Groups 2 and 3 showed 23.02% ± 8.6% (p = 0.01 and 38.35% ± 19.59% (p = 0.06 of bone in the defect, respectively. Groups 4 and 5 showed 51.48% ± 11.7% (p = 0.30 and 61.80% ± 2.14% (p = 0.88 of bone in the defect, respectively. Animals whose bone defects were repaired with α-tricalcium phosphate and mesenchymal stem cells presented the highest bone volume filling the defects; both were not statistically different from autogenous bone.

  9. Cytocompatibility and biocompatibility of nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite spheres for bone repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    CALASANS-MAIA, Mônica Diuana; de MELO, Bruno Raposo; ALVES, Adriana Terezinha Neves Novellino; RESENDE, Rodrigo Figueiredo de Brito; LOURO, Rafael Seabra; SARTORETTO, Suelen Cristina; GRANJEIRO, José Mauro; ALVES, Gutemberg Gomes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo biological responses to nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite/calcium alginate (CHA) microspheres used for alveolar bone repair, compared to sintered hydroxyapatite (HA). Material and Methods The maxillary central incisors of 45 Wistar rats were extracted, and the dental sockets were filled with HA, CHA, and blood clot (control group) (n=5/period/group). After 7, 21 and 42 days, the samples of bone with the biomaterials were obtained for histological and histomorphometric analysis, and the plasma levels of RANKL and OPG were determined via immunoassay. Statistical analysis was performed by Two-Way ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey test at 95% level of significance. Results The CHA and HA microspheres were cytocompatible with both human and murine cells on an in vitro assay. Histological analysis showed the time-dependent increase of newly formed bone in control group characterized by an intense osteoblast activity. In HA and CHA groups, the presence of a slight granulation reaction around the spheres was observed after seven days, which was reduced by the 42nd day. A considerable amount of newly formed bone was observed surrounding the CHA spheres and the biomaterials particles at 42-day time point compared with HA. Histomorphometric analysis showed a significant increase of newly formed bone in CHA group compared with HA after 21 and 42 days from surgery, moreover, CHA showed almost 2-fold greater biosorption than HA at 42 days (two-way ANOVA, p<0.05) indicating greater biosorption. An increase in the RANKL/OPG ratio was observed in the CHA group on the 7th day. Conclusion CHA spheres were osteoconductive and presented earlier biosorption, inducing early increases in the levels of proteins involved in resorption. PMID:26814461

  10. Cytocompatibility and biocompatibility of nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite spheres for bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Diuana CALASANS-MAIA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo biological responses to nanostructured carbonated hydroxyapatite/calcium alginate (CHA microspheres used for alveolar bone repair, compared to sintered hydroxyapatite (HA. Material and Methods The maxillary central incisors of 45 Wistar rats were extracted, and the dental sockets were filled with HA, CHA, and blood clot (control group (n=5/period/group. After 7, 21 and 42 days, the samples of bone with the biomaterials were obtained for histological and histomorphometric analysis, and the plasma levels of RANKL and OPG were determined via immunoassay. Statistical analysis was performed by Two-Way ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey test at 95% level of significance. Results The CHA and HA microspheres were cytocompatible with both human and murine cells on an in vitro assay. Histological analysis showed the time-dependent increase of newly formed bone in control group characterized by an intense osteoblast activity. In HA and CHA groups, the presence of a slight granulation reaction around the spheres was observed after seven days, which was reduced by the 42nd day. A considerable amount of newly formed bone was observed surrounding the CHA spheres and the biomaterials particles at 42-day time point compared with HA. Histomorphometric analysis showed a significant increase of newly formed bone in CHA group compared with HA after 21 and 42 days from surgery, moreover, CHA showed almost 2-fold greater biosorption than HA at 42 days (two-way ANOVA, p<0.05 indicating greater biosorption. An increase in the RANKL/OPG ratio was observed in the CHA group on the 7th day. Conclusion CHA spheres were osteoconductive and presented earlier biosorption, inducing early increases in the levels of proteins involved in resorption.

  11. UV-killed Staphylococcus aureus enhances adhesion and differentiation of osteoblasts on bone-associated biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somayaji, Shankari N; Huet, Yvette M; Gruber, Helen E; Hudson, Michael C

    2010-11-01

    Titanium alloys (Ti) are the preferred material for orthopedic applications. However, very often, these metallic implants loosen over a long period and mandate revision surgery. For implant success, osteoblasts must adhere to the implant surface and deposit a mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we utilized UV-killed Staphylococcus aureus as a novel osteoconductive coating for Ti surfaces. S. aureus expresses surface adhesins capable of binding to bone and biomaterials directly. Furthermore, interaction of S. aureus with osteoblasts activates growth factor-related pathways that potentiate osteogenesis. Although UV-killed S. aureus cells retain their bone-adhesive ability, they do not stimulate significant immune modulator expression. All of the abovementioned properties were utilized for a novel implant coating so as to promote osteoblast recruitment and subsequent cell functions on the bone-implant interface. In this study, osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and mineralized ECM synthesis were measured on Ti surfaces coated with fibronectin with and without UV-killed bacteria. Osteoblast adhesion was enhanced on Ti alloy surfaces coated with bacteria compared to uncoated surfaces, while cell proliferation was sustained comparably on both surfaces. Osteoblast markers such as collagen, osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralized nodule formation were increased on Ti alloy coated with bacteria compared to uncoated surfaces.

  12. Raman study of the repair of surgical bone defects grafted with biphasic synthetic microgranular HA + β-calcium triphosphate and irradiated or not with λ780 nm laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luiz Guilherme P; Marques, Aparecida Maria C; Barbosa, Artur Felipe S; Santos, Nicole R; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S; Souza, Caroline Mathias C; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B; Silveira, Landulfo

    2014-09-01

    The treatment of bone loss due to different etiologic factors is difficult, and many techniques aim to improve repair, including a wide range of biomaterials and, recently, photobioengineering. This work aimed to assess, through Raman spectroscopy, the level of bone mineralization using the intensities of the Raman peaks of both inorganic (∼ 960, ∼ 1,070, and ∼ 1,077 cm(-1)) and organic (∼ 1,454 and ∼ 1,666 cm(-1)) contents of bone tissue. Forty rats were divided into four groups each subdivided into two subgroups according to the time of killing (15 and 30 days). Surgical bone defects were made on femur of each animal with a trephine drill. On animals of group Clot, the defect was filled only by blood clot; on group Laser, the defect filled with the clot was further irradiated. On animals of groups Biomaterial and Laser + Biomaterial, the defect was filled by biomaterial and the last one was further irradiated (λ780 nm, 70 mW, Φ ∼ 0.4 cm(2), 20 J/cm(2) session, 140 J/cm(2) treatment) in four points around the defect at 48-h intervals and repeated for 2 weeks. At both 15th and 30th day following killing, samples were taken and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. At the end of the experimental time, the intensities of both inorganic and organic contents were higher on group Laser + Biomaterial. It is concluded that the use of laser phototherapy associated to biomaterial was effective in improving bone healing on bone defects as a result of the increasing deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite measured by Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Hydrogels That Allow and Facilitate Bone Repair, Remodeling, and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Aaron R; Koralla, Deepthi; Deshmukh, Ameya; Wissel, Benjamin; Stocker, Benjamin; Calhoun, Mark; Dean, David; Winter, Jessica O

    2015-10-28

    Bone defects can originate from a variety of causes, including trauma, cancer, congenital deformity, and surgical reconstruction. Success of the current "gold standard" treatment (i.e., autologous bone grafts) is greatly influenced by insufficient or inappropriate bone stock. There is thus a critical need for the development of new, engineered materials for bone repair. This review describes the use of natural and synthetic hydrogels as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. We discuss many of the advantages that hydrogels offer as bone repair materials, including their potential for osteoconductivity, biodegradability, controlled growth factor release, and cell encapsulation. We also discuss the use of hydrogels in composite devices with metals, ceramics, or polymers. These composites are useful because of the low mechanical moduli of hydrogels. Finally, the potential for thermosetting and photo-cross-linked hydrogels as three-dimensionally (3D) printed, patient-specific devices is highlighted. Three-dimensional printing enables controlled spatial distribution of scaffold materials, cells, and growth factors. Hydrogels, especially natural hydrogels present in bone matrix, have great potential to augment existing bone tissue engineering devices for the treatment of critical size bone defects.

  14. Comparison of ossification of demineralized bone, hydroxyapatite, Gelfoam, and bone wax in cranial defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papay, F A; Morales, L; Ahmed, O F; Neth, D; Reger, S; Zins, J

    1996-09-01

    Demineralized bone allografts in the repair of calvarial defects are compared with other common bone fillers. This study uses a video-digitizing radiographic analysis of calvarial defect ossification to determine calcification of bone defects and its relation to postoperative clinical examination and regional controls. The postoperative clinical results at 3 months demonstrated that bony healing was greatest in bur holes filled with demineralized bone and hydroxyapatite. Radiographic analysis demonstrated calcification of demineralized bone-filled defects compared to bone wax- and Gelfoam-filled regions. Hydroxyapatite granules are radiographically dense, thus not allowing accurate measurement of true bone healing. The results suggest that demineralized bone and hydroxyapatite provide better structural support via bone healing to defined calvarial defects than do Gelfoam and bone wax.

  15. Effects of sterilization and storage on the properties of ALP-grafted biomaterials for prosthetic and bone tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraris, S; Pan, G; Vernè, E; Spriano, S; Cassinelli, C; Mazzucco, L

    2012-01-01

    Grafting of the biomaterial surfaces with biomolecules is nowadays a challenging research field for prosthetic and bone tissue engineering applications. On the other hand, very few research works investigate the effect of the sterilization processes on the properties of functionalized biomaterials. In this study, the effects of different sterilization techniques (e.g. gamma and electron beam irradiation, ethylene oxide) on the enzymatic activity of bioactive glasses and Ti6Al4V grafted with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) have been analyzed. Sterility maintenance and in vitro bioactivity of the sterilized surfaces have also been investigated. Finally the effect of packaging and storage conditions has been considered. (paper)

  16. An Osteoinductive Polymer Composite for Cranial and Maxillofacial Bone Repair,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    a suitable level of anesthesia , a semi-lunar incision was made in the midline from the superior sagittal crest to the middle of the nasal bone. The...internal fixation of Fractures, and as intraosseous bone repair materials. A promising use for these polymers has been as carriers for osteogenic...acids. Oral Surg. 37:142, 1974. 7. Getter, L., Cutright, D.E., Bhaskar, S.N., and Augsburg, J.K. A biodegradable intraosseous apliance in the

  17. Biology and augmentation of tendon-bone insertion repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lui PPY

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surgical reattachment of tendon and bone such as in rotator cuff repair, patellar-patella tendon repair and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction often fails due to the failure of regeneration of the specialized tissue ("enthesis" which connects tendon to bone. Tendon-to-bone healing taking place between inhomogenous tissues is a slow process compared to healing within homogenous tissue, such as tendon to tendon or bone to bone healing. Therefore special attention must be paid to augment tendon to bone insertion (TBI healing. Apart from surgical fixation, biological and biophysical interventions have been studied aiming at regeneration of TBI healing complex, especially the regeneration of interpositioned fibrocartilage and new bone at the healing junction. This paper described the biology and the factors influencing TBI healing using patella-patellar tendon (PPT healing and tendon graft to bone tunnel healing in ACL reconstruction as examples. Recent development in the improvement of TBI healing and directions for future studies were also reviewed and discussed.

  18. Roles of Chondrocytes in Endochondral Bone Formation and Fracture Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, R.J.; Jing, Y.; Jing, J.; Feng, J.Q.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) and its subchondral bone is an important but understudied topic in dental research. The current concept regarding endochondral bone formation postulates that most hypertrophic chondrocytes undergo programmed cell death prior to bone formation. Under this paradigm, the MCC and its underlying bone are thought to result from 2 closely linked but separate processes: chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. However, recent investigations using cell lineage tracing techniques have demonstrated that many, perhaps the majority, of bone cells are derived via direct transformation from chondrocytes. In this review, the authors will briefly discuss the history of this idea and describe recent studies that clearly demonstrate that the direct transformation of chondrocytes into bone cells is common in both long bone and mandibular condyle development and during bone fracture repair. The authors will also provide new evidence of a distinct difference in ossification orientation in the condylar ramus (1 ossification center) versus long bone ossification formation (2 ossification centers). Based on our recent findings and those of other laboratories, we propose a new model that contrasts the mode of bone formation in much of the mandibular ramus (chondrocyte-derived) with intramembranous bone formation of the mandibular body (non-chondrocyte-derived). PMID:27664203

  19. Development of implants composed of bioactive materials for bone repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei

    The purpose of this Ph.D. research was to address the clinical need for synthetic bioactive materials to heal defects in non-loaded and loaded bone. Hollow hydroxyapatite (HA) microspheres created in a previous study were evaluated as a carrier for controlled release of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in bone regeneration. New bone formation in rat calvarial defects implanted with BMP2-loaded microspheres (43%) was significantly higher than microspheres without BMP2 (17%) at 6 weeks postimplantation. Then hollow HA microspheres with a carbonate-substituted composition were prepared to improve their resorption rate. Hollow HA microspheres with 12 wt. % of carbonate showed significantly higher new bone formation (73 +/- 8%) and lower residual HA (7 +/- 2%) than stoichiometric HA microspheres (59 +/- 2% new bone formation; 21 +/- 3% residual HA). The combination of carbonate-substituted hollow HA microspheres and clinically-safe doses of BMP2 could provide promising implants for healing non-loaded bone defects. Strong porous scaffolds of bioactive silicate (13-93) glass were designed with the aid of finite-element modeling, created by robocasting and evaluated for loaded bone repair. Scaffolds with a porosity gradient to mimic human cortical bone showed a compressive strength of 88 +/- 20 MPa, a flexural strength of 34 +/- 5 MPa and the ability to support bone infiltration in vivo. The addition of a biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA) layer to the external surface of these scaffolds increased their load-bearing capacity in four-point bending by 50% and dramatically enhanced their work of fracture, resulting in a "ductile" mechanical response. These bioactive glass-PLA composites, combining bioactivity, high strength, high work of fracture and an internal architecture conducive to bone infiltration, could provide optimal implants for structural bone repair.

  20. A Biodegradable and Proteolipid Bone Repair Composite,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-10

    that the positive bone healing response engen - dered in experimental animals from the copolymer of PLA and PGA may be a con- sequence of several factors...residues interaction with host organic matrix could function as a mechanism engendering release from the matrix of certain polypeptides, such as bone...34 Calcif Tissue Int, 34:376-381, 1982. 19. Wuthier RE, "A Review of the Primary Mechanism of Enchondral Calcification with Special Emphasis on the

  1. Silk-based biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Gregory H; Diaz, Frank; Jakuba, Caroline; Calabro, Tara; Horan, Rebecca L; Chen, Jingsong; Lu, Helen; Richmond, John; Kaplan, David L

    2003-02-01

    Silk from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, has been used as biomedical suture material for centuries. The unique mechanical properties of these fibers provided important clinical repair options for many applications. During the past 20 years, some biocompatibility problems have been reported for silkworm silk; however, contamination from residual sericin (glue-like proteins) was the likely cause. More recent studies with well-defined silkworm silk fibers and films suggest that the core silk fibroin fibers exhibit comparable biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo with other commonly used biomaterials such as polylactic acid and collagen. Furthermore, the unique mechanical properties of the silk fibers, the diversity of side chain chemistries for 'decoration' with growth and adhesion factors, and the ability to genetically tailor the protein provide additional rationale for the exploration of this family of fibrous proteins for biomaterial applications. For example, in designing scaffolds for tissue engineering these properties are particularly relevant and recent results with bone and ligament formation in vitro support the potential role for this biomaterial in future applications. To date, studies with silks to address biomaterial and matrix scaffold needs have focused on silkworm silk. With the diversity of silk-like fibrous proteins from spiders and insects, a range of native or bioengineered variants can be expected for application to a diverse set of clinical needs.

  2. Preparation and characterization of a novel composite containing carboxymethyl cellulose used for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Liuyun; Li Yubao; Zhang Li; Wang Xuejiang

    2009-01-01

    The composite biomaterial made from nano-hydroxyapatite(n-HA) and chitosan(CS) cross-linked with carboxymethyl cellulose(CMC) by a co-solution method has been studied. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectra (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), burn-out test, chemical analysis, transmission electron microscope(TEM) and universal material testing machine were used to test the properties of the composite. The experiment of SBF soaking for 8 weeks was used to investigate their degradation and bioactivity in vitro. The results show that the formation of composite is mainly contributed to the ionic cross-linking of CMC with CS, and n-HA particles in the form of nanometer grade short crystals are uniformly distributed in the organic network structure of polyelectrolyte complexes, which endows the composite with high compressive strength and good bioactivity. The compressive strength and degradation rate are concerned with the content of n-HA. It can be stated that the n-HA/CS/CMC composite whose weight ratio is 40/30/30 may be a potential candidate as one of novel bone repair materials because of its high compressive strength and acceptable degradation rate as well as good bioactivity, displaying a promising prospect of the clinical application of CMC-contained composite in the field of bone repair

  3. Do laser/LED phototherapies influence the outcome of the repair of surgical bone defects grafted with biphasic synthetic microgranular HA + β-tricalcium phosphate? A Raman spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luiz Guilherme Pinheiro; Marques, Aparecida Maria Cordeiro; Aciole, Jouber Mateus Santos; da Guarda, Milena Góes; Cangussú, Maria Cristina Teixeira; Silveira, Landulfo; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2014-09-01

    The treatment of bone loss is difficult. Many techniques are proposed to improve repair, including biomaterials and, recently, phototherapies. This work studied bone mineralization by Raman spectroscopy assessing intensities of Raman peaks of both inorganic (∼ 960, ∼ 1,070 cm(-1)) and organic (∼ 1,454 cm(-1)) contents in animal model. Six groups were studied: clot, laser, light-emitting diode (LED), biomaterial (HA + β-tricalcium phosphate), laser + biomaterial, and LED + biomaterial. Defects at right tibia were performed with a drill. When indicated, defects were further irradiated at a 48-h interval during 2 weeks. At the 15th and 30th days, the tibias were withdrawn and analyzed. The ∼ 960-cm(-1) peak was significantly affected by phototherapy on both clot- and biomaterial-filled defects. The ∼ 1,070-cm(-1) peak was affected by both time and the use of the LED light on clot-filled defects. On biomaterial-filled defects, only the use of the laser light significantly influenced the outcome. No significant influence of either the time or the use of the light was detected on clot-filled defects as regards the ∼ 1,454-cm(-1) peak. Raman intensities of both mineral and matrix components indicated that the use of laser and LED phototherapies improved the repair of bone defects grafted or not with biphasic synthetic microgranular HA + β-tricalcium phosphate.

  4. Amorphous, Smart, and Bioinspired Polyphosphate Nano/Microparticles: A Biomaterial for Regeneration and Repair of Osteo-Articular Impairments In-Situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner E. G. Müller

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Using femur explants from mice as an in vitro model, we investigated the effect of the physiological polymer, inorganic polyphosphate (polyP, on differentiation of the cells of the bone marrow in their natural microenvironment into the osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. In the form of amorphous Ca-polyP nano/microparticles, polyP retains its function to act as both an intra- and extracellular metabolic fuel and a stimulus eliciting morphogenetic signals. The method for synthesis of the nano/microparticles with the polyanionic polyP also allowed the fabrication of hybrid particles with the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid, a drug used in therapy of bone metastases in cancer patients. The results revealed that the amorphous Ca-polyP particles promote the growth/viability of mesenchymal stem cells, as well as the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of the bone marrow cells in rat femur explants, as revealed by an upregulation of the expression of the transcription factors SOX9 (differentiation towards osteoblasts and RUNX2 (chondrocyte differentiation. In parallel to this bone anabolic effect, incubation of the femur explants with these particles significantly reduced the expression of the gene encoding the osteoclast bone-catabolic enzyme, cathepsin-K, while the expression of the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase remained unaffected. The gene expression data were supported by the finding of an increased mineralization of the cells in the femur explants in response to the Ca-polyP particles. Finally, we show that the hybrid particles of polyP complexed with zoledronic acid exhibit both the cytotoxic effect of the bisphosphonate and the morphogenetic and mineralization inducing activity of polyP. Our results suggest that the Ca-polyP nano/microparticles are not only a promising scaffold material for repairing long bone osteo-articular damages but can also be applied, as a hybrid with zoledronic acid, as a drug delivery system for

  5. Repair of microdamage in osteonal cortical bone adjacent to bone screw.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    Full Text Available Up to date, little is known about the repair mode of microdamage in osteonal cortical bone resulting from bone screw implantation. In this study, self-tapping titanium cortical bone screws were inserted into the tibial diaphyses of 24 adult male rabbits. The animals were sacrificed at 1 day, 2 weeks, 1 month and 2 months after surgery. Histomorphometric measurement and confocal microscopy were performed on basic fuchsin stained bone sections to examine the morphological characteristics of microdamage, bone resorption activity and spatial relationship between microdamage and bone resorption. Diffuse and linear cracks were coexisted in peri-screw bone. Intracortical bone resorption was significantly increased 2 weeks after screw installation and reach to the maximum at 1 month. There was no significant difference in bone resorption between 1-month and 2-months groups. Microdamage was significantly decreased within 1 month after surgery. Bone resorption was predisposed to occur in the region of <100 µm from the bone-screw interface, where had extensive diffuse damage mixed with linear cracks. Different patterns of resorption cavities appeared in peri-screw bone. These data suggest that 1 the complex microdamage composed of diffuse damage and linear cracks is a strong stimulator for initiating targeted bone remodeling; 2 bone resorption activities taking place on the surfaces of differently oriented Haversian and Volkmann canals work in a team for the repair of extensive microdamage; 3 targeted bone remodeling is a short-term reaction to microdamage and thereby it may not be able to remove all microdamage resulting from bone screw insertion.

  6. Adipose stem cells for bone tissue repair

    OpenAIRE

    Ciuffi, Simone; Zonefrati, Roberto; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs), together with adipocytes, vascular endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells, are contained in fat tissue. ASCs, like the human bone marrow stromal/stem cells (BMSCs), can differentiate into several lineages (adipose cells, fibroblast, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, neuronal cells, endothelial cells, myocytes, and cardiomyocytes). They have also been shown to be immunoprivileged, and genetically stable in long-term cultures. Nevertheless, unlik...

  7. Presentation of a novel model of chitosan- polyethylene oxide-nanohydroxyapatite nanofibers together with bone marrow stromal cells to repair and improve minor bone defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgar Emamgholi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Various methods for repairing bone defects are presented. Cell therapy is one of these methods. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs seem to be suitable for this purpose. On the other hand, lots of biomaterials are used to improve and repair the defect in the body, so in this study we tried to produce a similar structure to the bone by the chitosan and hydroxyapatite. Materials and Methods: In this study, the solution of chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite-polyethylene oxide (PEO Nanofibers was produced by electrospinning method, and then the BMSCs were cultured on this solution. A piece of chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite Nanofibers with BMSCs was placed in a hole with the diameter of 1 mm at the distal epiphysis of the rat femur. Then the biomechanical and radiographic studies were performed. Results: Biomechanical testing results showed that bone strength was significantly higher in the Nanofiber/BMSCs group in comparison with control group. Also the bone strength in nanofiber/BMSCs group was significant, but in nanofiber group was nearly significant. Radiographic studies also showed that the average amount of callus formation (radio opacity in nanofiber and control group was not significantly different. The callus formation in nanofiber/BMSCs group was increased compared to the control group, and it was not significant in the nanofiber group. Conclusion: Since chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite nanofibers with BMSCs increases the rate of bone repair, the obtained cell-nanoscaffold shell can be used in tissue engineering and cell therapy, especially for bone defects.

  8. Low-frequency vibration treatment of bone marrow stromal cells induces bone repair in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shengwei; Zhao, Wenzhi; Zhang, Lu; Mi, Lidong; Du, Guangyu; Sun, Chuanxiu; Sun, Xuegang

    2017-01-01

    To study the effect of low-frequency vibration on bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and potential bone repair in vivo . Forty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into five groups with eight rabbits in each group. For each group, bone defects were generated in the left humerus of four rabbits, and in the right humerus of the other four rabbits. To test differentiation, bones were isolated and demineralized, supplemented with bone marrow stromal cells, and implanted into humerus bone defects. Varying frequencies of vibration (0, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 Hz) were applied to each group for 30 min each day for four weeks. When the bone defects integrated, they were then removed for histological examination. mRNA transcript levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligan, and pre-collagen type 1 α were measured. Humeri implanted with bone marrow stromal cells displayed elevated callus levels and wider, more prevalent, and denser trabeculae following treatment at 25 and 50 Hz. The mRNA levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand, and pre-collagen type 1 α were also markedly higher following 25 and 50 Hz treatment. Low frequency (25-50 Hz) vibration in vivo can promote bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and repair bone injury.

  9. Low-frequency vibration treatment of bone marrow stromal cells induces bone repair in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengwei He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:To study the effect of low-frequency vibration on bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and potential bone repair in vivo. Materials and Methods:Forty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into five groups with eight rabbits in each group. For each group, bone defects were generated in the left humerus of four rabbits, and in the right humerus of the other four rabbits. To test differentiation, bones were isolated and demineralized, supplemented with bone marrow stromal cells, and implanted into humerus bone defects. Varying frequencies of vibration (0, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 Hz were applied to each group for 30 min each day for four weeks. When the bone defects integrated, they were then removed for histological examination. mRNA transcript levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor k-B ligan, and pre-collagen type 1 a were measured. Results:Humeri implanted with bone marrow stromal cells displayed elevated callus levels and wider, more prevalent, and denser trabeculae following treatment at 25 and 50 Hz. The mRNA levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor k-B ligand, and pre-collagen type 1 a were also markedly higher following 25 and 50 Hz treatment. Conclusion:Low frequency (25–50 Hz vibration in vivo can promote bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and repair bone injury.

  10. Biochemical changes on the repair of surgical bone defects grafted with biphasic synthetic micro-granular HA + β-tricalcium phosphate induced by laser and LED phototherapies and assessed by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa; Soares, Luiz Guilherme Pinheiro; Marques, Aparecida Maria Cordeiro; Cangussú, Maria Cristina Teixeira; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu Tavares; Silveira, Landulfo

    2017-04-01

    This work aimed the assessment of biochemical changes induced by laser or LED irradiation during mineralization of a bone defect in an animal model using a spectral model based on Raman spectroscopy. Six groups were studied: clot, laser (λ = 780 nm; 70 mW), LED (λ = 850 ± 10 nm; 150 mW), biomaterial (biphasic synthetic micro-granular hydroxyapatite (HA) + β-tricalcium phosphate), biomaterial + laser, and biomaterial + LED. When indicated, defects were further irradiated at a 48-h interval during 2 weeks (20 J/cm 2 per session). At the 15th and 30th days, femurs were dissected and spectra of the defects were collected. Raman spectra were submitted to a model to estimate the relative amount of collagen, phosphate HA, and carbonate HA by using the spectra of pure collagen and biomaterials composed of phosphate and carbonate HA, respectively. The use of the biomaterial associated to phototherapy did not change the collagen formation at both 15 and 30 days. The amount of carbonate HA was not different in all groups at the 15th day. However, at the 30th day, there was a significant difference (ANOVA, p = 0.01), with lower carbonate HA for the group biomaterial + LED compared to biomaterial (p biomaterial grafts at the 15th day compared to clot (significant for the biomaterial; p biomaterial + laser, while this was lower for all the other groups. These results indicated that the use of laser phototherapy improved the repair of bone defects grafted with the biomaterial by increasing the deposition of phosphate HA.

  11. Siliceous mesostructured cellular foams/ poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate composite biomaterials for bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang S

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Shengbing Yang,1,* Shuogui Xu,2,* Panyu Zhou,2,* Jing Wang,3 Honglue Tan,4 Yang Liu,5 TingTing Tang,4 ChangSheng Liu1,3,5 1The State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Changhai Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, the Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implant, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai 9th People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine China, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 5Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Osteoinductive and biodegradable composite biomaterials for bone regeneration were prepared by combining poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate (PHBHHx with siliceous mesostructured cellular foams (SMC, using the porogen leaching method. Surface hydrophilicity, morphology, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 adsorption/release behavior of the SMC/PHBHHx scaffolds were analyzed. Results of scanning electron microscopy indicated that the SMC was uniformly dispersed in the PHBHHx scaffolds, and SMC modification scaffolds have an interconnected porous architecture with pore sizes ranging from 200 to 400 µm. The measurements of the water contact angles suggested that the incorporation of SMC into PHBHHx improves the hydrophilicity of the composite. In vitro studies with simulated body fluid show great improvements to bioactivity and biodegradability versus pure PHBHHx scaffolds. Cell adhesion and cell proliferation on the scaffolds was also evaluated, and the new

  12. Photographic-Based Optical Evaluation of Tissues and Biomaterials Used for Corneal Surface Repair: A New Easy-Applied Method.

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    Miguel Gonzalez-Andrades

    Full Text Available Tissues and biomaterials used for corneal surface repair require fulfilling specific optical standards prior to implantation in the patient. However, there is not a feasible evaluation method to be applied in clinical or Good Manufacturing Practice settings. In this study, we describe and assess an innovative easy-applied photographic-based method (PBM for measuring functional optical blurring and transparency in corneal surface grafts.Plastic compressed collagen scaffolds (PCCS and multilayered amniotic membranes (AM samples were optically and histologically evaluated. Transparency and image blurring measures were obtained by PBM, analyzing photographic images of a standardized band pattern taken through the samples. These measures were compared and correlated to those obtained applying the Inverse Adding-Doubling (IAD technique, which is the gold standard method.All the samples used for optical evaluation by PBM or IAD were histological suitable. PCCS samples presented transmittance values higher than 60%, values that increased with increasing wavelength as determined by IAD. The PBM indicated that PCCS had a transparency ratio (TR value of 80.3 ± 2.8%, with a blurring index (BI of 50.6 ± 4.2%. TR and BI obtained from the PBM showed a high correlation (ρ>|0.6| with the diffuse transmittance and the diffuse reflectance, both determined using the IAD (p<0.005. The AM optical properties showed that there was a largely linear relationship between the blurring and the number of amnion layers, with more layers producing greater blurring.This innovative proposed method represents an easy-applied technique for evaluating transparency and blurriness of tissues and biomaterials used for corneal surface repair.

  13. Novel nano-calcium phosphate generation to improve cell activity in bone restructuring

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wepener, I

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation addresses the replacement and repair of bone. There are four types of biomaterials; namely biotoxic, bioinert, bioactive and ioresorbable. The most abundant inorganic mineral in bone is hydroxyapatite, which is a good candidate...

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing Ihh promote bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Shasha; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Yanan; Tian, Ruhui; Zhang, Lingling; Song, Pingping; Yang, Shi; Zhu, Yong; Guo, Xizhi; Huang, Yiran; Li, Zheng; Kan, Lixin; Hu, Hongliang

    2014-10-28

    Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling pathway is known to play key roles in various aspects of normal endochondral bone development. This study tested the potential roles of high Ihh signaling in the context of injury-induced bone regeneration. A rabbit tibia defect model was established to test the effects of the implant of Ihh/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)/scaffold complex. Computed tomography (CT), gross observation, and standard histological and immunohistological techniques were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. In vitro studies with MSCs and C3H10T1/2 cells were also employed to further understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms. We found that the implanted Ihh/MSCs/scaffold complex promoted bone repair. Consistently, in vitro study found that Ihh induced the upregulation of chondrocytic, osteogenic, and vascular cell markers, both in C3H10T1/2 cells and MSCs. Our study has demonstrated that high Ihh signaling in a complex with MSCs enhanced bone regeneration effectively in a clinically relevant acute injury model. Even though the exact underlying mechanisms are still far from clear, our primary data suggested that enhanced chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and angiogenesis of MSCs at least partially contribute to the process. This study not only has implications for basic research of MSCs and Ihh signaling pathway but also points to the possibility of direct application of this specific paradigm to clinical bone repair.

  15. How Can Nanotechnology Help to Repair the Body? Advances in Cardiac, Skin, Bone, Cartilage and Nerve Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Marchal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnologists have become involved in regenerative medicine via creation of biomaterials and nanostructures with potential clinical implications. Their aim is to develop systems that can mimic, reinforce or even create in vivo tissue repair strategies. In fact, in the last decade, important advances in the field of tissue engineering, cell therapy and cell delivery have already been achieved. In this review, we will delve into the latest research advances and discuss whether cell and/or tissue repair devices are a possibility. Focusing on the application of nanotechnology in tissue engineering research, this review highlights recent advances in the application of nano-engineered scaffolds designed to replace or restore the followed tissues: (i skin; (ii cartilage; (iii bone; (iv nerve; and (v cardiac.

  16. Tissue-engineered bone constructed in a bioreactor for repairing critical-sized bone defects in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Deqiang; Li, Ming; Liu, Peilai; Zhang, Yuankai; Lu, Jianxi; Li, Jianmin

    2014-11-01

    Repair of bone defects, particularly critical-sized bone defects, is a considerable challenge in orthopaedics. Tissue-engineered bones provide an effective approach. However, previous studies mainly focused on the repair of bone defects in small animals. For better clinical application, repairing critical-sized bone defects in large animals must be studied. This study investigated the effect of a tissue-engineered bone for repairing critical-sized bone defect in sheep. A tissue-engineered bone was constructed by culturing bone marrow mesenchymal-stem-cell-derived osteoblast cells seeded in a porous β-tricalcium phosphate ceramic (β-TCP) scaffold in a perfusion bioreactor. A critical-sized bone defect in sheep was repaired with the tissue-engineered bone. At the eighth and 16th week after the implantation of the tissue-engineered bone, X-ray examination and histological analysis were performed to evaluate the defect. The bone defect with only the β-TCP scaffold served as the control. X-ray showed that the bone defect was successfully repaired 16 weeks after implantation of the tissue-engineered bone; histological sections showed that a sufficient volume of new bones formed in β-TCP 16 weeks after implantation. Eight and 16 weeks after implantation, the volume of new bones that formed in the tissue-engineered bone group was more than that in the β-TCP scaffold group (P bone improved osteogenesis in vivo and enhanced the ability to repair critical-sized bone defects in large animals.

  17. Raman ratios on the repair of grafted surgical bone defects irradiated or not with laser (λ780 nm) or LED (λ850 nm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B; Soares, Luiz Guilherme P; Marques, Aparecida Maria C; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S; de Souza, Renato Aparecido; Silveira, Landulfo

    2014-09-05

    This work aimed to assess biochemical changes associated to mineralization and remodeling of bone defects filled with Hydroxyapatite+Beta-Beta-tricalcium phosphate irradiated or not with 2 light sources. Ratios of intensities, band position and bandwidth of selected Raman peaks of collagen and apatites were used. Sixty male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups subdivided into 2 subgroups (15th and 30th days). A standard surgical defect was created on one femur of each animal. In 3 groups the defects were filled with blood clot (Clot, Clot+Laser and Clot+LED groups) and in the remaining 3 groups the defects were filled with biomaterial (Biomaterial, Biomaterial+Laser and Biomaterial+LED groups). When indicated, the defects were irradiated with either Laser (λ780 nm, 70 mW, Φ∼0.4 cm(2)) or LED (λ850±10 nm, 150 mW, Φ∼0.5 cm(2)), 20 J/cm(2) each session, at 48 h intervals/2 weeks (140 J/cm(2) treatment). Following sacrifice, bone fragments were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis (ANOVA General Linear Model, pRaman ratios of selected protein matrix and phosphate and carbonate HA indicated that the use of biphasic synthetic micro-granular HA+Beta-TCP graft improved the repair of bone defects, associated or not with Laser or LED light, because of the increasing deposition of HA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biomaterials in orthopaedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, M; Michiardi, A; Castaño, O; Planell, J.A

    2008-01-01

    At present, strong requirements in orthopaedics are still to be met, both in bone and joint substitution and in the repair and regeneration of bone defects. In this framework, tremendous advances in the biomaterials field have been made in the last 50 years where materials intended for biomedical purposes have evolved through three different generations, namely first generation (bioinert materials), second generation (bioactive and biodegradable materials) and third generation (materials designed to stimulate specific responses at the molecular level). In this review, the evolution of different metals, ceramics and polymers most commonly used in orthopaedic applications is discussed, as well as the different approaches used to fulfil the challenges faced by this medical field. PMID:18667387

  19. [Preparation of sodium alginate-nanohydroxyapatite composite material for bone repair and its biocompatibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanmei; He, Jiacai; Li, Quanli; Shen, Jijia

    2014-02-01

    To prepare sodium alginate-nanohydroxyapatite composite material and to explore its feasibility as a bone repair material. Sodium alginate-nanohydroxyapatite composite material was prepared using chemical cross-linking and freeze-drying technology. The composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and its porosity was measured by liquid displacement method. The fifth passage of bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) were incubated on the composite material and then growth was observed by inverted microscope and SEM. BMSCs were cultured with liquid extracts of the material, methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to calculate the relative growth rate (RGR) on 1, 3, 5 d and to evaluate the cytotoxicity. Fresh dog blood was added into the liquid extracts to conduct hemolysis test, the spectrophotometer was used to determine the optical density (OD) and to calculate the hemolysis rate. Sodium alginate-nanohydroxyapatite composite material displayed porosity, the porous pore rate was (88.6 +/- 4.5)%. BMSCs showed full stretching and vigorous growth under inverted microscope and SEM. BMSCs cultured with liquid extracts of the material had good activities. The toxicity of composite material was graded as 1. Hemolysis test results showed that the hemolysis rate of the composite material was 1.28%, thus meeting the requirement of medical biomaterials. The composite material fabricated in this study has high porosity and good biocompatibility.

  20. Electrospun composites of PHBV/pearl powder for bone repairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Bai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun fiber has highly structural similarity with natural bone extracelluar matrix (ECM. Many researches about fabricating organic–inorganic composite materials have been carried out in order to mimic the natural composition of bone and enhance the biocompatibility of materials. In this work, pearl powder was added to the poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV and the composite nanofiber scaffold was prepared by electrospinning. Mineralization ability of the composite scaffolds can be evaluated by analyzing hydroxyapatite (HA formation on the surface of nanofiber scaffolds. The obtained composite nanofiber scaffolds showed an enhanced mineralization capacity due to incorporation of pearl powder. The HA formed amount of the composite scaffolds was raised as the increase of pearl powder in composite scaffolds. Therefore, the prepared PHBV/pearl composite nanofiber scaffolds would be a promising candidate as an osteoconductive composite material for bone repairing.

  1. Synthetic scaffold coating with adeno-associated virus encoding BMP2 to promote endogenous bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Kenneth M; Boerckel, Joel D; Stevens, Hazel Y; Diab, Tamim; Kolambkar, Yash M; Takahata, Masahiko; Schwarz, Edward M; Guldberg, Robert E

    2012-03-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds functionalized to stimulate endogenous repair mechanisms via the incorporation of osteogenic cues offer a potential alternative to bone grafting for the treatment of large bone defects. We first quantified the ability of a self-complementary adeno-associated viral vector encoding bone morphogenetic protein 2 (scAAV2.5-BMP2) to enhance human stem cell osteogenic differentiation in vitro. In two-dimensional culture, scAAV2.5-BMP2-transduced human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) displayed significant increases in BMP2 production and alkaline phosphatase activity compared with controls. hMSCs and human amniotic-fluid-derived stem cells (hAFS cells) seeded on scAAV2.5-BMP2-coated three-dimensional porous polymer Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds also displayed significant increases in BMP2 production compared with controls during 12 weeks of culture, although only hMSC-seeded scaffolds displayed significantly increased mineral formation. PCL scaffolds coated with scAAV2.5-BMP2 were implanted into critically sized immunocompromised rat femoral defects, both with or without pre-seeding of hMSCs, representing ex vivo and in vivo gene therapy treatments, respectively. After 12 weeks, defects treated with acellular scAAV2.5-BMP2-coated scaffolds displayed increased bony bridging and had significantly higher bone ingrowth and mechanical properties compared with controls, whereas defects treated with scAAV2.5-BMP2 scaffolds pre-seeded with hMSCs failed to display significant differences relative to controls. When pooled, defect treatment with scAAV2.5-BMP2-coated scaffolds, both with or without inclusion of pre-seeded hMSCs, led to significant increases in defect mineral formation at all time points and increased mechanical properties compared with controls. This study thus presents a novel acellular bone-graft-free endogenous repair therapy for orthotopic tissue-engineered bone regeneration.

  2. Bony defect repair in rabbit using hybrid rapid prototyping polylactic co glycolic acid/β tricalciumphosphate collagen I/apatite scaffold and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Pang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In bone tissue engineering, extracellular matrix exerts critical influence on cellular interaction with porous biomaterial and the apatite playing an important role in the bonding process of biomaterial to bone tissue. The aim of this study was to observe the therapeutic effects of hybrid rapid prototyping (RP scaffolds comprising polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, β-tricalciumphosphate (β-TCP, collagen I and apatite (PLGA/β-TCP-collagen I/apatite on segmental bone defects in conjunction with combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs. Materials and Methods: BMSCs were seeded into the hybrid RP scaffolds to repair 15 mm defect in the radius of rabbits. Radiograph, microcomputed tomography and histology were used to evaluate new bone formation. Results: Radiographic analysis done from 12 to 36 weeks postoperative period demonstrated that new bone formed at the radial defect site and continues to increase until the medullary cavity is recanalized and remodelling is complete. The bone defect remained unconnected in the original RP scaffolds (PLGA/β-TCP during the whole study. Histological observations conformed to the radiographic images. In hybrid RP scaffold group, woven bone united the radial defect at 12 weeks and consecutively remodeled into lamellar bone 24 weeks postoperation and finally matured into cortical bone with normal marrow cavity after another 12 weeks. No bone formation but connective tissue has been detected in RP scaffold at the same time. Conclusion: Collagen I/apatite sponge composite coating could improve new bone formation in vivo. The hybrid RP scaffold of PLGA/β-TCP skeleton with collagen I/apatite sponge composite coating is a promising candidate for bone tissue engineering.

  3. Use of NASA Bioreactor in Engineering Tissue for Bone Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Pauline

    1998-01-01

    This study was proposed in search for a new alternative for bone replacement or repair. Because the systems commonly used in repair of bony defects form bone by going through a cartilaginous phase, implantation of a piece of cartilage could enhance the healing process by having a more advanced starting point. However, cartilage has seldom been used to replace bone due, in part, to the limitations in conventional culture systems that did not allow production of enough tissue for implants. The NASA-developed bioreactors known as STLV (Slow Turning Lateral Vessel) provide homogeneous distribution of cells, nutrients, and waste products, with less damaging turbulence and shear forces than conventional systems. Cultures under these conditions have higher growth rates, viability, and longevity, allowing larger "tissue-like" aggregates to form, thus opening the possibilities of producing enough tissue for implantation, along with the inherent advantages of in vitro manipulations. To assure large numbers of cells and to eliminate the use of timed embryos, we proposed to use an immortalized mouse limb bud cell line as the source of cells.

  4. A novel method for biomaterial scaffold internal architecture design to match bone elastic properties with desired porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng Yu; Kikuchi, Noboru; Hollister, Scott J

    2004-05-01

    An often-proposed tissue engineering design hypothesis is that the scaffold should provide a biomimetic mechanical environment for initial function and appropriate remodeling of regenerating tissue while concurrently providing sufficient porosity for cell migration and cell/gene delivery. To provide a systematic study of this hypothesis, the ability to precisely design and manufacture biomaterial scaffolds is needed. Traditional methods for scaffold design and fabrication cannot provide the control over scaffold architecture design to achieve specified properties within fixed limits on porosity. The purpose of this paper was to develop a general design optimization scheme for 3D internal scaffold architecture to match desired elastic properties and porosity simultaneously, by introducing the homogenization-based topology optimization algorithm (also known as general layout optimization). With an initial target for bone tissue engineering, we demonstrate that the method can produce highly porous structures that match human trabecular bone anisotropic stiffness using accepted biomaterials. In addition, we show that anisotropic bone stiffness may be matched with scaffolds of widely different porosity. Finally, we also demonstrate that prototypes of the designed structures can be fabricated using solid free-form fabrication (SFF) techniques.

  5. Comparative evaluation of hydroxyapatite and nano-bioglass in two forms of conventional micro- and nano-particles in repairing bone defects (an animal study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosouhian, Saied; Razavi, Mohammad; Jafari-Pozve, Nasim; Rismanchian, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Many synthetic bone materials have been introduced for repairing bone defects. The aim of this study is to comparatively evaluate the efficacy of nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) and nano-bioglass bone materials with their traditional micro counterparts in repairing bone defects. In this prospective animal study, four healthy dogs were included. First to fourth premolars were extracted in each quadrant and five cavities in each quadrant were created using trephine. Sixteen cavities in each dog were filled by HA, nano-HA, bioglass, and nano-bioglass and four defects were left as the control group. All defects were covered by a nonrestorable membrane. Dogs were sacrificed after 15, 30, 45, and 60 days sequentially. All 20 samples were extracted by trephine #8 with a sufficient amount of surrounding bone. All specimens were investigated under an optical microscope and the percentage of total regenerated bone, lamellar, and woven bone were evaluated. Data analysis was carried out by SPSS Software ver. 15 and Mann-Whitney U-test (α =0.05). After 15 days, the bone formation percentage showed a significant difference between HA and nano-HA and between HA and bioglass (P bone formation after 15 days. Nano-bioglass and bioglass and nano-HA and nano-bioglass groups represented a significant difference and nano-bioglass showed the highest rate of bone formation after 30 days (P = 0.01). After 45 days, the bone formation percentage showed a significant difference between nano-bioglass and bioglass and between nano-HA and nano-bioglass groups (P = 0.01). Nano-HA and nano-bioglass biomaterials showed promising results when compared to conventional micro-particles in the repair of bone defects.

  6. Repair of dense connective tissues via biomaterial-mediated matrix reprogramming of the wound interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Feini; Pintauro, Michael P; Haughan, Joanne E; Henning, Elizabeth A; Esterhai, John L; Schaer, Thomas P; Mauck, Robert L; Fisher, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Repair of dense connective tissues in adults is limited by their intrinsic hypocellularity and is exacerbated by a dense extracellular matrix (ECM) that impedes cellular migration to and local proliferation at the wound site. Conversely, healing in fetal tissues occurs due in part to an environment conducive to cell mobility and division. Here, we investigated whether the application of a degradative enzyme, collagenase, could reprogram the adult wound margin to a more fetal-like state, and thus abrogate the biophysical impediments that hinder migration and proliferation. We tested this concept using the knee meniscus, a commonly injured structure for which few regenerative approaches exist. To focus delivery and degradation to the wound interface, we developed a system in which collagenase was stored inside poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) electrospun nanofibers and released upon hydration. Through a series of in vitro and in vivo studies, our findings show that partial digestion of the wound interface improves repair by creating a more compliant and porous microenvironment that expedites cell migration to and/or proliferation at the wound margin. This innovative approach of targeted manipulation of the wound interface, focused on removing the naturally occurring barriers to adult tissue repair, may find widespread application in the treatment of injuries to a variety of dense connective tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The influence of phosphorylation and freezing temperature on the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite/chitosan composite as bone scaffold biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albab, Muh Fadhil; Giovani, Nicholas; Yuwono, Akhmad Herman; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Ramahdita, Ghiska; Whulanza, Yudan

    2018-02-01

    Biomaterials composite of hydroxyapatite/chitosan is a preeminent material for medical applications including bone scaffold. To improve its mechanical properties, the chitosan as the matrix needs to be modified with particular chemical agents. One of the methods is phosphorylation of chitosan by using orthophosphoric acid prior to the biomaterials fabrication. In the current study, biomaterials with the weight composition of 70% hydroxyapatite (HA) and 30% phosphorylated chitosan have been fabricated using thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) method with freezing temperature variation of -20, -30, -40 and -80°C prior to three day-freeze drying. The results obtained by this work showed that the highest compression modulus of 376.9 kPa, highest compressive strength of 38.4 kPa and biggest pore size of 48.24 µm were achieved in the freezing temperature of -20°C. In comparison to non-phosphorylated chitosan/hydroxyapatite, the modification of chitosan using orthophosphoric acid in this work has been found to increase the compressive strength of composite up to 5.5 times.

  8. Mechanical characterization of structurally porous biomaterials built via additive manufacturing: experiments, predictive models, and design maps for load-bearing bone replacement implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melancon, D; Bagheri, Z S; Johnston, R B; Liu, L; Tanzer, M; Pasini, D

    2017-11-01

    Porous biomaterials can be additively manufactured with micro-architecture tailored to satisfy the stringent mechano-biological requirements imposed by bone replacement implants. In a previous investigation, we introduced structurally porous biomaterials, featuring strength five times stronger than commercially available porous materials, and confirmed their bone ingrowth capability in an in vivo canine model. While encouraging, the manufactured biomaterials showed geometric mismatches between their internal porous architecture and that of its as-designed counterpart, as well as discrepancies between predicted and tested mechanical properties, issues not fully elucidated. In this work, we propose a systematic approach integrating computed tomography, mechanical testing, and statistical analysis of geometric imperfections to generate statistical based numerical models of high-strength additively manufactured porous biomaterials. The method is used to develop morphology and mechanical maps that illustrate the role played by pore size, porosity, strut thickness, and topology on the relations governing their elastic modulus and compressive yield strength. Overall, there are mismatches between the mechanical properties of ideal-geometry models and as-manufactured porous biomaterials with average errors of 49% and 41% respectively for compressive elastic modulus and yield strength. The proposed methodology gives more accurate predictions for the compressive stiffness and the compressive strength properties with a reduction of the average error to 11% and 7.6%. The implications of the results and the methodology here introduced are discussed in the relevant biomechanical and clinical context, with insight that highlights promises and limitations of additively manufactured porous biomaterials for load-bearing bone replacement implants. In this work, we perform mechanical characterization of load-bearing porous biomaterials for bone replacement over their entire design

  9. Repair of Temporal Bone Encephalocele following Canal Wall Down Mastoidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarantis Blioskas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of a temporal bone encephalocele after a canal wall down mastoidectomy performed to treat chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma. The patient was treated successfully via an intracranial approach. An enhanced layer-by-layer repair of the encephalocele and skull base deficit was achieved from intradurally to extradurally, using temporalis fascia, nasal septum cartilage, and artificial dural graft. After a 22-month follow-up period the patient remains symptom free and no recurrence is noted.

  10. Trabecular bone structure and strength - remodelling and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Lis; Ebbesen, Ebbe Nils; Erikstrup, Lise Tornvig

    2000-01-01

    vertical and horizontal struts reaching a certain magnitude and thereby inducing buckling under compression. 4) Microdamage and microfractures will occur - mainly in these very loaded vertical struts. The microfractures will be repaired by microcallus formation, and these calluses will later be removed...... can never be isolated in vivo, other factors need to be investigated: The interplay between the cortical shell and the trabecular network; transmission of load; the interplay between soft tissues (cartilage, connective tissue, muscle) and bone; the shock absorbing capacity of the discs...

  11. Additively Manufactured Macroporous Titanium with Silver-Releasing Micro-/Nanoporous Surface for Multipurpose Infection Control and Bone Repair - A Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhaojun; Xiu, Peng; Xiong, Pan; Zhou, Wenhao; Cheng, Yan; Wei, Shicheng; Zheng, Yufeng; Xi, Tingfei; Cai, Hong; Liu, Zhongjun; Wang, Caimei; Zhang, Weiping; Li, Zhijiang

    2016-10-26

    Restoring large-scale bone defects, where osteogenesis is slow while infections lurk, with biomaterials represents a formidable challenge in orthopedic clinics. Here, we propose a scaffold-based multipurpose anti-infection and bone repairing strategy to meet such restorative needs. To do this, personalized multifunctional titanium meshes were produced through an advanced additive manufacturing process and dual "TiO 2 -poly(dopamine)/Ag (nano)" post modifications, yielding macroporous constructs with micro-/nanoporous walls and nanosilver bullets immobilized/embedded therein. Ultrahigh loading capacity and durable release of Ag + were accomplished. The scaffolds were active against planktonic/adherent bacteria (Gram-negative and positive) for up to 12 weeks. Additionally, they not only defended themselves from biofilm colonization but also helped destroy existing biofilms, especially in combination with antibiotics. Further, the osteoblasts/bacteria coculture study displayed that the engineered surfaces aided MG-63 cells to combat bacterial invasion. Meanwhile, the scaffolds elicited generally acceptable biocompatibility (cell adhesion, proliferation, and viability) and hastened osteoblast differentiation and maturation (alkaline phosphatase production, matrix secretion, and calcification), by synergy of micro-/nanoscale topological cues and bioactive catecholamine chemistry. Although done ex vivo, these studies reveal that our three-in-one strategy (infection prophylaxis, infection fighting, and bone repair) has great potential to simultaneously prevent/combat infections and bridge defected bone. This work provides new thoughts to the use of enabling technologies to design biomaterials that resolve unmet clinical needs.

  12. Reconstruction of irradiated bone segmental defects with a biomaterial associating MBCP+(R), microstructured collagen membrane and total bone marrow grafting: an experimental study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégoux, Franck; Goyenvalle, Eric; Cognet, Ronan; Malard, Olivier; Moreau, Francoise; Daculsi, Guy; Aguado, Eric

    2009-12-15

    The bone tissue engineering models used today are still a long way from any oncologic application as immediate postimplantation irradiation would decrease their osteoinductive potential. The aim of this study was to reconstruct a segmental critical size defect in a weight-bearing bone irradiated after implantation. Six white New Zealand rabbits were immediately implanted with a biomaterial associating resorbable collagen membrane EZ(R) filled and micro-macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate granules (MBCP+(R)). After a daily schedule of radiation delivery, and within 4 weeks, a total autologous bone marrow (BM) graft was injected percutaneously into the center of the implant. All the animals were sacrificed at 16 weeks. Successful osseous colonization was found to have bridged the entire length of the defects. Identical distribution of bone ingrowth and residual ceramics at the different levels of the implant suggests that the BM graft plays an osteoinductive role in the center of the defect. Periosteum-like formation was observed at the periphery, with the collagen membrane most likely playing a role. This model succeeded in bridging a large segmental defect in weight-bearing bone with immediate postimplantation fractionated radiation delivery. This has significant implications for the bone tissue engineering approach to patients with cancer-related bone defects.

  13. 3D artificial bones for bone repair prepared by computed tomography-guided fused deposition modeling for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Ye, Xiaojian; Wei, Daixu; Zhong, Jian; Chen, Yuyun; Xu, Guohua; He, Dannong

    2014-09-10

    The medical community has expressed significant interest in the development of new types of artificial bones that mimic natural bones. In this study, computed tomography (CT)-guided fused deposition modeling (FDM) was employed to fabricate polycaprolactone (PCL)/hydroxyapatite (HA) and PCL 3D artificial bones to mimic natural goat femurs. The in vitro mechanical properties, in vitro cell biocompatibility, and in vivo performance of the artificial bones in a long load-bearing goat femur bone segmental defect model were studied. All of the results indicate that CT-guided FDM is a simple, convenient, relatively low-cost method that is suitable for fabricating natural bonelike artificial bones. Moreover, PCL/HA 3D artificial bones prepared by CT-guided FDM have more close mechanics to natural bone, good in vitro cell biocompatibility, biodegradation ability, and appropriate in vivo new bone formation ability. Therefore, PCL/HA 3D artificial bones could be potentially be of use in the treatment of patients with clinical bone defects.

  14. Glucocorticoid induced osteopenia in cancellous bone of sheep: validation of large animal model for spine fusion and biomaterial research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Cheng, Liming; Bollen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Glucocorticoid with low calcium and phosphorus intake induces osteopenia in cancellous bone of sheep. OBJECTIVE: To validate a large animal model for spine fusion and biomaterial research. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: A variety of ovariectomized animals has been used to study...... osteoporosis. Most experimental spine fusions were based on normal animals, and there is a great need for suitable large animal models with adequate bone size that closely resemble osteoporosis in humans. METHODS: Eighteen female skeletal mature sheep were randomly allocated into 3 groups, 6 each. Group 1 (GC......-1) received prednisolone (GC) treatment (0.60 mg/kg/day, 5 times weekly) for 7 months. Group 2 (GC-2) received the same treatment as GC-1 for 7 months followed by 3 months without treatment. Group 3 was left untreated and served as the controls. All sheep received restricted diet with low calcium...

  15. Surface-modified functionalized polycaprolactone scaffolds for bone repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Svend Le, Dang Quang

    2014-01-01

    A porcine calvaria defect study was carried out to investigate the bone repair potential of three-dimensional (3D)-printed poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds embedded with nanoporous PCL. A microscopic grid network was created by rapid prototyping making a 3D-fused deposition model (FDM-PCL). Af......A porcine calvaria defect study was carried out to investigate the bone repair potential of three-dimensional (3D)-printed poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds embedded with nanoporous PCL. A microscopic grid network was created by rapid prototyping making a 3D-fused deposition model (FDM......-PCL). Afterward, the FDM-PCL scaffolds were infused with a mixture of PCL, water, and 1,4-dioxane and underwent a thermal-induced phase separation (TIPS) followed by lyophilization. The TIPS process lead to a nanoporous structure shielded by the printed microstructure (NSP-PCL). Sixteen Landrace pigs were divided...... into two groups with 8 and 12 weeks follow-up, respectively. A total of six nonpenetrating holes were drilled in the calvaria of each animal. The size of the cylindrical defects was h 10 mm and Ø 10 mm. The defects were distributed randomly using following groups: (a) NSP-PCL scaffold, (b) FDM-PCL scaffold...

  16. Raman spectroscopic study of the repair of surgical bone defects grafted or not with biphasic synthetic micro-granular HA + β-calcium triphosphate irradiated or not with λ850 nm LED light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luiz Guilherme P; Marques, Aparecida Maria C; Guarda, Milena G; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S; Andrade, Aline S; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B; Silveira, Landulfo

    2014-11-01

    The handling of bone losses due to different etiologic factors is difficult and many techniques are aim to improve repair, including a wide range of biomaterials and, recently, photobioengineering. This work aimed to assess, through Raman spectroscopy, the level of bone mineralization using the intensities of the Raman peaks of both inorganic (~960, ~1,070, and 1,077 cm(-1)) and organic (~1,454 and ~1,666 cm(-1)) contents of bone tissue. Forty rats were divided into four groups each subdivided into two subgroups according to the time of sacrifice (15 and 30 days). Surgical bone defects were made on the femur of each animal with a trephine drill. On animals of group clot, the defect was filled only by blood clot, on group LED, the defect filled with the clot was further irradiated. On animals of groups biomaterial and LED + biomaterial, the defect was filled by biomaterial and the last one was further irradiated (λ850 ± 10 nm, 150 mW, Φ ~ 0.5 cm(2), 20 J/cm(2)-session, 140 J/cm(2)-treatment) at 48-h intervals and repeated for 2 weeks. At both 15th and 30th days following sacrifice, samples were taken and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. At the end of the experimental time, the intensity of hydroxyapatite (HA) (~960 cm(-1)) were higher on group LED + biomaterial and the peaks of both organic content (~1,454 and ~1,666 cm(-1)) and transitional HA (~1,070 and ~1,077 cm(-1)) were lower on the same group. It is concluded that the use of LED phototherapy associated to biomaterial was effective in improving bone healing on bone defects as a result of the increasing deposition of HA measured by Raman spectroscopy.

  17. Glucocorticoid induced osteopenia in cancellous bone of sheep: validation of large animal model for spine fusion and biomaterial research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ming; Cheng, Liming; Bollen, Peter; Schwarz, Peter; Overgaard, Søren

    2010-02-15

    Glucocorticoid with low calcium and phosphorus intake induces osteopenia in cancellous bone of sheep. To validate a large animal model for spine fusion and biomaterial research. A variety of ovariectomized animals has been used to study osteoporosis. Most experimental spine fusions were based on normal animals, and there is a great need for suitable large animal models with adequate bone size that closely resemble osteoporosis in humans. Eighteen female skeletal mature sheep were randomly allocated into 3 groups, 6 each. Group 1 (GC-1) received prednisolone (GC) treatment (0.60 mg/kg/day, 5 times weekly) for 7 months. Group 2 (GC-2) received the same treatment as GC-1 for 7 months followed by 3 months without treatment. Group 3 was left untreated and served as the controls. All sheep received restricted diet with low calcium and phosphorus during experiment. After killing the animals, cancellous bone specimens from the vertebra, femurs, and tibias were micro-CT scanned and tested mechanically. Serum biomarkers were determined. In lumbar vertebra, the GC treatment resulted in significant decrease of cancellous bone volume fraction and trabecular thickness, and bone strength. However, the microarchitecture and bone strength of GC-2 recovered to a similar level of the controls. A similar trend of microarchitectural changes was also observed in the distal femur and proximal tibia of both GC treated sheep. The bone formation marker serum-osteocalcin was largely reduced in GC-1 compared to the controls, but recovered with a rebound increase at month 10 in GC-2. The current investigation demonstrates that the changes in microarchitecture and mechanical properties were comparable with those observed in humans after long-term GC treatment. A prolonged GC treatment is needed for a long-term observation to keep osteopenic bone. This model resembles long-term glucocorticoid treated osteoporotic model, and is useful in preclinical studies.

  18. Bone Injury and Repair Trigger Central and Peripheral NPY Neuronal Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília J Alves

    Full Text Available Bone repair is a specialized type of wound repair controlled by complex multi-factorial events. The nervous system is recognized as one of the key regulators of bone mass, thereby suggesting a role for neuronal pathways in bone homeostasis. However, in the context of bone injury and repair, little is known on the interplay between the nervous system and bone. Here, we addressed the neuropeptide Y (NPY neuronal arm during the initial stages of bone repair encompassing the inflammatory response and ossification phases in femoral-defect mouse model. Spatial and temporal analysis of transcriptional and protein levels of NPY and its receptors, Y1R and Y2R, reported to be involved in bone homeostasis, was performed in bone, dorsal root ganglia (DRG and hypothalamus after femoral injury. The results showed that NPY system activity is increased in a time- and space-dependent manner during bone repair. Y1R expression was trigged in both bone and DRG throughout the inflammatory phase, while a Y2R response was restricted to the hypothalamus and at a later stage, during the ossification step. Our results provide new insights into the involvement of NPY neuronal pathways in bone repair.

  19. Biocompatibility and Toxicity of Nano biomaterials 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.; Lee, S.Ch.; Zhang, Sh.; Akasaka, T.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that nano materials have developed rapidly over the past few decades. Based on their unique physicochemical properties and special mechanical properties, nano materials have provided application possibility in many different fields. Currently, as nano biomaterials, they are widely used in various biomedical applications, such as drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, dental/bone implant, and biosensors. For example, nano biomaterials have been used in tissue engineering because of their satisfactory bioactivity, high mechanical properties, and large surface area to adsorb specific proteins. Many kinds of nano biomaterials are used to prepare composite scaffolds to get better biocompatibility and higher ability in repairing specific tissues. Several antibacterial metallic nano biomaterials are used to coat implant surfaces to improve the speed of healing fractures. In addition, lots of nano biomaterials have the potential to break the limitations of the traditional delivery systems. They can load larger amount of drugs and provide stable drug release for long time at the targeted sites, such as tumors. Moreover, they can combine with polymers to furnish simultaneous drug delivery systems with the controllable release rate. Besides these applications, more and more nano biomaterials show great potential to be applied as highly sensitive biosensors because they have higher ability in loading firmly or interacting completely with recognition aptamers.

  20. The effect of hydroxyapatite addition on the mechanical properties of polyvinyl alcohol/chitosan biomaterials for bone scaffolds application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramahdita, Ghiska; Puspita, Debie Maya; Albab, Muh Fadhil; Alfata, Rowi; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Yuwono, Akhmad Herman

    2018-02-01

    The increasing number of bone fracture incident in Indonesia from year to year needs an urgent problem solving of the limited bone substitute which can meet the necessary criteria for that purpose. Motivated by this, therefore, the current study is focusing on the optimization of material properties used as bone scaffold. A biomaterial of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/chitosan-hydroxyapatite (HA) composite was successfully made by wet chemistry method, followed by freeze thawing and freeze drying. For comparison purposes, the percentage of HA has been varied from 0, 25 and 40 % (wt/v). The resulting composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), compressive test, and swelling behavior. The results showed that the addition of HA up to 40% (wt/v) has yielded a porous structure with an average pore size of 42.39 µm. In addition, the compressive modulus was enhanced from 14 MPa for 0% HA to 143, and 191 MPa for composites with the addition of HA from 25 to 40% (wt/v). The addition of HA has also reduced the swelling ratio from 296% for the sample without HA to 85 and 78 % for sample with addition of HA from 25 to 40 (wt/v), respectively. The obtained results show that PVA/chitosan-HA in this study is potential to be used as scaffold in bone tissue engineering.

  1. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  2. Diaphragm Repair with a Novel Cross-Linked Collagen Biomaterial in a Growing Rabbit Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffi Mayer

    investigated ACM is not a viable option for CDH repair.

  3. Influence of the λ780nm laser light on the repair of surgical bone defects grafted or not with biphasic synthetic micro-granular hydroxylapatite+Beta-Calcium triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luiz Guilherme P; Marques, Aparecida Maria C; Guarda, Milena G; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B

    2014-02-05

    The treatment of bone loss due to different etiologic factors is difficult and many techniques aim to improve repair, including a wide range of biomaterials and, recently, photobioengineering. This work aimed to assess, through histological analysis The aim of this study was to assess, by light microscopy, the repair of bone defects grafted or not with biphasic synthetic micro-granular Calcium hydroxyapatite (HA)+Beta-TCP associated or not with Laser phototherapy - LPT (λ780nm). Forty rats were divided into 4 groups each subdivided into 2 subgroups according to the time of sacrifice (15 and 30days). Surgical bone defects were made on femur of each animal with a trephine drill. On animals of Clot group the defect was filled only by blood clot, on Laser group the defect filled with the clot was further irradiated. On animals of Biomaterial and Laser+Biomaterial groups the defect was filled by biomaterial and the last one was further irradiated (λ780nm, 70mW, spot size∼0.4cm(2), 20J/cm(2)-session, 140J/cm(2)-treatment) in four points around the defect at 48-h intervals and repeated for 2weeks. At both 15th and 30th days following sacrifice, samples were taken and analyzed by light microscopy. Many similarities were observed histologically between groups on regards bone reabsorption and neoformation, inflammatory infiltrate and collagen deposition. The criterion degree of maturation, marked by the presence of basophilic lines, indicated that the use of LPT associated with HA+Beta TCP graft, resulted in more advanced stage of bone repair at the end of the experiment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Carbon-centered radicals in γ-irradiated bone substituting biomaterials based on hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadlo, Jaroslaw; Strzelczak, Grazyna; Lewandowska-Szumiel, Malgorzata; Sterniczuk, Marcin; Pajchel, Lukasz; Michalik, Jacek

    2012-09-01

    Gamma irradiated synthetic hydroxyapatite, bone substituting materials NanoBone(®) and HA Biocer were examined using EPR spectroscopy and compared with powdered human compact bone. In every case, radiation-induced carbon centered radicals were recorded, but their molecular structures and concentrations differed. In compact bone and synthetic hydroxyapatite the main signal assigned to the CO(2) (-) anion radical was stable, whereas the signal due to the CO(3) (3-) radical dominated in NanoBone(®) and HA Biocer just after irradiation. However, after a few days of storage of these samples, also a CO(2) (-) signal was recorded. The EPR study of irradiated compact bone and the synthetic graft materials suggest that their microscopic structures are different. In FT-IR spectra of NanoBone(®), HA Biocer and synthetic hydroxyapatite the HPO(4) (2-) and CO(3) (2-) in B-site groups are detected, whereas in compact bone signals due to collagen dominate.

  5. Visualizing Angiogenesis by Multiphoton Microscopy In Vivo in Genetically Modified 3D-PLGA/nHAp Scaffold for Calvarial Critical Bone Defect Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Jahr, Holger; Zheng, Wei; Ren, Pei-Gen

    2017-09-07

    The reconstruction of critically sized bone defects remains a serious clinical problem because of poor angiogenesis within tissue-engineered scaffolds during repair, which gives rise to a lack of sufficient blood supply and causes necrosis of the new tissues. Rapid vascularization is a vital prerequisite for new tissue survival and integration with existing host tissue. The de novo generation of vasculature in scaffolds is one of the most important steps in making bone regeneration more efficient, allowing repairing tissue to grow into a scaffold. To tackle this problem, the genetic modification of a biomaterial scaffold is used to accelerate angiogenesis and osteogenesis. However, visualizing and tracking in vivo blood vessel formation in real-time and in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds or new bone tissue is still an obstacle for bone tissue engineering. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a novel bio-imaging modality that can acquire volumetric data from biological structures in a high-resolution and minimally-invasive manner. The objective of this study was to visualize angiogenesis with multiphoton microscopy in vivo in a genetically modified 3D-PLGA/nHAp scaffold for calvarial critical bone defect repair. PLGA/nHAp scaffolds were functionalized for the sustained delivery of a growth factor pdgf-b gene carrying lentiviral vectors (LV-pdgfb) in order to facilitate angiogenesis and to enhance bone regeneration. In a scaffold-implanted calvarial critical bone defect mouse model, the blood vessel areas (BVAs) in PHp scaffolds were significantly higher than in PH scaffolds. Additionally, the expression of pdgf-b and angiogenesis-related genes, vWF and VEGFR2, increased correspondingly. MicroCT analysis indicated that the new bone formation in the PHp group dramatically improved compared to the other groups. To our knowledge, this is the first time multiphoton microscopy was used in bone tissue-engineering to investigate angiogenesis in a 3D bio-degradable scaffold in

  6. Molecular interactions in biomineralized hydroxyapatite amino acid modified nanoclay: In silico design of bone biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katti, Dinesh R.; Sharma, Anurag; Ambre, Avinash H.; Katti, Kalpana S.

    2015-01-01

    A simulations driven approach to design of a novel biomaterial nanocomposite system is described in this study. Nanoclays modified with amino acids (OMMT) were used to mineralize hydroxyapatite (HAP), mimicking biomineralization. Representative models of organically modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) and OMMT-hydroxyapatite (OMMT-HAP) were constructed using molecular dynamics and validated using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transforms Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Attractive interactions exist between Ca atoms of HAP and C=O group of aminovaleric acid, indicating chelate formation in OMMT-HAP. Interaction energy maps describe molecular interactions among different constituents and their quantitative contributions in the OMMT and OMMT-HAP systems at both parallel and perpendicular orientations. High attractive and high repulsive interactions were found between PO 4 3− and MMT clay as well as aminovaleric molecules in OMMT-HAP perpendicular and parallel models. Large non-bonded interactions in OMMT-HAP indicate influence of neighboring environment on PO 4 3− in in situ HAPclay. Extensive hydrogen bonds were observed between functional hydrogen atoms of modifier and MMT clay in OMMT-HAP as compared to OMMT. Thus, HAP interacts with clay through the aminovaleric acid. This computational study provides a framework for materials design and selection for biomaterials used in tissue engineering and other areas of regenerative medicine. - Highlights: • Representative models of a hybrid nanoclay-hydroxyapatite biomaterial are built. • Interaction energy maps are constructed using a molecular dynamics. • Quantitative interactions between the three components of the biomaterial are found. • The modeling and experimental approach provides insight into the complex nanomaterial

  7. An in vitro study of bone cells grown on an electrospun scaffold for bone repair and reconstruction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wepener, I

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This presentation focuses on the manufacturing of the electrospun scaffold and the in vitro testing of this scaffold by making use of human cells. This scaffold is a possible candidate for repair and reconstruction of bone tissue....

  8. Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther J.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials serve as an integral component of tissue engineering. They are designed to provide architectural framework reminiscent of native extracellular matrix in order to encourage cell growth and eventual tissue regeneration. Bone and cartilage represent two distinct tissues with varying compositional and mechanical properties. Despite these differences, both meet at the osteochondral interface. This article presents an overview of current biomaterials employed in bone and cartilage applications, discusses some design considerations, and alludes to future prospects within this field of research. PMID:23820768

  9. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the marine sponge skeleton as a bone mimicking biomaterial

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nandi S.K.; Kundu, B.; Mahato, A.; Thakur, N.L.; Joardar, S.N.; Mandal, B.B.

    cells to migrate. For effective bone regeneration, delivery of these growth factors through a suitable carrier is of utmost importance. Systemic administrations of growth factors are often unpredictable, probably due to their short biological half life... to measure the semi-quantitative bone formation in all the groups at each time point of radiology which has been presented in Table 2. Identification of suitable natural bioscaffolds as bone regeneration capabilities as well as local delivery system...

  10. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel W. Pot

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of mechanically inferior fibrocartilage. As a result, this technique offers only temporary clinical improvement. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine may improve the outcome of microfracture surgery. Filling the subchondral defect with a biomaterial may provide a template for the formation of new hyaline cartilage tissue. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the current evidence for the efficacy of cartilage regeneration in preclinical models using acellular biomaterials implanted after marrow stimulating techniques (microfracturing and subchondral drilling compared to the natural healing response of defects. The review aims to provide new insights into the most effective biomaterials, to provide an overview of currently existing knowledge, and to identify potential lacunae in current studies to direct future research. A comprehensive search was systematically performed in PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP using search terms related to tissue engineering, cartilage and animals. Primary studies in which acellular biomaterials were implanted in osteochondral defects in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals were included and study characteristics tabulated (283 studies out of 6,688 studies found. For studies comparing non-treated empty defects to defects containing implanted biomaterials and using semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure, the risk of bias (135 studies was assessed and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis (151 studies. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed, using cartilage regeneration as outcome measure on an absolute 0–100% scale. Implantation of acellular

  11. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pot, Michiel W; Gonzales, Veronica K; Buma, Pieter; IntHout, Joanna; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; de Vries, Rob B M; Daamen, Willeke F

    2016-01-01

    Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of mechanically inferior fibrocartilage. As a result, this technique offers only temporary clinical improvement. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine may improve the outcome of microfracture surgery. Filling the subchondral defect with a biomaterial may provide a template for the formation of new hyaline cartilage tissue. In this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the current evidence for the efficacy of cartilage regeneration in preclinical models using acellular biomaterials implanted after marrow stimulating techniques (microfracturing and subchondral drilling) compared to the natural healing response of defects. The review aims to provide new insights into the most effective biomaterials, to provide an overview of currently existing knowledge, and to identify potential lacunae in current studies to direct future research. A comprehensive search was systematically performed in PubMed and EMBASE (via OvidSP) using search terms related to tissue engineering, cartilage and animals. Primary studies in which acellular biomaterials were implanted in osteochondral defects in the knee or ankle joint in healthy animals were included and study characteristics tabulated (283 studies out of 6,688 studies found). For studies comparing non-treated empty defects to defects containing implanted biomaterials and using semi-quantitative histology as outcome measure, the risk of bias (135 studies) was assessed and outcome data were collected for meta-analysis (151 studies). Random-effects meta-analyses were performed, using cartilage regeneration as outcome measure on an absolute 0-100% scale. Implantation of acellular biomaterials significantly

  12. In vitro assessment of biomaterial-induced remodeling of subchondral and cancellous bone for the early intervention of joint degeneration with focus on the spinal disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCanless, Jonathan D.

    Osteoarthritis-associated pain of the spinal disc, knee, and hip derives from degeneration of cartilagenous tissues in these joints. Traditional therapies have focused on these cartilage (and disc specific nucleus pulposus) changes as a means of treatment through tissue grafting, regenerative synthetic implants, non-regenerative space filling implants, arthroplasty, and arthrodesis. Although such approaches may seem apparent upon initial consideration of joint degeneration, tissue pathology has shown changes in the underlying bone and vascular bed precede the onset of cartilaginous changes. It is hypothesized that these changes precedent joint degeneration and as such may provide a route for early prevention. The current work proposes an injectable biomaterial-based therapy within these subchondral and cancellous bone regions as a means of preventing or reversing osteoarthritis. Two human concentrated platelet releasate-containing alginate hydrogel/beta-tricalcium phosphate composites have been developed for this potential biomaterial application. The undertaking of assessing these materials through bench-, in vitro, and ex vivo work is described herein. These studies showed the capability of the biomaterials to initiate a wound healing response in monocytes, angiogenic and differentiation behavior in immature endothelial cells, and early osteochondral differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. These cellular activities are associated with fracture healing and endochondral bone formation, demonstrating the potential of the biomaterials to induce osseous and vascular tissue remodeling underlying osteoarthritic joints as a novel therapy for a disease with rapidly growing healthcare costs.

  13. An experimental study on the application of radionuclide imaging in repair of the bone defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Zhu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to validate the effect of radionuclide imaging in early monitoring of the bone’s reconstruction, the animal model of bone defect was made on the rabbits repaired with HA artificial bone. The ability of bone defect repair was evaluated by using radionuclide bone imaging at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks postoperatively. The results indicate that the experimental group stimulated more bone formation than that of the control group. The differences of the bone reconstruction ability were statistically significant (p<0.05. The nano-HA artificial has good bone conduction, and it can be used for the treatment of bone defects. Radionuclide imaging may be an effective and first choice method for the early monitoring of the bone’s reconstruction.

  14. Using radionuclide imaging for monitoring repairment of bone defect with tissue-engineered bone graft in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Changsuo; Ye Fagang; Zou Yunwen; Ji Shixiang; Wang Dengchun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of tissue-engineered bone grafts in repairing bone defect in rabbits, and assess the value of radionuclide for monitoring the therapeutic effect of this approach. Methods: Bilateral radial defects of 15 mm in length in 24 rabbits were made. The tissue-engineered bone grafts (composite graft) contained bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of rabbits and calcium phosphate cement (CPC) were grafted in left side defects, CPC only grafts (artificial bone graft) in right defects. After the operation, radionuclide was used to monitor the therapeutic effects at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Results: 99 Tc m -methylene diphosphonic acid (MDP) radionuclide bone imaging indicated that there was more radionuclide accumulation in grafting region of composite than that of CPC. There was significant difference between 99 Tc m -MDP uptake of the region of interest (ROI) and scintillant counts of composite bone and the artificial bone (P<0.01). Conclusion: Tissue-engineered bone grafts is eligible for repairing radial bone defects, and radionuclide imaging may accurately monitor the revascularization and bone regeneration after the bone graft implantation. (authors)

  15. Graded/Gradient Porous Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xigeng Miao

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials include bioceramics, biometals, biopolymers and biocomposites and they play important roles in the replacement and regeneration of human tissues. However, dense bioceramics and dense biometals pose the problem of stress shielding due to their high Young’s moduli compared to those of bones. On the other hand, porous biomaterials exhibit the potential of bone ingrowth, which will depend on porous parameters such as pore size, pore interconnectivity, and porosity. Unfortunately, a highly porous biomaterial results in poor mechanical properties. To optimise the mechanical and the biological properties, porous biomaterials with graded/gradient porosity, pores size, and/or composition have been developed. Graded/gradient porous biomaterials have many advantages over graded/gradient dense biomaterials and uniform or homogenous porous biomaterials. The internal pore surfaces of graded/gradient porous biomaterials can be modified with organic, inorganic, or biological coatings and the internal pores themselves can also be filled with biocompatible and biodegradable materials or living cells. However, graded/gradient porous biomaterials are generally more difficult to fabricate than uniform or homogenous porous biomaterials. With the development of cost-effective processing techniques, graded/gradient porous biomaterials can find wide applications in bone defect filling, implant fixation, bone replacement, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  16. Calvarial Suture-Derived Stem Cells and Their Contribution to Cranial Bone Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Doro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the natural turnover during life, the bones in the skeleton possess the ability to self-repair in response to injury or disease-related bone loss. Based on studies of bone defect models, both processes are largely supported by resident stem cells. In the long bones, the source of skeletal stem cells has been widely investigated over the years, where the major stem cell population is thought to reside in the perivascular niche of the bone marrow. In contrast, we have very limited knowledge about the stem cells contributing to the repair of calvarial bones. In fact, until recently, the presence of specific stem cells in adult craniofacial bones was uncertain. These flat bones are mainly formed via intramembranous rather than endochondral ossification and thus contain minimal bone marrow space. It has been previously proposed that the overlying periosteum and underlying dura mater provide osteoprogenitors for calvarial bone repair. Nonetheless, recent studies have identified a major stem cell population within the suture mesenchyme with multiple differentiation abilities and intrinsic reparative potential. Here we provide an updated review of calvarial stem cells and potential mechanisms of regulation in the context of skull injury repair.

  17. Extrusion of bone anchor suture following flexor digitorum profundus tendon avulsion injury repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2011-09-01

    Flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) zone I tendon avulsion injury is traditionally repaired with a pullout suture technique. More recently, bone anchor sutures have been used as a viable alternative and have largely replaced areas in hand surgery where pullout suture technique was once required. To date, there have been very few complications reported related to bone anchor suture use in FDP tendon reattachment to the bone. We report a very unusual case of extrusion of bone anchor through the nailbed, 6 years after zone I FDP tendon avulsion injury repair and a brief review of literature.

  18. Radiographic and histological study of perennial bone defect repair in rat calvaria after treatment with blocks of porous bovine organic graft material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marins, Lucele Vieira; Cestari, Tania Mary; Sottovia, André Dotto; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Taga, Rumio

    2004-03-01

    Over the last few years, various bone graft materials of bovine origin to be used in oromaxillofacial surgeries have entered the market. In the present study, we determined the capacity of a block organic bone graft material (Gen-ox, Baumer SA, Brazil) prepared from bovine cancellous bone to promote the repair of critical size bone injuries in rat calvaria. A transosseous defect measuring approximately 8mm in diameter was performed with a surgical trephine in the parietal bone of 25 rats. In 15 animals, the defects were filled with a block of graft material measuring 8mm in diameter and soaked in the animal's own blood, and in the other 10 animals the defects were only filled with blood clots. The calvariae of rats receiving the material were collected 1, 3 and 6 months after surgery, and those of animals receiving the blood clots were collected immediately and 6 months after surgery. During surgery, the graft material was found to be of easy handling and to adapt perfectly to the receptor bed after soaking in blood. The results showed that, in most animals treated, the material was slowly resorbed and served as a space filling and maintenance material, favoring angiogenesis, cell migration and adhesion, and bone neoformation from the borders of the lesion. However, a foreign body-type granulomatous reaction, with the presence of numerous giant cells preventing local bone neoformation, was observed in two animals of the 1-month subgroup and in one animal of the 3-month subgroup. These cases were interpreted as resulting from the absence of demineralization and the lack of removal of potential antigen factors during production of the biomaterial. We conclude that, with improvement in the quality control of the material production, block organic bone matrix will become a good alternative for bone defect repair in the oromaxillofacial region due to its high osteoconductive capacity.

  19. Teeth and bones: applications of surface science to dental materials and related biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, F. H.

    2001-05-01

    Recent years have seen a considerable upsurge in publications concerning the surface structure and chemistry of materials with biological or biomedical applications. Within the body, gas-solid interactions become relatively less significant and solid-liquid or solid-solid interfaces dominate, providing new challenges for the surface scientist. The current paper aims to provide a timely review of the use of surface analysis and modification techniques within the biomaterials field. A broad overview of applications in a number of related areas is given with particular attention focusing on those materials commonly encountered in dentistry and oral or maxillofacial implantology. Several specific issues of current interest are discussed. The interaction between synthetic and natural solids, both in the oral environment and elsewhere in the body is important in terms of adhesion, related stresses and strains and ultimately the longevity of a dental restoration, biomedical implant, or indeed the surrounding tissue. Exposure to body fluids, of course, can also affect stability, leading to the degradation or corrosion of materials within the body. Whilst this could potentially be harmful, e.g., if cytotoxic elements are released, it may alternatively provide a route to the preferential release of beneficial substances. Furthermore, in some cases, the controlled disintegration of a biomaterial is desirable, allowing the removal of an implant, e.g., without the need for further surgery. The presence of cells in the immediate bioenvironment additionally complicates the situation. A considerable amount of current research activity is targeted at the development of coatings or surface treatments to encourage tissue growth. If this is to be achieved by stimulating enhanced cell productivity, determination of the relationship between cell function and surface composition is essential.

  20. An animal model in sheep for biocompatibility testing of biomaterials in cancellous bones

    OpenAIRE

    Nuss, Katja MR; Auer, Joerg A; Boos, Alois; Rechenberg, Brigitte von

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The past years have seen the development of many synthetic bone replacements. To test their biocompatibility and ability for osseointegration, osseoinduction and -conduction requires their placement within bone preferably in an animal experiment of a higher species. Methods A suitable experimental animal model in sheep with drill holes of 8 mm diameter and 13 mm depth within the proximal and distal humerus and femur for testing biocompatibility issues is introduced. Result...

  1. 3D-Printed Scaffolds and Biomaterials: Review of Alveolar Bone Augmentation and Periodontal Regeneration Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Asa'ad, Farah; Pagni, Giorgio; Pilipchuk, Sophia P.; Giann?, Aldo Bruno; Giannobile, William V.; Rasperini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    To ensure a successful dental implant therapy, the presence of adequate vertical and horizontal alveolar bone is fundamental. However, an insufficient amount of alveolar ridge in both dimensions is often encountered in dental practice due to the consequences of oral diseases and tooth loss. Although postextraction socket preservation has been adopted to lessen the need for such invasive approaches, it utilizes bone grafting materials, which have limitations that could negatively affect the qu...

  2. Repair of rabbit radial bone defects using true bone ceramics combined with BMP-2-related peptide and type I collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingfeng; Lin Zhenyu; Zheng Qixin; Guo Xiaodong; Lan Shenghui; Liu Sunan; Yang Shuhua

    2010-01-01

    An ideal bone graft material is the one characterized with good biocompatibility, biodegradation, osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity. In this study, a novel synthetic BMP-2-related peptide (designated P24) corresponding to residues of the knuckle epitope of BMP-2 was introduced into a biomimetic scaffold based on sintered bovine bone or true bone ceramics (TBC) and type I collagen (TBC/collagen I) using a simulated body fluid (SBF). Hydroxylapatite crystal mineralization with a Ca/P molar ratio of 1.63 was observed on the surface of P24/TBC/collagen I composite by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Cell adhesion rate evaluation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) seeded on materials in vitro showed that the percentage of cells attached to P24/TBC/collagen I composite was significantly higher than that of the TBC/collagen I composite. A 10 mm unilateral segmental bone defect was created in the radius of New Zealand white rabbits and randomly implanted with three groups of biomaterials (Group A: P24/TBC/collagen I composite; Group B: TBC/collagen I composite and Group C: TBC alone). Based on radiographic evaluation and histological examination, the implants of P24/TBC/collagen I composite significantly stimulated bone growth, thereby confirming the enhanced rate of bone healing compared with that of TBC/collagen I composite and TBC alone. It was concluded that BMP-2-related peptide P24 could induce nucleation of calcium phosphate crystals on the surface of TBC/collagen I composite. The TBC/collagen I composite loaded with the synthetic BMP-2-related peptide is a promising scaffold biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

  3. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ya-jing; Liu, Jian-min; Wei, Shu-ming; Zhang, Yun-hao; Qu, Zhen-hua; Chen, Shu-bo

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-l...

  4. A Review of Injectable and Implantable Biomaterials for Treatment and Repair of Soft Tissues in Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Feng Chou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The two major topics concerning the development of nanomedicine are drug delivery and tissue engineering. With the advance in nanotechnology, scientists and engineers now have the ability to fabricate functional drug carriers and/or biomaterials that deliver and release drugs locally as well as promote tissue regeneration. In this short review, we address the use of nanotechnology in the fabrication of biomaterials (i.e., nanoparticles and nanofibers and their therapeutic function in wound healing as dressing materials. Furthermore, we discuss the use of surface nanofeatures to regulate cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation, which is a crucial step in wound healing associated with tissue regeneration. Given that nanotechnology-based biomaterials exhibit superior pharmaceutical performance as compared to the traditional medicine, this short review provides current status and future directions of how nanotechnology is and will be used in biomedical field, especially in wound healing.

  5. Adaptive growth factor delivery from a polyelectrolyte coating promotes synergistic bone tissue repair and reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nisarg J.; Hyder, Md. Nasim; Quadir, Mohiuddin A.; Dorval Courchesne, Noémie-Manuelle; Seeherman, Howard J.; Nevins, Myron; Spector, Myron; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic wounds and congenital defects that require large-scale bone tissue repair have few successful clinical therapies, particularly for craniomaxillofacial defects. Although bioactive materials have demonstrated alternative approaches to tissue repair, an optimized materials system for reproducible, safe, and targeted repair remains elusive. We hypothesized that controlled, rapid bone formation in large, critical-size defects could be induced by simultaneously delivering multiple biological growth factors to the site of the wound. Here, we report an approach for bone repair using a polyelectrolye multilayer coating carrying as little as 200 ng of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and platelet-derived growth factor-BB that were eluted over readily adapted time scales to induce rapid bone repair. Based on electrostatic interactions between the polymer multilayers and growth factors alone, we sustained mitogenic and osteogenic signals with these growth factors in an easily tunable and controlled manner to direct endogenous cell function. To prove the role of this adaptive release system, we applied the polyelectrolyte coating on a well-studied biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) support membrane. The released growth factors directed cellular processes to induce bone repair in a critical-size rat calvaria model. The released growth factors promoted local bone formation that bridged a critical-size defect in the calvaria as early as 2 wk after implantation. Mature, mechanically competent bone regenerated the native calvaria form. Such an approach could be clinically useful and has significant benefits as a synthetic, off-the-shelf, cell-free option for bone tissue repair and restoration. PMID:25136093

  6. The homing of bone marrow MSCs to non-osseous sites for ectopic bone formation induced by osteoinductive calcium phosphate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, G.; Habibovic, Pamela; Bao, Chongyun; Hu, J.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Yuan, Huipin; Chen, W.; Xu, H.H.K.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoinductive biomaterials are promising for bone repair. There is no direct proof that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) home to non-osseous sites and participate in ectopic bone formation induced by osteoinductive bioceramics. The objective of this study was to use a sex-mismatched

  7. Effects of bone substitute architecture and surface properties on cell response, angiogenesis, and structure of new bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, F.S.L.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    The success of bone substitutes used to repair bone defects such as critical sized defects depends on the architecture of the porous biomaterial. The architectural parameters and surface properties affect cell seeding efficiency, cell response, angiogenesis, and eventually bone formation. The

  8. Evaluation on Bending Properties of Biomaterial GUM Metal Meshed Plates for Bone Graft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiromichi; He, Jianmei

    2017-11-01

    There are three bone graft methods for bone defects caused by diseases such as cancer and accident injuries: Autogenous bone grafts, Allografts and Artificial bone grafts. In this study, meshed GUM Metal plates with lower elasticity, high strength and high biocompatibility are introduced to solve the over stiffness & weight problems of ready-used metal implants. Basic mesh shapes are designed and applied to GUM Metal plates using 3D CAD modeling tools. Bending properties of prototype meshed GUM Metal plates are evaluated experimentally and analytically. Meshed plate specimens with 180°, 120° and 60° axis-symmetrical types were fabricated for 3-point bending tests. The pseudo bending elastic moduli of meshed plate specimens obtained from 3-point bending test are ranged from 4.22 GPa to 16.07 GPa, within the elasticity range of natural cortical bones from 2.0 GPa to 30.0 GPa. Analytical approach method is validated by comparison with experimental and analytical results for evaluation on bending property of meshed plates.

  9. beta-TCP Versus Autologous Bone for Repair of Alveolar Clefts in a Goat Model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, A. de; Meijer, G.J.; Dormaar, T.; Janssen, N.; Bilt, A. van der; Slootweg, P.J.; Bruijn, J. de; Rijn, L. van; Koole, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective : The aim of this study in goats was to test the hypothesis that a novel synthetic bone substitute beta tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) can work as well as autologous bone harvested from the iliac crest for grafting and repair of alveolar clefts. Design : Ten adult Dutch milk goats ( Capra

  10. Primary implant stability in augmented sinuslift-sites after completed bone regeneration: a randomized controlled clinical study comparing four subantrally inserted biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo Troedhan; Izabela Schlichting; Andreas Kurrek; Marcel Wainwright

    2014-01-01

    Implant-Insertion-Torque-Value (ITV) proved to be a significant clinical parameter to predict long term implant success-rates and to decide upon immediate loading. The study evaluated ITVs, when four different and commonly used biomaterials were used in sinuslift-procedures compared to natural subantral bone in two-stage-implant-procedures. The tHUCSL-INTRALIFT-method was chosen for sinuslifting in 155 sinuslift-sites for its minimal invasive transcrestal approach and scalable augmentation vo...

  11. Biomaterials recycling: bioglasses obtained from reuse of hydroxyapatite (HA) bovine bone with term exceeded validity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.C.; Santos, S.C.; Braga, F.J.C.; Aparecida, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    The hydroxyapatite (HA) is a reference bioceramic for bone replacement and regeneration medical practice, becoming one of the most produced and researched bone graft material. Since it is a material for biomedical application, the manufacture and storage of this bioceramic must comply with severe conservation criteria, and its validity date is the lawful major factor for disposal. Materials with the exceeded expiration date are usually discarded and incinerated, resulting in ash, environmental contamination and energy expenditure. This study evaluates the possibility of reuse of bovine HA collected after its validity date as raw material to obtain bioglass, aiming to natural resources saving and environmental emissions mitigation. 45S5 similar compositions were obtained by melting the materials at 1500 ° C, followed by rapid cooling and annealing thermal treatment (500 ° C for 2h), analytical grade chemical reagents were used to set the final composition. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and hydrolysis resistance techniques. The results of comparative chemical resistance (Hydrolytic) tests indicate the potential use of the materials developed for bone replacement applications. (author)

  12. 3D printed microchannel networks to direct vascularisation during endochondral bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Andrew C; Pitacco, Pierluca; Nulty, Jessica; Cunniffe, Gráinne M; Kelly, Daniel J

    2018-04-01

    Bone tissue engineering strategies that recapitulate the developmental process of endochondral ossification offer a promising route to bone repair. Clinical translation of such endochondral tissue engineering strategies will require overcoming a number of challenges, including the engineering of large and often anatomically complex cartilage grafts, as well as the persistence of core regions of avascular cartilage following their implantation into large bone defects. Here 3D printing technology is utilized to develop a versatile and scalable approach to guide vascularisation during endochondral bone repair. First, a sacrificial pluronic ink was used to 3D print interconnected microchannel networks in a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) laden gelatin-methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogel. These constructs (with and without microchannels) were next chondrogenically primed in vitro and then implanted into critically sized femoral bone defects in rats. The solid and microchanneled cartilage templates enhanced bone repair compared to untreated controls, with the solid cartilage templates (without microchannels) supporting the highest levels of total bone formation. However, the inclusion of 3D printed microchannels was found to promote osteoclast/immune cell invasion, hydrogel degradation, and vascularisation following implantation. In addition, the endochondral bone tissue engineering strategy was found to support comparable levels of bone healing to BMP-2 delivery, whilst promoting lower levels of heterotopic bone formation, with the microchanneled templates supporting the lowest levels of heterotopic bone formation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that 3D printed hypertrophic cartilage grafts represent a promising approach for the repair of complex bone fractures, particularly for larger defects where vascularisation will be a key challenge. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 3D printing of hybrid biomaterials for bone tissue engineering: Calcium-polyphosphate microparticles encapsulated by polycaprolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufurth, Meik; Wang, Xiaohong; Wang, Shunfeng; Steffen, Renate; Ackermann, Maximilian; Haep, Natalie D; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2017-12-01

    Here we describe the formulation of a morphogenetically active bio-ink consisting of amorphous microparticles (MP) prepared from Ca 2+ and the physiological inorganic polymer, polyphosphate (polyP). Those MP had been fortified by mixing with poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) to allow 3D-bioprinting. The resulting granular PCL/Ca-polyP-MP hybrid material, liquefied by short-time heating to 100 °C, was used for the 3D-printing of tissue-like scaffolds formed by strands with a thickness of 400 µm and a stacked architecture leaving ≈0.5 mm 2 -sized open holes enabling cell migration. The printed composite scaffold turned out to combine suitable biomechanical properties (Young's modulus of 1.60 ± 0.1 GPa; Martens hardness of 153 ± 28 MPa), matching those of cortical and trabecular bone, with morphogenetic activity. This scaffold was capable of attracting and promoting the growth of human bone-related SaOS-2 cells as demonstrated by staining for cell viability (Calcein AM), cell density (DRAQ5) and SEM studies. Furthermore, the hybrid material was demonstrated to upregulate the steady-state-expression of the cell migration-inducing chemokine SDF-1α. EDX analysis and FTIR measurements revealed the presence of hydroxyapatite in the mineral deposits formed on the scaffold surface. Based on the results we conclude that granular PCL/Ca-polyP-MP hybrid material is suitable for the fabrication of bioprintable scaffold which comprises not only biomechanical stability but also morphogenetic potential. In present-day regenerative engineering efforts, biomaterial- and cell-based strategies are proposed that meet the required functional and spatial characteristics and variations, especially in the transition regions between soft (cartilage, tendon or ligament) and hard (bone) tissues. In a biomimetic approach we succeeded to fabricate amorphous Ca-polyP nanoparticles/microparticles which are highly biocompatible. Together with polycaprolactone (PCL), polyP can be

  14. Novel nanocomposite biomaterial to differentiate bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to the osteogenic lineage for bone restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Arun; Young, Chelsea; Farina, Juliana; Witzl, Ashley; Marks, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: As the bone engineering field moves away from nonviable implants to more biocompatible and natural structures, nanomedicine has emerged as a superior tool for developing implantable materials. Methods: Here, we describe the fabrication and testing of a nanocomposite structure composed of chitosan and a biocompatible thermoplastic (PMMA). Results: Our nanocomposite material displayed morphologically similar characteristics to an extracted murine femur during microsc...

  15. Advanced age diminishes tendon-to-bone healing in a rat model of rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plate, Johannes F; Brown, Philip J; Walters, Jordan; Clark, John A; Smith, Thomas L; Freehill, Michael T; Tuohy, Christopher J; Stitzel, Joel D; Mannava, Sandeep

    2014-04-01

    Advanced patient age is associated with recurrent tearing and failure of rotator cuff repairs clinically; however, basic science studies have not evaluated the influence of aging on tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair in an animal model. Hypothesis/ This study examined the effect of aging on tendon-to-bone healing in an established rat model of rotator cuff repair using the aged animal colony from the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. The authors hypothesized that normal aging decreases biomechanical strength and histologic organization at the tendon-to-bone junction after acute repair. Controlled laboratory study. In 56 F344xBN rats, 28 old and 28 young (24 and 8 months of age, respectively), the supraspinatus tendon was transected and repaired. At 2 or 8 weeks after surgery, shoulder specimens underwent biomechanical testing to compare load-to-failure and load-relaxation response between age groups. Histologic sections of the tendon-to-bone interface were assessed with hematoxylin and eosin staining, and collagen fiber organization was assessed by semiquantitative analysis of picrosirius red birefringence under polarized light. Peak failure load was similar between young and old animals at 2 weeks after repair (31% vs 26% of age-matched uninjured controls, respectively; P > .05) but significantly higher in young animals compared with old animals 8 weeks after repair (86% vs 65% of age-matched uninjured controls, respectively; P repair, fibroblasts appeared more organized and uniformly aligned in young animals on hematoxylin and eosin slides compared with old animals. Collagen birefringence analysis of the tendon-to-bone junction demonstrated that young animals had increased collagen fiber organization and similar histologic structure compared with age-matched controls (53.7 ± 2.4 gray scales; P > .05). In contrast, old animals had decreased collagen fiber organization and altered structure compared with age

  16. Defective bone repair in mast cell-deficient Cpa3Cre/+ mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Ramirez-GarciaLuna

    Full Text Available In the adult skeleton, cells of the immune system interact with those of the skeleton during all phases of bone repair to influence the outcome. Mast cells are immune cells best known for their pathologic role in allergy, and may be involved in chronic inflammatory and fibrotic disorders. Potential roles for mast cells in tissue homeostasis, vascularization and repair remain enigmatic. Previous studies in combined mast cell- and Kit-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice (KitW-sh implicated mast cells in bone repair but KitW-sh mice suffer from additional Kit-dependent hematopoietic and non- hematopoietic deficiencies that could have confounded the outcome. The goal of the current study was to compare bone repair in normal wild type (WT and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, which lack mast cells in the absence of any other hematopoietic or non- hematopoietic deficiencies. Repair of a femoral window defect was characterized using micro CT imaging and histological analyses from the early inflammatory phase, through soft and hard callus formation, and finally the remodeling phase. The data indicate 1 mast cells appear in healing bone of WT mice but not Cpa3Cre/+ mice, beginning 14 days after surgery; 2 re-vascularization of repair tissue and deposition of mineralized bone was delayed and dis-organised in Cpa3Cre/+ mice compared with WT mice; 3 the defects in Cpa3Cre/+ mice were associated with little change in anabolic activity and biphasic alterations in osteoclast and macrophage activity. The outcome at 56 days postoperative was complete bridging of the defect in most WT mice and fibrous mal-union in most Cpa3Cre/+ mice. The results indicate that mast cells promote bone healing, possibly by recruiting vascular endothelial cells during the inflammatory phase and coordinating anabolic and catabolic activity during tissue remodeling. Taken together the data indicate that mast cells have a positive impact on bone repair.

  17. Defective bone repair in mast cell-deficient Cpa3Cre/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-GarciaLuna, Jose Luis; Chan, Daniel; Samberg, Robert; Abou-Rjeili, Mira; Wong, Timothy H; Li, Ailian; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Henderson, Janet E; Martineau, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    In the adult skeleton, cells of the immune system interact with those of the skeleton during all phases of bone repair to influence the outcome. Mast cells are immune cells best known for their pathologic role in allergy, and may be involved in chronic inflammatory and fibrotic disorders. Potential roles for mast cells in tissue homeostasis, vascularization and repair remain enigmatic. Previous studies in combined mast cell- and Kit-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice (KitW-sh) implicated mast cells in bone repair but KitW-sh mice suffer from additional Kit-dependent hematopoietic and non- hematopoietic deficiencies that could have confounded the outcome. The goal of the current study was to compare bone repair in normal wild type (WT) and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, which lack mast cells in the absence of any other hematopoietic or non- hematopoietic deficiencies. Repair of a femoral window defect was characterized using micro CT imaging and histological analyses from the early inflammatory phase, through soft and hard callus formation, and finally the remodeling phase. The data indicate 1) mast cells appear in healing bone of WT mice but not Cpa3Cre/+ mice, beginning 14 days after surgery; 2) re-vascularization of repair tissue and deposition of mineralized bone was delayed and dis-organised in Cpa3Cre/+ mice compared with WT mice; 3) the defects in Cpa3Cre/+ mice were associated with little change in anabolic activity and biphasic alterations in osteoclast and macrophage activity. The outcome at 56 days postoperative was complete bridging of the defect in most WT mice and fibrous mal-union in most Cpa3Cre/+ mice. The results indicate that mast cells promote bone healing, possibly by recruiting vascular endothelial cells during the inflammatory phase and coordinating anabolic and catabolic activity during tissue remodeling. Taken together the data indicate that mast cells have a positive impact on bone repair.

  18. Preservation and promotion of bone formation in the mandible as a response to a novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial in mineral deficiency induced low bone mass male versus female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Kritika; Naula, Diana P.; Mijares, Dindo Q.; Janal, Malvin N.; LeGeros, Raquel Z.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Calcium and other trace mineral supplements have previously demonstrated to safely improve bone quality. We hypothesize that our novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial (SBM) preserves and promotes mandibular bone formation in male and female rats on mineral deficient diet (MD). Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive one of three diets (n = 10): basic diet (BD), MD or mineral deficient diet with 2% SBM. Rats were sacrificed after 6 months. Micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) was used to evaluate bone volume and 3D-microarchitecture while microradiography (Faxitron) was used to measure bone mineral density from different sections of the mandible. Results showed that bone quality varied with region, gender and diet. MD reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and volume and increased porosity. SBM preserved BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in the alveolar bone and condyle in both genders. In the alveolar crest and mandibular body, while preserving more bone in males, SBM also significantly supplemented female bone. Results indicate that mineral deficiency leads to low bone mass in skeletally immature rats, comparatively more in males. Furthermore, SBM administered as a dietary supplement was effective in preventing mandibular bone loss in all subjects. This study suggests that the SBM preparation has potential use in minimizing low peak bone mass induced by mineral deficiency and related bone loss irrespective of gender. PMID:26914814

  19. Insight on stem cell preconditioning and instructive biomaterials to enhance cell adhesion, retention, and engraftment for tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Muhammad; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Stem cells are a promising solution for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the limited survival and engraftment of transplanted cells due to a hostile ischemic environment is a bottleneck for effective utilization and commercialization. Within this environment, the majority of transplanted cells undergo apoptosis prior to participating in lineage differentiation and cellular integration. Therefore, in order to maximize the clinical utility of stem/progenitor cells, strategies must be employed to increase their adhesion, retention, and engraftment in vivo. Here, we reviewed key strategies that are being adopted to enhance the survival, retention, and engraftment of transplanted stem cells through the manipulation of both the stem cells and the surrounding environment. We describe how preconditioning of cells or cell manipulations strategies can enhance stem cell survival and engraftment after transplantation. We also discuss how biomaterials can enhance the function of stem cells for effective tissue regeneration. Biomaterials can incorporate or mimic extracellular function (ECM) function and enhance survival or differentiation of transplanted cells in vivo. Biomaterials can also promote angiogenesis, enhance engraftment and differentiation, and accelerate electromechanical integration of transplanted stem cells. Insight gained from this review may direct the development of future investigations and clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Probing molecular interactions in bone biomaterials: Through molecular dynamics and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhowmik, Rahul; Katti, Kalpana S.; Verma, Devendra; Katti, Dinesh R.

    2007-01-01

    Polymer-hydroxyapatite (HAP) composites are widely investigated for their potential use as bone replacement materials. The molecular interactions at mineral polymer interface are known to have significant role of mechanical response of the composite system. Modeling interactions between such dissimilar molecules using molecular dynamics (MD) is an area of current interest. Molecular dynamics studies require potential function or force field parameters. Some force fields are described in literature that represents the structure of hydroxyapatite reasonably well. Yet, the applicability of these force fields for studying the interaction between dissimilar materials (such as mineral and polymer) is limited, as there is no accurate representation of polymer in these force fields. We have obtained the parameters of consistent valence force field (CVFF) for monoclinic hydroxyapatite. Validation of parameters was done by comparing the computationally obtained unit cell parameters, vibrational spectra and atomic distances with XRD and FTIR experiments. Using the obtained parameters of HAP, and available parameters of polymer (polyacrylic acid), interaction study was performed with MD simulations. The MD simulations showed that several hydrogen bonds may form between HAP and polyacrylic acid depending upon the exposed surface of HAP. Also there are some favourable planes of HAP where polyacrylic acid is most likely to attach. We have also simulated the mineralization of HAP using a 'synthetic biomineralization'. These modeling studies are supported by photoacoustic spectroscopy experiments on both porous and non porous composite samples for potential joint replacement and bone tissue engineering applications

  1. Composite Biomaterial as a Carrier for Bone-Active Substances for Metaphyseal Tibial Bone Defect Reconstruction in Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horstmann, Peter Frederik; Raina, Deepak Bushan; Isaksson, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    grouped according to defect filling: (1) Empty, (2) Allograft, (3) GBM, (4) GBM + ZA, and (5) GBM + ZA + BMP-2. In vivo microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) images at 4 weeks showed significantly higher mineralized tissue volume (MV) in the intramedullary defect region and the neocortical/callus region...... in all GBM-treated groups. After euthanization at 8 weeks, ex vivo micro-CT showed that addition of ZA (GBM + ZA) and BMP-2 (GBM + ZA + BMP-2) mainly increased the neocortical and callus formation, with the highest MV in the combined ZA and BMP-2-treated group. Qualitative histological analysis......, verifying the increased neocortical/callus thickness and finding of trabecular bone in all GBM-treated groups, supported that the differences in MV measured with micro-CT in fact represented bone tissue. In conclusion, GBM can serve as a carrier for ZA and BMP-2 leading to increased MV in the neocortex...

  2. Rotator cuff repair with a tendon-fibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoxi; Chen, Qingshan; Thoreson, Andrew R; Qu, Jin; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Steinmann, Scott P; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-11-01

    To compare the mechanical performance of a rotator cuff repaired with a novel tendon-fibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch vs the traditional Mason-Allen repair in an in vitro canine model. Twenty shoulders and 10 bridging patches from patellar tendon were harvested. The patches were trimmed and sliced into 2 layers. An infraspinatus tendon tear was created in each shoulder. Modified Mason-Allen sutures were used to repair the infraspinatus tendon to the greater tuberosity, with or without the bridging patch (bridging patch group and controls, respectively). Shoulders were loaded to failure under displacement control at a rate of 0.5mm/s. The ultimate tensile load was significantly higher in the bridging patch group than control (mean [SD], 365.46 [36.45] vs 272.79 [48.88] N; Pfibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch achieved higher ultimate tensile load and stiffness at the patch-greater tuberosity repair site compared with traditional repair in a canine model. This composite tissue transforms the traditional tendon-to-bone healing interface (with dissimilar tissues) into a pair of bone-to-bone and tendon-to-tendon interfaces, which may improve healing quality and reduce retear rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ya-jing; Liu, Jian-min; Wei, Shu-ming; Zhang, Yun-hao; Qu, Zhen-hua; Chen, Shu-bo

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and fluorogold-labeled nerve fibers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was markedly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats. PMID:26487860

  4. Bioactive Molecule-loaded Drug Delivery Systems to Optimize Bone Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Joao Augusto; Sato, Mariana Rillo; Scardueli, Cassio Rocha; Lopes de Oliveira, Guilherme Jose Pimentel; Abucafy, Marina Paiva; Chorilli, Marlus

    2017-01-01

    Bioactive molecules such as peptides and proteins can optimize the repair of bone tissue; however, the results are often unpredictable when administered alone, owing to their short biological half-life and instability. Thus, the development of bioactive molecule-loaded drug delivery systems (DDS) to repair bone tissue has been the subject of intense research. DDS can optimize the repair of bone tissue owing to their physicochemical properties, which improve cellular interactions and enable the incorporation and prolonged release of bioactive molecules. These characteristics are fundamental to favor bone tissue homeostasis, since the biological activity of these factors depends on how accessible they are to the cell. Considering the importance of these DDS, this review aims to present relevant information on DDS when loaded with osteogenic growth peptide and bone morphogenetic protein. These are bioactive molecules that are capable of modulating the differentiation and proliferation of mesenchymal cells in bone tissue cells. Moreover, we will present different approaches using these peptide and protein-loaded DDS, such as synthetic membranes and scaffolds for bone regeneration, synthetic grafts, bone cements, liposomes, and micelles, which aim at improving the therapeutic effectiveness, and we will compare their advantages with commercial systems. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. High doses of ionizing radiation on bone repair: is there effect outside the irradiated site?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Flaviana Soares; Dias, Pâmella Coelho; Limirio, Pedro Henrique Justino Oliveira; Lara, Vitor Carvalho; Batista, Jonas Dantas; Dechichi, Paula

    2017-03-01

    Local ionizing radiation causes damage to bone metabolism, it reduces blood supply and cellularity over time. Recent studies indicate that radiation promotes biological response outside the treatment field. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on bone repair outside the irradiated field. Ten healthy male Wistar rats were used; and five animals were submitted to radiotherapy on the left femur. After 4 weeks, in all animals were created bone defects in the right and left femurs. Seven days after surgery, animals were euthanized. The femurs were removed and randomly divided into 3 groups (n=5): Control (C) (right femur of the non-irradiated animals); Local ionizing radiation (IR) (left femur of the irradiated animals); Contralateral ionizing radiation (CIR) (right femur of the irradiated animals). The femurs were processed and embedded in paraffin; and bone histologic sections were evaluated to quantify the bone neoformation. Histomorphometric analysis showed that there was no significant difference between groups C (24.6±7.04) and CIR (25.3±4.31); and IR group not showed bone neoformation. The results suggest that ionizing radiation affects bone repair, but does not interfere in bone repair distant from the primary irradiated site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. In vivo biocompatibility of new nano-calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite/poly-amino acid complex biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhenyu; Li, Yue; Lu, Weizhong; Jiang, Dianming; Li, Hong; Yan, Yonggang; Lv, Guoyu; Yang, Aiping

    2015-01-01

    implanting n-CDHA/PAA biomaterials, and lamellar bone gradually formed at 12 weeks and 24 weeks after implantation. Routine blood and kidney function tests showed no significant changes at 2 weeks and 24 weeks after implantation of both biomaterials. Conclusion n-CDHA/PAA composites showed good compatibility in in vivo model. In this study, n-CDHA/PAA were found to be safe, nontoxic, and biologically active in bone repair. PMID:26504382

  7. In vivo biocompatibility of new nano-calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite/poly-amino acid complex biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhenyu; Li, Yue; Lu, Weizhong; Jiang, Dianming; Li, Hong; Yan, Yonggang; Lv, Guoyu; Yang, Aiping

    2015-01-01

    -CDHA/PAA biomaterials, and lamellar bone gradually formed at 12 weeks and 24 weeks after implantation. Routine blood and kidney function tests showed no significant changes at 2 weeks and 24 weeks after implantation of both biomaterials. n-CDHA/PAA composites showed good compatibility in in vivo model. In this study, n-CDHA/PAA were found to be safe, nontoxic, and biologically active in bone repair.

  8. Stem cells applications in bone and tooth repair and regeneration: New insights, tools, and hopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Meguid, Eiman; Ke, Yuehai; Ji, Junfeng; El-Hashash, Ahmed H K

    2018-03-01

    The exploration of stem and progenitor cells holds promise for advancing our understanding of the biology of tissue repair and regeneration mechanisms after injury. This will also help in the future use of stem cell therapy for the development of regenerative medicine approaches for the treatment of different tissue-species defects or disorders such as bone, cartilages, and tooth defects or disorders. Bone is a specialized connective tissue, with mineralized extracellular components that provide bones with both strength and rigidity, and thus enable bones to function in body mechanical supports and necessary locomotion process. New insights have been added to the use of different types of stem cells in bone and tooth defects over the last few years. In this concise review, we briefly describe bone structure as well as summarize recent research progress and accumulated information regarding the osteogenic differentiation of stem cells, as well as stem cell contributions to bone repair/regeneration, bone defects or disorders, and both restoration and regeneration of bones and cartilages. We also discuss advances in the osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration of dental and periodontal stem cells as well as in stem cell contributions to dentine regeneration and tooth engineering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Angiographic findings of demineralised bone matrix grafts in femoral fracture repair in canines*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.V.S.; Ramakrishna, O.

    2000-01-01

    Demineralised bone matrix implants and autogenous cancellous bone grafts were evaluated in femoral fracture repair with bone loss in canines, and compared to untreated animals. Angiograms were taken at 3,6,9 and 12 weeks post- operatively using conrary-420 as contrast medium. Early angiograms showed leakage of contrast medium into soft tissue. Grafted groups showed slight hypervascularity and enhanced capillary network. At 12 Weeks the same groups observed nearly normal persistent vascular supply. Early establishment of cortices continuity and draining of contrast medium via extraosseous veins was observed in demineralized bone matrix implanted groups

  10. Bone Repair on Fractures Treated with Osteosynthesis, ir Laser, Bone Graft and Guided Bone Regeneration: Histomorfometric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Aciole, Jouber Mateus; dos Santos Aciole, Gilberth Tadeu; Soares, Luiz Guilherme Pinheiro; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Santos, Jean Nunes; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, through the analysis of histomorfometric, the repair of complete tibial fracture in rabbits fixed with osteosynthesis, treated or not with infrared laser light (λ780 nm, 50 mW, CW) associated or not to the use of hydroxyapatite and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Surgical fractures were created, under general anesthesia (Ketamina 0,4 ml/Kg IP and Xilazina 0,2 ml/Kg IP), on the dorsum of 15 Oryctolagus rabbits that were divided into 5 groups and maintained on individual cages, at day/night cycle, fed with solid laboratory pelted diet and had water ad libidum. On groups II, III, IV and V the fracture was fixed with wire osteosynthesis. Animals of groups III and V were grafted with hydroxyapatite and GBR technique used. Animals of groups IV and V were irradiated at every other day during two weeks (16 J/cm2, 4×4 J/cm2). Observation time was that of 30 days. After animal death (overdose of general anesthetics) the specimes were routinely processed to wax and underwent histological analysis by light microscopy. The histomorfometric analysis showed an increased bone neoformation, increased collagen deposition, less reabsorption and inflammation when laser was associated to the HATCP. It is concluded that IR laser light was able to accelerate fracture healing and the association with HATCP and GBR resulted on increased deposition of CHA.

  11. Degradability of injectable calcium sulfate/mineralized collagen-based bone repair material and its effect on bone tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zonggang; Kang, Lingzhi; Meng, Qing-Yuan; Liu, Huanye; Wang, Zhaoliang; Guo, Zhongwu; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2014-01-01

    The nHAC/CSH composite is an injectable bone repair material with controllable injectability and self-setting properties prepared by introducing calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) into mineralized collagen (nHAC). When mixed with water, the nHAC/CSH composites can be transformed into mineralized collagen/calcium sulfate dihydrate (nHAC/CSD) composites. The nHAC/CSD composites have good biocompatibility and osteogenic capability. Considering that the degradation behavior of bone repair material is another important factor for its clinical applications, the degradability of nHAC/CSD composites was studied. The results showed that the degradation ratio of the nHAC/CSD composites with lower nHAC content increased with the L/S ratio increase of injectable materials, but the variety of L/S ratio had no significant effect on the degradation ratio of the nHAC/CSD composites with higher nHAC content. Increasing nHAC content in the composites could slow down the degradation of nHAC/CSD composite. Setting accelerator had no significant effect on the degradability of nHAC/CSD composites. In vivo histological analysis suggests that the degradation rate of materials can match the growth rate of new mandibular bone tissues in the implanted site of rabbit. The regulable degradability of materials resulting from the special prescriptions of injectable nHAC/CSH composites will further improve the workability of nHAC/CSD composites. - Highlights: • The nHAC/CSH composite can be as an injectable bone repair material. • The L/S ratio and nHAC content have a significant effect on material degradability. • The degradability of bone materials can be regulated to match tissue repair. • The regulable degradability will further improve the workability of bone materials

  12. Degradability of injectable calcium sulfate/mineralized collagen-based bone repair material and its effect on bone tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zonggang, E-mail: chenzg@sdu.edu.cn [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Lingzhi [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Meng, Qing-Yuan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Huanye [Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Wang, Zhaoliang [Jinan Military General Hospital of PLA, Jinan 250031 (China); Guo, Zhongwu, E-mail: zwguo@sdu.edu.cn [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Cui, Fu-Zhai, E-mail: cuifz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-12-01

    The nHAC/CSH composite is an injectable bone repair material with controllable injectability and self-setting properties prepared by introducing calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) into mineralized collagen (nHAC). When mixed with water, the nHAC/CSH composites can be transformed into mineralized collagen/calcium sulfate dihydrate (nHAC/CSD) composites. The nHAC/CSD composites have good biocompatibility and osteogenic capability. Considering that the degradation behavior of bone repair material is another important factor for its clinical applications, the degradability of nHAC/CSD composites was studied. The results showed that the degradation ratio of the nHAC/CSD composites with lower nHAC content increased with the L/S ratio increase of injectable materials, but the variety of L/S ratio had no significant effect on the degradation ratio of the nHAC/CSD composites with higher nHAC content. Increasing nHAC content in the composites could slow down the degradation of nHAC/CSD composite. Setting accelerator had no significant effect on the degradability of nHAC/CSD composites. In vivo histological analysis suggests that the degradation rate of materials can match the growth rate of new mandibular bone tissues in the implanted site of rabbit. The regulable degradability of materials resulting from the special prescriptions of injectable nHAC/CSH composites will further improve the workability of nHAC/CSD composites. - Highlights: • The nHAC/CSH composite can be as an injectable bone repair material. • The L/S ratio and nHAC content have a significant effect on material degradability. • The degradability of bone materials can be regulated to match tissue repair. • The regulable degradability will further improve the workability of bone materials.

  13. Primary implant stability in augmented sinuslift-sites after completed bone regeneration: a randomized controlled clinical study comparing four subantrally inserted biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troedhan, Angelo; Schlichting, Izabela; Kurrek, Andreas; Wainwright, Marcel

    2014-07-30

    Implant-Insertion-Torque-Value (ITV) proved to be a significant clinical parameter to predict long term implant success-rates and to decide upon immediate loading. The study evaluated ITVs, when four different and commonly used biomaterials were used in sinuslift-procedures compared to natural subantral bone in two-stage-implant-procedures. The tHUCSL-INTRALIFT-method was chosen for sinuslifting in 155 sinuslift-sites for its minimal invasive transcrestal approach and scalable augmentation volume. Four different biomaterials were inserted randomly (easy-graft CRYSTAL n = 38, easy-graft CLASSIC n = 41, NanoBone n = 42, BioOss n = 34), 2 ccm in each case. After a mean healing period of 8,92 months uniform tapered screw Q2-implants were inserted and Drill-Torque-Values (DTV) and ITV were recorded and compared to a group of 36 subantral sites without need of sinuslifting. DTV/ITV were processed for statistics by ANOVA-tests. Mean DTV/ITV obtained in Ncm were: Control Group 10,2/22,2, Bio-Oss 12,7/26,2, NanoBone 17,5/33,3, easy-graft CLASSIC 20,3/45,9, easy-graft CRYSTAL 23,8/56,6 Ncm, significance-level of differences throughout p < 0,05. Within the limits of this study the results suggest self-hardening solid-block-like bone-graft-materials to achieve significantly better DTV/ITV than loose granulate biomaterials for its suspected improvement of vascularization and mineralization of the subantral scaffold by full immobilization of the augmentation site towards pressure changes in the human sinus at normal breathing.

  14. * Hypoxia Biomimicry to Enhance Monetite Bone Defect Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drager, Justin; Ramirez-GarciaLuna, Jose Luis; Kumar, Abhishek; Gbureck, Uwe; Harvey, Edward J; Barralet, Jake E

    2017-12-01

    Tissue hypoxia is a critical driving force for angiogenic and osteogenic responses in bone regeneration and is, at least partly, under the control of the Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway. Recently, the widely used iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) has been found to elevate HIF-1α levels independent of oxygen concentrations, thereby, creating an otherwise normal environment that mimics the hypoxic state. This has the potential to augment the biological properties of inorganic scaffolds without the need of recombinant growth factors. This pilot study investigates the effect of local delivery of DFO on bone formation and osseointegration of an anatomically matched bone graft substitute, in the treatment of segmental bone defects. Three-dimensional printing was used to create monetite grafts, which were implanted into 10 mm midshaft ulnar defects in eight rabbits. Starting postoperative day 4, one graft site in each animal was injected with 600 μL (200 μM) of DFO every 48 h for six doses. Saline was injected in the contralateral limb as a control. At 8 weeks, micro-CT and histology were used to determine new bone growth, vascularity, and assess osseointegration. Six animals completed the protocol. Bone metric analysis using micro-CT showed a significantly greater amount of new bone formed (19.5% vs. 13.65% p = 0.042) and an increase in bone-implant contact area (63.1 mm 2 vs. 33.2 mm 2 p = 0.03) in the DFO group compared with control. Vascular channel volume was significantly greater in the DFO group (20.9% vs. 16.2% p = 0.004). Histology showed increased bone formation within the osteotomy gap, more bone integrated with the graft surface as well as more matured soft tissue callus in the DFO group. This study demonstrates a significant increase in new bone formation after delivery of DFO in a rabbit long bone defect bridged by a 3D-printed bioresorbable bone graft substitute. Given the safety, ease of handling, and low expense of

  15. Radioprotective effect of sodium selenite on bone repair in the tibia of ovariectomized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Deborah Queiroz de; Neves, Ellen Gaby; Boscolo, Frab Norberto; Almeida, Solange Maria de [University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Piracicaba Dental School. Department of Oral Diagnosis. Oral Radiology Area; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes [Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Department of Clinical and Preventive Dentistry; Marques, Marcelo Rocha [University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Piracicaba Dental School. Division of Histology. Department of Morphology

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated protection by selenium (Se) in the bone repair process in ovariectomized rats after irradiation. For such purpose, 80 ovariectomized female Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups: ovariectomized (Ov), Ov/Se, Ov/irradiated (Irr) and Ov/ Se/Irr. A bone defect was created on the tibia of all animals 40 days after ovariectomy. Two days after surgery, only the Ov/Se and Ov/Se/Irr rats received 0.8 mg Se/kg. Three days after surgery, only the Ov/Irr and Ov/Se/Irr rats received 10 Gy of x-rays on the lower limb region. The animals were euthanized at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after surgery to assess the repair process, which was evaluated by analysis of trabecular bone number (Masson Trichrome) and birefringence analysis (Picrosirius). It was possible to observe a delay in the bone repair process in the ovariectomized/irradiated group and similarity between the ovariectomized, Ov/Se and Ov/Se/Irr groups. In conclusion, sodium selenite exerted a radioprotective effect in the bone repair of tibia of ovariectomized rats without toxicity. (author)

  16. [Effects of sintered bone modified with surface mineralization/P24 peptide composite biomaterial on the adhesion, proliferation and osteodifferentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingfeng; Zheng, Qixin; Guo, Xiaodong; Chen, Liaobin

    2014-10-01

    In the present research, the effects of sintered bone modified with surface mineralization/P24 peptide composite biomaterials on the adhesion, proliferation and osteodifferentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells were investigated. The experiments were divided into three groups due to biomaterials used: Group A (composite materials of sintered bone modified with surface mineralization and P24, a peptide of bone morphogenetic protein-2); Group B (sintered bone modified with surface mineralization) and Group C (sintered bone only). The three groups were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before the experiments, respectively. Then MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on the surfaces of the three kinds of material, respectively. The cell adhesion rate was assessed by precipitation method. The proliferative ability of MC3T3-E1 cells were measured with MTT assay. And the ALP staining and measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were performed to assess the differentiation of cells into osteoblasts. The SEM results showed that the materials in the three groups retained the natural pore structure and the pore sizes were in the range between 200-850 μm. The adhesive ratio measurements and MTT assay suggested that adhesion and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells in Group A were much higher than those in Group B and Group C (P bone modified with surface mineralization/P24 composite material was confirmed to improve the adhesion rate and proliferation and osteodifferentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells, and maintained their morphology.

  17. Trabecular bone structure and strength - remodelling and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Lis; Ebbesen, Ebbe Nils; Erikstrup, Lise Tornvig

    2000-01-01

    The strength of the spinal trabecular bone declines by a factor of 4-5 from the age of 20 to 80 years. At the same time, the volumetric (apparent) density declines by a factor of only 2. This discrepancy can be explained by the known power relationship between density and strength; this power rel......; and the hydraulic effect of the bone marrow. In order to answer these questions, more in vitro and in vivo studies on human bone in relation to aging, to immobilisation, to exercise and in relation to different treatment regimens are needed.......The strength of the spinal trabecular bone declines by a factor of 4-5 from the age of 20 to 80 years. At the same time, the volumetric (apparent) density declines by a factor of only 2. This discrepancy can be explained by the known power relationship between density and strength; this power...

  18. 3D printing of biomaterials with mussel-inspired nanostructures for tumor therapy and tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongshi; Luo, Jian; Sun, Zhe; Xia, Lunguo; Shi, Mengchao; Liu, Mingyao; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2016-12-01

    Primary bone cancer brings patients great sufferings. To deal with the bone defects resulted from cancer surgery, biomaterials with good bone-forming ability are necessary to repair bone defects. Meanwhile, in order to prevent possible tumor recurrence, it is essential that the remaining tumor cells around bone defects are completely killed. However, there are few biomaterials with the ability of both cancer therapy and bone regeneration until now. Here, we fabricated a 3D-printed bioceramic scaffold with a uniformly self-assembled Ca-P/polydopamine nanolayer surface. Taking advantage of biocompatibility, biodegradability and the excellent photothermal effect of polydopamine, the bifunctional scaffolds with mussel-inspired nanostructures could be used as a satisfactory and controllable photothermal agent, which effectively induced tumor cell death in vitro, and significantly inhibited tumor growth in mice. In addition, owing to the nanostructured surface, the prepared polydopamine-modified bioceramic scaffolds could support the attachment and proliferation of rabbit bone mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), and significantly promoted the formation of new bone tissues in rabbit bone defects even under photothermal treatment. Therefore, the mussel-inspired nanostructures in 3D-printed bioceramic exhibited a remarkable capability for both cancer therapy and bone regeneration, offering a promising strategy to construct bifunctional biomaterials which could be widely used for therapy of tumor-induced tissue defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Technical Report: Correlation Between the Repair of Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in an Osteochondral Defect Using Bilayered, Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Lee, Esther J; Seyednejad, Hajar; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kasper, F Kurtis; Scott, David W; Wong, Mark E; Jansen, John A; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-12-01

    The present work investigated correlations between cartilage and subchondral bone repair, facilitated by a growth factor-delivering scaffold, in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Histological scoring indices and microcomputed tomography morphological parameters were used to evaluate cartilage and bone repair, respectively, at 6 and 12 weeks. Correlation analysis revealed significant associations between specific cartilage indices and subchondral bone parameters that varied with location in the defect (cortical vs. trabecular region), time point (6 vs. 12 weeks), and experimental group (insulin-like growth factor-1 only, bone morphogenetic protein-2 only, or both growth factors). In particular, significant correlations consistently existed between cartilage surface regularity and bone quantity parameters. Overall, correlation analysis between cartilage and bone repair provided a fuller understanding of osteochondral repair and can help drive informed studies for future osteochondral regeneration strategies.

  20. EPR analysis of biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhodub, L.

    2001-01-01

    There is the review of electron spin resonance application for paramagnetic individual investigation in biomaterials. Especially the bone tissue and tooth enamel can be taken into account. The material composition (e.g. Mn 2+ and Cr 3+ ions) can be measured, also after irradiation (X, γ radiations) when paramagnetic signal appears as a result of physical radiation effects

  1. Mechanical and mechanobiological influences on bone fracture repair : identifying important cellular characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isaksson, H.E.

    2007-01-01

    Fracture repair is a complex and multifactorial process, which involves a well-programmed series of cellular and molecular events that result in a combination of intramembranous and endochondral bone formation. The vast majority of fractures is treated successfully. They heal through ‘secondary

  2. Mimicking Bone Healing Process to Self Repair Concrete Structure Novel Approach Using Porous Network Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangadji, S.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    To repair concrete cracks in difficult or dangerous conditions such as underground structures or hazardous liquid containers, self healing mechanism is a promising alternative method. This research aims to imitate the bone self healing process by putting porous concrete internally in the concrete

  3. Surgical repair of mid-body proximal sesamoid bone fractures in 25 horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busschers, Evita; Richardson, Dean W; Hogan, Patricia M; Leitch, Midge

    2008-12-01

    To describe the characteristics of unilateral mid-body proximal sesamoid bone (PSB) fractures, to determine factors associated with the outcome of horses after surgical repair, and to describe a technique for arthroscopically assisted screw fixation in lag fashion. Retrospective case series. Horses (n=25) with unilateral mid-body PSB fracture. Medical records (1996-2006), radiographs, and arthroscopic videos of horses with surgically repaired unilateral mid-body PSB fractures were reviewed. Retrieved data included signalment, affected limb and PSB, fracture characteristics, and surgical technique. Outcome was established by radiographic assessment of healing and race records; categorical data were analyzed using Fisher's Exact test. Medial forelimb PSBs were most commonly affected (80%). Surgical technique and degree of reduction were significantly associated with outcome; 44% of horses with screw repair and none of the horses with wire fixation raced (P=.047). Factors that may have influenced this outcome were differences in fracture reduction (improved reduction in 22% wire repairs and 88% screw repairs, P=.002) and use of external coaptation (22% wire repair and 88% lag screw repair, P=.002). None of the horses with unimproved reduction raced after surgery. Only 28% of horses with mid-body PSB fractures raced after surgery. Compared with wire fixation, screw fixation in lag fashion resulted in good reduction and is seemingly a superior repair technique. For mid-body PSB fractures, arthroscopically assisted screw fixation in lag fashion and external coaptation for anesthesia recovery and initial support provides the best likelihood of return to athletic use.

  4. [Experiment of porous calcium phosphate/bone matrix gelatin composite cement for repairing lumbar vertebral bone defect in rabbit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Yang, Han; Yang, Jian; Kang, Jianping; Wang, Qing; Song, Yueming

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effect of a porous calcium phosphate/bone matrix gelatin (BMG) composite cement (hereinafter referred to as the "porous composite cement") for repairing lumbar vertebral bone defect in a rabbit model. BMG was extracted from adult New Zealand rabbits according to the Urist's method. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microsphere was prepared by W/O/W double emulsion method. The porous composite cement was developed by using calcium phosphate cement (CPC) composited with BMG and PLGA microsphere. The physicochemical characterizations of the porous composite cement were assessed by anti-washout property, porosity, and biomechanical experiment, also compared with the CPC. Thirty 2-month-old New Zealand rabbits were used to construct vertebral bone defect at L 3 in size of 4 mm×3 mm×3 mm. Then, the bone defect was repaired with porous composite cement (experimental group, n =15) or CPC (control group, n =15). At 4, 8, and 12 weeks after implantation, each bone specimen was assessed by X-ray films for bone fusion, micro-CT for bone mineral density (BMD), bone volume fraction (BVF), trabecular thickness (Tb. Th.), trabecular number (Tb.N.), and trabecular spacing (Tb. Sp.), and histological section with toluidine blue staining for new-born bone formation. The study demonstrated well anti-washout property in 2 groups. The porous composite cement has 55.06%±1.18% of porosity and (51.63±6.73) MPa of compressive strength. The CPC has 49.38%±1.75% of porosity and (63.34±3.27) MPa of compressive strength. There were significant differences in porosity and compressive strength between different cements ( t =4.254, P =0.006; t =2.476, P =0.034). X-ray films revealed that the zone between the cement and host bone gradually blurred with the time extending. At 12 weeks after implantation, the zone was disappeared in the experimental group, but clear in the control group. There were significant differences in BMD, BVF, Tb. Th., Tb. N., and Tb. Sp. between

  5. Effect of sodium selenite on bone repair in tibiae of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Anna Silvia Setti da; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes; Boscolo, Frab Norberto; Almeida, Solange Maria; Manzi, Flavio Ricardo; Chicareli, Mariliani

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the radioprotective effect of sodium selenite on the bone repair process in tibiae of female rats. For such purpose, 100 female Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus, albinus) were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=25), according to the treatment received: administration of distilled water (control); administration of sodium selenite; gamma radiation; and administration of sodium selenite plus gamma radiation. A bone defect was prepared on both tibiae of all animals. Three days after surgery, the gamma radiation and selenium/ gamma radiation groups received 8 Gy gamma rays on the lower limbs. Five animals per group were sacrificed 7, 14, 21, 28 days after surgery for evaluation of the repair process by bone volumetric density analysis. The 5 animals remaining in each group were sacrificed 45 days postoperatively for examination of the mature bone by scanning electron microscopy. Based on all analyzed parameters, the results of the present study suggest that sodium selenite exerted a radioprotective effect in the bone repair of tibia of irradiated rats. (author)

  6. Effect of sodium selenite on bone repair in tibiae of irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Anna Silvia Setti da [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR, (Brazil). Dept. of Physics; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes; Boscolo, Frab Norberto; Almeida, Solange Maria [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Piracicaba Dental School. Dept. of Oral Diagnosis], e-mail: flaviamaria@fop.unicamp.br; Manzi, Flavio Ricardo [Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais (PUC-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. of Stomatology; Chicareli, Mariliani [State Univ. of Maringa, PR (Brazil). Dept. of Oral Diagnosis

    2009-07-01

    This study evaluated the radioprotective effect of sodium selenite on the bone repair process in tibiae of female rats. For such purpose, 100 female Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus, albinus) were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=25), according to the treatment received: administration of distilled water (control); administration of sodium selenite; gamma radiation; and administration of sodium selenite plus gamma radiation. A bone defect was prepared on both tibiae of all animals. Three days after surgery, the gamma radiation and selenium/ gamma radiation groups received 8 Gy gamma rays on the lower limbs. Five animals per group were sacrificed 7, 14, 21, 28 days after surgery for evaluation of the repair process by bone volumetric density analysis. The 5 animals remaining in each group were sacrificed 45 days postoperatively for examination of the mature bone by scanning electron microscopy. Based on all analyzed parameters, the results of the present study suggest that sodium selenite exerted a radioprotective effect in the bone repair of tibia of irradiated rats. (author)

  7. An Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell–Derived Extracellular Matrix Scaffold Applied with Bone Marrow Stimulation for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Jin, Chengzhe; Du, Xiaotao; Yan, Chao; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is well known that implanting a bioactive scaffold into a cartilage defect site can enhance cartilage repair after bone marrow stimulation (BMS). However, most of the current scaffolds are derived from xenogenous tissue and/or artificial polymers. The implantation of these scaffolds adds risks of pathogen transmission, undesirable inflammation, and other immunological reactions, as well as ethical issues in clinical practice. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of implanting autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell–derived extracellular matrix (aBMSC-dECM) scaffolds after BMS for cartilage repair. Methods: Full osteochondral defects were performed on the trochlear groove of both knees in 24 rabbits. One group underwent BMS only in the right knee (the BMS group), and the other group was treated by implantation of the aBMSC-dECM scaffold after BMS in the left knee (the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group). Results: Better repair of cartilage defects was observed in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group than in the BMS group according to gross observation, histological assessments, immunohistochemistry, and chemical assay. The glycosaminoglycan and DNA content, the distribution of proteoglycan, and the distribution and arrangement of type II and I collagen fibers in the repaired tissue in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group at 12 weeks after surgery were similar to that surrounding normal hyaline cartilage. Conclusions: Implanting aBMSC-dECM scaffolds can enhance the therapeutic effect of BMS on articular cartilage repair, and this combination treatment is a potential method for successful articular cartilage repair. PMID:24666429

  8. Enhancement of the repair of dog alveolar cleft by an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuanzheng, Chen; Yan, Gao; Ting, Li; Yanjie, Fu; Peng, Wu; Nan, Bai

    2015-05-01

    Autologous bone graft has been regarded as the criterion standard for the repair of alveolar cleft. However, the most prominent issue in alveolar cleft treatment is the high absorption rate of the bone graft. The authors' objective was to investigate the effects of an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture on the repair of dog alveolar cleft. Twenty beagle dogs with unilateral alveolar clefts created by surgery were divided randomly into four groups: group A underwent repair with an autologous iliac bone, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell, and platelet-rich fibrin mixture; group B underwent repair with autologous iliac bone and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells; group C underwent repair with autologous iliac bone and platelet-rich fibrin; and group D underwent repair with autologous iliac bone as the control. One day and 6 months after transplantation, the transplant volumes and bone mineral density were assessed by quantitative computed tomography. All of the transplants were harvested for hematoxylin and eosin staining 6 months later. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin transplants formed the greatest amounts of new bone among the four groups. The new bone formed an extensive union with the underlying maxilla in groups A, B, and C. Transplants with the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, platelet-rich fibrin, and their mixture retained the majority of their initial volume, whereas the transplants in the control group showed the highest absorption rate. Bone mineral density of transplants with the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, platelet-rich fibrin, and their mixture 6 months later was significantly higher than in the control group (p platelet-rich fibrin mixed transplants. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that the structure of new bones formed the best in group A. Both bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and platelet

  9. Current Progress in Bioactive Ceramic Scaffolds for Bone Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chengde; Deng, Youwen; Feng, Pei; Mao, Zhongzheng; Li, Pengjian; Yang, Bo; Deng, Junjie; Cao, Yiyuan; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics have received great attention in the past decades owing to their success in stimulating cell proliferation, differentiation and bone tissue regeneration. They can react and form chemical bonds with cells and tissues in human body. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the application of bioactive ceramics for bone repair and regeneration. The review systematically summarizes the types and characters of bioactive ceramics, the fabrication methods for nanostructure and hierarchically porous structure, typical toughness methods for ceramic scaffold and corresponding mechanisms such as fiber toughness, whisker toughness and particle toughness. Moreover, greater insights into the mechanisms of interaction between ceramics and cells are provided, as well as the development of ceramic-based composite materials. The development and challenges of bioactive ceramics are also discussed from the perspective of bone repair and regeneration. PMID:24646912

  10. Biological methods to enhance bone healing and fracture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, René; Goubau, Yannick; Almqvist, Fredrik K; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-04-01

    This article looks into normal physiological fracture healing with special emphasis on the diamond concept. A precise definition of nonunion of long bones is described. Most often inadequate fixation (too rigid or too loose) is the reason for nonunion in long bone fractures. Because a critical bone defect cannot be bridged, it may lead directly or indirectly (lack of fixation) to nonunion. Individual inadequate local biological characteristics are also often found to be the cause; poor soft tissue coverage as well as a lack of periosteum and muscle or fascia or skin defects can lead to compromised vascularity in situ. Systemic factors are now much more recognized, e.g., smoking, diabetes, and cachexia, as well as the limited impact of some medications, e.g., nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids. Today's mode of treatment for nonunion is approached in this article, and suggestions for appropriate treatment of long bone nonunion is presented. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Piezoelectric materials as stimulatory biomedical materials and scaffolds for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Biranche; Blaker, Jonny J; Cartmell, Sarah H

    2018-04-16

    The process of bone repair and regeneration requires multiple physiological cues including biochemical, electrical and mechanical - that act together to ensure functional recovery. Myriad materials have been explored as bioactive scaffolds to deliver these cues locally to the damage site, amongst these piezoelectric materials have demonstrated significant potential for tissue engineering and regeneration, especially for bone repair. Piezoelectric materials have been widely explored for power generation and harvesting, structural health monitoring, and use in biomedical devices. They have the ability to deform with physiological movements and consequently deliver electrical stimulation to cells or damaged tissue without the need of an external power source. Bone itself is piezoelectric and the charges/potentials it generates in response to mechanical activity are capable of enhancing bone growth. Piezoelectric materials are capable of stimulating the physiological electrical microenvironment, and can play a vital role to stimulate regeneration and repair. This review gives an overview of the association of piezoelectric effect with bone repair, and focuses on state-of-the-art piezoelectric materials (polymers, ceramics and their composites), the fabrication routes to produce piezoelectric scaffolds, and their application in bone repair. Important characteristics of these materials from the perspective of bone tissue engineering are highlighted. Promising upcoming strategies and new piezoelectric materials for this application are presented. Electrical stimulation/electrical microenvironment are known effect the process of bone regeneration by altering the cellular response and are crucial in maintaining tissue functionality. Piezoelectric materials, owing to their capability of generating charges/potentials in response to mechanical deformations, have displayed great potential for fabricating smart stimulatory scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. The growing

  12. Implantes de biomateriais em falha óssea produzida na fíbula de ratos Biomaterial implants in bone fractures produced in rat fibulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Yassuhiro Shirane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a importância do colágeno e hidroxiapatita na regeneração de fraturas provocadas experimentalmente na fíbula de ratos. MÉTODOS: Utilizou-se 15 ratos nos quais foram submetidos à cirurgia para retirada de um fragmento da fíbula sendo o local enxertado com tubos de silicone preenchidos com hidroxiapatita e colágeno. RESULTADOS: Ocorreu pouca neoformação óssea no interior dos tubos preenchidos com os biomateriais sendo em maior quantidade naqueles com colágeno. CONCLUSÃO: Os biomateriais usados apresentaram biocompatibilidade e capacidade osteocondutora capaz de estimular a osteogênese mesmo nos ossos com funções mecânicas e morfológicas secundárias como a fíbula de ratos.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of collagen and hydroxyapatite in the regeneration of fractures experimentally induced in the fibulas of mice. METHOD: 15 rats were submitted to a surgery for the removal of a fragment of the fibula. The fragment was replaced by a silicone tube filled with hydroxyapatite and collagen. RESULTS: Little bone neoformation occurred inside the tubes filled with biomaterials, the largest amount occurring in those with collagen. CONCLUSION: The biomaterials used demonstrated biocompatibility and osteoconductive capacity capable of stimulating osteogenesis, even in bones with secondary mechanical and morphological functions such as the fibula of the rat.

  13. The role of bone marrow-derived cells in bone fracture repair in a green fluorescent protein chimeric mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Rei; Migita, Makoto; Hanawa, Hideki; Ito, Hiromoto; Orimo, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the role of bone marrow cells in bone fracture repair using green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric model mice. First, the chimeric model mice were created: bone marrow cells from GFP-transgenic C57BL/6 mice were injected into the tail veins of recipient wild-type C57BL/6 mice that had been irradiated with a lethal dose of 10 Gy from a cesium source. Next, bone fracture models were created from these mice: closed transverse fractures of the left femur were produced using a specially designed device. One, three, and five weeks later, fracture lesions were extirpated for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. In the specimens collected 3 and 5 weeks after operation, we confirmed calluses showing intramembranous ossification peripheral to the fracture site. The calluses consisted of GFP- and osteocalcin-positive cells at the same site, although the femur consisted of only osteocalcin-positive cells. We suggest that bone marrow cells migrated outside of the bone marrow and differentiated into osteoblasts to make up the calluses

  14. Bone repair by periodontal ligament stem cell-seeded nanohydroxyapatite-chitosan scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Shaohua Ge,1 Ning Zhao,1 Lu Wang,1 Meijiao Yu,1 Hong Liu,2 Aimei Song,1 Jing Huang,1 Guancong Wang,2 Pishan Yang11Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine of Shandong Province, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, 2Center of Bio and Micro/Nano Functional Materials, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, ChinaBackground: A nanohydroxyapatite-coated chitosan scaffold has been developed in recent years, but the effect of this composite scaffold on the viability and differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and bone repair is still unknown. This study explored the behavior of PDLSCs on a new nanohydroxyapatite-coated genipin-chitosan conjunction scaffold (HGCCS in vitro as compared with an uncoated genipin-chitosan framework, and evaluated the effect of PDLSC-seeded HGCCS on bone repair in vivo.Methods: Human PDLSCs were cultured and identified, seeded on a HGCCS and on a genipin-chitosan framework, and assessed by scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, MTT, alkaline phosphatase activity, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction at different time intervals. Moreover, PDLSC-seeded scaffolds were used in a rat calvarial defect model, and new bone formation was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining at 12 weeks postoperatively.Results: PDLSCs were clonogenic and positive for STRO-1. They had the capacity to undergo osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation in vitro. When seeded on HGCCS, PDLSCs exhibited significantly greater viability, alkaline phosphatase activity, and upregulated the bone-related markers, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, and osteocalcin to a greater extent compared with PDLSCs seeded on the genipin-chitosan framework. The use of PDLSC-seeded HGCCS promoted calvarial bone repair.Conclusion: This study demonstrates the potential of HGCCS combined with PDLSCs as a promising tool for bone regeneration.Keywords: periodontal ligament, stem

  15. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signalling: Role in bone biology and potential therapeutic target for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartawi, Ziad; Schipani, Ernestina; Ryan, Katie B; Waeber, Christian

    2017-11-01

    The lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) affects cellular functions in most systems. Interest in its therapeutic potential has increased following the discovery of its G protein-coupled receptors and the recent availability of agents that can be safely administered in humans. Although the role of S1P in bone biology has been the focus of much less research than its role in the nervous, cardiovascular and immune systems, it is becoming clear that this lipid influences many of the functions, pathways and cell types that play a key role in bone maintenance and repair. Indeed, S1P is implicated in many osteogenesis-related processes including stem cell recruitment and subsequent differentiation, differentiation and survival of osteoblasts, and coupling of the latter cell type with osteoclasts. In addition, S1P's role in promoting angiogenesis is well-established. The pleiotropic effects of S1P on bone and blood vessels have significant potential therapeutic implications, as current therapeutic approaches for critical bone defects show significant limitations. Because of the complex effects of S1P on bone, the pharmacology of S1P-like agents and their physico-chemical properties, it is likely that therapeutic delivery of S1P agents will offer significant advantages compared to larger molecular weight factors. Hence, it is important to explore novel methods of utilizing S1P agents therapeutically, and improve our understanding of how S1P and its receptors modulate bone physiology and repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Repair of segmental bone defect using Totally Vitalized tissue engineered bone graft by a combined perfusion seeding and culture system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The basic strategy to construct tissue engineered bone graft (TEBG is to combine osteoblastic cells with three dimensional (3D scaffold. Based on this strategy, we proposed the "Totally Vitalized TEBG" (TV-TEBG which was characterized by abundant and homogenously distributed cells with enhanced cell proliferation and differentiation and further investigated its biological performance in repairing segmental bone defect. METHODS: In this study, we constructed the TV-TEBG with the combination of customized flow perfusion seeding/culture system and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP scaffold fabricated by Rapid Prototyping (RP technique. We systemically compared three kinds of TEBG constructed by perfusion seeding and perfusion culture (PSPC method, static seeding and perfusion culture (SSPC method, and static seeding and static culture (SSSC method for their in vitro performance and bone defect healing efficacy with a rabbit model. RESULTS: Our study has demonstrated that TEBG constructed by PSPC method exhibited better biological properties with higher daily D-glucose consumption, increased cell proliferation and differentiation, and better cell distribution, indicating the successful construction of TV-TEBG. After implanted into rabbit radius defects for 12 weeks, PSPC group exerted higher X-ray score close to autograft, much greater mechanical property evidenced by the biomechanical testing and significantly higher new bone formation as shown by histological analysis compared with the other two groups, and eventually obtained favorable healing efficacy of the segmental bone defect that was the closest to autograft transplantation. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated the feasibility of TV-TEBG construction with combination of perfusion seeding, perfusion culture and RP technique which exerted excellent biological properties. The application of TV-TEBG may become a preferred candidate for segmental bone defect repair in orthopedic and

  17. The effect of phototherapies on bone repair of euthyroid and hypothyroid rats: Raman spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Amanda P.; Rodriguez, Tania T.; Soares, Luiz G. P.; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Silveira, Landulfo; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B.

    2018-04-01

    The repair of bone tissue is complex and can be influenced by several local and systemic factors that can delay the repair. Laser and LED phototherapies have shown positive results in the repair of bone tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate, through Raman spectroscopy, the influence of laser (λ780 nm) and LED (λ850 nm) phototherapies in the repair of surgical defects in femurs of euthyroid and hypothyroid rats. Thirty Albinus Wistar rats were randomly divided into 6 groups. The animals of the hypothyroid groups were submitted to surgical removal of the thyroid gland. After general anesthesia, a surgical bone defect was created in the femur of each animal and filled with blood clot in all groups. In group I (Euthyroid) the defect was created in euthyroid animals; In Group II (Hypo) the defect was created in hypothyroid animals; In Group III (Euthyroid Laser) the defect was irradiated with Laser; on Group IV (Hypo Laser) the defect was made in a hypothyroid animal and irradiated with Laser; on Group V (Euthyroid LED) the defect was irradiated with LED and on Group VI (Hypo LED) the defect was created in hypothyroid animals and LED irradiated. Irradiation was carried out at every 48-h for 15 days. Specimens were taken and stored in liquid nitrogen. Intensity of peaks of phosphate HA ( 960 cm-1), carbonated HA ( 1,070 cm-1) and collagen ( 1,414 cm-1) were measured by Raman Spectroscopy. The results showed that the health status had significant influence all peaks. Irradiation influenced only the peak of 1454 cm-1. It is concluded that phototherapies influences bone repair in cases of thyroid diseases.

  18. A quantitative study of bone repair after endodontic therapy on digital subtraction radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Duk

    1997-01-01

    This study was performed to prepare the quantitative method of judging the sensitive prognosis of chronic apical periodontitis as early as possible. The subjects were 25 cases with periapical radiolucencies of which were treated with endodontic treatment. Serial radiographs were taken by standardized method longitudinally. The density slice function of digital radiographic system were employed for quantitative and longitudinal assessment of the radiolucent area and the condensing osteitis simultaneously. Obtained results were as follows: 1. The amount of bone repair after endodontic treatment could be detected quantitatively by the density slice function of digital radiographic system. 2. Within the 6-week period after root canal filling, the prognosis could be evaluated by assessment both radiolucent area and condensing osteitis on digital radiographic system. 3. The pattern of bone repair showed peripheral type in most cases from the 6th week after root canal filling. 4. In longitudinal change, bone repair showed two patterns; the succeeding reduction of radiolucent area showing the increase of condensing osteitis in size till 6th week and following by static state or reduction tendency and the reduction following the initial increase of both areas. 5. Cases with pulpitis by trauma showed initial increase of condensing osteitis at 2nd week, marked reduction of radiolucent area and condensing osteitis at 6th week, and approximately normal bone state at 8th week after root canal filling.

  19. A quantitative study of bone repair after endodontic therapy on digital subtraction radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Duk [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-15

    This study was performed to prepare the quantitative method of judging the sensitive prognosis of chronic apical periodontitis as early as possible. The subjects were 25 cases with periapical radiolucencies of which were treated with endodontic treatment. Serial radiographs were taken by standardized method longitudinally. The density slice function of digital radiographic system were employed for quantitative and longitudinal assessment of the radiolucent area and the condensing osteitis simultaneously. Obtained results were as follows: 1. The amount of bone repair after endodontic treatment could be detected quantitatively by the density slice function of digital radiographic system. 2. Within the 6-week period after root canal filling, the prognosis could be evaluated by assessment both radiolucent area and condensing osteitis on digital radiographic system. 3. The pattern of bone repair showed peripheral type in most cases from the 6th week after root canal filling. 4. In longitudinal change, bone repair showed two patterns; the succeeding reduction of radiolucent area showing the increase of condensing osteitis in size till 6th week and following by static state or reduction tendency and the reduction following the initial increase of both areas. 5. Cases with pulpitis by trauma showed initial increase of condensing osteitis at 2nd week, marked reduction of radiolucent area and condensing osteitis at 6th week, and approximately normal bone state at 8th week after root canal filling.

  20. Analysing the bioactive makeup of demineralised dentine matrix on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for enhanced bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, S J; Sadaghiani, L; Sloan, A J; Waddington, R J

    2017-07-10

    Dentine matrix has proposed roles for directing mineralised tissue repair in dentine and bone; however, the range of bioactive components in dentine and specific biological effects on bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in humans are less well understood. The aims of this study were to further elucidate the biological response of MSCs to demineralised dentine matrix (DDM) in enhancing wound repair responses and ascertain key contributing components. Dentine was obtained from human teeth and DDM proteins solubilised with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Bone marrow derived MSCs were commercially obtained. Cells with a more immature phenotype were then selected by preferential fibronectin adhesion (FN-BMMSCs) for use in subsequent in vitro assays. DDM at 10 µg/mL reduced cell expansion, attenuated apoptosis and was the minimal concentration capable of inducing osteoblastic differentiation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) quantification of growth factors indicated physiological levels produced the above responses; transforming growth factor β (TGF-β1) was predominant (15.6 ng/mg DDM), with relatively lower concentrations of BMP-2, FGF, VEGF and PDGF (6.2-4.7 ng/mg DDM). Fractionation of growth factors from other DDM components by heparin affinity chromatography diminished osteogenic responses. Depletion of biglycan from DDM also attenuated osteogenic potency, which was partially rescued by the isolated biglycan. Decorin depletion from DDM had no influence on osteogenic potency. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential of DDM for the delivery of physiological levels of growth factors for bone repair processes, and substantiate a role for biglycan as an additional adjuvant for driving osteogenic pathways.

  1. Subchondral chitosan/blood implant-guided bone plate resorption and woven bone repair is coupled to hyaline cartilage regeneration from microdrill holes in aged rabbit knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Morales, J; Lafantaisie-Favreau, C-H; Chen, G; Hoemann, C D

    2014-02-01

    Little is known of how to routinely elicit hyaline cartilage repair tissue in middle-aged patients. We tested the hypothesis that in skeletally aged rabbit knees, microdrill holes can be stimulated to remodel the bone plate and induce a more integrated, voluminous and hyaline cartilage repair tissue when treated by subchondral chitosan/blood implants. New Zealand White rabbits (13 or 32 months old, N = 7) received two 1.5 mm diameter, 2 mm depth drill holes in each knee, either left to bleed as surgical controls or press-fit with a 10 kDa (distal hole: 10K) or 40 kDa (proximal hole: 40K) chitosan/blood implant with fluorescent chitosan tracer. Post-operative knee effusion was documented. Repair tissues at day 0 (N = 1) and day 70 post-surgery (N = 6) were analyzed by micro-computed tomography, and by histological scoring and histomorphometry (SafO, Col-2, and Col-1) at day 70. All chitosan implants were completely cleared after 70 days, without increasing transient post-operative knee effusion compared to controls. Proximal control holes had worse osteochondral repair than distal holes. Both implant formulations induced bone remodeling and improved lateral integration of the bone plate at the hole edge. The 40K implant inhibited further bone repair inside 50% of the proximal holes, while the 10K implant specifically induced a "wound bloom" reaction, characterized by decreased bone plate density in a limited zone beyond the initial hole edge, and increased woven bone (WB) plate repair inside the initial hole (P = 0.016), which was accompanied by a more voluminous and hyaline cartilage repair (P holes with a biodegradable subchondral implant that elicits bone plate resorption followed by anabolic WB repair within a 70-day repair period. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of the Interposition of Calcium Phosphate Materials on Tendon-Bone Healing During Repair of Chronic Rotator Cuff Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Peng, Lingjie; Xie, Guoming; Li, Dingfeng; Zhao, Jinzhong; Ning, Congqin

    2014-08-01

    The current nature of tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff (RC) repair is still the formation of granulation tissue at the tendon-bone interface rather than the formation of fibrocartilage, which is the crucial structure in native tendon insertion and can be observed after knee ligament reconstruction. The interposition of calcium phosphate materials has been found to be able to enhance tendon-bone healing in knee ligament reconstruction. However, whether the interposition of these kinds of materials can enhance tendon-bone healing or even change the current nature of tendon-bone healing after RC repair still needs to be explored. The interposition of calcium phosphate materials during RC repair would enhance tendon-bone healing or change its current nature of granulation tissue formation into a more favorable process. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 144 male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral detachment of the supraspinatus tendon, followed by delayed repair after 3 weeks. The animals were allocated into 1 of 3 groups: (1) repair alone, (2) repair with Ca5(PO4)2SiO4 (CPS) bioceramic interposition, or (3) repair with hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic interposition at the tendon-bone interface. Animals were sacrificed at 2, 4, or 8 weeks postoperatively, and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) was used to quantify the new bone formation at the repair site. New fibrocartilage formation and collagen organization at the tendon-bone interface was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis. Biomechanical testing of the supraspinatus tendon-bone complex was performed. Statistical analysis was performed using 1-way analysis of variance. Significance was set at P repair, CPS bioceramic significantly increased the area of fibrocartilage at the tendon-bone interface compared with the control and HA groups. Moreover, CPS and HA bioceramics had significantly improved collagen organization. Biomechanical tests indicated that the CPS and HA groups have greater ultimate

  3. Development of a Moldable, Biodegradable Polymeric Bone Repair Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-30

    26% Cellulose 2 85% PCL 1250 15% Calcium Carbonate 2 85% PCL 1250 15% Carnauba Wax 3 80% PCL 1250 20% Carboxymethyl 4 Cellulose 85% PCL 1250 15% Gum...Tragacanth 4 83% PCL 1250 17% Gelatin 5 83% PCL 1250 17% Gum Xanthan 7 79% PCL 2000 21% Carnauba Wax 7 85% PCL 2000 15% Calcium Stearate 7 83% PLA 2000...azaum 200 wo ) After the revision of the statement of work, the objective of this contract was the development of a biodegradable bone wax . It would be

  4. Platelet-rich plasma in bone repair of irradiated tibiae of Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumieiro, Emne Hammoud; Abrahao, Marcio; Jahn, Ricardo Schmitutz; Segretto, Helena; Alves, Maria Tereza de Seixas; Nannmark, Ulf; Granstroem, Goesta; Dib, Luciano Lauria

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the influence of PRP addition on bone repair of circular defects created in irradiated tibiae of rats by histometric analysis. Methods: sixty male Wistar rats had the right tibiae irradiated with 30 Gy. After 30 days monocortical defects were created and platelet-rich plasma as applied in 30 rats. In the control group defects were created but not filled. The animals were sacrificed after 4, 7, 14, 21, 56 and 84 days and the tibiae removed for histological processing. Results: there was a tendency in the PRP group to increased bone neoformation from 14-days to 84-days; in the control group increased bone neoformation was not seen after 21 days or later. Conclusion: the addition of platelet-rich plasma had a beneficial effect in the initial cellular regeneration period and enhanced bone formation in later periods when compared to control. (author)

  5. Morphological and chemical evaluation of bone with apatite-coated Al2O3 implants as scaffolds for bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. M. Maia F.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The clinical challenge in the reconstruction of bone defects has stimulated several studies in search of alternatives to repair these defects. The ceramics are considered as synthetic scaffolds and are used in dentistry and orthopedics. This study aimed to evaluate by micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (µ-EDXRF and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS, the influence of uncoated and apatite-coated Al2O3 implants on bone regeneration. Twelve samples of Al2O3 implants were prepared and half of this samples (n = 6 were apatite-coated by the modified biomimetic method and then the ceramic material were implanted in the tibia of rabbits. Three experimental groups were tested: Group C - control, surgery procedure without ceramic implant, Group Ce - uncoated Al2O3 implants (n = 6 and Group CeHA - apatite-coated Al2O3 implants (n = 6. The deposition of bone tissue was determined by measuring the weight content of Ca and P through surface mapping of bone-implant interface by µ-EDXRF and through point analysis by EDS. It was observed after thirty days of treatment a greater deposition of Ca and P in the group treated with CeHA (p <0.001 compared to group C. The results suggest that ceramic coated with hydroxyapatite (CeHA can be an auxiliary to bone deposition in tibia defect model in rabbits.

  6. [Effect of simvastatin on inducing endothelial progenitor cells homing and promoting bone defect repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Quansheng; Wang, Lingying; Zhu, Jinglin; Han, Xiaoguang; Li, Xu; Yang, Yanlin; Sun, Yan; Song, Chunli

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the effect of simvastatin on inducing endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) homing and promoting bone defect repair, and to explore the mechanism of local implanting simvastatin in promoting bone formation. Simvastatin (50 mg) compounded with polylactic acid (PLA, 200 mg) or only PLA (200 mg) was dissolved in acetone (1 mL) to prepare implanted materials (Simvastatin-PLA material, PLA material). EPCs were harvested from bone marrow of 2 male rabbits and cultured with M199; after identified by immunohistochemistry, the cell suspension of EPCs at the 3rd generation (2 x 10(6) cells/mL) was prepared and transplanted into 12 female rabbits through auricular veins (2 mL). After 3 days, the models of cranial defect with 15 cm diameter were made in the 12 female rabbits. And the defects were repaired with Simvastatin-PLA materials (experimental group, n=6) and PLA materials (control group, n=6), respectively. The bone repair was observed after 8 weeks of operation by gross appearance, X-ray film, and histology; gelatin-ink perfusion and HE staining were used to show the new vessels formation in the defect. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to show the EPCs homing at the defect site. All experimental animals of 2 groups survived to the end of the experiment. After 8 weeks in experimental group, new bone formation was observed in the bone defect by gross and histology, and an irregular, hyperdense shadow by X-ray film; no similar changes were observed in control group. FISH showed that the male EPC containing Y chromosome was found in the wall of new vessels in the defect of experimental group, while no male EPC containing Y chromosome was found in control group. The percentage of new bone formation in defect area was 91.63% +/- 4.07% in experimental group and 59.45% +/- 5.43% in control group, showing significant difference (P < 0.05). Simvastatin can promote bone defect repair, and its mechanism is probably associated with inducing EPCs

  7. Technical Report: Correlation Between the Repair of Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in an Osteochondral Defect Using Bilayered, Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, S.; Lam, J.; Trachtenberg, J.E.; Lee, E.J.; Seyednejad, H.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Tabata, Y.; Kasper, F.K.; Scott, D.W.; Wong, M.E.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The present work investigated correlations between cartilage and subchondral bone repair, facilitated by a growth factor-delivering scaffold, in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Histological scoring indices and microcomputed tomography morphological parameters were used to evaluate cartilage and

  8. A preclinical evaluation of alternative synthetic biomaterials for fascial defect repair using a rat abdominal hernia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ulrich

    Full Text Available Fascial defects are a common problem in the abdominal wall and in the vagina leading to hernia or pelvic organ prolapse that requires mesh enhancement to reduce operation failure. However, the long-term outcome of synthetic mesh surgery may be unsatisfactory due to post-surgical complications. We hypothesized that mesh fabricated from alternative synthetic polymers may evoke a different tissue response, and provide more appropriate mechanical properties for hernia repair. Our aim was to compare the in vivo biocompatibility of new synthetic meshes with a commercial mesh.We have fabricated 3 new warp-knitted synthetic meshes from different polymers with different tensile properties polyetheretherketone (PEEK, polyamide (PA and a composite, gelatin coated PA (PA+G. The rat abdominal hernia model was used to implant the meshes (25 × 35 mm, n = 24/ group. After 7, 30, 60, 90 days tissues were explanted for immunohistochemical assessment of foreign body reaction and tissue integration, using CD31, CD45, CD68, alpha-SMA antibodies. The images were analysed using an image analysis software program. Biomechanical properties were uniaxially evaluated using an Instron Tensile® Tester.This study showed that the new meshes induced complex differences in the type of foreign body reaction over the time course of implantation. The PA, and particularly the composite PA+G meshes, evoked a milder early inflammatory response, and macrophages were apparent throughout the time course. Our meshes led to better tissue integration and new collagen deposition, particularly with the PA+G meshes, as well as greater and sustained neovascularisation compared with the PP meshes.PA, PA+G and PEEK appear to be well tolerated and are biocompatible, evoking an overlapping and different host tissue response with time that might convey mechanical variations in the healing tissue. These new meshes comprising different polymers may provide an alternative option for future treatment

  9. Application of bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for testing the biocompatibility of metal-based biomaterials functionalized with ascorbic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Grzesiak, Jakub; Donesz-Sikorska, Anna; Krzak-Roś, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    In this study, metal-based biomaterials were functionalized with ascorbic acid (LAA). Two types of substrates were used: austenitic steel 316L and titanium Ti6Al4V. Coatings were prepared with the sol–gel method and applied on metal surfaces using the dip-coating technique. Ascorbic acid was delivered with SiO 2 -coating at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.4 M. The morphology of the surfaces and coatings was determined using scanning electron microscope (SEM), whereas their elemental composition by SEM-EDX. Immobilization of ascorbic acid in the coatings was confirmed with Raman spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of the materials obtained was tested in vitro using both bone marrow- and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSC and ADMSC, respectively). Proliferation rate and morphology of cells cultured in the presence of designed biomaterials were monitored after 24, 48, 120 and 168 h of propagation. The results obtained indicated that silica coatings doped with 0.4 M LAA had a positive effect on the proliferation rate of investigated cells, and in some cases on the growth pattern of culture. (paper)

  10. Smart biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Narain, Ravin; Idota, Naokazu; Kim, Young-Jin; Hoffman, John M; Uto, Koichiro; Aoyagi, Takao

    2014-01-01

    This book surveys smart biomaterials, exploring the properties, mechanics and characterization of hydrogels, particles, assemblies, surfaces, fibers and conjugates. Reviews applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, bioseparation and more.

  11. Nanoporous Calcium Silicate and PLGA Bio composite for Bone Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, J.; Wang, Z.; Wu, Y.; Cao, L.; Ma, Y.; Yu, B.; Li, M.; Yan, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoporous calcium silicate (n-CS) with high surface area was synthesized using the mixed surfactants of EO20PO70EO20 (polyethylene oxide)20(polypropylene oxide)70(polyethylene oxide)20, P123) and hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as templates, and its composite with poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were fabricated. The results showed that the n-CS/PLGA composite (n-CPC) with 20 wt% n-CS could induce a dense and continuous layer of apatite on its surface after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1 week, suggesting the excellent in vitro bioactivity. The n-CPC could promote cell attachment on its surfaces. In addition, the proliferation ratio of MG63 cells on n-CPC was significantly higher than PLGA; the results demonstrated that n-CPC had excellent cytocompatibility. We prepared n-CPC scaffolds that contained open and interconnected macroporous ranging in size from 200 to 500 μ m. The n-CPC scaffolds were implanted in femur bone defect of rabbits, and the in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenicity of the scaffolds were investigated. The results indicated that n-CPC scaffolds exhibited good biocompatibility, degradability, and osteogenesis in vivo. Collectively, these results suggested that the incorporation of n-CS in PLGA produced biocomposites with improved bioactivity and biocompatibility.

  12. Surgical repair of central slip avulsion injuries with Mitek bone anchor--retrospective analysis of a case series.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Jeffrey C Y

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe our technique of central slip repair using the Mitek bone anchor and to evaluate the treatment outcome. Eight digits in eight patients were reconstructed using the bone anchor: three little fingers, two middle fingers, two index fingers and one ring finger. There were two immediate and six delayed repairs (range from one day to eight months). Four patients had pre-operative intensive splinting and physiotherapy to restore passive extension of the proximal interphalangeal joint prior to central slip reconstruction. All patients have made good progress since surgery. No patient requires a second procedure and none of the bone anchors have dislodged or loosened. We conclude that the Mitek bone anchor is a reliable technique to achieve soft tissue to bone fixation in central slip avulsion injuries. We recommend that this technique be considered as a treatment option for patients requiring surgical repair.

  13. Adipose, Bone Marrow and Synovial Joint-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, Christopher R.; Matta, Csaba; Zakany, Roza; Khan, Ilyas M.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Current cell-based repair strategies have proven unsuccessful for treating cartilage defects and osteoarthritic lesions, consequently advances in innovative therapeutics are required and mesenchymal stem cell-based (MSC) therapies are an expanding area of investigation. MSCs are capable of differentiating into multiple cell lineages and exerting paracrine effects. Due to their easy isolation, expansion, and low immunogenicity, MSCs are an attractive option for regenerative medicine for joint repair. Recent studies have identified several MSC tissue reservoirs including in adipose tissue, bone marrow, cartilage, periosteum, and muscle. MSCs isolated from these discrete tissue niches exhibit distinct biological activities, and have enhanced regenerative potentials for different tissue types. Each MSC type has advantages and disadvantages for cartilage repair and their use in a clinical setting is a balance between expediency and effectiveness. In this review we explore the challenges associated with cartilage repair and regeneration using MSC-based cell therapies and provide an overview of phenotype, biological activities, and functional properties for each MSC population. This paper also specifically explores the therapeutic potential of each type of MSC, particularly focusing on which cells are capable of producing stratified hyaline-like articular cartilage regeneration. Finally we highlight areas for future investigation. Given that patients present with a variety of problems it is unlikely that cartilage regeneration will be a simple “one size fits all,” but more likely an array of solutions that need to be applied systematically to achieve regeneration of a biomechanically competent repair tissue. PMID:28066501

  14. Adipose, Bone Marrow and Synovial Joint-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Fellows

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Current cell-based repair strategies have proven unsuccessful for treating cartilage defects and osteoarthritic lesions, consequently advances in innovative therapeutics are required and mesenchymal stem cell-based (MSC therapies are an expanding area of investigation. MSCs are capable of differentiating into multiple cell lineages and exerting paracrine effects. Due to their easy isolation, expansion and low immunogenicity, MSCs are an attractive option for regenerative medicine for joint repair. Recent studies have identified several MSC tissue reservoirs including in adipose tissue, bone marrow, cartilage, periosteum and muscle. MSCs isolated from these discrete tissue niches exhibit distinct biological activities, and have enhanced regenerative potentials for different tissue types. Each MSC type has advantages and disadvantages for cartilage repair and their use in a clinical setting is a balance between expediency and effectiveness. In this review we explore the challenges associated with cartilage repair and regeneration using MSC-based cell therapies and provide an overview of phenotype, biological activities and functional properties for each MSC population. This paper also specifically explores the therapeutic potential of each type of MSC, particularly focusing on which cells are capable of producing stratified hyaline-like articular cartilage regeneration. Finally we highlight areas for future investigation. Given that patients present with a variety of problems it is unlikely that cartilage regeneration will be a simple ‘one size fits all’, but more likely an array of solutions that need to applied systematically to achieve regeneration of a biomechanically competent repair tissue.

  15. To reduce the maximum stress and the stress shielding effect around a dental implant-bone interface using radial functionally graded biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharzadeh Shirazi, H; Ayatollahi, M R; Asnafi, A

    2017-05-01

    In a dental implant system, the value of stress and its distribution plays a pivotal role on the strength, durability and life of the implant-bone system. A typical implant consists of a Titanium core and a thin layer of biocompatible material such as the hydroxyapatite. This coating has a wide range of clinical applications in orthopedics and dentistry due to its biocompatibility and bioactivity characteristics. Low bonding strength and sudden variation of mechanical properties between the coating and the metallic layers are the main disadvantages of such common implants. To overcome these problems, a radial distributed functionally graded biomaterial (FGBM) was proposed in this paper and the effect of material property on the stress distribution around the dental implant-bone interface was studied. A three-dimensional finite element simulation was used to illustrate how the use of radial FGBM dental implant can reduce the maximum von Mises stress and, also the stress shielding effect in both the cortical and cancellous bones. The results, of course, give anybody an idea about optimized behaviors that can be achieved using such materials. The finite element solver was validated by familiar methods and the results were compared to previous works in the literature.

  16. Changes in tissue morphology and collagen composition during the repair of cortical bone in the adult chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glimcher, M J; Shapiro, F; Ellis, R D; Eyre, D R

    1980-09-01

    An animal model was developed to study the histology and collagen chemistry of healing cortical bone. A hole was cut through the cortex of the mid-shaft of the humerus of the adult chicken, which allowed for repair at a mechanically stable site. After one to two weeks the collagen of the repair tissue, which consisted principally of woven bone, contained almost three times as much hydroxylysine as the collagen of normal adult bone and thus resembled the collagen of embryonic long bones. By eight weeks, when lamellar one predominated, the hydroxylysine content had fallen to normal levels. Type I was the major genetic type of collagen present throughout. No type-II collagen, characteristic of cartilage, was detected; this was consistent with the histological findings. The results established that hydroxylysine-rich type-I collagen can be made by osteoblasts of adult animals as well as by those of embryos and early postnates. In order to understand the biological characteristics of fracture healing, it is vital to study not only the macroscopic organization of the repair tissue but also the chemical properties of its molecular components. The strength of healing fractured bone, and indeed of normal bone, depends largely on the properties of the structural protein collagen. To date, it is not known whether the collagen in healing fractures is the same as that in normal bone, or whether it has distinct chemical features that may suit it for bone repair.

  17. Nano-calciumphosphate scaffold generation for bone repair/replacement: elucidating the signalling response and cell cycle

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wepnener, I

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Strong, bioinert materials have always been the focus for bone replacement and repair. This practice has since moved towards materials that can mimic living tissue and aid the healing process (i.e. be replaced by natural bone); thus materials...

  18. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A; Baldini, N; Cenni, E; Gomez-Barrena, E; Granchi, D; Kassem, M; Konttinen, Y T; Mustafa, K; Pioletti, D P; Sillat, T; Finne-Wistrand, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and foetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem cells, use of platelet-rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed. PMID:21129153

  19. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A

    2011-01-01

    cells, use of platelet rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed.......This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and fetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem...

  20. A biocompatible hybrid material with simultaneous calcium and strontium release capability for bone tissue repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, J. Carlos [CICECO — Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Wacha, András [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar Tudósok körútja 2, Budapest 1117 (Hungary); Gomes, Pedro S. [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto (Portugal); Alves, Luís C. [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N.10, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Fernandes, M. Helena Vaz [CICECO — Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Salvado, Isabel M. Miranda, E-mail: isabelmsalvado@ua.pt [CICECO — Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Fernandes, M. Helena R. [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto (Portugal)

    2016-05-01

    The increasing interest in the effect of strontium in bone tissue repair has promoted the development of bioactive materials with strontium release capability. According to literature, hybrid materials based on the system PDMS–SiO{sub 2} have been considered a plausible alternative as they present a mechanical behavior similar to the one of the human bone. The main purpose of this study was to obtain a biocompatible hybrid material with simultaneous calcium and strontium release capability. A hybrid material, in the system PDMS–SiO{sub 2}–CaO–SrO, was prepared with the incorporation of 0.05 mol of titanium per mol of SiO{sub 2}. Calcium and strontium were added using the respective acetates as sources, following a sol–gel technique previously developed by the present authors. The obtained samples were characterized by FT-IR, solid-state NMR, and SAXS, and surface roughness was analyzed by 3D optical profilometry. In vitro studies were performed by immersion of the samples in Kokubo's SBF for different periods of time, in order to determine the bioactive potential of these hybrids. Surfaces of the immersed samples were observed by SEM, EDS and PIXE, showing the formation of calcium phosphate precipitates. Supernatants were analyzed by ICP, revealing the capability of the material to simultaneously fix phosphorus ions and to release calcium and strontium, in a concentration range within the values reported as suitable for the induction of the bone tissue repair. The material demonstrated to be cytocompatible when tested with MG63 osteoblastic cells, exhibiting an inductive effect on cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity. - Highlights: • A hybrid PDMS–SiO{sub 2}–CaO–SrO material was prepared with the incorporation of Ti. • Sr was released in concentrations suitable for the induction of bone tissue repair. • The material demonstrated to be cytocompatible when tested with osteoblastic cells.

  1. Construction of doxycycline-mediated BMP-2 transgene combining with APA microcapsules for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Dongyang; Bai, Bo; Yan, Guangbin; Zhang, Shujiang; Liu, Qi; Chen, Yi; Tan, Xiaobo; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    The repairing of large segmental bone defects is difficult for clinical orthopedists at present. Gene therapy is regarded as a promising method for bone defects repair. The present study aimed to construct an effective and controllable Tet-On expression system for transferring hBMP-2 gene into bone marrow mesenchymal progenitor cells (BMSCs). Meanwhile, with combination of alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate (APA) microencapsulation technology, we attempted to reduce the influence of immunologic rejection and examine the effect of the Tet-On expression system on osteogenesis of BMSCs. The adenovirus encoding hBMP-2 (ADV-hBMP2) was constructed using the means of molecular cloning. The ADV-hBMP2 and Adeno-X Tet-On virus was respectively transfected to the HEK293 for amplification and afterward BMSCs were co-infected with the virus of ADV-hBMP2 and the Adeno-X Tet-On. The expression of hBMP-2 was measured with induction by doxycycline (DOX) at different concentration by means of RT-PCR and ELISA. Combining Tet-On expression system and APA microcapsules with the use of the pulsed high-voltage electrostatic microcapsule instrument, we examined the expression level of hBMP-2 in APA microcapsules by ELISA as well as the osteogenesis by alizarin red S staining. An effective Tet-On expression system for transferring hBMP-2 gene into BMSCs was constructed successfully. Also, the expression of hBMP-2 could be regulated by concentration of DOX. The data exhibited that BMSCs in APA microcapsules maintained the capability of proliferation and differentiation. The combination of Tet-On expression system and APA microcapsules could promote the osteogenesis of BMSCs. According to the results, microencapsulated Tet-On expression system showed the effective characteristics of secreting hBMP-2 and enhancing osteogenesis, which would provide a promising way for bone repair.

  2. Design of bone-integrating organic-inorganic composite suitable for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Toshiki

    2013-01-01

    Several ceramics exhibit specific biological affinity, i.e. direct bone integration, when implanted in bony defects. They are called bioactive ceramics and utilized as important bone substitutes. However, there is limitation on clinical application, because of their inappropriate mechanical properties such as high Young's modulus and low fracture toughness. Novel bioactive materials exhibiting high machinability and flexibility have been desired in medical fields. Mixing bioactive ceramic powders and organic polymers have developed various organic-inorganic composites. Their mechanical property and bioactivity are mainly governed by the ceramics content. It is known that bioactive ceramics integrate with the bone through bone-like hydroxyapatite layer formed on their surfaces by chemical reaction with body fluid. This is triggered by a catalytic effect of various functional groups. On the basis of these facts, novel bioactive organic-inorganic nanocomposites have been developed. In these composites, inorganic components effective for triggering the hydroxyapatite nucleation are dispersed in polymer matrix at molecular level. Concept of the organic-inorganic composite is also applicable for providing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement with the bioactivity.

  3. Transplantation of neurotrophin-3-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Yuzhen; Yang, Libin; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Hongxing; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to be therapeutic in the repair of spinal cord injury. However, the low survival rate of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo remains a problem. Neurotrophin-3 promotes motor neuron survival and it is hypothesized that its transfection can enhance the therapeutic effect. We show that in vitro transfection of neurotrophin-3 gene increases the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the region of spinal ...

  4. Chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine in the cartilage and subchondral bone repair of dogs - Histological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Eleotério

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate nutraceuticals are commonly used in the management of degenerative articular disease in veterinary routine. However, there are controversies on the contribution of these substances to articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate-based veterinary nutraceutical on the repair of an induced osteochondral defect in a dog femoral condyle, by macroscopic, histological and histomorphometric analyses. The nutraceutical was orally administered the day following injury induction, every 24 hours (treated group, TG, n=24, compared with animals that did not receive the product (control group, CG, n=24. Six animals per group were anaesthetized for sample collection at 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after surgery. At 15 days, defects were macroscopically filled with red-pinkish tissue. After 30 days, whitish color tissue was observed, both in TG and CG animals, with firmer consistency to touch at 60 and 90 postoperative days. Histological analysis demonstrated that, in both groups, there was initial blood clot formation, which was subsequently substituted by a fibrin net, with capillary proliferation from the adjacent bone marrow and infiltration of mesenchymal cells in clot periphery. As cellular differentiation developed, repair tissue presented a fibrocartilage aspect most of the time, and new subchondral bone formation occurred in the deepest area corresponding to the defect. Histomorphometry suggested that the nutraceutical did not favor the articular cartilage repair process. It was concluded that nutraceutical did not significantly influence chondrocytes proliferation or hyaline architecture restoration.

  5. Chitosan-glycerol phosphate/blood implants elicit hyaline cartilage repair integrated with porous subchondral bone in microdrilled rabbit defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoemann, C D; Sun, J; McKee, M D; Chevrier, A; Rossomacha, E; Rivard, G-E; Hurtig, M; Buschmann, M D

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that microfractured ovine defects are repaired with more hyaline cartilage when the defect is treated with in situ-solidified implants of chitosan-glycerol phosphate (chitosan-GP) mixed with autologous whole blood. The objectives of this study were (1) to characterize chitosan-GP/blood clots in vitro, and (2) to develop a rabbit marrow stimulation model in order to determine the effects of the chitosan-GP/blood implant and of debridement on the formation of incipient cartilage repair tissue. Blood clots were characterized by histology and in vitro clot retraction tests. Bilateral 3.5 x 4 mm trochlear defects debrided into the calcified layer were pierced with four microdrill holes and filled with a chitosan-GP/blood implant or allowed to bleed freely as a control. At 1 day post-surgery, initial defects were characterized by histomorphometry (n=3). After 8 weeks of repair, osteochondral repair tissues between or through the drill holes were evaluated by histology, histomorphometry, collagen type II expression, and stereology (n=16). Chitosan-GP solutions structurally stabilized the blood clots by inhibiting clot retraction. Treatment of drilled defects with chitosan-GP/blood clots led to the formation of a more integrated and hyaline repair tissue above a more porous and vascularized subchondral bone plate compared to drilling alone. Correlation analysis of repair tissue between the drill holes revealed that the absence of calcified cartilage and the presence of a porous subchondral bone plate were predictors of greater repair tissue integration with subchondral bone (Phyaline and integrated repair tissue associated with a porous subchondral bone replete with blood vessels. Concomitant regeneration of a vascularized bone plate during cartilage repair could provide progenitors, anabolic factors and nutrients that aid in the formation of hyaline cartilage.

  6. Repair of sheep long bone cortical defects filled with COLLOSS, COLLOSS E, OSSAPLAST, and fresh iliac crest autograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffer, William E; Benedict, James J; Turner, A S; Briest, Arne; Rettenmaier, Robert; Springer, Marco; Walboomers, X F

    2007-08-01

    COLLOSS and COLLOSS E are osteoinductive bone void fillers consisting of bone collagen and noncollagenous proteins from bovine and equine bone, respectively. The aim of this study was to compare COLLOSS, COLLOSS E, iliac bone autograft, sintered beta tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP; OSSAPLAST), and COLLOSS E plus OSSAPLAST. Materials were placed for 4, 8, or 24 weeks in 5-mm cortical bone defects in sheep long bones. Histological sections in a plane perpendicular to the long axis of the bone were used to measure the total repair area (original defect plus callus) and the area of bone within the total repair area. The incidence of defect union was also evaluated. At 4 and 8 weeks, defects treated with COLLOSS and COLLOSS E with or without OSSAPLAST had total repair and bone areas equivalent to autograft, and larger than OSSAPLAST-treated defects. At 8 weeks, the incidence of defect union was higher in defects treated with autograft or COLLOSS E plus OSSAPLAST than in untreated defects. At 24 weeks, the incidence of union was 100% in all treatment groups and 0% in untreated defects. The incidence of union was related to the degree of remodeling between 8 and 24 weeks. This was greater in all treated than nontreated defects. In conclusion, COLLOSS and COLLOSS E were equivalent to each other and to autograft, and superior to beta-TCP, in this study model.

  7. Hyaluronic Acid Accelerates Tendon-to-Bone Healing After Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hirokazu; Gotoh, Masafumi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Ohzono, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hidehiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro; Fukuda, Kanji; Teramura, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Shichijo, Shigeki; Shiba, Naoto

    2017-12-01

    There is growing evidence that the subacromial injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) is effective for pain relief in rotator cuff tears; however, its effect on tendon-to-bone healing remains unknown. To examine the effect of HA on the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro and on tendon-to-bone healing in a rotator cuff repair model. Controlled laboratory study. Bilateral complete tears of the infraspinatus tendon were made in rabbits and subsequently repaired. Before closure, 1 mL HA was applied to the repaired site, and phosphate-buffered saline was used in the opposite side as a control. Biomechanical, histological, and immunohistochemical analyses were performed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. After euthanizing each animal, the bone marrow was isolated from the femoral bone in the same rabbits. Then, MSCs were cultured in media for chondrogenic differentiation, and the chondral pellet production and cartilage-related gene expression levels in the cells were examined at various concentrations of HA. At 4 and 8 weeks after surgery, ultimate load-to-failure was significantly greater in the HA group than in the control group (45.61 ± 9.0 N vs 32.42 ± 9.4 N at 4 weeks, 90.7 ± 16.0 N vs 66.97 ± 10.0 N at 8 weeks; both P .05). Linear stiffness was not significant throughout the time point evaluation. The chondroid formation area at the tendon-bone interface stained by safranin O (control vs HA group) was 0.33% ± 0.7% versus 13.5% ± 12.3% at 4 weeks after surgery ( P repaired site stained by PicroSirius Red (control vs HA group) was 16.2 ± 10.6 versus 43.5 ± 21.3 at 4 weeks after surgery ( P .05), and 1.8% ± 4.0% versus 5.4% ± 4.2% at 12 weeks after surgery ( P > .05). Compared with the control group, HA significantly increased the volume of cartilaginous pellet produced by MSCs (0.0016 ± 0.0015 mm 3 at 0 mg/mL of HA, 0.0041 ± 0.0023 mm 3 at 1.0 mg/mL, and 0.0041 ± 0.0018 mm 3 at 4.0 mg/mL), with increased mRNA expression (relative ratio

  8. Efficacy of bone marrow-stimulating technique in rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilsel, Kerem; Yildiz, Fatih; Kapicioglu, Mehmet; Uzer, Gokcer; Elmadag, Mehmet; Pulatkan, Anil; Esrefoglu, Mukaddes; Bozdag, Ergun; Milano, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    This study used a chronic rotator cuff (RC) tear model to investigate the effect of microfracture as a bone marrow-stimulating (BMS) technique for RC healing. A chronic retracted RC tendon tear model was created bilaterally in the subscapularis tendons of 20 New Zealand rabbits. The tendons were repaired after 8 weeks using a single-row configuration. Tendons in the right shoulder were repaired in standard fashion (control group). Microfractures were performed in the left shoulders before repair (microfracture group). The animals were euthanized 8 and 16 weeks after repair. The repaired tendons were tested biomechanically for their ultimate failure load, linear stiffness, and elongation at failure. Gross and histologic evaluations of the tendon-to-bone healing were evaluated. Macroscopically, subscapularis tendons were attached on the lesser tuberosity. In the microfracture group, collagen fibers were organized in relatively thicker bundles. The mean ultimate failure load of the microfracture group was significantly greater at 8 weeks (148.4 ± 31 N vs. 101.4 ± 26 N, respectively; P = .011) and 16 weeks (155 ± 30 N vs. 114.9 ± 25 N, respectively; P = .017) after repair. There were no significant differences between the groups for linear stiffness at 8 weeks (15.9 ± 2.7 N/mm vs. 15.8 ± 1.3 N/mm, respectively; P = .798) and 16 weeks (16.9 ± 4.3 N/mm vs. 17.1 ± 3.6 N/mm, respectively, P = .848) and elongation at failure at 8 weeks (4.7 ± 1.1 mm vs. 4.7 ± 1.3 mm, respectively; P = .848) and 16 weels (4.8 ± 1.5 mm vs. 4.9 ± 0.9 mm, respectively; P = .749). The microfracture on the tuberosity of the repaired chronic rotator cuff tear promoted dynamic tendon healing with significantly increased ultimate force to failure and with thicker collagen bundles and more fibrocartilage histologically at 8 weeks. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of

  9. Human bone marrow stem cell-encapsulating calcium phosphate scaffolds for bone repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Michael D.; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2010-01-01

    Due to its injectability and excellent osteoconductivity, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is highly promising for orthopedic applications. However, a literature search revealed no report on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hBMSC) encapsulation in CPC for bone tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to encapsulate hBMSCs in alginate hydrogel beads and then incorporate them into CPC, CPC–chitosan and CPC–chitosan–fiber scaffolds. Chitosan and degradable fibers were used to mechanically reinforce the scaffolds. After 21 days, that the percentage of live cells and the cell density of hBMSCs inside CPC-based constructs matched those in alginate without CPC, indicating that the CPC setting reaction did not harm the hBMSCs. Alkaline phosphate activity increased by 8-fold after 14 days. Mineral staining, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirmed that apatitic mineral was deposited by the cells. The amount of hBMSC-synthesized mineral in CPC–chitosan–fiber matched that in CPC without chitosan and fibers. Hence, adding chitosan and fibers, which reinforced the CPC, did not compromise hBMSC osteodifferentiation and mineral synthesis. In conclusion, hBMSCs were encapsulated in CPC and CPC–chitosan–fiber scaffolds for the first time. The encapsulated cells remained viable, osteodifferentiated and synthesized bone minerals. These self-setting, hBMSC-encapsulating CPC-based constructs may be promising for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:20451676

  10. Repair of rat cranial bone defect by using bone morphogenetic protein-2-related peptide combined with microspheres composed of polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid copolymer and chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jingfeng; Jin, Lin; Zhu, Shaobo; Wang, Mingbo; Xu, Shuyun

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the transplanted bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) -related peptide P24 and rhBMP 2 combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/chitosan (CS) microspheres were investigated in promoting the repair of rat cranial bone defect. Forty white rats were selected and equally divided into four groups (group A: 1 μg of rhBMP 2 /PLGA/CS composite; group B: 3 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group C: 0.5 μg of rhBMP 2 + 1.5 mg of P24/PLGA/CS composite; group D: blank PLGA/CS material), and rat cranial bone defect models with a diameter of 5 mm were established. The materials were transplanted to the cranial bone defects. The animals were sacrificed on weeks 6 and 12 post-operation. Radiographic examinations (x-ray imaging and 3D CT scanning) and histological evaluations were performed. The repaired areas of cranial bone defects were measured, and the osteogenetic abilities of various materials were compared. Cranial histology, imaging, and repaired area measurements showed that the osteogenetic effects at two time points (weeks 6 and 12) in group C were better than those in groups A and B. The effects in groups A and B were similar. Group D achieved the worst repair effect of cranial bone defects, where a large number of fibrous connective tissues were observed. The PLGA/CS composite microspheres loaded with rhBMP 2 and P24 had optimal concrescence and could mutually increase their osteogenesis capability. rhBMP 2 + P24/PLGA/CS composite is a novel material for bone defect repair with stable activity to induce bone formation. (paper)

  11. Biphasic calcium phosphates (BCP of hydroxyapatite (HA and tricalcium phosphate (TCP as bone substitutes: Importance of physicochemical characterizations in biomaterials studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ebrahimi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Biphasic calcium phosphates bioceramics (HA/TCP: Concept, physicochemical properties and the impact of standardization of study protocols in biomaterials research” [1]. This article provides in depth study of BCP bone substitutes as valuable option in the field of tissue engineering. However, there are discrepancies in the literature regarding the ideal physicochemical properties of BCP and the ideal balance between different phase compositions for enhanced bone tissue engineering (M. Ebrahimi, M.G. Botelho, S.V. Dorozhkin, 2016; M. Ebrahimi, P. Pripatnanont, S. Suttapreyasri, N. Monmaturapoj, 2014 [1,2]. This is found to be mainly because of improper characterization of BCP bioceramics in basic studies and lack of standard study protocols in in vitro and in vivo research. This data article along with original article provide the basic data required for ideal characterization of BCP and other bioceramics in an attempt to provide basic standardized protocols for future studies.

  12. Calcium-phosphate matrix with or without TGF-β3 improves tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, David; Fox, Alice J; Bedi, Asheesh; Ying, Liang; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Warren, Russell F; Rodeo, Scott A

    2011-04-01

    Rotator cuff tendon heals by formation of an interposed zone of fibrovascular scar tissue. Recent studies demonstrate that transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-β(3)) is associated with tissue regeneration and "scarless" healing, in contrast to scar-mediated healing that occurs with TGF-β(1). Delivery of TGF-β(3) in an injectable calcium-phosphate matrix to the healing tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair will result in increased attachment strength secondary to improved bone formation and collagen organization and reduced scar formation of the healing enthesis. Controlled laboratory study. Ninety-six male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral detachment of the supraspinatus tendon followed by acute repair using transosseous suture fixation. Animals were allocated into 1 of 3 groups: (1) repair alone (controls, n = 32), (2) repair augmented by application of an osteoconductive calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) matrix only (n = 32), or (3) repair augmented with Ca-P matrix + TGF-β(3) (2.75 µg) at the tendon-bone interface (n = 32). Animals were euthanized at either 2 weeks or 4 weeks postoperatively. Biomechanical testing of the supraspinatus tendon-bone complex was performed at 2 and 4 weeks (n = 8 per group). Microcomputed tomography was utilized to quantitate bone microstructure at the repair site. The healing tendon-bone interface was evaluated with histomorphometry and immunohistochemical localization of collagen types I (COLI) and III (COLIII). Statistical analysis was performed using 2-way analysis of variance with significance set at P repair site is associated with new bone formation, increased fibrocartilage, and improved collagen organization at the healing tendon-bone interface in the early postoperative period after rotator cuff repair. The addition of TGF-β(3) significantly improved strength of the repair at 4 weeks postoperatively and resulted in a more favorable COLI/COLIII ratio. The delivery of TGF-β(3) with an injectable Ca-P matrix

  13. Bioactive glass-ceramic bone repair associated or not with autogenous bone: a study of organic bone matrix organization in a rabbit critical-sized calvarial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Cavalla, Franco; Tim, Carla Roberta; Saraiva, Patrícia Pinto; Orcini, Wilson; De Andrade Holgado, Leandro; Rennó, Ana Claudia Muniz; Matsumoto, Mariza Akemi

    2018-04-26

    The aim of the study was to analyze bone matrix (BMX) organization after bone grafting and repair using a new bioactive glass-ceramic (Biosilicate ® ) associated or not with particulate autogenous bone graft. Thirty rabbits underwent surgical bilateral parietal defects and divided into groups according to the materials used: (C) control-blood clot, (BG) particulate autogenous bone, (BS) bioactive glass-ceramic, and BG + BS. After 7, 14, and 30 days post-surgery, a fragment of each specimen was fixed in - 80 °C liquid nitrogen for zymographic evaluation, while the remaining was fixed in 10% formalin for histological birefringence analysis. The results of this study demonstrated that matrix organization in experimental groups was significantly improved compared to C considering collagenous organization. Zymographic analysis revealed pro-MMP-2, pro-MMP-9, and active (a)-MMP-2 in all groups, showing gradual decrease of total gelatinolytic activity during the periods. At day 7, BG presented more prominent gelatinolytic activity for pro-MMP-2 and 9 and a-MMP-2, when compared to the other groups. In addition, at day 7, a 53% activation ratio (active form/[active form + latent form]) was evident in C group, 33% in BS group, and 31% in BG group. In general, BS allowed the production of a BMX similar to BG, with organized collagen deposition and MMP-2 and MMP-9 disponibility, permitting satisfactory bone remodeling at the late period. The evaluation of new bone substitute, with favorable biological properties, opens the possibility for its use as a viable and efficient alternative to autologous bone graft.

  14. A Multicentric, Open-Label, Randomized, Comparative Clinical Trial of Two Different Doses of Expanded hBM-MSCs Plus Biomaterial versus Iliac Crest Autograft, for Bone Healing in Nonunions after Long Bone Fractures: Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Gómez-Barrena

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ORTHOUNION is a multicentre, open, comparative, three-arm, randomized clinical trial (EudraCT number 2015-000431-32 to compare the efficacy, at one and two years, of autologous human bone marrow-derived expanded mesenchymal stromal cell (hBM-MSC treatments versus iliac crest autograft (ICA to enhance bone healing in patients with diaphyseal and/or metaphysodiaphyseal fracture (femur, tibia, and humerus status of atrophic or oligotrophic nonunion (more than 9 months after the acute fracture, including recalcitrant cases after failed treatments. The primary objective is to determine if the treatment with hBM-MSCs combined with biomaterial is superior to ICA in obtaining bone healing. If confirmed, a secondary objective is set to determine if the dose of 100 × 106 hBM-MSCs is noninferior to that of 200 × 106 hBM-MSCs. The participants (n=108 will be randomly assigned to either the experimental low dose (n=36, the experimental high dose (n=36, or the comparator arm (n=36 using a central randomization service. The trial will be conducted in 20 clinical centres in Spain, France, Germany, and Italy under the same clinical protocol. The confirmation of superiority for the proposed ATMP in nonunions may foster the future of bone regenerative medicine in this indication. On the contrary, absence of superiority may underline its limitations in clinical use.

  15. A Multicentric, Open-Label, Randomized, Comparative Clinical Trial of Two Different Doses of Expanded hBM-MSCs Plus Biomaterial versus Iliac Crest Autograft, for Bone Healing in Nonunions after Long Bone Fractures: Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Padilla-Eguiluz, Norma G; Avendaño-Solá, Cristina; Payares-Herrera, Concepción; Velasco-Iglesias, Ana; Torres, Ferran; Rosset, Philippe; Gebhard, Florian; Baldini, Nicola; Rubio-Suarez, Juan C; García-Rey, Eduardo; Cordero-Ampuero, José; Vaquero-Martin, Javier; Chana, Francisco; Marco, Fernando; García-Coiradas, Javier; Caba-Dessoux, Pedro; de la Cuadra, Pablo; Hernigou, Philippe; Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri; Gouin, François; Mainard, Didier; Laffosse, Jean Michel; Kalbitz, Miriam; Marzi, Ingo; Südkamp, Norbert; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Donati, Davide Maria; Zagra, Luigi; Pazzaglia, Ugo; Zarattini, Guido; Capanna, Rodolfo; Catani, Fabio

    2018-01-01

    ORTHOUNION is a multicentre, open, comparative, three-arm, randomized clinical trial (EudraCT number 2015-000431-32) to compare the efficacy, at one and two years, of autologous human bone marrow-derived expanded mesenchymal stromal cell (hBM-MSC) treatments versus iliac crest autograft (ICA) to enhance bone healing in patients with diaphyseal and/or metaphysodiaphyseal fracture (femur, tibia, and humerus) status of atrophic or oligotrophic nonunion (more than 9 months after the acute fracture, including recalcitrant cases after failed treatments). The primary objective is to determine if the treatment with hBM-MSCs combined with biomaterial is superior to ICA in obtaining bone healing. If confirmed, a secondary objective is set to determine if the dose of 100 × 10 6 hBM-MSCs is noninferior to that of 200 × 10 6 hBM-MSCs. The participants ( n = 108) will be randomly assigned to either the experimental low dose ( n = 36), the experimental high dose ( n = 36), or the comparator arm ( n = 36) using a central randomization service. The trial will be conducted in 20 clinical centres in Spain, France, Germany, and Italy under the same clinical protocol. The confirmation of superiority for the proposed ATMP in nonunions may foster the future of bone regenerative medicine in this indication. On the contrary, absence of superiority may underline its limitations in clinical use.

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor/bone morphogenetic protein-2 bone marrow combined modification of the mesenchymal stem cells to repair the avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Wei; Cui, Da-Ping; Zhao, De-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) was used to repair avascular necrosis of the femoral head, which can maintain the osteogenic phenotype of seed cells, and effectively secrete VEGF and BMP-2, and effectively promote blood vessel regeneration and contribute to formation and revascularization of tissue engineered bone tissues. To observe the therapeutic effect on the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) modified by VEGF-165 and BMP-2 in vitro. The models were avascular necrosis of femoral head of rabbits on right leg. There groups were single core decompression group, core decompression + BMSCs group, core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group. Necrotic bone was cleared out under arthroscope. Arthroscopic observation demonstrated that necrotic bone was cleared out in each group, and fresh blood flowed out. Histomorphology determination showed that blood vessel number and new bone area in the repair region were significantly greater at various time points following transplantation in the core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group compared with single core decompression group and core decompression + BMSCs group (P < 0.05). These suggested that VEGF-165/BMP-2 gene transfection strengthened osteogenic effects of BMSCs, elevated number and quality of new bones and accelerated the repair of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:26629044

  17. The Development of Biomimetic Spherical Hydroxyapatite/Polyamide 66 Biocomposites as Bone Repair Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel biomedical material composed of spherical hydroxyapatite (s-HA and polyamide 66 (PA biocomposite (s-HA/PA was prepared, and its composition, mechanical properties, and cytocompatibility were characterized and evaluated. The results showed that HA distributed uniformly in the s-HA/PA matrix. Strong molecule interactions and chemical bonds were presented between the s-HA and PA in the composites confirmed by IR and XRD. The composite had excellent compressive strength in the range between 95 and 132 MPa, close to that of natural bone. In vitro experiments showed the s-HA/PA composite could improve cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Therefore, the developed s-HA/PA composites in this study might be used for tissue engineering and bone repair.

  18. Determination of bone and tissue concentrations of teicoplanin mixed with hydroxyapatite cement to repair cortical defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggenreich, K; Zeipper, U; Schwendenwein, E; Hadju, S; Kaltenecker, G; Laslo, I; Lang, S; Roschger, P; Vecsei, V; Wintersteiger, R

    2002-01-01

    A highly specific and sensitive isocratic reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the determination of the major component of teicoplanin in tissue is reported. Comparing fluorescamine and o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) as derivatizing agents, the derivative formed with the latter exhibits superior fluorescence intensity allowing detection of femtomole quantities. Pretreatment for tissue samples is by solid-phase extraction which uses Bakerbond PolarP C(18) cartridges and gives effective clean up from endogenous by-products. Linearity was given from 0.6 to 100 ng per injection. The coefficient of variation did not exceed 5.8% for both interday and intraday assays. It was found that when bone defects are repaired with a hydroxyapatite-teicoplanin mixture, the antibiotic does not degrade, even when it is in the cement for several months. The stability of teicoplanin in bone cement was determined fluorodensitometrically.

  19. Reversibility of Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy in Tendon-Bone Healing After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Bok; Ryu, Ho Young; Hong, Jin Ho; Ko, Young Hoo; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2016-04-01

    To date, there are few reports of the definite reversibility of rotator cuff muscle atrophy after repair. To evaluate the reversibility of rotator cuff muscle atrophy after successful arthroscopic repair. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Included in this study were 47 patients (mean age, 61.2 ± 7.3 years; range, 49-73 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and at 6-month and last follow-up. Patients who had confirmed rotator cuff healing (grades 1-3 according to the Sugaya classification) on both series of postoperative MRI were enrolled in the study. The mean time from the onset of symptoms to surgery was 24.7 ± 25.6 months (range, 3-120 months). The minimum follow-up was 2 years, and the mean follow-up duration was 41.8 ± 14.4 months. Serial changes in the supraspinatus muscle area on the most matching MRI scans (sagittal-oblique view) were evaluated. The area was measured by 2 independent observers. Both independent observers reported no significant difference in the area of the supraspinatus muscle between the preoperative time point and 6-month follow-up (observer 1: P = .135; observer 2: P = .189). However, there was a significant difference between the 6-month and last follow-up (mean, 41.8 months; observers 1 and 2: P .999) or from 6-month to final follow-up (P = .077). After successful arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, there was a slight (11.3%-13.9%) increase in muscle volume from preoperatively to final follow-up, as seen on serial MRI. Fatty infiltration according to the Goutallier grade was not reversed (P = .077). Some reversibility of supraspinatus muscle atrophy may exist in tendon-bone healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair; further follow-up is needed to better elucidate this result. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. The combined use of rhBMP-2/ACS, autogenous bone graft, a bovine bone mineral biomaterial, platelet-rich plasma, and guided bone regeneration at nonsubmerged implant placement for supracrestal bone augmentation. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclar, Anthony G; Best, Steven P

    2013-01-01

    This case report presents the clinical application and outcomes of the use of a combined approach to treat a patient with a severe alveolar defect. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in an absorbable collagen sponge carrier, along with autogenous bone graft, bovine bone mineral, platelet-rich plasma, and guided bone regeneration, were used simultaneous with nonsubmerged implant placement. At 1 year postsurgery, healthy peri-implant soft tissues and radiographically stable peri-implant crestal bone levels were observed along with locally increased radiographic bone density. In addition, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan demonstrated apparent supracrestal peri-implant bone augmentation with the appearance of normal alveolar ridge contours, including the facial bone wall.

  1. Tough and strong porous bioactive glass-PLA composites for structural bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Zaeem, Mohsen Asle; Li, Guangda; Bal, B Sonny; Rahaman, Mohamed N

    2017-08-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds have been used to heal small contained bone defects but their application to repairing structural bone is limited by concerns about their mechanical reliability. In the present study, the addition of an adherent polymer layer to the external surface of strong porous bioactive glass (13-93) scaffolds was investigated to improve their toughness. Finite element modeling (FEM) of the flexural mechanical response of beams composed of a porous glass and an adherent polymer layer predicted a reduction in the tensile stress in the glass with increasing thickness and elastic modulus of the polymer layer. Mechanical testing of composites with structures similar to the models, formed from 13-93 glass and polylactic acid (PLA), showed trends predicted by the FEM simulations but the observed effects were considerably more dramatic. A PLA layer of thickness -400 µm, equal to -12.5% of the scaffold thickness, increased the load-bearing capacity of the scaffold in four-point bending by ~50%. The work of fracture increased by more than 10,000%, resulting in a non-brittle mechanical response. These bioactive glass-PLA composites, combining bioactivity, high strength, high work of fracture and an internal architecture shown to be conducive to bone infiltration, could provide optimal implants for healing structural bone defects.

  2. Stability of double-row rotator cuff repair is not adversely affected by scaffold interposition between tendon and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitzel, Knut; Chowaniec, David M; McCarthy, Mary Beth; Cote, Mark P; Russell, Ryan P; Obopilwe, Elifho; Imhoff, Andreas B; Arciero, Robert A; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2012-05-01

    Rotator cuff reconstructions may be improved by adding growth factors, cells, or other biologic factors into the repair zone. This usually requires a biological carrier (scaffold) to be integrated into the construct and placed in the area of tendon-to-bone healing. This needs to be done without affecting the constructs mechanics. Hypothesis/ The hypothesis was that scaffold placement, as an interposition, has no adverse effects on biomechanical properties of double-row rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of scaffold interposition on the initial strength of rotator cuff repairs. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-five fresh-frozen shoulders (mean age: 65.5 ± 8.9 years) were randomly assigned to 5 groups. Groups were chosen to represent a broad spectrum of commonly used scaffold types: (1) double-row repair without augmentation, (2) double-row repair with interposition of a fibrin clot (Viscogel), (3) double-row repair with interposition of a collagen scaffold (Mucograft) between tendon and bone, (4) double-row repair with interposition of human dermis patch (ArthroFlex) between tendon and bone, and (5) double-row repair with human dermis patch (ArthroFlex) placed on top of the repair. Cyclic loading to measure displacement was performed to 3000 cycles at 1 Hz with an applied 10- to 100-N load. The ultimate load to failure was determined at a rate of 31 mm/min. There were no significant differences in mean displacement under cyclic loading, slope, or energy absorbed to failure between all groups (P = .128, P = .981, P = .105). Ultimate load to failure of repairs that used the collagen patch as an interposition (573.3 ± 75.6 N) and a dermis patch on top of the reconstruction (575.8 ± 22.6 N) was higher compared with the repair without a scaffold (348.9 ± 98.8 N; P = .018 and P = .025). No significant differences were found for repairs with the fibrin clot as an interposition (426.9 ± 103.6 N) and the decellularized dermis

  3. Repairing rabbit radial defects by combining bone marrow stroma stem cells with bone scaffold material comprising a core-cladding structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Liu, G H; Wu, Q; Yu, B

    2015-10-05

    We prepared a bone scaffold material comprising a PLGA/β-TCP core and a Type I collagen cladding, and recombined it with bone marrow stroma stem cells (BMSCs) to evaluate its potential for use in bone tissue engineering by in vivo and in vitro experiments. PLGA/β-TCP without a cladding was used for comparison. The adherence rate of the BMSCs to the scaffold was determined by cell counting. Cell proliferation rate was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. The osteogenic capability was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity. The scaffold materials were recombined with the BMSCs and implanted into a large segmental rabbit radial defect model to evaluate defect repair. Osteogenesis was assessed in the scaffold materials by histological and double immunofluorescence labeling, etc. The adherence number, proliferation number, and alkaline phosphatase expression of the cells on the bone scaffold material with core-cladding structure were significantly higher than the corresponding values in the PLGA/β-TCP composite scaffold material (P structure completely degraded at the bone defect site and bone formation was completed. The rabbit large sentimental radial defect was successfully repaired. The degradation and osteogenesis rates matched well. The bone scaffold with core-cladding structure exhibited better osteogenic activity and capacity to repair a large segmental bone defect compared to the PLGA/β-TCP composite scaffold. The bone scaffold with core-cladding structure has excellent physical properties and biocompatibility. It is an ideal scaffold material for bone tissue engineering.

  4. Biomimetic materials for controlling bone cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevelle, Olivier; Faucheux, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Bone defects that cannot "heal spontaneously during life" will become an ever greater health problem as populations age. Harvesting autografts has several drawbacks, such as pain and morbidity at both donor and acceptor sites, the limited quantity of material available, and frequently its inappropriate shape. Researchers have therefore developed alternative strategies that involve biomaterials to fill bone defects. These biomaterials must be biocompatible and interact with the surrounding bone tissue to allow their colonization by bone cells and blood vessels. The latest generation biomaterials are not inert; they control cell responses like adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. These biomaterials are called biomimetic materials. This review focuses on the development of third generation materials. We first briefly describe the bone tissue with its cells and matrix, and then how bone cells interact with the extracellular matrix. The next section covers the materials currently used to repair bone defects. Finally, we describe the strategies employed to modify the surface of materials, such as coating with hydroxyapatite and grafting biomolecules.

  5. Phosphate functionalized and lactic acid containing graft copolymer: synthesis and evaluation as biomaterial for bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Pallab; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy; Dhara, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polylactic acids (PLA) are biocompatible materials possessing some inherent contrasting limitations which have reduced the scope of their individual applicability. Specifically, overcoming strong hydrophobicity and introducing chemical groups for biofunctionalization are unmet challenges for PLA whilst chemical endeavors to render adequate aqueous stability and cell adhesion properties to PVA have not produced completely intended results. Objective of the present work is to explore synthesis of a graft polymer as an approach towards coupling biofunctional groups with PLA materials. In a two-step reaction, PPVA (phosphorylated polyvinyl alcohol or PVA pre-functionalized with phosphate) is esterified with lactic acid followed by polymerization into PLA in presence of stannous chloride as catalyst to obtain phosphorylated polyvinyl alcohol-graft-polylactic acid (PPVA-g-LA) copolymer. Product is characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. PPVA-g-LA shows an increase in uniaxial elongation compared to parent PPVA under condition of tensile loading. The graft copolymer also exhibits higher water contact angles compared to PPVA, but a more hydrophilic surface compared to PLA. Culture of MG-63 cells on solvent cast films of polymers demonstrates that PPVA-g-LA as a cell substrate can significantly (p acid-based biomaterials with subsequent improvement in cell response on the polymers. In this attempt, it also affords materials with tunable surface or bulk properties of relevance for tissue engineering applications.

  6. Biological biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge-Herrero, E. [Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    There are a number of situations in which substances of biological origin are employed as biomaterials. Most of them are macromolecules derived from isolated connective tissue or the connective tissue itself in membrane form, in both cases, the tissue can be used in its natural form or be chemically treated. In other cases, certain blood vessels can be chemically pretreated and used as vascular prostheses. Proteins such as albumin, collagen and fibrinogen are employed to coat vascular prostheses. Certain polysaccharides have also been tested for use in controlled drug release systems. Likewise, a number of tissues, such as dura mater, bovine pericardium, procine valves and human valves, are used in the preparation of cardiac prostheses. We also use veins from animals or humans in arterial replacement. In none of these cases are the tissues employed dissimilar to the native tissues as they have been chemically modified, becoming a new bio material with different physical and biochemical properties. In short, we find that natural products are being utilized as biomaterials and must be considered as such; thus, it is necessary to study both their chemicobiological and physicomechanical properties. In the present report, we review the current applications, problems and future prospects of some of these biological biomaterials. (Author) 84 refs.

  7. Surface-modified functionalized polycaprolactone scaffolds for bone repair: in vitro and in vivo experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jonas; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Kristiansen, Asger Albaek; Nygaard, Jens Vinge; Hokland, Lea Bjerre; Bendtsen, Michael; Kassem, Moustapha; Lysdahl, Helle; Bünger, Cody Eric

    2014-09-01

    A porcine calvaria defect study was carried out to investigate the bone repair potential of three-dimensional (3D)-printed poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds embedded with nanoporous PCL. A microscopic grid network was created by rapid prototyping making a 3D-fused deposition model (FDM-PCL). Afterward, the FDM-PCL scaffolds were infused with a mixture of PCL, water, and 1,4-dioxane and underwent a thermal-induced phase separation (TIPS) followed by lyophilization. The TIPS process lead to a nanoporous structure shielded by the printed microstructure (NSP-PCL). Sixteen Landrace pigs were divided into two groups with 8 and 12 weeks follow-up, respectively. A total of six nonpenetrating holes were drilled in the calvaria of each animal. The size of the cylindrical defects was h 10 mm and Ø 10 mm. The defects were distributed randomly using following groups: (a) NSP-PCL scaffold, (b) FDM-PCL scaffold, (c) autograft, (d) empty defect, (a1) NSP-PCL scaffold + autologous mononuclear cells, and (a2) NSP-PCL scaffold + bone morphogenetic protein 2. Bone volume to total volume was analyzed using microcomputed tomography (µCT) and histomorphometry. The µCT and histological data showed significantly less bone formation in the NSP-PCL scaffolds in all three variations after both 8 and 12 weeks compared to all other groups. The positive autograft control had significantly higher new bone formation compared to all other groups except the FDM-PCL when analyzed using histomorphometry. The NSP-PCL scaffolds were heavily infiltrated with foreign body giant cells suggesting an inflammatory response and perhaps active resorption of the scaffold material. The unmodified FDM-PCL scaffold showed good osteoconductivity and osseointegration after both 8 and 12 weeks. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Transplantation of neurotrophin-3-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuzhen; Yang, Libin; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Hongxing; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-08-15

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to be therapeutic in the repair of spinal cord injury. However, the low survival rate of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo remains a problem. Neurotrophin-3 promotes motor neuron survival and it is hypothesized that its transfection can enhance the therapeutic effect. We show that in vitro transfection of neurotrophin-3 gene increases the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the region of spinal cord injury. These results indicate that neurotrophin-3 can promote the survival of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into the region of spinal cord injury and potentially enhance the therapeutic effect in the repair of spinal cord injury.

  9. Oligoaniline-based conductive biomaterials for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrintaj, Payam; Bakhshandeh, Behnaz; Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Sefat, Farshid; Rezaeian, Iraj; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Mozafari, Masoud

    2018-05-01

    The science and engineering of biomaterials have improved the human life expectancy. Tissue engineering is one of the nascent strategies with an aim to fulfill this target. Tissue engineering scaffolds are one of the most significant aspects of the recent tissue repair strategies; hence, it is imperative to design biomimetic substrates with suitable features. Conductive substrates can ameliorate the cellular activity through enhancement of cellular signaling. Biocompatible polymers with conductivity can mimic the cells' niche in an appropriate manner. Bioconductive polymers based on aniline oligomers can potentially actualize this purpose because of their unique and tailoring properties. The aniline oligomers can be positioned within the molecular structure of other polymers, thus painter acting with the side groups of the main polymer or acting as a comonomer in their backbone. The conductivity of oligoaniline-based conductive biomaterials can be tailored to mimic the electrical and mechanical properties of targeted tissues/organs. These bioconductive substrates can be designed with high mechanical strength for hard tissues such as the bone and with high elasticity to be used for the cardiac tissue or can be synthesized in the form of injectable hydrogels, particles, and nanofibers for noninvasive implantation; these structures can be used for applications such as drug/gene delivery and extracellular biomimetic structures. It is expected that with progress in the fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering, more innovative constructs will be proposed in the near future. This review discusses the recent advancements in the use of oligoaniline-based conductive biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. The tissue engineering applications of aniline oligomers and their derivatives have recently attracted an increasing interest due to their electroactive and biodegradable properties. However, no reports have systematically reviewed

  10. Enhancement of osteogenesis and biodegradation control by brushite coating on Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr alloy for mandibular bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xingmin; Xiong, Meiping; Zeng, Feiyue; Xu, Bin; Yang, Lingdi; Guo, Han; Niu, Jialin; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Chenxin; Pei, Jia; Huang, Hua; Yuan, Guangyin

    2014-12-10

    To diminish incongruity between bone regeneration and biodegradation of implant magnesium alloy applied for mandibular bone repair, a brushite coating was deposited on a matrix of a Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr (hereafter, denoted as JDBM) alloy to control the degradation rate of the implant and enhance osteogenesis of the mandible bone. Both in vitro and in vivo evaluations were carried out in the present work. Viability and adhesion assays of rabbit bone marrow mesenchyal stem cells (rBM-MSCs) were applied to determine the biocompatibility of a brushite-coated JDBM alloy. Osteogenic gene expression was characterized by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Brushite-coated JDBM screws were implanted into mandible bones of rabbits for 1, 4, and 7 months, respectively, using 316L stainless steel screws as a control group. In vivo biodegradation rate was determined by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography, and osteogenesis was observed and evaluated using Van Gieson's picric acid-fuchsin. Both the naked JDBM and brushite-coated JDBM samples revealed adequate biosafety and biocompatibility as bone repair substitutes. In vitro results showed that brushite-coated JDBM considerably induced osteogenic differentiation of rBM-MSCs. And in vivo experiments indicated that brushite-coated JDBM screws presented advantages in osteoconductivity and osteogenesis of mandible bone of rabbits. Degradation rate was suppressed at a lower level at the initial stage of implantation when new bone tissue formed. Brushite, which can enhance oeteogenesis and partly control the degradation rate of an implant, is an appropriate coating for JDBM alloys used for mandibular repair. The Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr alloy with brushite coating possesses great potential for clinical applications for mandibular repair.

  11. Cell and protein compatible 3D bioprinting of mechanically strong constructs for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawkins, M J; Mistry, P; Shakesheff, K M; Yang, J; Brown, B N; Bonassar, L J

    2015-01-01

    Rapid prototyping of bone tissue engineering constructs often utilizes elevated temperatures, organic solvents and/or UV light for materials processing. These harsh conditions may prevent the incorporation of cells and therapeutic proteins in the fabrication processes. Here we developed a method for using bioprinting to produce constructs from a thermoresponsive microparticulate material based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) at ambient conditions. These constructs could be engineered with yield stresses of up to 1.22 MPa and Young’s moduli of up to 57.3 MPa which are within the range of properties of human cancellous bone. Further study showed that protein-releasing microspheres could be incorporated into the bioprinted constructs. The release of the model protein lysozyme from bioprinted constructs was sustainted for a period of 15 days and a high degree of protein activity could be measured up to day 9. This work suggests that bioprinting is a viable route to the production of mechanically strong constructs for bone repair under mild conditions which allow the inclusion of viable cells and active proteins. (paper)

  12. Chondroitinase ABC plus bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for repair of spinal cord injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun; He, Xijing; Li, Haopeng; Wang, Guoyu

    2013-01-01

    As chondroitinase ABC can improve the hostile microenvironment and cell transplantation is proven to be effective after spinal cord injury, we hypothesized that their combination would be a more effective treatment option. At 5 days after T8 spinal cord crush injury, rats were injected with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell suspension or chondroitinase ABC 1 mm from the edge of spinal cord damage zone. Chondroitinase ABC was first injected, and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell suspension was injected on the next day in the combination group. At 14 days, the mean Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score of the rats in the combination group was higher than other groups. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that the necrotic area was significantly reduced in the combination group compared with other groups. Glial fibrillary acidic protein-chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan double staining showed that the damage zone of astrocytic scars was significantly reduced without the cavity in the combination group. Glial fibrillary acidic protein/growth associated protein-43 double immunostaining revealed that positive fibers traversed the damage zone in the combination group. These results suggest that the combination of chondroitinase ABC and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation contributes to the repair of spinal cord injury. PMID:25206389

  13. In situ repair of bone and cartilage defects using 3D scanning and 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Yu, Fei; Shi, Jianping; Shen, Sheng; Teng, Huajian; Yang, Jiquan; Wang, Xingsong; Jiang, Qing

    2017-08-25

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a rapidly emerging technology that promises to transform tissue engineering into a commercially successful biomedical industry. However, the use of robotic bioprinters alone is not sufficient for disease treatment. This study aimed to report the combined application of 3D scanning and 3D printing for treating bone and cartilage defects. Three different kinds of defect models were created to mimic three orthopedic diseases: large segmental defects of long bones, free-form fracture of femoral condyle, and International Cartilage Repair Society grade IV chondral lesion. Feasibility of in situ 3D bioprinting for these diseases was explored. The 3D digital models of samples with defects and corresponding healthy parts were obtained using high-resolution 3D scanning. The Boolean operation was used to achieve the shape of the defects, and then the target geometries were imported in a 3D bioprinter. Two kinds of photopolymerized hydrogels were synthesized as bioinks. Finally, the defects of bone and cartilage were restored perfectly in situ using 3D bioprinting. The results of this study suggested that 3D scanning and 3D bioprinting could provide another strategy for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  14. Engineering of biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    dos Santos, Venina; Savaris, Michele

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on biomaterials of different forms used for medical implants. The authors introduce the characteristics and properties of biomaterials and then dedicate special chapters to metallic, ceramic, polymeric and composite biomaterials. Case studies on sterilization methods by biomaterials are also presented. Finally, the authors describe the degradation and effects of biomaterials in living tissue.

  15. In vivo biocompatibility of new nano-calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite/poly-amino acid complex biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai ZY

    2015-10-01

    the peripheral tissues of the implanted biomaterials were continuous and lacked bone osteolysis, absorption, necrosis, or osteomyelitis. The connection between implanted biomaterials and bone tissue was tight. The results of HE, Masson, toluidine blue staining and SEM confirmed that the implanted biomaterials were closely connected to the bone defect and that no rejection had taken place. The n-CDHA/PAA biomaterials induced differentiation of a large number of chondrocytes. New bone trabecula began to form at 4 weeks after implanting n-CDHA/PAA biomaterials, and lamellar bone gradually formed at 12 weeks and 24 weeks after implantation. Routine blood and kidney function tests showed no significant changes at 2 weeks and 24 weeks after implantation of both biomaterials.Conclusion: n-CDHA/PAA composites showed good compatibility in in vivo model. In this study, n-CDHA/PAA were found to be safe, nontoxic, and biologically active in bone repair. Keywords: in vivo implantation, histological evaluation, n-CDHA/PAA, bioactive composite

  16. Deproteinized bovine bone functionalized with the slow delivery of BMP-2 for the repair of critical-sized bone defects in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tie; Wu, Gang; Wismeijer, Daniel; Gu, Zhiyuan; Liu, Yuelian

    2013-09-01

    As an alternative to an autologous bone graft, deproteinized bovine bone (DBB) is widely used in the clinical dentistry. Although DBB provides an osteoconductive scaffold, it is not capable of enhancing bone regeneration because it is not osteoinductive. In order to render DBB osteoinductive, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) has previously been incorporated into a three dimensional reservoir (a biomimetic calcium phosphate coating) on DBB, which effectively promoted the osteogenic response by the slow delivery of BMP-2. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of such coating on the DBB granules in repairing a large cylindrical bone defect (8 mm diameter, 13 mm depth) in sheep. Eight groups were randomly assigned to the bone defects: (i) no graft material; (ii) autologous bone; (iii) DBB only; (iv) DBB mixed with autologous bone; (v) DBB bearing adsorbed BMP-2; (vi) DBB bearing a coating but no BMP-2; (vii) DBB bearing a coating with adsorbed BMP-2; and (viii) DBB bearing a coating-incorporated depot of BMP-2. 4 and 8 weeks after implantation, samples were withdrawn for a histological and a histomorphometric analysis. Histological results confirmed the excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity of all the grafts tested. At 4 weeks, DBB mixed with autologous bone or functionalized with coating-incorporated BMP-2 showed more newly-formed bone than the other groups with DBB. At 8 weeks, the volume of newly-formed bone around DBB that bore a coating-incorporated depot of BMP-2 was greatest among the groups with DBB, and was comparable to the autologous bone group. The use of autologous bone and BMP-2 resulted in more bone marrow formation. Multinucleated giant cells were observed in the resorption process around DBB, whereas histomorphometric analysis revealed no significant degradation of DBB. In conclusion, it was shown that incorporating BMP-2 into the calcium phosphate coating of DBB induced strong bone formation around DBB

  17. An Overview of Poly(lactic-co-glycolic Acid (PLGA-Based Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piergiorgio Gentile

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA has attracted considerable interest as a base material for biomedical applications due to its: (i biocompatibility; (ii tailored biodegradation rate (depending on the molecular weight and copolymer ratio; (iii approval for clinical use in humans by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA; (iv potential to modify surface properties to provide better interaction with biological materials; and (v suitability for export to countries and cultures where implantation of animal-derived products is unpopular. This paper critically reviews the scientific challenge of manufacturing PLGA-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of current innovative techniques for scaffolds and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to prepare biomimetic PLGA substrates able to modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, or enhancement of bone tissue function.

  18. Injectable calcium sulfate/mineralized collagen-based bone repair materials with regulable self-setting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zonggang; Liu, Huanye; Liu, Xi; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2011-12-15

    An injectable and self-setting bone repair materials (nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen/calcium sulfate hemihydrate, nHAC/CSH) was developed in this study. The nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen (nHAC) composite, which is the mineralized fibril by self-assembly of nano-hydrocyapatite and collagen, has the same features as natural bone in both main hierarchical microstructure and composition. It is a bioactive osteoconductor due to its high level of biocompatibility and appropriate degradation rate. However, this material lacks handling characteristics because of its particle or solid-preformed block shape. Herein, calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) was introduced into nHAC to prepare an injectable and self-setting in situ bone repair materials. The morphology of materials was observed using SEM. Most important and interesting of all, calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD), which is not only the reactant of preparing CSH but also the final solidified product of CSH, was introduced into nHAC as setting accelerator to regulate self-setting properties of injectable nHAC/CSH composite, and thus the self-setting time of nHAC/CSH composite can be regulated from more than 100 min to about 30 min and even less than 20 min by adding various amount of setting accelerator. The compressive properties of bone graft substitute after final setting are similar to those of cancellous bone. CSD as an excellent setting accelerator has no significant effect on the mechanical property and degradability of bone repair materials. In vitro biocompatibility and in vivo histology studies demonstrated that the nHAC/CSH composite could provide more adequate stimulus for cell adhesion and proliferation, embodying favorable cell biocompatibility and a strong ability to accelerate bone formation. It can offer a satisfactory biological environment for growing new bone in the implants and for stimulating bone formation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Developing a novel magnesium glycerophosphate/silicate-based organic-inorganic composite cement for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhengwen; Li, Hong; Wei, Jie; Li, Ruijiang; Yan, Yonggang

    2018-06-01

    Considering that the phospholipids and glycerophosphoric acid are the basic materials throughout the metabolism of the whole life period and the bone is composed of organic polymer collagen and inorganic mineral apatite, a novel self-setting composite of magnesium glycerophosphate (MG) and di-calcium silicate(C2S)/tri-calcium silicate(C3S) was developed as bio-cement for bone repair, reconstruction and regeneration. The composite was prepared by mixing the MG, C2S and C3S with the certain ratios, and using the deionized water and phosphoric acid solution as mixed liquid. The combination and formation of the composites was characterized by FTIR, XPS and XRD. The physicochemical properties were studied by setting time, compressive strength, pH value, weight loss in the PBS and surface change by SEM-EDX. The biocompatibility was evaluated by cell culture in the leaching solution of the composites. The preliminary results showed that when di- and tri-calcium silicate contact with water, there are lots of Ca(OH) 2 generated making the pH value of solution is higher than 9 which is helpful for the formation of hydroxyapatite(HA) that is the main bone material. The new organic-inorganic self-setting bio-cements showed initial setting time is ranged from 20 min to 85 min and the compressive strength reached 30 MPa on the 7th days, suitable as the bone fillers. The weight loss was 20% in the first week, and 25% in the 4th week. Meanwhile, the new HA precipitated on the composite surface during the incubation in the SBF showed bioactivity. The cell cultured in the leaching liquid of the composite showed high proliferation inferring the new bio-cement has good biocompatibility to the cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Human mandible bone defect repair by the grafting of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells and collagen sponge biocomplexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R d’Aquino

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we used a biocomplex constructed from dental pulp stem/progenitor cells (DPCs and a collagen sponge scaffold for oro-maxillo-facial (OMF bone tissue repair in patients requiring extraction of their third molars. The experiments were carried out according to our Internal Ethical Committee Guidelines and written informed consent was obtained from the patients. The patients presented with bilateral bone reabsorption of the alveolar ridge distal to the second molar secondary to impaction of the third molar on the cortical alveolar lamina, producing a defect without walls, of at least 1.5 cm in height. This clinical condition does not permit spontaneous bone repair after extraction of the third molar, and eventually leads to loss also of the adjacent second molar. Maxillary third molars were extracted first for DPC isolation and expansion. The cells were then seeded onto a collagen sponge scaffold and the obtained biocomplex was used to fill in the injury site left by extraction of the mandibular third molars. Three months after autologous DPC grafting, alveolar bone of patients had optimal vertical repair and complete restoration of periodontal tissue back to the second molars, as assessed by clinical probing and X-rays. Histological observations clearly demonstrated the complete regeneration of bone at the injury site. Optimal bone regeneration was evident one year after grafting. This clinical study demonstrates that a DPC/collagen sponge biocomplex can completely restore human mandible bone defects and indicates that this cell population could be used for the repair and/or regeneration of tissues and organs.

  1. Expression of various growth factors for cell proliferation and cytodifferentiation during fracture repair of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fukuda

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined immunohistochemically the fracture repair process in rat tibial bone using antibodies to PCNA, BMP2, TGF-b 1,-2,-3, TGF-b R1,- R2, bFGF, bFGFR, PDGF, VEGF, and S-100. The peak level of cell proliferation as revealed by PCNA labelling appeared first in primitive mesenchymal cells and inflammatory cells at the fracture edges and neighboring periosteum at 2-days after fracture, followed by the peaks of periosteal primitive fibroblasts and chondroblasts, which appeared at fracture edges at 3- and 4-days after fracture, respectively. BMP2 was weakly positive in primitive mesenchymal cells, osteoblasts and chondroblasts. At 3-days post-fracture, periosteal osteoblasts produced osteoid tissue and callus with marrow spaces lined by osteoblasts and osteoclasts, and all primitive mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts were positive for TGF-b 1,-2,-3, and TGF-b R1,-R2. They were also positive for vascular growth factors bFGF, FGFR and PDGF, but negative for VEGF, and the peak of PCNA labelling of vascular endothelial cells in the marrow space was delayed to 4-days after fracture. Chondroblasts at fracture edges produced hypertrophic chondrocytes at 5-days after fracture and they were positive for TGF-b 1,-2,-3, and TGF-b R1,-R2. Primitive chondroblasts were positive for vascular growth factors VEGF as well as bFGF, FGFR, and the peak of PCNA labelling of vascular endothelial cells in the cartilage was at 5-days after fracture. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were also positive for these growth factors but negative for bFGF and bFGFR. S-100 protein-induced calcification was only positive on chondroblasts and hypertrophic chondrocytes. At 7-days after fracture, bone began to be formed from the cartilage at fracture edges, by a process similar to bone formation in the growth plate. Enchondral ossification established a bridge between both fracture edges and periosteal membranous ossification encompassed the fracture site like a sheath at 14- day after

  2. Early passage bone marrow stromal cells express genes involved in nervous system development supporting their relevance for neural repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandoe Tewarie, R.D.S.; Bossers, K.; Ritfeld, G.J.; Blits, B.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Verhaagen, J.; Oudega, M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The assessment of the capacity of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) to repair the nervous system using gene expression profiling. The evaluation of effects of long-term culturing on the gene expression profile of BMSC. METHODS: Fourty four k whole genome rat microarrays were used to study

  3. Design strategies and applications of nacre-based biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, Ethan Michael; Wang, Wei; Li, Caiyan; Guo, Jinshan; Ozbolat, Ibrahim Tarik; Rahn, Kevin Michael; Armstrong, April Dawn; Xia, Jingfen; Qian, Guoying; Yang, Jian

    2017-05-01

    The field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine relies heavily on materials capable of implantation without significant foreign body reactions and with the ability to promote tissue differentiation and regeneration. The field of bone tissue engineering in particular requires materials capable of providing enhanced mechanical properties and promoting osteogenic cell lineage commitment. While bone repair has long relied almost exclusively on inorganic, calcium phosphate ceramics such as hydroxyapatite and their composites or on non-degradable metals, the organically derived shell and pearl nacre generated by mollusks has emerged as a promising alternative. Nacre is a naturally occurring composite material composed of inorganic, calcium carbonate plates connected by a framework of organic molecules. Similar to mammalian bone, the highly organized microstructure of nacre endows the composite with superior mechanical properties while the organic phase contributes to significant bioactivity. Studies, both in vitro and in vivo, have demonstrated nacre's biocompatibility, biodegradability, and osteogenic potential, which are superior to pure inorganic minerals such as hydroxyapatite or non-degradable metals. Nacre can be used directly as a bulk implant or as part of a composite material when combined with polymers or other ceramics. While nacre has demonstrated its effectiveness in multiple cell culture and animal models, it remains a relatively underexplored biomaterial. This review introduces the formation, structure, and characteristics of nacre, and discusses the present and future uses of this biologically-derived material as a novel biomaterial for orthopedic and other tissue engineering applications. Mussel derived nacre, a biological composite composed of mineralized calcium carbonate platelets and interplatelet protein components, has recently gained interest as a potential alternative ceramic material in orthopedic biomaterials, combining the

  4. Synergistic effects of dimethyloxallyl glycine and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on repair of critical-sized bone defects in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Liu, Yang; Ding, Zhen-Yu; Cao, Jia-Qing; Huang, Jing-Huan; Zhang, Jie-Yuan; Jia, Wei-Tao; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chang-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Lin

    2017-02-01

    In bone remodeling, osteogenesis is closely coupled to angiogenesis. Bone tissue engineering using multifunctional bioactive materials is a promising technique which has the ability to simultaneously stimulate osteogenesis and angiogenesis for repair of bone defects. We developed mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG)-doped poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) composite scaffolds as delivery vehicle. Two bioactive molecules, dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), a small-molecule angiogenic drug, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), an osteoinductive growth factor, were co-incorporated into the scaffold. The synergistic effects of DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the composite scaffolds on osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs were investigated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Moreover, in vivo studies were conducted to observe bone regeneration and vascular formation of critical-sized bone defects in rats using micro-computed tomography, histological analyses, Microfil® perfusion, fluorescence labeling, and immunohistochemical analysis. The results showed that DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the MBG-PHBHHx scaffolds did exert synergistic effects on the osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Moreover, DMOG and rhBMP-2 produced significant increases in newly-formed bone and neovascularization of calvarial bone defects in rats. It is concluded that the co-delivery strategy of both rhBMP-2 and DMOG can significantly improve the critical-sized bone regeneration.

  5. Additively manufactured metallic porous biomaterials based on minimal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bobbert, F. S. L.; Lietaert, K.; Eftekhari, Ali Akbar

    2017-01-01

    Porous biomaterials that simultaneously mimic the topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties of bone are in great demand but are rarely found in the literature. In this study, we rationally designed and additively manufactured (AM) porous metallic biomaterials based on four different...... of bone properties is feasible, biomaterials that could simultaneously mimic all or most of the relevant bone properties are rare. We used rational design and additive manufacturing to develop porous metallic biomaterials that exhibit an interesting combination of topological, mechanical, and mass...

  6. Cartilage Repair With Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation: Review of Preclinical and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Mera, Hisashi; Itokazu, Maki; Hashimoto, Yusuke; Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials of various procedures, including bone marrow stimulation, mosaicplasty, and autologous chondrocyte implantation, have been explored to treat articular cartilage defects. However, all of them have some demerits. We focused on autologous culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), which can proliferate without losing their capacity for differentiation. First, we transplanted BMSC into the defective articular cartilage of rabbit and succeeded in regenerating osteochondral tissue. We then applied this transplantation in humans. Our previous reports showed that treatment with BMSC relieves the clinical symptoms of chondral defects in the knee and elbow joint. We investigated the efficacy of BMSC for osteoarthritic knee treated with high tibial osteotomy, by comparing 12 BMSC-transplanted patients with 12 cell-free patients. At 16-month follow-up, although the difference in clinical improvement between both groups was not significant, the arthroscopic and histological grading score was better in the cell-transplanted group. At the over 10-year follow-up, Hospital for Special Surgery knee scores improved to 76 and 73 in the BMSC-transplanted and cell-free groups, respectively, which were better than preoperative scores. Additionally, neither tumors nor infections were observed in all patients, and in the clinical study, we have never observed hypertrophy of repaired tissue, thereby guaranteeing the clinical safety of this therapy. Although we have never observed calcification above the tidemark in rabbit model and human histologically, the repair cartilage was not completely hyaline cartilage. To elucidate the optimum conditions for cell therapy, other stem cells, culture conditions, growth factors, and gene transfection methods should be explored.

  7. Lightweight Open-Cell Scaffolds from Sea Urchin Spines with Superior Material Properties for Bone Defect Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Li, Xiaokang; Zhou, Xiaoshu; Li, Yong; Vecchio, Kenneth S; Yang, Lina; Cui, Wei; Yang, Rui; Zhu, Yue; Guo, Zheng; Zhang, Xing

    2017-03-22

    Sea urchin spines (Heterocentrotus mammillatus), with a hierarchical open-cell structure similar to that of human trabecular bone and superior mechanical property (compressive strength ∼43.4 MPa) suitable for machining to shape, were explored for potential applications of bone defect repair. Finite element analyses reveal that the compressive stress concentrates along the dense growth rings and dissipates through strut structures of the stereoms, indicating that the exquisite mesostructures play an important role in high strength-to-weight ratios. The fracture strength of magnesium-substituted tricalcium phosphate (β-TCMP) scaffolds produced by hydrothermal conversion of urchin spines is about 9.3 MPa, comparable to that of human trabecular bone. New bone forms along outer surfaces of β-TCMP scaffolds after implantation in rabbit femoral defects for one month and grows into the majority of the inner open-cell spaces postoperation in three months, showing tight interface between the scaffold and regenerative bone tissue. Fusion of beagle lumbar facet joints using a Ti-6Al-4V cage and β-TCMP scaffold can be completed within seven months with obvious biodegradation of the β-TCMP scaffold, which is nearly completely degraded and replaced by newly formed bone ten months after implantation. Thus, sea urchin spines suitable for machining to shape have advantages for production of biodegradable artificial grafts for bone defect repair.

  8. Three-dimensional poly (ε-caprolactone)/hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffolds incorporating bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of bone defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Xin; Huang, Yinjun; Zhang, Jieyuan; Cao, Jiaqing; Jin, Xiangyun; Huang, Jinghuan; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Ting; Han, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that three-dimensional (3D) hydroxyapatite (HAP)-collagen (COL)-coated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds (HAP-COL-PCL) possess appropriate nano-structures, surface roughness, and nutrients, providing a favorable environment for osteogenesis. However, the effect of using 3D HAP-COL-PCL scaffolds incorporating BMSCs for the repair of bone defects in rats has been not evaluated. 3D PCL scaffolds coated with HAP, collagen or HAP/COL and incorporating BMSCs were implanted into calvarial defects. At 12 weeks after surgery, the rats were sacrificed and crania were harvested to assess the bone defect repair using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), histology, immunohistochemistry and sequential fluorescent labeling analysis. 3D micro-CT reconstructed images and quantitative analysis showed that HAP-COL-PCL groups possessed better bone-forming capacity than HAP-PCL groups or COL-PCL groups. Fluorescent labeling analysis revealed the percentage of tetracycline labeling, alizarin red labeling, and calcein labeling in HAP-COL-PCL groups were all greater than in the other two groups (P  <  0.05), and the result was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining and histological analysis of bone regeneration. This study demonstrates that 3D HAP-COL-PCL scaffolds incorporating BMSCs markedly enhance bone regeneration of bone defects in rats. (paper)

  9. Transplantation of bone marrow derived cells promotes pancreatic islet repair in diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiaodong; Song Lujun; Shen Kuntang; Wang Hongshan; Niu Weixin; Qin Xinyu

    2008-01-01

    The transplantation of bone marrow (BM) derived cells to initiate pancreatic regeneration is an attractive but as-yet unrealized strategy. Presently, BM derived cells from green fluorescent protein transgenic mice were transplanted into diabetic mice. Repair of diabetic islets was evidenced by reduction of hyperglycemia, increase in number of islets, and altered pancreatic histology. Cells in the pancreata of recipient mice co-expressed BrdU and insulin. Double staining revealed β cells were in the process of proliferation. BrdU + insulin - PDX-1 + cells, Ngn3 + cells and insulin + glucagon + cells, which showed stem cells, were also found during β-cell regeneration. The majority of transplanted cells were mobilized to the islet and ductal regions. In recipient pancreas, transplanted cells simultaneously expressed CD34 but did not express insulin, PDX-1, Ngn3, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, Pax4, Pax6, and CD45. It is concluded that BM derived cells especially CD34 + cells can promote repair of pancreatic islets. Moreover, both proliferation of β cells and differentiation of pancreatic stem cells contribute to the regeneration of β cells

  10. The RAPIDOS project—European and Chinese collaborative research on biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Eglin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The research project entitled “rapid prototyping of custom-made bone-forming tissue engineering constructs” (RAPIDOS is one of the three unique projects that are the result of the first coordinated call for research proposals in biomaterials launched by the European Union Commission and the National Natural Science Foundation of China in 2013 for facilitating bilateral translational research. We formed the RAPIDOS European and Chinese consortium with the aim of applying technologies creating custom-made tissue engineered constructs made of resorbable polymer and calcium phosphate ceramic composites specifically designed by integrating the following: (1 imaging and information technologies, (2 biomaterials and process engineering, and (3 biological and biomedical engineering for novel and truly translational bone repair solutions. Advanced solid free form fabrication technologies, precise stereolithography, and low-temperature rapid prototyping provide the necessary control to create innovative high-resolution medical implants. The use of Chinese medicine extracts, such as the bone anabolic factor icaritin, which has been shown to promote osteogenic differentiation of stem cells and enhance bone healing in vivo, is a safe and technologically relevant alternative to the intensely debated growth factors delivery strategies. This unique initiative driven by a global consortium is expected to accelerate scientific progress in the important field of biomaterials and to foster strong scientific cooperation between China and Europe.

  11. Niacin deficiency delays DNA excision repair and increases spontaneous and nitrosourea-induced chromosomal instability in rat bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostecki, Lisa M; Thomas, Megan; Linford, Geordie; Lizotte, Matthew; Toxopeus, Lori; Bartleman, Anne-Pascale; Kirkland, James B

    2007-12-01

    We have shown that niacin deficiency impairs poly(ADP-ribose) formation and enhances sister chromatid exchanges and micronuclei formation in rat bone marrow. We designed the current study to investigate the effects of niacin deficiency on the kinetics of DNA repair following ethylation, and the accumulation of double strand breaks, micronuclei (MN) and chromosomal aberrations (CA). Weanling male Long-Evans rats were fed niacin deficient (ND), or pair fed (PF) control diets for 3 weeks. We examined repair kinetics by comet assay in the 36h following a single dose of ethylnitrosourea (ENU) (30mg/kg bw). There was no effect of ND on mean tail moment (MTM) before ENU treatment, or on the development of strand breaks between 0 and 8h after ENU. Repair kinetics between 12 and 30h were significantly delayed by ND, with a doubling of area under the MTM curve during this period. O(6)-ethylation of guanine peaked by 1.5h, was largely repaired by 15h, and was also delayed in bone marrow cells from ND rats. ND significantly enhanced double strand break accumulation at 24h after ENU. ND alone increased chromosome and chromatid breaks (four- and two-fold). ND alone caused a large increase in MN, and this was amplified by ENU treatment. While repair kinetics suggest that ND may be acting by creating catalytically inactive PARP molecules with a dominant-negative effect on repair processes, the effect of ND alone on O(6)-ethylation, MN and CA, in the absence of altered comet results, suggests additional mechanisms are also leading to chromosomal instability. These data support the idea that the bone marrow cells of niacin deficient cancer patients may be more sensitive to the side effects of genotoxic chemotherapy, resulting in acute bone marrow suppression and chronic development of secondary leukemias.

  12. Biomaterials in myocardial tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Lewis A.; Chiu, Loraine L. Y.; Feric, Nicole; Fu, Lara; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the developed world, and as such there is a pressing need for treatment options. Cardiac tissue engineering emerged from the need to develop alternate sources and methods of replacing tissue damaged by cardiovascular diseases, as the ultimate treatment option for many who suffer from end-stage heart failure is a heart transplant. In this review we focus on biomaterial approaches to augment injured or impaired myocardium with specific emphasis on: the design criteria for these biomaterials; the types of scaffolds—composed of natural or synthetic biomaterials, or decellularized extracellular matrix—that have been used to develop cardiac patches and tissue models; methods to vascularize scaffolds and engineered tissue, and finally injectable biomaterials (hydrogels)designed for endogenous repair, exogenous repair or as bulking agents to maintain ventricular geometry post-infarct. The challenges facing the field and obstacles that must be overcome to develop truly clinically viable cardiac therapies are also discussed. PMID:25066525

  13. Biomaterials use in Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda: Access and affordability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakwatanisa, Bosco; Enywaku, Alfred; Kiwanuka, Martin; Lamunu, Claire; Mbowa, Nicholas; Mukiibi, Denis; Namayega, Catherine; Ngabirano, Beryl; Ntambi, Henry; Reichert, William

    2016-01-01

    Students in Biomaterials BBE3102 at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda were assigned semester long group projects in the first semester of the 2014-15 academic year to determine the biomaterials type and usage in Mulago National Referral Hospital, which is emblematic of large public hospitals across East Africa. Information gathering was conducted through student interviews with Mulago physicians because there were no archival records. The students divided themselves into seven project groups covering biomaterials use in the areas of wound closure, dental and oral surgery, cardiology, burn care, bone repair, ophthalmology and total joint replacement. As in the developed world, the majority of biomaterials used in Mulago are basic wound closure materials, dental materials, and bone fixation materials, all of which are comparatively inexpensive, easy to store, and readily available from either the government or local suppliers; however, there were significant issues with the implant supply chain, affordability, and patient compliance and follow-up in cases where specialty expertise and expensive implants were employed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effect of laser phototherapy on human alveolar bone repair: micro tomographic and histomorphometrical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romão, Marcia M. A.; Marques, Márcia M.; Cortes, Arthur R. G.; Horliana, Anna C. R. T.; Moreira, Maria S.; Lascala, Cesar A.

    2015-06-01

    The immediate dental implant placement in the molars region is critical, because of the high amount of bone loss and the discrepancy between the alveolar crest thickness and the dental implant platform. Laser phototherapy (LPT) improves bone repair thus could accelerate the implant placement. Twenty patients were selected for the study. Ten patients were submitted to LPT with GaAlAs diode laser (808nm) during molar extraction, immediately after, 24h, 48h, 72h, 96h and 7 days. The irradiations were applied in contact and punctual mode (100mW, 0.04cm2, 0.75J/cm2, 30s per point, 3J per point). The control group (n=10) received the same treatment; however with the power of the laser off. Forty days later samples of the tissue formed inside the sockets were obtained for further microtomography (microCTs) and histomorphometry analyses. Data were compared by the Student t test, whereas those from the different microCT parameters were compared by the Pearson correlation test (pPearson correlation test it was possible to infer that the lased group presented a more homogeneous trabecular configuration, which would allow earlier dental implant placement.

  15. Concise Review: Biomimetic Functionalization of Biomaterials to Stimulate the Endogenous Healing Process of Cartilage and Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraballi, Francesca; Bauza, Guillermo; McCulloch, Patrick; Harris, Josh; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-12-01

    Musculoskeletal reconstruction is an ongoing challenge for surgeons as it is required for one out of five patients undergoing surgery. In the past three decades, through the close collaboration between clinicians and basic scientists, several regenerative strategies have been proposed. These have emerged from interdisciplinary approaches that bridge tissue engineering with material science, physiology, and cell biology. The paradigm behind tissue engineering is to achieve regeneration and functional recovery using stem cells, bioactive molecules, or supporting materials. Although plenty of preclinical solutions for bone and cartilage have been presented, only a few platforms have been able to move from the bench to the bedside. In this review, we highlight the limitations of musculoskeletal regeneration and summarize the most relevant acellular tissue engineering approaches. We focus on the strategies that could be most effectively translate in clinical practice and reflect on contemporary and cutting-edge regenerative strategies in surgery. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:2186-2196. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  16. Bone-repair properties of biodegradable hydroxyapatite nano-rod superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elía, Noelia L.; Mathieu, Colleen; Hoemann, Caroline D.; Laiuppa, Juan A.; Santillán, Graciela E.; Messina, Paula V.

    2015-11-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HAp) materials show an analogous chemical composition to the biogenic mineral components of calcified tissues and depending on their topography they may mimic the specific arrangement of the crystals in bone. In this work, we have evaluated the potential of four synthesized nano-HAp superstructures for the in vitro conditions of bone-repair. Experiments are underway to investigate the effects of the material microstructure, surface roughness and hydrophilicity on their osseo-integration, osteo-conduction and osteo-induction abilities. Materials were tested in the presence of both, rat primary osteoblasts and rabbit mesenchymal stem cells. The following aspects are discussed: (i) cytotoxicity and material degradation; (ii) rat osteoblast spreading, proliferation and differentiation; and (iii) rabbit mesenchymal stem cell adhesion on nano-HAp and nano-HAp/collagen type I coatings. We effectively prepared a material based on biomimetic HAp nano-rods displaying the appropriate surface topography, hydrophilicity and degradation properties to induce the in vitro desired cellular responses for bone bonding and healing. Cells seeded on the selected material readily attached, proliferated and differentiated, as confirmed by cell viability, mitochondrial metabolic activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and cytoskeletal integrity analysis by immunofluorescence localization of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) protein. These results highlight the influence of material's surface characteristics to determine their tissue regeneration potential and their future use in engineering osteogenic scaffolds for orthopedic implants.Nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HAp) materials show an analogous chemical composition to the biogenic mineral components of calcified tissues and depending on their topography they may mimic the specific arrangement of the crystals in bone. In this work, we have evaluated the potential of four synthesized nano-HAp superstructures

  17. Arthroscopic Bankart repair and subscapularis augmentation: an alternative technique treating anterior shoulder instability with bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiotti, Marco; Russo, Raffaele; Zanini, Antonio; Schröter, Steffen; Massoni, Carlo; Bianchedi, Diana

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the preliminary results of a new arthroscopic technique consisting of the association of 2 procedures, capsulolabral repair and subscapularis augmentation tenodesis, in the treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability with both glenoid bone loss and a Hill-Sachs lesion. Eighty-nine patients engaged in sports were enrolled in this retrospective case-series study with 2 to 5 years' follow-up. All patients underwent a computed tomography scan to assess the percentage of glenoid bone loss by the Pico method. A prior stabilization procedure had failed in 20 patients, who were then segregated into a different group. Visual analog scale (VAS), Rowe, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were used to assess the results. Only 3 of 89 patients had a post-traumatic redislocation. The mean length of follow-up was 31.5 months (range, 25-60 months). The VAS, Rowe, and ASES scores showed significant improvements: The VAS score decreased from a mean of 3.1 to 0.5 (P = .0157), the Rowe score increased from 58.9 to 94.1 (P = .0215), and the ASES score increased from 68.5 to 95.5 (P = .0197). The mean deficit of external rotation was 6° with the arm at the side of the trunk, and the mean deficit was 3° with the arm in 90° of abduction. The described procedure is a reproducible and effective technique used to restore joint stability in patients engaged in sports who have incurred anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation associated with glenoid bone loss (Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Modified classification and single-stage microsurgical repair of posttraumatic infected massive bone defects in lower extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-fa; Xu, Zhong-he; Zhang, Guang-ming; Wang, Jian-wei; Hu, Si-wang; Hou, Zhi-qi; Xu, Da-chuan

    2013-11-01

    Posttraumatic infected massive bone defects in lower extremities are difficult to repair because they frequently exhibit massive bone and/or soft tissue defects, serious bone infection, and excessive scar proliferation. This study aimed to determine whether these defects could be classified and repaired at a single stage. A total of 51 cases of posttraumatic infected massive bone defect in lower extremity were included in this study. They were classified into four types on the basis of the conditions of the bone defects, soft tissue defects, and injured limb length, including Type A (without soft tissue defects), Type B (with soft tissue defects of 10 × 20 cm or less), Type C (with soft tissue defects of 10 × 20 cm or more), and Type D (with the limb shortening of 3 cm or more). Four types of single-stage microsurgical repair protocols were planned accordingly and implemented respectively. These protocols included the following: Protocol A, where vascularized fibular graft was implemented for Type A; Protocol B, where vascularized fibular osteoseptocutaneous graft was implemented for Type B; Protocol C, where vascularized fibular graft and anterior lateral thigh flap were used for Type C; and Protocol D, where limb lengthening and Protocols A, B, or C were used for Type D. There were 12, 33, 4, and 2 cases of Types A, B, C, and D, respectively, according to this classification. During the surgery, three cases of planned Protocol B had to be shifted into Protocol C; however, all microsurgical repairs were completed. With reference to Johner-Wruhs evaluation method, the total percentage of excellent and good results was 82.35% after 6 to 41 months of follow-up. It was concluded that posttraumatic massive bone defects could be accurately classified into four types on the basis of the conditions of bone defects, soft tissue coverage, and injured limb length, and successfully repaired with the single-stage repair protocols after thorough debridement. Thieme Medical

  19. Osteoinductive biomaterials: current knowledge of properties, experimental models and biological mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barradas, A.M.C.; Yuan, Huipin; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Habibovic, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    In the past thirty years, a number of biomaterials have shown the ability to induce bone formation when implanted at heterotopic sites, an ability known as osteoinduction. Such biomaterials – osteoinductive biomaterials – hold great potential for the development of new therapies in bone

  20. Ectopic bone formation during tissue-engineered cartilage repair using autologous chondrocytes and novel plasma-derived albumin scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robla Costales, David; Junquera, Luis; García Pérez, Eva; Gómez Llames, Sara; Álvarez-Viejo, María; Meana-Infiesta, Álvaro

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were twofold: first, to evaluate the production of cartilaginous tissue in vitro and in vivo using a novel plasma-derived scaffold, and second, to test the repair of experimental defects made on ears of New Zealand rabbits (NZr) using this approach. Scaffolds were seeded with chondrocytes and cultured in vitro for 3 months to check in vitro cartilage production. To evaluate in vivo cartilage production, a chondrocyte-seeded scaffold was transplanted subcutaneously to a nude mouse. To check in vivo repair, experimental defects made in the ears of five New Zealand rabbits (NZr) were filled with chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds. In vitro culture produced mature chondrocytes with no extracellular matrix (ECM). Histological examination of redifferentiated in vitro cultures showed differentiated chondrocytes adhered to scaffold pores. Subcutaneous transplantation of these constructs to a nude mouse produced cartilage, confirmed by histological study. Experimental cartilage repair in five NZr showed cartilaginous tissue repairing the defects, mixed with calcified areas of bone formation. It is possible to produce cartilaginous tissue in vivo and to repair experimental auricular defects by means of chondrocyte cultures and the novel plasma-derived scaffold. Further studies are needed to determine the significance of bone formation in the samples. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomechanical comparison of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) and PTFE interpositional patches and direct tendon-to-bone repair for massive rotator cuff tears in an ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Andrew Dj; Beattie, Rebekah F; Murrell, George Ac; Lam, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears are a difficult problem. Modalities such as irrigation and debridement, partial repair, tendon transfer and grafts have been utilized with high failure rates and mixed results. Synthetic interpositional patch repairs are a novel and increasingly used approach. The present study aimed to examine the biomechanical properties of common synthetic materials for interpositional repairs in contrast to native tendon. Six ovine tendons, six polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt sections and six expanded PTFE (ePTFE) patch sections were pulled-to-failure to analyze their biomechanical and material properties. Six direct tendon-to-bone surgical method repairs, six interpositional PTFE felt patch repairs and six interpositional ePTFE patch repairs were also constructed in ovine shoulders and pulled-to-failure to examine the biomechanical properties of each repair construct. Ovine tendon had higher load-to-failure (591 N) and had greater stiffness (108 N/mm) than either PTFE felt (296 N, 28 N/mm) or ePTFE patch sections (323 N, 34 N/mm). Both PTFE felt and ePTFE repair techniques required greater load-to-failure (225 N and 177 N, respectively) than direct tendon-to-bone surgical repairs (147 N) in ovine models. Synthetic materials lacked several biomechanical properties, including strength and stiffness, compared to ovine tendon. Interpositional surgical repair models with these materials were significantly stronger than direct tendon-to-bone model repairs.

  2. Middle cranial fossa approach to repair tegmen defects assisted by three-dimensionally printed temporal bone models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sameer; VanKoevering, Kyle K; Kline, Stephanie; Green, Glenn E; Arts, H Alexander

    2017-10-01

    To explore the perioperative utility of three-dimensionally (3D)-printed temporal bone models of patients undergoing repair of lateral skull base defects and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks with the middle cranial fossa approach. Case series. 3D-printed temporal bone models-based on patient-specific, high-resolution computed tomographic imaging-were constructed using inexpensive polymer materials. Preoperatively, the models demonstrated the extent of temporal lobe retraction necessary to visualize the proposed defects in the lateral skull base. Also preoperatively, Silastic sheeting was arranged across the modeled tegmen, marked, and cut to cover all of the proposed defect sites. The Silastic sheeting was then sterilized and subsequently served as a precise intraoperative template for a synthetic dural replacement graft. Of note, these grafts were customized without needing to retract the temporal lobe. Five patients underwent the middle cranial fossa approach assisted by 3D-printed temporal bone models to repair tegmen defects and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. No complications were encountered. The prefabricated dural repair grafts were easily placed and fit precisely onto the middle fossa floor without any additional modifications. All defects were covered as predicted by the 3D temporal bone models. At their postoperative visits, all five patients maintained resolution of their spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Inexpensive 3D-printed temporal bone models of tegmen defects can serve as beneficial adjuncts during lateral skull base repair. The models provide a panoramic preoperative view of all tegmen defects and allow for custom templating of dural grafts without temporal lobe retraction. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:2347-2351, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Bone cysts after osteochondral allograft repair of cartilage defects in goats suggest abnormal interaction between subchondral bone and overlying synovial joint tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D; Sah, Robert L

    2013-11-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCAs) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCAs and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral bone (ScB) and trabecular bone (TB) structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCAs was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCAs was lower than Non-Op and other OCAs. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCAs did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCAs contained "basal" cysts, localized to deeper regions, some "subchondral" cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  4. TOB1 Deficiency Enhances the Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Tendon-Bone Healing in a Rat Rotator Cuff Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulei Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study investigated the effect of silencing TOB1 (Transducer of ERBB2, 1 expression in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on MSC-facilitated tendon-bone healing in a rat supraspinatus repair model. Methods: Rat MSCs were transduced with a recombinant lentivirus encoding short hairpin RNA (shRNA against TOB1. MSC cell proliferation was analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. The effect of MSCs with TOB1 deficiency on tendon-bone healing in a rat rotator cuff repair model was evaluated by biomechanical testing, histological analysis and collagen type I and II gene expression. An upstream regulator (miR-218 of TOB1 was determined in MSCs. Results: We found that knockdown of TOB1 significantly increased the proliferative activity of rat MSCs in vitro. When MSCs with TOB1 deficiency were injected into injured rat supraspinatus tendon-bone junctions, the effect on tendon-bone healing was enhanced compared to treatment with control MSCs with normal TOB1 expression, as evidenced by elevated levels of ultimate load to failure and stiffness, increased amount of fibrocartilage and augmented expression of collagen type I and type II genes. In addition, we found that the TOB1 3′ untranslated region is a direct target of miR-218. Similar to the effect of TOB1 deficiency, overexpression of miR-218 effectively promoted tendon-bone healing in rat. Conclusion: These results suggest that TOB1 may play a negative role in the effect of MSCs on tendon-bone healing, and imply that expression of TOB1 may be regulated by miR-218.

  5. Bone Cysts After Osteochondral Allograft Repair of Cartilage Defects in Goats Suggest Abnormal Interaction Between Subchondral Bone and Overlying Synovial Joint Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L.; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCA) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12 months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCA and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral (ScB) and trabecular (TB) bone structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCA was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCA was lower than Non-Op and other OCA. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCA did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCA contained “basal” cysts, localized to deeper regions, some “subchondral” cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  6. In vitro biomechanical and biocompatible evaluation of natural hydroxyapatite/chitosan composite for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xiaoying; Zheng, Buzhong; Tang, Xiaojun; Zhao, Lifeng; Lu, Jieyan; Zhang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jizhong; Cui, Wei

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the biomechanical properties and biocompatibility of natural hydroxyapatite/chitosan (HA/CS) composites. The natural HA/CS composites with a different proportion of HA and CS were prepared by the cross-linking method, and then the compressive strength, microstructure and pH values of extracts from these composites were measured by SEM and pH meter, respectively. Subsequently, the biocompatibility of the composites was evaluated by means of a series of biological tests, including MTT, acute systemic toxicity, heat source, and hemolysis tests in vitro. The chitosan content in the composites had significantly influenced the mechanical properties and microstructure of the composites. The pH value of the composite extract was approximately 7.0, which was very close to that of human plasma. Furthermore, the natural HA/CS composites showed no cytotoxicity, irritation, teratogenicity, carcinogenicity and special pyrogen. These results indicated that the natural HA/CS composite may be a potential bone repair material.

  7. Effect of Footprint Preparation on Tendon-to-Bone Healing: A Histologic and Biomechanical Study in a Rat Rotator Cuff Repair Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Haruhiko; Morihara, Toru; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kabuto, Yukichi; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Kida, Yoshikazu; Furukawa, Ryuhei; Arai, Yuji; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Masaki; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2017-08-01

    To compare the histologic and biomechanical effects of 3 different footprint preparations for repair of tendon-to-bone insertions and to assess the behavior of bone marrow-derived cells in each method of insertion repair. We randomized 81 male Sprague-Dawley rats and green fluorescent protein-bone marrow chimeric rats into 3 groups. In group A, we performed rotator cuff repair after separating the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tuberosity and removing the residual tendon tissue. In group B, we also drilled 3 holes into the footprint. The native fibrocartilage was preserved in groups A and B. In group C, we excavated the footprint until the cancellous bone was exposed. Histologic repair of the tendon-to-bone insertion, behavior of the bone marrow-derived cells, and ultimate force to failure were examined postoperatively. The areas of metachromasia in groups A, B, and C were 0.033 ± 0.019, 0.089 ± 0.022, and 0.002 ± 0.001 mm 2 /mm 2 , respectively, at 4 weeks and 0.029 ± 0.022, 0.090 ± 0.039, and 0.003 ± 0.001 mm 2 /mm 2 , respectively, at 8 weeks. At 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, significantly higher cartilage matrix production was observed in group B than in group C (4 weeks, P = .002; 8 weeks, P repair tissue and biomechanical strength at the tendon-to-bone insertion after rotator cuff repair in an animal model. Drilling into the footprint and preserving the fibrocartilage can enhance repair of tendon-to-bone insertions. This method may be clinically useful in rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Digital subtraction radiography evaluation of the bone repair process of chronic apical periodontitis after root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfica e Silva, J; Leles, C R; Alencar, A H G; Nunes, C A B C M; Mendonça, E F

    2010-08-01

    To monitor radiographically the progress of bone repair within chronic periapical lesions after root canal treatment using digital subtraction radiography (DSR). Twelve patients with 17 single-rooted teeth with chronic apical periodontitis associated with an infected necrotic pulp were selected for root canal treatment. Periapical radiographs were taken before treatment (baseline) and immediately post-treatment, 45, 90, 135 and 180 days after treatment. The radiographic protocol included the use of individualized film holders with silicone bite blocks. The six radiographic images were digitized and submitted to digital subtraction using DSR software, resulting in five subtracted images (SI). Quantitative analysis of these SI was performed using Image Tool software to assess pixel value changes, considering a step-wedge as the gold standard and a cut-off value of 128 pixels. The aim was to identify any increase or decrease in mineral density in the region of the periapical lesion. A minor decrease in mineral density at the canal filling session and a significant progressive mineral gain in the following evaluations (P < 0.001) occurred. Pairwise comparison of pixel grey values revealed that only the 180-day follow-up differed significantly from the previous SI. Digital subtraction radiography is a useful method for evaluating the progress of bone repair after root canal treatment. Noticeable mineral gain was observed approximately 90 days after root canal filling and definite bone repair after 180 days.

  9. The structural characterization of some biomaterials, type AISI 310, used in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minciuna, M. G.; Vizureanu, P.; Hanganu, C.; Achitei, D. C.; Popescu, D. C.; Focsaneanu, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    Orthopedics biomaterials are intended for implantation in the human body and substituted or help to repair of bones, cartilage or organ transplant, and tendons. At the end of the 20th century, the availability of materials for the manufacture implants used in medicine has been the same as for other industrial applications. The most used metals for manufacturing the orthopedics implants are: stainless steels, cobalt-chrome-molybdenum alloys, titanium and his alloys. The structural researches which are made in this paper, offer a complete analysis of AISI310 stainless steels, using: optical spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electronic microscopy.

  10. The Effect of Gravity on the Combustion Synthesis of Porous Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, M.; Zhang, X.; Moore, J. J.; Schowengerdt, F. D.; Ayers, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Production of highly porous composite materials by traditional materials processing is limited by difficult processing techniques. This work investigates the use of self propagating high temperature (combustion) synthesis (SHS) to create porous tricalcium phosphate (Ca3(PO4)2), TiB-Ti, and NiTi in low and microgravity. Combustion synthesis provides the ability to use set processing parameters to engineer the required porous structure suitable for bone repair or replacement. The processing parameters include green density, particle size, gasifying agents, composition, and gravity. The advantage of the TiB-Ti system is the high level of porosity achieved together with a modulus that can be controlled by both composition (TiB-Ti) and porosity. At the same time, NiTi exhibits shape memory properties. SHS of biomaterials allows the engineering of required porosity coupled with resorbtion properties and specific mechanical properties into the composite materials to allow for a better biomaterial.

  11. Strength of bone tunnel versus suture anchor and push-lock construct in Broström repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, Eric; Nathe, Ryan; Nathe, Tyler; Anderson, Matthew; Campanelli, Valentina

    2012-06-01

    Operative treatment of mechanical ankle instability is indicated for patients who have had multiple sprains and have continued episodes of instability despite bracing and rehabilitation. Anatomic reconstruction has been shown to have improved outcomes and return to sport as compared with nonanatomic reconstruction. The use of 2 suture anchors and a push-lock anchor is equal to 2 bone tunnels in strength to failure for anatomic Broström repair. Controlled laboratory study. In 7 matched pairs of human cadaver ankles, the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) were incised from their origin on the fibula. A No. 2 Fiberwire suture was placed into the CFL and a separate suture into the ATFL in a running Krackow fashion with a total of 4 locking loops. In 1 ankle of the matched pair, the ligaments were repaired to their anatomic insertion with bone tunnels. In the other, 2 suture anchors were used to reattach the ligaments to their anatomic origins, and a push-lock was used proximally to reinforce these suture anchors. The ligaments were cyclically loaded 20 times and then tested to failure. Torque to failure, degrees to failure, and stiffness were measured. The authors performed a matched pair analysis. An a priori power analysis of 0.8 demonstrated 6 pairs were needed to show a difference of 30% with a 15% standard error at a significance level of .05. There was no difference in the degrees to failure, torque to failure, and stiffness. A post hoc power analysis of torque to failure showed a power of .89 with 7 samples. Power for initial stiffness was .97 with 7 samples. Eleven of 14 specimens failed at either the suture anchor or the bone tunnel. There is no statistical difference in strength or stiffness for a suture anchor and push-lock construct as compared with a bone tunnel construct for an anatomic repair of the lateral ligaments of the ankle. The use of suture anchors in lateral ligament stabilization allows for a smaller

  12. The promotion of cartilage defect repair using adenovirus mediated Sox9 gene transfer of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Yang, Fei; Liu, Guangwang; Yu, Degang; Li, Huiwu; Fan, Qiming; Gan, Yaokai; Tang, Tingting; Dai, Kerong

    2011-06-01

    Although Sox9 is essential for chondrogenic differentiation and matrix production, its application in cartilage tissue engineering has been rarely reported. In this study, the chondrogenic effect of Sox9 on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and its application in articular cartilage repair in vivo were evaluated. Rabbit BMSCs were transduced with adenoviral vector containing Sox9. Toluidine blue, safranin O staining and real-time PCR were performed to check chondrogenic differentiation. The results showed that Sox9 could induce chondrogenesis of BMSCs both in monolayer and on PGA scaffold effectively. The rabbit model with full-thickness cartilage defects was established and then repaired by PGA scaffold and rabbit BMSCs with or without Sox9 transduction. HE, safranin O staining and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the repair of defects by the complex. Better repair, including more newly-formed cartilage tissue and hyaline cartilage-specific extracellular matrix and greater expression of several chondrogenesis marker genes were observed in PGA scaffold and BMSCs with Sox9 transduction, compared to that without transduction. Our findings defined the important role of Sox9 in the repair of cartilage defects in vivo and provided evidence that Sox9 had the potential and advantage in the application of tissue engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Repair of segmental bone defects in the maxilla by transport disc distraction osteogenesis: Clinical experience with a new device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonzaier, James; Vicatos, George; Hendricks, Rushdi

    2015-01-01

    The bones of the maxillary complex are vital for normal oro-nasal function and facial cosmetics. Maxillary tumor excision results in large defects that commonly include segments of the alveolar and palatine processes, compromising eating, speech and facial appearance. Unlike the conventional approach to maxillary defect repair by vascularized bone grafting, transport disc distraction osteogenesis (TDDO) stimulates new bone by separating the healing callus, and stimulates growth of surrounding soft tissues as well. Bone formed in this way closely mimics the parent bone in form and internal structure, producing a superior anatomical, functional and cosmetic result. Historically, TDDO has been successfully used to close small horizontal cleft defects in the maxilla, not exceeding 25 mm. Fujioka et al. reported in 2012 that “no bone transporter corresponding to the (large) size of the oro-antral fistula is marketed. The authors report the successful treatment of 4 cases involving alveolar defects of between 25 mm and 80 mm in length. PMID:26389041

  14. Platelet-rich plasma, plasma rich in growth factors and simvastatin in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, César; Monsalve, Francisco; Salas, Juan; Morán, Andrea; Suazo, Iván

    2013-12-01

    Platelet preparations promote bone regeneration by inducing cell migration, proliferation and differentiation in the area of the injury, which are essential processes for regeneration. In addition, several studies have indicated that simvastatin (SIMV), widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, stimulates osteogenesis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with either platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) in combination with SIMV in the regeneration and repair of alveolar bone. The jaws of Sprague Dawley rats (n=18) were subjected to rotary instrument-induced bone damage (BD). Animals were divided into six groups: BD/H 2 O (n=3), distilled water without the drug and alveolar bone damage; BD/H 2 O/PRP (n=3), BD and PRP; BD/H 2 O/PRGF (n=3), BD and PRGF; BD/SIMV (n=3), BD and water with SIMV; BD/SIMV/PRP (n=3), BD, PRP and SIMV; and BD/SIMV/PRGF (n=3), BD, PRGF and SIMV. Conventional histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin staining) revealed that the BD/SIMV group showed indicators for mature bone tissue, while the BD/SIMV/PRP and BD/SIMV/PRGF groups showed the coexistence of indicators for mature and immature bone tissue, with no statistical differences between the platelet preparations. Simvastatin did not improve the effect of platelet-rich plasma and plasma rich in growth factors. It was not possible to determine which platelet preparation produced superior effects.

  15. Calcium phosphate fibers coated with collagen: In vivo evaluation of the effects on bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Fabio Roberto; Kido, Hueliton Wilian; Granito, Renata Neves; Gabbai-Armelin, Paulo Roberto; Magri, Angela Maria Paiva; Fernandes, Kelly Rosseti; da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Braga, Francisco José Correa; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2016-08-12

    The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of the CaP/Col composites, in powder and fiber form, via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), pH and calcium release evaluation after immersion in SBF and to evaluate the performance of these materials on the bone repair process in a tibial bone defect model. For this, four different formulations (CaP powder - CaPp, CaP powder with collagen - CaPp/Col, CaP fibers - CaPf and CaP fibers with collagen - CaPf/Col) were developed. SEM images indicated that both material forms were successfully coated with collagen and that CaPp and CaPf presented HCA precursor crystals on their surface. Although presenting different forms, FTIR analysis indicated that CaPp and CaPf maintained the characteristic peaks for this class of material. Additionally, the calcium assay study demonstrated a higher Ca uptake for CaPp compared to CaPf for up to 5 days. Furthermore, pH measurements revealed that the collagen coating prevented the acidification of the medium, leading to higher pH values for CaPp/Col and CaPf/Col. The histological analysis showed that CaPf/Col demonstrated a higher amount of newly formed bone in the region of the defect and a reduced presence of material. In summary, the results indicated that the fibrous CaP enriched with the organic part (collagen) glassy scaffold presented good degradability and bone-forming properties and also supported Runx2 and RANKL expression. These results show that the present CaP/Col fibrous composite may be used as a bone graft for inducing bone repair.

  16. Designer bFGF-incorporated D-form self-assembly peptide nanofiber scaffolds to promote bone repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Bin, E-mail: binheing@163.com [Department of Orthopedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Ou, Yunsheng; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Weikang; Zhou, Ao [Department of Orthopedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Zhao, Jinqiu [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Li, Hong [School of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610000 (China); Jiang, Dianming [Department of Orthopedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Zhu, Yong, E-mail: 568731668@qq.com [Department of Orthopedics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China)

    2017-05-01

    D-Form and L-form peptide nanofiber scaffolds can spontaneously form stable β-sheet secondary structures and nanofiber hydrogel scaffolds, and hold some promise in hemostasis and wound healing. We report here on the synthetic self-assembling peptide D-RADA16 and L-RADA16 are both found to produce stable β-sheet secondary structure and nanofiber hydrogel scaffolds based on circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and rheology analysis etc. D-RADA16 hydrogel and L-RADA16 hydrogel can enhance obvious bone repair in femoral condyle defects of the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat model compared to PBS treatment. Based on micro-computed tomography (CT), it was revealed that D-RADA16 hydrogel and L-RADA16 hydrogel were capable to obtain the extensive bone healing. Histological evaluation also found that these two hydrogels facilitate the presence of more mature bone tissue within the femoral condyle defects. Additionally, D-RADA16 hydrogel showed some potential in storing and releasing basic-fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) which was able to further promote bone regeneration based on micro-CT analysis. These results indicate that D-form peptide nanofiber hydrogel have some special capacity for bone repair. - Highlights: • Peptide D-RADA16 and L-RADA16 can form stable hydrogels. • D-RADA16 hydrogel can obtain the comparable and extensive promotion to bone healing compared to L-RADA16 hydrogel. • L-RADA16 hydrogel allows for slow release of bFGF.

  17. Effects of combined therapy of alendronate and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on metaphyseal bone repair after osteotomy in the proximal tibia of glucocorticoid-induced osteopenia rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Kawano

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: ALN monotherapy and combined ALN and LUPUS treatment augmented BMD and stimulated cancellous bone repair with increased Runx2 expression at the osteotomy site in GIO rats. However, the combined treatment had no additional effect on cancellous bone healing compared to ALN monotherapy.

  18. Preparation and characterization of cockle shell aragonite nanocomposite porous 3D scaffolds for bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saffanah Khuder Mahmood

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The demands for applicable tissue-engineered scaffolds that can be used to repair load-bearing segmental bone defects (SBDs is vital and in increasing demand. In this study, seven different combinations of 3 dimensional (3D novel nanocomposite porous structured scaffolds were fabricated to rebuild SBDs using an extraordinary blend of cockle shells (CaCo3 nanoparticles (CCN, gelatin, dextran and dextrin to structure an ideal bone scaffold with adequate degradation rate using the Freeze Drying Method (FDM and labeled as 5211, 5400, 6211, 6300, 7101, 7200 and 8100. The micron sized cockle shells powder obtained (75 µm was made into nanoparticles using mechano-chemical, top-down method of nanoparticles synthesis with the presence of the surfactant BS-12 (dodecyl dimethyl bataine. The phase purity and crystallographic structures, the chemical functionality and the thermal characterization of the scaffolds’ powder were recognized using X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrophotometer and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC respectively. Characterizations of the scaffolds were assessed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Degradation Manner, Water Absorption Test, Swelling Test, Mechanical Test and Porosity Test. Top-down method produced cockle shell nanoparticles having averagely range 37.8±3–55.2±9 nm in size, which were determined using Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM. A mainly aragonite form of calcium carbonate was identified in both XRD and FTIR for all scaffolds, while the melting (Tm and transition (Tg temperatures were identified using DSC with the range of Tm 62.4–75.5 °C and of Tg 230.6–232.5 °C. The newly prepared scaffolds were with the following characteristics: (i good biocompatibility and biodegradability, (ii appropriate surface chemistry and (iii highly porous, with interconnected pore network. Engineering analyses showed that scaffold 5211 possessed 3D interconnected homogenous

  19. Characterization of biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffe, M; Tolias, P; Arinzeh, T

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterials and medical devices must be rigorously tested in the laboratory before they can be implanted. Testing requires the right analytical techniques. Characterization of biomaterials reviews the latest methods for analyzing the structure, properties and behaviour of biomaterials. Beginning with an introduction to microscopy techniques for analyzing the phase nature and morphology of biomaterials, Characterization of biomaterials goes on to discuss scattering techniques for structural analysis, quantitative assays for measuring cell adhesion, motility and differentiation, and the evaluation of cell infiltration and tissue formation using bioreactors. Further topics considered include studying molecular-scale protein-surface interactions in biomaterials, analysis of the cellular genome and abnormalities, and the use of microarrays to measure cellular changes induced by biomaterials. Finally, the book concludes by outlining standards and methods for assessing the safety and biocompatibility of biomaterial...

  20. Pulsed electromagnetic field therapy improves tendon-to-bone healing in a rat rotator cuff repair model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jennica J; Cirone, James M; Morris, Tyler R; Nuss, Courtney A; Huegel, Julianne; Waldorff, Erik I; Zhang, Nianli; Ryaby, James T; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2017-04-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common musculoskeletal injuries often requiring surgical intervention with high failure rates. Currently, pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) are used for treatment of long-bone fracture and lumbar and cervical spine fusion surgery. Clinical studies examining the effects of PEMF on soft tissue healing show promising results. Therefore, we investigated the role of PEMF on rotator cuff healing using a rat rotator cuff repair model. We hypothesized that PEMF exposure following rotator cuff repair would improve tendon mechanical properties, tissue morphology, and alter in vivo joint function. Seventy adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to three groups: bilateral repair with PEMF (n = 30), bilateral repair followed by cage activity (n = 30), and uninjured control with cage activity (n = 10). Rats in the surgical groups were sacrificed at 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Control group was sacrificed at 8 weeks. Passive joint mechanics and gait analysis were assessed over time. Biomechanical analysis and μCT was performed on left shoulders; histological analysis on right shoulders. Results indicate no differences in passive joint mechanics and ambulation. At 4 weeks the PEMF group had decreased cross-sectional area and increased modulus and maximum stress. At 8 weeks the PEMF group had increased modulus and more rounded cells in the midsubstance. At 16 weeks the PEMF group had improved bone quality. Therefore, results indicate that PEMF improves early tendon healing and does not alter joint function in a rat rotator cuff repair model. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:902-909, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A surprisingly poor correlation between in vitro and in vivo testing of biomaterials for bone regeneration : results of a multicentre analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsart-Billström, G.; Dawson, J.I.; Hofmann, S.; Müller, R.; Stoddart, M.J.; Alini, M.; Redl, H.; El Haj, A.; Brown, R.; Salih, V.; Hilborn, J.; Larsson, S.; Oreffo, R.O.C.

    2016-01-01

    New regenerative materials and approaches need to be assessed through reliable and comparable methods for rapid translation to the clinic. There is a considerable need for proven in vitro assays that are able to reduce the burden on animal testing, by allowing assessment of biomaterial utility

  2. Slab fractures of the third tarsal bone: Minimally invasive repair using a single 3.5 mm cortex screw placed in lag fashion in 17 Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, W H J; Wright, I M

    2017-03-01

    A technique for minimally invasive repair of slab fractures of the third tarsal bone has not previously been reported. Results of third tarsal bone slab fracture repair in Thoroughbred racehorses are lacking. To report the outcomes of repair of uniplanar frontal slab factures of the third tarsal bone using a single 3.5 mm cortex screw in lag fashion. Retrospective case series. Case records of horses that had undergone this procedure were reviewed. Seventeen horses underwent surgery. Eighteen percent of cases had wedge shaped third tarsal bones. A point midway between the long and lateral digital extensor tendons and centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints created a suitable entry site for implants. The fracture location, configuration and curvature of the third tarsal bone and associated joints requires a dorsolateral proximal-plantaromedial distal trajectory for the screw, which was determined by preplaced needles. There were no complications and fractures healed in all cases at 4-6 months post surgery. Seventy-nine percent of horses returned to racing and, at the time of reporting, 3 are in post operative rehabilitation programmes. The technique reported provides a safe, appropriate and repeatable means of repairing slab fractures of the third tarsal bone. Surgical repair is a viable alternative to conservative management. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  3. Advances in biologic augmentation for rotator cuff repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sahishnu; Gualtieri, Anthony P.; Lu, Helen H.; Levine, William N.

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tear is a very common shoulder injury that often necessitates surgical intervention for repair. Despite advances in surgical techniques for rotator cuff repair, there is a high incidence of failure after surgery because of poor healing capacity attributed to many factors. The complexity of tendon-to-bone integration inherently presents a challenge for repair because of a large biomechanical mismatch between the tendon and bone and insufficient regeneration of native tissue, leading to the formation of fibrovascular scar tissue. Therefore, various biological augmentation approaches have been investigated to improve rotator cuff repair healing. This review highlights recent advances in three fundamental approaches for biological augmentation for functional and integrative tendon–bone repair. First, the exploration, application, and delivery of growth factors to improve regeneration of native tissue is discussed. Second, applications of stem cell and other cell-based therapies to replenish damaged tissue for better healing is covered. Finally, this review will highlight the development and applications of compatible biomaterials to both better recapitulate the tendon–bone interface and improve delivery of biological factors for enhanced integrative repair. PMID:27750374

  4. Variance of [sup 99m]Tc-MDP bone imaging among the repairing process after experimental femoral head necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibiao, Sang; Yimin, Jiang; Jinxi, Wang [Suzhou Medical Coll., Suzhou, JS (China). First Affiliated Hospital

    1993-05-01

    Six of 26 adult mongrel dogs were used as controls. Avascular necrosis of the left femoral head was induced by freezing method with liquid nitrogen and the right side being used as a self-control. The 20 dogs were divided into four groups, 5 dogs each which was sacrificed successively at 1/2, 2,2 and 6 months after operation. All of the femoral heads were studied by radionuclide bone imaging, radiological, histological and biochemical examinations. The results were as follows: [sup 99m]Tc-MDP bone imaging showed a decreased uptake at the early stage, and was gradually increased later, and reached its peak values at precollape stage at four months. Hypermetabolism state was still maintained at collapsed stage. Above changes was in coincidence with the bone imaging. As for the repairing process after necrosis, the hypermetabolic reaction in bone imaging of the femoral head correlates well with the proliferation of vessels and bone marrow cells and also the activity of tissue collagenase. Therefore, a poor bony reconstruction in the weight-bearing portion could be an important cause for late segmental collapse.

  5. Surface-enrichment with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in stereolithography-fabricated composite polymer scaffolds promotes bone repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guillaume, O.; Geven, M. A.; Sprecher, C. M.; Stadelmann, V. A.; Grijpma, D. W.; Tang, T.T.; Qin, L.; Lai, Y.; Alini, M.; de Bruijn, J. D.; Yuan, H.; Richards, R.G.; Eglin, D.

    2017-01-01

    Fabrication of composite scaffolds using stereolithography (SLA) for bone tissue engineering has shown great promises. However, in order to trigger effective bone formation and implant integration, exogenous growth factors are commonly combined to scaffold materials. In this study, we fabricated

  6. Runx2 is required for early stages of endochondral bone formation but delays final stages of bone repair in Axin2-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Carpio, Lomeli R.; Bradley, Elizabeth W.; Dudakovic, Amel; Lian, Jane B.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Kakar, Sanjeev; Hsu, Wei; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Runx2 and Axin2 regulate skeletal development. We recently determined that Axin2 and Runx2 molecularly interact in differentiating osteoblasts to regulate intramembranous bone formation, but the relationship between these factors in endochondral bone formation was unresolved. To address this, we examined the effects of Axin2 deficiency on the cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) phenotype of Runx2+/− mice, focusing on skeletal defects attributed to improper endochondral bone formation. Axin2 deficiency unexpectedly exacerbated calvarial components of the CCD phenotype in the Runx2+/− mice; the endocranial layer of the frontal suture, which develops by endochondral bone formation, failed to mineralize in the Axin2−/−:Runx2+/− mice, resulting in a cartilaginous, fibrotic and larger fontanel than observed in Runx2+/− mice. Transcripts associated with cartilage development (e.g., Acan, miR140) were expressed at higher levels, whereas blood vessel morphogenesis transcripts (e.g., Slit2) were suppressed in Axin2−/−:Runx2+/− calvaria. Cartilage maturation was impaired, as primary chondrocytes from double mutant mice demonstrated delayed differentiation and produced less calcified matrix in vitro. The genetic dominance of Runx2 was also reflected during endochondral fracture repair, as both Runx2+/− and double mutant Axin2−/−:Runx2+/− mice had enlarged fracture calluses at early stages of healing. However, by the end stages of fracture healing, double mutant animals diverged from the Runx2+/− mice, showing smaller calluses and increased torsional strength indicative of more rapid end stage bone formation as seen in the Axin2−/− mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate a dominant role for Runx2 in chondrocyte maturation, but implicate Axin2 as an important modulator of the terminal stages of endochondral bone formation. PMID:24973690

  7. Decalcified allograft in repair of lytic lesions of bone: A study to evolve bone bank in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The quest for ideal bone graft substitutes still haunts orthopedic researchers. The impetus for this search of newer bone substitutes is provided by mismatch between the demand and supply of autogenous bone grafts. Bone banking facilities such as deep frozen and freeze-dried allografts are not so widely available in most of the developing countries. To overcome the problem, we have used partially decalcified, ethanol preserved, and domestic refrigerator stored allografts which are economical and needs simple technology for procurement, preparation, and preservation. The aim of the study was to assess the radiological and functional outcome of the partially decalcified allograft (by weak hydrochloric acid in patients of benign lytic lesions of bone. Through this study, we have also tried to evolve, establish, and disseminate the concept of the bone bank. Materials and Methods: 42 cases of lytic lesions of bone who were treated by decalcified (by weak hydrochloric acid, ethanol preserved, allografts were included in this prospective study. The allograft was obtained from freshly amputated limbs or excised femoral heads during hip arthroplasties under strict aseptic conditions. The causes of lytic lesions were unicameral bone cyst ( n = 3, aneurysmal bone cyst ( n = 3, giant cell tumor ( n = 9, fibrous dysplasia ( n = 12, chondromyxoid fibroma, chondroma, nonossifying fibroma ( n = 1 each, tubercular osteomyelitis ( n = 7, and chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis ( n = 5. The cavity of the lesion was thoroughly curetted and compactly filled with matchstick sized allografts. Results: Quantitative assessment based on the criteria of Sethi et al. (1993 was done. There was complete assimilation in 27 cases, partial healing in 12 cases, and failure in 3 cases. Functional assessment was also done according to which there were 29 excellent results, 6 good, and 7 cases of failure (infection, recurrence, and nonunion of pathological fracture. We

  8. Effects of infrared laser on the bone repair assessed by x-ray microtomography (μct) and histomorphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolillo, Alessandra Rossi; Paolillo, Fernanda Rossi; da Silva, Alessandro M. Hakme; Reiff, Rodrigo Bezerra de Menezes; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Alves, José Marcos

    2015-06-01

    The bone fracture is important public health problems. The lasertherapy is used to accelerate tissue healing. Regarding diagnosis, few methods are validated to follow the evolution of bone microarchitecture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of lasertherapy on bone repair with x-ray microtomography (μCT) and histomorphometry. A transverse rat tibia osteotomy with a Kirchner wire and a 2mm width polymeric spacer beads were used to produce a delayed bone union. Twelve rats were divided into two groups: (i) Control Group: untreated fracture and; (ii) Laser Group: fracture treated with laser. Twelve sessions of treatment (808nm laser, 100mW, 125J/cm2, 50seconds) were performed. The μCT scanner parameters were: 100kV, 100μA, Al+Cu filter and 9.92μm resolution. A volume of interest (VOI) was chosen with 300 sections above and below the central region of the fracture, totaling 601sections with a 5.96mm. The softwares CT-Analyzer, NRecon and Mimics were used for 2D and 3D analysis. A histomorphometry analysis was also performed. The connectivity (Conn) showed significant increase for Laser Group than Control Group (32371+/-20689 vs 17216+/-9467, pcartilaginous (0.19+/-0.05% vs 0.11+/-0.09%) and fibrotic (0.21+/-0.12% vs 0.09+/-0.11%) tissues]. The negative effect was presence of the cartilaginous and fibrotic tissues which may be related to the Kirchner wire and the non-absorption of the polymeric that may have influenced negatively the light distribution through the bone. However, the positive effect was greater bone connectivity, indicating improvement in bone microarchitecture.

  9. Mechanical properties of bioactive glass (13-93) scaffolds fabricated by robotic deposition for structural bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Hilmas, Gregory E; Bal, B Sonny

    2013-06-01

    There is a need to develop synthetic scaffolds to repair large defects in load-bearing bones. Bioactive glasses have attractive properties as a scaffold material for bone repair, but data on their mechanical properties are limited. The objective of the present study was to comprehensively evaluate the mechanical properties of strong porous scaffolds of silicate 13-93 bioactive glass fabricated by robocasting. As-fabricated scaffolds with a grid-like microstructure (porosity 47%, filament diameter 330μm, pore width 300μm) were tested in compressive and flexural loading to determine their strength, elastic modulus, Weibull modulus, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness. Scaffolds were also tested in compression after they were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) in vitro or implanted in a rat subcutaneous model in vivo. As fabricated, the scaffolds had a strength of 86±9MPa, elastic modulus of 13±2GPa, and a Weibull modulus of 12 when tested in compression. In flexural loading the strength, elastic modulus, and Weibull modulus were 11±3MPa, 13±2GPa, and 6, respectively. In compression, the as-fabricated scaffolds had a mean fatigue life of ∼10(6) cycles when tested in air at room temperature or in phosphate-buffered saline at 37°C under cyclic stresses of 1-10 or 2-20MPa. The compressive strength of the scaffolds decreased markedly during the first 2weeks of immersion in SBF or implantation in vivo, but more slowly thereafter. The brittle mechanical response of the scaffolds in vitro changed to an elasto-plastic response after implantation for longer than 2-4weeks in vivo. In addition to providing critically needed data for designing bioactive glass scaffolds, the results are promising for the application of these strong porous scaffolds in loaded bone repair. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Repair of bone defect by nano-modified white mineral trioxide aggregates in rabbit: A histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghiri, Mohammad-Ali; Orangi, Jafar; Tanideh, Nader; Asatourian, Armen; Janghorban, Kamal; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-09-01

    Many researchers have tried to enhance materials functions in different aspects of science using nano-modification method, and in many cases the results have been encouraging. To evaluate the histopathological responses of the micro-/nano-size cement-type biomaterials derived from calcium silicate-based composition with addition of nano tricalcium aluminate (3CaO.Al2O3) on bone healing response. Ninety mature male rabbits were anesthetized and a bone defect was created in the right mandible. The rabbits were divided into three groups, which were in turn subdivided into five subgroups with six animals each based on the defect filled by: white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA), Nano-WMTA, WMTA without 3CaO.Al2O3, Nano-WMTA with 2% Nano-3CaO.Al2O3, and empty as control. Twenty, forty and sixty days postoperatively the animals were sacrificed and the right mandibles were removed for histopathological evaluations. Kruskal-Wallis test with post-hoc comparisons based on the LSMeans procedure was used for data analysis. All the experimental materials provoked a moderate to severe inflammatory reaction, which significantly differed from the control group (pbone formation and bone regeneration data showed significant differences between groups at 40- and 60- day intervals in all groups. Absence of 3CaO.Al2O3 leads to more inflammation and foreign body reaction than other groups in all time intervals. Both powder nano-modification and addition of 2% Nano-3CaO.Al2O3 to calcium silicate-based cement enhanced the favorable tissue response and osteogenesis properties of WMTA based materials.

  11. Traumatic glenohumeral bone defects and their relationship to failure of arthroscopic Bankart repairs: significance of the inverted-pear glenoid and the humeral engaging Hill-Sachs lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, S S; De Beer, J F

    2000-10-01

    Our goal was to analyze the results of 194 consecutive arthroscopic Bankart repairs (performed by 2 surgeons with an identical suture anchor technique) in order to identify specific factors related to recurrence of instability. Case series. We analyzed 194 consecutive arthroscopic Bankart repairs by suture anchor technique performed for traumatic anterior-inferior instability. The average follow-up was 27 months (range, 14 to 79 months). There were 101 contact athletes (96 South African rugby players and 5 American football players). We identified significant bone defects on either the humerus or the glenoid as (1) "inverted-pear" glenoid, in which the normally pear-shaped glenoid had lost enough anterior-inferior bone to assume the shape of an inverted pear; or (2) "engaging" Hill-Sachs lesion of the humerus, in which the orientation of the Hill-Sachs lesion was such that it engaged the anterior glenoid with the shoulder in abduction and external rotation. There were 21 recurrent dislocations and subluxations (14 dislocations, 7 subluxations). Of those 21 shoulders with recurrent instability, 14 had significant bone defects (3 engaging Hill-Sachs and 11 inverted-pear Bankart lesions). For the group of patients without significant bone defects (173 shoulders), there were 7 recurrences (4% recurrence rate). For the group with significant bone defects (21 patients), there were 14 recurrences (67% recurrence rate). For contact athletes without significant bone defects, there was a 6.5% recurrence rate, whereas for contact athletes with significant bone defects, there was an 89% recurrence rate. (1) Arthroscopic Bankart repairs give results equal to open Bankart repairs if there are no significant structural bone deficits (engaging Hill-Sachs or inverted-pear Bankart lesions). (2) Patients with significant bone deficits as defined in this study are not candidates for arthroscopic Bankart repair. (3) Contact athletes without structural bone deficits may be treated by

  12. Bone fragment union and remodeling after arthroscopic bony bankart repair for traumatic anterior shoulder instability with a glenoid defect: influence on postoperative recurrence of instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shigeto; Ozaki, Ritsuro; Take, Yasuhiro; Mae, Tatsuo; Hayashida, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Although good clinical outcomes have been reported after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair, the extent of bone union is still unclear. To investigate bone union after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair and its influence on postoperative recurrence of instability. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Among 113 consecutive shoulders that underwent arthroscopic bony Bankart repair, postoperative evaluation of bone union by computed tomography (CT) was performed at various times in 81 shoulders. Bone union was investigated during 3 periods: 3 to 6 months postoperatively (first period), 7 to 12 months postoperatively (second period), and 13 months or more postoperatively (third period). The influence of the size of the preoperative glenoid defect and the size of the bone fragment on bone union was investigated, as well as the influence of bone union on postoperative recurrence of instability. In shoulders with bone union, bone fragment remodeling and changes in the glenoid defect size were also investigated. The bone union rate was 30.5% in the first period, 55.3% in the second period, and 84.6% in the third period. Among 53 shoulders with CT evaluation in the second period or later and follow-up for a minimum of 1 year, there was complete union in 33 shoulders (62.3%), partial union in 3 (5.7%), nonunion in 8 (15.1%), and no fragment on CT in 9 (17.0%). The complete union rate was 50% for 22 shoulders with small bone fragments (fragments (5%-10%), and 86.7% for 15 shoulders with large fragments (>10%). The recurrence rate for postoperative instability was only 6.1% for shoulders with complete union, while it was 50% for shoulders with partial union, nonunion, no fragment, and no fragment on CT. The recurrence rate was significantly higher (36.4%) in shoulders with small fragments, but it was significantly lower in shoulders with bone union. In shoulders with bone union, the bone fragment frequently became larger over time, while the size of the glenoid defect decreased

  13. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic–inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius; Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen; Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50 mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2 h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21 days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell–material combination in bone tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy image depicting cell adhesion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into a pore of a hybrid Direct Laser Writing

  14. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic–inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria, E-mail: mchatzin@materials.uoc.gr [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen [Hematology Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Crete (Greece); Farsari, Maria [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Vamvakaki, Maria [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece)

    2015-03-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50 mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2 h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21 days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell–material combination in bone tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy image depicting cell adhesion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into a pore of a hybrid Direct Laser Writing

  15. Autologous Bone Marrow Concentrate in a Sheep Model of Osteoarthritis: New Perspectives for Cartilage and Meniscus Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desando, Giovanna; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Cavallo, Carola; Bartolotti, Isabella; Sartoni, Federica; Nicoli Aldini, Nicolò; Martini, Lucia; Parrilli, Annapaola; Mariani, Erminia; Fini, Milena; Grigolo, Brunella

    2016-06-01

    Cell-based therapies are becoming a valuable tool to treat osteoarthritis (OA). This study investigated and compared the regenerative potential of bone marrow concentrate (BMC) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), both engineered with Hyaff(®)-11 (HA) for OA treatment in a sheep model. OA was induced via unilateral medial meniscectomy. Bone marrow was aspirated from the iliac crest, followed by concentration processes or cell isolation and expansion to obtain BMC and MSC, respectively. Treatments consisted of autologous BMC and MSC seeded onto HA. The regenerative potential of bone, cartilage, menisci, and synovia was monitored using macroscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and micro-computed tomography at 12 weeks post-op. Data were analyzed using the general linear model with adjusted Sidak's multiple comparison and Spearman's tests. BMC-HA treatment showed a greater repair ability in inhibiting OA progression compared to MSC-HA, leading to a reduction of inflammation in cartilage, meniscus, and synovium. Indeed, the decrease of inflammation positively contributed to counteract the progression of fibrotic and hypertrophic processes, known to be involved in tissue failure. Moreover, the treatment with BMC-HA showed the best results in allowing meniscus regeneration. Minor healing effects were noticed at bone level for both cell strategies; however, a downregulation of subchondral bone thickness (Cs.Th) was found in both cell treatments compared to the OA group in the femur. The transplantation of BMC-HA provided the best effects in supporting regenerative processes in cartilage, meniscus, and synovium and at less extent in bone. On the whole, both MSC and BMC combined with HA reduced inflammation and contributed to switch off fibrotic and hypertrophic processes. The observed regenerative potential by BMC-HA on meniscus could open new perspectives, suggesting its use not only for OA care but also for the treatment of meniscal lesions, even if further analyses are

  16. Injectable calcium phosphate with hydrogel fibers encapsulating induced pluripotent, dental pulp and bone marrow stem cells for bone repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin [VIP Integrated Department, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130011,China (China); Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zhang, Chi [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Chunyan [VIP Integrated Department, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130011,China (China); Weir, Michael D. [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Wang, Ping, E-mail: pwang@umaryland.edu [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Reynolds, Mark A. [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zhao, Liang, E-mail: lzhaonf@126.com [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Xu, Hockin H.K. [Department of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Center for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore County, MD 21250 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hiPSC-MSCs), dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and bone marrow MSCs (hBMSCs) are exciting cell sources in regenerative medicine. However, there has been no report comparing hDPSCs, hBMSCs and hiPSC-MSCs for bone engineering in an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffold. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel injectable CPC containing hydrogel fibers encapsulating stem cells for bone engineering, and (2) compare cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs, hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow (BM-hiPSC-MSCs) and from foreskin (FS-hiPSC-MSCs), and hBMSCs in CPC for the first time. The results showed that the injection did not harm cell viability. The porosity of injectable CPC was 62%. All four types of cells proliferated and differentiated down the osteogenic lineage inside hydrogel fibers in CPC. hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs exhibited high alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor, collagen I, and osteocalcin gene expressions. Cell-synthesized minerals increased with time (p < 0.05), with no significant difference among hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs (p > 0.1). Mineralization by hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs inside CPC at 14 d was 14-fold that at 1 d. FS-hiPSC-MSCs were inferior in osteogenic differentiation compared to the other cells. In conclusion, hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs are similarly and highly promising for bone tissue engineering; however, FS-hiPSC-MSCs were relatively inferior in osteogenesis. The novel injectable CPC with cell-encapsulating hydrogel fibers may enhance bone regeneration in dental, craniofacial and orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • The osteogenic differentiation of hiPSC-MSCs from different origins, hDPSCs and hBMSCs were first investigated and compared in this study. • hDPSCs and hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow represented viable alternatives to hBMSCs in bone tissue engineering. • hi

  17. Injectable calcium phosphate with hydrogel fibers encapsulating induced pluripotent, dental pulp and bone marrow stem cells for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lin; Zhang, Chi; Li, Chunyan; Weir, Michael D.; Wang, Ping; Reynolds, Mark A.; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hiPSC-MSCs), dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and bone marrow MSCs (hBMSCs) are exciting cell sources in regenerative medicine. However, there has been no report comparing hDPSCs, hBMSCs and hiPSC-MSCs for bone engineering in an injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffold. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel injectable CPC containing hydrogel fibers encapsulating stem cells for bone engineering, and (2) compare cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs, hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow (BM-hiPSC-MSCs) and from foreskin (FS-hiPSC-MSCs), and hBMSCs in CPC for the first time. The results showed that the injection did not harm cell viability. The porosity of injectable CPC was 62%. All four types of cells proliferated and differentiated down the osteogenic lineage inside hydrogel fibers in CPC. hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs exhibited high alkaline phosphatase, runt-related transcription factor, collagen I, and osteocalcin gene expressions. Cell-synthesized minerals increased with time (p < 0.05), with no significant difference among hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs (p > 0.1). Mineralization by hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs, and hBMSCs inside CPC at 14 d was 14-fold that at 1 d. FS-hiPSC-MSCs were inferior in osteogenic differentiation compared to the other cells. In conclusion, hDPSCs, BM-hiPSC-MSCs and hBMSCs are similarly and highly promising for bone tissue engineering; however, FS-hiPSC-MSCs were relatively inferior in osteogenesis. The novel injectable CPC with cell-encapsulating hydrogel fibers may enhance bone regeneration in dental, craniofacial and orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • The osteogenic differentiation of hiPSC-MSCs from different origins, hDPSCs and hBMSCs were first investigated and compared in this study. • hDPSCs and hiPSC-MSCs from bone marrow represented viable alternatives to hBMSCs in bone tissue engineering. • hi

  18. Current concepts of regenerative biomaterials in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna Ahuja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of any implant system is to achieve firm fixation to the bone and this could be influenced by biomechanical as well as biomaterial selection. An array of materials is used in the replacement of missing teeth through implantation. The appropriate selection of biomaterials directly influences the clinical success and longevity of implants. Thus the clinician needs to have adequate knowledge of the various biomaterials and their properties for their judicious selection and application in his/her clinical practice. The recent materials such as bioceramics and composite biomaterials that are under consideration and investigation have a promising future. For optimal performance, implant biomaterials should have suitable mechanical strength, biocompatibility, and structural biostability in the physiological environment. This article reviews the various implant biomaterials and their ease of use in implant dentistry.

  19. Bone response to collagenized xenografts of porcine origin (mp3(®) ) and a bovine bone mineral grafting (4BONE(™) XBM) grafts in tibia defects: experimental study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Aguilar-Salvatierra, Antonio; Ramírez-Fernández, Maria P; Maté Sánchez de Val, José E; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to carry out the evaluation of bone response of new bone formation to two different xenografts (bovine and porcine) biomaterials inserted in rabbit tibiae. The study used a total of 20 male New Zealand albino rabbits. They received a total of 40 grafts in the proximal metaphyseal areas of both tibiae. Two biomaterials were evaluated: 20 porcine xenografts, as a bone granulate (OsteoBiol(®) MP3(®) ; Tecnoss srl, Giaveno, Italy), were placed in the proximal metaphyseal area of the right tibia, 20 anorganic bovine bone mineral grafting (4BONE(™) XBM, MIS Implants Inc., BARLEV, Israel) were placed in the left tibia. Following graft insertion, the animals were sacrificed in two groups of 10 animals, after 1 and 4 months, respectively. For each group, biomaterials were analyzed: newly formed bone, residual graft materials and the connective tissue. Histomorphometric, EDX analysis and element mapping were performed at 1 and 4 months after graft insertion. At 4 months after treatment, the bone defects displayed radiological images that showed complete repair of osseous defects. Histomorphometric evaluation showed that for the porcine xenograft, the study averages for newly formed bone represented 84.23 ± 2.9%, while bovine matrix was 79.34 ± 2.1%. For residual graft material, the porcine biomaterial had 11.23 ± 1.7% and the bovine graft 31.56 ± 2.3%. Finally, the connective tissue for MP3 was 10.33 ± 1.8%, while for the 4BONE(™) XBM we obtained 14.34 ± 2.9%. Element analysis revealed higher percentages of Ca (54 ± 9%) and P (35 ± 6%) in the group B than group A and control group (P MP3 material; this supports new bone formation, creates a bridge between borders, and facilitates bone ingrowth in both biomaterials. Furthermore, this study observed partial dissolution of the mineral phase of four bone graft and complete resorption of porcine MP3 biomaterial and its incorporation into the surrounding bone. Depending on

  20. Neurotrophin-3 Induces BMP-2 and VEGF Activities and Promotes the Bony Repair of Injured Growth Plate Cartilage and Bone in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Wen; Chung, Rosa; Ruan, Chun-Sheng; Chim, Shek Man; Kuek, Vincent; Dwivedi, Prem P; Hassanshahi, Mohammadhossein; Chen, Ke-Ming; Xie, Yangli; Chen, Lin; Foster, Bruce K; Rosen, Vicki; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Xu, Jiake; Xian, Cory J

    2016-06-01

    Injured growth plate is often repaired by bony tissue causing bone growth defects, for which the mechanisms remain unclear. Because neurotrophins have been implicated in bone fracture repair, here we investigated their potential roles in growth plate bony repair in rats. After a drill-hole injury was made in the tibial growth plate and bone, increased injury site mRNA expression was observed for neurotrophins NGF, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4 and their Trk receptors. NT-3 and its receptor TrkC showed the highest induction. NT-3 was localized to repairing cells, whereas TrkC was observed in stromal cells, osteoblasts, and blood vessel cells at the injury site. Moreover, systemic NT-3 immunoneutralization reduced bone volume at injury sites and also reduced vascularization at the injured growth plate, whereas recombinant NT-3 treatment promoted bony repair with elevated levels of mRNA for osteogenic markers and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2) and increased vascularization and mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial cell marker CD31 at the injured growth plate. When examined in vitro, NT-3 promoted osteogenesis in rat bone marrow stromal cells, induced Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, and enhanced expression of BMPs (particularly BMP-2) and VEGF in the mineralizing cells. It also induced CD31 and VEGF mRNA in rat primary endothelial cell culture. BMP activity appears critical for NT-3 osteogenic effect in vitro because it can be almost completely abrogated by co-addition of the BMP inhibitor noggin. Consistent with its angiogenic effect in vivo, NT-3 promoted angiogenesis in metatarsal bone explants, an effect abolished by co-treatment with anti-VEGF. This study suggests that NT-3 may be an osteogenic and angiogenic factor upstream of BMP-2 and VEGF in bony repair, and further studies are required to investigate whether NT-3 may be a potential target for preventing growth plate faulty bony repair or for promoting bone fracture healing. © 2016

  1. Analysis of the Osteogenic Effects of Biomaterials Using Numerical Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Hui-Lin; Luo, Zong-Ping

    2017-01-01

    We describe the development of an optimization algorithm for determining the effects of different properties of implanted biomaterials on bone growth, based on the finite element method and bone self-optimization theory. The rate of osteogenesis and the bone density distribution of the implanted biomaterials were quantitatively analyzed. Using the proposed algorithm, a femur with implanted biodegradable biomaterials was simulated, and the osteogenic effects of different materials were measured. Simulation experiments mainly considered variations in the elastic modulus (20-3000 MPa) and degradation period (10, 20, and 30 days) for the implanted biodegradable biomaterials. Based on our algorithm, the osteogenic effects of the materials were optimal when the elastic modulus was 1000 MPa and the degradation period was 20 days. The simulation results for the metaphyseal bone of the left femur were compared with micro-CT images from rats with defective femurs, which demonstrated the effectiveness of the algorithm. The proposed method was effective for optimization of the bone structure and is expected to have applications in matching appropriate bones and biomaterials. These results provide important insights into the development of implanted biomaterials for both clinical medicine and materials science.

  2. Analysis of the Osteogenic Effects of Biomaterials Using Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Hui-Lin

    2017-01-01

    We describe the development of an optimization algorithm for determining the effects of different properties of implanted biomaterials on bone growth, based on the finite element method and bone self-optimization theory. The rate of osteogenesis and the bone density distribution of the implanted biomaterials were quantitatively analyzed. Using the proposed algorithm, a femur with implanted biodegradable biomaterials was simulated, and the osteogenic effects of different materials were measured. Simulation experiments mainly considered variations in the elastic modulus (20–3000 MPa) and degradation period (10, 20, and 30 days) for the implanted biodegradable biomaterials. Based on our algorithm, the osteogenic effects of the materials were optimal when the elastic modulus was 1000 MPa and the degradation period was 20 days. The simulation results for the metaphyseal bone of the left femur were compared with micro-CT images from rats with defective femurs, which demonstrated the effectiveness of the algorithm. The proposed method was effective for optimization of the bone structure and is expected to have applications in matching appropriate bones and biomaterials. These results provide important insights into the development of implanted biomaterials for both clinical medicine and materials science. PMID:28116309

  3. Comparison of a novel bone-tendon allograft with a human dermis-derived patch for repair of chronic large rotator cuff tears using a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J; Cook, James L; Kuroki, Keiichi; Jayabalan, Prakash S; Cook, Cristi R; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Waters, Nicole P

    2012-02-01

    This study tested a bone-tendon allograft versus human dermis patch for reconstructing chronic rotator cuff repair by use of a canine model. Mature research dogs (N = 15) were used. Radiopaque wire was placed in the infraspinatus tendon (IST) before its transection. Three weeks later, radiographs showed IST retraction. Each dog then underwent 1 IST treatment: debridement (D), direct repair of IST to bone with a suture bridge and human dermis patch augmentation (GJ), or bone-tendon allograft (BT) reconstruction. Outcome measures included lameness grading, radiographs, and ultrasonographic assessment. Dogs were killed 6 months after surgery and both shoulders assessed biomechanically and histologically. BT dogs were significantly (P = .01) less lame than the other groups. BT dogs had superior bone-tendon, tendon, and tendon-muscle integrity compared with D and GJ dogs. Biomechanical testing showed that the D group had significantly (P = .05) more elongation than the other groups whereas BT had stiffness and elongation characteristics that most closely matched normal controls. Radiographically, D and GJ dogs showed significantly more retraction than BT dogs (P = .003 and P = .045, respectively) Histologically, GJ dogs had lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, tendon degeneration and hypocellularity, and poor tendon-bone integration. BT dogs showed complete incorporation of allograft bone into host bone, normal bone-tendon junctions, and well-integrated allograft tendon. The bone-tendon allograft technique re-establishes a functional IST bone-tendon-muscle unit and maintains integrity of repair in this model. Clinical trials using this bone-tendon allograft technique are warranted. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomaterials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Reza Rezaie, Hamid; Öchsner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This short book presents an overview of different types of biomaterial such as bio ceramics, bio polymers, metals and bio composites, while especially focusing on nano biomaterials and their applications in different tissues. It provides a compact introduction to nano materials for drug delivery systems, tissue engineering and implants, while also reviewing essential trends in the biomaterial field over the last few decades and the latest developments.

  5. Investigation of the histology and interfacial bonding between carbonated hydroxyapatite cement and bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Keya; Hao Libo; Tang Peifu; Wang Zheng; Wen Ning; Du Mingkui; Wang Jifang; Wang Yan; Yang Yun; Li Jiangtao

    2009-01-01

    An ideal bone implant should facilitate the formation of a new bone layer as an osteo-integrated interface between bone and the implanted biomaterials. In the present work, the interface between carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) cement and bone was evaluated by interfacial bonding strength measurements and histological characterizations. CHA cement was implanted into a mongrel dog's femoral supracondylar and below the tibial plateau area, and was then tested ex vivo by, respectively, detaching and pullout experiments. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was used as a control. CHA cement could be directly injected and solidified in situ to repair bone defects. Histology results showed that CHA bonded with bone through gradual remodeling and was replaced by new bone tissue, which is an attribute for excellent biocompatibility. The interfacial bonding strength increased with implantation time. After 16 weeks implantation, the measured detaching force and the pullout force between CHA and bone were 281 ± 16 N and 512.5 ± 14.5 N, respectively. These values were several times higher compared to 5 days implantation. In contrast, the control showed a fibrous microstructure between PMMA and bone, and the detaching force and the pullout force decreased with implantation time. The results strongly suggest that CHA can form a better osteo-integrated interface compared to PMMA, and could be used as an ideal biomaterial for bone defect repair.

  6. An introduction to biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Hollinger, Jeffrey O

    2011-01-01

    Consensus Definitions, Fundamental Concepts, and a Standardized Approach to Applied Biomaterials Sciences, J.O. HollingerBiology, Biomechanics, Biomaterial Interactions: Wound Healing BiologyCutaneous Wound Pathobiology: Raison d'etre for Tissue Engineering, L.K. Macri and R.A.F. ClarkOsseous Wound Healing, A. Nawab, M. Wong, D. Kwak, L. Schutte, A. Sharma, and J.O. HollingerBiology, Biomechanics, Biomaterial Interactions: Cellular MechanicsCell and Tissue Mechanobiology, W. Guo, P. Alvarez, and Y. WangBiology, Biomechanics, Biomaterial Interactions: Materials-Host InteractionsCell-Material In

  7. Biomaterials for MEMS

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, Mu

    2011-01-01

    This book serves as a guide for practicing engineers, researchers, and students interested in MEMS devices that use biomaterials and biomedical applications. It is also suitable for engineers and researchers interested in MEMS and its applications but who do not have the necessary background in biomaterials.Biomaterials for MEMS highlights important features and issues of biomaterials that have been used in MEMS and biomedical areas. Hence this book is an essential guide for MEMS engineers or researchers who are trained in engineering institutes that do not provide the background or knowledge

  8. Evaluation of the sealing ability of bone cement as furcation perforation repair material when compared with mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium phosphate cement: An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Chordiya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was undertaken to compare the sealing ability of bone cement as furcation perforation repair material when compared with mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium phosphate cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 70 sound mandibular molars were selected for this study. The sample teeth were randomly divided into five groups: group I - n=20, perforation repair material used, mineral trioxide aggregate; group II - n=20, perforation repair material used, calcium phosphate cement; group III - n=20, perforation repair material used, bone cement; group IV - positive control, n=5, the furcation were not repaired with any material; group V - negative control, n=5, furcation area intact, no perforation done. The teeth were immersed in silver nitrate solution for 2 hours and then rinsed with photographic developer solution for 6 hours. They were then sectioned in a longitudinal direction and examined under a stereomicroscope. In each section the actual values of dye leakage were calculated from outer margins of perforation to the level of pulpal floor and were then subjected to statistical analysis. Results: An unpaired ′t′ test revealed that different groups exhibited significantly different dye penetrations (P<0.01. Conclusion: Furcation perforation repaired with MTA showed minimum microleakage (mean 54.5%, calcium phosphate cement showed maximum microleakage (100%, and bone cement showed moderate dye leakage (87.8%.

  9. Induction of angiogenesis in tissue-engineered scaffolds designed for bone repair: a combined gene therapy-cell transplantation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Starnes, Trevor; Khan, Yusuf M; Jiang, Tao; Wirtel, Anthony J; Deng, Meng; Lv, Qing; Nair, Lakshmi S; Doty, Steven B; Laurencin, Cato T

    2008-08-12

    One of the fundamental principles underlying tissue engineering approaches is that newly formed tissue must maintain sufficient vascularization to support its growth. Efforts to induce vascular growth into tissue-engineered scaffolds have recently been dedicated to developing novel strategies to deliver specific biological factors that direct the recruitment of endothelial cell (EC) progenitors and their differentiation. The challenge, however, lies in orchestration of the cells, appropriate biological factors, and optimal factor doses. This study reports an approach as a step forward to resolving this dilemma by combining an ex vivo gene transfer strategy and EC transplantation. The utility of this approach was evaluated by using 3D poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) sintered microsphere scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. Our goal was achieved by isolation and transfection of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) with adenovirus encoding the cDNA of VEGF. We demonstrated that the combination of VEGF releasing ADSCs and ECs results in marked vascular growth within PLAGA scaffolds. We thereby delineate the potential of ADSCs to promote vascular growth into biomaterials.

  10. Induction of angiogenesis in tissue-engineered scaffolds designed for bone repair: A combined gene therapy–cell transplantation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Starnes, Trevor; Khan, Yusuf M.; Jiang, Tao; Wirtel, Anthony J.; Deng, Meng; Lv, Qing; Nair, Lakshmi S.; Doty, Steven B.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2008-01-01

    One of the fundamental principles underlying tissue engineering approaches is that newly formed tissue must maintain sufficient vascularization to support its growth. Efforts to induce vascular growth into tissue-engineered scaffolds have recently been dedicated to developing novel strategies to deliver specific biological factors that direct the recruitment of endothelial cell (EC) progenitors and their differentiation. The challenge, however, lies in orchestration of the cells, appropriate biological factors, and optimal factor doses. This study reports an approach as a step forward to resolving this dilemma by combining an ex vivo gene transfer strategy and EC transplantation. The utility of this approach was evaluated by using 3D poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) sintered microsphere scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. Our goal was achieved by isolation and transfection of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) with adenovirus encoding the cDNA of VEGF. We demonstrated that the combination of VEGF releasing ADSCs and ECs results in marked vascular growth within PLAGA scaffolds. We thereby delineate the potential of ADSCs to promote vascular growth into biomaterials. PMID:18678895

  11. The Effect of Subcritical Bone Loss and Exposure on Recurrent Instability After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair in Intercollegiate American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Jonathan F; Owens, Brett D; Cameron, Kenneth L; DeBerardino, Thomas M; Masini, Brendan D; Peck, Karen Y; Svoboda, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal method of stabilization (arthroscopic or open) in collision athletes with anterior shoulder instability. To examine the effect of "subcritical" bone loss and football-specific exposure on the rate of recurrent shoulder instability after arthroscopic stabilization in an intercollegiate American football population. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Fifty intercollegiate football players underwent primary arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability and returned to football for at least a single season. Preoperatively, 32 patients experienced recurrent subluxations, and 18 patients experienced a single or recurrent dislocation. Shoulders with glenoid bone loss >20%, an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, an off-track lesion, and concomitant rotator cuff repair were excluded from the study. The primary outcome of interest was the ability to return to football without subsequent instability. Patients were followed for time to a subsequent instability event after return to play using days of exposure to football and total follow-up time after arthroscopic stabilization. Fifty consecutive patients returned to American football for a mean 1.5 seasons (range, 1-3) after arthroscopic stabilization. Three of 50 (6%; 95% CI, 1.3%-16.5%) patients experienced recurrent instability. There were no subsequent instability events after a mean 3.2 years of military service. All shoulders with glenoid bone loss >13.5% (n = 3) that underwent arthroscopic stabilization experienced recurrent instability upon returning to sport, while none of the shoulders with football ( X 2 = 15.80, P 13.5% glenoid bone loss had an incidence rate of 5.31 cases of recurrent instability per 1000 athlete-exposures of football. In 72,000 athlete-exposures to football with football players with <13.5% glenoid bone loss provides reliable outcomes and low recurrence rates.

  12. Mechanism of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in repairing hematopoietic injury in mice exposed to γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuibing; Hu Peizhen; Hou Ying; Li Xubo; Tian Qiong; Shi Mei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in repairing hematopoietic injury in mice irradiated with γ-ray. To prepare SRY gene probe and study the effect of rhBMP-2 in repairing hematopoietic injury in mice by in situ hybridization. Methods: Twenty-two BALB/c female mice were randomly divided into the irradiated group and BMP treated group, respectively. Bone marrow cells of normal male mice were transplanted into 22 female mice post-irradiation to 8.5 Gy of 60 Co γ rays. The left femurs of the survived female mice were re-irradiated with 9 Gy 14 days later. Mice in BMP treated group were given rhBMP-2 20 mg/kg while those in control group were treated with 0.9% saline by intraperitoneal injection every day for 6 days. These mice were killed 14 days later and paraffin sections of femurs were made. The SRY gene was detected with in situ hybridization. Results: There were more positive blots in the left femurs of the mice in irradiated group than those in BMP treated group (T=155.0, P 0.05). The number of positive blots in the left femurs of the mice in BMPtreated group was significantly less than those in the right femurs of the mice in two groups (T=155.0, 55.0, P<0.05). Conclusions: No donor cell of male mice was detected in the left femurs of BMP treated group, suggesting that rhBMP-2 promoted the restoration of residuary bone marrow cells. Thus, rhBMP-2 promotes the proliferation or differentiation of residuary mesenchymal stem cells, improves hematopoietic microenvironment and accelerates the hematopoietic restoration. (authors)

  13. Preparation and characterization of Sr-Ti-hardystonite (Sr-Ti-HT nanocomposite for bone repair application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mohammadi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Hardystonite (HT is Zn-modified silicate bioceramics with promising results for bone tissue regeneration. However, HT possesses no obvious apatite formation. Thus, in this study we incorporated Sr and Ti into HT to prepare Sr-Ti-hardystonite (Sr-Ti-HT nanocomposite and evaluated its in vitro bioactivity with the purpose of developing a more bioactive bone substitute material. Materials and methods:The HT and Sr-Ti-HT were prepared by mechanical milling and subsequent heat treatment. Calcium oxide (CaO, zinc oxide (ZnO and silicon dioxide (SiO2 (all from Merck were mixed with molar ratio of 2:1:2. The mixture of powders mixture was then milled in a planetary ball mill for 20 h. In the milling run, the ball-to-powder weight ratio was 10:1 and the rotational speed was 200 rpm. After synthesis of HT, 3% nanotitanium dioxide (TiO2, Degussa and 3% strontium carbonate (SrCO3, Merck were added to HT and then the mixture was ball milled and calcined at 1150°C for 6 h. Simultaneous thermal analysis (STA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR performed to characterize the powders. Results:XRD and FT-IR confirmed the crystal phase and silicate structure of HT and TEM images demonstrated the nanostructure of powders. Further, Sr-Ti-HT induced apatite formation and showed a higher human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs adhesion and proliferation compared to HT. Conclusion:Our study revealed that Sr-Ti-HT with a nanostructured crystal structure of 50 nm, can be prepared by mechanical activation to use as biomaterials for orthopedic applications.

  14. Warning About the Use of Critical-Size Defects for the Translational Study of Bone Repair: Analysis of a Sheep Tibial Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammens, Johan; Maréchal, Marina; Geris, Lisbet; Van der Aa, Joshua; Van Hauwermeiren, Hadewych; Luyten, Frank P; Delport, Hendrik

    2017-11-01

    The repair of large long bone defects requires complex surgical procedures as the bone loss cannot simply be replaced by autologous grafts due to an insufficient bone stock of the human body. Tissue engineering strategies and the use of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMPs) for these reconstructions remain a considerable challenge, in particular since robust outcomes in well-defined large animal models are lacking. To be suitable as a model for treatment of human sized bone defects, we developed a large animal model in both skeletally immature and mature sheep and made close observations on the spontaneous healing of defects. We warn for the spontaneous repair of large defects in immature animals, which can mask the (in)effectiveness of ATMP therapies, and propose the use of large 4.5 cm defects that are pretreated with a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) spacer in skeletally mature animals.

  15. Improved cartilage regeneration by implantation of acellular biomaterials after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, M.W.; Gonzales, V.K.; Buma, P.; Hout, J. in't; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Vries, R.B. de; Daamen, W.F.

    2016-01-01

    Microfracture surgery may be applied to treat cartilage defects. During the procedure the subchondral bone is penetrated, allowing bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to migrate towards the defect site and form new cartilage tissue. Microfracture surgery generally results in the formation of

  16. Paracrine effects of bone marrow soup restore organ function, regeneration, and repair in salivary glands damaged by irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D Tran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are reports that bone marrow cell (BM transplants repaired irradiated salivary glands (SGs and re-established saliva secretion. However, the mechanisms of action behind these reports have not been elucidated. METHODS: To test if a paracrine mechanism was the main effect behind this reported improvement in salivary organ function, whole BM cells were lysed and its soluble intracellular contents (termed as "BM Soup" injected into mice with irradiation-injured SGs. The hypothesis was that BM Soup would protect salivary cells, increase tissue neovascularization, function, and regeneration. Two minor aims were also tested a comparing two routes of delivering BM Soup, intravenous (I.V. versus intra-glandular injections, and b comparing the age of the BM Soup's donors. The treatment-comparison group consisted of irradiated mice receiving injections of living whole BM cells. Control mice received irradiation and injections of saline or sham-irradiation. All mice were followed for 8 weeks post-irradiation. RESULTS: BM Soup restored salivary flow rates to normal levels, protected salivary acinar, ductal, myoepithelial, and progenitor cells, increased cell proliferation and blood vessels, and up-regulated expression of tissue remodeling/repair/regenerative genes (MMP2, CyclinD1, BMP7, EGF, NGF. BM Soup was as an efficient therapeutic agent as injections of live BM cells. Both intra-glandular or I.V. injections of BM Soup, and from both young and older mouse donors were as effective in repairing irradiated SGs. The intra-glandular route reduced injection frequency/dosage by four-fold. CONCLUSION: BM Soup, which contains only the cell by-products, can be advantageously used to repair irradiation-damaged SGs rather than transplanting whole live BM cells which carry the risk of differentiating into unwanted/tumorigenic cell types in SGs.

  17. Paracrine effects of bone marrow soup restore organ function, regeneration, and repair in salivary glands damaged by irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Simon D; Liu, Younan; Xia, Dengsheng; Maria, Ola M; Khalili, Saeed; Wang, Renee Wan-Jou; Quan, Vu-Hung; Hu, Shen; Seuntjens, Jan

    2013-01-01

    There are reports that bone marrow cell (BM) transplants repaired irradiated salivary glands (SGs) and re-established saliva secretion. However, the mechanisms of action behind these reports have not been elucidated. To test if a paracrine mechanism was the main effect behind this reported improvement in salivary organ function, whole BM cells were lysed and its soluble intracellular contents (termed as "BM Soup") injected into mice with irradiation-injured SGs. The hypothesis was that BM Soup would protect salivary cells, increase tissue neovascularization, function, and regeneration. Two minor aims were also tested a) comparing two routes of delivering BM Soup, intravenous (I.V.) versus intra-glandular injections, and b) comparing the age of the BM Soup's donors. The treatment-comparison group consisted of irradiated mice receiving injections of living whole BM cells. Control mice received irradiation and injections of saline or sham-irradiation. All mice were followed for 8 weeks post-irradiation. BM Soup restored salivary flow rates to normal levels, protected salivary acinar, ductal, myoepithelial, and progenitor cells, increased cell proliferation and blood vessels, and up-regulated expression of tissue remodeling/repair/regenerative genes (MMP2, CyclinD1, BMP7, EGF, NGF). BM Soup was as an efficient therapeutic agent as injections of live BM cells. Both intra-glandular or I.V. injections of BM Soup, and from both young and older mouse donors were as effective in repairing irradiated SGs. The intra-glandular route reduced injection frequency/dosage by four-fold. BM Soup, which contains only the cell by-products, can be advantageously used to repair irradiation-damaged SGs rather than transplanting whole live BM cells which carry the risk of differentiating into unwanted/tumorigenic cell types in SGs.

  18. Smart Radiation Therapy Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Boateng, Francis; Kumar, Rajiv; Irvine, Darrell J; Formenti, Silvia; Ngoma, Twalib; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Hildenbrand, Georg Lars; Hausmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a crucial component of cancer care, used in the treatment of over 50% of cancer patients. Patients undergoing image guided RT or brachytherapy routinely have inert RT biomaterials implanted into their tumors. The single function of these RT biomaterials is to ensure geometric accuracy during treatment. Recent studies have proposed that the inert biomaterials could be upgraded to "smart" RT biomaterials, designed to do more than 1 function. Such smart biomaterials include next-generation fiducial markers, brachytherapy spacers, and balloon applicators, designed to respond to stimuli and perform additional desirable functions like controlled delivery of therapy-enhancing payloads directly into the tumor subvolume while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. More broadly, smart RT biomaterials may include functionalized nanoparticles that can be activated to boost RT efficacy. This work reviews the rationale for smart RT biomaterials, the state of the art in this emerging cross-disciplinary research area, challenges and opportunities for further research and development, and a purview of potential clinical applications. Applications covered include using smart RT biomaterials for boosting cancer therapy with minimal side effects, combining RT with immunotherapy or chemotherapy, reducing treatment time or health care costs, and other incipient applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Heterogeneity of Scaffold Biomaterials in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Edgar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering (TE offers a potential solution for the shortage of transplantable organs and the need for novel methods of tissue repair. Methods of TE have advanced significantly in recent years, but there are challenges to using engineered tissues and organs including but not limited to: biocompatibility, immunogenicity, biodegradation, and toxicity. Analysis of biomaterials used as scaffolds may, however, elucidate how TE can be enhanced. Ideally, biomaterials should closely mimic the characteristics of desired organ, their function and their in vivo environments. A review of biomaterials used in TE highlighted natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and decellularized organs as sources of scaffolding. Studies of discarded organs supported that decellularization offers a remedy to reducing waste of donor organs, but does not yet provide an effective solution to organ demand because it has shown varied success in vivo depending on organ complexity and physiological requirements. Review of polymer-based scaffolds revealed that a composite scaffold formed by copolymerization is more effective than single polymer scaffolds because it allows copolymers to offset disadvantages a single polymer may possess. Selection of biomaterials for use in TE is essential for transplant success. There is not, however, a singular biomaterial that is universally optimal.

  20. FUNCTIONAL BIOMATERIALS: Design of Novel Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakiyama-Elbert, Se; Hubbell, Ja

    2001-08-01

    The field of biomaterials has recently been focused on the design of intelligent materials. Toward this goal, materials have been developed that can provide specific bioactive signals to control the biological environment around them during the process of materials integration and wound healing. In addition, materials have been developed that can respond to changes in their environment, such as a change in pH or cell-associated enzymatic activity. In designing such novel biomaterials, researchers have sought not merely to create bio-inert materials, but rather materials that can respond to the cellular environment around them to improve device integration and tissue regeneration.

  1. Surgical repair of skull fractures in four horses using cuttable bone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, B A; Dart, A J; Trope, G

    2001-05-01

    Three horses with severely comminuted, open facial bone fractures and one horse with a comminuted, open orbital rim fracture were referred for treatment. Severe facial bone asymmetry and epistaxis were apparent in all cases and subcutaneous emphysema was present in two, however physical and neurological examinations were otherwise normal. Radiography and endoscopy were of some use in assessing the degree of damage, although the true extent of the damage was more apparent at surgery. Surgical reduction of the fractures was recommended to maximise cosmetic and functional outcome. After surgical debridement and reduction of the fractures the bone fragments remained unstable and were not amenable to stabilisation with interfragmentary wires alone, so 2 mm cuttable bone plates were used to maintain fracture alignment. Screw migration occurred in three horses and in one of these horses the plate had to be removed. Other complications were minor and in all horses the fractures healed with good cosmetic and functional outcome. The use of cuttable bone plates should be considered as a reasonable alternative to inter-fragmentary wiring for unstable, comminuted fractures of the facial bones, even where fractures are open.

  2. Biomaterials for artificial organs

    CERN Document Server

    Lysaght, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide demand for organ transplants far exceeds available donor organs. Consequently some patients die whilst waiting for a transplant. Synthetic alternatives are therefore imperative to improve the quality of, and in some cases, save people's lives. Advances in biomaterials have generated a range of materials and devices for use either outside the body or through implantation to replace or assist functions which may have been lost through disease or injury. Biomaterials for artificial organs reviews the latest developments in biomaterials and investigates how they can be used to improve the quality and efficiency of artificial organs. Part one discusses commodity biomaterials including membranes for oxygenators and plasmafilters, titanium and cobalt chromium alloys for hips and knees, polymeric joint-bearing surfaces for total joint replacements, biomaterials for pacemakers, defibrillators and neurostimulators and mechanical and bioprosthetic heart valves. Part two goes on to investigate advanced and ...

  3. Estudio experimental sobre la regeneración ósea mandibular de la rata con diferentes biomateriales Experimental study in rats of mandibular bone regeneration with different biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Peral Cagigal

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Los defectos óseos mandibulares resultantes de infecciones, traumatismos o resecciones oncológicas, van a producir severos problemas funcionales y/o estéticos, que van a precisar de un tratamiento complejo. Durante los últimos años, las aportaciones al terreno de la reconstrucción ósea se han debatido entre métodos tan dispares como la distracción ósea o la utilización de colgajos libres microvascularizados, pasando por un sin fin de biomateriales. El objetivo de este estudio fue comparar la formación de hueso nuevo tras la aplicación de una membrana reabsorbible y dos tipos de sustitutivos óseos. Material y método. Se utilizaron 24 ratas adultas macho tipo Wistar, en las que se crearon defectos circulares de 4 mm de diámetro en ambos lados de la mandíbula. Se formaron 4 grupos, un grupo control y 3 grupos experimentales. Los animales fueron sacrificados a las 3 y 6 semanas de la cirugía, realizándose un análisis radiológico e histológico. Resultados. Los defectos control no mostraron formación ósea, apareciendo una reparación por tejido fibroso. La membrana de hueso utilizada de forma aislada, actuó como una barrera eficaz excluyendo los tejidos no osteogénicos, pero no se produjo reparación total del defecto en ningún caso. El grupo de Colloss® y membrana, mostró una regeneración ósea completa del defecto a las 6 semanas. El grupo de NovaBone® y membrana, no mostró formación ósea, apareciendo las partículas del biomaterial ocupando el defecto. Conclusiones. La regeneración ósea fue significativamente mayor en los defectos rellenos con Colloss® y cubiertos con la membrana de Lambone®, comparado con los otros grupos experimentales.Objective. Mandibular bone defects can occur as a result of trauma, neoplasm, or infectious conditions. Such conditions often are associated with severe funtional and esthetic problems. Corrective treatment often is complicated by limitations in tissue adaptation. The

  4. Allogeneic versus autologous derived cell sources for use in engineered bone-ligament-bone grafts in sheep anterior cruciate ligament repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Horine, Storm V; Olsen, Tyler J; Smietana, Michael J; Wojtys, Edward M; Wellik, Deneen M; Arruda, Ellen M; Larkin, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    The use of autografts versus allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is controversial. The current popular options for ACL reconstruction are patellar tendon or hamstring autografts, yet advances in allograft technologies have made allogeneic grafts a favorable option for repair tissue. Despite this, the mismatched biomechanical properties and risk of osteoarthritis resulting from the current graft technologies have prompted the investigation of new tissue sources for ACL reconstruction. Previous work by our lab has demonstrated that tissue-engineered bone-ligament-bone (BLB) constructs generated from an allogeneic cell source develop structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL and vascular and neural structures that exceed those of autologous patellar tendon grafts. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered ligament constructs fabricated from autologous versus allogeneic cell sources. Our preliminary results demonstrate that 6 months postimplantation, our tissue-engineered auto- and allogeneic BLB grafts show similar histological and mechanical outcomes indicating that the autologous grafts are a viable option for ACL reconstruction. These data indicate that our tissue-engineered autologous ligament graft could be used in clinical situations where immune rejection and disease transmission may preclude allograft use.

  5. Advances in Osteobiologic Materials for Bone Substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Byambaa, Batzaya; Morshed, Mahboob; Cheikh, Mohammad Ibrahim; Shakoor, Rana Abdul; Mustafy, Tanvir; Marei, Hany

    2018-04-27

    A significant challenge in the current orthopedics is the development of suitable osteobiologic materials that can replace the conventional allografts, autografts and xenografts, and thereby serve as implant materials as bone substitutes for bone repair or remodeling. The complex biology behind the nano-microstructure of bones and their repair mechanisms, which involve various types of chemical and biomechanical signaling amongst different cells, has set strong requirements for biomaterials to be used in bone tissue engineering. This review presents an overview of various types of osteobiologic materials to facilitate the formation of the functional bone tissue and healing of the bone, covering metallic, ceramic, polymeric and cell-based graft substitutes, as well as some biomolecular strategies including stem cells, extracellular matrices, growth factors and gene therapies. Advantages and disadvantages of each type, particularly from the perspective of osteoinductive and osteoconductive capabilities, are discussed. Although the numerous challenges of bone regeneration in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are yet to be entirely addressed, further advancements in osteobiologic materials will pave the way towards engineering fully functional bone replacement grafts. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel hydroxyapatite biomaterial covalently linked to raloxifene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meme, L; Santarelli, A; Marzo, G; Emanuelli, M; Nocini, P F; Bertossi, D; Putignano, A; Dioguardi, M; Lo Muzio, L; Bambini, F

    2014-01-01

    Since raloxifene, a drug used in osteoporosis therapy, inhibits osteoclast, but not osteoblast functions, it has been suggested to improve recovery during implant surgery. The present paper describes an effective method to link raloxifene, through a covalent bond, to a nano-Hydroxyapatite-based biomaterial by interfacing with (3-aminopropyl)-Triethoxysilane as assessed by Infra Red-Fourier Transformed (IR-FT) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). To evaluate the safety of this modified new material, the vitality of osteoblast-like cells cultured with the new biomaterial was then investigated. Raloxifene-conjugated HAbiomaterial has been shown to be a safe material easy to obtain which could be an interesting starting point for the use of a new functional biomaterial suitable in bone regeneration procedures.

  7. Drug-Loadable Calcium Alginate Hydrogel System for Use in Oral Bone Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luyuan; Shen, Renze; Komasa, Satoshi; Xue, Yanxiang; Jin, Bingyu; Hou, Yepo; Okazaki, Joji; Gao, Jie

    2017-05-06

    This study developed a drug-loadable hydrogel system with high plasticity and favorable biological properties to enhance oral bone tissue regeneration. Hydrogels of different calcium alginate concentrations were prepared. Their swelling ratio, degradation time, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) release rate were measured. Human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured with both calcium alginate hydrogels and polylactic acid (PLA), and then we examined the proliferation of cells. Inflammatory-related factor gene expressions of hPDLCs and osteogenesis-related gene expressions of BMSCs were observed. Materials were implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of rabbits to determine the biosecurity properties of the materials. The materials were also implanted in mandibular bone defects and then scanned using micro-CT. The calcium alginate hydrogels caused less inflammation than the PLA. The number of mineralized nodules and the expression of osteoblast-related genes were significantly higher in the hydrogel group compared with the control group. When the materials were implanted in subcutaneous tissue, materials showed favorable biocompatibility. The calcium alginate hydrogels had superior osteoinductive bone ability to the PLA. The drug-loadable calcium alginate hydrogel system is a potential bone defect reparation material for clinical dental application.

  8. Cellular compatibility of nanocomposite scaffolds based on hydroxyapatite entrapped in cellulose network for bone repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beladi, Faranak [Material and Biomaterial Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saber-Samandari, Samaneh, E-mail: samaneh.saber@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Eastern Mediterranean University, Gazimagusa, TRNC via Mersin 10 (Turkey); Saber-Samandari, Saeed, E-mail: saeedss@aut.ac.ir [New Technologies Research Center, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-01

    In the past few decades, artificial graft materials for bone tissue engineering have gained much importance. In this study, novel porous 3D nanocomposite scaffolds composed of polyacrylamide grafted cellulose and hydroxyapatite were proposed. They were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The swelling behavior of the scaffolds was examined in both water and phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution. The cytotoxicity of the scaffolds was determined by MTT assays on human fibroblast gum (HuGu) cells. Results showed that the nanocomposite scaffolds were highly porous with maximum porosity of 85.7% interconnected with a pore size of around 72–125 μm. The results of cell culture experiments showed that the scaffolds extracts do not have cytotoxicity in any concentration. Obtained results suggested that the introduced scaffolds are comparable with the trabecular bone from the compositional, structural, and mechanical perspectives and have a great potential as a bone substitute. - Highlights: • A series of biocompatible scaffolds were synthesized through a novel multi-step route. • The porosity increased by increasing n-HAp amounts in the structure of the scaffold. • The mechanical properties of the scaffolds were found close to those of trabecular bone. • The results suggest that the scaffold extracts do not have any cell cytotoxicity. • The scaffold can be efficient as a bioactive bone implant for tissue engineering.

  9. Cellular compatibility of nanocomposite scaffolds based on hydroxyapatite entrapped in cellulose network for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beladi, Faranak; Saber-Samandari, Samaneh; Saber-Samandari, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    In the past few decades, artificial graft materials for bone tissue engineering have gained much importance. In this study, novel porous 3D nanocomposite scaffolds composed of polyacrylamide grafted cellulose and hydroxyapatite were proposed. They were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The swelling behavior of the scaffolds was examined in both water and phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution. The cytotoxicity of the scaffolds was determined by MTT assays on human fibroblast gum (HuGu) cells. Results showed that the nanocomposite scaffolds were highly porous with maximum porosity of 85.7% interconnected with a pore size of around 72–125 μm. The results of cell culture experiments showed that the scaffolds extracts do not have cytotoxicity in any concentration. Obtained results suggested that the introduced scaffolds are comparable with the trabecular bone from the compositional, structural, and mechanical perspectives and have a great potential as a bone substitute. - Highlights: • A series of biocompatible scaffolds were synthesized through a novel multi-step route. • The porosity increased by increasing n-HAp amounts in the structure of the scaffold. • The mechanical properties of the scaffolds were found close to those of trabecular bone. • The results suggest that the scaffold extracts do not have any cell cytotoxicity. • The scaffold can be efficient as a bioactive bone implant for tissue engineering.

  10. Visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-ping Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T 7-8 . Superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord via the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic field was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunofluorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guidance. Our data confirm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic field guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively tracked in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury.

  11. Disruption of Runx1 and Runx3 Leads to Bone Marrow Failure and Leukemia Predisposition due to Transcriptional and DNA Repair Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsia Qiuxia Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The RUNX genes encode transcription factors involved in development and human disease. RUNX1 and RUNX3 are frequently associated with leukemias, yet the basis for their involvement in leukemogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we show that Runx1;Runx3 double-knockout (DKO mice exhibited lethal phenotypes due to bone marrow failure and myeloproliferative disorder. These contradictory clinical manifestations are reminiscent of human inherited bone marrow failure syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA, caused by defective DNA repair. Indeed, Runx1;Runx3 DKO cells showed mitomycin C hypersensitivity, due to impairment of monoubiquitinated-FANCD2 recruitment to DNA damage foci, although FANCD2 monoubiquitination in the FA pathway was unaffected. RUNX1 and RUNX3 interact with FANCD2 independently of CBFβ, suggesting a nontranscriptional role for RUNX in DNA repair. These findings suggest that RUNX dysfunction causes DNA repair defect, besides transcriptional misregulation, and promotes the development of leukemias and other cancers.

  12. Obtaining new composite biomaterials by means of mineralization of methacrylate hydrogels using the reaction–diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, Yousof; González-Sánchez, M. Isabel; Hawkins, Karl; Rubio-Retama, Jorge; Valero, Edelmira; Perni, Stefano; Prokopovich, Polina; López-Cabarcos, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The present paper describes the synthesis and characterization of a new polymeric biomaterial mineralized with calcium phosphate using the reaction–diffusion method. The scaffold of this biomaterial was a hydrogel constituted by biocompatible polyethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMEM) and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEM), which were cross-linked with N-N’-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS). The cross-linking content of the hydrogels was varied from 0.25% to 15% (w/w). The gels were used as matrix where two reactants (Na 2 HPO 4 and CaCl 2 ) diffused from both ends of the gel and upon encountering produced calcium phosphate crystals that precipitated within the polymer matrix forming bands. The shape of the crystals was tuned by modifying the matrix porosity in such a way that when the polymer matrix was slightly reticulated the diffusion reaction produced round calcium phosphate microcrystals, whilst when the polymer matrix was highly reticulated the reaction yielded flat calcium phosphate crystals. Selected area electron diffraction performed on the nanocrystals that constitute the microcrystals showed that they were formed by Brushite (CaHPO 4 .2H 2 O). This new composite material could be useful in medical and dentistry applications such as bone regeneration, bone repair or tissue engineering. - Highlights: • New polymeric biomaterial mineralized with calcium phosphate using the reaction-diffusion method.-Growing of brushite nanocrystals within a polymeric matrix. • Mineralization by reaction diffusion method controls the crystal growth within gels

  13. Development of a Functional Schwann Cell Phenotype from Autologous Porcine Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for Nerve Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Rutten

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs are a potential resource for making Schwann cells to repair damaged peripheral nerves. However, many methods of producing Schwann-like cells can be laborious with the cells lacking a functional phenotype. The objective of this study was to develop a simple and rapid method using autologous BM-MNCs to produce a phenotypic and functional Schwann-like cell. Adult porcine bone marrow was collected and enriched for BM-MNCs using a SEPAX device, then cells cultured in Neurobasal media, 4 mM L-glutamine and 20% serum. After 6–8 days, the cultures expressed Schwann cell markers, S-100, O4, GFAP, were FluoroMyelin positive, but had low p75(NGF expression. Addition of neuregulin (1–25 nM increased p75(NGF levels at 24–48 hrs. We found ATP dose-dependently increased intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i, with nucleotide potency being UTP=ATP>ADP>AMP>adenosine. Suramin blocked the ATP-induced [Ca2+]i but α, β,-methylene-ATP had little effect suggesting an ATP purinergic P2Y2 G-protein-coupled receptor is present. Both the Schwann cell markers and ATP-induced [Ca2+]i sensitivity decreased in cells passaged >20 times. Our studies indicate that autologous BM-MNCs can be induced to form a phenotypic and functional Schwann-like cell which could be used for peripheral nerve repair.

  14. Does footprint preparation influence tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair in an animal model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficklscherer, Andreas; Loitsch, Thomas; Serr, Michaela; Gülecyüz, Mehmet F; Niethammer, Thomas R; Müller, Hans-Helge; Milz, Stefan; Pietschmann, Matthias F; Müller, Peter E

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of footprint spongialization and radiofrequency ablation on rotator cuff repair outcomes compared with an untreated group in a rat model. We randomly assigned 189 Sprague-Dawley rats to either a spongialization, radiofrequency ablation, or untreated group. After separation of the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tubercle, the footprint was prepared by removing the cortical bone with a burr (spongialization), was prepared by ablating soft tissue with a radiofrequency ablation device, or was left unaltered (untreated). Biomechanical testing (after 7 weeks, n = 165) and histologic analysis after 1 and 7 weeks (n = 24) followed reinsertion. The mean load to failure was 17.51 ± 4.46 N/mm(2) in the spongialization group, 15.56 ± 4.85 N/mm(2) in the radiofrequency ablation group, and 19.21 ± 5.19 N/mm(2) in the untreated group. A significant difference was found between the spongialization and radiofrequency ablation groups (P = .0409), as well as between the untreated and radiofrequency ablation groups (P = .0014). There was no significant difference between the spongialization and untreated groups (P = .2456). The mean area of fibrocartilage transition, characterized by the presence of type II collagen, was larger after 1 and 7 weeks in the spongialization group (0.57 ± 0.1 mm(2) and 0.58 ± 0.1 mm(2), respectively) and untreated group (0.51 ± 0.1 mm(2) and 0.51 ± 0.2 mm(2), respectively) than in the radiofrequency ablation group (0.11 ± 0.1 mm(2) and 0.4 ± 0.1 mm(2), respectively) with P rotator cuff repair may influence tendon-to-bone healing. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of platelet-rich plasma on fibrocartilage, cartilage, and bone repair in temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kütük, Nükhet; Baş, Burcu; Soylu, Emrah; Gönen, Zeynep Burçin; Yilmaz, Canay; Balcioğlu, Esra; Özdamar, Saim; Alkan, Alper

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the potential use of platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) in the treatment of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). Surgical defects were created bilaterally on the condylar fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone to induce an osteoarthritic TMJ in rabbits. PRP was applied to the right joints of the rabbits (PRP group), and the left joints received physiologic saline (control group). After 4 weeks, the rabbits were sacrificed for histologic and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations. The data were analyzed statistically. The new bone regeneration was significantly greater in the PRP group (P fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage was greater in the PRP group, no statistically significant difference was found between the 2 groups. SEM showed better ultrastructural architecture of the collagen fibrils in the PRP group. PRP might enhance the regeneration of bone in TMJ-OA. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Additively manufactured metallic porous biomaterials based on minimal surfaces: A unique combination of topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, F S L; Lietaert, K; Eftekhari, A A; Pouran, B; Ahmadi, S M; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2017-04-15

    Porous biomaterials that simultaneously mimic the topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties of bone are in great demand but are rarely found in the literature. In this study, we rationally designed and additively manufactured (AM) porous metallic biomaterials based on four different types of triply periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS) that mimic the properties of bone to an unprecedented level of multi-physics detail. Sixteen different types of porous biomaterials were rationally designed and fabricated using selective laser melting (SLM) from a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). The topology, quasi-static mechanical properties, fatigue resistance, and permeability of the developed biomaterials were then characterized. In terms of topology, the biomaterials resembled the morphological properties of trabecular bone including mean surface curvatures close to zero. The biomaterials showed a favorable but rare combination of relatively low elastic properties in the range of those observed for trabecular bone and high yield strengths exceeding those reported for cortical bone. This combination allows for simultaneously avoiding stress shielding, while providing ample mechanical support for bone tissue regeneration and osseointegration. Furthermore, as opposed to other AM porous biomaterials developed to date for which the fatigue endurance limit has been found to be ≈20% of their yield (or plateau) stress, some of the biomaterials developed in the current study show extremely high fatigue resistance with endurance limits up to 60% of their yield stress. It was also found that the permeability values measured for the developed biomaterials were in the range of values reported for trabecular bone. In summary, the developed porous metallic biomaterials based on TPMS mimic the topological, mechanical, and physical properties of trabecular bone to a great degree. These properties make them potential candidates to be applied as parts of orthopedic implants and/or as bone

  17. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Generate Muscle Cells and Repair Muscle Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezawa, Mari; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Itokazu, Yutaka; Yoshihara, Tomoyuki; Hoshino, Mikio; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Ide, Chizuka; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2005-07-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) have great potential as therapeutic agents. We report a method for inducing skeletal muscle lineage cells from human and rat general adherent MSCs with an efficiency of 89%. Induced cells differentiated into muscle fibers upon transplantation into degenerated muscles of rats and mdx-nude mice. The induced population contained Pax7-positive cells that contributed to subsequent regeneration of muscle upon repetitive damage without additional transplantation of cells. These MSCs represent a more ready supply of myogenic cells than do the rare myogenic stem cells normally found in muscle and bone marrow.

  18. Repair of segmental load-bearing bone defect by autologous mesenchymal stem cells and plasma-derived fibrin impregnated ceramic block results in early recovery of limb function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Min Hwei; Duski, Suryasmi; Tan, Kok Keong; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Low, Kiat Cheong; Rose, Isa Mohamed; Mohamed, Zahiah; Bin Saim, Aminuddin; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes have not been used to repair load-bearing bone defects due to their weak mechanical property. In this study, we reevaluated the functional outcomes of combining ceramic block with osteogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma (TEB) to repair critical-sized segmental tibial defect. Comparisons were made with fresh marrow-impregnated ceramic block (MIC) and partially demineralized allogeneic bone block (ALLO). Six New Zealand White female rabbits were used in each study group and three rabbits with no implants were used as negative controls. By Day 90, 4/6 rabbits in TEB group and 2/6 in ALLO and MIC groups resumed normal gait pattern. Union was achieved significantly faster in TEB group with a radiological score of 4.50 ± 0.78 versus ALLO (1.06 ± 0.32), MIC (1.28 ± 0.24), and negative controls (0). Histologically, TEB group scored the highest percentage of new bone (82% ± 5.1%) compared to ALLO (5% ± 2.5%) and MIC (26% ± 5.2%). Biomechanically, TEB-treated tibiae achieved the highest compressive strength (43.50 ± 12.72 MPa) compared to those treated with ALLO (15.15 ± 3.57 MPa) and MIC (23.28 ± 6.14 MPa). In conclusion, TEB can repair critical-sized segmental load-bearing bone defects and restore limb function.

  19. Effects of calcium phosphate/chitosan composite on bone healing in rats: calcium phosphate induces osteon formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Tulio; Olave, Gilberto; Valencia, Carlos H; Arce, Sandra; Quinn, Julian M W; Thouas, George A; Chen, Qi-Zhi

    2014-07-01

    Vascularization of an artificial graft represents one of the most significant challenges facing the field of bone tissue engineering. Over the past decade, strategies to vascularize artificial scaffolds have been intensively evaluated using osteoinductive calcium phosphate (CaP) biomaterials in animal models. In this work, we observed that CaP-based biomaterials implanted into rat calvarial defects showed remarkably accelerated formation and mineralization of new woven bone in defects in the initial stages, at a rate of ∼60 μm/day (0.8 mg/day), which was considerably higher than normal bone growth rates (several μm/day, 0.1 mg/day) in implant-free controls of the same age. Surprisingly, we also observed histological evidence of primary osteon formation, indicated by blood vessels in early-region fibrous tissue, which was encapsulated by lamellar osteocyte structures. These were later fully replaced by compact bone, indicating complete regeneration of calvarial bone. Thus, the CaP biomaterial used here is not only osteoinductive, but vasculogenic, and it may have contributed to the bone regeneration, despite an absence of osteons in normal rat calvaria. Further investigation will involve how this strategy can regulate formation of vascularized cortical bone such as by control of degradation rate, and use of models of long, dense bones, to more closely approximate repair of human cortical bone.

  20. Comparative study of the application of microcurrent and AsGa 904 nm laser radiation in the process of repair after calvaria bone excision in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonça, J S; Neves, L M G; Esquisatto, M A M; Mendonça, F A S; Santos, G M T

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of microcurrent stimulation (10 μA/5 min) and 904 nm GaAs laser irradiation (3 J cm −2 for 69 s/day) on excisional lesions created in the calvaria bone of Wistar rats. The results showed significant responses in the reduction of inflammatory cells and an increase in the number of new blood vessels, number of fibroblasts and deposition of birefringent collagen fibers when these data were compared with those of samples of the untreated lesions. Both applications, microcurrent and laser at 904 nm, favored tissue repair in the region of bone excisions during the study period and these techniques can be used as coadjuvantes in the repair of bone tissue. (paper)

  1. Adverse Biological Effect of TiO2 and Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles Used in Bone Repair and Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangxue Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The adverse biological effect of nanoparticles is an unavoidable scientific problem because of their small size and high surface activity. In this review, we focus on nano-hydroxyapatite and TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs to clarify the potential systemic toxicological effect and cytotoxic response of wear nanoparticles because they are attractive materials for bone implants and are widely investigated to promote the repair and reconstruction of bone. The wear nanoparticles would be prone to binding with proteins to form protein-particle complexes, to interacting with visible components in the blood including erythrocytes, leukocytes, and platelets, and to being phagocytosed by macrophages or fibroblasts to deposit in the local tissue, leading to the formation of fibrous local pseudocapsules. These particles would also be translocated to and disseminated into the main organs such as the lung, liver and spleen via blood circulation. The inflammatory response, oxidative stress, and signaling pathway are elaborated to analyze the potential toxicological mechanism. Inhibition of the oxidative stress response and signaling transduction may be a new therapeutic strategy for wear debris–mediated osteolysis. Developing biomimetic materials with better biocompatibility is our goal for orthopedic implants.

  2. New biomaterials for orthopedic implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong KL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kevin L Ong, Brian Min Yun, Joshua B WhiteExponent, Inc., Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: With the increasing use of orthopedic implants worldwide, there continues to be great interest in the development of novel technologies to further improve the effective clinical performance of contemporary treatment modalities and devices. Continuing research interest also exists in developing novel bulk biomaterials (eg, polycarbonate urethanes, silicon or novel formulations of existing but less widely used biomaterials (eg, polyaryletherketones, polyetheretherketone. There is also growing focus on customizing the material properties of bioabsorbables and composite materials with fillers such as bioactive ceramics. In terms of tissue engineering, more recent developments have focused on basic engineering and biological fundamentals to use cells, signaling factors, and the scaffold material itself to better restore tissue and organ structure and function. There has also been recent controversy with the use of injectables as a nonsurgical approach to treat joint disorders, but more attention is being directed toward the development of newer formulations with different molecular weights. The industry has also continuously sought to improve coatings to supplement the function of existing implants, with the goal of improving their osseointegrative qualities and incorporating antimicrobial properties. These include the use of bone morphogenetic protein, bisphosphonates, calcium phosphate, silicon nitride, and iodine. Due to the widespread use of bone graft materials, recent developments in synthetic graft materials have explored further development of bioactive glass, ceramic materials, and porous titanium particles. This review article provides an overview of ongoing efforts in the above research areas.Keywords: coatings, scaffolds, bioabsorbables, bone graft, injectables

  3. Improvement of in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement for bone repair by dicalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Chien-Wen; Hsueh, Nai-Shuo; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2014-01-01

    bone defect repair

  4. Biofilm and Dental Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Øilo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All treatment involving the use of biomaterials in the body can affect the host in positive or negative ways. The microbiological environment in the oral cavity is affected by the composition and shape of the biomaterials used for oral restorations. This may impair the patients’ oral health and sometimes their general health as well. Many factors determine the composition of the microbiota and the formation of biofilm in relation to biomaterials such as, surface roughness, surface energy and chemical composition, This paper aims to give an overview of the scientific literature regarding the association between the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of dental biomaterials and oral biofilm formation, with emphasis on current research and future perspectives.

  5. Biomaterials a basic introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Qizhi

    2014-01-01

    Part IBiomaterials ScienceBiomaterials Science and EngineeringLearning ObjectivesMaterials Science and EngineeringMultilevels of Structure and Categorization of MaterialsFour Categories of MaterialsDefinitions of Biomaterials, Biomedical Materials, and Biological MaterialsBiocompatibilityChapter HighlightsActivitiesSimple Questions in ClassProblems and ExercisesBibliographyToxicity and CorrosionLearning ObjectivesElements in the BodyBiological Roles and Toxicities of Trace ElementsSelection of Metallic Elements in Medical-Grade AlloysCorrosion of MetalsEnvironment inside the BodyMinimization of Toxicity of Metal ImplantsChapter HighlightsLaboratory Practice 1Simple Questions in ClassProblems and ExercisesAdvanced Topic: Biological Roles of Alloying ElementsBibliographyMechanical Properties of BiomaterialsLearning ObjectivesRole of Implant BiomaterialsMechanical Properties of General ImportanceHardnessElasticity: Resilience and StrechabilityMechanical Properties Terms Used in the Medical CommunityFailureEssent...

  6. Biomaterials in Artificial Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambic, Helen E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Biomaterials are substances or combinations of substances that can be used in a system that treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ, or body function. The nature and role of these substances, particularly in the cadiovascular system, are discussed. (JN)

  7. Designer biomaterials for mechanobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linqing; Eyckmans, Jeroen; Chen, Christopher S.

    2017-12-01

    Biomaterials engineered with specific bioactive ligands, tunable mechanical properties and complex architecture have emerged as powerful tools to probe cell sensing and response to physical properties of their material surroundings, and ultimately provide designer approaches to control cell function.

  8. Bone repair after osteotomy with diamond burs and CVD ultrasonic tips – histological study in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Matuda, Fábio S.; Pagani, Clovis; Miranda, Carolina B.; Crema, Aline A. S.; Brentel, Aline S.; Carvalho, Yasmin R.

    2010-01-01

    This study histologically evaluated the behavior of bone tissue of rats submitted to osteotomy with conventional diamond burs in high speed and a new ultrasonic diamond tips system (CVD – Chemical Vapor Deposition), at different study periods. The study was conducted on 24 Wistar rats. Osteotomy was performed on the posterior paws of each rat, with utilization of diamond burs in high speed under thorough water cooling at the right paw, and CVD tips at the left paw. Animals were killed a...

  9. In situ repair of bone and cartilage defects using 3D scanning and 3D printing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lan; Yu, Fei; Shi, Jianping; Shen, Sheng; Teng, Huajian; Yang, Jiquan; Wang, Xingsong; Jiang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a rapidly emerging technology that promises to transform tissue engineering into a commercially successful biomedical industry. However, the use of robotic bioprinters alone is not sufficient for disease treatment. This study aimed to report the combined application of 3D scanning and 3D printing for treating bone and cartilage defects. Three different kinds of defect models were created to mimic three orthopedic diseases: large segmental defects of long bon...

  10. Gamma irradiation processing of Hydroxyapatite/poly-L-lactide composite biomaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suljovrujic, E.; Ignjatovic, N.; Uskokovic, D.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. As is well known, Hydroxyapatite/poly-L-lactide (HAp/PLLA) is a composite biomaterial, used for substitution and repair of hard bone tissue. It consists of a non-bioresorptive ceramic (HAp) and a bioresorptive polymer PLLA component, with mechanical properties similar to those of bones can be produced. On the other hand, a radiation processing is a main wide used step in certain modern technologies, and can be utilized for sterilization of implants based on sensitive polymers and composites. In this paper, the relation between the structure and properties is investigated for the case of HAp/PLLA composite where structure changes are created by gamma irradiation. The irradiation, to various absorbed doses (10, 25, 50, 100 and 300 KGy) of gamma radiation, was performed in a 60 Co radiation facility, in air at room temperature, at a dose rate of 9 kGy/h. Since the morphology of Hap/PLLA composite biomaterial is very sensitive to these procedures, surface microstructure was analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Structural changes occurring in the material, mostly changes in PLLA, which is more sensitive to irradiation than HAp, were studied by wade angle X-ray structural analyses (WAXS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements (DSC) were used to study the changes in thermal behaviour and crystallinity. Effects of radiation on the HAp/PLLA composite thermal stability were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Conclusions derived using different methods were compared

  11. Effect of single- and double-row rotator cuff repair at the tendon-to-bone interface: preliminary results using an in vivo sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, M H; Schminke, B; Posmyk, A; Miosge, N; Klinger, H-M; Lakemeier, S

    2015-01-01

    The clinical superiority of the double-row technique is still a subject of controversial debate in rotator cuff repair. We hypothesised that the expression of different collagen types will differ between double-row and single-row rotator cuff repair indicating a faster healing response by the double-row technique. Twenty-four mature female sheep were randomly assembled to two different groups in which a surgically created acute infraspinatus tendon tear was fixed using either a modified single- or double-row repair technique. Shoulder joints from female sheep cadavers of identical age, bone maturity, and weight served as untreated control cluster. Expression of type I, II, and III collagen was observed in the tendon-to-bone junction along with recovering changes in the fibrocartilage zone after immunohistological tissue staining at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 26 weeks postoperatively. Expression of type III collagen remained positive until 6 weeks after surgery in the double-row group, whereas it was detectable for 12 weeks in the single-row group. In both groups, type I collagen expression increased after 12 weeks. Type II collagen expression was increased after 12 weeks in the double-row versus single-row group. Clusters of chondrocytes were only visible between week 6 and 12 in the double-row group. The study demonstrates differences regarding the expression of type I and type III collagen in the tendon-to-bone junction following double-row rotator cuff repair compared to single-row repair. The healing response in this acute repair model is faster in the double-row group during the investigated healing period.

  12. Effect of platelet-rich plasma on tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair in rats: an in vivo experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapa, Onur; Cakıcı, Hüsamettin; Kükner, Aysel; Aygün, Hayati; Sarkalan, Nazlı; Baysal, Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to analyze the effects of local autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection on tendon-to-bone healing in a rotator cuff repair model in rats. Rotator cuff injury was created in 68 left shoulders of rats. PRP was obtained from the blood of an additional 15 rats. The 68 rats were divided into 4 groups with 17 rats in each group; PRP group (Week 2), control group (Week 2), PRP group (Week 4), and control group (Week 4). Platelet-rich plasma or saline was injected to the repair area intraoperatively. Rats were sacrificed 2 and 4 weeks after the surgery. Histological analysis using a semiquantitative scoring was performed on 7 rats per group. Tendon integrity and increases in vascularity and inflammatory cells and the degree of new bone formation were evaluated and compared between the groups. The remaining tendons (n=10) were mechanically tested. Degree of inflammation and vascularity were less in the study group at both time intervals (protator cuff tendon-to-bone healing and enhance initial tendon-to-bone healing remodeling. This may represent a clinically important improvement in rotator cuff repair.

  13. Microscopic and radiographic analysis of the effect of particle size of demineralized bovine cancellous bone matrix on the repair of bone defects in femurs of rabbits Análise microscópica e radiográfica do efeito do tamanho das partículas de matriz de osso medular bovino desmineralizado na reparação de defeito ósseo em fêmures de coelhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everdan Carneiro

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The bone tissue has a great regenerative potential, with ability to completely restore its structure and original functions. In some situations, though, bone defects cannot be self-repaired, thus requiring the use of grafts for a correct treatment and good prognosis. This work aimed at microscopically analyzing the effect of the particle size of demineralized bovine cancellous bone matrix in micro and macrogranular forms on the repair of bone defects in femurs of rabbits, with blood clot used as control. At 1, 3 and 6 months after implantation of the materials, the animals were killed and the anatomic specimens were removed. A foreign body-type granulomatous reaction containing macrophages and multinucleated giant cells in contact with the implanted particles was observed. These results suggest a failure in demineralization and/or interruption of the antigenic potential during production of the biomaterial. It is concluded that the size of the particles did not influence the evolution of the repair process of bone defects, acting only as bone-filler substances, and that the material implanted should be improved by quality control during production, since it may represent a good alternative for bone graft.O tecido ósseo possui grande potencial regenerativo com capacidade para restaurar completamente sua estrutura e função originais. Há situações em que os defeitos ósseos não conseguem por si só obter o reparo, casos em que se fazem necessários o uso de enxertos, para um correto tratamento e bom prognóstico. Este experimento teve o propósito de analisar microscopicamente o efeito do tamanho das partículas de matriz de osso medular bovino desmineralizado, nas formas micro e macrogranular, na reparação de defeito ósseo em fêmures de coelhos, tendo como controle o coágulo sanguíneo. Após 1,3 e 6 meses da implantação dos materiais, os animais foram mortos e as peças anatômicas removidas. Uma reação granulomatosa tipo corpo

  14. Radiation produced biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiak, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Medical advances that have prolonged the average life span have generated increased need for new materials that can be used as tissue and organ replacements, drug delivery systems and/or components of devices related to therapy and diagnosis. The first man-made plastic used as surgical implant was celluloid, applied for cranial defect repair. However, the first users applied commercial materials with no regard for their purity, biostability and post-operative interaction with the organism. Thus, these materials evoked a strong tissue reaction and were unacceptable. The first polymer which gained acceptance for man-made plastic was poly(methyl methacrylate). But the first polymer of choice, precursor of the broad class of materials known today as hydrogels, was poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) synthesized in the fifties by Wichterle and Lim. HEMA and its various combinations with other, both hydrophilic and hydrophobic, polymers are till now the most often used hydrogels for medical purposes. In the early fifties, the pioneers of the radiation chemistry of polymers began some experiments with radiation crosslinking, also with hydrophilic polymers. However, hydrogels were analyzed mainly from the point of view of phenomena associated with mechanism of reactions, topology of network, and relations between radiation parameters of the processes. Fundamental monographs on radiation polymer physics and chemistry written by Charlesby (1960) and Chapiro (1962) proceed from this time. The noticeable interest in application of radiation to obtain hydrogels for biomedical purposes began in the late sixties as a result of the papers and patents published by Japanese and American scientists. Among others, the team of the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment headed by Kaetsu as well as Hoffman and his colleagues from the Center of Bioengineering, University of Washington have created the base for spreading interest in the field of biomaterials formed by means of

  15. In vitro evaluation of three different biomaterials as scaffolds for canine mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oduvaldo Câmara Marques Pereira-Junior

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate in vitro ability the of three different biomaterials - purified hydroxyapatite, demineralized bone matrix and castor oil-based polyurethane - as biocompatible 3D scaffolds for canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC intending bone tissue engineering. METHODS: MSCs were isolated from canine bone marrow, characterized and cultivated for seven days with the biomaterials. Cell proliferation and adhesion to the biomaterial surface were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy while differentiation into osteogenic lineage was evaluated by Alizarin Red staining and Sp7/Osterix surface antibody marker. RESULTS: The biomaterials allowed cellular growth, attachment and proliferation. Osteogenic differentiation occurred in the presence of hydroxyapatite, and matrix deposition commenced in the presence of the castor oil-based polyurethane. CONCLUSION: All the tested biomaterials may be used as mesenchymal stem cell scaffolds in cell-based orthopedic reconstructive therapy.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of novel biomimetic PLLA/cellulose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for bone repair applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eftekhari, Samin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3 (Canada); El Sawi, Ihab; Bagheri, Zahra Shaghayegh [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3 (Canada); Turcotte, Ginette [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3 (Canada); Bougherara, Habiba, E-mail: habiba.bougherara@ryerson.ca [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop and characterize a novel biomimetic nanocomposite that closely mimics the properties of real bone such as morphology, composition and mechanical characteristics. This novel porous nanocomposite is composed of cotton-sourced cellulose microcrystals, hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and poly L-lactide acid. A unique combination of commonly used fabrication procedures has been developed including pre-treatment of particles using a coupling agent. The effect of various weight ratios of the reinforcing agents was evaluated to assess their influence on the chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites. The prepared nanocomposites were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and compression testing. Our results indicated the presence of molecular interactions between all components leading to an increase of the crystallinity of the polymer from 50% to 80%. Compression test results revealed that increasing the weight ratio of microcrystalline cellulose/poly L-lactide acid and hydroxyapatite/poly L-lactide acid from 0.1 to 0.5 enhanced the compressive yield stress from 0.127 to 2.2 MPa and The Young's modulus from 6.6 to 38 MPa, respectively. It was found that the fabricated nanocomposites are comparable with the trabecular bone from compositional, structural, and mechanical point of view. - Highlights: • Fabrication of PLLA/HA/cellulose composites that mimic the spongeous bone • Homogenous dispersion of the reinforcing agents in the PLLA matrix was attained. • More efficient interface between the PLLA and the reinforcing agents was achieved. • Preliminary in vitro biocompatibility test showed the nontoxicity of the composite. • The crystallinity, the compressive strength and modulus were investigated.

  17. Drug loaded biodegradable load-bearing nanocomposites for damaged bone repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmanas, E. Y.; Gotman, I.; Sharipova, A.; Psakhie, S. G.; Swain, S. K.; Unger, R.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we present a short review-scientific report on processing and properties, including in vitro degradation, of load bearing biodegradable nanocomposites as well as of macroporous 3D scaffolds for bone ingrowth. Biodegradable implantable devices should slowly degrade over time and disappear with ingrown of natural bone replacing the synthetic graft. Compared to low strength biodegradable polymers, and brittle CaP ceramics, biodegradable CaP-polymer and CaP-metal nanocomposites, mimicking structure of natural bone, as well as strong and ductile metal nanocomposites can provide to implantable devices both strengths and toughness. Nanostructuring of biodegradable β-TCP (tricalcium phosphate)-polymer (PCL and PLA), β-TCP-metal (FeMg and FeAg) and of Fe-Ag composites was achieved employing high energy attrition milling of powder blends. Nanocomposite powders were consolidated to densities close to theoretical by high pressure consolidation at ambient temperature—cold sintering, with retention of nanoscale structure. The strength of developed nanocomposites was significantly higher as compared with microscale composites of the same or similar composition. Heat treatment at moderate temperatures in hydrogen flow resulted in retention of nanoscale structure and higher ductility. Degradation of developed biodegradable β-TCP-polymer, β-TCP-metal and of Fe-Ag nanocomposites was studied in physiological solutions. Immersion tests in Ringer's and saline solution for 4 weeks resulted in 4 to 10% weight loss and less than 50% decrease in compression or bending strength, the remaining strength being significantly higher than the values reported for other biodegradable materials. Nanostructuring of Fe-Ag based materials resulted also in an increase of degradation rate because of creation on galvanic Fe-Ag nanocouples. In cell culture experiments, the developed nanocomposites supported the attachment the human osteoblast cells and exhibited no signs of cytotoxicity

  18. Excellent healing rates and patient satisfaction after arthroscopic repair of medium to large rotator cuff tears with a single-row technique augmented with bone marrow vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierckman, Brian D; Ni, Jake J; Karzel, Ronald P; Getelman, Mark H

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the repair integrity and patient clinical outcomes following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair of medium to large rotator cuff tears using a single-row technique consisting of medially based, triple-loaded anchors augmented with bone marrow vents in the rotator cuff footprint lateral to the repair. This is a retrospective study of 52 patients (53 shoulders) comprising 36 males and 16 females with a median age of 62 (range 44-82) with more than 24-month follow-up, tears between 2 and 4 cm in the anterior-posterior dimension and utilizing triple-loaded anchors. Mann-Whitney test compared Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) outcome scores between patients with healed and re-torn cuff repairs. Multivariate logistic regression analysed association of variables with healing status and WORC score. Cuff integrity was assessed on MRI, read by a musculoskeletal fellowship-trained radiologist. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated an intact repair in 48 of 53 shoulders (91%). The overall median WORC score was 95.7 (range 27.6-100.0). A significant difference in WORC scores were seen between patients with healed repairs 96.7 (range 56.7-100.0) compared with a re-tear 64.6 (27.6-73.8), p rotator cuff tears using a triple-loaded single-row repair augmented with bone marrow vents resulted in a 91% healing rate by MRI and excellent patient reported clinical outcomes comparable to similar reported results in the literature. IV.

  19. Skin & bones: an artistic repair of a science exhibition by a mobile app

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Marques

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the costs involved with renovating exhibitions at natural history museums, some permanent exhibits stay on display unchanged for decades. The Bone Hall at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History has remained intact for 51 years. Here we discuss this exhibition as a stark exemplification of a science-only, art-free approach to communicating ideas and how creative reimaginings of the visitor experience have made it more accessible for the majority of visitors. Within the Bone Hall, mounted skeletons are displayed in static poses without any hint of movement and interpretation of their behaviors and text labels describe, in esoteric language, skeletal details. In a rare opportunity to redesign the visitor experience for an existing exhibition, we produced a mobile app. The app is guided by concepts in the natural sciences, yet inspired by artistic ideas applied to audio, video and 3D animation, which created a multisensory visitor experience. Indispensable to the approach was a production team comprised of individuals rooted in the arts/humanities and sciences. They used their crafts to make science more accessible to non-specialized visitors through audio/visual creations. Interviews and surveys with visitors confirmed the value of producing artistic interpretations of science as a more effective method of communication in the exhibit.

  20. Extracorporeal shockwave enhanced regeneration of fibrocartilage in a delayed tendon-bone insertion repair model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Dick Ho Kiu; Suen, Pui Kit; Huang, Le; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Ng, Chun; Shi, San Qiang; Wong, Margaret Wan Nar; Qin, Ling

    2014-04-01

    Fibrous tissue is often formed in delayed healing of tendon bone insertion (TBI) instead of fibrocartilage. Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) provides mechanical cues and upregulates expression of fibrocartilage-related makers and cytokines. We hypothesized that ESW would accelerate fibrocartilage regeneration at the healing interface in a delayed TBI healing model. Partial patellectomy with shielding at the TBI interface was performed on 32 female New Zealand White Rabbits for establishing this delayed TBI healing model. The rabbits were separated into the control and ESW group for evaluations at postoperative week 8 and 12. Shielding was removed at week 4 and a single ESW treatment was applied at week 6. Fibrocartilage regeneration was evaluated histomorphologically and immunohistochemically. Vickers hardness of the TBI matrix was measured by micro-indentation. ESW group showed higher fibrocartilage area, thickness, and proteoglycan deposition than the control in week 8 and 12. ESW increased expression of SOX9 and collagen II significantly in week 8 and 12, respectively. ESW group showed a gradual transition of hardness from bone to fibrocartilage to tendon, and had a higher Vickers hardness than the control group at week 12. In conclusion, ESW enhanced fibrocartilage regeneration at the healing interface in a delayed TBI healing model. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. 3D printing of high-strength bioscaffolds for the synergistic treatment of bone cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongshi; Li, Tao; Huan, Zhiguang; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Zezheng; Wang, Jinwu; Chang, Jiang; Wu, Chengtie

    2018-04-01

    The challenges in bone tumor therapy are how to repair the large bone defects induced by surgery and kill all possible residual tumor cells. Compared to cancellous bone defect regeneration, cortical bone defect regeneration has a higher demand for bone substitute materials. To the best of our knowledge, there are currently few bifunctional biomaterials with an ultra-high strength for both tumor therapy and cortical bone regeneration. Here, we designed Fe-CaSiO3 composite scaffolds (30CS) via 3D printing technique. First, the 30CS composite scaffolds possessed a high compressive strength that provided sufficient mechanical support in bone cortical defects; second, synergistic photothermal and ROS therapies achieved an enhanced tumor therapeutic effect in vitro and in vivo. Finally, the presence of CaSiO3 in the composite scaffolds improved the degradation performance, stimulated the proliferation and differentiation of rBMSCs, and further promoted bone formation in vivo. Such 30CS scaffolds with a high compressive strength can function as versatile and efficient biomaterials for the future regeneration of cortical bone defects and the treatment of bone cancer.

  2. Adult Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Primed for fhe Repair of Damaged Cardiac Tissue After Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Edward D.

    The burden of cardiovascular disease around the world is growing, despite improvements in hospital care and time to treatment. As more people survive an initial myocardial infarction (MI), the decompensated heart tissue is strained, leading to heart failure (HF) and an increased risk for a second MI. While extensive progress has been made in treating the symptoms after MI, including HF and angina, little success has come from repairing the damaged heart tissue to alleviate the progression to these end- stage symptoms. One promising area of regenerative research has been the use of adult stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow (BMSCs). These cells can differentiate towards the cardiac cell lineage in vitro while producing trophic factors that can repair damaged tissue. When placed in the heart after MI though, BMSCs have mixed results, producing profound changes in some patients but zero or even negative effects in others. In this report, we used BMSCs as a stem cell base for a regenerative medicine system for the repair of damaged cardiac tissue. These cells are seeded on a polycaprolactone nanoscaffolding support system, which provides a growth substrate for in vitro work, as well as a housing system for protected in vivo delivery. When the nanoscaffold is pre-coated with a novel combination of a cardiac protein, thymosin beta4 (Tbeta4), and a small molecule effector of the WNT protein pathway, IWP-2, BMSCs differentiated towards the cardiac lineage in as little as 24hours. When injected into rat hearts that have been given an ischemic MI, the nanoscaffolding system slowly dissolves, leaving the cells in place of the damaged cardiac tissue. After two weeks of monitoring, BMSCs are present within the damaged hearts, as evidenced by immunofluorescence and nanoparticle tracking. Injections of the nanoscaffolding/cell system led to robust healing of the rat hearts that had been given small- and medium- damage heart attacks, outperforming PBS sham and cell

  3. Biomaterials in Relation to Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sanjukta; Chana, Simran

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries remains a challenge in the improvement of oral health. It is the most common and widespread biofilm-dependent oral disease, resulting in the destruction of tooth structure by the acidic attack from cariogenic bacteria. The tooth is a heavily mineralised tissue, and both enamel and dentine can undergo demineralisation due to trauma or dietary conditions. The adult population worldwide affected by dental caries is enormous and despite significant advances in caries prevention and tooth restoration, treatments continue to pose a substantial burden to healthcare. Biomaterials play a vital role in the restoration of the diseased or damaged tooth structure and, despite providing reasonable outcomes, there are some concerns with clinical performance. Amalgam, the silver grey biomaterial that has been widely used as a restorative material in dentistry, is currently in throes of being phased out, especially with the Minimata convention and treaty being signed by a number of countries (January 2013; http://mercuryconvention.org/Convention/) that aims to control the anthropogenic release of mercury in the environment, which naturally impacts the use of amalgam, where mercury is a component. Thus, the development of alternative restoratives and restoration methods that are inexpensive, can be used under different climatic conditions, withstand storage and allow easy handling, the main prerequisites of dental biomaterials, is important. The potential for using biologically engineered tissue and consequent research to replace damaged tissues has also seen a quantum leap in the last decade. Ongoing research in regenerative treatments in dentistry includes alveolar ridge augmentation, bone tissue engineering and periodontal ligament replacement, and a future aim is bioengineering of the whole tooth. Research towards developing bioengineered teeth is well underway and identification of adult stem cell sources to make this a viable treatment is advancing; however, this

  4. Bone induction by surface-double-modified true bone ceramics in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jingfeng; Chen, Liaobin; Deng, Yu; Zheng, Qixin; Guo, Xiaodong; Zou, Zhenwei; Liu, Yudong; Lan, Shenghui

    2013-01-01

    True bone ceramic (TBC), obtained by twice sintering fresh bovine cancellous bone at high temperatures, is an osteoconductive and bioactive bone substitute material that exhibits excellent biocompatibility with hard tissue. The authors have previously synthesized a novel BMP-2-related peptide, P24, and found that it could enhance the osteoblastic differentiation of cells. The objective of the present study was to construct a double-modified TBC via mineralization into simulated body fluid and P24 incorporation for enhanced bone formation. In vitro experiments revealed that surface mineralization-modified (SMM) TBC scaffolds demonstrated efficiency for sustained release of P24. The P24/SMM-TBC composite exhibited increased osteogenic activity by cell adhesion rate determination, MTT assay, alkaline phosphatase staining, and calcium nodule staining with alizarin red compared with SMM-TBC and TBC. In vivo studies showed that the P24/SMM-TBC composite scaffold promoted significant bone defect repair, in marked contrast to stand-alone SMM-TBC and TBC, based on the results of radiographic evaluation and histological examination. These findings indicate that SMM-TBC is a good scaffold for the controlled release of P24 and that the P24/SMM-TBC composite could improve the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells and repair bone defects. The double-modified P24/SMM-TBC composite biomaterial shows potential for clinical application in bone tissue engineering. (paper)

  5. A biomechanical comparison of tendon-bone interface motion and cyclic loading between single-row, triple-loaded cuff repairs and double-row, suture-tape cuff repairs using biocomposite anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Drew, Otis R

    2012-09-01

    To compare tendon-bone interface motion and cyclic loading in a single-row, triple-loaded anchor repair with a suture-tape, rip-stop, double-row rotator cuff repair. Using 18 human shoulders from 9 matched cadaveric pairs, we created 2 groups of rotator cuff repairs. Group 1 was a double-row, rip-stop, suture-tape construct. Group 2 was a single-row, triple-loaded construct. Before mechanical testing, the supraspinatus footprint was measured with calipers. A superiorly positioned digital camera optically measured the tendon footprint motion during 60° of humeral internal and external rotation. Specimens were secured at a fixed angle not exceeding 45° in reference to the load. After preloading, each sample was cycled between 10 N and 100 N for 200 cycles at 1 Hz, followed by destructive testing at 33 mm/s. A digital camera with tracking software measured the repair displacement at 100 and 200 cycles. Ultimate load and failure mode for each sample were recorded. The exposed anterior footprint border (6.5% ± 6%) and posterior footprint border (0.9% ± 1.7%) in group 1 were statistically less than the exposed anterior footprint border (30.3% ± 17%) and posterior footprint border (29.8% ± 14%) in group 2 (P = .003 and P row rotator cuff repair had greater footprint coverage, less rotational footprint displacement, and a greater mean ultimate failure load than the triple-loaded, single-row repair on mechanical testing. No double-row or single-row constructs showed 5 mm of displacement after the first 100 cycles. The most common failure mode for both constructs was suture tearing through the tendon. Differences in cuff fixation influence rotational tendon movement and may influence postoperative healing. Stronger repair constructs still fail at the suture-tendon interface. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomaterials — where biology, physics, chemistry, engineering and medicine meet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, K. A.

    2008-03-01

    The success or failure of an implant material in the body depends on a complex interaction between a synthetic 'foreign body' and the 'host tissue'. These interactions occur at many levels from the sub-microscopic level, where subtle changes in the surface physio-chemistry can substantially alter the nature of the biomaterial-host tissue interface, through the microscopical level (e.g. sensitivity to surface topography) to the macrostructural level (e.g. dependence on scaffold porosity). Thus the factors that control these responses are not only biologically determined but also mechanically, physically and chemically mediated, although identifying where one starts and the other finishes can be difficult. Design of a successful medical device has therefore to call on expertise within a wide range of disciplines. In terms of both investigating the basic science behind the factors which orchestrate a biological response and developing research tools that enable study of these responses. However, a medical device must also meet the economic and practical demands of health care professionals who will ultimately be using it in the clinic. Bone graft substitute materials are used in orthopaedics as an alternative or adjunct to autografting, a practice where the patient 'donates' bone from a healthy site to aid bone repair at a damaged or diseased site. These materials are used in a wide range of procedures from total hip revision to spinal fusion and their evolution over the last 10 years illustrates how an interdisciplinary approach has benefited their development and may lead to further innovation in the future.

  7. Optimal Treatment of Malignant Long Bone Fracture: Influence of Method of Repair and External Beam Irradiation on the Pathway and Efficacy of Fracture Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    stiffness, or a partial snap with lower yield force and stiffness (Figure 4). Three dimensional micro CT analysis around fracture Figure 3. (a-b... fractures with plate fixation on both sides and irradiation on the left while the contralateral limb serves as a non-radiated internal control. The...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0430 TITLE: Optimal Treatment of Malignant Long Bone Fracture : Influence of Method of Repair and External Beam

  8. Evaluation of bone repair in the femur of rats submitted to laser therapy in different wavelengths: An image segmentation method of analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroga, A. S.; Sousa, F. B.; Araújo, J. M. S.; Santos, S. D.; Sousa, C. D'f. S.; Quintans, T. C.; Almeida, T. P.; Nonaka, C. F. W.; Batista, L. V.; Limeira Junior, F. A.

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to histologically assess the effect of laser therapy (LILT, 660 and 780 nm) on the repair of standardized bone defects on the femur of Wistar albinus rats. The sample was composed of 12 Wistar albinus young adult rats of both genders. Three randomized groups were studied: group I (control, n = 4), group II (LILT, 660 nm, n = 4), and group III (LILT, 780 nm, n = 4). Samples were prepared using a bone defect on the left-side femur surface of the animals, with a total dimension of approximately 3 mm3. Groups II and III were irradiated every 48 h from the second application, where the first dose was given immediately after surgery and the second application came 24 h after surgery. The irradiations were applied transcutaneously at four points around the wound for 14 days. At each point, a dose of 50 J/cm2 (2 J) was given ( s ˜ 0.04 cm2, 40 mW) and the total dose per session was 200 J/cm2 (8 J). The sacrifices were made 15 days after surgery and the specimens were routinely processed to wax, serially cut, stained with an H&E stain, and analyzed under light microscopy. The images were submitted to morphometric analysis using the image segmentation method using the K-means algorithm. The data obtained through the morphometric analysis were submitted to statistical analysis using the Tukey test. The results showed that the group treated with laser therapy in the infrared spectrum resulted in an increase in the repair of bone defects when compared with the group treated with the laser in the red spectrum and control group, which, in turn, had a very similar pattern of repair. A statistical significance ( p spectrum produced a positive biomodulation effect on the repair of bone defects in the femur of rats.

  9. Viscoelasticity of biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, W.G.; Hatakeyama, H.

    1992-01-01

    Viscoelasticity of Biomaterials is divided into three sections. The first offers a materials design lesson on the architectural arrangement of biopolymers in collagen. Included also are reviews on solution properties of polysacchardies, chiral and liquid crystalline solution characteristics of cellulose derivatives, and viscoelastic properties of wood and wood fiber reinforced thermoplastics. The second section, Biogels and Gelation, discusses the molecular arrangements of highly hydrated biomaterials such as mucus, gums, skinlike tissue, and silk fibroin. The physical effects that result from the transition from a liquid to a solid state are the subject of the third section, which focuses on relaxation phenomena. Gel formation, the conformation of domain structures, and motional aspects of complex biomaterials are described in terms of recent experimental advances in various fields. A relevant chapter on the effects of ionizing radiation on connective tissue is abstracted separately

  10. Advanced biomaterials and biodevices

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials are the fastest-growing emerging field of  biodevices. Design and development of biomaterials play a significant role in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. Recently, a variety of scaffolds/carriers have been evaluated for tissue regeneration, drug delivery, sensing and imaging.  Liposomes and microspheres have been developed for sustained delivery. Several anti-cancer drugs have been successfully formulated using biomaterial. The targeting of drugs to certain physiological sites has emerged as a promising tool in the treatment with improved drug bioavailability and reduction of dosing frequency. Biodevices-based targeting of drugs may improve the therapeutic success by limiting the adverse drug effects and resulting in more patient compliance and attaining a higher adherence level. Advanced biodevices hold merit as a drug carrier with high carrier capacity, feasibility of incorporation of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances, high stability, as well as the feasibility...

  11. Gelatin/nano-hydroxyapatite hydrogel scaffold prepared by sol-gel technology as filler to repair bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raucci, Maria Grazia; Demitri, Christian; Soriente, Alessandra; Fasolino, Ines; Sannino, Alessandro; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2018-07-01

    This study reports on the development of a scaffold with a gradient of bioactive solid signal embedded in the biodegradable polymer matrix by combining a sol-gel approach and freeze-drying technology. The chemical approach based on the sol-gel transition of calcium phosphates ensures the particles dispersion into the gelatin matrix and a direct control of interaction among COOH gelatin /Ca 2+ ions. Morphological analysis demonstrated that on the basis of the amount of inorganic component and by using specific process conditions, it is possible to control the spatial distribution of nanoparticles around the gelatin helix. In fact, methodology and formulations were able to discriminate between the different hydroxyapatite concentrations and their respective morphology. The good biological response represented by good cell attachment, proliferation and increased levels of alkaline phosphatase as an indicator of osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells toward the osteogenic lineage, demonstrating the effect of bioactive solid signals on cellular behavior. Furthermore, the inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by composite materials predicted potential anti-inflammatory properties of scaffolds thus confirming their biocompatibility. Indeed, these interesting biological results suggest good potential application of this scaffold as filler to repair bone defects. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 2007-2019, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Deproteinized bovine bone functionalized with the slow delivery of BMP-2 for the repair of critical-sized bone defects in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, T.; Wu, G.; Wismeijer, D.; Gu, Z.; Liu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    As an alternative to an autologous bone graft, deproteinized bovine bone (DBB) is widely used in the clinical dentistry. Although DBB provides an osteoconductive scaffold, it is not capable of enhancing bone regeneration because it is not osteoinductive. In order to render DBB osteoinductive, bone

  13. Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Repair With Soft Tissue Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangarajah, Tanujan; Pendegrass, Catherine J.; Shahbazi, Shirin; Lambert, Simon; Alexander, Susan; Blunn, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tears of the rotator cuff are one of the most common tendon disorders. Treatment often includes surgical repair, but the rate of failure to gain or maintain healing has been reported to be as high as 94%. This has been substantially attributed to the inadequate capacity of tendon to heal once damaged, particularly to bone at the enthesis. A number of strategies have been developed to improve tendon-bone healing, tendon-tendon healing, and tendon regeneration. Scaffolds have received considerable attention for replacement, reconstruction, or reinforcement of tendon defects but may not possess situation-specific or durable mechanical and biological characteristics. Purpose To provide an overview of the biology of tendon-bone healing and the current scaffolds used to augment rotator cuff repairs. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A preliminary literature search of MEDLINE and Embase databases was performed using the terms rotator cuff scaffolds, rotator cuff augmentation, allografts for rotator cuff repair, xenografts for rotator cuff repair, and synthetic grafts for rotator cuff repair. Results The search identified 438 unique articles. Of these, 214 articles were irrelevant to the topic and were therefore excluded. This left a total of 224 studies that were suitable for analysis. Conclusion A number of novel biomaterials have been developed into biologically and mechanically favorable scaffolds. Few clinical trials have examined their effect on tendon-bone healing in well-designed, long-term follow-up studies with appropriate control groups. While there is still considerable work to be done before scaffolds are introduced into routine clinical practice, there does appear to be a clear indication for their use as an interpositional graft for large and massive retracted rotator cuff tears and when repairing a poor-quality degenerative tendon. PMID:26665095

  14. Bone healing and bone substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Peter D; Hiltzik, David; Govindaraj, Satish; Moche, Jason

    2002-02-01

    With the advent of new biomaterials and surgical techniques, the reconstructive surgeon has a wider range of treatment modalities for the rehabilitation and reconstruction of craniofacial skeletal deformities than ever before. These innovative substances act as true bone graft substitutes, thereby allowing the surgeon to avoid the use of autogenous bone grafts and their associated donor site morbidity. Surgeons have long been interested in producing a composite graft that can heal faster by induction, incorporate with surrounding tissues, and be remodeled to resemble native bone. Currently, there are a host of bone graft substitutes available that vary in both their composition and properties. Craniomaxillofacial surgeons must therefore become comfortable with numerous biomaterials to best tailor the treatment for each patient individually. Ongoing investigations into the next phase of tissue engineering will continue to bring us closer to the ability to regenerate or replace bone.

  15. Biomaterials and therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    A number of organic and inorganic, synthetic or natural derived materials have been classified as not harmful for the human body and are appropriate for medical applications. These materials are usually named biomaterials since they are suitable for introduction into living human tissues of prosthesis, as well as for drug delivery, diagnosis, therapies, tissue regeneration and many other clinical applications. Recently, nanomaterials and bioabsorbable polymers have greatly enlarged the fields of application of biomaterials attracting much more the attention of the biomedical community. In this review paper I am going to discuss the most recent advances in the use of magnetic nanoparticles and biodegradable materials as new biomedical tools.

  16. Advances in the development of supramolecular polymeric biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goor, O.J.G.M.; Dankers, P.Y.W.

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine applications aim to recreate or repair the living functional environment of the human body. Many biomaterials that are designed and synthesized in recent years are inspired by the extracellular matrix (ECM) that is responsible for mechanical, structural, and biochemical support

  17. Repair of Segmental Load-Bearing Bone Defect by Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Plasma-Derived Fibrin Impregnated Ceramic Block Results in Early Recovery of Limb Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hwei Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes have not been used to repair load-bearing bone defects due to their weak mechanical property. In this study, we reevaluated the functional outcomes of combining ceramic block with osteogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma (TEB to repair critical-sized segmental tibial defect. Comparisons were made with fresh marrow-impregnated ceramic block (MIC and partially demineralized allogeneic bone block (ALLO. Six New Zealand White female rabbits were used in each study group and three rabbits with no implants were used as negative controls. By Day 90, 4/6 rabbits in TEB group and 2/6 in ALLO and MIC groups resumed normal gait pattern. Union was achieved significantly faster in TEB group with a radiological score of 4.50 ± 0.78 versus ALLO (1.06 ± 0.32, MIC (1.28 ± 0.24, and negative controls (0. Histologically, TEB group scored the highest percentage of new bone (82% ± 5.1% compared to ALLO (5% ± 2.5% and MIC (26% ± 5.2%. Biomechanically, TEB-treated tibiae achieved the highest compressive strength (43.50 ± 12.72 MPa compared to those treated with ALLO (15.15 ± 3.57 MPa and MIC (23.28 ± 6.14 MPa. In conclusion, TEB can repair critical-sized segmental load-bearing bone defects and restore limb function.

  18. Biomedical potential of chitosan/HA and chitosan/β-1,3-glucan/HA biomaterials as scaffolds for bone regeneration — A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przekora, Agata, E-mail: agata.przekora@umlub.pl [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin (Poland); Palka, Krzysztof [Department of Materials Engineering, Lublin University of Technology, Nadbystrzycka 36, 20-618 Lublin (Poland); Ginalska, Grazyna [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin (Poland)

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare biomedical potential of chitosan/hydroxyapatite (chit/HA) and novel chitosan/β-1,3-glucan/hydroxyapatite (chit/glu/HA) materials as scaffolds for bone regeneration via characterization of their biocompatibility, porosity, mechanical properties, and water uptake behaviour. Biocompatibility of the scaffolds was assessed in direct-contact with the materials using normal human foetal osteoblast cell line. Cytotoxicity and osteoblast proliferation rate were evaluated. Porosity was assessed using computed microtomography analysis and mechanical properties were determined by compression testing. Obtained results demonstrated that chit/HA scaffold possessed significantly better mechanical properties (compressive strength: 1.23 MPa, Young's modulus: 0.46 MPa) than chit/glu/HA material (compressive strength: 0.26 MPa, Young's modulus: 0.25 MPa). However, addition of bacterial β-1,3-glucan to the chit/HA scaffold improved its flexibility and porosity. Moreover, chit/glu/HA scaffold revealed significantly higher water uptake capability (52.6% after 24 h of soaking) compared to the chit/HA (30.7%) and thus can serve as a very good drug delivery carrier. Chit/glu/HA scaffold was also more favourable to osteoblast survival (near 100% viability after 24-h culture), proliferation, and spreading compared to the chit/HA (63% viability). The chit/glu/HA possesses better biomedical potential than chit/HA scaffold. Nevertheless, poor mechanical properties of the chit/glu/HA limit its application to non-load bearing implantation area. - Highlights: • Chitosan/HA and chit/β-1,3-glucan/HA scaffolds for bone regeneration were compared. • Chit/HA significantly reduced osteoblast viability to 63% compared to chit/glu/HA. • Unlike chit/HA, chit/glu/HA favoured cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation. • Chit/HA had better compressive strength and Young's modulus than chit/glu/HA. • Chit/glu/HA revealed significantly higher

  19. Numerical simulation of fluid field and in vitro three-dimensional fabrication of tissue-engineered bones in a rotating bioreactor and in vivo implantation for repairing segmental bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kedong; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Bowen; Lim, Mayasari; Liu, Yingchao; Liu, Tianqing

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, two-dimensional flow field simulation was conducted to determine shear stresses and velocity profiles for bone tissue engineering in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB). In addition, in vitro three-dimensional fabrication of tissue-engineered bones was carried out in optimized bioreactor conditions, and in vivo implantation using fabricated bones was performed for segmental bone defects of Zelanian rabbits. The distribution of dynamic pressure, total pressure, shear stress, and velocity within the culture chamber was calculated for different scaffold locations. According to the simulation results, the dynamic pressure, velocity, and shear stress around the surface of cell-scaffold construction periodically changed at different locations of the RWVB, which could result in periodical stress stimulation for fabricated tissue constructs. However, overall shear stresses were relatively low, and the fluid velocities were uniform in the bioreactor. Our in vitro experiments showed that the number of cells cultured in the RWVB was five times higher than those cultured in a T-flask. The tissue-engineered bones grew very well in the RWVB. This study demonstrates that stress stimulation in an RWVB can be beneficial for cell/bio-derived bone constructs fabricated in an RWVB, with an application for repairing segmental bone defects.

  20. Biomaterials for tissue engineering: summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, L.; Mikos, A. G.; Gibbons, D. F.; Picciolo, G. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations and discussion at the workshop "Enabling Biomaterial Technology for Tissue Engineering," which was held during the Fifth World Biomaterials Congress in May 1996. Presentations covered the areas of material substrate architecture, barrier effects, and cellular response, including analysis of biomaterials challenges involved in producing specific tissue-engineered products.

  1. Biomaterials modification by ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tonghe; Yi Zhongzhen; Zhang Xu; Wu Yuguang

    2001-01-01

    Ion beam technology is one of best ways for the modification of biomaterials. The results of ion beam modification of biomaterials are given. The method and results of improved biocompatibility are indicated by ion beam technology. The future development of ion beam modification of biomaterials is discussed

  2. Development of Flexible Capacitive Ultrasound Transducers and the Use of Ultrasound for Bone Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzell, Scott A.

    devices have the potential to mediate both bone resorption and deposition, and also provide a new functional system for generating ultrasound on the irregular surfaces encountered in clinical settings.

  3. Developing a pro-regenerative biomaterial scaffold microenvironment requires T helper 2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Estrellas, Kenneth; Allen, Brian W; Wolf, Matthew T; Fan, Hongni; Tam, Ada J; Patel, Chirag H; Luber, Brandon S; Wang, Hao; Wagner, Kathryn R; Powell, Jonathan D; Housseau, Franck; Pardoll, Drew M; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2016-04-15

    Immune-mediated tissue regeneration driven by a biomaterial scaffold is emerging as an innovative regenerative strategy to repair damaged tissues. We investigated how biomaterial scaffolds shape the immune microenvironment in traumatic muscle wounds to improve tissue regeneration. The scaffolds induced a pro-regenerative response, characterized by an mTOR/Rictor-dependent T helper 2 pathway that guides interleukin-4-dependent macrophage polarization, which is critical for functional muscle recovery. Manipulating the adaptive immune system using biomaterials engineering may support the development of therapies that promote both systemic and local pro-regenerative immune responses, ultimately stimulating tissue repair. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Treatment of adolescent lumber spondylolysis with modified Boston brace. Selection of the patients with bone scintigraphy and repair of the part defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, Hiroyuki; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Kaneda, Kiyoshi; Sato, Eishu [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-06-01

    Results of brace treatment of 29 spondylolysis patients were reported. Patients were those who were diagnosed by scout roentgenography and accumulated {sup 99m}Tc at spondylolytic site by bone scintigraphy or by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) which being found more convenient to see the accumulation than the scintigraphy. Coaptation after brace treatment was observed by flat and tomographic roentgenography. Under limited sports activity, the hard brace was used for about 4 months and then soft one, for 2 months. Coaptation and repair were observed for 46 (79%) of 58 part defects in the 29 patients. Since lumber spine spondylolysis is mostly caused by fatigue fracture and bone metabolism is activated at the lesional site, {sup 99m}Tc accumulation can be seen at the spondylolytic site by bone scintigraphy with high frequency. Therefore, the rate of repair can be increased when brace treatment was applied for patients with positive bone scintigraphy findings. The scintigraphy was thus useful far selecting patients suitable for brace treatment. (K.H.)

  5. Treatment of adolescent lumber spondylolysis with modified Boston brace. Selection of the patients with bone scintigraphy and repair of the part defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Hiroyuki; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Kaneda, Kiyoshi; Sato, Eishu

    1996-01-01

    Results of brace treatment of 29 spondylolysis patients were reported. Patients were those who were diagnosed by scout roentgenography and accumulated 99m Tc at spondylolytic site by bone scintigraphy or by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) which being found more convenient to see the accumulation than the scintigraphy. Coaptation after brace treatment was observed by flat and tomographic roentgenography. Under limited sports activity, the hard brace was used for about 4 months and then soft one, for 2 months. Coaptation and repair were observed for 46 (79%) of 58 part defects in the 29 patients. Since lumber spine spondylolysis is mostly caused by fatigue fracture and bone metabolism is activated at the lesional site, 99m Tc accumulation can be seen at the spondylolytic site by bone scintigraphy with high frequency. Therefore, the rate of repair can be increased when brace treatment was applied for patients with positive bone scintigraphy findings. The scintigraphy was thus useful far selecting patients suitable for brace treatment. (K.H.)

  6. The homing of bone marrow MSCs to non-osseous sites for ectopic bone formation induced by osteoinductive calcium phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guodong; Habibovic, Pamela; Bao, Chongyun; Hu, Jing; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Yuan, Huipin; Chen, Wenchuan; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoinductive biomaterials are promising for bone repair. There is no direct proof that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) home to non-osseous sites and participate in ectopic bone formation induced by osteoinductive bioceramics. The objective of this study was to use a sex-mismatched beagle dog model to investigate BMSC homing via blood circulation to participate in ectopic bone formation via osteoinductive biomaterial. BMSCs of male dogs were injected into female femoral marrow cavity. The survival and stable chimerism of donor BMSCs in recipients were confirmed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) granules were implanted in dorsal muscles of female dogs. Y chromosomes were detected in samples harvested from female dogs which had received male BMSCs. At 4 weeks, cells with Y-chromosomes were distributed in the new bone matrix throughout the BCP granule implant. At 6 weeks, cells with Y chromosomes were present in newly mineralized woven bone. TRAP positive osteoclast-like cells were observed in 4-week implants, and the number of such cells decreased from 4 to 6 weeks. These results show that osteoprogenitors were recruited from bone marrow and homed to ectopic site to serve as a cell source for calcium phosphate-induced bone formation. In conclusion, BMSCs were demonstrated to migrate from bone marrow through blood circulation to non-osseous bioceramic implant site to contribute to ectopic bone formation in a canine model. BCP induced new bone in muscles without growth factor delivery, showing excellent osteoinductivity that could be useful for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23298780

  7. Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Keim, S.; Ma, R.; Li, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2010-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is attracting increasing attention as an effective technique for the processing of biomaterials, specifically bioactive coatings and biomedical nanostructures. The well-known advantages of EPD for the production of a wide range of microstructures and nanostructures as well as unique and complex material combinations are being exploited, starting from well-dispersed suspensions of biomaterials in particulate form (microsized and nanoscale particles, nanotubes, nanoplatelets). EPD of biological entities such as enzymes, bacteria and cells is also being investigated. The review presents a comprehensive summary and discussion of relevant recent work on EPD describing the specific application of the technique in the processing of several biomaterials, focusing on (i) conventional bioactive (inorganic) coatings, e.g. hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass coatings on orthopaedic implants, and (ii) biomedical nanostructures, including biopolymer–ceramic nanocomposites, carbon nanotube coatings, tissue engineering scaffolds, deposition of proteins and other biological entities for sensors and advanced functional coatings. It is the intention to inform the reader on how EPD has become an important tool in advanced biomaterials processing, as a convenient alternative to conventional methods, and to present the potential of the technique to manipulate and control the deposition of a range of nanomaterials of interest in the biomedical and biotechnology fields. PMID:20504802

  8. Hot topics in biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Alton, Eric W; Griesenbach, Uta

    2014-01-01

    The expert coverage of the eight chapters in this book reflects the diverse nature of the field of biomaterials science and encompasses contributions from a wide range of fields, highlighting key classes of novel materials and exploring the underlying science and potential applications.

  9. Repair effect of transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on liver injury in severe burned rats and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hao; Zhou Yubo; Zhang Ying; Qin Yonggang; Guo Li; Yin Fei; Meng Chunyang; Yang Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the repair effect of transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on liver injury in severe burned rats, and to clarify its mechanism. Methods: The BMSCs of rats were isolated, cultured, amplified, identified, and labeled in vitro. 30 Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control group (n=10), model group (n=10) and cell therapy group (n=10). The burned rat model was established. The BMSCs labeled by chlormethyl-benzamidodialkylcarbocyanine (CM-Dil) were transplanted into the rats in cell therapy group by retro-orbital intravenous injection and the saline was injected into the rats in model group. The general status of all rats were observed. The liver tissues of rats were obtained 2 weeks after transplantation, and the pathohistological changes were observed and the pathohistological scores were detected; the apoptotic rate of liver cells was detected by TUNEL method; the engraftment of BMSCs in liver tissues of the rats was observed under laser scanning confocal microscope. Results: 2 weeks after transplantation, the rats in model group were obviously malaise dispirited and the rats in cell therapy group showed obviously better, and the body weight of the rats in cell therapy group was higher than that in model group (P<0.05). The pathohistological results showed the normal liver lobules of the rats in model group disappeared, and the liver cords disordered, and some liver sinusoids dilated and congested, lymphocytes infiltrated with occasional focal aggregating, and cell edema was found, cytoplasm loose and steatosis were seen in liver tissue. However, the pathohistological changes of liver tissue of the rats in cell therapy group were significantly better than those in model group. The pathohistological score of the rats in cell therapy group was significantly lower than that in model group (P<0.05). The TUNEL staining results showed that there were lots of apoptotic liver cells in liver tissue of the rats in

  10. Demineralized dentin matrix composite collagen material for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianan; Yang, Juan; Zhong, Xiaozhong; He, Fengrong; Wu, Xiongwen; Shen, Guanxin

    2013-01-01

    Demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) had been successfully used in clinics as bone repair biomaterial for many years. However, particle morphology of DDM limited it further applications. In this study, DDM and collagen were prepared to DDM composite collagen material. The surface morphology of the material was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). MC3T3-E1 cells responses in vitro and tissue responses in vivo by implantation of DDM composite collagen material in bone defect of rabbits were also investigated. SEM analysis showed that DDM composite collagen material evenly distributed and formed a porous scaffold. Cell culture and animal models results indicated that DDM composite collagen material was biocompatible and could support cell proliferation and differentiation. Histological evaluation showed that DDM composite collagen material exhibited good biocompatibility, biodegradability and osteoconductivity with host bone in vivo. The results suggested that DDM composite collagen material might have a significant clinical advantage and potential to be appli