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Sample records for bone regenerative potential

  1. Bone Marrow Stem Cell Derived Paracrine Factors for Regenerative Medicine: Current Perspectives and Therapeutic Potential

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    Tom J. Burdon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past several years, there has been intense research in the field of bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC therapy to facilitate its translation into clinical setting. Although a lot has been accomplished, plenty of challenges lie ahead. Furthermore, there is a growing body of evidence showing that administration of BMSC-derived conditioned media (BMSC-CM can recapitulate the beneficial effects observed after stem cell therapy. BMSCs produce a wide range of cytokines and chemokines that have, until now, shown extensive therapeutic potential. These paracrine mechanisms could be as diverse as stimulating receptor-mediated survival pathways, inducing stem cell homing and differentiation or regulating the anti-inflammatory effects in wounded areas. The current review reflects the rapid shift of interest from BMSC to BMSC-CM to alleviate many logistical and technical issues regarding cell therapy and evaluates its future potential as an effective regenerative therapy.

  2. Hydroxyapatite from fish scale for potential use as bone scaffold or regenerative material

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    Pon-On, Weeraphat, E-mail: fsciwpp@ku.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok (Thailand); Suntornsaratoon, Panan [Center of Calcium and Bone Research, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol [Center of Calcium and Bone Research, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Thongbunchoo, Jirawan [Center of Calcium and Bone Research, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Krishnamra, Nateetip [Center of Calcium and Bone Research, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Tang, I. Ming [Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2016-05-01

    The present paper studies the physico-chemical, bioactivity and biological properties of hydroxyapatite (HA) which is derived from fish scale (FS) (FSHA) and compares them with those of synthesized HA (sHA) obtained by co-precipitation from chemical solution as a standard. The analysis shows that the FSHA is composed of flat-plate nanocrystal with a narrow width size of about 15–20 nm and having a range of 100 nm in length and that the calcium phosphate ratio (Ca/P) is 2.01 (Ca-rich CaP). Whereas, synthesized HA consists of sub-micron HA particle having a Ca/P ratio of 1.65. Bioactivity test shows that the FSHA forms more new apatite than does the sHA after being incubated in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 7 days. Moreover, the biocompatibility study shows a higher osteoblast like cell adhesion on the FSHA surface than on the sHA substrate after 3 days of culturing. Our results also show the shape of the osteoblast cells on the FSHA changes from being a rounded shape to being a flattened shape reflecting its spreading behavior on this surface. MTT assay and ALP analysis show significant increases in the proliferation and activity of osteoblasts over the FSHA scaffold after 5 days of culturing as compared to those covering the sHA substrates. These results confirm that the bio-materials derived from fish scale (FSHA) are biologically better than the chemically synthesized HA and have the potential for use as a bone scaffold or as regenerative materials. - Highlights: • Preparation of hydroxyapatite (HA) which is derived from fish scale (FS) (FSHA) and their bioactivities • The FSHA is composed of flat-plate nanocrystal with a narrow size of 15–20 nm. • Bioactivity test shows that the FSHA forms more new apatite than does the sHA after being incubated SBF. • In vitro cell availability tests show a higher cell adhesion on the FSHA surface.

  3. Instrumentation for Investigating the Regenerative Potential of Bone-Tissue-Engineered Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-12

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and for chemical structure using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy ( FTIR ). (a) Papers published in peer...0.63 dL/g was obtained from Lactel Absorbable Polymers (AL, USA). PCL polymer with an inherent viscosity 1.15 dL/g aws obtained from Durect Corporation...Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy ( FTIR ). Introduction With the continual aging of the population in the United States, bone fractures and

  4. Regenerative capacity of augmented bone in rat calvarial guided bone augmentation model.

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    Kubota, Tatsuya; Hasuike, Akira; Ozawa, Yasumasa; Yamamoto, Takanobu; Tsunori, Katsuyoshi; Yamada, Yutaka; Sato, Shuichi

    2017-04-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) is the most widely used technique to regenerate and augment bones. Even though augmented bones (ABs) have been examined histologically in many studies, few studies have been conducted to examine the biological potential of these bones and the healing dynamics following their use. Moreover, whether the bone obtained from the GBR procedure possesses the same functions as the existing autogenous bone is uncertain. In particular, little attention has been paid to the regenerative ability of GBR bone. Therefore, the present study histologically evaluated the regenerative capacity of AB in the occlusive space of a rat guided bone augmentation (GBA) model. The calvaria of 30 rats were exposed, and plastic caps were placed on the right of the calvaria in 10 of the 30 rats. After a 12-week healing phase, critical-sized calvarial bone defects (diameter: 5.0 mm) were trephined into the dorsal parietal bone on the left of the calvaria. Bone particles were harvested from the AB or the cortical bone (CB) using a bone scraper and transplanted into the critical defects. The newly generated bone at the defects' edge was evaluated using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histological sections. In the micro-CT analysis, the radiopacity in both the augmented and the CB groups remained high throughout the observational period. In the histological analysis, the closure rate of the CB was significantly higher than in the AB group. The numbers of cells positive for runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) in the AB group were larger than in the CB group. The regenerative capacity of AB in the occlusive space of the rat GBA model was confirmed. Within the limitations of this study, the regenerative ability of the AB particulate transplant was inferior to that of the CB particulate transplant.

  5. Very small embryonic-like stem cells with maximum regenerative potential get discarded during cord blood banking and bone marrow processing for autologous stem cell therapy.

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    Bhartiya, Deepa; Shaikh, Ambreen; Nagvenkar, Punam; Kasiviswanathan, Sandhya; Pethe, Prasad; Pawani, Harsha; Mohanty, Sujata; Rao, S G Ananda; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2012-01-01

    Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are possibly lost during cord blood banking and bone marrow (BM) processing for autologus stem cell therapy mainly because of their small size. The present study was conducted on human umbilical cord blood (UCB, n=6) and discarded red blood cells (RBC) fraction obtained after separation of mononuclear cells from human BM (n=6), to test this hypothesis. The results show that VSELs, which are pluripotent stem cells with maximum regenerative potential, settle along with the RBCs during Ficoll-Hypaque density separation. These cells are very small in size (3-5 μm), have high nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio, and express nuclear Oct-4, cell surface protein SSEA-4, and other pluripotent markers such as Nanog, Sox-2, Rex-1, and Tert as indicated by immunolocalization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) studies. Interestingly, a distinct population of slightly larger, round hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with cytoplasmic Oct-4 were detected in the "buffy" coat, which usually gets banked or used during autologus stem cell therapy. Immunohistochemical studies on the umbilical cord tissue (UCT) sections (n=3) showed the presence of nuclear Oct-4-positive VSELs and many fibroblast-like mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with cytoplasmic Oct-4. These VSELs with nuclear Oct-4, detected in UCB, UCT, and discarded RBC fraction obtained after BM processing, may persist throughout life, maintain tissue homeostasis, and undergo asymmetric cell division to self-renew as well as produce larger progenitor stem cells, viz. HSCs or MSCs, which follow differentiation trajectories depending on the somatic niche. Hence, it can be concluded that the true stem cells in adult body tissues are the VSELs, whereas the HSCs and MSCs are actually progenitor stem cells that arise by asymmetric cell division of VSELs. The results of the present study may help explain low efficacy reported during adult autologous stem cell trials, wherein unknowingly

  6. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    specimen. Low predicted bone density was lower than actual specimen. Differences were probably due to applied muscle and joint reaction loads, boundary conditions, and values of constants used. Work is underway to study this. Nonetheless, the results demonstrate three dimensional bone remodeling simulation validity and potential. Such adaptive predictions take physiological bone remodeling simulations one step closer to reality. Computational analyses are needed that integrate biological remodeling rules and predict how bone will respond over time. We expect the combination of computational static stress analyses together with adaptive bone remodeling simulations to become effective tools for regenerative medicine research.

  7. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

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    Sharma, Gulshan B., E-mail: gbsharma@ucalgary.ca [Emory University, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Spine and Orthopaedic Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); University of Pittsburgh, Swanson School of Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); University of Calgary, Schulich School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Robertson, Douglas D., E-mail: douglas.d.robertson@emory.edu [Emory University, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Spine and Orthopaedic Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); University of Pittsburgh, Swanson School of Engineering, Department of Bioengineering, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    actual specimen. Low predicted bone density was lower than actual specimen. Differences were probably due to applied muscle and joint reaction loads, boundary conditions, and values of constants used. Work is underway to study this. Nonetheless, the results demonstrate three dimensional bone remodeling simulation validity and potential. Such adaptive predictions take physiological bone remodeling simulations one step closer to reality. Computational analyses are needed that integrate biological remodeling rules and predict how bone will respond over time. We expect the combination of computational static stress analyses together with adaptive bone remodeling simulations to become effective tools for regenerative medicine research.

  8. Biomimetics of Bone Implants: The Regenerative Road

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    Elizabeth Brett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current strategies for healing bone defects are numerous and varied. At the core of each bone healing therapy is a biomimetic mechanism, which works to enhance bone growth. These range from porous scaffolds, bone mineral usage, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan substitutes to transplanted cell populations. Bone defects face a range of difficulty in their healing, given the composite of dense outer compact bone and blood-rich inner trabecular bone. As such, the tissue possesses a number of inherent characteristics, which may be clinically harnessed as promoters of bone healing. These include mechanical characteristics, mineral composition, native collagen content, and cellular fraction of bone. This review charts multiple biomimetic strategies to help heal bony defects in large and small osseous injury sites, with a special focus on cell transplantation.

  9. From regenerative dentistry to regenerative medicine: progress, challenges, and potential applications of oral stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Li; Nasu, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and epithelial stem cells play essential roles in tissue repair and self-healing. Oral MSCs and epithelial stem cells can be isolated from adult human oral tissues, for example, teeth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Cocultivated adult oral epithelial stem cells and MSCs could represent some developmental events, such as epithelial invagination and tubular structure formation, signifying their potentials for tissue regeneration. Oral epithelial stem cells have been used in regenerative medicine over 1 decade. They are able to form a stratified cell sheet under three-dimensional culture conditions. Both experimental and clinical data indicate that the cell sheets can not only safely and effectively reconstruct the damaged cornea in humans, but also repair esophageal ulcer in animal models. Oral MSCs include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), and mesenchymal stem cells from gingiva (GMSCs). They are widely applied in both regenerative dentistry and medicine. DPSCs, SHED, and SCAP are able to form dentin-pulp complex when being transplanted into immunodeficient animals. They have been experimentally used for the regeneration of dental pulp, neuron, bone muscle and blood vessels in animal models and have shown promising results. PDLSCs and GMSCs are demonstrated to be ideal cell sources for repairing the damaged tissues of periodontal, muscle, and tendon. Despite the abovementioned applications of oral stem cells, only a few human clinical trials are now underway to use them for the treatment of certain diseases. Since clinical use is the end goal, their true regenerative power and safety need to be further examined.

  10. From regenerative dentistry to regenerative medicine: progress, challenges, and potential applications of oral stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Li Xiao,1 Masanori Nasu2 1Department of Pharmacology, 2Research Center, The Nippon Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and epithelial stem cells play essential roles in tissue repair and self-healing. Oral MSCs and epithelial stem cells can be isolated from adult human oral tissues, for example, teeth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Cocultivated adult oral epithelial stem cells and MSCs could represent some developmental events, such as epithelial invagination and tubular structure formation, signifying their potentials for tissue regeneration. Oral epithelial stem cells have been used in regenerative medicine over 1 decade. They are able to form a stratified cell sheet under three-dimensional culture conditions. Both experimental and clinical data indicate that the cell sheets can not only safely and effectively reconstruct the damaged cornea in humans, but also repair esophageal ulcer in animal models. Oral MSCs include dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED, stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs, and mesenchymal stem cells from gingiva (GMSCs. They are widely applied in both regenerative dentistry and medicine. DPSCs, SHED, and SCAP are able to form dentin–pulp complex when being transplanted into immunodeficient animals. They have been experimentally used for the regeneration of dental pulp, neuron, bone muscle and blood vessels in animal models and have shown promising results. PDLSCs and GMSCs are demonstrated to be ideal cell sources for repairing the damaged tissues of periodontal, muscle, and tendon. Despite the abovementioned applications of oral stem cells, only a few human clinical trials are now underway to use them for the treatment of certain diseases. Since clinical use is the end goal, their true regenerative power and safety need to be further examined.Keywords: oral mesenchymal stem cells, oral

  11. Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

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    Devang M. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are stromal cells that have the ability to self-renew and also exhibit multilineage differentiation into both mesenchymal and nonmesenchymal lineages. The intrinsic properties of these cells make them an attractive candidate for clinical applications. MSCs are of keen interest because they can be isolated from a small aspirate of bone marrow or adipose tissues and can be easily expanded in vitro. Moreover, their ability to modulate immune responses makes them an even more attractive candidate for regenerative medicine as allogeneic transplant of these cells is feasible without a substantial risk of immune rejection. MSCs secrete various immunomodulatory molecules which provide a regenerative microenvironment for a variety of injured tissues or organ to limit the damage and to increase self-regulated tissue regeneration. Autologous/allogeneic MSCs delivered via the bloodstream augment the titers of MSCs that are drawn to sites of tissue injury and can accelerate the tissue repair process. MSCs are currently being tested for their potential use in cell and gene therapy for a number of human debilitating diseases and genetic disorders. This paper summarizes the current clinical and nonclinical data for the use of MSCs in tissue repair and potential therapeutic role in various diseases.

  12. Application of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as an allogeneic transplantation cell source in bone regenerative therapy

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    Tsuno, Hiroaki [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nogami, Makiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Koike, Chika; Okabe, Motonori [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Noto, Zenko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Arai, Naoya; Noguchi, Makoto [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nikaido, Toshio, E-mail: tnikaido@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have therapeutic applications in bone regenerative therapy due to their pluripotency. However, the ability of MSCs to proliferate and differentiate varies between donors. Furthermore, alternative sources of MSCs are required for patients with contraindications to autogenous cell therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mesenchymal cells from the human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a source of cells for allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. Cells that retained a proliferative capacity of more than 50 population doubling level were distinguished from other HAM cells as HAM{alpha} cells and induced to osteogenic status-their in vivo osteogenesis was subsequently investigated in rats. It was found that HAM{alpha} cells were spindle shaped and were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic stem cell markers. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition increased with osteogenic status of HAM{alpha} cells. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was increased in HAM{alpha} cells cultured on calcium phosphate scaffolds. Moreover, xenografted HAM{alpha} cells remained viable and produced extracellular matrix for several weeks. Thus, this study suggests that human amniotic mesenchymal cells possess osteogenic differentiation potential and could be applied to allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human amniotic mesenchymal cells include cells (HAM{alpha} cells) that have the properties of MSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells have excellent osteogenic differentiation potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteogenic differentiation ability of HAM{alpha} was amplified by calcium phosphate scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells can be applicable to allogeneic cell transplantation in bone regenerative therapy.

  13. New regenerative treatment for tooth and periodontal bone defect associated with posttraumatic alveolar bone crush fracture.

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    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Kiyokawa, Munekatsu; Takagi, Mikako; Rikimaru, Hideaki; Fukaya, Takuji

    2009-05-01

    We developed a new regenerative treatment of tooth and periodontal defect and tooth dislocation associated with posttraumatic alveolar bone crush fracture in the region of the maxillary anterior teeth. Using this method, dislocated teeth are first extracted and crushed alveolar bone is debrided. The dislocated teeth are then reimplanted, and cancellous iliac bone (bone marrow) is grafted to the area surrounding the teeth to regenerate periodontal bone. Tooth reimplantation was completely successful in 2 cases, and periodontal bone regenerated to a sufficient height with the iliac bone graft. Compared with the general method of treatment with a prosthesis (bridge), when using this method to treat cases such as these, there is no sacrifice of healthy teeth adjacent to the defect, and sufficient esthetic and functional recovery is possible. It is thought that this method could be applied as a new treatment of alveolar bone fracture in the future.

  14. Trophic Effects and Regenerative Potential of Mobilized Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue as Alternative Cell Sources for Pulp/Dentin Regeneration.

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    Murakami, Masashi; Hayashi, Yuki; Iohara, Koichiro; Osako, Yohei; Hirose, Yujiro; Nakashima, Misako

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cell (DPSC) subsets mobilized by granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) are safe and efficacious for complete pulp regeneration. The supply of autologous pulp tissue, however, is very limited in the aged. Therefore, alternative sources of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) are needed for the cell therapy. In this study, DPSCs, bone marrow (BM), and adipose tissue (AD)-derived stem cells of the same individual dog were isolated using G-CSF-induced mobilization (MDPSCs, MBMSCs, and MADSCs). The positive rates of CXCR4 and G-CSFR in MDPSCs were similar to MADSCs and were significantly higher than those in MBMSCs. Trophic effects of MDPSCs on angiogenesis, neurite extension, migration, and antiapoptosis were higher than those of MBMSCs and MADSCs. Pulp-like loose connective tissues were regenerated in all three MSC transplantations. Significantly higher volume of regenerated pulp and higher density of vascularization and innervation were observed in response to MDPSCs compared to MBMSC and MADSC transplantation. Collagenous matrix containing dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP)-positive odontoblast-like cells was the highest in MBMSCs and significantly higher in MADSCs compared to MDPSCs. MBMSCs and MADSCs, therefore, have potential for pulp regeneration, although the volume of regenerated pulp tissue, angiogenesis, and reinnervation, were less. Thus, in conclusion, an alternative cell source for dental pulp/dentin regeneration are stem cells from BM and AD tissue.

  15. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of regenerative potential of GTR membrane (Biomesh®) along with alloplastic bone graft (Biograft®) in the treatment of periodontal intrabony defects.

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    Mopur, James Manohar; Devi, T Rama; Ali, Syed Muhammad; Srinivasa, T S; Gopinath, V; Salam, A R Tariq

    2013-05-01

    The primary goal of periodontal therapy is to restore the tooth supporting tissues lost due to periodontal disease. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of combination of GTR membrane and alloplastc bone graft with open flap debridement (OFD) in treatment of periodontal intrabony defects. Twenty paired intrabony defects were surgically treated using split mouth design. The defects were randomly assigned to treatment with OFD, GTR membrane+bone graft (test) or OFD alone (control). The clinical efficacy of two treatment modalities was evaluated at 6 months postoperatively by clinical, radiographical parameters. The measurements included probing pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), gingival recession (GR), bone fill (BF), bone density (BD). The mean reduction in PD at 0 to 6 months was 3.20±0.82 mm and CAL gain of 3.10±1.51 mm occurred in the GTR membrane+bone graft (test) group; corresponding values for OFD (control) were 2.10±0.63 mm and 1.90±0.57 mm. Similar pattern of improvement was observed when radiographically postoperative evaluation was made. All improvement in different parameters was statistically significant (p<0.01). Treatment with a combination of collagen membrane and bone graft led to a significantly more favorable clinical outcome in intrabony defects as compared to open flap debridement alone.

  16. Regenerative Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Age-Related Changes.

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    Bruna, Flavia; Contador, David; Conget, Paulette; Erranz, Benjamín; Sossa, Claudia L; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that a therapeutic effect results from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) transplant. No systematic information is currently available regarding whether donor age modifies MSC regenerative potential on cutaneous wound healing. Here, we evaluate whether donor age influences this potential. Two different doses of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) from young, adult, or old mouse donors or two doses of their acellular derivatives mesenchymal stromal cells (acd-MSCs) were intradermally injected around wounds in the midline of C57BL/6 mice. Every two days, wound healing was macroscopically assessed (wound closure) and microscopically assessed (reepithelialization, dermal-epidermal junction, skin appendage regeneration, granulation tissue, leukocyte infiltration, and density dermal collagen fibers) after 12 days from MSC transplant. Significant differences in the wound closure kinetic, quality, and healing of skin regenerated were observed in lesions which received BM-MSCs from different ages or their acd-MSCs compared to lesions which received vehicle. Nevertheless, our data shows that adult's BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs were the most efficient for recovery of most parameters analyzed. Our data suggest that MSC efficacy was negatively affected by donor age, where the treatment with adult's BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs in cutaneous wound promotes a better tissue repair/regeneration. This is due to their paracrine factors secretion.

  17. Regenerative Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Age-Related Changes

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    Flavia Bruna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that a therapeutic effect results from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs transplant. No systematic information is currently available regarding whether donor age modifies MSC regenerative potential on cutaneous wound healing. Here, we evaluate whether donor age influences this potential. Two different doses of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs from young, adult, or old mouse donors or two doses of their acellular derivatives mesenchymal stromal cells (acd-MSCs were intradermally injected around wounds in the midline of C57BL/6 mice. Every two days, wound healing was macroscopically assessed (wound closure and microscopically assessed (reepithelialization, dermal-epidermal junction, skin appendage regeneration, granulation tissue, leukocyte infiltration, and density dermal collagen fibers after 12 days from MSC transplant. Significant differences in the wound closure kinetic, quality, and healing of skin regenerated were observed in lesions which received BM-MSCs from different ages or their acd-MSCs compared to lesions which received vehicle. Nevertheless, our data shows that adult’s BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs were the most efficient for recovery of most parameters analyzed. Our data suggest that MSC efficacy was negatively affected by donor age, where the treatment with adult’s BM-MSCs or their acd-MSCs in cutaneous wound promotes a better tissue repair/regeneration. This is due to their paracrine factors secretion.

  18. Changes of Bone Turnover Markers in Long Bone Nonunions Treated with a Regenerative Approach

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    Donatella Granchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this clinical trial, we investigated if biochemical bone turnover markers (BTM changed according to the progression of bone healing induced by autologous expanded MSC combined with a biphasic calcium phosphate in patients with delayed union or nonunion of long bone fractures. Bone formation markers, bone resorption markers, and osteoclast regulatory proteins were measured by enzymatic immunoassay before surgery and after 6, 12, and 24 weeks. A satisfactory bone healing was obtained in 23 out of 24 patients. Nine subjects reached a good consolidation already at 12 weeks, and they were considered as the “early consolidation” group. We found that bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP, C-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP, and beta crosslaps collagen (CTX changed after the regenerative treatment, BAP and CTX correlated to the imaging results collected at 12 and 24 weeks, and BAP variation along the healing course differed in patients who had an “early consolidation.” A remarkable decrease in BAP and PICP was observed at all time points in a single patient who experienced a treatment failure, but the predictive value of BTM changes cannot be determined. Our findings suggest that BTM are promising tools for monitoring cell therapy efficacy in bone nonunions, but studies with larger patient numbers are required to confirm these preliminary results.

  19. Changes of Bone Turnover Markers in Long Bone Nonunions Treated with a Regenerative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granchi, Donatella; Rojewski, Markus; Rosset, Philippe; Layrolle, Pierre; Spazzoli, Benedetta; Donati, Davide Maria

    2017-01-01

    In this clinical trial, we investigated if biochemical bone turnover markers (BTM) changed according to the progression of bone healing induced by autologous expanded MSC combined with a biphasic calcium phosphate in patients with delayed union or nonunion of long bone fractures. Bone formation markers, bone resorption markers, and osteoclast regulatory proteins were measured by enzymatic immunoassay before surgery and after 6, 12, and 24 weeks. A satisfactory bone healing was obtained in 23 out of 24 patients. Nine subjects reached a good consolidation already at 12 weeks, and they were considered as the “early consolidation” group. We found that bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), C-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), and beta crosslaps collagen (CTX) changed after the regenerative treatment, BAP and CTX correlated to the imaging results collected at 12 and 24 weeks, and BAP variation along the healing course differed in patients who had an “early consolidation.” A remarkable decrease in BAP and PICP was observed at all time points in a single patient who experienced a treatment failure, but the predictive value of BTM changes cannot be determined. Our findings suggest that BTM are promising tools for monitoring cell therapy efficacy in bone nonunions, but studies with larger patient numbers are required to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:28744314

  20. Regenerative potential of endometrial stem cells: a mini review.

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    Ghobadi, Farnaz; Mehrabani, Davood; Mehrabani, Golnoush

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings in stem cell biology have opened a new window in regenerative medicine. The endometrium possesses mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) called endometrial stem cells (EnSCs) having specific regenerative properties linked to adult stem cells. They contribute in tissue remodeling and engineering and were shown to have immuno-modulating effects. Many clinical trials were undertaken to ascertain the therapeutic potential of EnSCS. In this mini review, we showed that EnSCs are readily available sources of adult stem cells in the uterus that can be highlighted for their renewable multipotent and differentiation properties. This cell population may be a practical solution of choice in reproductive biology, regenerative medicine and autologous stem cell therapy.

  1. Plug and play: combining materials and technologies to improve bone regenerative strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moroni, Lorenzo; Nandakumar, A.; Barrère, F.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Habibovic, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the development of biomaterials intended to replace natural bone grafts for the regeneration of large, clinically relevant defects, most synthetic solutions that are currently applied in the clinic are still inferior to natural bone grafts with regard to regenerative

  2. Bone regenerative properties of rat, goat and human platelet-rich plasma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plachokova, A.S.; Dolder, J. van den; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Jansen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    To explore the reported contradictory osteogenic capacity of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), the aim of the study was to examine and compare the bone regenerative effect of: PRPs of different species (rat, goat, human); human bone graft (HB) vs. HB combined with human PRP (HB+hPRP); and HB+hPRP vs.

  3. The Regenerative Potential of Parietal Epithelial Cells in Adult Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Katja; Schulte, Kevin; Boor, Peter; Kuppe, Christoph; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Floege, Jürgen; Smeets, Bart; Moeller, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we showed that some podocytes in juvenile mice are recruited from cells lining Bowman’s capsule, suggesting that parietal epithelial cells (PECs) are a progenitor cell population for podocytes. To investigate whether PECs also replenish podocytes in adult mice, PECs were genetically labeled in an irreversible fashion in 5-week-old mice. No significant increase in labeled podocytes was observed, even after 18 months. To accelerate a potential regenerative mechanism, progressive glo...

  4. Bone regenerative medicine: classic options, novel strategies, and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This review analyzes the literature of bone grafts and introduces tissue engineering as a strategy in this field of orthopedic surgery. We evaluated articles concerning bone grafts; analyzed characteristics, advantages, and limitations of the grafts; and provided explanations about bone-tissue engineering technologies. Many bone grafting materials are available to enhance bone healing and regeneration, from bone autografts to graft substitutes; they can be used alone or in combination. Autografts are the gold standard for this purpose, since they provide osteogenic cells, osteoinductive growth factors, and an osteoconductive scaffold, all essential for new bone growth. Autografts carry the limitations of morbidity at the harvesting site and limited availability. Allografts and xenografts carry the risk of disease transmission and rejection. Tissue engineering is a new and developing option that had been introduced to reduce limitations of bone grafts and improve the healing processes of the bone fractures and defects. The combined use of scaffolds, healing promoting factors, together with gene therapy, and, more recently, three-dimensional printing of tissue-engineered constructs may open new insights in the near future. PMID:24628910

  5. Regenerative potential of tonsil mesenchymal stem cells on surgical cutaneous defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung-Chan; Seo, Yoojin; Park, Hee Young; Jung, Da-Woon; Shin, Tae-Hoon; Son, Haejin; Kim, Young Keum; Lee, Jin-Choon; Sung, Eui-Suk; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Byung-Joo

    2018-02-07

    As tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have evolved recently, stem cell therapy has been investigated in the field of impaired wound healing. Several studies have reported that mesenchymal stem cells derived from various tissues including bone marrow and adipose tissue can exert the regenerative efficacy in the wound healing. Previously, we have demonstrated the isolation and characterization of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (TMSCs) with excellent proliferative property. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the regenerative efficacy of TMSCs in the wound healing process. Two distinct cutaneous surgical defects were generated in the dorsum of mice. Each wound was treated with TMSCs or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), respectively. After sacrifice, the skin and subcutaneous tissues around the surgical defect were harvested and assessed for inflammation, re-epithelialization, dermal regeneration, and granulation tissue formation. The administration of TMSCs into wound beds significantly promoted the repair of surgical defects in mice. Especially, TMSCs efficiently contributed to the attenuation of excessive inflammation in the surgical lesion, as well as the augmentation of epidermal and dermal regeneration. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, TMSCs were analyzed for their potency in immunomodulatory ability on immune cells, stimulatory effect on the proliferation of keratinocytes, and fibroblasts, as well as the regulation of fibroblast differentiation. TMSCs inhibited the non-specific or T-cell-specific proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, as well as the M1 polarization of macrophage-like cells. Moreover, TMSCs augmented the proliferation of skin-constituting fibroblasts and keratinocytes while they suppressed the differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the regenerative potential of TMSCs in wound healing process through the regulation on inflammation, proliferation

  6. The regenerative potential of epithelial stem cells in tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arandjelovic, Philip; Kaur, Pritinder

    2014-11-01

    Acute and chronic wounds encompass devastating injuries with significant physical, emotional and economic costs at both the individual and societal level. The pathogenesis of chronic wounds is as varied as the potential causes; however, contributing factors include repetitive ischaemia/reperfusion injury coupled with bacterial infection, inflammation and matrix degradation at the wound site. Similarly, the acute physical damage of burns may leave patients vulnerable to dehydration and infection, and in certain cases this may be followed by a body-wide systemic response with debilitating consequences. Epithelial stem cells provide a promising avenue for the treatment of burns and chronic wounds. This is exemplified by recent achievements such as the restoration of corneal epithelium using limbal stem cells, and the treatment of epidermolysis bullosa via a gene therapy approach. Nevertheless, many technical and regulatory challenges remain to be addressed. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Endodontic treatment enhances the regenerative potential of teeth with advanced periodontal disease with secondary endodontic involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eun-Young; Cho, Yunjung; Lee, Ju-Youn; Kim, Sung-Jo; Choi, Jeomil

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a role for endodontic intervention in enhancing the regenerative potential of the periodontal ligament when combined with periodontal treatment in seriously involved teeth with a secondary endodontic component. Patients who exhibited radiolucency extending to the periapical region, abnormal electric pulp testing values, and deep probing depth derived from primary periodontal disease with secondary endodontic involvement were included. Intentional root canal treatment was applied to those teeth in which the apical lesions were presumed to communicate with those of the periodontal lesion of the teeth that remained vital. In all three selected cases, regenerative periodontal therapy incorporating either bone graft or guided tissue regeneration was instituted 3 months after the endodontic intervention. Remarkable enhancement in radiographic density was noticeable around the affected teeth as evidenced by changes in radiopacity. There was a significant reduction in the probing pocket depth and gain in the clinical attachment level. Chewing discomfort gradually disappeared from the commencement of the combined treatment. An intentional endodontic intervention may be a worthwhile approach for the sophisticated management of teeth suffering from serious attachment loss and alveolar bone destruction with concomitant secondary endodontic involvement.

  8. Regenerative Injection Therapy with Whole Bone Marrow Aspirate for Degenerative Joint Disease: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A. Hauser MD

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative therapeutic strategies for joint diseases usually employ either enriched concentrates of bone marrow-derived stem cells, chondrogenic preparations such as platelet-rich plasma, or irritant solutions such as hyperosmotic dextrose. In this case series, we describe our experience with a simple, cost-effective regenerative treatment using direct injection of unfractionated whole bone marrow (WBM into osteoarthritic joints in combination with hyperosmotic dextrose. Seven patients with hip, knee or ankle osteoarthritis (OA received two to seven treatments over a period of two to twelve months. Patient-reported assessments were collected in interviews and by questionnaire. All patients reported improvements with respect to pain, as well as gains in functionality and quality of life. Three patients, including two whose progress under other therapy had plateaued or reversed, achieved complete or near-complete symptomatic relief, and two additional patients achieved resumption of vigorous exercise. These preliminary findings suggest that OA treatment with WBM injection merits further investigation.

  9. Phenotypic characterization of the bone marrow stem cells used in regenerative cellular therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias Abraham, Consuelo; Valle Perez, Lazaro O del; Baganet Cobas, Aymara

    2011-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a novel therapeutic method with broad potential for the treatment of various illnesses, based on the use of bone marrow (BM) stem cells, whose phenotypic characterization is limited. The paper deals with the expression of different cell membrane markers in mononuclear BM cells from 14 patients who underwent autologous cell therapy, obtained by medullary puncture and mobilization to peripheral blood, with the purpose of characterizing the different types of cells present in that heterogeneous cellular population and identifying the adhesion molecules involved in their adhesion. A greater presence was observed of adherent stem cells from the marrow stroma in mononuclear cells obtained directly from the BM; a larger population of CD90 +c ells in mononuclear cells from CD34 -/ CD45 -p eripheral blood with a high expression of molecules CD44 and CD62L, which suggests a greater presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in mobilized cells from the marrow stroma. The higher levels of CD34 +c ells in peripheral blood stem cells with a low expression of molecules CD117 -a nd DR -s uggests the presence of hematopoietic stem cells, hemangioblasts and progenitor endothelial cells mobilized to peripheral circulation. It was found that mononuclear cells from both the BM and peripheral blood show a high presence of stem cells with expression of adhesion molecule CD44 (MMC marker), probably involved in their migration, settling and differentiation

  10. Stem cells from amniotic fluid--Potential for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukogeorgakis, Stavros P; De Coppi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Regenerative medicine has recently been established as an emerging field focussing on repair, replacement or regeneration of cells, tissues and whole organs. The significant recent advances in the field have intensified the search for novel sources of stem cells with potential for therapy. Recently, researchers have identified the amniotic fluid as an untapped source of stem cells that are multipotent, possess immunomodulatory properties and do not have the ethical and legal limitations of embryonic stem cells. Stem cells from the amniotic fluid have been shown to differentiate into cell lineages representing all three embryonic germ layers without generating tumours, which make them an ideal candidate for tissue engineering applications. In addition, their ability to engraft in injured organs and modulate immune and repair responses of host tissues suggest that transplantation of such cells may be useful for the treatment of various degenerative and inflammatory diseases affecting major tissues/organs. This review summarises the evidence on amniotic fluid cells over the past 15 years and explores the potential therapeutic applications of amniotic fluid stem cells and amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The regenerative potential of parietal epithelial cells in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Katja; Schulte, Kevin; Boor, Peter; Kuppe, Christoph; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Floege, Jürgen; Smeets, Bart; Moeller, Marcus J

    2014-04-01

    Previously, we showed that some podocytes in juvenile mice are recruited from cells lining Bowman's capsule, suggesting that parietal epithelial cells (PECs) are a progenitor cell population for podocytes. To investigate whether PECs also replenish podocytes in adult mice, PECs were genetically labeled in an irreversible fashion in 5-week-old mice. No significant increase in labeled podocytes was observed, even after 18 months. To accelerate a potential regenerative mechanism, progressive glomerular hypertrophy was induced by progressive partial nephrectomies. Again, no significant podocyte replenishment was observed. Rather, labeled PECs exclusively invaded segments of the tuft affected by glomerulosclerosis, consistent with our previous findings. We next reassessed PEC recruitment in juvenile mice using a different reporter mouse and confirmed significant recruitment of labeled PECs onto the glomerular tuft. Moreover, some labeled cells on Bowman's capsule expressed podocyte markers, and cells on Bowman's capsule were also directly labeled in juvenile podocyte-specific Pod-rtTA transgenic mice. In 6-week-old mice, however, cells on Bowman's capsule no longer expressed podocyte-specific markers. Similarly, in human kidneys, some cells on Bowman's capsule expressed the podocyte marker synaptopodin from 2 weeks to 2 years of age but not at 7 years of age. In summary, podocyte regeneration from PECs could not be detected in aging mice or models of glomerular hypertrophy. We propose that a small fraction of committed podocytes reside on Bowman's capsule close to the vascular stalk and are recruited onto the glomerular tuft during infancy to adolescence in mice and humans.

  12. Bone Marrow Micro-Environment in Normal and Deranged Hematopoiesis: Opportunities for Regenerative Medicine and Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkaria, Shawn M; Decker, Matthew; Ding, Lei

    2018-03-01

    Various cell types cooperate to create a highly organized and dynamic micro-environmental niche in the bone marrow. Over the past several years, the field has increasingly recognized the critical roles of the interplay between bone marrow environment and hematopoietic cells in normal and deranged hematopoiesis. These advances rely on several new technologies that have allowed us to characterize the identity and roles of these niches in great detail. Here, we review the progress of the last several years, list some of the outstanding questions in the field and propose ways to target the diseased environment to better treat hematologic diseases. Understanding the extrinsic regulation by the niche will help boost hematopoiesis for regenerative medicine. Based on natural development of hematologic malignancies, we propose that combinatory targeting the niche and hematopoietic intrinsic mechanisms in early stages of hematopoietic malignancies may help eliminate minimal residual disease and have the highest efficacy. © 2018 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Effect of combined therapeutic methods on healing of periodontal vertical bone defects in regenerative surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dori, Ferenc

    2009-03-15

    Several methods are available to enhance the healing and regeneration of periodontal tissues after surgical therapy of intrabony defects. The main indications for the use of combined regenerative procedures are the extent and morphology of the osseous lesions. The six studies of the present dissertation focused on the clinical effect of different barrier techniques, bone substitutes, enamel matrix derivatives and a growth factors containing adjuvant used in various combinations on the healing of severe periodontal intrabony impairments. Synthetic, xenogenetic and autologous materials were used in these randomized clinical studies. Mechanical barriers (polytetrafluoroethylene and collagen membranes) for GTR, biological barriers/enamel matrix proteins (EMD), synthetic (beta-TCP) and xenogeneic (NBM) bone grafts and autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were combined in the test and control groups of the trials. The main clinical variable was the clinical attachment level (CAL) and the subsidiary one was the probing pocket depth (PPD), estimated at baseline and after one year. The summation of the results after the statistical analysis takes cognizance of the followings: a) Each of the eleven regenerative methods evaluated (ten combined procedures) leads to significant CAL gain and PPD decrease. b) Using beta-TCP or NBM with EMD or with PRP+GTR and GTR's, the difference between the parameters of the test and control groups were not statistically significant. c) It was confirmed in four studies that the addition of PRP to graft materials has not increased significantly the positive outcomes independent of the type of barrier or graft. d) Adding platelet-rich plasma to natural bone mineral, no benefit was observed from the point of view of the clinical variables. e) The polypeptide proteins of the platelet-rich plasma do not enhance the clinical regenerative effect of enamel matrix proteins. In conclusion, the option of the periodontal surgeons between these methods

  14. Regenerative potential and healing dynamics of the periodontium: a critical-size supra-alveolar periodontal defect study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, Giuseppe; Susin, Cristiano; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2009-03-01

    The nature and characteristics of the newly formed periodontium obtained following regenerative procedures remain a matter of controversy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regenerative potential of the periodontal attachment and healing dynamics as observed from the spatial distribution of newly formed cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone following optimal circumstances for wound healing/regeneration in a discriminating animal model. Critical-size, 6-mm, supra-alveolar, periodontal defects were surgically created in six young adult Beagle dogs. Space-providing ePTFE devices with 300-microm laser-drilled pores were implanted to support wound stability and space provision in one jaw quadrant/animal. Treatments were alternated between left and right jaw quadrants in subsequent animals. The gingival flaps were advanced to submerge the defect sites for primary intention healing. Histometric analysis followed an 8-week healing interval. Healing was uneventful in all animals. The histometric analysis showed that cementum regeneration (2.99 +/- 0.22 mm) was significantly greater than PDL (2.54 +/- 0.18 mm, p=0.03) and bone regeneration (2.46 +/- 0.26 mm, p=0.03). The wound area showed significant positive non-linear effect on cementum (log beta=1.25, palveolar bone virtually regenerate in parallel under optimal circumstances for periodontal wound healing/regeneration. Moreover, space provision positively influences the extent of periodontal regeneration.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem and Progenitor Cells in Regeneration: Tissue Specificity and Regenerative Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohban, Rokhsareh; Pieber, Thomas Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    It has always been an ambitious goal in medicine to repair or replace morbid tissues for regaining the organ functionality. This challenge has recently gained momentum through considerable progress in understanding the biological concept of the regenerative potential of stem cells. Routine therapeutic procedures are about to shift towards the use of biological and molecular armamentarium. The potential use of embryonic stem cells and invention of induced pluripotent stem cells raised hope for clinical regenerative purposes; however, the use of these interventions for regenerative therapy showed its dark side, as many health concerns and ethical issues arose in terms of using these cells in clinical applications. In this regard, adult stem cells climbed up to the top list of regenerative tools and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) showed promise for regenerative cell therapy with a rather limited level of risk. MSC have been successfully isolated from various human tissues and they have been shown to offer the possibility to establish novel therapeutic interventions for a variety of hard-to-noncurable diseases. There have been many elegant studies investigating the impact of MSC in regenerative medicine. This review provides compact information on the role of stem cells, in particular, MSC in regeneration.

  16. Aging of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells: Implications on autologous regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charif, N; Li, Y Y; Targa, L; Zhang, L; Ye, J S; Li, Y P; Stoltz, J F; Han, H Z; de Isla, N

    2017-01-01

    With their proliferation, differentiation into specific cell types, and secretion properties, mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) are very interesting tools to be used in regenerative medicine. Bone marrow (BM) was the first MSC source characterized. In the frame of autologous MSC therapy, it is important to detect donor's parameters affecting MSC potency. Age of the donors appears as one parameter that could greatly affect MSC properties. Moreover, in vitro cell expansion is needed to obtain the number of cells necessary for clinical developments. It will lead to in vitro cell aging that could modify cell properties. This review recapitulates several studies evaluating the effect of in vitro and in vivo MSC aging on cell properties.

  17. Standardized in vivo model for studying novel regenerative approaches for multitissue bone-ligament interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padial-Molina, Miguel; Rodriguez, Juan C; Volk, Sarah L; Rios, Hector F

    2015-07-01

    The regeneration of the original structure and function of bone-ligament interfaces remains a major challenge in biomedical research. A preclinical model that maintains physiologic mechanical loads and controls for other external factors, such as microbial influence, is of great value for testing novel regenerative materials, provided that studies are performed by highly trained researchers with proper regard for animal welfare. The tooth root fenestration preclinical model is an ideal tool for hard tissue evaluation by micro-computed tomography, histological techniques and RNA analyses. The procedure starts with an extraoral incision lateral to the mandible and reflection of the masseter muscle. Superficial lateral mandibular bone is removed with standardized dimensions to expose the roots of the teeth and to eliminate periodontal ligament and cementum to expose the tooth dentin. The testing material can subsequently be applied to the defect and the flap can be repositioned and secured back in place. At specific time points, samples are collected and processed according to the subsequent analyses to be performed, which can include descriptive histology, histomorphometry, immunostaining, 3D bone imaging, electron microscopy, gene expression analyses and safety assessments.

  18. Adipose-derived stem cells retain their regenerative potential after methotrexate treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, Olivia S. [Center for Biomedical Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Fonseca, Vera C. [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biotechnology, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Darling, Eric M., E-mail: Eric_Darling@brown.edu [Center for Biomedical Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biotechnology, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Department of Orthopaedics, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2014-10-01

    In musculoskeletal tissues like bone, chemotherapy can impair progenitor cell differentiation and proliferation, resulting in decreased bone growth and mineralization throughout a patient's lifetime. In the current study, we investigated the effects of chemotherapeutics on adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) function to determine whether this cell source could be a candidate for repairing, or even preventing, chemotherapy-induced tissue damage. Dose-dependent proliferation rates of ASCs and normal human fibroblasts (NHFs) were quantified after treatment with cytarabine (CY), etoposide (ETO), methotrexate (MTX), and vincristine (VIN) using a fluorescence-based assay. The influence of MTX on the multipotency of ASCs and freshly isolated stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells was also evaluated using lineage-specific stains and spectrophotometry. ASC and NHF proliferation were equally inhibited by exposure to CY and ETO; however, when treated with MTX and VIN, ASCs exhibited greater resistance. This was especially apparent for MTX-treated samples, with ASC proliferation showing no inhibition for clinically relevant MTX doses ranging from 0.1 to 50 μM. Additional experiments revealed that the differentiation potential of ASCs was not affected by MTX treatment and that upregulation of dihydrofolate reductase possibly contributed to this response. Moreover, SVF cells, which include ASCs, exhibited similar resistance to MTX impairment, with respect to cellular proliferation, clonogenicity, and differentiation capability. Therefore, we have shown that the regenerative properties of ASCs resist the cytotoxicity of MTX, identifying these cells as a potential key for repairing musculoskeletal damage in patients undergoing chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Long-term effects of chemotherapeutics can include musculoskeletal dysfunction. • A screen of common drugs showed disparate effects on ASCs and fibroblasts. • One drug, methotrexate, did not impair ASC growth

  19. Potential sources of stem cells as a regenerative therapy for Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Oueida El-Sadik

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abir Oueida El-SadikDepartment of Anatomy and Embryology, Scientific Research Unit, Female Health Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Stem cells are believed to hold enormous promise as potential replacement therapy in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD. Stem cells were investigated to be the alternative therapeutic source capable of differentiating into dopamine (DA neurons. Multiple important signaling factors were recorded for the induction of DA neuronal traits from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs such as fibroblast growth factor 8, sonic hedgehog, and Wnt 1. Recent protocols were described for the differentiation of human ESCs into DA neurons, achieving high efficiency of DA neuronal derivation. Despite that, the use of human ESCs is still ethically controversial. The transcription factors necessary for DA neuron development from adult neural stem cells (NSCs, such as Pitx3, Nurr1, En-1, En-2, Lmx1a, Lmx1b, Msx1, and Ngn2, were investigated. In addition to replacement of lost DA neurons, adult NSCs were recorded to provide neuroprotective and neurogenic factors for the mesencephalon. In addition, induced pluripotent stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells represent reliable stem cell sources of DA neurons. Future studies are recommended to provide further insight into the regenerative capacity of stem cells needed for the treatment of PD.Keywords: dopamine, embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, Parkinson's disease, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells

  20. Harnessing the potential of lung stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQualter, Jonathan L; Anthony, Desiree; Bozinovski, Steven; Prêle, Cecilia M; Laurent, Geoffrey J

    2014-11-01

    In response to recurrent exposure to environmental insults such as allergens, pollution, irritants, smoke and viral/bacterial infection, the epithelium of the lung is continually damaged. Homeostasis of the lung requires a balance between immune regulation and promotion of tissue regeneration, which requires the co-ordinated proliferation and differentiation of stem and progenitor cells. In this review we reflect on the current understanding of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and advocate a model hierarchy in which self-renewing multipotent lung epithelial stem cells give rise to lineage restricted progenitor cells that repopulate airway and alveolar epithelial cell lineages during homeostasis and repair. We also discuss the role of mesenchymal progenitor cells in maintaining the structural integrity of the lung and propose a model in which mesenchymal cells act as the quintessential architects of lung regeneration by providing molecular signals, such as FGF-10, to regulate the fate and specificity of epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Moreover, we discuss the current status and future prospects for translating lung stem cell therapies to the clinic to replace, repair, or regenerate diseased lung tissue. This article is part of a directed issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment outcomes of implants performed after regenerative treatment of absorbed alveolar bone due to the severe periodontal disease and endoscopic surgery for maxillary sinus lift without bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Rikimaru, Hideaki; Kiyokawa, Munekatsu; Fukaya, Hajime; Sakaguchi, Shinji

    2013-09-01

    We have developed a regenerative medicine therapy for the alveolar bone and endoscopic surgery for maxillary sinus lift without bone grafts, in patients experiencing severe periodontal disease with significant absorption of the maxillary alveolar bone, in which more than 10 mm of bone thickness in the maxillary bone was attained, with satisfactory results. The objective of this study was to examine the treatment outcomes of implants that were performed after these therapies. The participants were 36 patients with severe periodontal disease, who cannot be cured with any other treatments except the extirpation of all teeth. The 36 patients are all patients who underwent regenerative treatment of the alveolar bone through tooth replantation and transplantation of the iliac cancellous bone (the bone marrow) as well as endoscopic surgery for maxillary sinus lift from May 2003 to July 2007 in our clinic. A total of 120 implants were placed in these patients when the replanted teeth fell out because of root resorption, and the success rate was examined. The success rates of the implants were 16 of 33 (48%) in the group when surveyed less than 2 years after the surgery and 84 of 87 (96.5%) in the group when surveyed more than 2 years after the surgery. A statistically significant difference was found between the 2 groups (Chi-squared test, P implant placement. Therefore, although the implant treatment should be performed later than 2 years after surgery, chewing is possible during this period, with the replanted teeth that were used for regenerative treatment of the alveolar bone. It is believed that this is an extremely effective treatment method to improve the patients' quality of life.

  2. Capturing the Regenerative Potential of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Springstead Scanlon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell population within the periodontal ligament (PDL tissue is remarkably heterogeneous1. Fibroblasts, a mixed population of cells, are the main cellular component of the PDL and the cell type most often studied for periodontal regeneration. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts are found on the bone side, while fibroblasts, macrophages, undifferentiated adult/mesenchymal stem cells, neural elements, and endothelial cells are found throughout the PDL. Epithelial rests of Malassez cells and cementoblasts are focused near the root surface. PDL tissue also includes loose connective tissue between dense fiber bundles that contain branches of the periodontal blood vessels and nerves2. The complexity of the PDL tissue, with its various cell types and cell progenitor components, explains the challenges involved in therapies to restore tissue following periodontal disease. Cementoblasts, osteoblasts, and endothelial cells must migrate, differentiate, and coordinately interact with a variety of soluble mediators to regenerate the periodontium3. Stem cells located in the PDL tissue are key contributors to this process4. Stem cells in the PDL are important not only for formation and maintenance of the tissue but also for repair, remodeling, and regeneration of adjacent alveolar bone and cementum5. Our laboratory has shown that progenitor cells isolated from PDL tissue by selection with cell surface markers STRO-1+ and CD146+ are capable of differentiating into chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic phenotypes under appropriate culture conditions6.

  3. Characterization of the enhanced bone regenerative capacity of human periodontal ligament stem cells engineered to express the gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Im-Hee; Lee, Si-Ho; Jun, Choong-Man; Oh, Namsik; Yun, Jeong-Ho

    2014-08-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) are considered an appropriate cell source for therapeutic strategies. The aims of this study were to investigate the sustainability of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) secretion and the bone regenerative capacity of hPDLSCs that had been genetically modified to express the gene encoding BMP2 (BMP2). hPDLSCs isolated from healthy third molars were transduced using replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus (rAd) encoding BMP2 (hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2), and the cellular characteristics and osteogenic potentials of hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 were analyzed both in vitro and in vivo. hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 successfully secreted BMP2, formed colonies, and expressed immunophenotypes similar to their nontransduced counterparts. As to their osteogenic potential, hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 formed greater mineralized nodules and exhibited significantly higher levels of expression of BMP2 and the gene encoding alkaline phosphatase, and formed more and better quality bone than other hPDLSC-containing or recombinant human BMP2-treated groups, being localized at the initial site until 8 weeks. The findings of the present study demonstrate that hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 effectively promote osteogenesis not only in vitro but also in vivo. The findings also suggest that hPDLSCs can efficiently carry and deliver BMP2, and that hPDLSCs/rAd-BMP2 could be used in an attractive novel therapeutic approach for the regeneration of deteriorated bony defects.

  4. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF in implant dentistry in combination with new bone regenerative technique in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cortese, MD, DDS

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The main advantages in using the platelet-rich fibrin are healing and bone regenerative properties in combination with its complete resorption after surgery, thus avoiding a second surgery time, important factor in the elderly patients. Currently, it is a minimally invasive technique with low risks and satisfactory clinical results such preventing complications or implant failure particularly in elderly patients for age related conditions.

  5. Bone marrow transplantation for research and regenerative therapies in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, David; Alonso, José Ramón; Weruaga, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stem cells are probably the best known stem cell type and have been employed for more than 50 years, especially in pathologies related to the hematopoietic and immune systems. However, their potential for therapeutic application is much broader (because these cells can differentiate into hepatocytes, myocytes, cardiomyocytes, pneumocytes or neural cells, among others), and they can also presumably be employed to palliate neural diseases. Current research addressing the integration of bone marrow -derived cells in the neural circuits of the central nervous system together with their features and applications are hotspots in current Neurobiology. Nevertheless, as in other leading research lines the efficacy and possibilities of their therapeutic application depend on the technical procedures employed, which are still far from being standardized. In this chapter we shall explain one of these procedures in depth, namely the transplantation of whole bone marrow from harvested bone marrow stem cells for subsequent integration into the encephalon.

  6. Regenerative treatment in osteochondral lesions of the talus: autologous chondrocyte implantation versus one-step bone marrow derived cells transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buda, Roberto; Vannini, Francesca; Castagnini, Francesco; Cavallo, Marco; Ruffilli, Alberto; Ramponi, Laura; Pagliazzi, Gherardo; Giannini, Sandro

    2015-05-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLT) usually require surgical treatment. Regenerative techniques for hyaline cartilage restoration, like autologous chondrocytes implantation (ACI) or bone marrow derived cells transplantation (BMDCT), should be preferred. The aim of this work is comparing two clusters with OLT, treated with ACI or BMDCT. Eighty patients were treated with regenerative techniques, 40 with ACI and 40 with BMDCT. The two groups were homogenous regarding age, lesion size and depth, previous surgeries, etiology of the lesion, subchondral bone graft, final follow-up and pre-operative AOFAS score. The two procedures were performed arthroscopically. The scaffold was a hyaluronic acid membrane in all the cases, loaded with previously cultured chondrocytes (ACI) or with bone marrow concentrated cells, harvested in the same surgical session (BMDCT). All the patients were clinically and radiologically evaluated, using MRI Mocart score and T2 mapping sequence. Clinical results were similar in both groups at 48 months. No statistically significant influence was reported after evaluation of all the pre-operative parameters. The rate of return to sport activity showed slightly better results for BMDCT than ACI. MRI Mocart score was similar in both groups. MRI T2 mapping evaluation highlighted a higher presence of hyaline like values in the BMDCT group, and lower incidence of fibrocartilage as well. To date, ACI and BMDCT showed to be effective regenerative techniques for the treatment of OLT. BMDCT could be preferred over ACI for the single step procedure, patients' discomfort and lower costs.

  7. Enhanced Regenerative Braking Strategies for Electric Vehicles: Dynamic Performance and Potential Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyi Xiao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A regenerative braking system and hydraulic braking system are used in conjunction in the majority of electric vehicles worldwide. We propose a new regenerative braking distribution strategy that is based on multi-input fuzzy control logic while considering the influences of the battery’s state of charge, the brake strength and the motor speed. To verify the braking performance and recovery economy, this strategy was applied to a battery electric vehicle model and compared with two other improved regenerative braking strategies. The performance simulation was performed using standard driving cycles (NEDC, LA92, and JP1015 and a real-world-based urban cycle in China. The tested braking strategies satisfied the general safety requirements of Europe (as specified in ECE-13H, and the emergency braking scenario and economic potential were tested. The simulation results demonstrated the differences in the braking force distribution performance of these three regenerative braking strategies, the feasibility of the braking methods for the proposed driving cycles and the energy economic potential of the three strategies.

  8. Concise Review: Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells: The Known, the Unknown, and Potential Regenerative Medicine Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukogeorgakis, Stavros P; De Coppi, Paolo

    2017-07-01

    The amniotic fluid has been identified as an untapped source of cells with broad potential, which possess immunomodulatory properties and do not have the ethical and legal limitations of embryonic stem cells. CD117(c-Kit)+ cells selected from amniotic fluid have been shown to differentiate into cell lineages representing all three embryonic germ layers without generating tumors, making them ideal candidates for regenerative medicine applications. Moreover, their ability to engraft in injured organs and modulate immune and repair responses of host tissues, suggest that transplantation of such cells may be useful for the treatment of various degenerative and inflammatory diseases. Although significant questions remain regarding the origin, heterogeneous phenotype, and expansion potential of amniotic fluid stem cells, evidence to date supports their potential role as a valuable stem cell source for the field of regenerative medicine. Stem Cells 2017;35:1663-1673. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  9. Oriented bone regenerative capacity of octacalcium phosphate/gelatin composites obtained through two-step crystal preparation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiko-Uzuka, Risa; Anada, Takahisa; Kobayashi, Kazuhito; Kawai, Tadashi; Tanuma, Yuji; Sasaki, Keiichi; Suzuki, Osamu

    2017-07-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether composite of coprecipitating octacalcium phosphate and gelatin (C-OCP/Gel) has an effect in repairing critical-sized defect of rat calvaria with oriented regenerative bone if implanted. The materials were prepared through two steps to disperse homogenous and well-elongated OCP toward long axis of the crystals in gelatin (Gel) matrix with the distinct concentration 17-44 wt %: OCP precipitates recovered from the coprecipitated with Gel molecules in aqueous solution (referred to as C-OCP hereafter) were mixed again in fresh aqueous Gel solution with various mixing ratio to form C-OCP/Gel for implantation. C-OCP/Gel disks with 9 mm diameter and 1 mm thickness after the dehydrothermal treatment was implanted in 9 mm diameter rat calvaria critical-sized defect. The histology, the histomorphometry in the regenerated bone and the quantitative analysis of the orientation of collagen with picrosirius red staining were carried out. It was found that C-OCP/Gel is capable of not only inducing sufficiently regenerative bone over 80% of the defect coupled with practically complete material biodegradation but also forming oriented bone significantly in relation to the amount of C-OCP in Gel matrix until 12 weeks after the implantation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1029-1039, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Ultrasound-Assisted Liposuction Does Not Compromise the Regenerative Potential of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duscher, Dominik; Atashroo, David; Maan, Zeshaan N; Luan, Anna; Brett, Elizabeth A; Barrera, Janos; Khong, Sacha M; Zielins, Elizabeth R; Whittam, Alexander J; Hu, Michael S; Walmsley, Graham G; Pollhammer, Michael S; Schmidt, Manfred; Schilling, Arndt F; Machens, Hans-Günther; Huemer, Georg M; Wan, Derrick C; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2016-02-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have recently become a focus of regenerative medicine, both for their multilineage differentiation capacity and their excretion of proregenerative cytokines. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are of particular interest because of their abundance in fat tissue and the ease of harvest via liposuction. However, little is known about the impact of different liposuction methods on the functionality of ASCs. Here we evaluate the regenerative abilities of ASCs harvested via a third-generation ultrasound-assisted liposuction (UAL) device versus ASCs obtained via standard suction-assisted lipoaspiration (SAL). Lipoaspirates were sorted using fluorescent assisted cell sorting based on an established surface-marker profile (CD34+/CD31-/CD45-), to obtain viable ASCs. Yield and viability were compared and the differentiation capacities of the ASCs were assessed. Finally, the regenerative potential of ASCs was examined using an in vivo model of tissue regeneration. UAL- and SAL-derived samples demonstrated equivalent ASC yield and viability, and UAL ASCs were not impaired in their osteogenic, adipogenic, or chondrogenic differentiation capacity. Equally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed comparable expression of most osteogenic, adipogenic, and key regenerative genes between both ASC groups. Cutaneous regeneration and neovascularization were significantly enhanced in mice treated with ASCs obtained by either UAL or SAL compared with controls, but there were no significant differences in healing between cell-therapy groups. We conclude that UAL is a successful method of obtaining fully functional ASCs for regenerative medicine purposes. Cells harvested with this alternative approach to liposuction are suitable for cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. Significance: Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are an appealing source of therapeutic progenitor cells because of their multipotency

  11. Ex vivo bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene delivery using periodontal ligament stem cells for enhanced re-osseointegration in the regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Gwak, Eun-Hye; Rhee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Jeong-Cheol; Shin, Seung-Yun; Koo, Ki-Tae; Lee, Yong-Moo; Seol, Yang-Jo

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a chronic inflammatory process with advanced bone loss and impaired healing potential. For peri-implantitis treatment, tissue engineering can be applied to enhance bone regeneration of peri-implant defects. This study aimed to evaluate ex vivo bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) gene delivery using canine periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) for regeneration of peri-implantitis defects. Canine PDLSCs were transduced with adenoviral vectors containing BMP2 (BMP2/PDLSCs). After peri-implantitis was induced by ligature placement in six beagle dogs, regenerative procedures were performed; hydroxyapatite (HA) particles and collagen gel with autologous canine PDLSCs (PDLSC group) or BMP2/PDLSCs (BMP/PDLSC group) or without cells (control group) were grafted into the defects and covered by an absorbable membrane. Three months later, the animals were sacrificed. In vitro, BMP2/PDLSCs showed similar levels of stem cell properties to PDLSCs, such as colony-forming efficiency and expression of MSC markers STRO-1 and CD 146. BMP2/PDLSCs produced BMP-2 until day 21 at a concentration of 4-8 ng/mL. In vivo, the BMP2/PDLSC group showed significantly more new bone formation and re-osseointegration in peri-implantitis defects compared to the other groups. In conclusion, ex vivo BMP2 gene delivery using PDLSCs enhanced new bone formation and re-osseointegration in peri-implantitis defects. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. "Young at heart": Regenerative potential linked to immature cardiac phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Renata S M; Skroblin, Philipp; Munster, Alex B; Tomlins, Hannah; Langley, Sarah R; Zampetaki, Anna; Yin, Xiaoke; Wardle, Fiona C; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The adult human myocardium is incapable of regeneration; yet, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can regenerate damaged myocardium. Similar to the zebrafish heart, hearts of neonatal, but not adult mice are capable of myocardial regeneration. We performed a proteomics analysis of adult zebrafish hearts and compared their protein expression profile to hearts from neonatal and adult mice. Using difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE), there was little overlap between the proteome from adult mouse (>8weeks old) and adult zebrafish (18months old) hearts. Similarly, there was a significant degree of mismatch between the protein expression in neonatal and adult mouse hearts. Enrichment analysis of the selected proteins revealed over-expression of DNA synthesis-related proteins in the cardiac proteome of the adult zebrafish heart similar to neonatal and 4days old mice, whereas in hearts of adult mice there was a mitochondria-related predominance in protein expression. Importantly, we noted pronounced differences in the myofilament composition: the adult zebrafish heart lacks many of the myofilament proteins of differentiated adult cardiomyocytes such as the ventricular isoforms of myosin light chains and nebulette. Instead, troponin I and myozenin 1 were expressed as skeletal isoforms rather than cardiac isoforms. The relative immaturity of the adult zebrafish heart was further supported by cardiac microRNA data. Our assessment of zebrafish and mammalian hearts challenges the assertions on the translational potential of cardiac regeneration in the zebrafish model. The immature myofilament composition of the fish heart may explain why adult mouse and human cardiomyocytes lack this endogenous repair mechanism. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Aging Periosteal Progenitor Cells have Reduced Regenerative Responsiveness to Bone Injury and to the Anabolic Actions of PTH 1-34 Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukata, Kiminori; Xie, Chao; Li, Tian-Fang; Takahata, Masahiko; Hoak, Donna; Kondabolu, Sirish; Zhang, Xinping; Awad, Hani A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Beck, Christopher A.; Jonason, Jennifer H.; O’Keefe, Regis J.

    2014-01-01

    A stabilized tibia fracture model was used in young (8-week old) and aged (1-year old) mice to define the relative bone regenerative potential and the relative responsiveness of the periosteal progenitor population with aging and PTH 1-34 (PTH) systemic therapy. Bone regeneration was assessed through gene expressions, radiographic imaging, histology/histomorphometry, and biomechanical testing. Radiographs and microCT showed increased calcified callus tissue and enhanced bone healing in young compared to aged mice. A key mechanism involved reduced proliferation, expansion, and differentiation of periosteal progenitor cell populations in aged mice. The experiments showed that PTH increased calcified callus tissue and torsional strength with a greater response in young mice. Histology and quantitative histomorphometry confirmed that PTH increased callus tissue area due primarily to an increase in bone formation, since minimal changes in cartilage and mesenchyme tissue area occurred. Periosteum examined at 3, 5, and 7 days showed that PTH increased cyclin D1 expression, the total number of cells in the periosteum, and width of the periosteal regenerative tissue. Gene expression showed that aging delayed differentiation of both bone and cartilage tissues during fracture healing. PTH resulted in sustained Col10a1 expression consistent with delayed chondrocyte maturation, but otherwise minimally altered cartilage gene expression. In contrast, PTH 1-34 stimulated expression of Runx2 and Osterix, but resulted in reduced Osteocalcin. β-catenin staining was present in mesenchymal chondroprogenitors and chondrocytes in early fracture healing, but was most intense in osteoblastic cells at later times. PTH increased active β-catenin staining in the osteoblast populations of both young and aged mice, but had a lesser effect in cartilage. Altogether the findings show that reduced fracture healing in aging involves decreased proliferation and differentiation of stem cells lining

  14. A case of cellular alchemy: lineage reprogramming and its potential in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuelime, Grace E; Shi, Yanhong

    2012-08-01

    The field of regenerative medicine is rapidly gaining momentum as an increasing number of reports emerge concerning the induced conversions observed in cellular fate reprogramming. While in recent years, much attention has been focused on the conversion of fate-committed somatic cells to an embryonic-like or pluripotent state, there are still many limitations associated with the applications of induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming, including relatively low reprogramming efficiency, the times required for the reprogramming event to take place, the epigenetic instability, and the tumorigenicity associated with the pluripotent state. On the other hand, lineage reprogramming involves the conversion from one mature cell type to another without undergoing conversion to an unstable intermediate. It provides an alternative approach in regenerative medicine that has a relatively lower risk of tumorigenesis and increased efficiency within specific cellular contexts. While lineage reprogramming provides exciting potential, there is still much to be assessed before this technology is ready to be applied in a clinical setting.

  15. Chitosan and Its Potential Use as a Scaffold for Tissue Engineering in Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Martin; Vega-Ruiz, Brenda; Ramos-Zúñiga, Rodrigo; Saldaña-Koppel, Daniel Alexander; Quiñones-Olvera, Luis Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an important therapeutic strategy to be used in regenerative medicine in the present and in the future. Functional biomaterials research is focused on the development and improvement of scaffolding, which can be used to repair or regenerate an organ or tissue. Scaffolds are one of the crucial factors for tissue engineering. Scaffolds consisting of natural polymers have recently been developed more quickly and have gained more popularity. These include chitosan, a copolymer derived from the alkaline deacetylation of chitin. Expectations for use of these scaffolds are increasing as the knowledge regarding their chemical and biological properties expands, and new biomedical applications are investigated. Due to their different biological properties such as being biocompatible, biodegradable, and bioactive, they have given the pattern for use in tissue engineering for repair and/or regeneration of different tissues including skin, bone, cartilage, nerves, liver, and muscle. In this review, we focus on the intrinsic properties offered by chitosan and its use in tissue engineering, considering it as a promising alternative for regenerative medicine as a bioactive polymer. PMID:26504833

  16. Chitosan and Its Potential Use as a Scaffold for Tissue Engineering in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is an important therapeutic strategy to be used in regenerative medicine in the present and in the future. Functional biomaterials research is focused on the development and improvement of scaffolding, which can be used to repair or regenerate an organ or tissue. Scaffolds are one of the crucial factors for tissue engineering. Scaffolds consisting of natural polymers have recently been developed more quickly and have gained more popularity. These include chitosan, a copolymer derived from the alkaline deacetylation of chitin. Expectations for use of these scaffolds are increasing as the knowledge regarding their chemical and biological properties expands, and new biomedical applications are investigated. Due to their different biological properties such as being biocompatible, biodegradable, and bioactive, they have given the pattern for use in tissue engineering for repair and/or regeneration of different tissues including skin, bone, cartilage, nerves, liver, and muscle. In this review, we focus on the intrinsic properties offered by chitosan and its use in tissue engineering, considering it as a promising alternative for regenerative medicine as a bioactive polymer.

  17. Regenerative potential and anti-bacterial activity of tetracycline loaded apatitic nanocarriers for the treatment of periodontitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhumathi, K; Sampath Kumar, T S

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment of periodontal infections includes mechanical debridement, administration of antibiotics and bone grafting. Oral administration of antibiotics results in undesirable side effects, while current modes of local administration are affected by problems concerning allergic response to the polymeric carrier agents. We have developed an osteoconductive drug delivery system composed of apatitic nanocarriers capable of providing sustained delivery of drugs in the periodontium. Calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanocarriers of different Ca/P ratios were synthesized and characterized using the x-ray diffraction method, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the BET gas isotherm method. Loading and release studies performed with tetracycline showed a sustained release of up to 88% in phosphate buffered saline over a period of five days. Antibacterial activity studies showed that the tetracycline loaded CDHA (TC-CDHA) nanocarriers were effective against S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. The biocompatibility of the TC-CDHA nanocarriers was demonstrated using an alamar blue assay and further characterized by cell uptake studies. Interestingly, cell uptake of drug loaded CDHA also increased the cellular proliferation of human periodontal ligament fibroblast cells. Hence, it can be concluded that the CDHA nanocarriers are ideal drug delivery agents and have bone regenerative potential for local periodontal applications. (paper)

  18. High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Identifies a Subset of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with Vascular Regenerative Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Stephen E; Kuljanin, Miljan; Cooper, Tyler T; Putman, David M; Lajoie, Gilles A; Hess, David A

    2017-06-01

    During culture expansion, multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentially express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), an intracellular detoxification enzyme that protects long-lived cells against oxidative stress. Thus, MSC selection based on ALDH-activity may be used to reduce heterogeneity and distinguish MSC subsets with improved regenerative potency. After expansion of human bone marrow-derived MSCs, cell progeny was purified based on low versus high ALDH-activity (ALDH hi ) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and each subset was compared for multipotent stromal and provascular regenerative functions. Both ALDH l ° and ALDH hi MSC subsets demonstrated similar expression of stromal cell (>95% CD73 + , CD90 + , CD105 + ) and pericyte (>95% CD146 + ) surface markers and showed multipotent differentiation into bone, cartilage, and adipose cells in vitro. Conditioned media (CDM) generated by ALDH hi MSCs demonstrated a potent proliferative and prosurvival effect on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) under serum-free conditions and augmented HMVEC tube-forming capacity in growth factor-reduced matrices. After subcutaneous transplantation within directed in vivo angiogenesis assay implants into immunodeficient mice, ALDH hi MSC or CDM produced by ALDH hi MSC significantly augmented murine vascular cell recruitment and perfused vessel infiltration compared with ALDH l ° MSC. Although both subsets demonstrated strikingly similar mRNA expression patterns, quantitative proteomic analyses performed on subset-specific CDM revealed the ALDH hi MSC subset uniquely secreted multiple proangiogenic cytokines (vascular endothelial growth factor beta, platelet derived growth factor alpha, and angiogenin) and actively produced multiple factors with chemoattractant (transforming growth factor-β, C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 1, 2, and 3 (GRO), C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 (RANTES), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8) and matrix

  19. Regenerative Potential of Ependymal Cells for Spinal Cord Injuries Over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have a high therapeutic potential for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI. We have shown previously that endogenous stem cell potential is confined to ependymal cells in the adult spinal cord which could be targeted for non-invasive SCI therapy. However, ependymal cells are an understudied cell population. Taking advantage of transgenic lines, we characterize the appearance and potential of ependymal cells during development. We show that spinal cord stem cell potential in vitro is contained within these cells by birth. Moreover, juvenile cultures generate more neurospheres and more oligodendrocytes than adult ones. Interestingly, juvenile ependymal cells in vivo contribute to glial scar formation after severe but not mild SCI, due to a more effective sealing of the lesion by other glial cells. This study highlights the importance of the age-dependent potential of stem cells and post-SCI environment in order to utilize ependymal cell's regenerative potential.

  20. Bone Regenerative Medicine in Oral and Maxillofacial Region Using a Three-Dimensional Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikita, Atsuhiko; Chung, Ung-Il; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2017-06-01

    Bone grafts currently used for the treatment of large bone defect or asymmetry in oral and maxillofacial region include autologous, allogeneic, and artificial bones. Although artificial bone is free from the concerns of donor site morbidity, limitation of volume, disease transmission, and ethical issues, it lacks osteogenic and osteoinductive activities. In addition, molding of the artificial bone is an issue especially when it is used for the augmentation of bone as onlay grafts. To solve this problem, additive manufacturing techniques have been applied to fabricate bones which have outer shapes conformed to patients' bones. We developed a custom-made artificial bone called a computed tomography (CT)-bone. Efficacy of CT-bone was proven in a clinical research and clinical trial, showing good manipulability, stability, and patient satisfaction. However, low replacement rate of artificial bones by endogenous bones remain an unsolved issue. Loading of cells and growth factors will improve the bone replacement by inducing osteogenic and osteoinductive activities. In addition, the three-dimensional bioprinting technique will facilitate bone regeneration by placing cells and biological substances into appropriate sites.

  1. Aging and Adipose Tissue: Potential Interventions for Diabetes and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Allyson K.; Kirkland, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue dysfunction occurs with aging and has systemic effects, including peripheral insulin resistance, ectopic lipid deposition, and inflammation. Fundamental aging mechanisms, including cellular senescence and progenitor cell dysfunction, occur in adipose tissue with aging and may serve as potential therapeutic targets in age-related disease. In this review, we examine the role of adipose tissue in healthy individuals and explore how aging leads to adipose tissue dysfunction, redistribution, and changes in gene regulation. Adipose tissue plays a central role in longevity, and interventions restricted to adipose tissue may impact lifespan. Conversely, obesity may represent a state of accelerated aging. We discuss the potential therapeutic potential of targeting basic aging mechanisms, including cellular senescence, in adipose tissue, using type II diabetes and regenerative medicine as examples. We make the case that aging should not be neglected in the study of adipose-derived stem cells for regenerative medicine strategies, as elderly patients make up a large portion of individuals in need of such therapies. PMID:26924669

  2. Assessment of the regenerative potential of allogeneic periodontal ligament stem cells in a rodent periodontal defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J; Menicanin, D; Marino, V; Ge, S; Mrozik, K; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2014-06-01

    The complex microenvironment of the periodontal wound creates many challenges associated with multitissue regeneration of periodontal lesions. Recent characterization of mesenchymal stem cell-like populations residing in periodontal ligament tissues has shown that these cells exhibit features of postnatal stem cells. Despite these advances, a lack of consistency in design of preclinical studies and a limited study of allogeneic transplantation applications has restricted our understanding of their clinical utility in the treatment of periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to assess the regenerative potential of allogeneic periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) in a rat periodontal fenestration defect mode and to identify an optimal end time-point suitable for quantitative assessment of tissue regeneration. Periodontal fenestration defects, created in Sprague Dawley rats, were treated with allogeneic PDLSCs seeded onto Gelfoam(®) (Absorbable gelatin sponge; Pharmacia Corporation, Kalamazoo, MI, USA) or with Gelfoam(®) alone, or remained untreated. Experimental rats were killed at 7, 14, 21 or 28 d after surgery and the tissues were processed for immunohistochemical and histomorphometric examination. Defects treated with PDLSCs showed significantly greater percentage bone fill and length of new bone bridge compared with the untreated group or the group treated with Gelfoam(®) alone on days 14 and 21. Similarly, a statistically significant difference was achieved within specimens retrieved on day 21 for analysis of regeneration of cementum/periodontal ligament (PDL)-like structures. The present investigation shows that allogeneic PDLSCs have a marked ability to repair periodontal defects by forming bone, PDL and cementum-like tissue in vivo. The results suggest that treatment periods of 14 and 21 d are optimal end time-points for quantitative assessment of periodontal regeneration within the rodent fenestration-defect model utilized in the present study

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells from rats with chronic kidney disease exhibit premature senescence and loss of regenerative potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mara Klinkhammer

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation has the potential for organ repair. Nevertheless, some factors might lessen the regenerative potential of MSCs, e.g. donor age or systemic disease. It is thus important to carefully assess the patient's suitability for autologous MSC transplantation. Here we investigated the effects of chronic kidney disease (CKD on MSC function. We isolated bone marrow MSCs from remnant kidney rats (RK with CKD (CKD-RK-MSC and found signs of premature senescence: spontaneous adipogenesis, reduced proliferation capacity, active senescence-associated-β-galactosidase, accumulation of actin and a modulated secretion profile. The functionality of CKD-RK-MSCs in vivo was tested in rats with acute anti-Thy1.1-nephritis, where healthy MSCs have been shown to be beneficial. Rats received healthy MSCs, CKD-RK-MSC or medium by injection into the left renal artery. Kidneys receiving healthy MSCs exhibited accelerated healing of glomerular lesions, whereas CKD-RK-MSC or medium exerted no benefit. The negative influence of advanced CKD/uremia on MSCs was confirmed in a second model of CKD, adenine nephropathy (AD. MSCs from rats with adenine nephropathy (CKD-AD-MSC also exhibited cellular modifications and functional deficits in vivo. We conclude that CKD leads to a sustained loss of in vitro and in vivo functionality in MSCs, possibly due to premature cellular senescence. Considering autologous MSC therapy in human renal disease, studies identifying uremia-associated mechanisms that account for altered MSC function are urgently needed.

  4. The bone-regenerative properties of Emdogain adsorbed onto poly(D,L-lactic-coglycolic acid)/calcium phosphate composites in an ectopic and an orthotopic rat model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plachokova, A.S.; Dolder, J. van den; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone-regenerative properties of Emdogain in osseous and nonosseous sites. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the orthotopic study, unloaded poly(D,L-lactic-coglycolic acid)/calcium phosphate implants, and poly(D,L-lactic-coglycolic

  5. Potential of Adipose-derived stem cells in muscular regenerative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eForcales

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative capacity of skeletal muscles resides in satellite cells, a self-renewing population of muscle cells. Several studies are investigating epigenetic mechanisms that control myogenic proliferation and differentiation to find new approaches that could boost regeneration of endogenous myogenic progenitor populations. In recent years, a lot of effort has been applied to purify, expand and manipulate adult stem cells from muscle tissue. However, this population of endogenous myogenic progenitors in adults is limited and their access is difficult and invasive. Therefore, other sources of stem cells with potential to regenerate muscles need to be examined. An excellent candidate could be a population of adult stromal cells within fat characterized by mesenchymal properties, which have been termed adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs. These progenitor adult stem cells have been successfully differentiated in vitro to osteogenic, chondrogenic, neurogenic and myogenic lineages. Autologous adipose-derived stem cells are multipotent and can be harvested with low morbidity; thus, they hold promise for a range of therapeutic applications. This review will discuss the use of ASCs in muscle regenerative approaches.

  6. Distinct regenerative potential of trunk and appendages ofDrosophilamediated by JNK signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Raquel; Pinal, Noelia; Morata, Ginés

    2017-11-01

    The Drosophila body comprises a central part, the trunk, and outgrowths of the trunk, the appendages. Much is known about appendage regeneration, but little about the trunk. As the wing imaginal disc contains a trunk component, the notum, and a wing appendage, we have investigated the response to ablation of these two components. We find that, in contrast with the strong regenerative response of the wing, the notum does not regenerate. Nevertheless, the elimination of the wing primordium elicits a proliferative response of notum cells, but they do not regenerate wing; they form a notum duplicate. Conversely, the wing cells cannot regenerate an ablated notum; they overproliferate and generate a hinge overgrowth. These results suggest that trunk and appendages cannot be reprogrammed to generate each other. Our experiments demonstrate that the proliferative response is mediated by JNK signalling from dying cells, but JNK functions differently in the trunk and the appendages, which may explain their distinct regenerative potential. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Elevated Expression of Dkk-1 by Glucocorticoid Treatment Impairs Bone Regenerative Capacity of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Toshiki; Khanh, Vuong Cat; Sato, Kazutoshi; Kimura, Kenichi; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Sugaya, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Mishima, Hajime; Ohneda, Osamu

    2018-01-15

    Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones used as anti-inflammatory treatments. However, this strong immunomodulation causes undesirable side effects that impair bones, such as osteoporosis. Glucocorticoid therapy is a major risk factor for developing steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femur head (ONFH). Since ONFH is incurable, therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can differentiate into osteoblasts are a first-line choice. Bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) are often used as a source of stem cell therapy for ONFH, but their proliferative activity is impaired after steroid treatment. Adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs) may be an attractive alternative source; however, it is unknown whether AT-MSCs from steroid-induced ONFH (sAT-MSCs) have the same differentiation ability as BM-MSCs or normal AT-MSCs (nAT-MSCs). In this study, we demonstrate that nAT-MSCs chronically exposed to glucocorticoids show lower alkaline phosphatase activity leading to reduced osteogenic differentiation ability. This impaired osteogenesis is mediated by high expression of Dickkopf1 (Dkk-1) that inhibits wnt/β-catenin signaling. Increased Dkk-1 also causes impaired osteogenesis along with reductions in bone regenerative capacity in sAT-MSCs. Of note, plasma Dkk-1 levels are elevated in steroid-induced ONFH patients. Collectively, our findings suggest that glucocorticoid-induced expression of Dkk-1 could be a key factor in modulating the differentiation ability of MSCs used for ONFH and other stem cell therapies.

  8. Stem cell technology for bone regeneration: current status and potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asatrian G

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Greg Asatrian,1 Dalton Pham,1,2 Winters R Hardy,3 Aaron W James,1–3 Bruno Peault3,4 1Dental and Craniofacial Research Institute and Section of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, 3UCLA/Orthopaedic Hospital Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4Medical Research Council Centre for Regenerative Medicine, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK Abstract: Continued improvements in the understanding and application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have revolutionized tissue engineering. This is particularly true within the field of skeletal regenerative medicine. However, much remains unknown regarding the native origins of MSC, the relative advantages of different MSC populations for bone regeneration, and even the biologic safety of such unpurified, grossly characterized cells. This review will first summarize the initial discovery of MSC, as well as the current and future applications of MSC in bone tissue engineering. Next, the relative advantages and disadvantages of MSC isolated from distinct tissue origins are debated, including the MSC from adipose, bone marrow, and dental pulp, among others. The perivascular origin of MSC is next discussed. Finally, we briefly comment on pluripotent stem cell populations and their possible application in bone tissue engineering. While continually expanding, the field of MSC-based bone tissue engineering and regeneration shows potential to become a clinical reality in the not-so-distant future.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cell, pericyte, bone tissue engineering, MSC, ASC, DMSC

  9. Induced pluripotent stem cells: current progress and potential for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Giovanni; Meissner, Alexander

    2009-02-01

    Lineage-restricted cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state through overexpression of defined transcription factors. Here, we summarize recent progress in the direct reprogramming field and discuss data comparing embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Results from many independent groups suggest that mouse and human iPS cells, once established, generally exhibit a normal karyotype, are transcriptionally and epigenetically similar to ES cells and maintain the potential to differentiate into derivatives of all germ layers. Recent developments provide optimism that safe, viral-free human iPS cells could be derived routinely in the near future. An important next step will be to identify ways of assessing which iPS cell lines are sufficiently reprogrammed and safe to use for therapeutic applications. The approach of generating patient-specific pluripotent cells will undoubtedly transform regenerative medicine in many ways.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells: Identification, phenotypic characterization, biological properties and potential for regenerative medicine through biomaterial micro-engineering of their niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobolak, Julianna; Dinnyes, Andras; Memic, Adnan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-04-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells. Although they were originally identified in bone marrow and described as 'marrow stromal cells', they have since been identified in many other anatomical locations in the body. MSCs can be isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue, umbilical cord and other tissues but the richest tissue source of MSCs is fat. Since they are adherent to plastic, they may be expanded in vitro. MSCs have a distinct morphology and express a specific set of CD (cluster of differentiation) molecules. The phenotypic pattern for the identification of MSCs cells requires expression of CD73, CD90, and CD105 and lack of CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR antigens. Under appropriate micro-environmental conditions MSCs can proliferate and give rise to other cell types. Therefore, they are ideally suited for the treatment of systemic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. They have also been implicated as key players in regenerating injured tissue following injury and trauma. MSC populations isolated from adipose tissue may also contain regulatory T (Treg) cells, which have the capacity for modulating the immune system. The immunoregulatory and regenerative properties of MSCs make them ideal for use as therapeutic agents in vivo. In this paper we review the literature on the identification, phenotypic characterization and biological properties of MSCs and discuss their potential for applications in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. We also discuss strategies for biomaterial micro-engineering of the stem cell niche. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH OF REGENERATIVE FEATURES IN BONE TISSUES AROUND IMPLANTS AFTER ONE-STAGE BILATERAL TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

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    V. M. Mashkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to research the specific features of regenerative processes of bone tissue around implants after one-stage bilateral total hip replacement in experiment. Material and methods: 27 total hip replacement operations have been performed in 18 rabbits of breed "chinchilla" to which bipolar femoral endoprosthesis made of titanic alloy PT-38, one type-size, with friction pair metal-on-metal and neck-shaft angle 165 degrees have been implanted: total unilateral hip replacement operations have been performed in 9 animals (control group, one-stage bilateral total hip replacement operations have been performed in 9 animals (experimental group. During research they have been on radiological and clinical checking-up. After the experiment the animals had histological tests of the tissues around endoprosthesis components. Results and conclusions: After one-stage bilateral total hip replacement in early terms of research more expressed changes of bone tissue in the form of its thinning and decompaction were found around implants. One-stage bilateral total hip replacement did not essentially influence on the speed of osteogenesis around endoprothesis components in comparison with unilateral total hip replacement, so in late terms of observation in both groups the fixing of endoprothesis components did not differ.

  12. Human periodontal ligament stem cells cultured onto cortico-cancellous scaffold drive bone regenerative process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomede, F; Zini, N; Gatta, V; Fulle, S; Merciaro, I; D'Aurora, M; La Rovere, R M; Traini, T; Pizzicannella, J; Ballerini, P; Caputi, S; Piattelli, A; Trubiani, O

    2016-09-16

    The purpose of this work was to test, in vitro and in vivo, a new tissue-engineered construct constituted by porcine cortico-cancellous scaffold (Osteobiol Dual Block) (DB) and xeno-free ex vivo culture of human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (hPDLSCs). hPDLSCs cultured in xeno-free media formulation preserved the stem cells' morphological features, the expression of stemness and pluripotency markers, and their ability to differentiate into mesenchymal lineage. Transmission electron microscopy analysis suggested that after one week of culture, both noninduced and osteogenic differentiation induced cells joined and grew on DB secreting extracellular matrix (ECM) that in osteogenic induced samples was hierarchically assembled in fibrils. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) showed the upregulation of key genes involved in the bone differentiation pathway in both differentiated and undifferentiated hPDLSCs cultured with DB (hPDLSCs/DB). Functional studies revealed a significant increased response of calcium transients in the presence of DB, both in undifferentiated and differentiated cells stimulated with calcitonin and parathormone, suggesting that the biomaterial could drive the osteogenic differentiation process of hPDLSCs. These data were confirmed by the increase of gene expression of L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ (VDCCL), subunits α1C and α2D1 in undifferentiated cells in the presence of DB. In vivo implantation of the hPDLSCs/DB living construct in the mouse calvaria evidenced a precocious osteointegration and vascularisation process. Our results suggest consideration of DB as a biocompatible, osteoinductive and osteoconductive biomaterial, making it a promising tool to regulate cell activities in biological environments and for a potential use in the development of new custom-made tissue engineering.

  13. Alveolar socket preservation technique: Effect of biomaterial on bone regenerative pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canullo, Luigi; Pellegrini, Gaia; Canciani, Elena; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Galliera, Emanuela; Dellavia, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    There is a lack of evidence in the literature on the correlation between histomorphometric findings and gene/protein expression markers for bone metabolism. Evaluation of the histological features, changes in protein expression and gene activation for specific markers of bone metabolism following application of the alveolar ridge preservation technique with magnesium-enriched hydroxyapatite (MgHA). For each patient (n=15), bone samples were harvested after tooth extraction and processed for immunohistochemical and gene expression analysis (T0). Then, all alveolar sockets were grafted with MgHA. After 4 months (T1), bone samples were harvested for histomorphometrical, immunohistochemical and gene expression analysis. Gene expression and protein expression were evaluated for: RANK, RANKL, OPG, IL-6, TNF-α. For all markers, gene expression increased, but not significantly, from T0 to T1. The mean RANKL/OPG ratio was 1.88±1.24. Protein expression increased significantly (ppreservation with MgHA, markers for bone catabolism were activated. No significant correlation was found between histomorphometrical features of the regenerated tissue and protein expression at baseline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. 3D silicon doped hydroxyapatite scaffolds decorated with Elastin-like Recombinamers for bone regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Mercedes; García, Ana; Girotti, Alessandra; Alonso, Matilde; Rodríguez-Cabello, Jose Carlos; González-Vázquez, Arlyng; Planell, Josep A; Engel, Elisabeth; Buján, Julia; García-Honduvilla, Natalio; Vallet-Regí, María

    2016-11-01

    The current study reports on the manufacturing by rapid prototyping technique of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds based on silicon substituted hydroxyapatite with Elastin-like Recombinamers (ELRs) functionalized surfaces. Silicon doped hydroxyapatite (Si-HA), with Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 5.7 (SiO 4 ) 0.3 (OH) 1.7 h 0.3 nominal formula, was surface functionalized with two different types of polymers designed by genetic engineering: ELR-RGD that contain cell attachment specific sequences and ELR-SN A 15/RGD with both hydroxyapatite and cells domains that interact with the inorganic phase and with the cells, respectively. These hybrid materials were subjected to in vitro assays in order to clarify if the ELRs coating improved the well-known biocompatible and bone regeneration properties of calcium phosphates materials. The in vitro tests showed that there was a total and homogeneous colonization of the 3D scaffolds by Bone marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (BMSCs). In addition, the BMSCs were viable and able to proliferate and differentiate into osteoblasts. Bone tissue engineering is an area of increasing interest because its main applications are directly related to the rising life expectancy of the population, which promotes higher rates of several bone pathologies, so innovative strategies are needed for bone tissue regeneration therapies. Here we use the rapid prototyping technology to allow moulding ceramic 3D scaffolds and we use different bio-polymers for the functionalization of their surfaces in order to enhance the biological response. Combining the ceramic material (silicon doped hydroxyapatite, Si-HA) and the Elastin like Recombinamers (ELRs) polymers with the presence of the integrin-mediate adhesion domain alone or in combination with SNA15 peptide that possess high affinity for hydroxyapatite, provided an improved Bone marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (BMSCs) differentiation into osteoblastic linkage. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier

  15. Placenta Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Hosted on RKKP Glass-Ceramic: A Tissue Engineering Strategy for Bone Regenerative Medicine Applications

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    Mario Ledda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In tissue engineering protocols, the survival of transplanted stem cells is a limiting factor that could be overcome using a cell delivery matrix able to support cell proliferation and differentiation. With this aim, we studied the cell-friendly and biocompatible behavior of RKKP glass-ceramic coated Titanium (Ti surface seeded with human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs from placenta. The sol-gel synthesis procedure was used to prepare the RKKP glass-ceramic material, which was then deposited onto the Ti surface by Pulsed Laser Deposition method. The cell metabolic activity and proliferation rate, the cytoskeletal actin organization, and the cell cycle phase distribution in hAMSCs seeded on the RKKP coated Ti surface revealed no significant differences when compared to the cells grown on the treated plastic Petri dish. The health of of hAMSCs was also analysed studying the mRNA expressions of MSC key genes and the osteogenic commitment capability using qRT-PCR analysis which resulted in being unchanged in both substrates. In this study, the combination of the hAMSCs’ properties together with the bioactive characteristics of RKKP glass-ceramics was investigated and the results obtained indicate its possible use as a new and interesting cell delivery system for bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

  16. Microtissues in Cardiovascular Medicine: Regenerative Potential Based on a 3D Microenvironment

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    Julia Günter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More people die annually from cardiovascular diseases than from any other cause. In particular, patients who suffer from myocardial infarction may be affected by ongoing adverse remodeling processes of the heart that may ultimately lead to heart failure. The introduction of stem and progenitor cell-based applications has raised substantial hope for reversing these processes and inducing cardiac regeneration. However, current stem cell therapies using single-cell suspensions have failed to demonstrate long-lasting efficacy due to the overall low retention rate after cell delivery to the myocardium. To overcome this obstacle, the concept of 3D cell culture techniques has been proposed to enhance therapeutic efficacy and cell engraftment based on the simulation of an in vivo-like microenvironment. Of great interest is the use of so-called microtissues or spheroids, which have evolved from their traditional role as in vitro models to their novel role as therapeutic agents. This review will provide an overview of the therapeutic potential of microtissues by addressing primarily cardiovascular regeneration. It will accentuate their advantages compared to other regenerative approaches and summarize the methods for generating clinically applicable microtissues. In addition, this review will illustrate the unique properties of the microenvironment within microtissues that makes them a promising next-generation therapeutic approach.

  17. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T.; Jhaveri, Hiral M.; Mishra, Gyan C.; Wani, Mohan R.

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  18. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Jhaveri, Hiral M. [Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pune (India); Mishra, Gyan C. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-03-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  19. Generation of thyroid follicular cells from pluripotent stem cells: potential for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Will; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 12% of the population in the United States will be afflicted with a thyroid related disorder during their lifetime. Common treatment approaches are tailored to the specific disorder and include surgery, radioactive iodine ablation, antithyroid drugs, thyroid hormone replacement, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Regenerative medicine endeavors to combat disease by replacing or regenerating damaged, diseased, or dysfunctional body parts. A series of achievements in pluripotent stem cell research have transformed regenerative medicine in many ways by demonstrating "repair" of a number of body parts in mice, of which, the thyroid has now been inducted into this special group. Seminal work in pluripotent cells, namely embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, have made possible their path to becoming key tools and biological building blocks for cell-based regenerative medicine to combat the gamut of human diseases, including those affecting the thyroid.

  20. Platelet-rich fibrin: a boon in regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebentish, Priyanka D; Umashetty, Girish; Kaur, Harpreet; Doizode, Trupthi; Kaslekar, Mithun; Chowdhury, Shouvik

    2016-12-01

    Research into regenerative dentistry has contributed momentum to the field of molecular biology. Periapical surgery aims at removing periapical pathology to achieve complete wound healing and regeneration of bone and periodontal tissue. Regenerative endodontic procedures are widely being added to the current armamentarium of pulp therapy procedures. The regenerative potential of platelets has been deliberated. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a wonderful tissue-engineering product and has recently gained much popularity due its promising results in wound healing bone induction. The features of this product are an attribute of platelets which, after cellular interactions, release growth factors and have shown application in diverse disciplines of dentistry. This paper is intended to shed light onto the various prospects of PRF and to provide clinical insight into regenerative endodontic therapy.

  1. Interactions of regenerative, inflammatory and biomechanical signals on bone morphogenetic protein-2 in periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokhbehsaim, M; Deschner, B; Winter, J; Bourauel, C; Rath, B; Jäger, A; Jepsen, S; Deschner, J

    2011-06-01

    Regeneration of periodontal tissues by EMD remains a major challenge because a number of modifying factors are as yet unknown. The effects of EMD seem to be mediated, at least in part, by bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). This in vitro study was performed to examine whether the effects of EMD on BMP-2 activity are modulated by inflammatory and/or biomechanical signals.   Periodontal ligament cells were seeded on BioFlex(®) plates and exposed to EMD under normal, inflammatory or biomechanical loading conditions for 1 and 6 d. In order to mimic proinflammatory or biomechanical loading conditions in vitro, cells were stimulated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which is increased at inflamed periodontal sites, and cyclic tensile strain of various magnitudes, respectively. The synthesis of BMP-2, its receptors (BMPR-1A, BMPR-1B and BMPR-2) and its inhibitors (follistatin, matrix gla protein and noggin) were analyzed using real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. In EMD-treated cells, BMP-2 synthesis was increased significantly at 1 d. EMD also induced the expression of all BMP receptors, and of the BMP inhibitors follistatin and noggin. In general, IL-1β and biomechanical loading neither down-regulated BMP-2 nor up-regulated BMP inhibitors in EMD-stimulated cells. However, IL-1β and biomechanical loading, when applied for a longer time period, caused a down-regulation of EMD-induced BMP receptors. EMD induces not only BMP-2, but also its receptors and inhibitors, in PDL cells. IL-1β and biomechanical forces may counteract the beneficial effects of EMD on BMP-2 activity via the down-regulation of BMP receptors. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Multilayer bioactive glass/zirconium titanate thin films in bone tissue engineering and regenerative dentistry

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    Mozafari M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Masoud Mozafari,1,2 Erfan Salahinejad,1,3 Vahid Shabafrooz,1 Mostafa Yazdimamaghani,1 Daryoosh Vashaee,4 Lobat Tayebi1,5 1Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK, USA; 2Biomaterials Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran; 4Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK, USA; 5School of Chemical Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK, USA Abstract: Surface modification, particularly coatings deposition, is beneficial to tissue-engineering applications. In this work, bioactive glass/zirconium titanate composite thin films were prepared by a sol-gel spin-coating method. The surface features of the coatings were studied by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and spectroscopic reflection analyses. The results show that uniform and sound multilayer thin films were successfully prepared through the optimization of the process variables and the application of carboxymethyl cellulose as a dispersing agent. Also, it was found that the thickness and roughness of the multilayer coatings increase nonlinearly with increasing the number of the layers. This new class of nanocomposite coatings, comprising the bioactive and inert components, is expected not only to enhance bioactivity and biocompatibility, but also to protect the surface of metallic implants against wear and corrosion. Keywords: bioactive glass, zirconium titanate, spin-coating, microstructural properties, bone/dental applications, tissue engineering

  3. Biomaterials Approaches for Utilizing the Regenerative Potential of the Peripheral Nerve Injury Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Melissa Renee

    following classical activation (M1/pro-inflammatory) with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1microg/mL) and would accelerate the transformation of Schwann cells from an immature state fol-lowing injury to a mature/pro-myelinating one. Cell phenotypes were functionally assessed using quantified reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and sandwich-ELISA based antibody arrays to measure changes in mRNA expression, mor-phology, and cytokine release, respectively. Macrophages cultured with the SCM and HA fibers had significantly reduced M1 gene expression, released lower levels of M1 cytokines (IL-1a, RANTES and TFN-a) and assumed an elongated morphology indicative of M2. These cues also induced changes in the Schwann cells including significantly reduced area, increased elongation, decreased expression of immature genes (GFAP) and increased expression of mature genes (Krox20 and Oct6). These results suggest that the SCM and HA nanofibers could trigger non-neuronal cells towards regenerative programs more quickly than traditional PNI interventions. Changes induced by biomaterials have distinct benefits over the use of immunomodulatory cy-tokines and would be a novel approach to direct repair. Our collective studies offer improved in-sight into the endogenous potential of the injured peripheral nerve and offer ways to incorporate intrinsic repair cues into a biomaterial system for treating large gaps.

  4. Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Response to Intervertebral Disc-Like Matrix Acidity and Oxygen Concentration: Implications for Cell-based Regenerative Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syeda M; Buckley, Conor T

    2016-05-01

    In vitro culture of porcine bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) in varying pH microenvironments in a three-dimensional hydrogel system. To characterize the response of BMSCs to varying pH environments (blood [pH 7.4], healthy intervertebral disc (IVD) (pH 7.1), mildly degenerated IVD (pH 6.8), and severely degenerated IVD (pH 6.5) in three-dimensional culture under normoxic (20%) and hypoxic (5%) conditions. The IVD is an avascular organ relying on diffusion of essential nutrients through the cartilaginous endplates (CEPs) thereby creating a challenging microenvironment. Within a degenerated IVD, oxygen and glucose concentrations decrease further (cell-based strategies as these adverse microenvironmental conditions might severely affect the survival and regenerative potential of transplanted cells. BMSCs were encapsulated in 1.5% alginate and ionically cross-linked in 102 mmol/L CaCl2 solution to form beads (diameter = 5 mm), which were cultured in different microenvironmental conditions (pH 6.5, 6.8, 7.1, and 7.4; oxygen: 5% and 20%). This study demonstrated decreased DNA content, increased cell death and minimal sulphated-glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) and collagen accumulation at pH 6.5 with increased proliferation, sustained cell viability and increased sGAG and collagen accumulation in pH 6.8 or higher. These findings suggest that there is a threshold at pH 6.8, below which cells cannot survive and accumulate nucleus pulposus-like matrix components (sGAG and collagen). Translation into a multimodal protocol requires the survival of stem cells and their ability to function normally amidst the harsh microenvironment. This study demonstrates the critical implication of degeneration stage and suggests stratified targeting to identify suitable candidates through measurement of the local pH thereby maximizing the efficacy for IVD cellular regenerative interventions. N/A.

  5. Three-year results following regenerative periodontal surgery of advanced intrabony defects with enamel matrix derivative alone or combined with a synthetic bone graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Al-Machot, Elyan; Meyle, Jörg; Jervøe-Storm, Pia-Merete; Jepsen, Søren

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to compare the clinical outcomes of a combination of enamel matrix derivatives (EMD) and a synthetic bone graft (biphasic calcium phosphate) with EMD alone in wide and deep one- and two-wall intrabony defects 36 months after treatment. Thirty patients with chronic periodontitis and one wide (≥ 2 mm) and deep (≥ 4 mm) intrabony defect had been recruited in three centres in Germany. During surgery, defects were randomly assigned to EMD/synthetic bone graft (SBG) (test) or EMD (control). Assessments at baseline, after 6, 12 and 36 months, included bone sounding, relative clinical attachment levels, probing pocket depths and recessions. After 36 months, defects in both groups were significantly improved (p regenerative modalities could be maintained over a period of 3 years. The combination of EMD with SBG did not show any advantage compared to the use of EMD alone.

  6. The effect of aging on the pluripotential capacity and regenerative potential of human periodontal ligament stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; An, Ying; Gao, Li-Na; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Jin, Yan; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2012-10-01

    Multipotent postnatal stem cells can be isolated from human periodontal ligaments (PDLs) and have the potential for large-scale expansion, offering a reliable cell source for clinical use in periodontal regenerative therapies. However, the effects of aging on the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) properties of these cells remain undefined. The aims of this study were to isolate and characterize the periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) derived from human impacted third molars of donors of different ages and to compare their pluripotential capacity and regenerative potential. PDL tissues were obtained from 90 surgically extracted third molars and divided into four groups according to the donor's age. For each group, the colony-forming ability, proliferative capacity, migratory potential, cell surface antigens, differentiation ability, alkaline phosphatase activity, and gene expression of the PDLSCs were contrastively evaluated and quantified for statistical analysis. The in vivo tissue regenerative potential of PDLSCs was assessed by an in vivo ectopic transplantation model. It was found that human PDLSCs were successfully isolated and characterized as MSCs in all 90 teeth. PDLSCs derived from donors of different ages were successfully differentiated under an osteogenic and adipogenic microenvironment. The proliferative and migratory potential and the differentiation capacity of PDLSCs decreased as age increased (p < 0.05). PDLSCs derived from donors whose age is 62.6 ± 6.8 have a statistically significant decrease in pluripotential capacity compared with those derived from relatively young donors (p < 0.01). There is no identified cementum and PDL-like tissue formation in vivo among the two aging groups. We conclude that human PDLSCs could be successfully isolated from PDL tissue derived from donors of different ages, but the age-related changes of the MSC properties should be taken into account whenever they are intended for use in research or cytotherapy. Copyright

  7. Periodontal Regenerative Therapy of Intrabony Defects Using Deproteinized Bovine Bone Mineral in Combination with Collagen Barrier Membrane: A Multicenter Prospective Case-Series Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irokawa, Daisuke; Okubo, Nobuki; Nikaido, Masahiko; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Konobu, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Tokuo; Fujita, Takahisa; Goto, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Takahiro; Ishii, Yoshihito; Saito, Atsushi

    This multicenter prospective case series study aimed to evaluate the outcome of periodontal regenerative therapy using a deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) in combination with a collagen barrier (CB) in the treatment of intrabony defects. A total of 36 nonsmoking patients with chronic periodontitis were recruited in five centers in Japan. All patients had at least one intrabony defect of ≥ 3 mm. The surgical procedures included access for debridement using a papilla preservation technique. Defects were filled with DBBM and covered with CB. Clinical evidence after 6 months supported the effectiveness of the combination therapy in the treatment of intrabony defects.

  8. Exploring the Potentials of ICT Tools for Human-Centric Regenerative Design

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    Giulia Sonetti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aiming for sustainable buildings and cities is critical to achieving a future that is socially just, ecologically regenerative, culturally rich, and economically viable. However, our current concepts of sustainability often exclude the essential domains of data, information, and the knowledge relating to the relationship between buildings and people that inhabit them. Thus, the research questions at the core of this paper have been as follows: Can technologies and artificial intelligence (AI be used to create systems that enhance relationships between buildings and inhabitants? Can social networks and natural interactions support further research relating to human-centric design tools for the built environment? The Human Observation Meta-Environment (HOME project was developed to address this question. The ICT architecture has been tested to observe and collect human behaviour data within a sentient room at the Politecnico di Torino (IT, where the inhabitants were strategically aware of their behaviours. Methods of analysis included technologies related to the domain of AI (such as Natural Language Analysis, Computer Vision, Machine Learning and Deep Learning that have been used in social network analysis in connection with the word ‘comfort’, and definitions resonate strongly with the realm of regenerative design. Results were used to further research the role of users that could serve as leverages to design (both spaces and related smart systems according to actual user needs. People from very different disciplinary backgrounds interacted with the prototype in a workshop and provided stimuli for further considerations regarding the possible technological, psychological, cognitive, cultural, social, political, and aesthetical impacts of the use of these technologies inside sentient buildings. The paper enriches the discourse on how ICT data can be organised and read in a human-centric regenerative design process perspective.

  9. The bone-regenerative properties of Emdogain adsorbed onto poly(D,L-lactic-coglycolic acid)/calcium phosphate composites in an ectopic and an orthotopic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachokova, A S; van den Dolder, J; Jansen, J A

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone-regenerative properties of Emdogain in osseous and nonosseous sites. For the orthotopic study, unloaded poly(D,L-lactic-coglycolic acid)/calcium phosphate implants, and poly(D,L-lactic-coglycolic acid)/calcium phosphate implants loaded with different concentrations (0.25, 0.50 or 0.80 mg per implant) of enamel matrix derivative (EMD), were inserted into cranial defects of 24 rats. The implantation time was 4 wk. For the ectopic study, 32 implants were placed subcutaneously. The same study period and groups as in the orthotopic study were used. Methods of evaluation consisted of descriptive histology, histomorphometry and an in vitro EMD-release study. In the orthotopic study, new bone formation was most abundant in unloaded implants followed by 0.50-mg EMD composites. Histomorphometric measurements showed 54 +/- 15.0% bone ingrowth for unloaded implants, 19 +/- 22.5% bone ingrowth for 0.25-mg EMD composites, 40 +/- 23.6% bone ingrowth for 0.50-mg EMD composites and 26 +/- 17.6% bone ingrowth for 0.80-mg EMD composites. Light microscopic analysis of the subcutaneous sections from the ectopic study revealed no bone formation in any group after 4 wk. The in vitro release study showed 60% cumulative EMD release after 4 wk. Emdogain is not osteoinductive and is not able to enhance bone healing in combination with an osteoconductive material, such as poly(D,L-lactic-coglycolic acid)/calcium phosphate cement.

  10. Evaluation of bone regenerative capacity in rats claverial bone defect using platelet rich fibrin with and without beta tri calcium phosphate bone graft material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Ahmed Abdullah

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: The addition of β-TCP to PRF significantly improved bone regeneration in the first 2 weeks after surgery. Although the differences between results with and without the addition of β-TCP to PRF were statistically insignificant from weeks 3 to 6, it was nevertheless apparent that the group receiving the combination showed better results. We suggest a synergistic mechanism for this effect.

  11. Cardiac Regenerative Medicine: The Potential of a New Generation of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambria, Elena; Steiger, Julia; Günter, Julia; Bopp, Annina; Wolint, Petra; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Emmert, Maximilian Y

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac stem cell therapy holds great potential to prompt myocardial regeneration in patients with ischemic heart disease. The selection of the most suitable cell type is pivotal for its successful application. Various cell types, including crude bone marrow mononuclear cells, skeletal myoblast, and hematopoietic and endothelial progenitors, have already advanced into the clinical arena based on promising results from different experimental and preclinical studies. However, most of these so-called first-generation cell types have failed to fully emulate the promising preclinical data in clinical trials, resulting in heterogeneous outcomes and a critical lack of translation. Therefore, different next-generation cell types are currently under investigation for the treatment of the diseased myocardium. This review article provides an overview of current stem cell therapy concepts, including the application of cardiac stem (CSCs) and progenitor cells (CPCs) and lineage commitment via guided cardiopoiesis from multipotent cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or pluripotent cells such as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. Furthermore, it introduces new strategies combining complementary cell types, such as MSCs and CSCs/CPCs, which can yield synergistic effects to boost cardiac regeneration.

  12. The potential of mesenchymal stem cells derived from amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid for neuronal regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Kim, Min Kyu

    2014-03-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are derived from the mesoderm, are considered as a readily available source for tissue engineering. They have multipotent differentiation capacity and can be differentiated into various cell types. Many studies have demonstrated that the MSCs identified from amniotic membrane (AM-MSCs) and amniotic fluid (AF-MSCs) are shows advantages for many reasons, including the possibility of noninvasive isolation, multipotency, self-renewal, low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory and nontumorigenicity properties, and minimal ethical problem. The AF-MSCs and AM-MSCs may be appropriate sources of mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine, as an alternative to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Recently, regenerative treatments such as tissue engineering and cell transplantation have shown potential in clinical applications for degenerative diseases. Therefore, amnion and MSCs derived from amnion can be applied to cell therapy in neuro-degeneration diseases. In this review, we will describe the potential of AM-MSCs and AF-MSCs, with particular focus on cures for neuronal degenerative diseases.

  13. A review on endogenous regenerative technology in periodontal regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Min; An, Ying; Chen, Fang; Wu, Zhi-Fen

    2010-11-01

    Periodontitis is a globally prevalent inflammatory disease that causes the destruction of the tooth-supporting apparatus and potentially leads to tooth loss. Currently, the methods to reconstitute lost periodontal structures (i.e. alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and root cementum) have relied on conventional mechanical, anti-infective modalities followed by a range of regenerative procedures such as guided tissue regeneration, the use of bone replacement grafts and exogenous growth factors (GFs), and recently developed tissue engineering technologies. However, all current or emerging paradigms have either been shown to have limited and variable outcomes or have yet to be developed for clinical use. To accelerate clinical translation, there is an ongoing need to develop therapeutics based on endogenous regenerative technology (ERT), which can stimulate latent self-repair mechanisms in patients and harness the host's innate capacity for regeneration. ERT in periodontics applies the patient's own regenerative 'tools', i.e. patient-derived GFs and fibrin scaffolds, sometimes in association with commercialized products (e.g. Emdogain and Bio-Oss), to create a material niche in an injured site where the progenitor/stem cells from neighboring tissues can be recruited for in situ periodontal regeneration. The choice of materials and the design of implantable devices influence therapeutic potential and the number and invasiveness of the associated clinical procedures. The interplay and optimization of each niche component involved in ERT are particularly important to comprehend how to make the desired cell response safe and effective for therapeutics. In this review, the emerging opportunities and challenges of ERT that avoid the ex vivo culture of autologous cells are addressed in the context of new approaches for engineering or regeneration of functional periodontal tissues by exploiting the use of platelet-rich products and its associated formulations as key

  14. Probing Regenerative Potential of Moringa oleifera Aqueous Extracts Using In vitro Cellular Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Evangeline E; Pulwale, Anubha V; Patil, Gauri A; Moghe, Alpana S

    2016-01-01

    Molecules stimulating regeneration and proliferation of cells are of significance in combating ailments caused due to tissue injury, inflammation, and degenerative disorders. Moringa oleifera is one of the most valued food plants having the profile of important nutrients and impressive range of medicinal uses. To evaluate the potential of M. oleifera aqueous leaf and flower extracts to promote the proliferation of cells and explore their effect on cancer cell lines for assessment of safety. Aqueous leaf and flower extracts of M. oleifera were investigated for effect on rat-derived primary fibroblast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and cancer cell lines using cell proliferation assay. They were also tested and compared for wound healing, angiogenesis, and hepatoprotective effect using in vitro assays. Statistically significant increase in the proliferation of primary rat fibroblast, MSCs, and angiogenesis was observed after treatment with aqueous flower extract. The aqueous leaf extract determined a comparatively moderate increment in the proliferation of MSCs and angiogenesis. It however showed prominent cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines and a significant hepatoprotective effect. A very clear difference in response of the two extracts to different types of cells was detected in this study. The aqueous flower extract exhibited a higher potential to stimulate cell proliferation while not exerting the same effect on cancer cell lines. The leaf extract on the other hand, had a prominent antitumor and hepatoptotective effects. Moringa oleifera flower extract showed significant ability to promote proliferation of rat fibroblast and mesenchymal stem cells. The extract also had prominent angiogenic and hepatoprotective effects.The extract did not influence proliferation of cancer cell lines indicating its safety for human consumption and use in pharmaceuticals.The Moringa oleifera leaf extract showed relatively less potential to stimulate cells but had prominent cytotoxic

  15. Probing Regenerative Potential of Moringa oleifera Aqueous Extracts Using In vitro Cellular Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Evangeline E.; Pulwale, Anubha V.; Patil, Gauri A.; Moghe, Alpana S.

    2016-01-01

    showed relatively less potential to stimulate cells but had prominent cytotoxic effect on cancer cell lines. Abbreviations Used: ALT: Alanine transaminase, AST: Asparatate amino transferase, ATCC: American type culture collection, BMMSC: Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (used in this paper), CAM: Chick chorioallantoic membrane, CCl4: Carbon tetra chloride, DMEM: Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium, DMSO: Dimethyl sulfoxide, EDTA: Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, HBL 100: Human breast epithelial cell line, Mcf-7: Human breast adenocarcinoma cell line, aMEM: Minimum Essential Medium Eagle alpha modification, MOF: Moringa oleifera aqueous flower extract (used in this paper), MOL: Moringa oleifera aqueos leaf extract (Used in this paper), OD: Optical density, PBS: Phosphate buffered saline PMID:27695260

  16. Pooled Human Serum Increases Regenerative Potential of In Vitro Expanded Stem Cells from Human Extracted Deciduous Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Nazmul; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty

    2017-07-21

    In regenerative therapy, in vitro expansion of stem cells is critical to obtain a significantly higher number of cells for successful engraftment after transplantation. However, stem cells lose its regenerative potential and enter senescence during in vitro expansion. In this study, the influence of foetal bovine serum (FBS) and pooled human serum (pHS) on the proliferation, morphology and migration of stem cells from human extracted deciduous teeth (SHED) was compared. SHED (n = 3) was expanded in KnockOut DMEM supplemented with either pHS (pHS-SM) or FBS (FBS-SM). pHS was prepared using peripheral blood serum of six healthy male adults, aged between 21 and 35 years old. The number of live SHED was significantly higher, from passage 5 to 7, when cultured in pHS-SM compared to those cultured in FBS-SM ( p cells having flattened morphology, characteristics of partially differentiated and senescent cells, was significantly lower ( p cells and support directional migration of cells.

  17. Methods to Analyze Bone Regenerative Response to Different rhBMP-2 Doses in Rabbit Craniofacial Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. 1Department of Craniomaxillofacial Regenerative Medicine, Dental and Trauma Research Detachment, United States...Corporation, Wheeling, IL) for each calvarium after extraction . The images were cap- tured at 25 kV at a 15 s exposure time and imported into the Faxitron DR...Clinical availability Detects radio-opaque materials only Possible serial application (depending on anatomical site) Possible issues based on anatomical

  18. Regenerative potential of leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin. Part A: intra-bony defects, furcation defects and periodontal plastic surgery. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Ana B; Meschi, Nastaran; Temmerman, Andy; Pinto, Nelson; Lambrechts, Paul; Teughels, Wim; Quirynen, Marc

    2017-01-01

    To analyse the regenerative potential of leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) during periodontal surgery. An electronic and hand search were conducted in three databases. Only randomized clinical trials were selected and no follow-up limitation was applied. Pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bone fill, keratinized tissue width (KTW), recession reduction and root coverage (%) were considered as outcome. When possible, meta-analysis was performed. Twenty-four articles fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Three subgroups were created: intra-bony defects (IBDs), furcation defects and periodontal plastic surgery. Meta-analysis was performed in all the subgroups. Significant PD reduction (1.1 ± 0.5 mm, p  0.05), CAL gain (0.2 ± 0.5 mm, p > 0.05), KTW (0.3 ± 0.4 mm, p > 0.05) and recession reduction (0.2 ± 0.3 mm, p > 0.05). L-PRF enhances periodontal wound healing. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Periodontology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Effect of PEI and PVP-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles on Equine Platelets Activation: Potential Application in Equine Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Hecold

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to assess the effect of different stabilizing agents, for example, polyethylenimine (PEI and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and their influence on equine platelet activation and release of particular growth factors. The gold nanoparticles were produced by chemical reduction of chloroauric acid. UV-Vis spectroscopy confirmed the presence of gold nanoparticles in investigated solutions. The AuNPs were incubated with whole blood at various concentrations. The morphology of platelets in PRP prepared from the blood incubated with AuNPs was characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy, whereas the concentrations of growth factors and cytokines were evaluated by ELISA assays. The most promising results were obtained with equine platelets incubated with 5% AuNPs stabilized by PEI, which lead to secretion of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1 and simultaneously cause decrease in concentration of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α. The qRT-PCR confirmed ELISA test results. The incubation with 5% AuNPs stabilized by PEI leads to upregulation of BMP-2 and VEGF transcripts of mRNA level and to downregulating expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6. Obtained data shed a promising light on gold nanoparticle application for future regenerative medicine application.

  20. Functional and regenerative effects of local administration of autologous mononuclear bone marrow cells combined with silicone conduit on transected femoral nerve of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Anelise Bonilla; Schestatsky, Pedro; Torres, Vítor Félix; Gomes, Cristiano; Gianotti, Giordano Cabral; Paz, Ana Helena da Rosa; Terraciano, Paula Barros; Marques, Janete Maria Volpato; Guimarães, Karina Magano; Graça, Dominguita Lühers; Cirne-Lima, Elizabeth Obino; Contesini, Emerson Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The inoculation of cells into injury sites can accelerate and improve the quality of nerve regeneration. This study aimed to evaluate the functional and regenerative effects of mononuclear autologous bone marrow cells (MABMC) combined with silicon conduit grafting in rabbit femoral nerves. Twenty-eight animals were allocated to one of two groups: treatment group (TG) or control group (CG), divided according to the time of evaluation, at either 50 or 75 days. After neurotmesis of the femoral nerve, surgical repair was performed with nerve autografts in silicon conduits, leaving a 5mm gap in both groups. The TG received MABMC in silicon conduits, and CG received a sham saline inoculum. Histological, clinical and electrophysiological analyses detected no differences between groups, but analysis of leg diameter showed that TG diameters were larger. This cell therapy did not improve regeneration of the femoral nerve, but there was a tendency for better functional recovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Regenerative Potential of D-δ-Tocotrienol Rich Fraction on Crushed Skeletal Muscle of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijo Elsy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Delayed muscle growth and regeneration of skeletal muscle in diabetics is believed to be due to diabetic myopathy because of alteration in the skeletal muscle homeostatis. Since vitamin E is a natural antioxidant and is also important for the integrity of sarcolemma, the present study was designed to explore the muscle regenerative potency of d-δ-tocotrienol-rich fraction (d-δ-TRF on crushed skeletal muscle in healthy and diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced through single subcutaneous injection of alloxan (100 mg/kg. Twenty-four albino rats were divided into four groups; healthy control, diabetic control, healthy treated, and diabetic treated. Treated groups received injections orally, daily (200 mg/kg for 3 weeks. A horizontal skin incision was made on the shaved right mid-thigh region, by splitting the fascia between gluteus maximus and tensor fascia lata, and gluteus maximus was crushed with Kocher’s forceps. Skin wound was closed with an absorbable suture. The crushed muscle changes were studied by assessing the histopathological features, histomorphological measurements, and biochemical analyses on 3rd week following induction of injury. One-way “ANOVA” followed by Tukey’s test and Student t-test were used for statistical analysis of data. Results: Results obtained through various methods indicate that the d-δ-TRF treated groups have controlled glycemic status, improved antioxidant capacity, faster revascularization, re-innervation, regeneration of myofibers, and connective tissue remodeling. Conclusion: It is, therefore, concluded that the d-δ-TRF is a beneficial nutritional adjuvant for skeletal muscles’ structural and functional recovery after crushed injury in both healthy and diabetics. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2017; 5(2.000: 36-42

  2. Regenerative potential of the cartilaginous tissue in mesenchymal stem cells: update, limitations, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica da; Severo, Antônio Lourenço; Azzolin, Verônica Farina; Garcia, Luiz Filipe Machado; Kuhn, André; Lech, Osvandré

    2017-01-01

    Advances in the studies with adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have turned tissue regenerative therapy into a promising tool in many areas of medicine. In orthopedics, one of the main challenges has been the regeneration of cartilage tissue, mainly in diarthroses. In the induction of the MSCs, in addition to cytodifferentiation, the microenvironmental context of the tissue to be regenerated and an appropriate spatial arrangement are extremely important factors. Furthermore, it is known that MSC differentiation is fundamentally determined by mechanisms such as cell proliferation (mitosis), biochemical-molecular interactions, movement, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. Although the use of MSCs for cartilage regeneration remains at a research level, there are important questions to be resolved in order to make this therapy efficient and safe. It is known, for instance, that the expansion of chondrocytes in cultivation, needed to increase the number of cells, could end up producing fibrocartilage instead of hyaline cartilage. However, the latest results are promising. In 2014, the first stage I/II clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the intra-articular injection of MSCs in femorotibial cartilage regeneration was published, indicating a decrease in injured areas. One issue to be explored is how many modifications in the articulate inflammatory environment could induce differentiation of MSCs already allocated in that region. Such issue arose from studies that suggested that the suppression of the inflammation may increase the efficiency of tissue regeneration. Considering the complexity of the events related to the chondrogenesis and cartilage repair, it can be concluded that the road ahead is still long, and that further studies are needed.

  3. Regenerative potential, metabolic profile, and genetic stability of Brachypodium distachyon embryogenic calli as affected by successive subcultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedes-Rodrigues, T C; Batista, D S; Vieira, N M; Matos, E M; Fernandes, D; Nunes-Nesi, A; Cruz, C D; Viccini, L F; Nogueira, F T S; Otoni, W C

    2018-03-01

    Brachypodium distachyon, a model species for forage grasses and cereal crops, has been used in studies seeking improved biomass production and increased crop yield for biofuel production purposes. Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is the morphogenetic pathway that supports in vitro regeneration of such species. However, there are gaps in terms of studies on the metabolic profile and genetic stability along successive subcultures. The physiological variables and the metabolic profile of embryogenic callus (EC) and embryogenic structures (ES) from successive subcultures (30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, and 360-day-old subcultures) were analyzed. Canonical discriminant analysis separated EC into three groups: 60, 90, and 120 to 240 days. EC with 60 and 90 days showed the highest regenerative potential. EC grown for 90 days and submitted to SE induction in 2 mg L -1 of kinetin-supplemented medium was the highest ES producer. The metabolite profiles of non-embryogenic callus (NEC), EC, and ES submitted to principal component analysis (PCA) separated into two groups: 30 to 240- and 360-day-old calli. The most abundant metabolites for these groups were malonic acid, tryptophan, asparagine, and erythrose. PCA of ES also separated ages into groups and ranked 60- and 90-day-old calli as the best for use due to their high levels of various metabolites. The key metabolites that distinguished the ES groups were galactinol, oxaloacetate, tryptophan, and valine. In addition, significant secondary metabolites (e.g., caffeoylquinic, cinnamic, and ferulic acids) were important in the EC phase. Ferulic, cinnamic, and phenylacetic acids marked the decreases in the regenerative capacity of ES in B. distachyon. Decreased accumulations of the amino acids aspartic acid, asparagine, tryptophan, and glycine characterized NEC, suggesting that these metabolites are indispensable for the embryogenic competence in B. distachyon. The genetic stability of the regenerated plants was evaluated

  4. Vitamin D and Bone Health; Potential Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Strain

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and significant economic and health costs. Vitamin D is a secosteriod hormone essential for calcium absorption and bone mineralization which is positively associated with bone mineral density [BMD]. It is well-established that prolonged and severe vitamin D deficiency leads to rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Sub-optimal vitamin D status has been reported in many populations but it is a particular concern in older people; thus there is clearly a need for effective strategies to optimise bone health. A number of recent studies have suggested that the role of vitamin D in preventing fractures may be via its mediating effects on muscle function (a defect in muscle function is one of the classical signs of rickets and inflammation. Studies have demonstrated that vitamin D supplementation can improve muscle strength which in turn contributes to a decrease in incidence of falls, one of the largest contributors to fracture incidence. Osteoporosis is often considered to be an inflammatory condition and pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with increased bone metabolism. The immunoregulatory mechanisms of vitamin D may thus modulate the effect of these cytokines on bone health and subsequent fracture risk. Vitamin D, therefore, may influence fracture risk via a number of different mechanisms.

  5. Glucocorticoid: A potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiancheng; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Wenbin; Xue, Yanru; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Jingbao; Shang, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Exposure of animals and humans to conditions of microgravity, including actual spaceflight and simulated microgravity, results in numerous negative alterations to bone structure and mechanical properties. Although there are abundant researches on bone loss in microgravity, the explicit mechanism is not completely understood. At present, it is widely accepted that the absence of mechanical stimulus plays a predominant role in bone homeostasis disorders in conditions of weightlessness. However, aside from mechanical unloading, nonmechanical factors such as various hormones, cytokines, dietary nutrition, etc. are important as well in microgravity induced bone loss. The stress-induced increase in endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) levels is inevitable in microgravity environments. Moreover, it is well known that GCs have a detrimental effect to bone health at excess concentrations. Therefore, GC plays a potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss. This review summarizeds several studies and their prospective solutions to this hypothesis.

  6. Regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, S; Smith, A J

    2014-03-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of the biological processes involved in tooth development and repair at the cellular and molecular levels have underpinned the newly emerging area of regenerative endodontics. Development of treatment protocols based on exploiting the natural wound healing properties of the dental pulp and applying tissue engineering principles has allowed reporting of case series showing preservation of tissue vitality and apexogenesis. To review current case series reporting regenerative endodontics. Current treatment approaches tend to stimulate more reparative than regenerative responses in respect of the new tissue generated, which often does not closely resemble the physiological structure of dentine-pulp. However, despite these biological limitations, such techniques appear to offer significant promise for improved treatment outcomes. Improved biological outcomes will likely emerge from the many experimental studies being reported and will further contribute to improvements in clinical treatment protocols.

  7. Potential Osteoporosis Recovery by Deep Sea Water through Bone Regeneration in SAMP8 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hen-Yu Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the therapeutic potential of deep sea water (DSW on osteoporosis. Previously, we have established the ovariectomized senescence-accelerated mice (OVX-SAMP8 and demonstrated strong recovery of osteoporosis by stem cell and platelet-rich plasma (PRP. Deep sea water at hardness (HD 1000 showed significant increase in proliferation of osteoblastic cell (MC3T3 by MTT assay. For in vivo animal study, bone mineral density (BMD was strongly enhanced followed by the significantly increased trabecular numbers through micro-CT examination after a 4-month deep sea water treatment, and biochemistry analysis showed that serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity was decreased. For stage-specific osteogenesis, bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs were harvested and examined. Deep sea water-treated BMSCs showed stronger osteogenic differentiation such as BMP2, RUNX2, OPN, and OCN, and enhanced colony forming abilities, compared to the control group. Interestingly, most untreated OVX-SAMP8 mice died around 10 months; however, approximately 57% of DSW-treated groups lived up to 16.6 months, a life expectancy similar to the previously reported life expectancy for SAMR1 24 months. The results demonstrated the regenerative potentials of deep sea water on osteogenesis, showing that deep sea water could potentially be applied in osteoporosis therapy as a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM.

  8. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis: the potential for engineering bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanczler, J M; Oreffo, R O C

    2008-05-02

    The repair of large bone defects remains a major clinical orthopaedic challenge. Bone is a highly vascularised tissue reliant on the close spatial and temporal connection between blood vessels and bone cells to maintain skeletal integrity. Angiogenesis thus plays a pivotal role in skeletal development and bone fracture repair. Current procedures to repair bone defects and to provide structural and mechanical support include the use of grafts (autologous, allogeneic) or implants (polymeric or metallic). These approaches face significant limitations due to insufficient supply, potential disease transmission, rejection, cost and the inability to integrate with the surrounding host tissue. The engineering of bone tissue offers new therapeutic strategies to aid musculoskeletal healing. Various scaffold constructs have been employed in the development of tissue-engineered bone; however, an active blood vessel network is an essential pre-requisite for these to survive and integrate with existing host tissue. Combination therapies of stem cells and polymeric growth factor release scaffolds tailored to promote angiogenesis and osteogenesis are under evaluation and development actively to stimulate bone regeneration. An understanding of the cellular and molecular interactions of blood vessels and bone cells will enhance and aid the successful development of future vascularised bone scaffold constructs, enabling survival and integration of bioengineered bone with the host tissue. The role of angiogenic and osteogenic factors in the adaptive response and interaction of osteoblasts and endothelial cells during the multi step process of bone development and repair will be highlighted in this review, with consideration of how some of these key mechanisms can be combined with new developments in tissue engineering to enable repair and growth of skeletal fractures. Elucidation of the processes of angiogenesis, osteogenesis and tissue engineering strategies offer exciting future

  9. BONE TUMOR ENVIRONMENT AS POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TARGET IN EWING SARCOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise eREDINI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ewing sarcoma is the second most common pediatric bone tumor, with three cases per million worldwide. In clinical terms, ES is an aggressive, rapidly fatal malignancy that mainly develops in osseous sites (85%, but also in extraskeletal soft tissue. It spreads naturally to the lungs, bones and bone marrow with poor prognosis in the two latter cases. Bone lesions from primary or secondary (metastases tumors are characterized by extensive bone remodeling, more often due to osteolysis. Osteoclast activation and subsequent bone resorption is responsible for the clinical features of bone tumors including pain, vertebral collapse and spinal cord compression. Based on the vicious cycle concept of tumor cells and bone resorbing cells, drugs which target osteoclasts may be promising agents as adjuvant setting for treating bone tumors, including Ewing sarcoma. There is also increasing evidence that cellular and molecular protagonists present in the bone microenvironment play a part in establishing a favorable niche for tumor initiation and progression. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential therapeutic value of drugs targeting the bone tumor microenvironment in Ewing Sarcoma. The first part of the review will focus on targeting the bone resorbing function of osteoclasts by means of bisphosphonates (BPs or drugs blocking the pro-resorbing cytokine Receptor Activator of NF-kappa B Ligand (RANKL. Second, the role of this peculiar hypoxic microenvironment will be discussed in the context of resistance to chemotherapy, escape from the immune system, or neo-angiogenesis. Therapeutic interventions based on these specificities could be then proposed in the context of Ewing sarcoma.

  10. Use of carboxymethyl cellulose and collagen carrier with equine bone lyophilisate suggests late onset bone regenerative effect in a humerus drill defect - a pilot study in six sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Jakobsen, Thomas Vestergaard

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the use of a filler compound together with the osteoinductive demineralized bone matrix (DBM), Colloss E. The filler was comprised of carboxymethyl-cellulose and collagen type 1. The purpose of the study was to see if the filler compound would enhance the bone formation and distribute...

  11. Mobilization of endogenous bone marrow derived endothelial progenitor cells and therapeutic potential of parathyroid hormone after ischemic stroke in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Wang

    Full Text Available Stroke is a major neurovascular disorder threatening human life and health. Very limited clinical treatments are currently available for stroke patients. Stem cell transplantation has shown promising potential as a regenerative treatment after ischemic stroke. The present investigation explores a new concept of mobilizing endogenous stem cells/progenitor cells from the bone marrow using a parathyroid hormone (PTH therapy after ischemic stroke in adult mice. PTH 1-34 (80 µg/kg, i.p. was administered 1 hour after focal ischemia and then daily for 6 consecutive days. After 6 days of PTH treatment, there was a significant increase in bone marrow derived CD-34/Fetal liver kinase-1 (Flk-1 positive endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in the peripheral blood. PTH treatment significantly increased the expression of trophic/regenerative factors including VEGF, SDF-1, BDNF and Tie-1 in the brain peri-infarct region. Angiogenesis, assessed by co-labeled Glut-1 and BrdU vessels, was significantly increased in PTH-treated ischemic brain compared to vehicle controls. PTH treatment also promoted neuroblast migration from the subventricular zone (SVZ and increased the number of newly formed neurons in the peri-infarct cortex. PTH-treated mice showed significantly better sensorimotor functional recovery compared to stroke controls. Our data suggests that PTH therapy improves endogenous repair mechanisms after ischemic stroke with functional benefits. Mobilizing endogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells/progenitor cells using PTH and other mobilizers appears an effective and feasible regenerative treatment after ischemic stroke.

  12. The bone regenerative effect of platelet-rich plasma in combination with an osteoconductive material in rat cranial defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plachokova, A.S.; Dolder, J. van den; Stoelinga, P.J.W.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on bone regeneration, in combination with an osteoconductive material, was evaluated in a rat model. Cranial defects, 6.2 mm in diameter, were filled with HA/beta-TCP particles, HA/beta-TCP particles combined with PRP and HA/beta-TCP particles combined with

  13. Comparison of the regenerative potential of an allograft used alone and that in conjunction with an immunosuppressive drug in the treatment of human periodontal infrabony defects: A clinical and radiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhawan Shivani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Experimentation confirmed the conclusion that bone allografts, like other tissue and organ allografts, are immunogenic. These immune responses cause resorption of allograft, thus lowering the bone formation capacity of the graft. An attempt has been made in this study to prevent immune reactions and achieve enhanced regeneration of allograft-demineralized freeze-dried bone matrix by incorporating it with an immunosuppressive drug Cyclosporine-A (CsA in the treatment of human periodontal infrabony defects. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients showing clinical evidence of almost bilateral infrabony defects requiring bone grafting procedures were selected. In each patient, the infrabony defect of one side of the arch was designated as Group A (control site and the infrabony defect of the contralateral side of the same arch was designated as Group B (test site. Results: On comparative evaluation of the two groups (by Student t-test, the mean values of reduction in probing depth (P=0.81 NS and gain in clinical attachment level (P=1.00 NS of Group B were found to be greater than that of Group-A, but the differences were statistically non-significant. The mean linear bone fill (P=0.010 FNx08 of Group B was also detected to be higher than that of Group A, and the difference was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: Increase in linear bone fill in Group B signifies the role of CsA in augmenting the regenerative potential of allograft by eliminating immune reactions.

  14. Risk of bias of animal studies on regenerative procedures for periodontal and peri-implant bone defects - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Listl, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    (1) To assess the risk of bias of studies in which animal models were used for investigating regenerative therapies for periodontal and peri-implant defects. (2) To investigate changes in risk of bias by comparing samples drawn from two different publication periods. We searched the PubMed and LILACS electronic databases, independently and in duplicate, for randomized and controlled trials published from 1998 to 2000 and from 2008 to 2010. Hand searching included search of 10 dental journals, in the issues published between August 2008 and August 2010. Studies on non-human primates and canines were included. We assessed independently and in triplicate the risk of bias with reference to a six-item checklist based on the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing the risk of bias and information about formal sample size calculation. One hundred and seven studies were included in the review. Checklist items were poorly reported in the studies selected, and therefore for most of the studies, the risk of bias was unclear. As a result of the unclear risk of bias of animal studies in periodontal and peri-implant treatments, it is difficult to determine the accuracy of treatment effect estimates. There is a need for standardization of reporting procedures on animal experiments. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Regenerative periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägi, Tobias T; Laugisch, Oliver; Ivanovic, Aleksandar; Sculean, Anton

    2014-03-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is to completely restore the tooth's supporting apparatus that has been lost due to inflammatory periodontal disease or injury. It is characterized by formation of new cementum with inserting collagen fibers, new periodontal ligament, and new alveolar bone. Indeed conventional, nonsurgical, and surgical periodontal therapy usually result in clinical improvements evidenced by probing depth reduction and clinical attachment gain, but the healing occurs predominantly through formation of a long junctional epithelium and no or only unpredictable periodontal regeneration. Therefore, there is an ongoing search for new materials and improved surgical techniques, with the aim of predictably promoting periodontal wound healing/regeneration and improving the clinical outcome. This article attempts to provide the clinician with an overview of the most important biologic events involved in periodontal wound healing/ regeneration and on the criteria on how to select the appropriate regenerative material and surgical technique in order to optimize the clinical outcomes.

  16. The Design and Use of Animal Models for Translational Research in Bone Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    analysis of in vitro toxicity. EXS 99, 401, 2009. 11. Colas , P. High throughput screening assays to discover small molecule inhibitors of protein...metastatic tumor cell interactions with bone. Cancer Res 69, 4097, 2009. 13. Patterson, T.E., Kumagai, K., Griffith, L., and Muschler, G.F. Cellular...auspicious role of mesenchymal stromal cells in cancer : be it friend or foe. Cytotherapy 10, 657, 2008. 33. Mishra, P.J., Glod, J.W., and Banerjee, D

  17. Bone loss following knee arthroplasty: potential treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasso, Michele; Beaufils, Philippe; Cerciello, Simone; Schiavone Panni, Alfredo

    2014-04-01

    The management of bone loss is a crucial aspect of the revision knee arthroplasty. Bone loss can hinder the correct positioning and alignment of the prosthetic components, and can prevent the achievement of a stable bone-implant interface. There is still controversy regarding the optimal management of knee periprosthetic bone loss, especially in large defects for which structural grafts, metal or tantalum augments, tantalum cones, porous metaphyseal sleeves, and special prostheses have been advocated. The aim of this review was to analyze all possible causes of bone loss and the most advanced strategies for managing bony deficiency within the knee joint reconstruction. Most significant and recent papers about the management of bone defects during revision knee arthroplasty were carefully analyzed and reviewed to report the most common causes of bone loss and the most effective strategies to manage them. Modular metal and tantalum augmentation showed to provide more stable and durable knee revisions compared to allografts, limited by complications such as graft failure, fracture and resorption. Moreover, modular augmentation may considerably shorten operative times with a potential decrease of complications, above all infection which has been frequently associated to the use of allografts. Modular augmentation may significantly reduce the need for allografting, whose complications appear to limit the long-term success of knee revisions.

  18. Focal Defects of the Knee Articular Surface: Evidence of a Regenerative Potential Pattern in Osteochondritis Dissecans and Degenerative Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gabusi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The surgical treatment of knee articular focal lesions may offer heterogeneous clinical results. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD lesions showed to heal better than degenerative lesions (DL but the underlying biological reasons are unknown. We evaluated the basal histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of these lesions analyzing a series of osteochondral fragments from young patients with similar age but presenting different etiology. Osteochondral tissue samples were stained with Safranin O and graded using a histological score. Markers of mesenchymal progenitor cells (CD146, osteoclasts (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, TRAP, and vessels (CD34 were evaluated. Histological score showed a higher degeneration of both cartilage and bone compartments in OCD compared to DL fragments. Only CD146-positive cells were found at the same percentage in cartilage compartment of both DL and OCD patients. By contrast, in the bone compartment a significantly higher percentage of CD146, TRAP, and CD34 markers was found in OCD compared to DL patients. These data showed distinct histological characteristics of osteochondral focal lesions located in the same anatomical region but having a different etiology. The higher percentages of these markers in OCD than in DL, mainly associated with a high bone turnover, could help to explain the higher clinical healing potential of OCD patients.

  19. A Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin Showed a Regenerative Potential in Intrabony Defects and Furcation Defects but Not in Periodontal Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natto, Zuhair S; Green, Martyn S

    2017-12-01

    Regenerative potential of leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin. Part A: intra-bony defects, furcation defects and periodontal plastic surgery. A systematic review and meta-analysis. Castro AB, Meschi N, Temmerman A, Pinto N, Lambrechts P, Teughels W, Quirynen M. J Clin Periodontol 2017; 44(1):67-82. Self-funded by the authors and their institution TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN: Systematic review with meta-analysis of data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Potential Use of Human Periapical Cyst-Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hPCy-MSCs as a Novel Stem Cell Source for Regenerative Medicine Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tatullo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are attracting growing interest by the scientific community due to their huge regenerative potential. Thus, the plasticity of MSCs strongly suggests the utilization of these cells for regenerative medicine applications. The main issue about the clinical use of MSCs is related to the complex way to obtain them from healthy tissues; this topic has encouraged scientists to search for novel and more advantageous sources of these cells in easily accessible tissues. The oral cavity hosts several cell populations expressing mesenchymal stem cell like-features, furthermore, the access to oral and dental tissues is simple and isolation of cells is very efficient. Thus, oral-derived stem cells are highly attractive for clinical purposes. In this context, human periapical cyst mesenchymal stem cells (hPCy-MSCs exhibit characteristics similar to other dental-derived MSCs, including their extensive proliferative potential, cell surface marker profile and the ability to differentiate into various cell types such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and neurons. Importantly, hPCy-MSCs are easily collected from the surgically removed periapical cysts; this reusing of biological waste guarantees a smart source of stem cells without any impact on the surrounding healthy tissues. In this review, we report the most interesting research topics related to hPCy-MSCs with a newsworthy discussion about the future insights. This newly discovered cell population exhibits interesting and valuable potentialities that could be of high impact in the future regenerative medicine applications.

  1. Potential Use of Human Periapical Cyst-Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hPCy-MSCs) as a Novel Stem Cell Source for Regenerative Medicine Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatullo, Marco; Codispoti, Bruna; Pacifici, Andrea; Palmieri, Francesca; Marrelli, Massimo; Pacifici, Luciano; Paduano, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are attracting growing interest by the scientific community due to their huge regenerative potential. Thus, the plasticity of MSCs strongly suggests the utilization of these cells for regenerative medicine applications. The main issue about the clinical use of MSCs is related to the complex way to obtain them from healthy tissues; this topic has encouraged scientists to search for novel and more advantageous sources of these cells in easily accessible tissues. The oral cavity hosts several cell populations expressing mesenchymal stem cell like-features, furthermore, the access to oral and dental tissues is simple and isolation of cells is very efficient. Thus, oral-derived stem cells are highly attractive for clinical purposes. In this context, human periapical cyst mesenchymal stem cells (hPCy-MSCs) exhibit characteristics similar to other dental-derived MSCs, including their extensive proliferative potential, cell surface marker profile and the ability to differentiate into various cell types such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and neurons. Importantly, hPCy-MSCs are easily collected from the surgically removed periapical cysts; this reusing of biological waste guarantees a smart source of stem cells without any impact on the surrounding healthy tissues. In this review, we report the most interesting research topics related to hPCy-MSCs with a newsworthy discussion about the future insights. This newly discovered cell population exhibits interesting and valuable potentialities that could be of high impact in the future regenerative medicine applications.

  2. A Therapeutic Potential for Marine Skeletal Proteins in Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Milthorpe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A vital ingredient for engineering bone tissue, in the culture dish, is the use of recombinant matrix and growth proteins to help accelerate the growth of cultivated tissues into clinically acceptable quantities. The skeletal organic matrices of calcifying marine invertebrates are an untouched potential source of such growth inducing proteins. They have the advantage of being ready-made and retain the native state of the original protein. Striking evidence shows that skeleton building bone morphogenic protein-2/4 (BMP and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β exist within various marine invertebrates such as, corals. Best practice mariculture and the latest innovations in long-term marine invertebrate cell cultivation can be implemented to ensure that these proteins are produced sustainably and supplied continuously. This also guarantees that coral reef habitats are not damaged during the collection of specimens. Potential proteins for bone repair, either extracted from the skeleton or derived from cultivated tissues, can be identified, evaluated and retrieved using chromatography, cell assays and proteomic methods. Due to the current evidence for bone matrix protein analogues in marine invertebrates, together with the methods established for their production and retrieval there is a genuine prospect that they can be used to regenerate living bone for potential clinical use.

  3. Advanced biomatrix designs for regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Park, C H; Perez, R A; Lee, H Y; Jang, J H; Lee, H H; Wall, I B; Shi, S; Kim, H W

    2014-12-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth-supporting apparatus, including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. A broad range of treatment options is currently available to restore the structure and function of the periodontal tissues. A regenerative approach, among others, is now considered the most promising paradigm for this purpose, harnessing the unique properties of stem cells. How to make full use of the body's innate regenerative capacity is thus a key issue. While stem cells and bioactive factors are essential components in the regenerative processes, matrices play pivotal roles in recapitulating stem cell functions and potentiating therapeutic actions of bioactive molecules. Moreover, the positions of appropriate bioactive matrices relative to the injury site may stimulate the innate regenerative stem cell populations, removing the need to deliver cells that have been manipulated outside of the body. In this topical review, we update views on advanced designs of biomatrices-including mimicking of the native extracellular matrix, providing mechanical stimulation, activating cell-driven matrices, and delivering bioactive factors in a controllable manner-which are ultimately useful for the regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  4. Nanohybrid Electro-Coatings Toward Therapeutic Implants with Controlled Drug Delivery Potential for Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kapil D; Singh, Rajendra K; Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-10-01

    Coatings of metallic implants facilitate a new bioactive interface that favors osteogenic responses and bone formation. Providing a therapeutic capacity to the coatings, involving with a sustainable and controllable delivery of drug molecules, significantly improves the bone regenerative potential. Here we design a novel nanocomposite coating, made of mesoporous silica-shelled hydroxyapatite (MS-HA) nanoparticles and chitosan (Chi), incorporating osteogenic drug dexamethasone phosphate (Dex(P)) within the MS-HA, by the process of an electrophoretic deposition (EPD). MS-HA, produced by a sol–gel reaction of silica onto an HA nanorod, exhibited mono-dispersed core–shell nanoparticles with a size of ∼40 nm and a shell thickness of ∼25 nm. The highly mesoporous structure enabled an effective loading of Dex(P) onto the nanocarriers, showing a loading capacity as high as 15% by weight. The Dex(P) loaded MS-HA were homogenized with Chi in acidic ethanol/water to allow for the EPD process. Nanocomposite coatings were produced well, forming thicknesses a few micrometers largely tunable with EPD parameters and exhibiting MS-HA nanoparticles evenly distributed within Chi matrix. While Dex(P) release from the bare MS-HA nanocarrier was very abrupt, showing a complete release within 24 h, the Dex(P) release from the nanocomposite coatings profiled a highly sustainable pattern over a month. Rat mesenchymal stem cells cultured on the Dex(P)-releasing coatings were substantially stimulated to an osteoblastic lineage, presenting enhanced alkaline phosphate activity and higher levels of osteogenic genes, with respect to coatings free of Dex(P). An indirect culture test also confirmed the long-term release effects of Dex(P) from the coatings over 4 weeks. The currently-developed nanocomposite EPD coatings, with a capacity to load osteogenic drug at large quantity and to deliver for a long-term period, are considered as a promising therapeutic coating platform for metallic

  5. Clinical outcome of periodontal regenerative therapy using collagen membrane and deproteinized bovine bone mineral: a 2.5-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irokawa, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Takahiro; Noda, Katsuya; Goto, Hiroaki; Egawa, Masahiro; Tomita, Sachiyo; Sugito, Hiroki; Nikaido, Masahiko; Saito, Atsushi

    2017-02-17

    This study aimed to evaluate, longitudinally, the outcome of periodontal regenerative therapy using a deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) in combination with a collagen barrier (CB) for the treatment of intrabony defects. Patients with chronic periodontitis who have completed initial periodontal therapy participated in this study. They had at least one 2- or 3-wall intrabony periodontal defect of ≥3 mm in depth. During surgery, defects were filled with DBBM and covered with CB. Ten patients completed 2.5-year reevaluation. At baseline, mean clinical attachment level (CAL) of the treated site was 8.0 mm and mean probing depth (PD) was 7.5 mm. Mean depth of intrabony component was 4.6 mm. Mean gains in CAL at 6 months and 2.5 years were 2.8 ± 1.0 and 1.4 ± 1.5 mm, respectively, both showing a significant improvement from baseline. CAL gains at 1 and 2.5 years were significantly reduced from that at 6 months. A significant improvement in PD was also noted: mean reductions in PD at 6 months and 2.5 years were 4.0 ± 0.8 and 3.2 ± 0.8 mm, respectively. The combination therapy using DBBM and CB yielded statistically significant effects such as CAL gain and PD reduction, up to 2.5 years in the treatment of intrabony defects. However, the trend for decrease in CAL gain over time calls for the need for careful maintenance care.

  6. The Infrapatellar Fat Pad as a Source of Perivascular Stem Cells with Increased Chondrogenic Potential for Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Paul; Khan, Nusrat; Biant, Leela; Péault, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Perivascular stem cells (PSCs) are the natural ancestors of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and are the stem cells responsible for homeostasis and repair in vivo. Prospectively identified and isolated PSCs have demonstrated increased plasticity and osteogenic potential. Cells from the infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) have demonstrated increased chondrogenic potential compared with those from subcutaneous fat. This research assessed the chondrogenic potential of IFP PSCs compared with MSCs from the IFP and bone marrow. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the location of perivascular markers (CD146, CD34, neural/glial antigen 2 [NG2], platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β [PDGFRβ], and α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) in relation to endothelial markers (CD31, CD144, von Willebrand factor [vWF]). Pericytes and adventitial cells were isolated from the stromal vascular fraction (3.8% and 21.2%, respectively) using flow cytometry with a viability of 88%. The mean numbers of pericytes and adventitial cells isolated were 4.6 ± 2.2 × 10 4 and 16.2 ± 3.2 × 10 4 , respectively, equating to 7.9 ± 4.4 × 10 3 and 20.8 ± 4.3 × 10 3 cells per gram of harvested tissue. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting demonstrated that cultured PSCs were CD44+CD90+CD105+; polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry demonstrated that pericytes retained their CD146+ phenotype and expressed the pericyte markers PDGFRβ and NG2. Differentiation was confirmed using histochemical stains and genetic expression. Using a pellet model, the IFP PSCs and the MSCs generated significantly more extracellular matrix than bone marrow MSCs (p < .001 and p = .011, respectively). The IFP PSCs generated significantly more extracellular matrix than IFP MSCs (p = .002). Micromass culture demonstrated that differentiated PSCs were upregulated compared with MSCs for COL2A1, ACAN, and SOX9 expression by factors of 4.8 ± 1.3, 4.3 ± 0.9, and 7.0 ± 1.7, respectively. The IFP was a significantly better source

  7. Design, synthesis, and initial evaluation of D-glyceraldehyde crosslinked gelatin-hydroxyapatite as a potential bone graft substitute material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florschutz, Anthony Vatroslav

    Utilization of bone grafts for the treatment of skeletal pathology is a common practice in orthopaedic, craniomaxillofacial, dental, and plastic surgery. Autogenous bone graft is the established archetype but has disadvantages including donor site morbidity, limited supply, and prolonging operative time. In order to avoid these and other issues, bone graft substitute materials are becoming increasingly prevalent among surgeons for reconstructing skeletal defects and arthrodesis applications. Bone graft substitutes are biomaterials, biologics, and guided tissue/bone regenerative devices that can be used alone or in combinations as supplements or alternatives to autogenous bone graft. There is a growing interest and trend to specialize graft substitutes for specific indications and although there is good rationale for this indication-specific approach, the development and utility of a more universal bone graft substitute may provide a better answer for patients and surgeons. The aim of the present research focuses on the design, synthesis, and initial evaluation of D-glyceraldehyde crosslinked gelatin-hydroxyapatite composites for potential use as a bone graft substitutes. After initial establishment of rational material design, gelatinhydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated with different gelatin:hydroxyapatite ratios and crosslinking concentrations. The synthesized scaffolds were subsequently evaluated on the basis of their swelling behavior, porosity, density, percent composition, mechanical properties, and morphology and further assessed with respect to cell-biomaterial interaction and biomineralization in vitro. Although none of the materials achieved mechanical properties suitable for structural graft applications, a reproducible material design and synthesis was achieved with properties recognized to facilitate bone formation. Select scaffold formulations as well as a subset of scaffolds loaded with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 were

  8. Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bovine Cortical Bone: Its Potential for Guided Bone Regeneration Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bovine pericardium collagen membrane (BPCM had been widely used in guided bone regeneration (GBR whose manufacturing process usually required chemical cross-linking to prolong its biodegradation. However, cross-linking of collagen fibrils was associated with poorer tissue integration and delayed vascular invasion. Objective. This study evaluated the potential of bovine cortical bone collagen membrane for GBR by evaluating its antigenicity potential, cytotoxicity, immune and tissue response, and biodegradation behaviors. Material and Methods. Antigenicity potential of demineralized freeze-dried bovine cortical bone membrane (DFDBCBM was done with histology-based anticellularity evaluation, while cytotoxicity was analyzed using MTT Assay. Evaluation of immune response, tissue response, and biodegradation was done by randomly implanting DFDBCBM and BPCM in rat’s subcutaneous dorsum. Samples were collected at 2, 5, and 7 days and 7, 14, 21, and 28 days for biocompatibility and tissue response-biodegradation study, respectively. Result. DFDBCBM, histologically, showed no retained cells; however, it showed some level of in vitro cytotoxicity. In vivo study exhibited increased immune response to DFDBCBM in early healing phase; however, normal tissue response and degradation rate were observed up to 4 weeks after DFDBCBM implantation. Conclusion. Demineralized freeze-dried bovine cortical bone membrane showed potential for clinical application; however, it needs to be optimized in its biocompatibility to fulfill all requirements for GBR membrane.

  9. Conductive vancomycin-loaded mesoporous silica polypyrrole-based scaffolds for bone regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanjanizadeh Ezazi, Nazanin; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Shatalin, Yuri V.

    2018-01-01

    engineering due to favorable biocompatibility, osteoconductivity and drug delivery potential, respectively. These materials were coupled with conductive polypyrrole (PPy) polymer to create a novel bone scaffold for regenerative medicine. Conductive and non-conductive scaffolds were made by slurry casting...

  10. Regenerative engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Laurencin, Cato T

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative Engineering: The Future of Medicine Saadiq F. El-Amin III , MD , PhD; Joylene W.L. Thomas, MD ; Ugonna N. Ihekweazu, MD ; Mia D. Woods, MS; and Ashim Gupta, MSCell Biology Gloria Gronowicz, PhD and Karen Sagomonyants, DMDStem Cells and Tissue Regeneration Kristen Martins-Taylor, PhD; Xiaofang Wang, MD , PhD; Xue-Jun Li, PhD; and Ren-He Xu, MD , PhDIntroduction to Materials Science Sangamesh G. Kumbar, PhD and Cato T. Laurencin, MD , PhDBiomaterials A. Jon Goldberg, PhD and Liisa T. Kuhn, PhDIn Vitro Assessment of Cell-Biomaterial Interactions Yong Wang, PhDHost Response to Biomate

  11. Evaluation of the Healing Potential of Demineralized Dentin Matrix Fixed with Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Bone Grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Yun Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of demineralized dentin matrix (DDM fixed with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2 through an experimental and a clinical study. Unilateral upper second and third premolars of eight beagles were extracted. A mucoperiosteal flap was elevated around the extraction socket, and a bone defect was made using a surgical drill. Each DDM was fixed with rhBMP-2, and autogenous bone was grafted at the bone defect area with a collagenous membrane. The beagles were euthanized at two, four, eight, and 12 weeks after receiving the bone graft. Block specimens involving grafted bone and surrounding natural bone were extracted. A total of 23 patients who received bone grafts using human DDM fixed with rhBMP-2 (AutoBT BMP with implant placements (36 implants; maxilla: 14, mandible: 22 were selected. The implant stability, marginal bone loss, and clinical outcome were evaluated. Three trephine cores were harvested fourmonths after bone grafting, and histologic examination was performed. In the histological evaluation performed four weeks after the bone graft, autogenous bone showed 52% new bone formation and DDM fixed with rhBMP-2 showed 33% new bone formation. Twelve weeks after the bone graft, autogenous bone showed 75% new bone formation and DDM fixed with rhBMP-2 showed 48% new bone formation. In the clinical study, favorable osseointegration was obtained in 35 out of 36 implant sites (one case of osseointegration failure. In all cases, severe complications were not observed. Histomorphometrically, new bone formation was observed in 14.98% of the cases. The residual DDM particles were 6.22%. AutoBT BMP provides good osteoinductive and osteoconductive potential and clinical efficacy.

  12. Changes of Surface Electric Potential of Bones Depending on Their Age

    OpenAIRE

    Freimanis, E; Dehtjars, J; Vendiņa, V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine how surface electric potential of bones changes with their age and how it correlates with mechanical properties of bones. Surface electric potential was measured in 6 cross-sectional zones of the tibia. Changes of bones surface electric potential with age were determined and correlations between surface electric potential and mechanical properties were derived.

  13. Interleukin-10 Inhibits Bone Resorption: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy in Periodontitis and Other Bone Loss Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Bin; Yan, Fuhua; Guo, Jianbin; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Shouzhi; Yang, Wenrong

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis and other bone loss diseases, decreasing bone volume and strength, have a significant impact on millions of people with the risk of tooth loss and bone fracture. The integrity and strength of bone are maintained through the balance between bone resorption and bone formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively, so the loss of bone results from the disruption of such balance due to increased resorption or/and decreased formation of bone. The goal of therapies for diseases...

  14. Processing and characterization of diatom nanoparticles and microparticles as potential source of silicon for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Thi Duy Hanh [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Bonani, Walter [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Trento Research Unit, Trento (Italy); Speranza, Giorgio [Center for Materials and Microsystems, PAM-SE, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Trento (Italy); Sglavo, Vincenzo; Ceccato, Riccardo [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Maniglio, Devid; Motta, Antonella [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Trento Research Unit, Trento (Italy); Migliaresi, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.migliaresi@unitn.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); BIOtech Research Center and European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Trento (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Trento Research Unit, Trento (Italy)

    2016-02-01

    Silicon plays an important role in bone formation and maintenance, improving osteoblast cell function and inducing mineralization. Often, bone deformation and long bone abnormalities have been associated with silica/silicon deficiency. Diatomite, a natural deposit of diatom skeleton, is a cheap and abundant source of biogenic silica. The aim of the present study is to validate the potential of diatom particles derived from diatom skeletons as silicon-donor materials for bone tissue engineering applications. Raw diatomite (RD) and calcined diatomite (CD) powders were purified by acid treatments, and diatom microparticles (MPs) and nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by fragmentation of purified diatoms under alkaline conditions. The influence of processing on the surface chemical composition of purified diatomites was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Diatoms NPs were also characterized in terms of morphology and size distribution by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic light scattering (DLS), while diatom MPs morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface area and microporosity of the diatom particles were evaluated by nitrogen physisorption methods. Release of silicon ions from diatom-derived particles was demonstrated using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES); furthermore, silicon release kinetic was found to be influenced by diatomite purification method and particle size. Diatom-derived microparticles (MPs) and nanoparticles (NPs) showed limited or no cytotoxic effect in vitro depending on the administration conditions. - Highlights: • Diatomite is a natural source of silica and has a potential as silicon-donor for bone regenerative applications. • Diatom particles derived from purified diatom skeletons were prepared by fragmentation under extreme alkaline condition. • Dissolution of diatom particles derived from diatom skeletons in DI water depend on purification method

  15. Processing and characterization of diatom nanoparticles and microparticles as potential source of silicon for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Thi Duy Hanh; Bonani, Walter; Speranza, Giorgio; Sglavo, Vincenzo; Ceccato, Riccardo; Maniglio, Devid; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Silicon plays an important role in bone formation and maintenance, improving osteoblast cell function and inducing mineralization. Often, bone deformation and long bone abnormalities have been associated with silica/silicon deficiency. Diatomite, a natural deposit of diatom skeleton, is a cheap and abundant source of biogenic silica. The aim of the present study is to validate the potential of diatom particles derived from diatom skeletons as silicon-donor materials for bone tissue engineering applications. Raw diatomite (RD) and calcined diatomite (CD) powders were purified by acid treatments, and diatom microparticles (MPs) and nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by fragmentation of purified diatoms under alkaline conditions. The influence of processing on the surface chemical composition of purified diatomites was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Diatoms NPs were also characterized in terms of morphology and size distribution by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic light scattering (DLS), while diatom MPs morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface area and microporosity of the diatom particles were evaluated by nitrogen physisorption methods. Release of silicon ions from diatom-derived particles was demonstrated using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES); furthermore, silicon release kinetic was found to be influenced by diatomite purification method and particle size. Diatom-derived microparticles (MPs) and nanoparticles (NPs) showed limited or no cytotoxic effect in vitro depending on the administration conditions. - Highlights: • Diatomite is a natural source of silica and has a potential as silicon-donor for bone regenerative applications. • Diatom particles derived from purified diatom skeletons were prepared by fragmentation under extreme alkaline condition. • Dissolution of diatom particles derived from diatom skeletons in DI water depend on purification method

  16. The use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor induced mobilization for isolation of dental pulp stem cells with high regenerative potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Masashi; Horibe, Hiroshi; Iohara, Koichiro; Hayashi, Yuki; Osako, Yohei; Takei, Yoshifumi; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Motoyama, Noboru; Kurita, Kenichi; Nakashima, Misako

    2013-12-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) contain subsets of progenitor/stem cells with high angiogenic, neurogenic and regenerative potential useful for cell therapy. It is essential to develop a safe and efficacious method to isolate the clinical-grade DPSCs subsets from a small amount of pulp tissue without using conventional flow cytometry. Thus, a method for isolation of DPSCs subsets based on their migratory response to optimized concentration of 100 ng/ml of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was determined in this study. The DPSCs mobilized by G-CSF (MDPSCs) were enriched for CD105, C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR-4) and G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) positive cells, demonstrating stem cell properties including high proliferation rate and stability. The absence of abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype and lack of tumor formation after transplantation in an immunodeficient mouse were demonstrated. The conditioned medium of MDPSCs exhibited anti-apoptotic activity, enhanced migration and immunomodulatory properties. Furthermore, transplantation of MDPSCs accelerated vasculogenesis in an ischemic hindlimb model and augmented regenerated pulp tissue in an ectopic tooth root model compared to that of colony-derived DPSCs, indicating higher regenerative potential of MDPSCs. In conclusion, this isolation method for DPSCs subsets is safe and efficacious, having utility for potential clinical applications to autologous cell transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Digital image processing of bone - Problems and potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, E. R.; Wronski, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a digital image processing system for bone histomorphometry and fluorescent marker monitoring is discussed. The system in question is capable of making measurements of UV or light microscope features on a video screen with either video or computer-generated images, and comprises a microscope, low-light-level video camera, video digitizer and display terminal, color monitor, and PDP 11/34 computer. Capabilities demonstrated in the analysis of an undecalcified rat tibia include the measurement of perimeter and total bone area, and the generation of microscope images, false color images, digitized images and contoured images for further analysis. Software development will be based on an existing software library, specifically the mini-VICAR system developed at JPL. It is noted that the potentials of the system in terms of speed and reliability far exceed any problems associated with hardware and software development.

  18. Intranasal delivery of hypoxia-preconditioned bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells enhanced regenerative effects after intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinmei; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Gu, Xiaohuan; Zhang, James Ya; Zhang, Yongbo; Li, Jimei; Wei, Ling

    2015-10-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke (ICH) causes high mortality and morbidity with very limited treatment options. Cell-based therapy has emerged as a novel approach to replace damaged brain tissues and promote regenerative processes. In this study we tested the hypothesis that intranasally delivered hypoxia-preconditioned BMSCs could reach the brain, promote tissue repair and improve functional recovery after ICH. Hemorrhagic stroke was induced in adult C57/B6 mice by injection of collagenase IV into the striatum. Animals were randomly divided into three groups: sham group, intranasal BMSC treatment group, and vehicle treatment group. BMSCs were pre-treated with hypoxic preconditioning (HP) and pre-labeled with Hoechst before transplantation. Behavior tests, including the mNSS score, rotarod test, adhesive removal test, and locomotor function evaluation were performed at varying days, up to 21days, after ICH to evaluate the therapeutic effects of BMSC transplantation. Western blots and immunohistochemistry were performed to analyze the neurotrophic effects. Intranasally delivered HP-BMSCs were identified in peri-injury regions. NeuN+/BrdU+ co-labeled cells were markedly increased around the hematoma region, and growth factors, including BDNF, GDNF, and VEGF were significantly upregulated in the ICH brain after BMSC treatment. The BMSC treatment group showed significant improvement in behavioral performance compared with the vehicle group. Our data also showed that intranasally delivered HP-BMSCs migrated to peri-injury regions and provided growth factors to increase neurogenesis after ICH. We conclude that intranasal administration of BMSC is an effective treatment for ICH, and that it enhanced neuroregenerative effects and promoted neurological functional recovery after ICH. Overall, the investigation supports the potential therapeutic strategy for BMSC transplantation therapy against hemorrhagic stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interleukin-10 Inhibits Bone Resorption: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy in Periodontitis and Other Bone Loss Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis and other bone loss diseases, decreasing bone volume and strength, have a significant impact on millions of people with the risk of tooth loss and bone fracture. The integrity and strength of bone are maintained through the balance between bone resorption and bone formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively, so the loss of bone results from the disruption of such balance due to increased resorption or/and decreased formation of bone. The goal of therapies for diseases of bone loss is to reduce bone loss, improve bone formation, and then keep healthy bone density. Current therapies have mostly relied on long-term medication, exercise, anti-inflammatory therapies, and changing of the life style. However there are some limitations for some patients in the effective treatments for bone loss diseases because of the complexity of bone loss. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, and recent studies have indicated that IL-10 can contribute to the maintenance of bone mass through inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption and regulation of osteoblastic bone formation. This paper will provide a brief overview of the role of IL-10 in bone loss diseases and discuss the possibility of IL-10 adoption in therapy of bone loss diseases therapy.

  20. Interleukin-10 inhibits bone resorption: a potential therapeutic strategy in periodontitis and other bone loss diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Chen, Bin; Yan, Fuhua; Guo, Jianbin; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Shouzhi; Yang, Wenrong

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis and other bone loss diseases, decreasing bone volume and strength, have a significant impact on millions of people with the risk of tooth loss and bone fracture. The integrity and strength of bone are maintained through the balance between bone resorption and bone formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively, so the loss of bone results from the disruption of such balance due to increased resorption or/and decreased formation of bone. The goal of therapies for diseases of bone loss is to reduce bone loss, improve bone formation, and then keep healthy bone density. Current therapies have mostly relied on long-term medication, exercise, anti-inflammatory therapies, and changing of the life style. However there are some limitations for some patients in the effective treatments for bone loss diseases because of the complexity of bone loss. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine, and recent studies have indicated that IL-10 can contribute to the maintenance of bone mass through inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption and regulation of osteoblastic bone formation. This paper will provide a brief overview of the role of IL-10 in bone loss diseases and discuss the possibility of IL-10 adoption in therapy of bone loss diseases therapy.

  1. Regenerative Perspective in Modern Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihnea Ioan Nicolescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to trace the contour lines of regenerative dentistry, to offer an introductory overview on this emerging field to both dental students and practitioners. The crystallized depiction of the concept is a translational approach, connecting dental academics to scientific research and clinical utility. Therefore, this review begins by presenting the general features of regenerative medicine, and then gradually introduces the specific aspects of major dental subdomains, highlighting the progress achieved during the last years by scientific research and, in some cases, which has already been translated into clinical results. The distinct characteristics of stem cells and their microenvironment, together with their diversity in the oral cavity, are put into the context of research and clinical use. Examples of regenerative studies regarding endodontic and periodontal compartments, as well as hard (alveolar bone and soft (salivary glands related tissues, are presented to make the reader further acquainted with the topic. Instead of providing a conclusion, we will emphasize the importance for all dental community members, from young students to experienced dentists, of an early awareness rising regarding biomedical research progress in general and regenerative dentistry in particular.

  2. Hydrogen gas treatment prolongs replicative lifespan of bone marrow multipotential stromal cells in vitro while preserving differentiation and paracrine potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, Haruhisa [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Guan, Jianjun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Tamama, Kenichi, E-mail: kenichi.tamama@osumc.edu [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2010-07-02

    Cell therapy with bone marrow multipotential stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents a promising approach in the field of regenerative medicine. Low frequency of MSCs in adult bone marrow necessitates ex vivo expansion of MSCs after harvest; however, such a manipulation causes cellular senescence with loss of differentiation, proliferative, and therapeutic potentials of MSCs. Hydrogen molecules have been shown to exert organ protective effects through selective reduction of hydroxyl radicals. As oxidative stress is one of the key insults promoting cell senescence in vivo as well as in vitro, we hypothesized that hydrogen molecules prevent senescent process during MSC expansion. Addition of 3% hydrogen gas enhanced preservation of colony forming early progenitor cells within MSC preparation and prolonged the in vitro replicative lifespan of MSCs without losing differentiation potentials and paracrine capabilities. Interestingly, 3% hydrogen gas treatment did not decrease hydroxyl radical, protein carbonyl, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, suggesting that scavenging hydroxyl radical might not be responsible for these effects of hydrogen gas in this study.

  3. Molecular mechanism and potential targets for bone metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Haruo

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of bone metastasis has been increasing in all cancers in recent years. Bone metastasis is associated with substantial morbidity, including bone pain, pathological fracture, neurological deficit and/or hypercalcemia. Thus, the management of bone metastasis in patients is a clinically significant issue. In the process of bone metastasis, the primary mechanism responsible for bone destruction is cancer cell-mediated stimulation of osteoclastic bone resorption, which results in osteolysis and release of various growth factors from the bone matrix. These growth factors are prerequisites for successful colonization and subsequent invasive growth of cancer cells in bone, which is called a 'vicious cycle.' Thus, it is important to elucidate what molecules are involved in this step of bone destruction, and the understanding of these molecular mechanisms could lead to develop molecular-target therapies for bone metastasis. Bisphosphonates introduced in the treatment for bone metastasis have been shown to reduce skeletal morbidity. In Japan, the most potent bisphosphonate, zoledronate (ZOMETA), was introduced in this past April, and a phase III clinical trial of humanized anti-receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) monoclonal antibody (Denosumab) against bone metastasis is under way as a global study. These new agents, which are targeted to osteoclasts, are considered to be standard management in the care of bone metastasis patients in combination with chemotherapy and/or hormone therapy. (author)

  4. Bone Alkaline Phosphatase and Tartrate-Resistant Acid Phosphatase: Potential Co-regulators of Bone Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halling Linder, Cecilia; Ek-Rylander, Barbro; Krumpel, Michael; Norgård, Maria; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Andersson, Göran; Magnusson, Per

    2017-07-01

    Phosphorylated osteopontin (OPN) inhibits hydroxyapatite crystal formation and growth, and bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) promotes extracellular mineralization via the release of inorganic phosphate from the mineralization inhibitor inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), produced by osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes, exhibits potent phosphatase activity towards OPN; however, its potential capacity as a regulator of mineralization has not previously been addressed. We compared the efficiency of BALP and TRAP towards the endogenous substrates for BALP, i.e., PPi and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), and their impact on mineralization in vitro via dephosphorylation of bovine milk OPN. TRAP showed higher phosphatase activity towards phosphorylated OPN and PPi compared to BALP, whereas the activity of TRAP and BALP towards PLP was comparable. Bovine milk OPN could be completely dephosphorylated by TRAP, liberating all its 28 phosphates, whereas BALP dephosphorylated at most 10 phosphates. OPN, dephosphorylated by either BALP or TRAP, showed a partially or completely attenuated phosphorylation-dependent inhibitory capacity, respectively, compared to native OPN on the formation of mineralized nodules. Thus, there are phosphorylations in OPN important for inhibition of mineralization that are removed by TRAP but not by BALP. In conclusion, our data indicate that both BALP and TRAP can alleviate the inhibitory effect of OPN on mineralization, suggesting a potential role for TRAP in skeletal mineralization. Further studies are warranted to explore the possible physiological relevance of TRAP in bone mineralization.

  5. Energy recovery from waste food by combustion or gasification with the potential for regenerative dehydration: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caton, P.A.; Carr, M.A.; Kim, S.S.; Beautyman, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Energy recovery from food waste was studied using the food service at the US Naval Academy as a case study. Post-consumer food waste was captured over a period of ten days to estimate individual waste per meal and total waste per month. The food waste was analyzed for chemical composition and water content using ultimate and proximate analysis, and for energy content, and compared with the same analyses of wood (a more typical biomass fuel). Three different samples of food waste showed relative uniformity of properties despite being sampled on different days, with different menus. Food waste had lower oxygen content, higher nitrogen and ash content, and higher energy content than wood. The food waste in this study had approximately 70% water content. Temperatures and emissions from combustion of wood pellets, dried pelletized food waste, and dried non-pelletized food waste were measured and compared using a modified residential pellet stove. Temperatures were higher for food waste due to the higher energy content. Emissions of NO, HC, and soot were slightly higher for food waste. Despite the large water content, thermodynamic analysis showed that regenerative dehydration, in which waste energy from the combustion system is used to remove water from the incoming wet fuel, is possible. An excess enthalpy ratio is defined to formalize the comparison of waste sensible enthalpy with the energy required for dehydration. Analysis of fuel-lean combustion and fuel-rich gasification shows that little, if any, external energy would necessarily be required to remove the water from the incoming fuel. An equilibrium model was used to simulate waste food gasification by extending the simulation to high water content levels. Probable ranges for successful food waste gasification are identified. Energy recovery of waste food could result in cost savings by offsetting traditional fuel-use (e.g. natural gas for heating) and by reducing disposal costs.

  6. Functional Tooth Regeneration Using a Bioengineered Tooth Unit as a Mature Organ Replacement Regenerative Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Aya; Ogawa, Miho; Yasukawa, Masato; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Morita, Ritsuko; Ikeda, Etsuko; Nakao, Kazuhisa; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Kasugai, Shohei; Saito, Masahiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Donor organ transplantation is currently an essential therapeutic approach to the replacement of a dysfunctional organ as a result of disease, injury or aging in vivo. Recent progress in the area of regenerative therapy has the potential to lead to bioengineered mature organ replacement in the future. In this proof of concept study, we here report a further development in this regard in which a bioengineered tooth unit comprising mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, was successfully transplanted into a properly-sized bony hole in the alveolar bone through bone integration by recipient bone remodeling in a murine transplantation model system. The bioengineered tooth unit restored enough the alveolar bone in a vertical direction into an extensive bone defect of murine lower jaw. Engrafted bioengineered tooth displayed physiological tooth functions such as mastication, periodontal ligament function for bone remodeling and responsiveness to noxious stimulations. This study thus represents a substantial advance and demonstrates the real potential for bioengineered mature organ replacement as a next generation regenerative therapy. PMID:21765896

  7. Age-Related Changes in the Regenerative Potential of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Isolated from the Prominent Fat Pads in Human Lower Eyelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xinhai; Liao, Caihe; Liu, Guangpeng; Xu, Yipin; Tan, Jian; Song, Zhenshun

    2016-01-01

    The existence of multipotent adipose-derived stem cells isolated from human orbital fat (OF) tissue has shown great therapeutic potential in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. But the use of stem cells for therapeutic applications is influenced by their proliferative and differentiation potentials, which may be affected by the age of the donor. So far there is little knowledge about the effects of donor age on the biological properties of human orbital adipose-derived stem cells (OASCs). The intraorbital fat protrusion in the lower eyelids occurs as an aging process, and the protruded fat is routinely removed during aesthetic surgeries. Based on the ease of OF harvest and the availability of OASCs, we investigated in this study the relationship between age and the differentiation and proliferation potentials of human OASCs. Human orbital adipose samples were harvested from young (with normal lower eyelid appearance) and old donors (having protruded fat pads in the lower eyelids). The morphological properties of orbital adipocytes were assessed and the fat cell size displayed a decreasing trend with advancing age. OASCs were isolated from the fat samples, expanded in vitro and cultured under appropriate inducive conditions. Compared to the young cells, although no difference was found in the cell yield and phenotype expression, aged OASCs showed fewer progenitor cell numbers, reduced proliferative rates, increased senescent features and decreased differentiation potentials towards adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. Our data suggested that using autologous OASCs from elderly patients for potential therapeutic purposes might be restricted.

  8. Climbing exercise increases bone mass and trabecular bone turnover through transient regulation of marrow osteogenic and osteoclastogenic potentials in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Toshiharu; Okimoto, Nobukazu; Sakai, Akinori; Okazaki, Yuichi; Nakura, Nariaki; Notomi, Takuya; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2003-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between the effects of bone turnover and bone marrow cell development in bone cells, we developed a mouse voluntary climbing exercise model. Climbing exercise increased bone volume and transient osteogenic potential of bone marrow. This model would be suitable for investigating the mechanistic roles of mechanical loading. The relationship between bone mass gain and local bone formation and resorption in mechanically loaded bone is not well understood. Sixty-five C57BL/6J mice, 8 weeks of age, were assigned to five groups: a baseline control and two groups each of ground control and climbing exercise mice for 2 and 4 weeks. Mice were housed in a 100-cm tower and had to climb toward a bottle placed at the top to drink water. Compared with the ground control, bone mineral density of the left femur increased in the climbing mice at 4 weeks. At 2 and 4 weeks, bone formation rate (BFR/BS) of periosteal surface, the cross-sectional area, and moment of inertia were increased in the climbing mice, whereas BFR/BS and eroded surface (ES/BS) of endosteal surface did not differ. The trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) of the proximal tibia increased in climbing mice, and osteoclast surface (Oc.S/BS) and osteoclast number decreased at 2 weeks. At 4 weeks, there were increases in BV/TV and parameters of bone formation, including mineralized surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate. In marrow cell cultures from the tibia, the number of alkaline phosphatase+ colony forming units-fibroblastic and the area of mineralized nodule formation in climbing mice were increased, and the number of osteoclast-like TRACP+ multinucleated cells was lower at 2 weeks. At 4 weeks, these parameters recovered to the levels of the ground controls. Our results indicate that climbing increased trabecular bone volume and reduced bone resorption, with a subsequent increase in bone formation. Intermittent climbing downregulates marrow osteoclastogenic cells and

  9. Fabrication of human hair keratin/jellyfish collagen/eggshell-derived hydroxyapatite osteoinductive biocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: From waste to regenerative medicine products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Yavuz Emre; Sezgin Arslan, Tugba; Derkus, Burak; Emregul, Emel; Emregul, Kaan C

    2017-06-01

    In the present study, we aimed at fabricating an osteoinductive biocomposite scaffold using keratin obtained from human hair, jellyfish collagen and eggshell-derived nano-sized spherical hydroxyapatite (nHA) for bone tissue engineering applications. Keratin, collagen and nHA were characterized with the modified Lowry method, free-sulfhydryl groups and hydroxyproline content analysis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) which confirmed the success of the extraction and/or isolation processes. Human adipose mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) were isolated and the cell surface markers were characterized via flow cytometry analysis in addition to multilineage differentiation capacity. The undifferentiated hAMSCs were highly positive for CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90 and CD105, but were not seen to express hematopoietic cell surface markers such as CD14, CD34 and CD45. The cells were successfully directed towards osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic lineages in vitro. The microarchitecture of the scaffolds and cell attachment were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cell viability on the scaffolds was assessed by the MTT assay which revealed no evidence of cytotoxicity. The osteogenic differentiation of hAMSCs on the scaffolds was determined histologically using alizarin red S, osteopontin and osteonectin stainings. Early osteogenic differentiation markers of hAMSCs were significantly expressed on the collagen-keratin-nHA scaffolds. In conclusion, it is believed that collagen-keratin-nHA osteoinductive biocomposite scaffolds have the potential of being used in bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, Laura; Dijkman, Petra E; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2016-07-01

    In regenerative medicine, adult stem cells are the most promising cell types for cell-based therapies. As a new source for multipotent stem cells, human adipose tissue has been introduced. These so called adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are considered to be ideal for application in regenerative therapies. Their main advantage over mesenchymal stem cells derived from other sources, e.g. from bone marrow, is that they can be easily and repeatable harvested using minimally invasive techniques with low morbidity. ADSCs are multipotent and can differentiate into various cell types of the tri-germ lineages, including e.g. osteocytes, adipocytes, neural cells, vascular endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes, pancreatic β-cells, and hepatocytes. Interestingly, ADSCs are characterized by immunosuppressive properties and low immunogenicity. Their secretion of trophic factors enforces the therapeutic and regenerative outcome in a wide range of applications. Taken together, these particular attributes of ADSCs make them highly relevant for clinical applications. Consequently, the therapeutic potential of ADSCs is enormous. Therefore, this review will provide a brief overview of the possible therapeutic applications of ADSCs with regard to their differentiation potential into the tri-germ lineages. Moreover, the relevant advancements made in the field, regulatory aspects as well as other challenges and obstacles will be highlighted.

  11. Effect of anisotropy on stress-induced electrical potentials in bovine bone using ultrasound irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, S.; Makino, T.; Mori, S.; Koyama, D.; Takayanagi, S.; Mizuno, K.; Yanagitani, T.; Matsukawa, M.

    2017-04-01

    The bone fracture healing mechanism of the low-intensity pulsed ultrasound technique is not yet clearly understood. In our previous study, the electrical potentials induced in bone were successfully measured by focusing on piezoelectricity in the MHz range. Bone is composed of collagen and hydroxyapatite and has strong anisotropy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of bone anisotropy on the electrical potentials induced by ultrasound irradiation. For this study, ultrasound bone transducers were fabricated using cortical bovine bone plates as piezoelectric devices. An ultrasound of 7.4 kPapeak-peak (i.e., the peak-to-peak pressure value) was used to irradiate the side surface of each bone plate. Electrical potentials induced in the bone plate were then measured by varying the wave propagation direction in the plate. The peak-to-peak values of these ultrasonically induced electrical potentials were found to vary with changes in the ultrasound propagation direction in the bone sample. The potential was maximized at an inclination of approximately 45° to the bone axis but was minimized around the three orthogonal directions. These maxima and minima ranged from 28 to 33 μVpeak-peak and from 5 to 12 μVpeak-peak, respectively. Additionally, our ultrasound results indicated a change in polarity due to bone anisotropy in the MHz range.

  12. Bone--bone marrow interface (endosteum) potential relationship of microenvironments in the regulation of response to internal emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, F.D.; Pool, R.R.; Stitzel, K.; Momeni, M.H.

    1976-01-01

    The interface between bone and bone marrow is examined in relation to radiation effects, with attention to new concepts of hematopoiesis. Such concepts propose a functional role of stroma in regulating the commitment of pluripotent stem cells as well as in the production of colony stimulating activity (CSA) including candidate granulopoietin(s). Morphologic examples are included, underlining the concept that stroma (including bone) and hematopoietic elements respond as a functional unit to injury to marrow elements. The methylcellulose bone marrow culture system is reviewed as it may relate to a method for quantitation of hematopoietic colonies (CFU-C), humoral regulators for granulopoiesis (CSA), and potentially as a method of quantitating mesenchymal progenitor populations (PFU-C). Based on these and other observations cited, a model depicting a tentative positioning of cells at risk relative to bone-seeking radionuclides is presented

  13. Potential Therapeutic Use of Relaxin in Healing Cranial Bone Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    incorporation of bone marrow-derived angio- and osteogenic progenitor cells into the lesion. This hormone / growth factor has numerous biological...and bone marrow progenitor cells at the lesion site by immunofluorescence. In addition, we quantitate bone growth and blood vessel density by...contributing Co-Is and Staff; animal husbandry; transport of mice to the various laboratories for procedures; coordination with Veterinary Staff for

  14. Regenerative cell therapy and pharmacotherapeutic intervention in heart failure Part 2 : Pharmacological targets, agents and intervention perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, C.; Schoemaker, R. G.; van Gilst, W. H.; Yu, B.; Roks, A. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Regenerative medicine represents a promising perspective on therapeutic angiogenesis in patients with cardiovascular disease, including heart failure. However, previous or ongoing clinical trials show ambiguous outcomes with respect to the benefit of regenerative therapy by means of bone marrow stem

  15. NOTCH-Mediated Maintenance and Expansion of Human Bone Marrow Stromal/Stem Cells: A Technology Designed for Orthopedic Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yufeng; Long, Teng; Wang, Cuicui; Mirando, Anthony J; Chen, Jianquan; O'Keefe, Regis J; Hilton, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    Human bone marrow-derived stromal/stem cells (BMSCs) have great therapeutic potential for treating skeletal disease and facilitating skeletal repair, although maintaining their multipotency and expanding these cells ex vivo have proven difficult. Because most stem cell-based applications to skeletal regeneration and repair in the clinic would require large numbers of functional BMSCs, recent research has focused on methods for the appropriate selection, expansion, and maintenance of BMSC populations during long-term culture. We describe here a novel biological method that entails selection of human BMSCs based on NOTCH2 expression and activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway in cultured BMSCs via a tissue culture plate coated with recombinant human JAGGED1 (JAG1) ligand. We demonstrate that transient JAG1-mediated NOTCH signaling promotes human BMSC maintenance and expansion while increasing their skeletogenic differentiation capacity, both ex vivo and in vivo. This study is the first of its kind to describe a NOTCH-mediated methodology for the maintenance and expansion of human BMSCs and will serve as a platform for future clinical or translational studies aimed at skeletal regeneration and repair. ©AlphaMed Press.

  16. Temporomandibular Joint Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Van Bellinghen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The temporomandibular joint (TMJ is an articulation formed between the temporal bone and the mandibular condyle which is commonly affected. These affections are often so painful during fundamental oral activities that patients have lower quality of life. Limitations of therapeutics for severe TMJ diseases have led to increased interest in regenerative strategies combining stem cells, implantable scaffolds and well-targeting bioactive molecules. To succeed in functional and structural regeneration of TMJ is very challenging. Innovative strategies and biomaterials are absolutely crucial because TMJ can be considered as one of the most difficult tissues to regenerate due to its limited healing capacity, its unique histological and structural properties and the necessity for long-term prevention of its ossified or fibrous adhesions. The ideal approach for TMJ regeneration is a unique scaffold functionalized with an osteochondral molecular gradient containing a single stem cell population able to undergo osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation such as BMSCs, ADSCs or DPSCs. The key for this complex regeneration is the functionalization with active molecules such as IGF-1, TGF-β1 or bFGF. This regeneration can be optimized by nano/micro-assisted functionalization and by spatiotemporal drug delivery systems orchestrating the 3D formation of TMJ tissues.

  17. Bone regeneration potential of sub-microfibrous membranes with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The results indicate that biodegradable PCL sub-microfibrous membrane produced by electrospinning process seems to have excellent biocompatibility, and may be used as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. Keywords: Biocompatibility, Hard tissue, Biomaterial availability, Bone remodeling, Polylactic acid, ...

  18. Regenerative therapy: a periodontal-endodontic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinaia, Bassam Michael; Chogle, Sami M A; Kinaia, Atheel M; Goodis, Harold E

    2012-07-01

    Periodontal and endodontic diseases are inflammatory responses leading to periodontal and pulpal tissue loss. Regenerative therapies aim to restore the lost structures to vitality and function. Various materials and treatments methods have been used such as bone grafts, guided tissue regeneration, enamel matrix derivatives, growth and differentiation factors, and stem cells. Although the current materials and methods demonstrated adequate clinical results, true and complete biological tissue regeneration is not yet attainable. The current article reviews chronologically the materials and methods used in periodontal and endodontic regeneration highlighting their clinical success and shortcomings, and discussing future directions in regenerative therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Similar ex vivo expansion and post-irradiation regenerative potential of juvenile and aged salivary gland stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimets, Martti; Bron, Reinier; de Haan, Gerald; van Os, Ronald; Coppes, Robert P

    2015-09-01

    Salivary gland dysfunction is a major side effect of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer patients, which in the future might be salvaged by autologous adult salivary gland stem cell (SGSC) therapy. Since frail elderly patients may have decreased activity of SGSCs, we aimed to characterize the potential of aged SGSC-population in a murine model. Salivary glands and salisphere-derived cells from young and old mice were tested for CD24 and CD29 stem cell marker expression using FACS. Moreover, in vitro expansion capability and in vivo regeneration potential upon post-irradiation transplantation of young and aged SGSCs were measured. An increase in CD24(hi)/CD29(hi) putative stem cells was detected in aged salivary glands albeit with a decrease in functional ability to form salispheres. However, the salispheres formed from aged mice salivary glands expressed CD24(hi)/CD29(hi) to the same extent as the ones from young mice. Moreover, following exposure to adequate growth conditions old and young SGSCs exhibited similar in vitro expansion- and in vivo regeneration potential. Aged SGSCs although reduced in number are in vitro indistinguishable from young SGSCs and could potentially be used to ameliorate age- or treatment related salivary gland dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Search for Fibrous Aggregates Potentially Useful in Regenerative Medicine Formed under Physiological Conditions by Self-Assembling Short Peptides Containing Two Identical Aromatic Amino Acid Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Fraczyk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the propensity of short peptides to self-organize and the influence of aggregates on cell cultures. The dipeptides were derived from both enantiomers of identical aromatic amino acids and tripeptides were prepared from two identical aromatic amino acids with one cysteine or methionine residue in the C-terminal, N-terminal, or central position. The formation or absence of fibrous structures under physiological conditions was established using Congo Red and Thioflavine T assays as well as by microscopic examination using normal and polarized light. The in vitro stability of the aggregates in buffered saline solution was assessed over 30 days. Materials with potential for use in regenerative medicine were selected based on the cytotoxicity of the peptides to the endothelial cell line EA.hy 926 and the wettability of the surfaces of the films, as well as using scanning electron microscopy. The criteria were fulfilled by H-dPhedPhe-OH, H-dCysdPhedPhe-OH, H-CysTyrTyr-OH, H-dPhedPhedCys-OH, H-TyrTyrMet-OH, and H–TyrMetTyr–OH. Our preliminary results suggest that the morphology and cell viability of L919 fibroblast cells do not depend on the stereochemistry of the self-organizing peptides.

  1. Stem cells and the future of regenerative medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council, Committee on the Biological and Biomedical Applications of Stem Cell Research; Commission on Life Sciences; National Research Council; Board on Life Sciences; Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health; Division on Earth and Life Studies; Institute of Medicine

    2002-01-01

    .... Stem Cells and the Future of Regenerative Medicine provides a deeper exploration of the biological, ethical, and funding questions prompted by the therapeutic potential of undifferentiated human cells...

  2. Applications of regenerative medicine in organ transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A worldwide shortage of organs for clinical implantation establishes the need to bring forward and test new technologies that will help in solving the problem. The concepts of regenerative medicine hold the potential for augmenting organ function or repairing damaged organ or allowing regeneration of deteriorated organs and tissue. Researchers are exploring possible regenerative medicine applications in organ transplantation so that coming together of the two fields can benefit each other. The present review discusses the strategies that are being implemented to regenerate or bio-engineer human organs for clinical purposes. It also highlights the limitations of the regenerative medicine that needs to be addressed to explore full potential of the field. A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using keywords "regenerative medicine," "tissue-engineering," "bio-engineered organs," "decellularized scaffold" and "three-dimensional printing." This review screened about 170 articles to get the desired knowledge update.

  3. Applications of regenerative medicine in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aditya; Bansal, Ramta

    2015-01-01

    A worldwide shortage of organs for clinical implantation establishes the need to bring forward and test new technologies that will help in solving the problem. The concepts of regenerative medicine hold the potential for augmenting organ function or repairing damaged organ or allowing regeneration of deteriorated organs and tissue. Researchers are exploring possible regenerative medicine applications in organ transplantation so that coming together of the two fields can benefit each other. The present review discusses the strategies that are being implemented to regenerate or bio-engineer human organs for clinical purposes. It also highlights the limitations of the regenerative medicine that needs to be addressed to explore full potential of the field. A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using keywords "regenerative medicine," "tissue-engineering," "bio-engineered organs," "decellularized scaffold" and "three-dimensional printing." This review screened about 170 articles to get the desired knowledge update.

  4. Strontium borate glass: potential biomaterial for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, H B; Zhao, X L; Zhang, X; Zhang, K B; Li, L C; Li, Z Y; Lam, W M; Lu, W W; Wang, D P; Huang, W H; Lin, K L; Chang, J

    2010-07-06

    Boron plays important roles in many life processes including embryogenesis, bone growth and maintenance, immune function and psychomotor skills. Thus, the delivery of boron by the degradation of borate glass is of special interest in biomedical applications. However, the cytotoxicity of borate glass which arises with the rapid release of boron has to be carefully considered. In this study, it was found that the incorporation of strontium into borate glass can not only moderate the rapid release of boron, but also induce the adhesion of osteoblast-like cells, SaOS-2, thus significantly increasing the cyto-compatibility of borate glass. The formation of multilayers of apatite with porous structure indicates that complete degradation is optimistic, and the spread of SaOS-2 covered by apatite to form a sandwich structure may induce bone-like tissue formation at earlier stages. Therefore, such novel strontium-incorporated borosilicate may act as a new generation of biomaterial for bone regeneration, which not only renders boron as a nutritious element for bone health, but also delivers strontium to stimulate formation of new bones.

  5. [Bone tissue morphological structure in congenital deformations of the jaws].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkanov, A V; Panin, M G; Shipkova, T P; Chumakov, A A; Komnova, Z D

    2001-01-01

    Morphological structure of bone tissue was studied in various types of congenital deformations of the jaws. Morphological changes in the bone with deformations and the severity of these disorders depended not so much on the type on the deformation, but mainly on its severity, which can be explained by a drastic increase of functional exercise because of impaired occlusion and impossibility of proper chewing. Decelerated weak restructuring of bone tissue and imperfect osteogenesis in deformed bone, similar in various types of deformations, were demonstrated on morphological material. These changes can affect the regenerative potential of the bone in operated zones.

  6. Amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal cells and their conditioned media: potential candidates for uterine regenerative therapy in the horse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Corradetti

    Full Text Available Amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal cells (AMCs are considered suitable candidates for a variety of cell-based applications. In view of cell therapy application in uterine pathologies, we studied AMCs in comparison to cells isolated from the endometrium of mares at diestrus (EDCs being the endometrium during diestrus and early pregnancy similar from a hormonal standpoint. In particular, we demonstrated that amnion tissue fragments (AM shares the same transcriptional profile with endometrial tissue fragments (ED, expressing genes involved in early pregnancy (AbdB-like Hoxa genes, pre-implantation conceptus development (Erα, PR, PGRMC1 and mPR and their regulators (Wnt7a, Wnt4a. Soon after the isolation, only AMCs express Wnt4a and Wnt7a. Interestingly, the expression levels of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2 were found greater in AM and AMCs than their endometrial counterparts thus confirming the role of AMCs as mediators of inflammation. The expression of nuclear progesterone receptor (PR, membrane-bound intracellular progesterone receptor component 1 (PGRMC1 and membrane-bound intracellular progesterone receptor (mPR, known to lead to improved endometrial receptivity, was maintained in AMCs over 5 passages in vitro when the media was supplemented with progesterone. To further explore the potential of AMCs in endometrial regeneration, their capacity to support resident cell proliferation was assessed by co-culturing them with EDCs in a transwell system or culturing in the presence of AMC-conditioned medium (AMC-CM. A significant increase in EDC proliferation rate exhibited the crucial role of soluble factors as mediators of stem cells action. The present investigation revealed that AMCs, as well as their derived conditioned media, have the potential to improve endometrial cell replenishment when low proliferation is associated to pregnancy failure. These findings make AMCs suitable candidates for the treatment of endometrosis in

  7. Could we also be regenerative superheroes, like salamanders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Agnese, Alessandra; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    Development of methods to reawaken the semi-dormant regenerative potential that lies within adult human tissues would hold promise for the restoration of diseased or damaged organs and tissues. While most of the regeneration potential is suppressed in many vertebrates, including humans, during adult life, urodele amphibians (salamanders) retain their regenerative ability throughout adulthood. Studies in newts and axolotls, two salamander models, have provided significant knowledge about adult limb regeneration. In this review, we present a comparative analysis of salamander and mammalian regeneration and discuss how evolutionarily altered properties of the regenerative environment can be exploited to restore full regenerative potential in the human body. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Tricalcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP-HA) bone scaffold as potential candidate for the formation of tissue engineered bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Shamsul Bin; Keong, Tan Kok; Cheng, Chen Hui; Saim, Aminuddin Bin; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj

    2013-06-01

    Various materials have been used as scaffolds to suit different demands in tissue engineering. One of the most important criteria is that the scaffold must be biocompatible. This study was carried out to investigate the potential of HA or TCP/HA scaffold seeded with osteogenic induced sheep marrow cells (SMCs) for bone tissue engineering. HA-SMC and TCP/HA-SMC constructs were induced in the osteogenic medium for three weeks prior to implantation in nude mice. The HA-SMC and TCP/HA-SMC constructs were implanted subcutaneously on the dorsum of nude mice on each side of the midline. These constructs were harvested after 8 wk of implantation. Constructs before and after implantation were analyzed through histological staining, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and gene expression analysis. The HA-SMC constructs demonstrated minimal bone formation. TCP/HA-SMC construct showed bone formation eight weeks after implantation. The bone formation started on the surface of the ceramic and proceeded to the centre of the pores. H&E and Alizarin Red staining demonstrated new bone tissue. Gene expression of collagen type 1 increased significantly for both constructs, but more superior for TCP/HA-SMC. SEM results showed the formation of thick collagen fibers encapsulating TCP/HA-SMC more than HA-SMC. Cells attached to both constructs surface proliferated and secreted collagen fibers. The findings suggest that TCP/HA-SMC constructs with better osteogenic potential compared to HA-SMC constructs can be a potential candidate for the formation of tissue engineered bone.

  9. Ethylene oxide gas sterilization does not reduce the osteoinductive potential of demineralized bone in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solheim, E; Pinholt, E M; Bang, G

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown that different sterilization procedures of demineralized bone may influence its osteoinductive properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethylene oxide sterilization for 1, 3, and 6 hours on the osteoinductive potential of allogeneic demineralized bone...... without prior sterilization of the material, whereas the demineralized bone implanted in Groups B, C, and D had been sterilized in ethylene oxide gas for 1, 3, or 6 hours, respectively, and aerated for 48 hours. At 4 weeks postoperatively, bone formation was evaluated quantitatively by strontium 85 uptake...

  10. Bone marrow concentrate for autologous transplantation in minipigs. Characterization and osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herten, M; Grassmann, J P; Sager, M; Benga, L; Fischer, J C; Jäger, M; Betsch, M; Wild, M; Hakimi, M; Jungbluth, P

    2013-01-01

    Autologous bone marrow plays an increasing role in the treatment of bone, cartilage and tendon healing disorders. Cell-based therapies display promising results in the support of local regeneration, especially therapies using intra-operative one-step treatments with autologous progenitor cells. In the present study, bone marrow-derived cells were concentrated in a point-of-care device and investigated for their mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) characteristics and their osteogenic potential. Bone marrow was harvested from the iliac crest of 16 minipigs. The mononucleated cells (MNC) were concentrated by gradient density centrifugation, cultivated, characterized by flow cytometry and stimulated into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Cell differentiation was investigated by histological and immunohistological staining of relevant lineage markers. The proliferation capacity was determined via colony forming units of fibroblast and of osteogenic alkaline-phosphatase-positive-cells. The MNC could be enriched 3.5-fold in nucleated cell concentrate in comparison to bone marrow. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a positive signal for the MSC markers. Cells could be differentiated into the three lines confirming the MSC character. The cellular osteogenic potential correlated significantly with the percentage of newly formed bone in vivo in a porcine metaphyseal long-bone defect model. This study demonstrates that bone marrow concentrate from minipigs display cells with MSC character and their osteogenic differentiation potential can be used for osseous defect repair in autologous transplantations.

  11. A new biphasic osteoinductive calcium composite material with a negative Zeta potential for bone augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciejewski Oliver

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of the present study was to analyze the osteogenic potential of a biphasic calcium composite material (BCC with a negative surface charge for maxillary sinus floor augmentation. In a 61 year old patient, the BCC material was used in a bilateral sinus floor augmentation procedure. Six months postoperative, a bone sample was taken from the augmented regions before two titanium implants were inserted at each side. We analyzed bone neoformation by histology, bone density by computed tomography, and measured the activity of voltage-activated calcium currents of osteoblasts and surface charge effects. Control orthopantomograms were carried out five months after implant insertion. The BCC was biocompatible and replaced by new mineralized bone after being resorbed completely. The material demonstrated a negative surface charge (negative Zeta potential which was found to be favorable for bone regeneration and osseointegration of dental implants.

  12. Strontium borate glass: potential biomaterial for bone regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, H. B.; Zhao, X. L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, K. B.; Li, L. C.; Li, Z. Y.; Lam, W. M.; Lu, W. W.; Wang, D. P.; Huang, W. H.; Lin, K. L.; Chang, J.

    2009-01-01

    Boron plays important roles in many life processes including embryogenesis, bone growth and maintenance, immune function and psychomotor skills. Thus, the delivery of boron by the degradation of borate glass is of special interest in biomedical applications. However, the cytotoxicity of borate glass which arises with the rapid release of boron has to be carefully considered. In this study, it was found that the incorporation of strontium into borate glass can not only moderate the rapid relea...

  13. Stippled ribs - A potential pitfall in bone scan interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink-Bennett, D.; Johnson, J.

    1985-05-01

    A retrospective evaluation of 100 consecutive bone scans were performed to determine the incidence and clinical importance, if any, of increased uptake at the insertion of the iliocostalis thoracis portion of the erector spinae muscle group (rib stippling). The scans were performed two-three hours after the intravenous injection of 15 mCi of technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate. (Tc-99m MDP). Each patient had a standard whole body scan (scintillation camera with whole body imaging table) or a whole body tomographic scan (PhoCon). Rib stippling was deemed present if a focal area of increased Tc-99m MDP was identified within the posterior angle of three or more consecutive ribs. Seven of 100 (3 bilateral, 4 unilateral) patients demonstrated rib stippling. Foci intensity was less than the scapular tips, but greater than the adjacent ribs. No patient had a history of chest traumapain and/or an abnormal radiograph. Even though increased uptake within the posterior angle of the ribs is an uncommon finding (7%), its recognition as a normal bone scan finding is important to prevent bone scan misinterpretations. Its characteristic scintigraphic appearance and location should serve to differentiate it from the increased uptake of trauma and/or tumor.

  14. Implantable Sensors for Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterhoff, Brett S; Tsang, Melissa; She, Didi; Ong, Keat Ghee; Allen, Mark G; Willett, Nick J; Guldberg, Robert E

    2017-02-01

    The translation of many tissue engineering/regenerative medicine (TE/RM) therapies that demonstrate promise in vitro are delayed or abandoned due to reduced and inconsistent efficacy when implemented in more complex and clinically relevant preclinical in vivo models. Determining mechanistic reasons for impaired treatment efficacy is challenging after a regenerative therapy is implanted due to technical limitations in longitudinally measuring the progression of key environmental cues in vivo. The ability to acquire real-time measurements of environmental parameters of interest including strain, pressure, pH, temperature, oxygen tension, and specific biomarkers within the regenerative niche in situ would significantly enhance the information available to tissue engineers to monitor and evaluate mechanisms of functional healing or lack thereof. Continued advancements in material and fabrication technologies utilized by microelectromechanical systems (MEMSs) and the unique physical characteristics of passive magnetoelastic sensor platforms have created an opportunity to implant small, flexible, low-power sensors into preclinical in vivo models, and quantitatively measure environmental cues throughout healing. In this perspective article, we discuss the need for longitudinal measurements in TE/RM research, technical progress in MEMS and magnetoelastic approaches to implantable sensors, the potential application of implantable sensors to benefit preclinical TE/RM research, and the future directions of collaborative efforts at the intersection of these two important fields.

  15. A Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of Periodontal Regenerative Potential of PerioGlas®: A Synthetic, Resorbable Material in Treating Periodontal Infrabony Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Neelathil Lisa; Abraham, Sathish; Rao, H N Shama; Sridhar, N; Moon, Ninad; Barde, Dhananjay H

    2014-06-01

    mean defect resolution was 46.5% and 15.3% for the experimental group and control group, respectively, with a slight increase in the ACH at the experimental site. Comparison of experimental and control sites revealed a statistically significant improvement in both clinical and radiographic parameters, but experimental sites showed better results when compared with control. How to cite the article: Chacko NL, Abraham S, Rao HN, Sridhar N, Moon N, Barde DH. A clinical and radiographic evaluation of periodontal regenerative potential of PerioGlas®: A synthetic, resorbable material in treating periodontal infrabony defects. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):20-6.

  16. Minerals and vitamins in bone health: the potential value of dietary enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjour, Jean-Philippe; Guéguen, Léon; Palacios, Cristina; Shearer, Martin J; Weaver, Connie M

    2009-06-01

    Nutrition is important to bone health, and a number of minerals and vitamins have been identified as playing a potential role in the prevention of bone diseases, particularly osteoporosis. Despite this, there is currently no consensus on maximum levels to allow in food or as dietary supplements. The benefits of supplementation of populations at risk of osteoporosis with Ca and vitamin D are well established. Prolonged supplementation of Ca and vitamin D in elderly has been shown to prevent bone loss, and in some intervention studies to prevent fragility fractures. Although P is essential to bone health, the average intake is considered to be more than sufficient and supplementation could raise intake to adverse levels. The role of vitamin K in bone health is less well defined, though it may enhance the actions of Ca and vitamin D. Sr administered in pharmacological doses as the ranelate salt was shown to prevent fragility fractures in postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, there is no hard evidence that supplementation with Sr salts would be beneficial in the general population. Mg is a nutrient implicated in bone quality, but the benefit of supplementation via foodstuffs remains to be established. A consensus on dietary supplementation for bone health should balance the risks, for example, exposure of vulnerable populations to values close to maximal tolerated doses, against evidence for benefits from randomised clinical trials, such as those for Ca and vitamin D. Feedback from community studies should direct further investigations and help formulate a consensus on dietary supplementation for bone health.

  17. Bone cells in cultures on nanocarbon-based materials for potential bone tissue engineering: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bačáková, Lucie; Kopová, Ivana; Staňková, Ľubica; Lišková, Jana; Vacík, Jiří; Lavrentiev, Vasyl; Kromka, Alexander; Potocký, Štěpán; Stránská, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 211, č. 12 (2014), s. 2688-2702 ISSN 1862-6300 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1168; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-04790S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : biocompatibility * bone implants * carbon * nanoparticles Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.616, year: 2014

  18. Regenerative similariton laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault North

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Self-pulsating lasers based on cascaded reshaping and reamplification (2R are capable of initiating ultrashort pulses despite the accumulation of large amounts of nonlinearities in all-fiber resonators. The spectral properties of pulses in self-similar propagation are compatible with cascaded 2R regeneration by offset filtering, making parabolic pulses suitable for the design of a laser of this recently introduced class. A new type of regenerative laser giving birth to similaritons is numerically investigated and shows that this laser is the analog of regenerative sources based solely on self-phase modulation and offset filtering. The regenerative similariton laser does not suffer from instabilities due to excessive nonlinearities and enables ultrashort pulse generation in a simple cavity configuration.

  19. Summary of: Regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of the biological processes involved in tooth development and repair at the cellular and molecular levels have underpinned the newly emerging area of regenerative endodontics. Development of treatment protocols based on exploiting the natural wound healing properties of the dental pulp and applying tissue engineering principles has allowed reporting of case series showing preservation of tissue vitality and apexogenesis. To review current case series reporting regenerative endodontics. Current treatment approaches tend to stimulate more reparative than regenerative responses in respect of the new tissue generated, which often does not closely resemble the physiological structure of dentine-pulp. However, despite these biological limitations, such techniques appear to offer significant promise for improved treatment outcomes. Improved biological outcomes will likely emerge from the many experimental studies being reported and will further contribute to improvements in clinical treatment protocols.

  20. Ethylene oxide gas sterilization does not reduce the osteoinductive potential of demineralized bone in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solheim, E; Pinholt, E M; Bang, G

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown that different sterilization procedures of demineralized bone may influence its osteoinductive properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethylene oxide sterilization for 1, 3, and 6 hours on the osteoinductive potential of allogeneic demineralized bone...... and qualitatively by light microscopy of histological sections. One-way analyses of variance at the 0.05 level revealed no significant difference in strontium 85 uptake of the different groups, and no qualitative differences in osteoinduction could be detected by light microscopy. Ossicles consisting of bone...

  1. Rat bone marrow stem cells isolation and culture as a bone formative experimental system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Smajilagić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow mesenchymal cells have been identified as a source of pluripotent stem cells with multipotential potential and differentiation in to the different cells types such as are osteoblast, chondroblast, adipoblast. In this research we describe pioneering experiment of tissue engineering in Bosnia and Herzegovina, of the isolation and differentiation rat bone marrow stromal cells in to the osteoblast cells lineages. Rat bone marrow stromal cells were isolated by method described by Maniatopulos using their plastic adherence capatibility. The cells obtained by plastic adherence were cultured and serially passaged in the osteoinductive medium to differentiate into the osteocytes. Bone marrow samples from rats long bones used for isolation of stromal cells (BMSCs. Under determinate culture conditions BMSCs were differentiated in osteogenic cell lines detected by Alizarin red staining three weeks after isolation. BMSCs as autologue cells model showed high osteogenetic potential and calcification capatibility in vitro. In future should be used as alternative method for bone transplantation in Regenerative Medicine.

  2. Cryogenic regenerative heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, Robert A

    1997-01-01

    An in-depth survey of regenerative heat exchangers, this book chronicles the development and recent commercialization of regenerative devices for cryogenic applications. Chapters cover historical background, concepts, practical applications, design data, and numerical solutions, providing the latest information for engineers to develop advanced cryogenic machines. The discussions include insights into the operation of a regenerator; descriptions of the cyclic and fluid temperature distributions in a regenerator; data for various matrix geometries and materials, including coarse and fine bronze, stainless steel-woven wire mesh screens, and lead spheres; and unique operating features of cryocoolers that produce deviations from ideal regenerator theory.

  3. Bone Marrow Therapies for Chronic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Keating, Armand; Gale, Robert Peter

    2015-11-01

    Chronic heart failure is a leading cause of death. The demand for new therapies and the potential regenerative capacity of bone marrow-derived cells has led to numerous clinical trials. We critically discuss current knowledge of the biology and clinical application of bone marrow cells. It appears unlikely that bone marrow cells can develop into functional cardiomyocyte after infusion but may have favorable paracrine effects. Most, but not all, clinical trials report a modest short- but not long-term benefit of infusing bone marrow-derived cells. Effect size appears to correlate with stringency of study-design: the most stringent trials report the smallest effect-sizes. We conclude there may be short- but not substantial long-term benefit of infusing bone marrow-derived cells into persons with chronic heart failure and any benefit observed is unlikely to result from trans-differentiation of bone marrow-derived cells into functioning cardiomyocytes. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  4. Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Secondary Complications of Arthritis: Potential Targets and their Natural Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Thushara, Ram M; Kumar, Somanathapura K Naveen; Paul, Manoj; Sundaram, Mahalingam S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S

    2018-01-01

    Arthritis is marked by joint deterioration that affects articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Though cartilage degradation does the major damage during arthritis, subsequent bone degeneration cannot be neglected. Recent progress in arthritis research has identified the clinical importance of bone erosion in destructive arthritis. Studies have showed the key role played by osteoclasts and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) signaling in bone erosion. Cathepsins and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) are considered key enzymatic factors contributing to bone erosion. Further, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed at the ruffled border of osteoclasts also causes bone resorption and matrix degradation. Besides, severe inflammation during arthritis induces bone erosion by aiding in Ca2+ removal and activating osteoclastogenesis. The inflammatory cytokines and ROS influence osteoclast differentiation by regulating osteoclast-lineage cells or by acting on other cells to regulate the expression of RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG). The enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and ROS in arthritis stimulates tissue injury by means of oxidative damage leading to vital organ damage and synovial and circulatory cell apoptosis. Thus, blocking enzymatic and non-enzymatic factors responsible for bone erosion and inflammation is considered a prime strategy in the management of arthritis. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms of bone erosion, inflammation and associated oxidative stress/damage during arthritis perpetuation along with shedding light on potential targets. The article also describes the possible natural therapeutic agents that could prevent bone loss and inflammation, and related secondary complications of arthritis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Long-Duration Spaceflight During the Bion-M1 Spaceflight Experiment Resulted in Significant Bone Loss in the Femoral Head and Alterations in Stem Cell Differentiation Potential in Male Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Almeida, Eduardo; Grigoryan, Eleonora; Globus, Ruth

    bone of the femoral mid-shaft. To determine the regenerative potential of osteoblasts derived from mesenchymal stem cells flown in microgravity we conducted post-flight in-vitro osteoblastogenesis and mineralized nodule formation assays. We found an increase in post-flight differentiation and mineralization of microgravity-flown osteogenic cells, suggesting an accumulation of precursor cells that fail to fully differentiate in space, and then resume vigorous osteogenesis upon reloading at 1g. Overall, these preliminary results indicate that exposure to 30-days spaceflight causes significant trabecular bone loss in the femoral head, a decrease in trabecular bone strength indicators, and compensatory widening of the femoral neck. These results, coupled with diminished regenerative potential of bone marrow stem cells during mechanical unloading in microgravity, have potentially serious implications for bone health and fracture risk during long-duration spaceflight.

  6. Stem cell- and growth factor-based regenerative therapies for avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head is a debilitating disease of multifactorial genesis, predominately affects young patients, and often leads to the development of secondary osteoarthritis. The evolving field of regenerative medicine offers promising treatment strategies using cells, biomaterial scaffolds, and bioactive factors, which might improve clinical outcome. Early stages of AVN with preserved structural integrity of the subchondral plate are accessible to retrograde surgical procedures, such as core decompression to reduce the intraosseous pressure and to induce bone remodeling. The additive application of concentrated bone marrow aspirates, ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells, and osteogenic or angiogenic growth factors (or both) holds great potential to improve bone regeneration. In contrast, advanced stages of AVN with collapsed subchondral bone require an osteochondral reconstruction to preserve the physiological joint function. Analogously to strategies for osteochondral reconstruction in the knee, anterograde surgical techniques, such as osteochondral transplantation (mosaicplasty), matrix-based autologous chondrocyte implantation, or the use of acellular scaffolds alone, might preserve joint function and reduce the need for hip replacement. This review summarizes recent experimental accomplishments and initial clinical findings in the field of regenerative medicine which apply cells, growth factors, and matrices to address the clinical problem of AVN. PMID:22356811

  7. Osteoinductive potential of a novel biphasic calcium phosphate bone graft in comparison with autographs, xenografts, and DFDBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Richard J; Sculean, Anton; Shuang, Yang; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Gruber, Reinhard; Buser, Daniel; Chandad, Fatiha; Zhang, Yufeng

    2016-06-01

    Since the original description of osteoinduction in the early 20th century, the study and development of innovative biomaterials has emerged. Recently, novel synthetic bone grafts have been reported with potential to form ectopic bone in vivo. However, their full characterization in comparison with other leading bone grafts has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the osteoinductive potential of bone grafts by comparing autogenous bone grafts, demineralized freeze-dried bone allografts (DFDBA), a commonly utilized natural bone mineral (NBM) from bovine origin (Bio-Oss), and a newly developed biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP). Grafts were compared in vitro for their ability to stimulate bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) migration, proliferation, and differentiation as assessed by quantitative real-time PCR for genes coding for bone markers including Runx2, collagen I, and osteocalcin. Furthermore, bone grafts were implanted in the calf muscle of 12 beagle dogs to determine their potential to form ectopic bone in vivo. The in vitro results demonstrate that both autografts and DFDBA show potential for cell recruitment, whereas only autografts and BCP demonstrated the ability to differentiate BMSCs toward the osteoblast lineage. The in vivo ectopic bone model demonstrated that while NBM particles were not osteoinductive and autogenous bone grafts were resorbed quickly in vivo, ectopic bone formation was reported in DFDBA and in synthetic BCP grafts. The modifications in nanotopography and chemical composition of the newly developed BCP bone grafts significantly promoted ectopic bone formation confirming their osteoinductive potential. In conclusion, the results from this study provide evidence that synthetic bone grafts not only serve as a three-dimensional scaffold but are also able to promote osteoinduction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Repair Potential of Matrix-Induced Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate and Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation for Talar Osteochondral Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desando, Giovanna; Bartolotti, Isabella; Vannini, Francesca; Cavallo, Carola; Castagnini, Francesco; Buda, Roberto; Giannini, Sandro; Mosca, Massimiliano; Mariani, Erminia; Grigolo, Brunella

    2016-01-01

    Objective The low regenerative potential of cartilage contributed to the development of different cell therapies aimed to improve the clinical outcome in young patients with Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus (OLT). This study is designed to assess the regenerative potential of autologous matrix-induced Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate (mBMAC) and matrix-induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (mACI) evaluating, on a small number of osteochondral biopsies, the expression of some catabolic, inflammatory, and pain mediators. Design Twenty-two patients with OLT were analyzed in this study; 7 were treated with mACI and 15 with mBMAC. Informed consent was obtained from all the patients. Clinical assessments were performed pre-operatively and at 12, 24, and 36 months after surgery using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). Histology and immunohistochemistry were used to assess cartilage repair at 24 months. Data were analyzed using non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney and Spearman tests. Results A remarkable improvement in AOFAS score was noticed for both treatments up to 36 months; however, patients treated with mACI reported the best AOFAS score. Various degrees of tissue remodeling were observed by histological analysis for both cell strategies. However, mBMAC treatment showed a higher expression of some fibrous and hypertrophic markers compared to mACI group. A mild positivity for nerve growth factor, as pain mediator, was noticed for both treatments.M Conclusions Our findings demonstrated the best histological and clinical results following mACI treatment since different fibrotic and hypertrophic features were evident in the mBMAC group at 24-month follow-up. PMID:27994720

  9. Transnet regenerative braking concept definition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Giesler, Achmed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transnet has shown an interest in the concept of regenerative braking on their freight trains. Regenerative braking is the capturing, storing and re-using energy currently being wasted during regenerative braking. Currently all the energy is dumped...

  10. Osteogenic potential of a chalcone in a critical-size defect in rat calvaria bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolan, Xana Raquel; Fenner, Bruna Proiss; Mezadri, Telmo José; Tames, David Rivero; Corrêa, Rogério; de Campos Buzzi, Fátima

    2014-07-01

    This study describes the bone formation stimulated by the application of a type of chalcone to critical-size defects in rat calvarial bone. Sixty female Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups of 10 animals per group: control (no treatment), vehicle (vaseline) and the chalcone (1-phenyl-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-propen-1-one) suspended in vaseline at 10%. A critical-size defect of 5 mm was prepared using a trephine in the calvarial bone, after which the treatment was applied, in a single dose, according to the experimental group. The samples were evaluated macroscopically using ImageJ software, and histologically 30 and 45 days after surgery. At 30 days after surgery, there was significant bone formation (p chalcone, compared with the other groups. Many active osteoblasts were observed adjacent to the borders of the newly formed bone tissue. 45 days after surgery in the chalcone group, the surgical defects showed complete bone closure. The results of this study suggest that chalcone has significant potential to induce the formation of new bone. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Implications of mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminekoo, Saber; Movassaghpour, Aliakbar; Rahimzadeh, Amirbahman; Talebi, Mehdi; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a population of multipotent progenitors which reside in bone marrow, fat, and some other tissues and can be isolated from various adult and fetal tissues. Self-renewal potential and multipotency are MSC's hallmarks. They have the capacity of proliferation and differentiation into a variety of cell lineages like osteoblasts, condrocytes, adipocytes, fibroblasts, cardiomyocytes. MSCs can be identified by expression of some surface molecules like CD73, CD90, CD105, and lack of hematopoietic specific markers including CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR. They are hopeful tools for regenerative medicine for repairing injured tissues. Many studies have focused on two significant features of MSC therapy: (I) systemically administered MSCs home to sites of ischemia or injury, and (II) MSCs can modulate T-cell-mediated immunological responses. MSCs express chemokine receptors and ligands involved in cells migration and homing process. MSCs induce immunomedulatory effects on the innate (dendritic cells, monocyte, natural killer cells, and neutrophils) and the adaptive immune system cells (T helper-1, cytotoxic T lymphocyte, and B lymphocyte) by secreting soluble factors like TGF-β, IL-10, IDO, PGE-2, sHLA-G5, or by cell-cell interaction. In this review, we discuss the main applications of mesenchymal stem in Regenerative Medicine and known mechanisms of homing and Immunomodulation of MSCs.

  12. Osteogenic potential of the human bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene activated nanobone putty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiao-bin; Sun, Li; Yang, Shu-hua; Zhang, Yu-kun; Hu, Ru-yin; Fu, De-hao

    2008-04-20

    Nanobone putty is an injectable and bioresorbable bone substitute. The neutral-pH putty resembles hard bone tissue, does not contain polymers or plasticizers, and is self-setting and nearly isothermic, properties which are helpful for the adhesion, proliferation, and function of bone cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the osteogenic potential of human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP2) gene activated nanobone putty in inducing ectopic bone formation, and the effects of the hBMP2 gene activated nanobone putty on repairing bone defects. Twenty four Kunming mice were randomly divided into two groups. The nanobone putty + hBMP2 plasmid was injected into the right thigh muscle pouches of the mice (experiment side). The nanobone putty + blank plasmid or nanobone putty was injected into the left thigh muscle pouches of the group 1 (control side 1) or group 2 (control side 2), respectively. The effects of ectopic bone formation were evaluated by radiography, histology, and molecular biology analysis at 2 and 4 weeks after operation. Bilateral 15 mm radial defects were made in forty-eight rabbits. These rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: Group A, nanobone putty + hBMP2 plasmid; Group B, putty + blank plasmid; Group C, nanobone putty only. Six rabbits with left radial defects served as blank controls. The effect of bone repairing was evaluated by radiography, histology, molecular biology, and biomechanical analysis at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after operation. The tissue from the experimental side of the mice expressed hBMP2. Obvious cartilage and island-distributed immature bone formation in implants of the experiment side were observed at 2 weeks after operation, and massive mature bone observed at 4 weeks. No bone formation was observed in the control side of the mice. The ALP activity in the experiment side of the mice was higher than that in the control side. The tissue of Group A rabbits expressed hBMP2 protein and higher ALP level. The new bone

  13. KrioBlastTMas a New Technology of Hyper-fast Cryopreservation of Cells and Tissues. Part I. Thermodynamic Aspects and Potential Applications in Reproductive and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkov, I I; Bolyukh, V F; Sukhikh, G T

    2018-03-01

    Kinetic (dynamic) vitrification is a promising trend in cryopreservation of biological materials because it allows avoiding the formation of lethal intracellular ice and minimizes harmful effects of highly toxic penetrating cryoprotectants. A uniform cooling protocol and the same instruments can be used for practically all types of cells. In modern technologies, the rate of cooling is essentially limited by the Leidenfrost effect. We describe a novel platform for kinetic vitrification of biological materials KrioBlast TM that realizes hyper-fast cooling and allows overcoming the Leidenfrost effect. This opens prospects for creation of a novel technology of cell cryopreservation for reproductive and regenerative medicine.

  14. Concise Review: Multifaceted Characterization of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Use in Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonraj, Rebekah M; Raghunath, Michael; Nurcombe, Victor; Hui, James H; van Wijnen, Andre J; Cool, Simon M

    2017-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) hold great potential for regenerative medicine because of their ability for self-renewal and differentiation into tissue-specific cells such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. MSCs orchestrate tissue development, maintenance and repair, and are useful for musculoskeletal regenerative therapies to treat age-related orthopedic degenerative diseases and other clinical conditions. Importantly, MSCs produce secretory factors that play critical roles in tissue repair that support both engraftment and trophic functions (autocrine and paracrine). The development of uniform protocols for both preparation and characterization of MSCs, including standardized functional assays for evaluation of their biological potential, are critical factors contributing to their clinical utility. Quality control and release criteria for MSCs should include cell surface markers, differentiation potential, and other essential cell parameters. For example, cell surface marker profiles (surfactome), bone-forming capacities in ectopic and orthotopic models, as well as cell size and granularity, telomere length, senescence status, trophic factor secretion (secretome), and immunomodulation, should be thoroughly assessed to predict MSC utility for regenerative medicine. We propose that these and other functionalities of MSCs should be characterized prior to use in clinical applications as part of comprehensive and uniform guidelines and release criteria for their clinical-grade production to achieve predictably favorable treatment outcomes for stem cell therapy. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:2173-2185. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  15. Clinical considerations for regenerative endodontic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Todd M

    2012-07-01

    The management of a tooth with incomplete root maturation and a necrotic pulp is an endodontic and a restorative challenge. Apexification procedures alone leave the tooth in a weakened state and at risk for reinfection. Regenerative endodontic procedures potentially offer advantages, including the possibility of hard tissue deposition and continued root development. Case studies have reported regeneration of human pulplike tissues in vivo, but there is no protocol that reliably regenerates pulplike tissue. This article summarizes historical, current, and future regenerative treatment approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stem Cells Applications in Regenerative Medicine and Disease Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahla, Ranjeet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine, the most recent and emerging branch of medical science, deals with functional restoration of tissues or organs for the patient suffering from severe injuries or chronic disease. The spectacular progress in the field of stem cell research has laid the foundation for cell based therapies of disease which cannot be cured by conventional medicines. The indefinite self-renewal and potential to differentiate into other types of cells represent stem cells as frontiers of regenerative medicine. The transdifferentiating potential of stem cells varies with source and according to that regenerative applications also change. Advancements in gene editing and tissue engineering technology have endorsed the ex vivo remodelling of stem cells grown into 3D organoids and tissue structures for personalized applications. This review outlines the most recent advancement in transplantation and tissue engineering technologies of ESCs, TSPSCs, MSCs, UCSCs, BMSCs, and iPSCs in regenerative medicine. Additionally, this review also discusses stem cells regenerative application in wildlife conservation.

  17. The imperative for regenerative agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    A review is made of the current state of agriculture, emphasising issues of soil erosion and dependence on fossil fuels, in regard to achieving food security for a relentlessly enlarging global population. Soil has been described as "the fragile, living skin of the Earth", and yet both its aliveness and fragility have all too often been ignored in the expansion of agriculture across the face of the globe. Since it is a pivotal component in a global nexus of soil-water-air-energy, how we treat the soil can impact massively on climate change - with either beneficial or detrimental consequences, depending on whether the soil is preserved or degraded. Regenerative agriculture has at its core the intention to improve the health of soil or to restore highly degraded soil, which symbiotically enhances the quality of water, vegetation and land-productivity. By using methods of regenerative agriculture, it is possible not only to increase the amount of soil organic carbon (SOC) in existing soils, but to build new soil. This has the effect of drawing down carbon from the atmosphere, while simultaneously improving soil structure and soil health, soil fertility and crop yields, water retention and aquifer recharge - thus ameliorating both flooding and drought, and also the erosion of further soil, since runoff is reduced. Since food production on a more local scale is found to preserve the soil and its quality, urban food production should be seen as a significant potential contributor to regenerative agriculture in the future, so long as the methods employed are themselves 'regenerative'. If localisation is to become a dominant strategy for dealing with a vastly reduced use of fossil fuels, and preserving soil quality - with increased food production in towns and cities - it will be necessary to incorporate integrated ('systems') design approaches such as permaculture and the circular economy (which minimise and repurpose 'waste') within the existing urban infrastructure. In

  18. State of the art: stem cells in equine regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M J; Jarazo, J

    2015-03-01

    According to Greek mythology, Prometheus' liver grew back nightly after it was removed each day by an eagle as punishment for giving mankind fire. Hence, contrary to popular belief, the concept of tissue and organ regeneration is not new. In the early 20th century, cell culture and ex vivo organ preservation studies by Alexis Carrel, some with famed aviator Charles Lindbergh, established a foundation for much of modern regenerative medicine. While early beliefs and discoveries foreshadowed significant accomplishments in regenerative medicine, advances in knowledge within numerous scientific disciplines, as well as nano- and micromolecular level imaging and detection technologies, have contributed to explosive advances over the last 20 years. Virtually limitless preparations, combinations and applications of the 3 major components of regenerative medicine, namely cells, biomaterials and bioactive molecules, have created a new paradigm of future therapeutic options for most species. It is increasingly clear, however, that despite significant parallels among and within species, there is no 'one-size-fits-all' regenerative therapy. Likewise, a panacea has yet to be discovered that completely reverses the consequences of time, trauma and disease. Nonetheless, there is no question that the promise and potential of regenerative medicine have forever altered medical practices. The horse is a relative newcomer to regenerative medicine applications, yet there is already a large body of work to incorporate novel regenerative therapies into standard care. This review focuses on the current state and potential future of stem cells in equine regenerative medicine. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  19. Graded porous polyurethane foam: A potential scaffold for oro-maxillary bone regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannitelli, S.M.; Basoli, F.; Mozetic, P.; Piva, P.; Bartuli, F.N.; Luciani, F.; Arcuri, C.; Trombetta, M.; Rainer, A.; Licoccia, S.

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering applications demand for biomaterials offering a substrate for cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, while inferring suitable mechanical properties to the construct. In the present study, polyurethane (PU) foams were synthesized to develop a graded porous material—characterized by a dense shell and a porous core—for the treatment of oro-maxillary bone defects. Foam was synthesized via a one-pot reaction starting from a polyisocyanate and a biocompatible polyester diol, using water as a foaming agent. Different foaming conditions were examined, with the aim of creating a dense/porous functional graded material that would perform at the same time as an osteoconductive scaffold for bone defect regeneration and as a membrane-barrier to gingival tissue ingrowth. The obtained PU was characterized in terms of morphological and mechanical properties. Biocompatibility assessment was performed in combination with bone-marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs). Our findings confirm that the material is potentially suitable for guided bone regeneration applications. - Highlights: • Graded porous polyurethane foams were synthesized via a one-pot foaming reaction. • The inner porous core might act as a scaffold for guided bone regeneration. • A dense outer shell was introduced to act as a barrier to gingival tissue ingrowth. • The synthesized foams were non-toxic and supportive of hBMSC adhesion

  20. Graded porous polyurethane foam: A potential scaffold for oro-maxillary bone regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannitelli, S.M. [Department of Engineering, Tissue Engineering Unit, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome (Italy); Basoli, F. [Department of Chemical Science and Technology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome (Italy); Mozetic, P. [Department of Engineering, Tissue Engineering Unit, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome (Italy); Piva, P.; Bartuli, F.N.; Luciani, F. [University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome (Italy); Arcuri, C. [Department of Periodontics, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome (Italy); U.O.C.C. Odontostomatology, “S. Giovanni Calibita, Fatebenefratelli” Hospital, Rome (Italy); Trombetta, M. [Department of Engineering, Tissue Engineering Unit, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome (Italy); Rainer, A., E-mail: a.rainer@unicampus.it [Department of Engineering, Tissue Engineering Unit, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome (Italy); Licoccia, S. [Department of Chemical Science and Technology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Bone tissue engineering applications demand for biomaterials offering a substrate for cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, while inferring suitable mechanical properties to the construct. In the present study, polyurethane (PU) foams were synthesized to develop a graded porous material—characterized by a dense shell and a porous core—for the treatment of oro-maxillary bone defects. Foam was synthesized via a one-pot reaction starting from a polyisocyanate and a biocompatible polyester diol, using water as a foaming agent. Different foaming conditions were examined, with the aim of creating a dense/porous functional graded material that would perform at the same time as an osteoconductive scaffold for bone defect regeneration and as a membrane-barrier to gingival tissue ingrowth. The obtained PU was characterized in terms of morphological and mechanical properties. Biocompatibility assessment was performed in combination with bone-marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs). Our findings confirm that the material is potentially suitable for guided bone regeneration applications. - Highlights: • Graded porous polyurethane foams were synthesized via a one-pot foaming reaction. • The inner porous core might act as a scaffold for guided bone regeneration. • A dense outer shell was introduced to act as a barrier to gingival tissue ingrowth. • The synthesized foams were non-toxic and supportive of hBMSC adhesion.

  1. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  2. Operculum bone carp (cyprinus carprio sp.) scaffold is a new potential xenograft material: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartiwa, A.; Abbas, B.; Pandansari, P.; Prahasta, A.; Nandini, M.; Fadhlillah, M.; Subroto, T.; Panigoro, R.

    2017-02-01

    Orbital floor fracture with extensive bone loss, would cause herniation of the orbital tissue into the maxillary sinus. Graft implantation should be done on the orbital fracture with extensive bone loss. Different types of grafts have their own characteristics and advantages. Xenograft has been widely studied for use in bone defects. This study was to investigate cyprinus carprio sp. opercula bone as a potential xenograft. The aim of this study was to investigate based on EDS chemical analysis using a ZAF Standardless Method of Quantitative Analysis (Oxide) and SEM examination conducted in the laboratory of Mathematics, Institute of Technology Bandung. Particularly the mass ratio of Ca and P (5.8/3:47), the result is 1.67. This is equivalent to the stoichiometric Hydroxyapatite (HA) (Aoki H, 1991, Science and medical applications of hydroxyapatite, Tokyo: Institute for Medical and Engineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University). C N O that there is an element of protein/amino acid collagen compound, serves as a matrix together with HA. As shown in the SEM analysis that the matrix is a porous sheet-shaped (oval) that interconnect with each other, which is good scaffold. The pore is composed of large pores >200 microns and smaller pores between the large pores with a size smaller or equal to 10 microns that can serve for the attachment of osteoblast cell. In conclusion, Opercula bone carp (cyprinus carprio sp.) scaffold could be a new potential xenograft material.

  3. Potential characteristics of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth compared with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for mineralized tissue-forming cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kenji; Yamada, Yoichi; Nakamura, Sayaka; Umemura, Eri; Ito, Kenji; Ueda, Minoru

    2011-12-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine using stem cell biology has been a promising field for treatment of local and systemic intractable diseases. Recently, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) have been identified as a novel population of stem cells. This study focused on the characterization of SHED as compared with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs). We investigated potential characteristics of SHED by using DNA microarray, real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence analysis. Multiple gene expression profiles indicated that the expression of 2753 genes in SHED had changed by ≥2.0-fold as compared with that in BMMSCs. One of the most significant pathways that accelerated in SHED was that of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor signaling, which contains several cascades such as PKA, JNK, and ASK1. When the BMP signaling pathway was stimulated by BMP-2, the expression of BMP-2, BMP-4, Runx2, and DSPP was up-regulated significantly in SHED than that in BMMSCs. Furthermore, the BMP-4 protein was expressed much higher in SHED but not in BMMSCs, as confirmed by immunofluorescence. By using the gene expression profiles, this study indicates that SHED is involved in the BMP signaling pathway and suggests that BMP-4 might play a crucial role in this. These results might be useful for effective cell-based tissue regeneration, including that of bone, pulp, and dentin, by applying the characteristics of SHED. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Regenerative potential of leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin. Part B: sinus floor elevation, alveolar ridge preservation and implant therapy. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Ana B; Meschi, Nastaran; Temmerman, Andy; Pinto, Nelson; Lambrechts, Paul; Teughels, Wim; Quirynen, Marc

    2017-02-01

    To analyse the effect of leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) on bone regeneration procedures and osseointegration. An electronic and hand search was conducted in three databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane). Only randomized clinical trials, written in English where L-PRF was applied in bone regeneration and implant procedures, were selected. No follow-up restrictions were applied. A total of 14 articles were included and processed. Three subgroups were created depending on the application: sinus floor elevation (SFE), alveolar ridge preservation and implant therapy. In SFE, for a lateral window as well as for the trans-alveolar technique, histologically faster bone healing was reported when L-PRF was added to most common xenografts. L-PRF alone improved the preservation of the alveolar width, resulting in less buccal bone resorption compared to natural healing. In implant therapy, better implant stability over time and less marginal bone loss were observed when L-PRF was applied. Meta-analyses could not be performed due to the heterogeneity of the data. Despite the lack of strong evidence found in this systematic review, L-PRF might have a positive effect on bone regeneration and osseointegration. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Periodontology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Emdogain in regenerative periodontal therapy. A review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Windisch, P.; Dori, F.; Keglevich, T.; Molnar, B.; Gera, I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures (i.e. the new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone). Results from basic research have pointed to the important role of the enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) in the

  6. Human adipose tissue possesses a unique population of pluripotent stem cells with nontumorigenic and low telomerase activities: potential implications in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Fumitaka; Wakao, Shohei; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Tsuchiyama, Kenichiro; Bagheri, Mozhdeh; Heneidi, Saleh; Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Aiba, Setsuya; Dezawa, Mari

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that a small population of pluripotent stem cells, termed adipose multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (adipose-Muse) cells, exist in adult human adipose tissue and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adipose-MSCs). They can be identified as cells positive for both MSC markers (CD105 and CD90) and human pluripotent stem cell marker SSEA-3. They intrinsically retain lineage plasticity and the ability to self-renew. They spontaneously generate cells representative of all three germ layers from a single cell and successfully differentiate into targeted cells by cytokine induction. Cells other than adipose-Muse cells exist in adipose-MSCs, however, do not exhibit these properties and are unable to cross the boundaries from mesodermal to ectodermal or endodermal lineages even under cytokine inductions. Importantly, adipose-Muse cells demonstrate low telomerase activity and transplants do not promote teratogenesis in vivo. When compared with bone marrow (BM)- and dermal-Muse cells, adipose-Muse cells have the tendency to exhibit higher expression in mesodermal lineage markers, while BM- and dermal-Muse cells were generally higher in those of ectodermal and endodermal lineages. Adipose-Muse cells distinguish themselves as both easily obtainable and versatile in their capacity for differentiation, while low telomerase activity and lack of teratoma formation make these cells a practical cell source for potential stem cell therapies. Further, they will promote the effectiveness of currently performed adipose-MSC transplantation, particularly for ectodermal and endodermal tissues where transplanted cells need to differentiate across the lineage from mesodermal to ectodermal or endodermal in order to replenish lost cells for tissue repair.

  7. Reduction of Dietary Acid Load as a Potential Countermeasure for Bone Loss Associated with Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, S. R.; Watts, S. M.; Sams, C. F.; Whitson, P. A.; Smith, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    In several studies we tested the concepts that diet can alter acid-base balance and that reducing the dietary acid load has a positive effect on maintenance of bone. In study 1, (n = 11, 60-90 d bed rest), the renal acid load of the diet was estimated from its chemical composition, and was positively correlated with urinary markers of bone resorption (P less than 0.05); that is, the greater the acid load, the greater the excretion of bone resorption markers. In study 2, in males (n = 8, 30 d bed rest), an estimate of the ratio of nonvolatile acid precursors to base precursors in the diet was positively correlated (P less than 0.05) with markers of bone resorption. In study 3, for 28 d subjects received either a placebo (n = 6) or an essential amino acid supplement (n = 7) that included methionine, a known acid precursor. During bed rest (28 d), urinary calcium was greater than baseline levels in the supplemented group but not the control group (P less than 0.05), and in the supplemented group, urinary pH decreased (P less than 0.05). In study 4, less bone resorption occurred in space crew members who received potassium citrate (n = 6) during spaceflight of 4-6 months than in crew members who received placebo or were not in the study (n = 8) (P less than 0.05). Reducing acid load has the potential to mitigate increased bone resorption during spaceflight, and may serve as a bone loss countermeasure.

  8. Crosstalk between bone niche and immune system: osteoimmunology signaling as a potential target for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscitiello, Carmen; Viale, Giulia; Gelao, Lucia; Esposito, Angela; De Laurentiis, Michele; De Placido, Sabino; Santangelo, Michele; Goldhirsch, Aron; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    There is a well recognized link between the bone and the immune system and in recent years there has been a major effort to elucidate the multiple functions of the molecules expressed in both bone and immune cells. Several molecules that were initially identified and studied in the immune system have been shown to have essential functions also in the bone. An interdisciplinary field embracing immune and bone biology has been brought together and called "osteoimmunology". The co-regulation of the skeletal and immune systems strikingly exemplifies the extreme complexity of such an interaction. Their interdependency must be considered in designing therapeutic approaches for either of the two systems. In other words, it is necessary to think of the osteoimmune system as a complex physiological unit. Denosumab was originally introduced to specifically target bone resorption, but it is now under evaluation for its effect on the long term immune response. Similarly, our current and still growing knowledge of the intimate link between the immune system and bone will be beneficial for the safety of drugs targeting either of these integrated systems. Given the large number of molecules exerting functions on both the skeletal and immune systems, osteoimmunological understanding is becoming increasingly important. Both bone and immune systems are frequently disrupted in cancer; and they may be crucial in regulating tumor growth and progression. Some therapies - such as bisphosphonates and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) targeted drugs - that aim at reducing pathologic osteolysis in cancer may interact with the immune system, thus providing potential favorable effects on survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Physical-chemical characterization of bovine bone ash for evaluating its potential agricultural use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pacca Luna Mattar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing of bovine bone ash is a low cost and easy production process which can be adopted for making good use of animal residues, in locations without infrastructure, such as the family production units. This study aimed at describing the manufacturing process of bone ash and characterizing the physical and chemical parameters of the resulting material for organic fertilization. The experiment was performed with three replications, being evaluated the bovine bone ash manufacturing process yield, as well as its density, water retention capacity, pH of the resulting material after burning and contents of total calcium, calcium soluble in water, total phosphorus and phosphorus soluble in citric acid and in ammonium citrate. The process resulted in an average yield of 24.4% and the bovine bone ash presented 33.07% of total calcium, 15.6% of total phosphorus, 10.4% of phosphorus soluble in citric acid, pH of 9.94, density of 0.89 g cm-3 and water retention capacity of 73.3%. The bovine bone ash showed promising characteristics, with potential for being used as source of phosphorus and calcium in the organic fertilization process.

  10. Graded porous polyurethane foam: a potential scaffold for oro-maxillary bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannitelli, S M; Basoli, F; Mozetic, P; Piva, P; Bartuli, F N; Luciani, F; Arcuri, C; Trombetta, M; Rainer, A; Licoccia, S

    2015-06-01

    Bone tissue engineering applications demand for biomaterials offering a substrate for cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, while inferring suitable mechanical properties to the construct. In the present study, polyurethane (PU) foams were synthesized to develop a graded porous material-characterized by a dense shell and a porous core-for the treatment of oro-maxillary bone defects. Foam was synthesized via a one-pot reaction starting from a polyisocyanate and a biocompatible polyester diol, using water as a foaming agent. Different foaming conditions were examined, with the aim of creating a dense/porous functional graded material that would perform at the same time as an osteoconductive scaffold for bone defect regeneration and as a membrane-barrier to gingival tissue ingrowth. The obtained PU was characterized in terms of morphological and mechanical properties. Biocompatibility assessment was performed in combination with bone-marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs). Our findings confirm that the material is potentially suitable for guided bone regeneration applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The relationship between Computed Tomography and DXA results: A potential bias in Bone Mineral Density assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Bokov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background It has been reported that the results of the lumbar spine bone mineral density assessment can be strongly biased by degenerative changes. However, the reported data remains controversial and a potential bias has not been assessed. Aims To evaluate the relationships between the results of DXA and CT with the assessment of potential bias related to the influence of different structures. Methods This is a cross-sectional study and 25 patients were enrolled. Using DXA scan, Bone Mineral density (BMD (g/cm2 was calculated from 100 vertebra from the lumbar spine. Out of all the CT measurements, a mean radiodensity in HU (Hounsfield Units for cancellous bone and total vertebra body, a mean square and radiodensity of vertebra pedicles and facet were calculated. Results Linear regression analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between BMD measured by DXA and CT data. Multiple correlation coefficient of model accounts for 0.8093, r2=0.6550, p<0.0001. Parameters that have significant relationships with the results of DXA were: a product of facet joints radiodensity and mean square on axial images (B= 0.000003379, p<0.0001 and total vertebral body radiodensity B=0.0016395253, p=0.0201. Beta coefficients for those variables accounted for 0.6729 and 0.3037 respectively. Conclusion The results of the bone mineral density assessment of the lumbar spine using DXA, can be strongly influenced by facet joints condition, especially in cases of degenerative changes. The results of BMD, provided by DXA, are partly relevant to vertebral body bone quality assessment and irrelevant to the characteristics of bone in pedicles. This means that the prognostic value of the DXA measurement results might be limited in relation to predicting low energy vertebra fracture and implant stability.

  12. Regenerative Medicine for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyuk Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The annual meeting of the American Society for Neural Therapy and Repair (ASNTR has always introduced us to top-notch and up-to-date approaches for regenerative medicine related to neuroscience, ranging from stem cell–based therapy to novel drugs. The 16th ASNTR meeting focused on a variety of different topics, including the unknown pathogenesis or mechanisms of specific neurodegenerative diseases, stem cell biology, and development of novel alternative medicines or devices. Newly developed stem cells, such as amniotic epithelial stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as well-known traditional stem cells, such as neural, embryonic, bone marrow mesenchymal, and human umbilical cord blood–derived stem cells, were reported. A number of commercialized stem cells were also covered at this meeting. Fetal neural tissues, such as ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and Schwann cells, were investigated for neurodegenerative diseases or spinal cord injury. A number of studies focused on novel methods for drug monitoring or graft tracking, and combination therapy with stem cells and medicine, such as cytokines or trophic factors. Finally, the National Institutes of Health guidelines for human stem cell research, clinical trials of commercialized stem cells without larger animal testing, and prohibition of medical tourism were big controversial issues that led to heated discussion.

  13. Regenerative medicine: A ray of light for medical science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Supekar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The perimeters of medical science have expanded to include regenerative medicine as a translational science, which has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of incapacitating diseases and chronic disorders.

  14. Regenerative rehabilitation: a new future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Childers, Martin K

    2014-11-01

    Modern rehabilitation medicine is propelled by newfound knowledge aimed at offering solutions for an increasingly aging population afflicted by chronic debilitating conditions. Considered a core component of future health care, the rollout of regenerative medicine underscores a paradigm shift in patient management targeted at restoring physiologic function and restituting normative impact. Nascent regenerative technologies offer unprecedented prospects in achieving repair of degenerated, diseased, or damaged tissues. In this context, principles of regenerative science are increasingly integrated in rehabilitation practices as illustrated in the present Supplement. Encompassing a growing multidisciplinary domain, the emergent era of "regenerative rehabilitation" brings radical innovations at the forefront of healthcare blueprints.

  15. Center for Neuroscience & Regenerative Medicine

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (CNRM) was established as a collaborative intramural federal program involving the U.S. Department of Defense...

  16. Comparison of the osteogenic potentials of autologous cultured osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells loaded onto allogeneic cancellous bone granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok-Jung; Chung, Yang-Guk; Lee, Yun-Kyoung; Oh, Il-Whan; Kim, Yong-Sik; Moon, Young-Seok

    2012-02-01

    We compared the bone regeneration potentials of autologous cultured osteoblasts and of bone-marrow-derived autologous MSCs in combination with allogeneic cancellous bone granules in a rabbit radial defect model. Radial shaft defects over 15 mm were made in 26 New Zealand white rabbits. The animals underwent insertion of allogeneic cancellous bone granules containing autologous osteoblasts into right-side defects (the experimental group) and of allogeneic cancellous bone granules with autologous MSCs into left-side defects (the control group). To quantitatively assess bone regeneration, radiographic evaluations as well as BMD and BMC measurements were performed 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks post-implantation and histology as well as micro-CT image analysis were performed at 6 and 12 weeks. Radiographic evaluations 3 weeks post-implantation showed that the experimental group had a higher mean bone quantity index (p bone volume and surface area than the control sides (p bone formation in the experimental group. This in vivo study demonstrates that a combination of autologous osteoblasts and small-sized, allogeneic cancellous bone granules leads to more rapid bone regeneration than autologous MSCs and small-sized, allogeneic cancellous bone granules.

  17. In vitro osteoinductive potential of porous monetite for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadine Idowu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering–based bone grafts are emerging as a viable alternative treatment modality to repair and regenerate tissues damaged as a result of disease or injury. The choice of the biomaterial component is a critical determinant of the success of the graft or scaffold; essentially, it must induce and allow native tissue integration, and most importantly mimic the hierarchical structure of the native bone. Calcium phosphate bioceramics are widely used in orthopaedics and dentistry applications due to their similarity to bone mineral and their ability to induce a favourable biological response. One such material is monetite, which is biocompatible, osteoconductive and has the ability to be resorbed under physiological conditions. The osteoinductive properties of monetite in vivo are known; however, little is known of the direct effect on osteoinduction of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. In this study, we evaluated the potential of monetite to induce and sustain human mesenchymal stem cells towards osteogenic differentiation. Human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded on the monetite scaffold in the absence of differentiating factors for up to 28 days. The gene expression profile of bone-specific markers in cells on monetite scaffold was compared to the control material hydroxyapatite. At day 14, we observed a marked increase in alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and osteonectin expressions. This study provides evidence of a suitable material that has potential properties to be used as a tissue engineering scaffold.

  18. In vitro osteoinductive potential of porous monetite for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idowu, Bernadine; Cama, Giuseppe; Deb, Sanjukta

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering–based bone grafts are emerging as a viable alternative treatment modality to repair and regenerate tissues damaged as a result of disease or injury. The choice of the biomaterial component is a critical determinant of the success of the graft or scaffold; essentially, it must induce and allow native tissue integration, and most importantly mimic the hierarchical structure of the native bone. Calcium phosphate bioceramics are widely used in orthopaedics and dentistry applications due to their similarity to bone mineral and their ability to induce a favourable biological response. One such material is monetite, which is biocompatible, osteoconductive and has the ability to be resorbed under physiological conditions. The osteoinductive properties of monetite in vivo are known; however, little is known of the direct effect on osteoinduction of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. In this study, we evaluated the potential of monetite to induce and sustain human mesenchymal stem cells towards osteogenic differentiation. Human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded on the monetite scaffold in the absence of differentiating factors for up to 28 days. The gene expression profile of bone-specific markers in cells on monetite scaffold was compared to the control material hydroxyapatite. At day 14, we observed a marked increase in alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and osteonectin expressions. This study provides evidence of a suitable material that has potential properties to be used as a tissue engineering scaffold. PMID:24904727

  19. Regenerative adsorption distillation system

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon

    2013-12-26

    There is provided a regenerative adsorption distillation system comprising a train of distillation effects in fluid communication with each other. The train of distillation effects comprises at least one intermediate effect between the first and last distillation effects of the train, each effect comprising a vessel and a condensing tube for flow of a fluid therein. The system further comprises a pair of adsorption-desorption beds in vapour communication with the last effect and at least one intermediate effect, wherein the beds contain an adsorbent that adsorbs vapour from the last effect and transmits desorbed vapour into at least one of the intermediate effect.

  20. Regenerative air heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselquist, Paul B.; Baldner, Richard

    1982-01-01

    A gas-cooled steel skirt is used to support a refractory cored brick matrix and dome structure in a high temperature regenerative air heater useful in magnetohydrodynamic power generation. The steel skirt thermally expands to accommodate the thermal expansion of the dome structure despite substantial temperature differential thereby reducing relative movement between the dome bricks. Gas cooling of the steel skirt allows the structure to operate above its normal temperature during clean-out cycles and also allows for the control of the thermal expansion of the steel skirt.

  1. Nanotechnologies in regenerative medicine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubinová, Šárka; Syková, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, 3-4 (2010), s. 144-156 ISSN 1364-5706 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500390902; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR KAN201110651 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) 1M0538; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/1242; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200520804; EC FP6 project ENIMET(XE) LSHM-CT-2005-019063 Program:1M; GA; KA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Nanotechnology * regenerative medicine * nanofibers Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.051, year: 2010

  2. Regenerative laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biancardi, F.R.; Landerman, A.; Melikian, G.

    1975-01-01

    Regenerative apparatus for exhausting the working medium from the optical cavity of a laser and for supplying preheated diluent to the reaction chamber of a laser is disclosed. In an aftercooler thermal energy is exchanged between the working medium exhausted from the optical cavity and a cryogenic coolant which is subsequently utilized as the motive fluid for an ejector and as a diluent in the production of laser gas. Highly toxic and corrosive gases are condensed out of the working medium as the cryogenic coolant is evaporated and superheated. A preheater transfers additional heat to the diluent before the diluent enters the reaction chamber. (U.S.)

  3. The potential of isotopically enriched magnesium to study bone implant degradation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Johannes; Martinelli, Elisabeth; Weinberg, Annelie M; Zitek, Andreas; Irrgeher, Johanna; Meischel, Martin; Stanzl-Tschegg, Stefanie E; Mingler, Bernhard; Prohaska, Thomas

    2017-03-15

    This pilot study highlights the substantial potential of using isotopically enriched (non-radioactive) metals to study the fate of biodegradable metal implants. It was possible to show that magnesium (Mg) release can be observed by combining isotopic mass spectrometry and isotopic pattern deconvolution for data reduction, even at low amounts of Mg released a from slowly degrading 26 Mg enriched (>99%) Mg metal. Following implantation into rats, structural in vivo changes were monitored by μCT. Results showed that the applied Mg had an average degradation rate of 16±5μmyear -1 , which corresponds with the degradation rate of pure Mg. Bone and tissue extraction was performed 4, 24, and 52weeks after implantation. Bone cross sections were analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to determine the lateral 26 Mg distribution. The 26 Mg/ 24 Mg ratios in digested tissue and excretion samples were analyzed by multi collector ICP-MS. Isotope pattern deconvolution in combination with ICP-MS enabled detection of Mg pin material in amounts as low as 200ppm in bone tissues and 20ppm in tissues up to two fold increased Mg levels with a contribution of pin-derived Mg of up to 75% (4weeks) and 30% (24weeks) were found adjacent to the implant. After complete degradation, no visual bone disturbance or residual pin-Mg could be detected in cortical bone. In organs, increased Δ 26 Mg/ 24 Mg values up to 16‰ were determined compared to control samples. Increased Δ 26 Mg/ 24 Mg values were detected in serum samples at a constant total Mg level. In contrast to urine, feces did not show a shift in the 26 Mg/ 24 Mg ratios. This investigation showed that the organism is capable of handling excess Mg well and that bones fully recover after degradation. Magnesium alloys as bone implants have faced increasing attention over the past years. In vivo degradation and metabolism studies of these implant materials have shown the promising application in

  4. Emerging regenerative approaches for periodontal reconstruction: a systematic review from the AAP Regeneration Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhao; Rios, Hector F; Cochran, David L

    2015-02-01

    More than 30 years have passed since the first successful application of regenerative therapy for treatment of periodontal diseases. Despite being feasible, periodontal regeneration still faces numerous challenges, and complete restoration of structure and function of the diseased periodontium is often considered an unpredictable task. This review highlights developing basic science and technologies for potential application to achieve reconstruction of the periodontium. A comprehensive search of the electronic bibliographic database PubMed was conducted to identify different emerging therapeutic approaches reported to influence either biologic pathways and/or tissues involved in periodontal regeneration. Each citation was assessed based on its abstract, and the full text of potentially eligible reports was retrieved. Based on the review of the full papers, their suitability for inclusion in this report was determined. In principle, only reports from scientifically well-designed studies that presented preclinical in vivo (animal studies) or clinical (human studies) evidence for successful periodontal regeneration were included. Hence, in vitro studies, namely those conducted in laboratories without any live animals, were excluded. In case of especially recent and relevant reviews with a narrow focus on specific regenerative approaches, they were identified as such, and thereby the option of referring to them to summarize the status of a specific approach, in addition to or instead of listing each separately, was preserved. Admittedly, the presence of subjectivity in the selection of studies to include in this overview cannot be excluded. However, it is believed that the contemporary approaches described in this review collectively represent the current efforts that have reported preclinical or clinical methods to successfully enhance regeneration of the periodontium. Today's challenges facing periodontal regenerative therapy continue to stimulate important research

  5. Regenerative Medicine Build-Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzic, Andre; Pfenning, Michael A; Gores, Gregory J; Harper, C Michel

    2015-12-01

    Regenerative technologies strive to boost innate repair processes and restitute normative impact. Deployment of regenerative principles into practice is poised to usher in a new era in health care, driving radical innovation in patient management to address the needs of an aging population challenged by escalating chronic diseases. There is urgency to design, execute, and validate viable paradigms for translating and implementing the science of regenerative medicine into tangible health benefits that provide value to stakeholders. A regenerative medicine model of care would entail scalable production and standardized application of clinical grade biotherapies supported by comprehensive supply chain capabilities that integrate sourcing and manufacturing with care delivery. Mayo Clinic has rolled out a blueprint for discovery, translation, and application of regenerative medicine therapies for accelerated adoption into the standard of care. To establish regenerative medical and surgical service lines, the Mayo Clinic model incorporates patient access, enabling platforms and delivery. Access is coordinated through a designated portal, the Regenerative Medicine Consult Service, serving to facilitate patient/provider education, procurement of biomaterials, referral to specialty services, and/or regenerative interventions, often in clinical trials. Platforms include the Regenerative Medicine Biotrust and Good Manufacturing Practice facilities for manufacture of clinical grade products for cell-based, acellular, and/or biomaterial applications. Care delivery leverages dedicated interventional suites for provision of regenerative services. Performance is tracked using a scorecard system to inform decision making. The Mayo Clinic roadmap exemplifies an integrated organization in the discovery, development, and delivery of regenerative medicine within a growing community of practice at the core of modern health care. Regenerative medicine is at the vanguard of health care

  6. Regenerative Medicine Build-Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfenning, Michael A.; Gores, Gregory J.; Harper, C. Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regenerative technologies strive to boost innate repair processes and restitute normative impact. Deployment of regenerative principles into practice is poised to usher in a new era in health care, driving radical innovation in patient management to address the needs of an aging population challenged by escalating chronic diseases. There is urgency to design, execute, and validate viable paradigms for translating and implementing the science of regenerative medicine into tangible health benefits that provide value to stakeholders. A regenerative medicine model of care would entail scalable production and standardized application of clinical grade biotherapies supported by comprehensive supply chain capabilities that integrate sourcing and manufacturing with care delivery. Mayo Clinic has rolled out a blueprint for discovery, translation, and application of regenerative medicine therapies for accelerated adoption into the standard of care. To establish regenerative medical and surgical service lines, the Mayo Clinic model incorporates patient access, enabling platforms and delivery. Access is coordinated through a designated portal, the Regenerative Medicine Consult Service, serving to facilitate patient/provider education, procurement of biomaterials, referral to specialty services, and/or regenerative interventions, often in clinical trials. Platforms include the Regenerative Medicine Biotrust and Good Manufacturing Practice facilities for manufacture of clinical grade products for cell-based, acellular, and/or biomaterial applications. Care delivery leverages dedicated interventional suites for provision of regenerative services. Performance is tracked using a scorecard system to inform decision making. The Mayo Clinic roadmap exemplifies an integrated organization in the discovery, development, and delivery of regenerative medicine within a growing community of practice at the core of modern health care. Significance Regenerative medicine is at the

  7. Osteogenic potential of effective bone engineering using dental pulp stem cells, bone marrow stem cells, and periosteal cells for osseointegration of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kenji; Yamada, Yoichi; Nakamura, Sayaka; Ueda, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this comparative study was to investigate cell-based effective bone engineering and the correlation between the osseointegration of dental implants and tissue-engineered bone using dental pulp stem cells (DPSC), bone marrow stem cells (BMSC), and periosteal cells (PC). The first molar and all premolars were extracted from the mandibles of three dogs, and in each dog, six bone defects (three on each side) were prepared with a 10-mm-diameter trephine bur after 4 weeks. Different materials were implanted in the defects and the sites were allowed to heal. The experimental groups were as follows: (1) dog DPSC and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) (dDPSC/PRP), (2) dog BMSC and PRP (dBMSC/PRP), (3) dog PC and PRP (dPC/PRP), and (4) control (defect only). Eight weeks later, dental implants were placed in the defects. After another 8 weeks, the amount of bone regeneration was assessed by histologic and histomorphometric analyses (bone-implant contact). The mean bone-implant contact values were 66.7% ± 3.6% for group 1 (dDPSC/PRP), 62.5% ± 3.1% for group 2 (dBMSC/PRP), 39.4% ± 2.4% for group 3 (dPC/PRP), and 30.3% ± 2.6% for the control group. DPSC showed the highest osteogenic potential and may be a useful cell source for tissue-engineered bone around dental implants.

  8. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: preparation, characterization, and evaluation of their potential use in bone targeting: an animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Luiza C; Cavalcante, Carolina H; Souza, Marina G F de; Ferreira, Carolina de A; Rubello, Domenico; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Cardoso, Valbert N; Ramaldes, Gilson A; Barros, André L B de; Soares, Daniel C F

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite is used as a drug-delivery system for bone therapy applications because of its biocompatibility, bioactivity, and osteoconductive properties. In addition, hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HApN) might be used as a theranostic probe. The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize hydroxyapatite mesoporous nanoparticles, and radiolabel these nanoparticles with technetium-99m (Tc). Moreover, biodistribution studies were carried out in healthy mice. HApN were synthesized and characterized. Tc-HApN was prepared by adding Tc-pertechnetate to a dispersion of HApN in the presence of stannous chloride. Radiochemical purity and in-vitro stability were determined. The circulation time of Tc-HApN was determined by measuring blood radioactivity in healthy mice. In addition, biodistribution studies were carried out in healthy mice at 1 and 4 h after injection. Tc-HApN showed high radiochemical purity (98.7±0.2%) and in-vitro stability until 24 h. Tc-HApN levels in blood decreased in a biphasic manner, with an α half-life of 1.8 min and a β half-life of 126.9 min. High uptake was achieved in the liver and spleen because of the macrophage uptake. Furthermore, bone uptake was higher than that of the surrounding muscle, resulting in high bone-to-muscle ratios. HApN were synthesized successfully with suitable characteristics for in-vivo applications. Tc-HApN was prepared and showed high stability. Tc-HApN presented increasing bone uptake over time, showing a higher affinity to bone tissues in contrast to surrounding muscle. The present results, together with further studies, may indicate a potential application of HApN as a nanocarrier for bone diseases.

  9. Morphological and mechanical characterization of chitosan-calcium phosphate composites for potential application as bone-graft substitutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Maia Mulder van de Graaf

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bone diseases, aging and traumas can cause bone loss and lead to bone defects. Treatment of bone defects is challenging, requiring chirurgical procedures. Bone grafts are widely used for bone replacement, but they are limited and expensive. Due to bone graft limitations, natural, semi-synthetic, synthetic and composite materials have been studied as potential bone-graft substitutes. Desirable characteristics of bone-graft substitutes are high osteoinductive and angiogenic potentials, biological safety, biodegradability, bone-like mechanical properties, and reasonable cost. Herein, we prepared and characterized potential bone-graft substitutes composed of calcium phosphate (CP - a component of natural bone, and chitosan (CS - a biocompatible biopolymer. Methods CP-CS composites were synthetized, molded, dried and characterized. The effect of drying temperatures (38 and 60 °C on the morphology, porosity and chemical composition of the composites was evaluated. As well, the effects of drying temperature and period of drying (3, 24, 48 and 72 hours on the mechanical properties - compressive strength, modulus of elasticity and relative deformation-of the demolded samples were investigated. Results Scanning electron microscopy and gas adsorption-desorption analyses of the CS-CP composites showed interconnected pores, indicating that the drying temperature played an important role on pores size and distribution. In addition, drying temperature have altered the color (brownish at 60 °C due to Maillard reaction and the chemical composition of the samples, confirmed by FTIR. Conclusion Particularly, prolonged period of drying have improved mechanical properties of the CS-CP composites dried at 38 °C, which can be designed according to the mechanical needs of the replaceable bone.

  10. Potential Role of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Alba; Almendros, Isaac; Farré, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is a prevalent disease caused by increased collapsibility of the upper airway. OSA induces oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, with important clinical consequences such as neurocognitive alterations and cardiovascular diseases. Although it has been shown that bone marrow-derived stem cells play a protective and reparative function in several diseases involving inflammatory processes and endothelial dysfunction, the data currently available on the potential role of adult stem cells in OSA are scarce. The present review presents recent data on the potential role of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in OSA. The results obtained in animal models that realistically mimic the events characterizing this sleep breathing disorder strongly support the notion that MSC are mobilized in circulating blood and then activated to play an anti-inflammatory role in OSA. PMID:24298333

  11. Chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells derived from equine bone marrow and umbilical cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Lise Charlotte; Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Heerkens, T.

    2009-01-01

    including bone marrow and umbilical cord blood. The objective of this study was to provide an in vitro comparison of the chondrogenic potential in MSC derived from adult bone marrow (BM-MSC) and umbilical cord blood (CB-MSC). Results: MSC from both sources produced tissue with cartilage-like morphology...... CB- and BM-MSC pellets. Protein concentration of cartilage-derived retinoic acid sensitive protein was higher in culture medium from CB- than BM-MSC pellets. Conclusion: CB-MSC and BM-MSC were both capable of producting hyaline-like cartilage in vitro. Howeverm, in this study the MSC from umbilical...... cord blood appeared to have more chondrogenic potential than the BM-MSC based on the cells tested and parameters measured....

  12. Micro-computed tomography (CT) based assessment of dental regenerative therapy in the canine mandible model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khobragade, P.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Andreana, S.; Dziak, R.; Sunkara, S. K.; Sunkara, S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C. N.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution 3D bone-tissue structure measurements may provide information critical to the understanding of the bone regeneration processes and to the bone strength assessment. Tissue engineering studies rely on such nondestructive measurements to monitor bone graft regeneration area. In this study, we measured bone yield, fractal dimension and trabecular thickness through micro-CT slices for different grafts and controls. Eight canines underwent surgery to remove a bone volume (defect) in the canine's jaw at a total of 44 different locations. We kept 11 defects empty for control and filled the remaining ones with three regenerative materials; NanoGen (NG), a FDA-approved material (n=11), a novel NanoCalcium Sulfate (NCS) material (n=11) and NCS alginate (NCS+alg) material (n=11). After a minimum of four and eight weeks, the canines were sacrificed and the jaw samples were extracted. We used a custombuilt micro-CT system to acquire the data volume and developed software to measure the bone yield, fractal dimension and trabecular thickness. The software used a segmentation algorithm based on histograms derived from volumes of interest indicated by the operator. Using bone yield and fractal dimension as indices we are able to differentiate between the control and regenerative material (p<0.005). Regenerative material NCS showed an average 63.15% bone yield improvement over the control sample, NCS+alg showed 55.55% and NanoGen showed 37.5%. The bone regeneration process and quality of bone were dependent upon the position of defect and time period of healing. This study presents one of the first quantitative comparisons using non-destructive Micro-CT analysis for bone regenerative material in a large animal with a critical defect model. Our results indicate that Micro-CT measurement could be used to monitor invivo bone regeneration studies for greater regenerative process understanding.

  13. Active Magnetic Regenerative Liquefier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay, John A. [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Oseen-Send, Kathryn [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Ferguson, Luke [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Pouresfandiary, Jamshid [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Cousins, Anand [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Ralph, Heather [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Hampto, Tom [Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-01-12

    This final report for the DOE Project entitled Active Magnetic Regenerative Liquefier (AMRL) funded under Grant DE-FG36-08GO18064 to Heracles Energy Corporation d.b.a. Prometheus Energy (Heracles/Prometheus) describes an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) prototype designed and built during the period from July 2008 through May 2011. The primary goal of this project was to make significant technical advances toward highly efficient liquefaction of hydrogen. Conventional hydrogen liquefiers at any scale have a maximum FOM of ~0.35 due primarily to the intrinsic difficulty of rapid, efficient compression of either hydrogen or helium working gases. Numerical simulation modeling of high performance AMRL designs indicates certain designs have promise to increase thermodynamic efficiency from a FOM of ~0.35 toward ~0.5 to ~0.6. The technical approach was the use of solid magnetic working refrigerants cycled in and out of high magnetic fields to build an efficient active regenerative magnetic refrigeration module providing cooling power for AMRL. A single-stage reciprocating AMRR with a design temperature span from ~290 K to ~120 K was built and tested with dual magnetic regenerators moving in and out of the conductively-cooled superconducting magnet subsystem. The heat transfer fluid (helium) was coupled to the process stream (refrigeration/liquefaction load) via high performance heat exchangers. In order to maximize AMRR efficiency a helium bypass loop with adjustable flow was incorporated in the design because the thermal mass of magnetic refrigerants is higher in low magnetic field than in high magnetic field. Heracles/Prometheus designed experiments to measure AMRR performance under a variety of different operational parameters such as cycle frequency, magnetic field strength, heat transfer fluid flow rate, amount of bypass flow of the heat transfer fluid while measuring work input, temperature span, cooling capability as a function of cold temperature

  14. Endometrial regenerative cells for treatment of heart failure: a new stem cell enters the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockeria, Leo; Bogin, Vladimir; Bockeria, Olga; Le, Tatyana; Alekyan, Bagrat; Woods, Erik J; Brown, Amalia A; Ichim, Thomas E; Patel, Amit N

    2013-03-05

    Heart failure is one of the key causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. The recent findings that regeneration is possible in the heart have made stem cell therapeutics the Holy Grail of modern cardiovascular medicine. The success of cardiac regenerative therapies hinges on the combination of an effective allogeneic "off the shelf" cell product with a practical delivery system. In 2007 Medistem discovered the Endometrial Regenerative Cell (ERC), a new mesenchymal-like stem cell. Medistem and subsequently independent groups have demonstrated that ERC are superior to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), the most widely used stem cell source in development. ERC possess robust expansion capability (one donor can generate 20,000 patients doses), key growth factor production and high levels of angiogenic activity. ERC have been published in the peer reviewed literature to be significantly more effect at treating animal models of heart failure (Hida et al. Stem Cells 2008).Current methods of delivering stem cells into the heart suffer several limitations in addition to poor delivery efficiency. Surgical methods are highly invasive, and the classical catheter based techniques are limited by need for sophisticated cardiac mapping systems and risk of myocardial perforation. Medistem together with Dr. Amit Patel Director of Clinical Regenerative Medicine at University of Utah have developed a novel minimally invasive delivery method that has been demonstrated safe and effective for delivery of stem cells (Tuma et al. J Transl Med 2012). Medistem is evaluating the combination of ERC, together with our retrograde delivery procedure in a 60 heart failure patient, double blind, placebo controlled phase II trial. To date 17 patients have been dosed and preliminary analysis by the Data Safety Monitoring Board has allowed for trial continuation.The combined use of a novel "off the shelf" cell together with a minimally invasive 30 minute delivery method provides a

  15. Regenerative strategies for the treatment of knee joint disabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, Rui

    2017-01-01

    This book presents regenerative strategies for the treatment of knee joint disabilities. The book is composed of four main sections totaling 19 chapters which review the current knowledge on the clinical management and preclinical regenerative strategies. It examines the role of different natural-based biomaterials as scaffolds and implants for addressing different tissue lesions in the knee joint. Section one provides an updated and comprehensive discussion on articular cartilage tissue regeneration. Section two focuses on the important contributions for bone and osteochondral tissue engineering. Section three overview the recent advances on meniscus repair/regeneration strategies. Finally, section four further discusses the current strategies for treatment of ligament lesions. Each chapter is prepared by world know expert on their fields, so we do firmly believe that the proposed book will be a reference in the area of biomaterials for regenerative medicine.

  16. Activation of dimeric glucocorticoid receptors in osteoclast progenitors potentiates RANKL induced mature osteoclast bone resorbing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, H Herschel; Henning, Petra; Lie, Anita; Tuckermann, Jan; Lerner, Ulf H

    2016-12-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is the greatest risk factor for secondary osteoporosis. Pathogenic mechanisms involve an initial increase in bone resorption followed by decreased bone formation. To gain a better understanding of the resorptive activity of GCs, we have used mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMM) to determine if GCs can directly modulate RANKL stimulated osteoclast formation and/or activity. In agreement with previous studies, experiments performed in plastic wells showed that GCs (dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, and prednisolone) inhibited osteoclast number and size during the initial phases of RANKL stimulated osteoclastogenesis; however, in prolonged cultures, decreased apoptosis was observed and escape from GC induced inhibition occurred with an enhanced number of osteoclasts formed, many with an increased area. When BMM cells were seeded on bone slices, GCs robustly enhanced RANKL stimulated formation of resorption pits and release of CTX without affecting the number or size of osteoclasts formed and with no effect on apoptosis. Stimulation of pit formation was not associated with increased life span of osteoclasts or an effect on mRNA expression of several osteoclastic or osteoclastogenic genes. The potentiation of RANKL induced CTX release by dexamethasone was significantly less in BMM cells from mice with conditional knockout of the osteoclastic glucocorticoid receptor and completely absent in cells from GR dim mice, which carry a point mutation in one dimerizing interface of the GC receptor. These data suggest that: 1. Plastic is a poor medium to use for studying direct effects of GCs on osteoclasts 2. GCs can enhance bone resorption without decreasing apoptosis, and 3. A direct enhancement of RANKL mediated resorption is stimulated by the dimeric GC-receptor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Regenerative braking device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1982-01-12

    Disclosed are several embodiments of a regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle. The device includes a plurality of rubber rollers (24, 26) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (14) connectable to the vehicle drivetrain and an output shaft (16) which is drivingly connected to the input shaft by a variable ratio transmission (20). When the transmission ratio is such that the input shaft rotates faster than the output shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy, thereby slowing the vehicle. When the transmission ratio is such that the output shaft rotates faster than the input shaft, the rubber rollers are torsionally relaxed to deliver accumulated energy, thereby accelerating or driving the vehicle.

  18. Low temperature thermally regenerative electrochemical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutfy, Raouf O.; Brown, Alan P.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1983-01-01

    A thermally regenerative electrochemical system including an electrochemical cell with two water-based electrolytes separated by an ion exchange membrane, at least one of the electrolytes containing a complexing agent and a salt of a multivalent metal whose respective order of potentials for a pair of its redox couples is reversible by a change in the amount of the complexing agent in the electrolyte, the complexing agent being removable by distillation to cause the reversal.

  19. Low-temperature thermally regenerative electrochemical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutfy, R.O.; Brown, A.P.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-21

    A thermally regenerative electrochemical system is described including an electrochemical cell with two water-based electrolytes separated by an ion exchange membrane, at least one of the electrolytes containing a complexing agent and a salt of a multivalent metal whose respective order of potentials for a pair of its redox couples is reversible by a change in the amount of the ocmplexing agent in the electrolyte, the complexing agent being removable by distillation to cause the reversal.

  20. Evaluation of Amnion-derived Multipotent Progenitor (AMP) Cells and Amnion-derived Cellular Cytokine Solution (ST266) in Promoting Craniomaxillofacial Regenerative Bone Healing in Critical Size Calvarial Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-10

    NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH UNIT SAN ANTONIO EVALUATION OF AMNION-DERIVED MULTIPOTENT PROGENITOR ( AMP ) CELLS AND AMNION-DERIVED...Care International AMP Amnion-derived multipotent progenitor BCA Bicinchoninic acid BS/BV Bone surface/bone volume BV/TV Bone volume/tissue... AMP ) cells release ST266, a secretome of biomolecules identified as integral to the process of bone regeneration and angiogenesis. The AMP cells

  1. Cultured epidermal stem cells in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Catherine J; Tønseth, Kim Alexander; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2017-07-04

    Transplantation of cultured epidermal cell sheets (CES) has long been used to treat patients with burns, chronic wounds, and stable vitiligo. In patients with large area burns this can be a life-saving procedure. The ultimate goal, however, is to restore all normal functions of the skin and prevent scar formation. Increased focus on the incorporation of epidermal stem cells (EpiSCs) within CES transplants may ultimately prove to be key to achieving this. Transplanted EpiSCs contribute to restoring the complete epidermis and provide long-term renewal.Maintenance of the regenerative potential of EpiSCs is anchorage-dependent. The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides physical cues that are interpreted by EpiSCs and reciprocal signaling between cells and ECM are integrated to determine cell fate. Thus, the carrier scaffold chosen for culture and transplant influences maintenance of EpiSC phenotype and may enhance or detract from regenerative healing following transfer.Long-term effectiveness and safety of genetically modified EpiSCs to correct the severe skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa has been shown clinically. Furthermore, skin is gaining interest as an easily accessible source of adult epithelial stem cells potentially useful for restoration of other types of epithelia. This review highlights the role of EpiSCs in the current treatment of skin injury and disease, as well as their potential in novel regenerative medicine applications involving other epithelia.

  2. Preparation and characterization of an iron oxide-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for potential bone cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneha, Murugesan; Sundaram, Nachiappan Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, multifunctional magnetic nanostructures have been found to have potential applications in biomedical and tissue engineering. Iron oxide nanoparticles are biocompatible and have distinctive magnetic properties that allow their use in vivo for drug delivery and hyperthermia, and as T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Hydroxyapatite is used frequently due to its well-known biocompatibility, bioactivity, and lack of toxicity, so a combination of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite materials could be useful because hydroxyapatite has better bone-bonding ability. In this study, we prepared nanocomposites of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite and analyzed their physicochemical properties. The results suggest that these composites have superparamagnetic as well as biocompatible properties. This type of material architecture would be well suited for bone cancer therapy and other biomedical applications.

  3. Evaluation of bone thickness around the mental foramen for potential fixation of a bone-borne functional appliance: a computer tomography scan study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kalaly, Abdullah A; Wong, Ricky W K; Cheung, Lim K; Purkayastha, Shimanto K; Schätzle, Marc; Rabie, A Bakr M

    2010-11-01

    A mandible bone-borne Herbst appliance (MBBHA) would avoid the proclination of the lower incisors that occurs with any teeth-borne functional appliance. But mapping of the bone characteristics at potential fixation areas around the mental foramen has not been carried out so far. The aim of this computer tomographic (CT) study was to evaluate bone thickness at specific positions around the mental foramen. CT scans of 60 randomly chosen adult Hong Kong Chinese subjects (mean age 28 ± 6.3 years) were used to measure the bi-cortical bone thickness in the mandible in the mental foramen area. The thickness of buccal and lingual cortical and cancellous bone was assessed at the following locations: 10 mm (A10 mm) and 5 mm (A5 mm) anterior, 10 mm (P10 mm) and 5 mm (P5 mm) posterior, and 5 mm (Inf5 mm) below the mental foramen. The amount of buccal cortical bone thickness ranged between 1.89 mm, 10 mm anterior of the mental foramen, and 2.16 mm, 10 mm posterior to its location. At the A10 mm level, cortical thickness showed a marginal statistically significant difference between A5 and A10 mm. The total amount of bone thickness ranged from 10.19 to 12.06 mm. At the locations studied around the mental foramen, a mean bicortical bone thickness of 10-12 mm was measured. No large variation in the thickness was found between bicortical bone thicknesses in the measured locations around the mental foramen. Thorough evaluation on a case-by-case basis is advisable. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. The pharmacology of regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, George J; Saul, Justin M; Furth, Mark E; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-07-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary, translational research enterprise whose explicit purpose is to advance technologies for the repair and replacement of damaged cells, tissues, and organs. Scientific progress in the field has been steady and expectations for its robust clinical application continue to rise. The major thesis of this review is that the pharmacological sciences will contribute critically to the accelerated translational progress and clinical utility of regenerative medicine technologies. In 2007, we coined the phrase "regenerative pharmacology" to describe the enormous possibilities that could occur at the interface between pharmacology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. The operational definition of regenerative pharmacology is "the application of pharmacological sciences to accelerate, optimize, and characterize (either in vitro or in vivo) the development, maturation, and function of bioengineered and regenerating tissues." As such, regenerative pharmacology seeks to cure disease through restoration of tissue/organ function. This strategy is distinct from standard pharmacotherapy, which is often limited to the amelioration of symptoms. Our goal here is to get pharmacologists more involved in this field of research by exposing them to the tools, opportunities, challenges, and interdisciplinary expertise that will be required to ensure awareness and galvanize involvement. To this end, we illustrate ways in which the pharmacological sciences can drive future innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and thus help to revolutionize the discovery of curative therapeutics. Hopefully, the broad foundational knowledge provided herein will spark sustained conversations among experts in diverse fields of scientific research to the benefit of all.

  5. Regenerative Therapy for Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narsis Daftarian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in various disciplines of basic sciences including embryology, molecular and cell biology, genetics, and nanotechnology, as well as stem cell biology have opened new horizons for regenerative therapy. The unique characteristics of stem cells prompt a sound understanding for their use in modern regenerative therapies. This review article discusses stem cells, developmental stages of the eye field, eye field transcriptional factors, and endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. Recent studies and challenges in the application of stem cells for retinal pigment epithelial degeneration models will be summarized followed by obstacles facing regenerative therapy.

  6. Osteogenic potential of bone marrow stromal cells on smooth, roughened, and tricalcium phosphate-modified titanium alloy surfaces.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Colombo, John S

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the influence of smooth, roughened, and tricalcium phosphate (TCP)-coated roughened titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) surfaces on the osteogenic potential of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

  7. A case of non-regenerative immune-mediated anemia treated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 12-year-old female Shih Tzu dog was referred with diarrhea. Hematological examination indicated severe nonregenerative anemia. Bone marrow aspiration smears and core biopsy specimens revealed normal bone marrow. Based on those results, non-regenerative immune mediated anemia was diagnosed. The dog ...

  8. Regenerative Endodontics: A Road Less Travelled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ramta; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Kaur, Dilpreet

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional approaches like root canal therapy and apexification procedures have been successful in treating diseased or infected root canals, but these modalities fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in treated teeth. Regeneration-based approaches aims to offer high levels of success by replacing diseased or necrotic pulp tissues with healthy pulp tissue to revitalize teeth. The applications of regenerative approaches in dental clinics have potential to dramatically improve patients’ quality of life. This review article offers a detailed overview of present regenerative endodontic approaches aiming to revitalize teeth and also outlines the problems to be dealt before this emerging field contributes to clinical treatment protocols. It conjointly covers the basic trilogy elements of tissue engineering. PMID:25478476

  9. Digit Tip Regeneration: Merging Regeneration Biology with Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Connor P; Dawson, Lindsay A; Muneoka, Ken

    2018-03-01

    Regeneration Biology is the study of organisms with endogenous regenerative abilities, whereas Regenerative Medicine focuses on engineering solutions for human injuries that do not regenerate. While the two fields are fundamentally different in their approach, there is an obvious interface involving mammalian regeneration models. The fingertip is the only part of the human limb that is regeneration-competent and the regenerating mouse digit tip has emerged as a model to study a clinically relevant regenerative response. In this article, we discuss how studies of digit tip regeneration have identified critical components of the regenerative response, and how an understanding of endogenous regeneration can lead to expanding the regenerative capabilities of nonregenerative amputation wounds. Such studies demonstrate that regeneration-incompetent wounds can respond to treatment with individual morphogenetic agents by initiating a multi-tissue response that culminates in structural regeneration. In addition, the healing process of nonregenerative wounds are found to cycle through nonresponsive, responsive and nonresponsive phases, and we call the responsive phase the Regeneration Window. We also find the responsiveness of mature healed amputation wounds can be reactivated by reinjury, thus nonregenerated wounds retain a potential for regeneration. We propose that regeneration-incompetent injuries possess dormant regenerative potential that can be activated by targeted treatment with specific morphogenetic agents. We believe that future Regenerative Medicine-based-therapies should be designed to promote, not replace, regenerative responses. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018;7:262-270. © 2018 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  10. [Osteogenic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from ovariectomied osteoporotic rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-ju; Ge, Dong-xia; Wu, Wen-chao; Wu, Jiang; Li, Liang

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the difference of osteogenic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) between healthy rats and osteoporotic rats. We established the animal model of osteoporosis by performing ovariectom on the 3-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) were isolated from the rats of control group and of ovariectomized (ovx) group by means of the density-gradient centrifugation method, and the 3rd-4th passage MSCs were used in all the experiments. The experiments comprised 4 groups: (1) Marrow mesenchymal stem cells control group (MSCs control group); (2) Marrow mesenchymal stem cells ovx group (MSCs ovx group); (3) Osteogenesis induction control group (OSI control group); (4) Osteogenesis induction ovx group (OSI ovx group). Cell cycle and proliferation index (PI) of MSCs were detected by flow cytometry. The expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was detected by dynamics method with substrate of phosphoric acid para-Nitro benzene. The levels of osteocalcin were detected with the isotope labelling method. (1) PI of MSCs was lower in MSCs ovx group than in MSCs control group. (2) The expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was much higher in OSI control group than in the MSCs control group; the expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was much higher in the OSI control group than in OSI ovx group after 7-day and 14-day osteogenic induction. (3) The level of osteocalcin was much higher in the OSI control group than in the MSCs control group after 14-day, 21-day, 28-day osteogenic induction. The level of osteocalcin was much higher in the OSI control group than in the OSI ovx group. Both the proliferative potential and the osteogenic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from the ovariectomized osteoporotic rat are decreased.

  11. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik, Sagar N.; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M. Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J.; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various ap...

  12. Biological Evaluation of Flexible Polyurethane/Poly l-Lactic Acid Composite Scaffold as a Potential Filler for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuk Fai Lui

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Degradable bone graft substitute for large-volume bone defects is a continuously developing field in orthopedics. With the advance in biomaterial in past decades, a wide range of new materials has been investigated for their potential in this application. When compared to common biopolymers within the field such as PLA or PCL, elastomers such as polyurethane offer some unique advantages in terms of flexibility. In cases of bone defect treatments, a flexible soft filler can help to establish an intimate contact with surrounding bones to provide a stable bone-material interface for cell proliferation and ingrowth of tissue. In this study, a porous filler based on segmented polyurethane incorporated with poly l-lactic acid was synthesized by a phase inverse salt leaching method. The filler was put through in vitro and in vivo tests to evaluate its potential in acting as a bone graft substitute for critical-sized bone defects. In vitro results indicated there was a major improvement in biological response, including cell attachment, proliferation and alkaline phosphatase expression for osteoblast-like cells when seeded on the composite material compared to unmodified polyurethane. In vivo evaluation on a critical-sized defect model of New Zealand White (NZW rabbit indicated there was bone ingrowth along the defect area with the introduction of the new filler. A tight interface formed between bone and filler, with osteogenic cells proliferating on the surface. The result suggested polyurethane/poly l-lactic acid composite is a material with the potential to act as a bone graft substitute for orthopedics application.

  13. Personalized Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Arjmand

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine as a novel field of medicine refers to the prescription of specific therapeutics procedure for an individual. This approach has established based on pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic information and data. The terms precision and personalized medicines are sometimes applied interchangeably. However, there has been a shift from “personalized medicine” towards “precision medicine”. Although personalized medicine emerged from pharmacogenetics, nowadays it covers many fields of healthcare. Accordingly, regenerative medicine and cellular therapy as the new fields of medicine use cell-based products in order to develop personalized treatments. Different sources of stem cells including mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have been considered in targeted therapies which could give many advantages. iPSCs as the novel and individual pluripotent stem cells have been introduced as the appropriate candidates for personalized cell therapies. Cellular therapies can provide a personalized approach. Because of person-to-person and population differences in the result of stem cell therapy, individualized cellular therapy must be adjusted according to the patient specific profile, in order to achieve best therapeutic results and outcomes. Several factors should be considered to achieve personalized stem cells therapy such as, recipient factors, donor factors, and the overall body environment in which the stem cells could be active and functional. In addition to these factors, the source of stem cells must be carefully chosen based on functional and physical criteria that lead to optimal outcomes.

  14. A helium regenerative compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, W.L.; Nutt, W.E.; Sixsmith, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and performance of a regenerative compressor that was developed primarily for use in cryogenic helium systems. The objectives for the development were to achieve acceptable efficiency in the machine using conventional motor and bearing technology while reducing the complexity of the system required to control contamination from the lubricants. A single stage compressor was built and tested. The compressor incorporates aerodynamically shaped blades on a 218 mm (8.6 inches) diameter impeller to achieve high efficiency. A gas-buffered non-contact shaft seal is used to oppose the diffusion of lubricant from the motor bearings into the cryogenic circuit. Since it is a rotating machine, the flow is continuous and steady, and the machine is very quiet. During performance testing with helium, the single stage machine has demonstrated a pressure ratio of 1.5 at a flow rate of 12 g/s with measured isothermal efficiencies in excess of 30%. This performance compares favorably with efficiencies generally achieved in oil flooded screw compressors

  15. Regenerative Medicine for Periodontal and Peri-implant Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, L.; Decker, A.M.; Nibali, L.; Pilipchuk, S.P.; Berglundh, T.; Giannobile, W.V.

    2015-01-01

    The balance between bone resorption and bone formation is vital for maintenance and regeneration of alveolar bone and supporting structures around teeth and dental implants. Tissue regeneration in the oral cavity is regulated by multiple cell types, signaling mechanisms, and matrix interactions. A goal for periodontal tissue engineering/regenerative medicine is to restore oral soft and hard tissues through cell, scaffold, and/or signaling approaches to functional and aesthetic oral tissues. Bony defects in the oral cavity can vary significantly, ranging from smaller intrabony lesions resulting from periodontal or peri-implant diseases to large osseous defects that extend through the jaws as a result of trauma, tumor resection, or congenital defects. The disparity in size and location of these alveolar defects is compounded further by patient-specific and environmental factors that contribute to the challenges in periodontal regeneration, peri-implant tissue regeneration, and alveolar ridge reconstruction. Efforts have been made over the last few decades to produce reliable and predictable methods to stimulate bone regeneration in alveolar bone defects. Tissue engineering/regenerative medicine provide new avenues to enhance tissue regeneration by introducing bioactive models or constructing patient-specific substitutes. This review presents an overview of therapies (e.g., protein, gene, and cell based) and biomaterials (e.g., resorbable, nonresorbable, and 3-dimensionally printed) used for alveolar bone engineering around teeth and implants and for implant site development, with emphasis on most recent findings and future directions. PMID:26608580

  16. Regenerative Medicine for Periodontal and Peri-implant Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, L; Decker, A M; Nibali, L; Pilipchuk, S P; Berglundh, T; Giannobile, W V

    2016-03-01

    The balance between bone resorption and bone formation is vital for maintenance and regeneration of alveolar bone and supporting structures around teeth and dental implants. Tissue regeneration in the oral cavity is regulated by multiple cell types, signaling mechanisms, and matrix interactions. A goal for periodontal tissue engineering/regenerative medicine is to restore oral soft and hard tissues through cell, scaffold, and/or signaling approaches to functional and aesthetic oral tissues. Bony defects in the oral cavity can vary significantly, ranging from smaller intrabony lesions resulting from periodontal or peri-implant diseases to large osseous defects that extend through the jaws as a result of trauma, tumor resection, or congenital defects. The disparity in size and location of these alveolar defects is compounded further by patient-specific and environmental factors that contribute to the challenges in periodontal regeneration, peri-implant tissue regeneration, and alveolar ridge reconstruction. Efforts have been made over the last few decades to produce reliable and predictable methods to stimulate bone regeneration in alveolar bone defects. Tissue engineering/regenerative medicine provide new avenues to enhance tissue regeneration by introducing bioactive models or constructing patient-specific substitutes. This review presents an overview of therapies (e.g., protein, gene, and cell based) and biomaterials (e.g., resorbable, nonresorbable, and 3-dimensionally printed) used for alveolar bone engineering around teeth and implants and for implant site development, with emphasis on most recent findings and future directions. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  17. Upcycling umbilical cords: bridging regenerative medicine with neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Alvaro; Alayli, Yasmeen; Balgi, Saloni; Winter, Caitlyn; Kahlenberg, Samuel; Mustafa, Shamimunisa; Hornsby, Peter

    2017-11-27

    Preterm birth is a major health concern that affects 10% of all worldwide deliveries. Many preterm infants are discharged from the hospital with morbidities that lead to an increased risk for neurodevelopmental impairment, recurrent hospitalizations, and life-long conditions. Unfortunately, the treatment of these conditions is palliative rather than curative, which calls for novel and innovative strategies. Progress in regenerative medicine has offered therapeutic options for many of these conditions. Specifically, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cord blood (UCB) cells have shown promise in treating adult-onset diseases. Unlike bone-marrow and embryonic derived stem cells, umbilical cord-derived cells are easily and humanely obtained, have low immunogenicity, and offer the potential of autologous therapy. While there are several studies to uphold the efficacy of umbilical cord MSCs in adult therapies, there remains an unmet need for the investigation of its use in treating neonates. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of current information on the potential therapeutic benefits and clinical applicability of umbilical cord MSCs and UCB cells. Promising preclinical studies have now led to a research movement that is focusing on cell-based therapies for preterm infants.

  18. A new take on an old story: chick limb organ culture for skeletal niche development and regenerative medicine evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EL Smith

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific research and progress, particularly in the drug discovery and regenerative medicine fields, is typically dependent on suitable animal models to develop new and improved clinical therapies for injuries and diseases. In vivo model systems are frequently utilised, but these models are expensive, highly complex and pose a number of ethical considerations leading to the development and use of a number of alternative ex vivo model systems. The ex vivo embryonic chick long bone and limb bud models have been utilised in the scientific research field as a model to understand skeletal development for over eighty years. The rapid development of avian skeletal tissues, coupled with the ease of experimental manipulation, availability of genome sequence and the presence of multiple cell and tissue types has seen such model systems gain significant research interest in the last few years in the tissue engineering field. The models have been explored both as systems for understanding the developmental bone niche and as potential testing tools for tissue engineering strategies for bone repair and regeneration. This review details the evolution of the chick limb organ culture system and presents recent innovative developments and emerging techniques and technologies applied to these models that are aiding our understanding of skeletal developmental and regenerative medicine research and application.

  19. Auditory brainstem and cortical potentials following bone-anchored hearing aid stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahne, Torsten; Ehelebe, Thomas; Rasinski, Christine; Götze, Gerrit

    2010-11-30

    Patients suffering from conductive or mixed hearing loss and Single-Sided Deafness may benefit from implantable hearing devices relying on bone conducted auditory stimulation. However, with only passively cooperative patients, objective methods are needed to estimate the aided and unaided pure-tone audiogram. This study focuses on the feasibility aspect of an electrophysiological determination of the hearing thresholds with bone-anchored hearing aid stimulation. Therefore, 10 normal-hearing subjects were provided with a Baha Intenso (Cochlear Ltd.) which was temporarily connected to the Baha Softband (Cochlear Ltd.). Auditory evoked potentials were measured by auditory stimulation paradigm used in clinical routine. The amplitudes, latencies, and thresholds of the resulting auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and the cortically evoked responses (CAEP) were correlated with the respective responses without the use of the Baha Intenso. The recording of ABR and CAEP by delivering the stimuli to the Baha results in response waveforms which are comparable to those evoked by earphone stimulation and appears appropriate to be measured using the Baha Intenso as stimulator. At the ABR recordings a stimulus artifact at higher stimulation levels and a constant latency shift caused by the Baha Intenso has to be considered. The CAEP recording appeared promising as a frequency specific objective method to approve the fitting of bone-anchored hearing aids. At all measurements, the ABR and CAEP thresholds seem to be consistent with the normal hearing of the investigated participants. Thus, a recording of auditory evoked potentials using a Baha is in general possible if specific limitations are considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Regenerative scaffold electrodes for peripheral nerve interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Isaac P; Mukhatyar, Vivek J; Srinivasan, Akhil; Bentley, John T; Andreasen, Dinal S; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2013-07-01

    Advances in neural interfacing technology are required to enable natural, thought-driven control of a prosthetic limb. Here, we describe a regenerative electrode design in which a polymer-based thin-film electrode array is integrated within a thin-film sheet of aligned nanofibers, such that axons regenerating from a transected peripheral nerve are topographically guided across the electrode recording sites. Cultures of dorsal root ganglia were used to explore design parameters leading to cellular migration and neurite extension across the nanofiber/electrode array boundary. Regenerative scaffold electrodes (RSEs) were subsequently fabricated and implanted across rat tibial nerve gaps to evaluate device recording capabilities and influence on nerve regeneration. In 20 of these animals, regeneration was compared between a conventional nerve gap model and an amputation model. Characteristic shaping of regenerated nerve morphology around the embedded electrode array was observed in both groups, and regenerated axon profile counts were similar at the eight week end point. Implanted RSEs recorded evoked neural activity in all of these cases, and also in separate implantations lasting up to five months. These results demonstrate that nanofiber-based topographic cues within a regenerative electrode can influence nerve regeneration, to the potential benefit of a peripheral nerve interface suitable for limb amputees.

  1. Regenerative endodontics--Creating new horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Harnoor; Kaushik, Mamta; Sharma, Roshni

    2016-05-01

    Trauma to the dental pulp, physical or microbiologic, can lead to inflammation of the pulp followed by necrosis. The current treatment modality for such cases is non-surgical root canal treatment. The damaged tissue is extirpated and the root canal system prepared. It is then obturated with an inert material such a gutta percha. In spite of advances in techniques and materials, 10%-15% of the cases may end in failure of treatment. Regenerative endodontics combines principles of endodontics, cell biology, and tissue engineering to provide an ideal treatment for inflamed and necrotic pulp. It utilizes mesenchymal stem cells, growth factors, and organ tissue culture to provide treatment. Potential treatment modalities include induction of blood clot for pulp revascularization, scaffold aided regeneration, and pulp implantation. Although in its infancy, successful treatment of damaged pulp tissue has been performed using principles of regenerative endodontics. This field is dynamic and exciting with the ability to shape the future of endodontics. This article highlights the fundamental concepts, protocol for treatment, and possible avenues for research in regenerative endodontics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Nanotechnology in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Graham G; McArdle, Adrian; Tevlin, Ruth; Momeni, Arash; Atashroo, David; Hu, Michael S; Feroze, Abdullah H; Wong, Victor W; Lorenz, Peter H; Longaker, Michael T; Wan, Derrick C

    2015-07-01

    Nanotechnology represents a major frontier with potential to significantly advance the field of bone tissue engineering. Current limitations in regenerative strategies include impaired cellular proliferation and differentiation, insufficient mechanical strength of scaffolds, and inadequate production of extrinsic factors necessary for efficient osteogenesis. Here we review several major areas of research in nanotechnology with potential implications in bone regeneration: 1) nanoparticle-based methods for delivery of bioactive molecules, growth factors, and genetic material, 2) nanoparticle-mediated cell labeling and targeting, and 3) nano-based scaffold construction and modification to enhance physicochemical interactions, biocompatibility, mechanical stability, and cellular attachment/survival. As these technologies continue to evolve, ultimate translation to the clinical environment may allow for improved therapeutic outcomes in patients with large bone deficits and osteodegenerative diseases. Traditionally, the reconstruction of bony defects has relied on the use of bone grafts. With advances in nanotechnology, there has been significant development of synthetic biomaterials. In this article, the authors provided a comprehensive review on current research in nanoparticle-based therapies for bone tissue engineering, which should be useful reading for clinicians as well as researchers in this field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical and Radiologic Evaluation of Regenerative Potential of NHA Paste and DBM in the Treatment of Periodontal Intra-bony Defects -A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepti; Sawhney, Anshul; Gupta, Bharat; Sharma, Saurabh; Juneja, Saurabh; Juneja, Manjushree; Sharma, Shruti; Patil, Neha

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that Hydroxyapatite (HA) has shown good results in the treatment of intra-osseous periodontal defects. A newer variety of HA has been designed over a period of research which has nano-sized particles and is availed in a paste consistency called Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite paste (NHA paste). This variation in size and surface area of NHA paste can provide better results when used in intra-bony defects. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes obtained with usage of NHA paste to those obtained with Demineralized Bone Matrix (DBM) in the treatment of periodontal intra-bony defects. A clinical trial was carried out for a period of 12 months. A total of 26 intra-bony defects in 10 patients were divided into experimental and control sites. The experimental sites were debrided and grafted with NHA paste. The control sites were debrided and grafted with DBM-Xenograft. Probing Depth, Clinical Attachment Level (DCAL) and Gingival Margin (GM) position were recorded at baseline 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Standardized radiographs were also documented at these recalls. The results were averaged (mean± standard deviation) for each parameter and Student t-test was used to determine intra-group statistical difference and One way analyses of variance (ANOVA) to test the difference between groups using Excel and SPSS (SPSS Inc, Chicago) software packages. On completion of 12 months, the mean percentage of PD reduction achieved in the experimental and control sites was 67.45% and 69.03% respectively (pperiodontal intra-bony defects.

  4. Genetic engineering for skeletal regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersbach, Charles A; Phillips, Jennifer E; García, Andrés J

    2007-01-01

    The clinical challenges of skeletal regenerative medicine have motivated significant advances in cellular and tissue engineering in recent years. In particular, advances in molecular biology have provided the tools necessary for the design of gene-based strategies for skeletal tissue repair. Consequently, genetic engineering has emerged as a promising method to address the need for sustained and robust cellular differentiation and extracellular matrix production. As a result, gene therapy has been established as a conventional approach to enhance cellular activities for skeletal tissue repair. Recent literature clearly demonstrates that genetic engineering is a principal factor in constructing effective methods for tissue engineering approaches to bone, cartilage, and connective tissue regeneration. This review highlights this literature, including advances in the development of efficacious gene carriers, novel cell sources, successful delivery strategies, and optimal target genes. The current status of the field and the challenges impeding the clinical realization of these approaches are also discussed.

  5. Bone morphogenetic proteins in periodontal tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakanth Malgikar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in understanding the role of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs in craniofacial and tooth development, the demonstration of stem cells in dental pulp, and accumulating knowledge on biomaterial scaffolds have set the stage for tissue engineering and regenerative therapy of the craniofacial complex. Furthermore, the recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA; Rockville, MD, USA of recombinant human BMPs for accelerating bone fusion in slow-healing fractures indicates that this protein family may prove useful in designing regenerative treatments in dental applications. In the near term, these advances are likely to be applied to endodontics and periodontal surgery; ultimately, they may facilitate approaches to regenerating whole teeth for use in tooth replacement. Early on, scientists focused on creating a suitable environment that favored the innate potential for regeneration. However, complex clinical protocols and extended treatments, in addition to inconsistent results, often brought treatment protocols out of favor. Predictable outcomes and minimally invasive protocols have become fundamental to clinicians and patients. Thus, novel regenerative concepts with improved or superior outcomes, predictability, and minimally invasive protocols are being developed and considered.

  6. Effect of antioxidant supplementation on the total yield, oxidative stress levels and multipotency of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves, H.A.D.C.R.; Mentink-Leusink, Anouk; Le, B.Q.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are the most frequently investigated cell type for potential regenerative strategies because they are relatively easy to isolate and are able to differentiate into several mesenchymal lineages. Unfortunately, during ex vivo culture,

  7. The Pharmacology of Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Justin M.; Furth, Mark E.; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary, translational research enterprise whose explicit purpose is to advance technologies for the repair and replacement of damaged cells, tissues, and organs. Scientific progress in the field has been steady and expectations for its robust clinical application continue to rise. The major thesis of this review is that the pharmacological sciences will contribute critically to the accelerated translational progress and clinical utility of regenerative medicine technologies. In 2007, we coined the phrase “regenerative pharmacology” to describe the enormous possibilities that could occur at the interface between pharmacology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. The operational definition of regenerative pharmacology is “the application of pharmacological sciences to accelerate, optimize, and characterize (either in vitro or in vivo) the development, maturation, and function of bioengineered and regenerating tissues.” As such, regenerative pharmacology seeks to cure disease through restoration of tissue/organ function. This strategy is distinct from standard pharmacotherapy, which is often limited to the amelioration of symptoms. Our goal here is to get pharmacologists more involved in this field of research by exposing them to the tools, opportunities, challenges, and interdisciplinary expertise that will be required to ensure awareness and galvanize involvement. To this end, we illustrate ways in which the pharmacological sciences can drive future innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and thus help to revolutionize the discovery of curative therapeutics. Hopefully, the broad foundational knowledge provided herein will spark sustained conversations among experts in diverse fields of scientific research to the benefit of all. PMID:23818131

  8. Genetic and Epigenetic Regulation of Human Cardiac Reprogramming and Differentiation in Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Paul W; Sharma, Arun; Wu, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration or replacement of lost cardiomyocytes within the heart has the potential to revolutionize cardiovascular medicine. Numerous methodologies have been used to achieve this aim, including the engraftment of bone marrow- and heart-derived cells as well as the identification of modulators of adult cardiomyocyte proliferation. Recently, the conversion of human somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells and induced cardiomyocyte-like cells has transformed potential approaches toward this goal, and the engraftment of cardiac progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells into patients is now feasible. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the genetic and epigenetic control of human cardiogenesis, cardiac differentiation, and the induced reprogramming of somatic cells to cardiomyocytes. We also cover genetic programs for inducing the proliferation of endogenous cardiomyocytes and discuss the genetic state of cells used in cardiac regenerative medicine.

  9. Autogenous tooth bone graft: Ingenious bone regeneration material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadalavada Sarala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth-derived bone graft material, which is proved to be rich in bone growth factors and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs, have been becoming a practical substitute to bone grafting. It can also be used as a carrier for growth factors and stem cells as reported in many recent studies. Autogenous-tooth bone grafting technique is significant as this biomaterial has excellent bone regeneration capacity and also relatively non-existent chances of antigenicity, genetic diseases and disease transmission. In this article, a broad overview of the published findings with regard to the properties and uses of tooth-derived regenerative bone grafting is discussed.

  10. Bone marrow mononuclear stem cells: potential in the treatment of myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Leblond

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Anne-Laure Leblond, John O’Sullivan, Noel Caplice1Centre for Research in Vascular Biology (CRVB, Biosciences Institute, University College Cork, Cork, IrelandAbstract: Despite advances in the management of myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure following myocardial infarction continues to be a major worldwide medical problem. Mononuclear cells from bone marrow are currently being studied as potential candidates for cellbased therapy to repair and regenerate damaged myocardium, with mixed results. The success of this strategy requires structural repair through both cardiomyogenesis and angiogenesis but also functional repair. However, pre-clinical and clinical studies with the intracoronary administration of cells indicate limited cardiomyogenesis and cell survival, controversial functional benefit and suggest paracrine effects mediated by the administered cells. Further investigations for optimizing therapeutic benefit focus on the requirement for stable cell engraftment and the involvement of cytokines in this process. This includes a large and varied range of strategies including cell or heart pre-treatment, tissue engineering and protein therapy. Although cellbased therapy holds promise in the future treatment of myocardial infarction, its current use is significantly hampered by biological and technological challenges.Keywords: bone marrow mononuclear cells, myocardial infarction, cardiac cell therapy

  11. Preparation of collagen/hydroxyapatite/alendronate hybrid hydrogels as potential scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; He, Zhiwei; Han, Fengxuan; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Chen, Liang; Li, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Development of biomimetic scaffolds represents a promising direction in bone tissue engineering. In this study, we designed a two-step process to prepare a type of biomimetic hybrid hydrogels that were composed of collagen, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and alendronate (ALN), an anti-osteoporosis drug. First, water-soluble ALN-conjugated HAP (HAP-ALN) containing 4.0wt.% of ALN was synthesized by treating HAP particles with ALN. Hydrogels were then formed from HAP-ALN conjugate and collagen under physiological conditions using genipin (GNP) as the crosslinker. Depending on the ALN/collagen molar ratio and GNP concentration, the gelation time of hydrogels ranged from 5 to 37min. Notably, these hybrid hydrogels exhibited markedly improved mechanical property (storage modulus G'=38-187kPa), higher gel contents, and lower swelling ratios compared to the hydrogels prepared from collagen alone under similar conditions. Moreover, they showed tunable degradation behaviors against collagenase. The collagen/HAP-ALN hybrid hydrogels supported the adhesion and growth of murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells well. Such tough yet enzymatically degradable hybrid hydrogels hold potential as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Repair Potential of Matrix-Induced Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate and Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation for Talar Osteochondral Repair: Patterns of Some Catabolic, Inflammatory, and Pain Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desando, Giovanna; Bartolotti, Isabella; Vannini, Francesca; Cavallo, Carola; Castagnini, Francesco; Buda, Roberto; Giannini, Sandro; Mosca, Massimiliano; Mariani, Erminia; Grigolo, Brunella

    2017-01-01

    The low regenerative potential of cartilage contributed to the development of different cell therapies aimed to improve the clinical outcome in young patients with Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus (OLT). This study is designed to assess the regenerative potential of autologous matrix-induced Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate (mBMAC) and matrix-induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (mACI) evaluating, on a small number of osteochondral biopsies, the expression of some catabolic, inflammatory, and pain mediators. Twenty-two patients with OLT were analyzed in this study; 7 were treated with mACI and 15 with mBMAC. Informed consent was obtained from all the patients. Clinical assessments were performed pre-operatively and at 12, 24, and 36 months after surgery using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). Histology and immunohistochemistry were used to assess cartilage repair at 24 months. Data were analyzed using non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney and Spearman tests. A remarkable improvement in AOFAS score was noticed for both treatments up to 36 months; however, patients treated with mACI reported the best AOFAS score. Various degrees of tissue remodeling were observed by histological analysis for both cell strategies. However, mBMAC treatment showed a higher expression of some fibrous and hypertrophic markers compared to mACI group. A mild positivity for nerve growth factor, as pain mediator, was noticed for both treatments.M. Our findings demonstrated the best histological and clinical results following mACI treatment since different fibrotic and hypertrophic features were evident in the mBMAC group at 24-month follow-up.

  13. Preclinical investigation of an innovative magnesium-based bone graft substitute for potential orthopaedic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Degradable or corrosive biometal is an attractive research and development (R&D area in clinical orthopaedics. This study was designed to investigate biomechanical and biological properties of magnesium (Mg and strontium (Sr with a focus on Mg-based metals, including pure Mg and Mg–xwt% Sr (x = 0.25, x = 1.0, x = 1.5, x = 2.5 alloys, as potential bone graft substitutes in respect to their mechanical strength, corrosion resistance, and cytocompatibility for further optimization and establishing indications for relevant in vivo applications. Our data showed that the tensile and compressive strength increased with addition of Sr because of the Mg17Sr2 precipitation strengthen. Compared with commercially used bone graft substitutes, the mechanical properties of Mg–Sr alloys were close to those of cortical bone, and the compressive strength could reach 300 MPa, suggesting its potential application for load-bearing bone as bone defect filler. The corrosion rates of Mg–xwt% Sr alloys were controlled in the range of 0.05–0.07 mm/y, indicating feasibility of bone grafting and the in situ bone repair process. Moreover, Mg–Sr alloys also exhibit good cytocompatibility and antibacterial properties. Our innovation presented in this work supported in vivo clinical indication-based assessment of biodegradable Mg-based metals that could be potential candidates for bone graft substitutes for future orthopaedic applications.

  14. In vitro osteogenic potential of bone debris resulting from placement of titanium screw-type implants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhore, C.R.; Snel, S.J.; Jacques, S.V.; Naert, I.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Histological sections of preclinical animal studies have shown that new bone formation around dental implants frequently contains debris derived from the original bone. Whether such debris by itself is osteogenic, i.e., can influence the process of new bone formation after implant

  15. Nanotechnology for regenerative medicine: nanomaterials for stem cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Aniruddh; Kim, John D; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2008-08-01

    Although stem cells hold great potential for the treatment of many injuries and degenerative diseases, several obstacles must be overcome before their therapeutic application can be realized. These include the development of advanced techniques to understand and control functions of microenvironmental signals and novel methods to track and guide transplanted stem cells. The application of nanotechnology to stem cell biology would be able to address those challenges. This review details the current challenges in regenerative medicine, the current applications of nanoparticles in stem cell biology and further potential of nanotechnology approaches towards regenerative medicine, focusing mainly on magnetic nanoparticle- and quantum dot-based applications in stem cell research.

  16. Regeneratively Cooled Porous Media Jacket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); London, Adam Pollok (Inventor); Fryer, Jack Merrill (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The fluid and heat transfer theory for regenerative cooling of a rocket combustion chamber with a porous media coolant jacket is presented. This model is used to design a regeneratively cooled rocket or other high temperature engine cooling jacket. Cooling jackets comprising impermeable inner and outer walls, and porous media channels are disclosed. Also disclosed are porous media coolant jackets with additional structures designed to transfer heat directly from the inner wall to the outer wall, and structures designed to direct movement of the coolant fluid from the inner wall to the outer wall. Methods of making such jackets are also disclosed.

  17. Perspectives in regenerative medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Ray Banerjee, Ena

    2014-01-01

    The information given in this book tries to capture the essence of the sheer dynamicity of the cell along with useful tips on how to address critical rate limiting steps in the process of exploration and investigation of its capacity to regenerate, rebuild and replenish from within. The definitions of stem cells, stemness, and the niche concept continue to undergo revisions. In adult vertebrates, hematopoietic and some non-hematopoietic progenitors are synthesized within specialized niches of bone marrow. They migrate to designated tissues, and are either trans-differentiated or become quiescent and settle down. These form the stem cell niche reservoir in all tissues. Not only the primary hematopoietic tissue but all organs and tissues are also capable of generating progenitors which are either synthesized from these migrants or are direct recruits from other tissues. In the niches, the cells settle down and await their turn to either make more clones like themselves or differentiate and mobilize in an exigen...

  18. Repairing quite swimmingly: advances in regenerative medicine using zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessling, Wolfram; North, Trista E

    2014-07-01

    Regenerative medicine has the promise to alleviate morbidity and mortality caused by organ dysfunction, longstanding injury and trauma. Although regenerative approaches for a few diseases have been highly successful, some organs either do not regenerate well or have no current treatment approach to harness their intrinsic regenerative potential. In this Review, we describe the modeling of human disease and tissue repair in zebrafish, through the discovery of disease-causing genes using classical forward-genetic screens and by modulating clinically relevant phenotypes through chemical genetic screening approaches. Furthermore, we present an overview of those organ systems that regenerate well in zebrafish in contrast to mammalian tissue, as well as those organs in which the regenerative potential is conserved from fish to mammals, enabling drug discovery in preclinical disease-relevant models. We provide two examples from our own work in which the clinical translation of zebrafish findings is either imminent or has already proven successful. The promising results in multiple organs suggest that further insight into regenerative mechanisms and novel clinically relevant therapeutic approaches will emerge from zebrafish research in the future. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Repairing quite swimmingly: advances in regenerative medicine using zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Goessling

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine has the promise to alleviate morbidity and mortality caused by organ dysfunction, longstanding injury and trauma. Although regenerative approaches for a few diseases have been highly successful, some organs either do not regenerate well or have no current treatment approach to harness their intrinsic regenerative potential. In this Review, we describe the modeling of human disease and tissue repair in zebrafish, through the discovery of disease-causing genes using classical forward-genetic screens and by modulating clinically relevant phenotypes through chemical genetic screening approaches. Furthermore, we present an overview of those organ systems that regenerate well in zebrafish in contrast to mammalian tissue, as well as those organs in which the regenerative potential is conserved from fish to mammals, enabling drug discovery in preclinical disease-relevant models. We provide two examples from our own work in which the clinical translation of zebrafish findings is either imminent or has already proven successful. The promising results in multiple organs suggest that further insight into regenerative mechanisms and novel clinically relevant therapeutic approaches will emerge from zebrafish research in the future.

  20. Maximum Safety Regenerative Power Tracking for DC Traction Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guifu Du

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Direct current (DC traction power systems are widely used in metro transport systems, with running rails usually being used as return conductors. When traction current flows through the running rails, a potential voltage known as “rail potential” is generated between the rails and ground. Currently, abnormal rises of rail potential exist in many railway lines during the operation of railway systems. Excessively high rail potentials pose a threat to human life and to devices connected to the rails. In this paper, the effect of regenerative power distribution on rail potential is analyzed. Maximum safety regenerative power tracking is proposed for the control of maximum absolute rail potential and energy consumption during the operation of DC traction power systems. The dwell time of multiple trains at each station and the trigger voltage of the regenerative energy absorbing device (READ are optimized based on an improved particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm to manage the distribution of regenerative power. In this way, the maximum absolute rail potential and energy consumption of DC traction power systems can be reduced. The operation data of Guangzhou Metro Line 2 are used in the simulations, and the results show that the scheme can reduce the maximum absolute rail potential and energy consumption effectively and guarantee the safety in energy saving of DC traction power systems.

  1. Collagen type I from bovine bone. Effect of animal age, bone anatomy and drying methodology on extraction yield, self-assembly, thermal behaviour and electrokinetic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Vincenza; Gaillard-Martinie, Brigitte; Sayd, Thierry; Chambon, Christophe; Anton, Marc; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique

    2017-04-01

    Natural collagen is easily available from animal tissues such as bones. Main limitations reported in the use of natural collagen are heterogeneity and loss of integrity during recovery. However, its natural complexity, functionality and bioactivity still remain to be achieved through synthetic and recombinant ways. Variability of physicochemical properties of collagen extracted from bovine bone by acetic acid was then investigated taking into account endogenous and exogenous factors. Endogenous: bovine's bones age (4 and 7 years) and anatomy (femur and tibia); exogenous: thermal treatments (spray-drying and lyophilisation). Scanning electron microscopy, spectroscopy (EDS, FTIR, UV/Vis and CD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), centesimal composition, mass spectrometry, amino acids and zeta-potential analysis were used for the purpose. Age correlated negatively with yield of recovery and positively with minerals and proteoglycans content. Comparing the anatomy, higher yields were found for tibias, and higher stability of tibias collagen in solution was noticed. Whatever the age and the anatomy, collagens were able to renature and to self-assemble into tri-dimensional structures. Nonetheless thermal stability and kinetics of renaturation were different. Variability of natural collagen with bone age and anatomy, and drying methodology, may be a crucial advantage to conceive tailor-made applications in either the biological or technical sector. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Autologous Bone Marrow Concentrate in a Sheep Model of Osteoarthritis: New Perspectives for Cartilage and Meniscus Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desando, Giovanna; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Cavallo, Carola; Bartolotti, Isabella; Sartoni, Federica; Nicoli Aldini, Nicolò; Martini, Lucia; Parrilli, Annapaola; Mariani, Erminia; Fini, Milena; Grigolo, Brunella

    2016-06-01

    Cell-based therapies are becoming a valuable tool to treat osteoarthritis (OA). This study investigated and compared the regenerative potential of bone marrow concentrate (BMC) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), both engineered with Hyaff(®)-11 (HA) for OA treatment in a sheep model. OA was induced via unilateral medial meniscectomy. Bone marrow was aspirated from the iliac crest, followed by concentration processes or cell isolation and expansion to obtain BMC and MSC, respectively. Treatments consisted of autologous BMC and MSC seeded onto HA. The regenerative potential of bone, cartilage, menisci, and synovia was monitored using macroscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and micro-computed tomography at 12 weeks post-op. Data were analyzed using the general linear model with adjusted Sidak's multiple comparison and Spearman's tests. BMC-HA treatment showed a greater repair ability in inhibiting OA progression compared to MSC-HA, leading to a reduction of inflammation in cartilage, meniscus, and synovium. Indeed, the decrease of inflammation positively contributed to counteract the progression of fibrotic and hypertrophic processes, known to be involved in tissue failure. Moreover, the treatment with BMC-HA showed the best results in allowing meniscus regeneration. Minor healing effects were noticed at bone level for both cell strategies; however, a downregulation of subchondral bone thickness (Cs.Th) was found in both cell treatments compared to the OA group in the femur. The transplantation of BMC-HA provided the best effects in supporting regenerative processes in cartilage, meniscus, and synovium and at less extent in bone. On the whole, both MSC and BMC combined with HA reduced inflammation and contributed to switch off fibrotic and hypertrophic processes. The observed regenerative potential by BMC-HA on meniscus could open new perspectives, suggesting its use not only for OA care but also for the treatment of meniscal lesions, even if further analyses are

  3. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs are a mesenchymal stem cell source with properties of self-renewal and multipotential differentiation. Compared to bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs, ASCs can be derived from more sources and are harvested more easily. Three-dimensional (3D tissue engineering scaffolds are better able to mimic the in vivo cellular microenvironment, which benefits the localization, attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of ASCs. Therefore, tissue-engineered ASCs are recognized as an attractive substitute for tissue and organ transplantation. In this paper, we review the characteristics of ASCs, as well as the biomaterials and tissue engineering methods used to proliferate and differentiate ASCs in a 3D environment. Clinical applications of tissue-engineered ASCs are also discussed to reveal the potential and feasibility of using tissue-engineered ASCs in regenerative medicine.

  4. Harnessing magnetic-mechano actuation in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lívia J; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical stimulus is of upmost importance in tissues developmental and regeneration processes as well as in maintaining body homeostasis. Classical physiological reactions encompass an increase of blood vessel diameter upon exposure to high blood pressure, or the expansion of cortical bone after continuous high-impact exercise. At a cellular level, it is well established that extracellular stiffness, topography, and remote magnetic actuation are instructive mechanical signals for stem cell differentiation. Based on this, biomaterials and their properties can be designed to act as true stem cell regulators, eventually leading to important advances in conventional tissue engineering techniques. This review identifies the latest advances and tremendous potential of magnetic actuation within the scope of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell- and gene-based therapeutic strategies for periodontal regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Hector F; Lin, Zhao; Oh, Bina; Park, Chan Ho; Giannobile, William V

    2011-09-01

    Inflammatory periodontal diseases are a leading cause of tooth loss and are linked to multiple systemic conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. Reconstruction of the support and function of affected tooth-supporting tissues represents an important therapeutic endpoint for periodontal regenerative medicine. An improved understanding of periodontal biology coupled with current advances in scaffolding matrices has introduced novel treatments that use cell and gene therapy to enhance periodontal tissue reconstruction and its biomechanical integration. Cell and gene delivery technologies have the potential to overcome limitations associated with existing periodontal therapies, and may provide a new direction in sustainable inflammation control and more predictable tissue regeneration of supporting alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and cementum. This review provides clinicians with the current status of these early-stage and emerging cell- and gene-based therapeutics in periodontal regenerative medicine, and introduces their future application in clinical periodontal treatment. The paper concludes with prospects on the application of cell and gene tissue engineering technologies for reconstructive periodontology.

  6. Regenerative therapy for neuronal diseases with transplantation of somatic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Hiroshi

    2013-10-26

    Pluripotent stem cells, which are capable of differentiating in various species of cells, are hoped to be donor cells in transplantation in regenerative medicine. Embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the potential to differentiate in approximately all species of cells. However, the proliferating ability of these cells is high and the cancer formation ability is also recognized. In addition, ethical problems exist in using ES cells. Somatic stem cells with the ability to differentiate in various species of cells have been used as donor cells for neuronal diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, Alzheimer disease, cerebral infarction and congenital neuronal diseases. Human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, adipose tissue, dermal tissue, umbilical cord blood and placenta are usually used for intractable neuronal diseases as somatic stem cells, while neural progenitor/stem cells and retinal progenitor/stem cells are used for a few congenital neuronal diseases and retinal degenerative disease, respectively. However, non-treated somatic stem cells seldom differentiate to neural cells in recipient neural tissue. Therefore, the contribution to neuronal regeneration using non-treated somatic stem cells has been poor and various differential trials, such as the addition of neurotrophic factors, gene transfer, peptide transfer for neuronal differentiation of somatic stem cells, have been performed. Here, the recent progress of regenerative therapies using various somatic stem cells is described.

  7. Long-term potentiation in bone – a role for glutamate in strain-induced cellular memory?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genever Paul G

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adaptive response of bone cells to mechanical strain is a primary determinant of skeletal architecture and bone mass. In vivo mechanical loading induces new bone formation and increases bone mineral density whereas disuse, immobilisation and weightlessness induce bone loss. The potency of mechanical strain is such that a single brief period of loading at physiological strain magnitude is able to induce a long-lasting osteogenic response that lasts for days. Although the process of mechanotransduction in bone is incompletely understood, observations that responses to mechanical strain outlast the duration of stimulation necessitate the existence of a form of cellular memory through which transient strain episodes are recorded, interpreted and remembered by bone cells. Recent evidence supports the existence of a complex multicellular glutamate-signalling network in bone that shares functional similarities to glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. In neurones, these signalling molecules coordinate synaptic communication required to support learning and memory formation, through a complex process of long-term potentiation. Presentation of the hypothesis We hypothesise that osteoblasts use a cellular mechanism similar or identical to neuronal long-term potentiation in the central nervous system to mediate long-lasting changes in osteogenesis following brief periods of mechanical strain. Testing the hypothesis N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonism should inhibit the saturating response of mechanical strain and reduce the enhanced osteogenicity of segregated loading to that of an equivalent period of uninterrupted loading. Changes in α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole propionate (AMPA receptor expression, localisation and electrophysiological responses should be induced by mechanical strain and inhibited by modulators of neuronal long-term potentiation. Implications of the hypothesis If true

  8. Saccular function in otosclerosis patients: bone conducted-vestibular evoked myogenic potential analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Amali

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular involvements have long been observed in otosclerotic patients. Among vestibular structures saccule has the closest anatomical proximity to the sclerotic foci, so it is the most prone vestibular structure to be affected during the otosclerosis process. The aim of this study was to investigate the saccular function in patients suffering from otosclerosis, by means of Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (VEMP. The material consisted of 30 otosclerosis patients and 20 control subjects. All participants underwent audiometric and VEMP testing. Analysis of tests results revealed that the mean values of Air-Conducted Pure Tone Average (AC-PTA and Bone-Conducted Pure Tone Average (BC-PTA in patients were 45.28 ± 15.57 and 19.68 ± 10.91, respectively and calculated 4 frequencies Air Bone Gap (ABG was 25.64 ± 9.95. The VEMP response was absent in 14 (28.57% otosclerotic ears. A statistically significant increase in latency of the p13 was found in the affected ears (P=0.004, differences in n23 latency did not reach a statistically significant level (P=0.112. Disparities in amplitude of p13-n23 in between two study groups was statistically meaningful (P=0.009, indicating that the patients with otosclerosis had lower amplitudes. This study tends to suggest that due to the direct biotoxic effect of the materials released from the otosclerosis foci on saccular receptors, there might be a possibility of vestibular dysfunction in otosclerotic patients.

  9. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sagar N; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various approaches of regenerative endodontics, there are several major challenges that remain to be improved: a) the endodontic root canal is a strong harbor of the endodontic bacterial biofilm and the fundamental etiologic factors of recurrent endodontic diseases, (b) tooth discolorations are caused by antibiotics and filling materials, (c) cervical root fractures are caused by endodontic medicaments, (d) pulp tissue is not vascularized nor innervated, and (e) the dentin matrix is not developed with adequate root thickness and length. Generally, current clinical protocols and recent studies have shown a limited success of the pulp-dentin tissue regeneration. Throughout the various approaches, the construction of biomimetic microenvironments of pulp-dentin tissue is a key concept of the tissue engineering based regenerative endodontics. The biomimetic microenvironments are composed of a synthetic nano-scaled polymeric fiber structure that mimics native pulp ECM and functions as a scaffold of the pulp-dentin tissue complex. They will provide a framework of the pulp ECM, can deliver selective bioactive molecules, and may recruit pluripotent stem cells from the vicinity of the pulp apex. The polymeric nanofibers are produced by methods of self-assembly, electrospinning, and phase separation. In order to be applied to biomedical use, the polymeric nanofibers require biocompatibility, stability, and biodegradability. Therefore, this review focuses on the development and application of the

  10. Osteoinductive potential of demineralized rat bone increases with increasing donor age from birth to adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Solheim, E

    1998-01-01

    Demineralized allogenic bone implanted in the subcutis or muscle of rodents causes formation of heterotopic bone by osteoinduction. The osteoinductive response may be weaker in primates than in rodents. It was suggested that the osteoinductive response of demineralized bone for clinical use could...... be enhanced by using young donors, because studies have indicated that the osteoinductive response is reduced in demineralized bone of old versus young donors. However, these findings may not represent a gradual decline in the osteoinductive property of bone matrix throughout the life span. We evaluated...... quantitatively, by uptake of strontium 85, the osteoinductive effect of demineralized bone matrix from newborn, 8-week-old (adolescent), and 8-month-old (adult) male Wistar rats implanted in the abdominal muscles of 8-week-old male Wistar rats. The osteoinductive response increased significantly with increasing...

  11. Dental pulp stem cells: function, isolation and applications in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatullo, Marco; Marrelli, Massimo; Shakesheff, Kevin M; White, Lisa J

    2015-11-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are a promising source of cells for numerous and varied regenerative medicine applications. Their natural function in the production of odontoblasts to create reparative dentin support applications in dentistry in the regeneration of tooth structures. However, they are also being investigated for the repair of tissues outside of the tooth. The ease of isolation of DPSCs from discarded or removed teeth offers a promising source of autologous cells, and their similarities with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) suggest applications in musculoskeletal regenerative medicine. DPSCs are derived from the neural crest and, therefore, have a different developmental origin to BMSCs. These differences from BMSCs in origin and phenotype are being exploited in neurological and other applications. This review briefly highlights the source and functions of DPSCs and then focuses on in vivo applications across the breadth of regenerative medicine. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Adjustment methodology for preliminary study on the distribution of bone tissue boron. Potential therapeutic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandizzi, D; Dagrosa, A; Carpano, M.; Olivera, M. S.; Nievas, S; Cabrini, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Boron is an element that has an affinity for bone tissue and represents a considered element in bone health . Other boron compounds are used in the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT ) in the form of sodium borocaptate (BSH ) and borono phenylalanine (BPA). The results of clinical trials up to date are encouraging but not conclusive . At an experimental level , some groups have applied BNCT in osteosarcomas . We present preliminary methodological adjustments for the presence of boron in bone. (author)

  13. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) evoked by air- and bone-conducted stimuli in vestibular neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Sendhil; Dennis, Danielle L; Colebatch, James G

    2015-10-01

    To compare and characterise abnormalities for short latency vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) elicited by air- (AC) and two differing types of bone-conducted (BC) stimuli during vestibular neuritis (VN). AC (500Hz short tone bursts) and two BC stimuli (500Hz at the forehead and impulses at the mastoids) were used to evoke cervical and ocular potentials (cVEMPs and oVEMPs) in VN patients (n=22) and healthy subjects. More abnormalities were observed for the oVEMP than the cVEMP when using either AC 500Hz or BC 500Hz. The AC stimulus showed slightly more abnormalities than the BC 500Hz stimulus. In contrast, BC impulses produced frequent abnormalities for both oVEMPs and cVEMPs. The findings were modelled, based upon presumed selective lesions of the superior nerve. AC 500Hz stimulation was slightly better than BC 500Hz in demonstrating abnormalities in patients with VN. BC impulses behave as expected for a predominantly utricular stimulus. The relative contributions of saccular and utricular fibres differ for stimulus type and target reflex. AC 500Hz is as effective as BC 500Hz for investigating VN. BC impulses act most strongly on utricular afferents. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Review - bioactive glass implants for potential application in structural bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahaman Mohamed N.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass particles andweak scaffolds have been used to heal small contained bone defects but an unmet challenge is the development of bioactive glass implants with the requisite mechanical reliability and in vivo performance to heal structural bone defects. Inadequate mechanical strength and a brittle mechanical response have been key concerns in the use of bioactive glass scaffolds in structural bone repair. Recent research has shown the capacity to create strong porous bioactive glass scaffolds and the ability of these scaffolds to heal segmental bone defects in small and large rodents at a rate comparable to autogenous bone grafts. Loading these strong porous scaffolds with bone morphogenetic protein-2 can significantly enhance their ability to regenerate bone. Recentwork has also shown that coating the external surface of strong porous scaffolds with an adherent biodegradable polymer can dramatically improve their load-bearing capacity in flexural loading and their work of fracture (a measure of toughness. These tough and strong bioactive glass-polymer composites with an internal architecture conducive to bone infiltration could provide optimal synthetic implants for structural bone repair.

  15. Gene delivery in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Y L; Chen, X G; W T, Godbey

    2015-11-01

    As a promising strategy to aid or replace tissue/organ transplantation, gene delivery has been used for regenerative medicine applications to create or restore normal function at the cell and tissue levels. Gene delivery has been successfully performed ex vivo and in vivo in these applications. Excellent proliferation capabilities and differentiation potentials render certain cells as excellent candidates for ex vivo gene delivery for regenerative medicine applications, which is why multipotent and pluripotent cells have been intensely studied in this vein. In this review, gene delivery is discussed in detail, along with its applications to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. A definition of a stem cell is compared to a definition of a stem property, and both provide the foundation for an in-depth look at gene delivery investigations from a germ lineage angle. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. {sup 188}Re-labeled bisphosphonates as potential bifunctional agents for therapy in patients with bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Mabhouh, Amal [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 3118 Dentistry Pharmacy Center, University of Alberta, Edmonton Alta, T6G-2N8 (Canada); Mercer, John R. [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 3118 Dentistry Pharmacy Center, University of Alberta, Edmonton Alta, T6G-2N8 (Canada); Faculty of Medicine, 3118 Dentistry Pharmacy Center, University of Alberta, Edmonton Alta, T6G-2N8 (Canada)]. E-mail: john.mercer@ualberta.ca

    2005-04-01

    Two new bisphosphonates have been examined for their ability to bind {sup 188}Re and deliver it selectively to bone. The bisphosphonates are prototype compounds with potential to deliver rhenium radionuclides and a second therapy modality to bone metastases. A conjugate between diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and bisphosphonate (DTPA/BP) and a conjugate between 5-fluorouracil and bisphosphonate (5-FU/BP) were prepared and labeled at high radiochemical purity with {sup 188}Re and biodistribution studies were carried out in normal Balb/C mice. The compounds showed rapid blood clearance and elimination from soft tissues with substantial retention of activity in the bone comparable to {sup 188}Re-hydroxyethylidine diphosphonate used as a control. At 8 h bone activity was 3.51% of injected dose for {sup 188}Re-DTPA/BP and 6.38% of injected dose for {sup 188}Re-5-FU/BP representing 69.6% and 80.6% of total body radioactivity, respectively. The two compounds show the potential for combination therapy of painful bone metastases.

  17. Differentiation potential of menstrual blood- versus bone marrow-stem cells into glial-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azedi, Fereshteh; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Behzadi, Gila; Vasei, Mohammad; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Khanjani, Sayeh; Edalatkhah, Haleh; Lakpour, Niknam

    2014-05-01

    Menstrual blood is easily accessible, renewable, and inexpensive source of stem cells that have been interested for cell therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we showed conversion of menstrual blood stem cells (MenSCs) into clonogenic neurosphere- like cells (NSCs), which can be differentiated into glial-like cells. Moreover, differentiation potential of MenSCs into glial lineage was compared with bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs). Differentiation potential of individual converted NSCs derived from MenSCs or BMSCs into glial-like cells was investigated using immunofluorescence staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction.The fibroblastic morphology of both MenSCs and BMSCs was turned into NSCs shape during first step of differentiation. NSCs derived from both BMSCs and MenSCs expressed higher levels of Olig-2 and Nestin markers compared to undifferentiated cells. The expression levels of myelin basic protein (MBP) mRNA up regulated only in BMSCs-NSCs no in MenSCs-NSCs. However, outgrowth of individual NSCs derived from both MenSCs and BMSCs into glial-like cells led to significant up regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein,Olig-2 and MBP at mRNA and protein level accompanied with down regulation of Nestin protein.This is the first study demonstrating that MenSCs can be converted to NSCs with differentiation ability into glial-like cells. Accumulative data show different expression pattern of glial markers in differentiated MenSCs compared to BMSCs. The comparable differentiation potential, more accessibility and no invasive technique for sample collection of MenSCs in comparison with BMSCs introduce MenSCs as an apt, consistent and safe alternative to BMSCs for cell therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  18. Potential Spermatogenesis Recovery with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in an Azoospermic Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deying Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-obstructive azoospermia is the most challenging type of male infertility. Stem cell based therapy provides the potential to enhance the recovery of spermatogenesis following cancer therapy. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs possess the potential to differentiate or trans-differentiate into multi-lineage cells, secrete paracrine factors to recruit the resident stem cells to participate in tissue regeneration, or fuse with the local cells in the affected region. In this study, we tested whether spermatogenically-induced BMSCs can restore spermatogenesis after administration of an anticancer drug. Allogeneic BMSCs were co-cultured in conditioned media derived from cultured testicular Sertoli cells in vitro, and then induced stem cells were transplanted into the seminiferous tubules of a busulfan-induced azoospermatic rat model for 8 weeks. The in vitro induced BMSCs exhibited specific spermatogonic gene and protein markers, and after implantation the donor cells survived and located at the basement membranes of the recipient seminiferous tubules, in accordance with what are considered the unique biological characteristics of spermatogenic stem cells. Molecular markers of spermatogonial stem cells and spermatogonia (Vasa, Stella, SMAD1, Dazl, GCNF, HSP90α, integrinβ1, and c-kit were expressed in the recipient testis tissue. No tumor mass, immune response, or inflammatory reaction developed. In conclusion, BMSCs might provide the potential to trans-differentiate into spermatogenic-like-cells, enhancing endogenous fertility recovery. The present study indicates that BMSCs might offer alternative treatment for the patients with azoospermatic infertility after cancer chemotherapy.

  19. Biomineralization of Engineered Spider Silk Protein-Based Composite Materials for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Hardy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Materials based on biodegradable polyesters, such as poly(butylene terephthalate (PBT or poly(butylene terephthalate-co-poly(alkylene glycol terephthalate (PBTAT, have potential application as pro-regenerative scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Herein, the preparation of films composed of PBT or PBTAT and an engineered spider silk protein, (eADF4(C16, that displays multiple carboxylic acid moieties capable of binding calcium ions and facilitating their biomineralization with calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate is reported. Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on films mineralized with calcium phosphate show enhanced levels of alkaline phosphatase activity suggesting that such composites have potential use for bone tissue engineering.

  20. Canine Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Promote Functional Recovery in Mice with Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    ODA, Yasutaka; TANI, Kenji; ASARI, Yusuke; QUINTANILHA, Luiz Fernando; HARAGUCHI, Tomoya; MOMOTA, Yutaka; KATAYAMA, Masaaki; ITAMOTO, Kazuhito; NAKAZAWA, Hiroshi; TAURA, Yasuho

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Regenerative therapy has begun to be clinically applied in humans and dogs to treat neurological disorders, such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Here, we show the therapeutic potential of transplantation of cultured canine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) into mice with SCI. Canine BMSC transplantation therapy was performed, immediately after the spinal cord was injured. Canine BMSC therapy enhanced functional recovery of the hind limbs in mice with SCI. Nestin-positive cells were obse...

  1. Properties and potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells from children with hematologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, H; Linardakis, E; Martimianaki, G; Stiakaki, E; Perdikogianni, C H; Charbord, P; Kalmanti, M

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have become the focus of cellular therapeutics but little is known regarding bone marrow (BM) MSC derived from children. As MSC constitute part of BM stroma, we examined their properties in children with hematologic diseases. BM MSC from children with non-malignant hematologic disorders and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were isolated and expanded. MSC were immunophenotypically characterized and their functional characteristics were assessed by CFU-F assay and cell doubling time calculation. Their ability for trilineage differentiation was verified by molecular and histochemical methods. Apoptosis was evaluated and clonal analysis was performed. MSC were isolated from BM of all groups. They acquired the mesenchymal-related markers from the first passage, with a simultaneous decrease of hematopoietic markers. A very low percentage of apoptotic cells was detected in all passages. The proliferative and clonogenic capacity did not differ among groups, with the exception of ALL at diagnosis, in which they were defective. Histochemical and molecular analysis of differentiated MSC yielded characteristics for adipocytes, osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Clonal analysis in a number of BM samples revealed a highly heterogeneous population of cells within each clone. MSC from BM of children with hematologic disorders, with the exception of ALL at diagnosis, can be isolated in sufficient number and quality to serve as a potential source for clinical applications.

  2. Nanotechnology Biomimetic Cartilage Regenerative Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardinha, Jose Paulo; Myers, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage has a limited regenerative capacity. Faced with the clinical challenge of reconstruction of cartilage defects, the field of cartilage engineering has evolved. This article reviews current concepts and strategies in cartilage engineering with an emphasis on the application of nanotechnology in the production of biomimetic cartilage regenerative scaffolds. The structural architecture and composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix and the evolution of tissue engineering concepts and scaffold technology over the last two decades are outlined. Current advances in biomimetic techniques to produce nanoscaled fibrous scaffolds, together with innovative methods to improve scaffold biofunctionality with bioactive cues are highlighted. To date, the majority of research into cartilage regeneration has been focused on articular cartilage due to the high prevalence of large joint osteoarthritis in an increasingly aging population. Nevertheless, the principles and advances are applicable to cartilage engineering for plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:24883273

  3. Regulation of Sclerostin Expression in Multiple Myeloma by Dkk-1: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy for Myeloma Bone Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eda, Homare; Santo, Loredana; Wein, Marc N; Hu, Dorothy Z; Cirstea, Diana D; Nemani, Neeharika; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Raines, Sarah E; Kuhstoss, Stuart Allen; Munshi, Nikhil C; Kronenberg, Henry M; Raje, Noopur S

    2016-06-01

    Sclerostin is a potent inhibitor of osteoblastogenesis. Interestingly, newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients have high levels of circulating sclerostin that correlate with disease stage and fractures. However, the source and impact of sclerostin in MM remains to be defined. Our goal was to determine the role of sclerostin in the biology of MM and its bone microenvironment as well as investigate the effect of targeting sclerostin with a neutralizing antibody (scl-Ab) in MM bone disease. Here we confirm increased sclerostin levels in MM compared with precursor disease states like monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering MM. Furthermore, we found that a humanized MM xenograft mouse model bearing human MM cells (NOD-SCID.CB17 male mice injected intravenously with 2.5 million of MM1.S-Luc-GFP cells) demonstrated significantly higher concentrations of mouse-derived sclerostin, suggesting a microenvironmental source of sclerostin. Associated with the increased sclerostin levels, activated β-catenin expression levels were lower than normal in MM mouse bone marrow. Importantly, a high-affinity grade scl-Ab reversed osteolytic bone disease in this animal model. Because scl-Ab did not demonstrate significant in vitro anti-MM activity, we combined it with the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib. Our data demonstrated that this combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor burden and improved bone disease in our in vivo MM mouse model. In agreement with our in vivo data, sclerostin expression was noted in marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts of MM patient bone marrow samples. Moreover, MM cells stimulated sclerostin expression in immature osteoblasts while inhibiting osteoblast differentiation in vitro. This was in part regulated by Dkk-1 secreted by MM cells and is a potential mechanism contributing to the osteoblast dysfunction noted in MM. Our data confirm the role of sclerostin as a potential therapeutic target in MM bone disease

  4. Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw Bone: Radiological Pattern and the Potential Role of CBCT in Early Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Olutayo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To systematize the clinico-radiological symptoms and course of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw bone and to evaluate the diagnostic potential of various radiological techniques to detect mild osteonecrosis in each stage of the disease.Material and Methods: The sample consisted of 22 patients previously diagnosed with extraoral malignant disease. Diagnosis was based on a clinical examination in conjunction to digital panoramic radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. Two dentomaxillofacial radiologists reviewed all images.Results: Twenty patients showed mandibular involvement clinically, while two others had a maxillary involvement. Four stages of the disease were proposed based on the clinico-radiological findings. Subclinical cortical and lamina dura thickening was detected with only three-dimensional CBCT and periapical images, while ulceration and cortical bone thickening was detected only by three-dimensional CBCT. Mixed sclerotic, lytic bone destruction involving alveolar and basal bone with or without encroachment on the mandibular canal, pathological mandibular fractures were detected by two-dimensional panoramic and three-dimensional CBCT images. Other findings are non healing extraction sockets, periapical radiolucencies, osteolysis, sequestra, oroantral fistula, and periosteal new bone formation.Conclusions: The present study showed that bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw bone occurs in four distinct clinico-radiological stages. For mild cases, panoramic image diagnosis was much less obvious, whereas cone beam computed tomography was able to fully characterise the bony lesions and describe their extent and involvement of neighbouring structures in all cases. Thus cone beam computed tomography might better contribute to the prevention of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw bone as well to the disease management.

  5. Playing with bone and fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Zvonic, Sanjin; Floyd, Z. Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between bone and fat formation within the bone marrow microenvironment is complex and remains an area of active investigation. Classical in vitro and in vivo studies strongly support an inverse relationship between the commitment of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells...... or stromal cells to the adipocyte and osteoblast lineage pathways. In this review, we focus on the recent literature exploring the mechanisms underlying these differentiation events and discuss their implications relevant to osteoporosis and regenerative medicine....

  6. Materials and scaffolds in medical 3D printing and bioprinting in the context of bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Martin; Bauer, Heide-Katharina; Goetze, Elisabeth; Gielisch, Matthias; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T; Moncal, Kazim K; Rizk, Elias; Seitz, Hermann; Gelinsky, Michael; Schröder, Heinz C; Wang, Xiaohong H; Müller, Werner E G; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    The structural and functional repair of lost bone is still one of the biggest challenges in regenerative medicine. In many cases, autologous bone is used for the reconstruction of bone tissue; however, the availability of autologous material is limited, which always means additional stress to the patient. Due to this, more and more frequently various biocompatible materials are being used instead for bone augmentation. In this context, in order to ensure the structural function of the bone, scaffolds are implanted and fixed into the bone defect, depending on the medical indication. Nevertheless, for the surgeon, every individual clinical condition in which standardized scaffolds have to be aligned is challenging, and in many cases the alignment is not possible without limitations. Therefore, in the last decades, 3D printing (3DP) or additive manufacturing (AM) of scaffolds has become one of the most innovative approaches in surgery to individualize and improve the treatment of patients. Numerous biocompatible materials are available for 3DP, and various printing techniques can be applied, depending on the process conditions of these materials. Besides these conventional printing techniques, another promising approach in the context of medical AM is 3D bioprinting, a technique which makes it possible to print human cells embedded in special carrier substances to generate functional tissues. Even the direct printing into bone defects or lesions becomes possible. 3DP is already improving the treatment of patients, and has the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine in future.

  7. Engineering growth factors for regenerative medicine applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Aaron C.; Briquez, Priscilla S.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-15

    Growth factors are important morphogenetic proteins that instruct cell behavior and guide tissue repair and renewal. Although their therapeutic potential holds great promise in regenerative medicine applications, translation of growth factors into clinical treatments has been hindered by limitations including poor protein stability, low recombinant expression yield, and suboptimal efficacy. This review highlights current tools, technologies, and approaches to design integrated and effective growth factor-based therapies for regenerative medicine applications. The first section describes rational and combinatorial protein engineering approaches that have been utilized to improve growth factor stability, expression yield, biodistribution, and serum half-life, or alter their cell trafficking behavior or receptor binding affinity. The second section highlights elegant biomaterial-based systems, inspired by the natural extracellular matrix milieu, that have been developed for effective spatial and temporal delivery of growth factors to cell surface receptors. Although appearing distinct, these two approaches are highly complementary and involve principles of molecular design and engineering to be considered in parallel when developing optimal materials for clinical applications.

  8. Morphological features of the macerated cranial bones registered by the 3D vision system for potential use in forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzat, Janusz; Sioma, Andrzej; Kozerska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present potential usage of the 3D vision system for registering features of the macerated cranial bones. Applied 3D vision system collects height profiles of the object surface and from that data builds a three-dimensional image of the surface. This method appeared to be accurate enough to capture anatomical details of the macerated bones. With the aid of the 3D vision system we generated images of the surface of the human calvaria which was used for testing the system. Performed reconstruction visualized the imprints of the dural vascular system, cranial sutures, and the three-layer structure of the cranial bones observed in the cross-section. We figure out that the 3D vision system may deliver data which can enhance estimation of sex from the osteological material.

  9. Regenerative endodontics: A way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogenes, Anibal; Ruparel, Nikita B; Shiloah, Yoav; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2016-05-01

    Immature teeth are susceptible to infections due to trauma, anatomic anomalies, and caries. Traditional endodontic therapies for immature teeth, such as apexification procedures, promote resolution of the disease and prevent future infections. However, these procedures fail to promote continued root development, leaving teeth susceptible to fractures. Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs) have evolved in the past decade, being incorporated into endodontic practice and becoming a viable treatment alternative for immature teeth. The authors have summarized the status of regenerative endodontics on the basis of the available published studies and provide insight into the different levels of clinical outcomes expected from these procedures. Substantial advances in regenerative endodontics are allowing a better understanding of a multitude of factors that govern stem cell-mediated regeneration and repair of the damaged pulp-dentin complex. REPs promote healing of apical periodontitis, continued radiographic root development, and, in certain cases, vitality responses. Despite the clinical success of these procedures, they appear to promote a guided endodontic repair process rather than a true regeneration of physiological-like tissue. Immature teeth with pulpal necrosis with otherwise poor prognosis can be treated with REPs. These procedures do not preclude the possibility of apexification procedures if attempts are unsuccessful. Therefore, REPs may be considered first treatment options for immature teeth with pulpal necrosis. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prospects for translational regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Zhao, Yi-Min; Jin, Yan; Shi, Songtao

    2012-01-01

    Translational medicine is an evolutional concept that encompasses the rapid translation of basic research for use in clinical disease diagnosis, prevention and treatment. It follows the idea "from bench to bedside and back", and hence relies on cooperation between laboratory research and clinical care. In the past decade, translational medicine has received unprecedented attention from scientists and clinicians and its fundamental principles have penetrated throughout biomedicine, offering a sign post that guides modern medical research toward a patient-centered focus. Translational regenerative medicine is still in its infancy, and significant basic research investment has not yet achieved satisfactory clinical outcomes for patients. In particular, there are many challenges associated with the use of cell- and tissue-based products for clinical therapies. This review summarizes the transformation and global progress in translational medicine over the past decade. The current obstacles and opportunities in translational regenerative medicine are outlined in the context of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for the safe and effective regeneration of functional tissue. This review highlights the requirement for multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary cooperation to ensure the development of the best possible regenerative therapies within the shortest timeframe possible for the greatest patient benefit. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Myogenic Differentiation Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Fetal Bovine Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Lucas Hidenori; Cordero, Paloma; Palomino, Jaime; Parraguez, Victor Hugo; Torres, Cristian Gabriel; Peralta, Oscar Alejandro

    2018-01-02

    The myogenic potential of bovine fetal MSC (bfMSC) derived from bone marrow (BM) remains unknown; despite its potential application for the study of myogenesis and its implications for livestock production. In the present study, three protocols for in vitro myogenic differentiation of bfMSC based on the use of DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza), myoblast-secreted factor Galectin-1 (Gal-1), and myoblast culture medium SkGM-2 BulletKit were used. Plastic-adherent bfMSC were isolated from fetal BM collected from abattoir-derived fetuses. Post-thaw viability analyses detected 85.6% bfMSC negative for propidium iodine (PI). Levels of muscle regulatory factors (MRF) MYF5, MYF6, MYOD, and DES mRNA were higher (P < 0.05) in bfMSC cultured under 100 µM of 5-Aza compared to 1 and 10 µM. Treatment of bfMSC with 10 µM of 5-Aza resulted in down-regulation of MYOD mRNA (Days 7 to 21) and up-regulation of MYF6 (Day 7), MYF5, and DES mRNA (Day 21). Gal-1 and SkGM-2 BulletKit induced sequential down-regulation of early MRF (MYF5) and up-regulation of intermediate (MYOD) and late MRF (DES) mRNA. Moreover, DES and MYF5 were immunodetected in differentiated bfMSC. In conclusion, protocols evaluated in bfMSC induced progress into myogenic differentiation until certain extent evidenced by changes in MRF gene expression.

  12. Multifunctional nano-hydroxyapatite and alginate/gelatin based sticky gel composites for potential bone regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yurong; Yu, Juhong [The Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab of Textile Fiber Materials & Processing Technology, College of Materials and Textile, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Kundu, Subhas C. [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Yao, Juming, E-mail: yaoj@zstu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, National Engineering Lab of Textile Fiber Materials & Processing Technology, College of Materials and Textile, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2016-09-15

    To improve the fixations of the implant and implant-bone integration after joint arthroplasty from locally preventing inflammation and promoting the bone regeneration, we design a multifunctional biomaterial consisting of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) and antibiotic loaded nano-hydroxyapatite with an alginate/gelatin sticky gel. We investigate its role for the prevention of the inflammation and possibility of inducing a new bone growth along with its adhesive ability. The stickiness exists in the composite, which may help to fix itself on the bone fracture surface. The composite sustains the antibacterial effect and promotes the proliferation and differentiation of MG63 cells in vitro. In vivo experimentation also shows that the composite gel has a role for the reduction of inflammation. It enhances the formation of new bone and blood vessels compared to both the sole rhBMP-2 and non-rhBMP-2/antibiotic loaded composite gels. The multifunctional composite provides a promising material for the prosthetic and bone tissue regeneration. - Highlights: • Multifunctional nanohydroxyapatite composite is fabricated. • The composite consists of nHAP, growth factor, antibiotic and alginate/gelatin gel. • The composite shows antibacterial effect and good cytocompatibility. • No adverse effect to the cells tested in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of a novel carbon fiber-reinforced calcium phosphate silicate bone cement with potential osteo-inductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jiangjiang; Xiao, Yu; Bao, Chongyun; Gong, Tianxing; Zhou, Shuxin; Troczynski, Tom; Yang, Quanzu; Xu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    The repair of bone defects is still a pressing challenge in clinics. Injectable bone cement is regarded as a promising material to solve this problem because of its special self-setting property. Unfortunately, its poor mechanical conformability, unfavorable osteo-genesis ability and insufficient osteo-inductivity seriously limit its clinical application. In this study, novel experimental calcium phosphate silicate bone cement reinforced by carbon fibers (CCPSC) was fabricated and characterized. First, a compressive strength test and cell culture study were carried out. Then, the material was implanted into the femoral epiphysis of beagle dogs to further assess its osteo-conductivity using a micro-computed tomography scan and histological analysis. In addition, we implanted CCPSC into the beagles’ intramuscular pouches to perform an elementary investigation of its osteo-inductivity. The results showed that incorporation of carbon fibers significantly improved its mechanical properties. Meanwhile, CCPSC had better biocompatibility to activate cell adhesion as well as proliferation than poly-methyl methacrylate bone cement based on the cell culture study. Moreover, pronounced biodegradability and improved osteo-conductivity of CCPSC could be observed through the in vivo animal study. Finally, a small amount of osteoid was found at the heterotopic site one month after implantation which indicated potential osteo-inductivity of CCPSC. In conclusion, the novel CCPSC shows promise as a bioactive bone substitute in certain load-bearing circumstances. (paper)

  14. Regulation of sclerostin expression in multiple myeloma by Dkk-1; a potential therapeutic strategy for myeloma bone disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eda, Homare; Santo, Loredana; Wein, Marc N.; Hu, Dorothy Z.; Cirstea, Diana D.; Nemani, Neeharika; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Raines, Sarah E.; Kuhstoss, Stuart Allen; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Raje, Noopur S.

    2016-01-01

    Sclerostin is a potent inhibitor of osteoblastogenesis. Interestingly, newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients have high levels of circulating sclerostin that correlate with disease stage and fractures. However, the source and impact of sclerostin in MM remains to be defined. Our goal was to determine the role of sclerostin in the biology of MM and its bone microenvironment as well as investigate the effect of targeting sclerostin with a neutralizing antibody (scl-Ab) in MM bone disease. Here we confirm increased sclerostin levels in MM compared to precursor disease states like Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) and smoldering MM. Furthermore, we found that a humanized MM xenograft mouse model bearing human MM cells (NOD-SCID.CB17 male mice injected intravenously with 2.5 million of MM1.S-Luc-GFP cells) demonstrated significantly higher concentrations of mouse-derived sclerostin, suggesting a microenvironmental source of sclerostin. Associated with the increased sclerostin levels, activated β-catenin expression levels were lower than normal in MM mouse bone marrow. Importantly, a high affinity grade scl-Ab reversed osteolytic bone disease in this animal model. Because scl-Ab did not demonstrate significant in vitro anti-MM activity, we combined it with the proteasome inhibitor, carfilzomib. Our data demonstrated that this combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor burden and improved bone disease in our in vivo MM mouse model. In agreement with our in vivo data, sclerostin expression was noted in marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts of MM patient BM samples. Moreover, MM cells stimulated sclerostin expression in immature osteoblasts while inhibiting osteoblast differentiation in vitro. This was in part regulated by Dkk-1 secreted by MM cells and is a potential mechanism contributing to the osteoblast dysfunction noted in MM. Our data confirms the role of sclerostin as a potential therapeutic target in MM bone disease, and

  15. Solar Airplanes and Regenerative Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.

    2007-01-01

    A solar electric aircraft with the potential to "fly forever" has captured NASA's interest, and the concept for such an aircraft was pursued under Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Feasibility of this aircraft happens to depend on the successful development of solar power technologies critical to NASA's Exploration Initiatives; hence, there was widespread interest throughout NASA to bring these technologies to a flight demonstration. The most critical is an energy storage system to sustain mission power during night periods. For the solar airplane, whose flight capability is already limited by the diffuse nature of solar flux and subject to latitude and time of year constraints, the feasibility of long endurance flight depends on a storage density figure of merit better than 400-600 watt-hr per kilogram. This figure of merit is beyond the capability of present day storage technologies (other than nuclear) but may be achievable in the hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell (RFC). This potential has led NASA to undertake the practical development of a hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell, initially as solar energy storage for a high altitude UAV science platform but eventually to serve as the primary power source for NASAs lunar base and other planet surface installations. Potentially the highest storage capacity and lowest weight of any non-nuclear device, a flight-weight RFC aboard a solar-electric aircraft that is flown continuously through several successive day-night cycles will provide the most convincing demonstration that this technology's widespread potential has been realized. In 1998 NASA began development of a closed cycle hydrogen oxygen PEM RFC under the Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project and continued its development, originally for a solar electric airplane flight, through FY2005 under the Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) project. Construction of

  16. The application of an enamel matrix protein derivative (Emdogain) in regenerative periodontal therapy: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Schwarz, F.; Becker, J.; Brecx, M.

    2007-01-01

    Regenerative periodontal therapy aims at reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures such as new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Findings from basic research indicate that enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) has a key role in periodontal wound healing.

  17. Regenerative Medicine for the Respiratory System: Distant Future or Tomorrow's Treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, K.M.; Hoogenkamp, H.R.; Daamen, W.F.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine (RM) is a new field of biomedical science that focuses on the regeneration of tissues and organs and the restoration of organ function. Although regeneration of organ systems such as bone, cartilage, and heart has attracted intense scientific research over recent decades, RM

  18. Osteostatin-coated porous titanium can improve early bone regeneration of cortical bone defects in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Stok, Johan; Lozano, Daniel; Chai, Yoke Chin; Amin Yavari, Saber; Bastidas Coral, Angela P.; Verhaar, Jan A N; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Schrooten, Jan; Jahr, Holger; Zadpoor, Amir A.; Esbrit, Pedro; Weinans, Harrie

    2015-01-01

    A promising bone graft substitute is porous titanium. Porous titanium, produced by selective laser melting (SLM), can be made as a completely open porous and load-bearing scaffold that facilitates bone regeneration through osteoconduction. In this study, the bone regenerative capacity of porous

  19. The transient receptor potential channel TRPV6 is dynamically expressed in bone cells but is not crucial for bone mineralization in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, B.C.J.; Weissgerber, P.; Fratzl-Zelman, N.; Olausson, J.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Schreuders-Koedam, M.; Eijken, M.; Roschger, P.; de Vries, T.J.; Chiba, H.; Klaushofer, K.; Flockerzi, V.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Freichel, M.; Leeuwen, J.P.T.M.

    2012-01-01

    Bone is the major store for Ca2+ in the body and plays an important role in Ca2+ homeostasis. During bone formation and resorption Ca2+ must be transported to and from bone by osteoblasts and osteoclasts, respectively. However, little is known about the Ca2+ transport machinery in these bone cells.

  20. The transient receptor potential channel TRPV6 is dynamically expressed in bone cells but is not crucial for bone mineralization in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, B.C. van der; Weissgerber, P.; Fratzl-Zelman, N.; Olausson, J.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Schreuders-Koedam, M.; Eijken, M.; Roschger, P.; Vries, T.J. de; Chiba, H.; Klaushofer, K.; Flockerzi, V.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Freichel, M.; Leeuwen, J.P. van

    2012-01-01

    Bone is the major store for Ca(2+) in the body and plays an important role in Ca(2+) homeostasis. During bone formation and resorption Ca(2+) must be transported to and from bone by osteoblasts and osteoclasts, respectively. However, little is known about the Ca(2+) transport machinery in these bone

  1. Hierarchical Structure of Articular Bone-Cartilage Interface and Its Potential Application for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Weiguo; Qin, Lian; Li, Dichen; Wang, Jin; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-09-01

    The artificial biodegradable osteochondral construct is one of mostly promising lifetime substitute in the joint replacement. And the complex hierarchical structure of natural joint is important in developing the osteochondral construct. However, the architecture features of the interface between cartilage and bone, in particular those at the micro-and nano-structural level, remain poorly understood. This paper investigates these structural data of the cartilage-bone interface by micro computerized tomography (μCT) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result of μCT shows that important bone parameters and the density of articular cartilage are all related to the position in the hierarchical structure. The conjunctions of bone and cartilage were defined by SEM. All of the study results would be useful for the design of osteochondral construct further manufactured by nano-tech. A three-dimensional model with gradient porous structure is constructed in the environment of Pro/ENGINEERING software.

  2. Poly aspartic acid peptide-linked PLGA based nanoscale particles: potential for bone-targeting drug delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Yu, Xiaohua; Carbone, Erica J; Nelson, Clarke; Kan, Ho Man; Lo, Kevin W-H

    2014-11-20

    potential for bone disease therapy in clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of directly autotransplanted tibial bone marrow aspirates on bone regeneration and osseointegration of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Michael; Lohberger, Birgit; Strunk, Dirk; Reich, Karoline M; Acham, Stephan; Jakse, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    Aim of the pilot trial was to evaluate applicability and effects of directly autotransplanted tibial bone marrow (BM) aspirates on the incorporation of porous bovine bone mineral in a sinus lift model and on the osseointegration of dental implants. Six edentulous patients with bilaterally severely resorbed maxillae requiring sinus augmentation and implant treatment were included. During surgery, tibial BM was harvested and added to bone substitute material (Bio-Oss(®) ) at the randomly selected test site. At control sites, augmentation was performed with Bio-Oss(®) alone. The cellular content of each BM aspirate was checked for multipotency and surface antigen expression as quality control. Histomorphometric analysis of biopsies from the augmented sites after 3 and 6 months (during implantation) was used to evaluate effects on bone regeneration. Osseointegration of implants was evaluated with Periotest(®) and radiographic means. Multipotent cellular content in tibial BM aspirates was comparable to that in punctures from the iliac crest. No significant difference in amount of new bone formation and the integration of bone substitute particles was detected histomorphometrically. Periotest(®) values and radiographs showed successful osseointegration of inserted implants at all sites. Directly autotransplanted tibial BM aspirates did not show beneficial regenerative effects in the small study population (N = 6) of the present pilot trial. However, the proximal tibia proved to be a potential donor site for small quantities of BM. Future trials should clarify whether concentration of tibial BM aspirates could effect higher regenerative potency. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Bone and skeletal muscle: Key players in mechanotransduction and potential overlapping mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Craig A; Hornberger, Troy A; Robling, Alexander G

    2015-11-01

    The development and maintenance of skeletal muscle and bone mass is critical for movement, health and issues associated with the quality of life. Skeletal muscle and bone mass are regulated by a variety of factors that include changes in mechanical loading. Moreover, bone mass is, in large part, regulated by muscle-derived mechanical forces and thus by changes in muscle mass/strength. A thorough understanding of the cellular mechanism(s) responsible for mechanotransduction in bone and skeletal muscle is essential for the development of effective exercise and pharmaceutical strategies aimed at increasing, and/or preventing the loss of, mass in these tissues. Thus, in this review we will attempt to summarize the current evidence for the major molecular mechanisms involved in mechanotransduction in skeletal muscle and bone. By examining the differences and similarities in mechanotransduction between these two tissues, it is hoped that this review will stimulate new insights and ideas for future research and promote collaboration between bone and muscle biologists.(1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Natural Products from Chinese Medicines with Potential Benefits to Bone Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Tao Che

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a progressive, systemic bone disorder characterized by loss of bone mass and microstructure, leading to reduced bone strength and increased risk of fracture. It is often associated with reduced quality of life and other medical complications. The disease is common in the aging population, particularly among postmenopausal women and patients who receive long-term steroidal therapy. Given the rapid growth of the aging population, increasing life expectancy, the prevalence of bone loss, and financial burden to the healthcare system and individuals, demand for new therapeutic agents and nutritional supplements for the management and promotion of bone health is pressing. With the advent of global interest in complementary and alternative medicine and natural products, Chinese medicine serves as a viable source to offer benefits for the improvement and maintenance of bone health. This review summarizes the scientific information obtained from recent literatures on the chemical ingredients of Chinese medicinal plants that have been reported to possess osteoprotective and related properties in cell-based and/or animal models. Some of these natural products (or their derivatives may become promising leads for development into dietary supplements or therapeutic drugs.

  6. Nano-hydroxyapatite/β-CD/chitosan nanocomposite for potential applications in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Mohammad; Jolly, Reshma; Khan, Mohd Shoeb; Rauf, Ahmar; Kazmi, Shadab

    2016-12-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel tri-component nanocomposite system incorporating β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) and chitosan (CS), (n-HA/β-CD/CS) at three different temperatures via co-precipitation method. The chemical interactions and surface morphology have been evaluated by TEM, SEM and AFM techniques revealing the agglomerated nanoparticles in CS/n-HA-HA binary system whereas the ternary systems produced needle shaped nanoparticles dispersed homogeneously at low temperature with more porous and rougher surface. The addition of β-CD in CS/n-HA at low temperature decreased the particle size and raised the thermal stability as compared to CS/n-HA. The comparative hemolytic, protein adsorption and platelet adhesion studies confirmed the better hemocompatibility of n-HA/β-CD/CS-(RT,HT,LT) nanocomposites relative to CS/n-HA. The cell viability has been evaluated in vitro using MG-63 cell line which revealed superior non toxicity of n-HA/β-CD/CS-LT nanocomposite in comparison to n-HA/β-CD/CS-(RT,HT) and CS/n-HA nanocomposites. Thus it may be concluded that the orchestrated organic/inorganic n-HA/β-CD/CS-(RT,HT,LT) nanocomposites exhibited relatively higher cell viability of human osteoblast cells, stimulated greater osteogenesis, controlled biodegradation, enhanced antibacterial activity with excellent in-vitro biomineralization and remarkable mechanical parameters as compared to CS/n-HA nanocomposite and thus may provide opportunities for potential use as an alternative biomaterial for Bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The potential of chitosan combined with chicken shank collagen as scaffold on bone defect regeneration process in Rattus norvegicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitria Rahmitasari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the field of dentistry, alveolar bone damage can be caused by periodontal disease, traumatic injury due to tooth extraction, cyst enucleation, and tumor surgery. One of the ways to regenerate the bone defect is using graft scaffold. Thus, combination of chitosan and collagen can stimulate osteogenesis. Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the potential of chitosan combined with chicken shank collagen on bone defect regeneration process. Method: Twelve Rattus norvegicus were prepared as animal models in this research. A bone defect was intentionally created at both of the right and left femoral bones of the models. Next, 24 samples were divided into four groups, namely Group 1 using chitosan – collagen scaffold (50:50, Group 2 using chitosan collagen-scaffold (80:20, Group 3 using chitosan scaffold only, and Control Group using 3% CMC-Na. On 14th day, those animals were sacrificed, and histopathological anatomy examination was conducted to observe osteoclast cells. In addition, immunohistochemistry examination was also performed to observe RANKL expressions. Result: There was a significant difference in RANKL expressions among the groups, except between Group 3 using chitosan scaffold only and control group (p value > 0.05. The highest expression of RANKL was found in Group 1 with chitosan – collagen scaffold (50:50, followed by Group 2 with chitosan-collagen scaffold (80:20. Moreover, there was also a significant difference in osteoclast generation, except between Group 1 using chitosan – collagen scaffold (50:50 and Group 2 using chitosan-collagen scaffold (80:20, p value 0.05. Less osteoclast was found in the groups using chitosan – collagen scaffold (Group 1 and Group 2. Conclusion: Combination of chitosan and chicken shank collagen scaffold can improve regeneration process of bone defect in Rattus novergicus animals through increasing of RANKL expressions, and decreasing of osteoclast.

  8. Osteoinductive potential and bone-bonding ability of ProRoot MTA, MTA Plus and Biodentine in rabbit intramedullary model: Microchemical characterization and histological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, M G; Iezzi, G; Piattelli, A; Prati, C; Scarano, A

    2017-05-01

    To study the in vivo osteoinductive potential, bone-bonding ability (bioactivity) and bone biomineralization of current hydraulic calcium silicate cements used as graft materials and placed in contact with medullary bone. ProRoot MTA, MTA Plus and Biodentine were used to fill surgical bone defects (2-mm diameter through the entire cortical thickness to reach the medullary bone) in the tibia of mature male rabbits. Tibiae were retrieved after 30days and submitted to histological analysis and microchemical characterization using Optical Microscopy (OM) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (ESEM-EDX). Bone neoformation and histomorphometric evaluations, degree of mineralization (by Ca/P, Ca/N and P/N ratios) and the diffusion of material elements were studied. Bone neoformation was observed in response to all materials. No sign of necrosis were found on the walls of the pre-existing cortical bone. No osteoclasts and no formation of fibrous tissue were evident. Sign of angiogenesis were present. EDX (element content, line profile and element mapping) showed the increase in Ca and P and decrease in C, S and N from the mature bone towards the mineralizing interface. Ca/P, Ca/N and P/N ratios showed differences in the degree of mineralization/maturation stage of bone. MTA Plus and ProRoot MTA exhibited close contact with the pre-existing bone and good bone-bonding with neoformed bone juxtaposed on the medullary side of the materials without interposed connective tissue or resorption lacunae or gaps. The materials showed a dense appearance with 100% of residual materials and no colonization by fluids and cells. No migration of Bi or Al material elements to the newly formed bone was found. Biodentine showed newly formed trabecular bone with marrow spaces and sparse traces of residual material (≈9%). The in vivo osteoinductive properties with dynamic biomineralization processes around these calcium silicate materials extruded

  9. REGEN: Ancestral Genome Reconstruction for Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Kuan; Heath, Lenwood S.; Setubal, João C.

    2012-01-01

    Ancestral genome reconstruction can be understood as a phylogenetic study with more details than a traditional phylogenetic tree reconstruction. We present a new computational system called REGEN for ancestral bacterial genome reconstruction at both the gene and replicon levels. REGEN reconstructs gene content, contiguous gene runs, and replicon structure for each ancestral genome. Along each branch of the phylogenetic tree, REGEN infers evolutionary events, including gene creation and deleti...

  10. Regenerative medicine in dental and oral tissues: Dental pulp mesenchymal stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janti Sudiono

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regenerative medicine is a new therapeutic modality using cell, stem cell and tissue engineering technologies. Purpose. To describe the regenerative capacity of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cell. Review. In dentistry, stem cell and tissue engineering technologies develop incredibly and attract great interest, due to the capacity to facilitate innovation in dental material and regeneration of dental and oral tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental pulp, periodontal ligament and dental follicle, can be isolated, cultured and differentiated into various cells, so that can be useful for regeneration of dental, nerves, periodontal and bone tissues. Tissue engineering is a technology in reconstructive biology, which utilizes mechanical, cellular, or biological mediators to facilitate regeneration or reconstruction of a particular tissue. The multipotency, high proliferation rates and accessibility, make dental pulp as an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. Revitalized dental pulp and continued root development is the focus of regenerative endodontic while biological techniques that can restore lost alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and root cementum is the focus of regenerative periodontic. Conclucion. Dentin-derived morphogens such as BMP are known to be involved in the regulation of odontogenesis. The multipotency and angiogenic capacity of DPSCs as the regenerative capacity of human dentin / pulp complex indicated that dental pulp may contain progenitors that are responsible for dentin repair. The human periodontal ligament is a viable alternative source for possible primitive precursors to be used in stem cell therapy.

  11. The regenerative effects of electromagnetic field on spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Christina L; Syed, Ishaq; Smith, Thomas L; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is typically the result of direct mechanical impact to the spine, leading to fracture and/or dislocation of the vertebrae along with damage to the surrounding soft tissues. Injury to the spinal cord results in disruption of axonal transmission of signals. This primary trauma causes secondary injuries that produce immunological responses such as neuroinflammation, which perpetuates neurodegeneration and cytotoxicity within the injured spinal cord. To date there is no FDA-approved pharmacological agent to prevent the development of secondary SCI and induce regenerative processes aimed at healing the spinal cord and restoring neurological function. An alternative method to electrically activate spinal circuits is the application of a noninvasive electromagnetic field (EMF) over intact vertebrae. The EMF method of modulating molecular signaling of inflammatory cells emitted in the extra-low frequency range of <100 Hz, and field strengths of <5 mT, has been reported to decrease inflammatory markers in macrophages, and increase endogenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation and differentiation rates. EMF has been reported to promote osteogenesis by improving the effects of osteogenic media, and increasing the proliferation of osteoblasts, while inhibiting osteoclast formation and increasing bone matrix in vitro. EMF has also been shown to increase chondrogenic markers and collagen and induce neural differentiation, while increasing cell viability by over 50%. As advances are made in stem cell technologies, stabilizing the cell line after differentiation is crucial to SCI repair. Once cell-seeded scaffolds are implanted, EMF may be applied outside the wound for potential continued adjunct treatment during recovery.

  12. Potential pitfalls of steatopygia on bone imaging using Tc99m MDP and role of SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgazzar, H; Elsaid, M; Omar, A; Al-Maskery, IB

    2004-01-01

    Body habbitus influence the quality of bone scintigraphy. Steatopygia (steato: fat, pygia: buttocks) may affect the quality of bone scan since it may lead to diagnostic pitfalls. Objective: The objective of this prospective study is to evaluate the effects of steatopygia on the appearance of the lumbar spine on bone scan and the role of SPECT in overcoming fat attenuation artifact if present. Method: Bone scintigraphy, including whole body bone scan, spot views and SPECT of the lumber spine, using a dual head gamma camera, were performed on thirty adult obese patients (13 males, 17 females) with an average weight of 90 kg. referred to the department for routine bone scan. Each patient was injected intravenously with 0.25 mCi/kg (9.25 Mbq of Tc-99m MDP, and their weight and height of each patient were recorded. Whole body scan was performed using 256 X 1024 matrix size and 8 min/meter speed. SPECT was performed using 128 X 128 matrix size, 20 second-32 projections and elliptical orbit around the lumbar spine. Spot views were acquired using 256X256 matrix size for 1000 Kcounts. Results: Twenty patients (67%) (6 males, 14 females) showed steatopygia with attenuation at the lower lumber vertebrae. Diminished uptake in the lower lumbar spine and edge effect artifacts were noted on planar images mimicking abnormalities. SPECT, especially in the sagittal axis, resolved these artifacts. Conclusion: Steatopygia should be considered in the interpretation of bone scans of obese patients to avoid diagnostic pitfalls. Adding SPECT of the lumber spine to the planar imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy in obese patients by overcoming the steatopygia effect seen on whole body and spot planar images. (authors)

  13. New advances in stem cell research: practical implications for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Jadczyk, Tomasz; Pędziwiatr, Daniel; Wojakowski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is searching for stem cells that can be safely and efficiently employed for regeneration of damaged solid organs (e.g., the heart, brain, or liver). Ideal for this purpose would be pluripotent stem cells, which, according to their definition, have broad potential to differentiate into all types of adult cells. For almost 20 years, there have been unsuccessful attempts to harness controversial embryonic stem cells (ESCs) isolated from embryos. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), generated by genetic modification of adult somatic cells, are a more promising source. However, both iPSC and ESCs are associated with a risk of teratoma formation. At the same time, various types of more‑differentiated adult stem and progenitor cells derived from the bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, mobilized peripheral blood, or fat tissue are being employed in clinical trials to regenerate damaged solid organs. However, for most of these cells, there is a lack of convincing documentation for successful regeneration of the treated organs. Beneficial effects of those cells might be explained by paracrine effects of growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, bioactive lipids, and extracellular microvesicles, which are released from the cells and have trophic, antiapoptotic, and angiopoietic effects. Nevertheless, there is evidence that adult tissues harbor a promising population of very rare dormant stem cells with broad differentiation potential. In this review, we will discuss various potential sources of stem cells for regenerative medicine and the mechanisms that explain some of their beneficial effects as well as highlight the results of the first clinical trials.  

  14. Regenerative Rehabilitation – a New Future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Childers, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    Modern rehabilitation medicine is propelled by newfound knowledge aimed at offering solutions for an increasingly aging population afflicted by chronic debilitating conditions. Considered a core component of future healthcare, the roll-out of regenerative medicine underscores a paradigm shift in patient management targeted at restoring physiologic function and restituting normative impact. Nascent regenerative technologies offer unprecedented prospects in achieving repair of degenerated, diseased or damaged tissues. In this context, principles of regenerative science are increasingly integrated in rehabilitation practices as illustrated in the present Supplement. Encompassing a growing multidisciplinary domain, the emergent era of “regenerative rehabilitation” brings radical innovations at the forefront of healthcare blueprints. PMID:25310603

  15. Reduced cellularity of bone marrow in multiple sclerosis with decreased MSC expansion potential and premature ageing in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Juliana; Sarkar, Pamela; Kemp, Kevin; Virgo, Paul F; Pawade, Joya; Norton, Aimie; Emery, David C; Guttridge, Martin G; Marks, David I; Wilkins, Alastair; Scolding, Neil J; Rice, Claire M

    2017-05-01

    Autologous bone-marrow-derived cells are currently employed in clinical studies of cell-based therapy in multiple sclerosis (MS) although the bone marrow microenvironment and marrow-derived cells isolated from patients with MS have not been extensively characterised. To examine the bone marrow microenvironment and assess the proliferative potential of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in progressive MS. Comparative phenotypic analysis of bone marrow and marrow-derived MSCs isolated from patients with progressive MS and control subjects was undertaken. In MS marrow, there was an interstitial infiltrate of inflammatory cells with lymphoid (predominantly T-cell) nodules although total cellularity was reduced. Controlling for age, MSCs isolated from patients with MS had reduced in vitro expansion potential as determined by population doubling time, colony-forming unit assay, and expression of β-galactosidase. MS MSCs expressed reduced levels of Stro-1 and displayed accelerated shortening of telomere terminal restriction fragments (TRF) in vitro. Our results are consistent with reduced proliferative capacity and ex vivo premature ageing of bone-marrow-derived cells, particularly MSCs, in MS. They have significant implication for MSC-based therapies for MS and suggest that accelerated cellular ageing and senescence may contribute to the pathophysiology of progressive MS. The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: Funding for this study was provided by the Medical Research Council, UK (grant no. MR/K004166/1). The ACTiMuS study is sup-ported by the Silverman Family Foundation, Multiple Sclerosis Trust, Rosetree’s Trust, Catholic Bishops of England and Wales and Friends of Frenchay and SIAMMS-II by the Sir Halley Stewart Trust. C.M.R., P.S., and K.K. received support from the Burden Neurological Institute.

  16. Comparative studies on proliferation, molecular markers and differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells from various tissues (adipose, bone marrow, ear skin, abdominal skin, and lung) and maintenance of multipotency during serial passages in miniature pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ah-Young; Lee, Jienny; Kim, Chan-Lan; Lee, Keum Sil; Lee, So-Hyun; Gu, Na-Yeon; Kim, Jeong-Min; Lee, Byeong Chun; Koo, Ok Jae; Song, Jae-Young; Cha, Sang-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to differentiate into multi-lineage cells, which confers great promise for use in regenerative medicine. In this study, MSCs were isolated from adipose tissue, bone marrow, ear skin, lung, and abdominal skin of miniature pigs (mpMSCs), and the optimal medium (DMEM/F12-Glutamax) was selected for the culturing of mpMSCs. As a result, proliferation of the mpMSCs derived from all tissues was steadily increased when cultured with DMEM/F12-Glutamax during 14 consecutive passages. The cells harbored MSC surface markers (CD34-, CD45-, CD29+, CD44+, CD90+, and CD105+), whose levels of expression differed among the tissue sources and declined over sub-passaging. In addition, the expression of stemness markers (Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog) and differentiation into mesoderm (adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts) were clearly represented at early passage; however, expression of stemness markers decreased, and differentiation potential was lost over sequential sub-passaging, which should be considered in the selection of mpMSC for MSC-based application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. New tools in regenerative medicine: gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Ruiz, Miguel; Regueiro, José R

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy aims to transfer genetic material into cells to provide them with new functions. A gene transfer agent has to be safe, capable of expressing the desired gene for a sustained period of time in a sufficiently large population of cells to produce a biological effect. Identifying a gene transfer tool that meets all of these criteria has proven to be a difficult objective. Viral and nonviral vectors, in vivo, ex vivo and in situ strategies co-exist at present, although ex vivo lenti-or retroviral vectors are presently the most popular.Natural stem cells (from embryonic, hematopoietic, mesenchymal, or adult tissues) or induced progenitor stem (iPS) cells can be modified by gene therapy for use in regenerative medicine. Among them, hematopoietic stem cells have shown clear clinical benefit, but iPS cells hold humongous potential with no ethical concerns.

  18. VSTM-v1, a potential myeloid differentiation antigen that is downregulated in bone marrow cells from myeloid leukemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Min; Li, Ting; Li, Ning; Li, Jinlan; Yao, Qiumei; Han, Wenling; Ruan, Guorui

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte differentiation antigens often represent important markers for the diagnosis, classification, prognosis, and therapeutic targeting of myeloid leukemia. Herein, we report a potential leukocyte differentiation antigen gene VSTM1 (V-set and transmembrane domain-containing 1) that was downregulated in bone marrow cells from leukemia patients and exhibited a higher degree of promoter methylation. The expression level of its predominant encoded product, VSTM1-v1, was positively correlated...

  19. Diffusion of Protease into Meat & Bone Meal for Solubility Improvement and Potential Inactivation of the BSE Prion

    OpenAIRE

    Coll, Brian A.; Garcia, Rafael A.; Marmer, William N.

    2007-01-01

    Background Government-imposed feed bans have created a need for new applications for meat & bone meal (MBM). Many potential new applications require MBM protein to be both soluble and free of infectious prion. Treatment with protease is generally effective in reducing insoluble, thermally-denatured proteins to soluble peptides. It has been reported in the literature that certain proteases, including Versazyme™, are able to degrade infectious prions in a system where the prions are readily acc...

  20. Stromal cell-derived factor-1β potentiates bone morphogenetic protein-2-stimulated osteoinduction of genetically engineered bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberg, Samuel; Fulzele, Sadanand; Yang, Nianlan; Shi, Xingming; Hess, Matthew; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Hamrick, Mark W; Isales, Carlos M; Hill, William D

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal injuries are among the most prevalent clinical problems and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (BMSCs) have successfully been used for the treatment thereof. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1; CXCL12) is a member of the CXC chemokine family with multiple splice variants. The two most abundant variants, SDF-1α and SDF-1β, share identical amino acid sequences, except for four additional amino acids at the C-terminus of SDF-1β, which may mediate surface stabilization via glycosaminoglycans and protect SDF-1β from proteolytic cleavage, rendering it twice as potent as SDF-1α. Increasing evidence suggests that SDF-1 is involved in bone formation through regulation of recruitment, engraftment, proliferation, and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that SDF-1β can potentiate bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-stimulated osteogenic differentiation and chemotaxis of BMSCs in vitro. Utilizing retrovirus-mediated gene transfer to generate novel Tet-Off-SDF-1β BMSCs, we found that conditional SDF-1β expression is tightly regulated by doxycycline in a dose-dependent and temporal fashion, leading to significantly increased SDF-1β mRNA and protein levels. In addition, SDF-1β was found to enhance BMP-2-stimulated mineralization, mRNA and protein expression of key osteogenic markers, and regulate BMP-2 signal transduction via extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2) phosphorylation in genetically engineered BMSCs in vitro. We also showed that SDF-1β promotes the migratory response of CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4)-expressing BMSCs in vitro. Taken together, these data support that SDF-1β can play an important role in BMP-2-stimulated osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs and may exert its biological activity in both an autocrine and paracrine fashion.

  1. Regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, L. C.; Stovall, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    PRESTO computer program was developed to analyze performance of wide range of steam turbine cycles with special attention given to regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles. It can be used to model standard turbine cycles, including such features as process steam extraction, induction and feedwater heating by external sources, peaking, and high back pressure. Expansion line efficiencies, exhaust loss, leakages, mechanical losses, and generator losses are used to calculate cycle heat rate and generator output. Program provides power engineer with flexible aid for design and analysis of steam turbine systems.

  2. Evaluation of the regenerative potential of 25% doxycycline-loaded biodegradable membrane vs biodegradable membrane alone in the treatment of human periodontal infrabony defects: A clinical and radiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaturvedi Rashi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microbial colonization of the barrier membranes used for guided tissue regeneration is inevitable and can lead to delayed healing. Aims: Antimicrobial coating of the membrane with 25% doxycycline paste has been attempted to prevent infection and achieve enhanced regeneration in periodontal infrabony defects. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four patients with 2-walled or 3-walled infrabony defects were selected and randomly divided into two equal groups. Infrabony defects of group A were treated with a biodegradable membrane coated with 25% doxycycline while those of group B were treated with membrane alone. Clinical assessment of probing depth and attachment level and radiographic evaluation of the defect depth was done preoperatively and at 12 and 24 weeks postoperatively. Statistical Analysis: The relative efficacy of the two treatment modalities were evaluated using the paired Student′s t- test and the comparative evaluation between the two groups was done using the independent Student′s t -test. Results: Both the groups exhibited a highly significant reduction in probing depth and gain in clinical attachment level and linear bone fill at the end of 24 weeks. Comparative evaluation between the two study groups revealed a significant reduction in probing depth ( P = 0.016 FNx01 and linear bone fill ( P = 0.02 FNx01 in group A as compared to group B. Mean gain in attachment level was greater for group A than for group B but the difference was statistically nonsignificant ( P = 0.065 NS . Conclusions: The results suggest that doxycycline is beneficial in reducing membrane-associated infection and can potentiate regeneration through host modulation.

  3. MicroRNAs: Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Alveolar Bone Loss in Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadayoshi Kagiya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease caused by bacterial infection of tooth-supporting structures, which results in the destruction of alveolar bone. Osteoclasts play a central role in bone destruction. Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells. Recently, we and other researchers revealed that microRNAs are involved in osteoclast differentiation. MicroRNAs are novel, single-stranded, non-coding, small (20–22 nucleotides RNAs that act in a sequence-specific manner to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level through cleavage or translational repression of their target mRNAs. They regulate various biological activities such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, cancer development, and inflammatory responses. In this review, the roles of microRNAs in osteoclast differentiation and function during alveolar bone destruction in periodontal disease are described.

  4. Potential of magnetic nanofiber scaffolds with mechanical and biological properties applicable for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajendra K; Patel, Kapil D; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanofibrous scaffolds of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) incorporating magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) were produced, and their effects on physico-chemical, mechanical and biological properties were extensively addressed to find efficacy for bone regeneration purpose. MNPs 12 nm in diameter were citrated and evenly distributed in PCL solutions up to 20% and then were electrospun into nonwoven nanofibrous webs. Incorporation of MNPs greatly improved the hydrophilicity of the nanofibers. Tensile mechanical properties of the nanofibers (tensile strength, yield strength, elastic modulus and elongation) were significantly enhanced with the addition of MNPs up to 15%. In particular, the tensile strength increase was as high as ∼25 MPa at 15% MNPs vs. ∼10 MPa in pure PCL. PCL-MNP nanofibers exhibited magnetic behaviors, with a high saturation point and hysteresis loop area, which increased gradually with MNP content. The incorporation of MNPs substantially increased the degradation of the nanofibers, with a weight loss of ∼20% in pure PCL, ∼45% in 10% MNPs and ∼60% in 20% MNPs. Apatite forming ability of the nanofibers tested in vitro in simulated body fluid confirmed the substantial improvement gained by the addition of MNPs. Osteoblastic cells favored the MNPs-incorporated nanofibers with significantly improved initial cell adhesion and subsequent penetration through the nanofibers, compared to pure PCL. Alkaline phosphatase activity and expression of genes associated with bone (collagen I, osteopontin and bone sialoprotein) were significantly up-regulated in cells cultured on PCL-MNP nanofibers than those on pure PCL. PCL-MNP nanofibers subcutaneously implanted in rats exhibited minimal adverse tissue reactions, while inducing substantial neoblood vessel formation, which however, greatly limited in pure PCL. In vivo study in radial segmental defects also signified the bone regeneration ability of the PCL-MNP nanofibrous scaffolds. The magnetic, bone

  5. Is regenerative medicine a new hope for kidney replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Maciej; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Nazarewski, Łukasz; Jundziłł, Arkadiusz; Pietkun, Katarzyna; Tyloch, Dominik; Rasmus, Marta; Warda, Karolina; Habib, Samy L; Drewa, Tomasz

    2014-06-01

    The availability of kidney and other organs from matching donors is not enough for many patients on demand for organ transplant. Unfortunately, this situation is not better despite the many of new interesting projects of promoting family, cross or domino transplants. These inexorable global statistics forced medical researchers to find a new potential therapeutic option that would guarantee safety and efficacy for the treatment of ESRD comparable to kidney transplantation. The aim of our review is to summarize the scientific literature that relating to the modern as well as innovative experimental methods and possibilities of kidney regeneration and, in addition, to find whether the regenerative medicine field will be a new hope for curing the patient with renal disease complications. The most important achievements in the field of regenerative medicine of kidney, which were mentioned and described here, are currently cumulated in 4 areas of interest: stem cell-based therapies, neo-kidneys with specially designed scaffolds or cell-seeded matrices, bioartificial kidneys and innovative nanotechnologically bioengineered solutions. Nowadays, we can add some remarks that the regenerative medicine is still insufficient to completely replace current therapy methods used in patients with chronic kidney disease especially with the end-stage renal disease where in many cases kidney transplantation is the only one chance. But we think that development of regenerative medicine especially in the last 20 years brings us more and more closer to solve many of today's problems at the frontier of nephrology and transplantology.

  6. Regulators of pluripotency and their implications in regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Badawy A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed El-Badawy, Nagwa El-Badri Center of Excellence for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza, Egypt Abstract: The ultimate goal of regenerative medicine is to replace damaged tissues with new functioning ones. This can potentially be accomplished by stem cell transplantation. While stem cell transplantation for blood diseases has been increasingly successful, widespread application of stem cell therapy in the clinic has shown limited results. Despite successful efforts to refine existing methodologies and to develop better ones for reprogramming, clinical application of stem cell therapy suffers from issues related to the safety of the transplanted cells, as well as the low efficiency of reprogramming technology. Better understanding of the underlying mechanism(s involved in pluripotency should accelerate the clinical application of stem cell transplantation for regenerative purposes. This review outlines the main decision-making factors involved in pluripotency, focusing on the role of microRNAs, epigenetic modification, signaling pathways, and toll-like receptors. Of special interest is the role of toll-like receptors in pluripotency, where emerging data indicate that the innate immune system plays a vital role in reprogramming. Based on these data, we propose that nongenetic mechanisms for reprogramming provide a novel and perhaps an essential strategy to accelerate application of regenerative medicine in the clinic. Keywords: dedifferentiation, transdifferentiation, reprogramming, pluripotency, microRNAs, epigenetic modifications, signaling pathways, toll-like receptors

  7. Regenerative Needs Following Alveolar Ridge Preservation Procedures in Compromised and Noncompromised Extraction Sockets: A Cone Beam Computed Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutouzis, Theofilos; Lipton, David

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the necessity for additional regenerative procedures following healing of compromised and noncompromised extraction sockets with alveolar ridge preservation procedures through the use of virtual implant imaging software. The cohort was comprised of 87 consecutive patients subjected to a single maxillary tooth extraction with an alveolar ridge preservation procedure for subsequent implant placement. Patients were divided into two main groups based on the integrity of the buccal bone plate following teeth extraction. Patients in the compromised socket (CS) group (n = 52) had partial or complete buccal bone plate loss, and patients in the noncompromised socket (NCS) group (n = 35) exhibited no bone loss of their socket walls following tooth extraction. Following 4 to 6 months of healing, all patients had a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) study. Root-formed implants were placed virtually in an ideal prosthetic position. The number of implants per group and location (anterior, premolar, molar) exhibiting exposed buccal implant surface was calculated. In the CS group, 5 out of 19 anterior implants (26.3%), 4 out of 14 premolar implants (28.5%), and 7 out of 19 molar implants (36.8%) had exposed buccal surfaces. In the NCS group, 4 out of 9 anterior implants (44.4%), 2 out of 9 premolar implants (22.2%), and 4 out of 17 molar implants (23.5%) had exposed buccal surfaces. There were no statistically significant differences for intragroup and intergroup comparisons (χ² test, P > .05). This study failed to find statistically significant differences in the frequency of implants with exposed buccal surfaces placed virtually, following treatment of compromised and noncompromised sockets. A high proportion (22% to 44%) of sites had implants that potentially needed additional regenerative procedures.

  8. Sequential Treatment with SDF-1 and BMP-2 Potentiates Bone Formation in Calvarial Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hee-Don; Lee, Jung-Tae; Koh, Jeong-Tae; Jung, Hong-Moon; Lee, Heon-Jin; Kwon, Tae-Geon

    2015-07-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) protein and its receptor, CXCR-4, play an important role in tissue repair and regeneration in various organs, including the bone. SDF-1 is indispensable for bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-induced osteogenic differentiation. However, SDF-1 is not needed after the osteogenic induction has been activated. Since the precise condition for the additive effects of combined DF-1 and BMP-2 in bone healing had not been fully investigated, we aimed to determine the optimal conditions for SDF-1- and BMP-2-mediated bone regeneration. We examined the in vitro osteoblastic differentiation and cell migration after sequential treatments with SDF-1 and BMP-2. Based on the in vitro additive effects of SDF-1 and BMP-2, the critical size defects of mice calvaria were treated with these cytokines in various sequences. Phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-, SDF-1-, or BMP-2-soaked collagen scaffolds were implanted into the calvarial defects (n=36). Periodic percutaneous injections of PBS or the cytokine SDF-1 and BMP-2 into the implanted scaffolds were performed on days 3 and 6, postoperatively. Six experimental groups were used according to the types and sequences of the cytokine treatments. After 28 days, the mice were euthanized and bone formation was evaluated with microcomputed tomography and histology. The molecular mechanism of the additive effect of SDF-1 and BMP-2 was evaluated by analyzing intracellular signal transduction through Smad and Erk phosphorylation. The in vitro experiments revealed that, among all the treatments, the treatment with BMP-2 after SDF-1 showed the strongest osteoblastic differentiation and enhanced cell migration. Similarly, in the animal model, the treatment with SDF-1 followed by BMP-2 treatment showed the highest degree of new bone regeneration than any other groups, including the one with continuous BMP-2 treatment. This new bone formation can be partially explained by the activation of Smad and Erk pathways

  9. Insertion Torques of Self-Drilling Mini-Implants in Simulated Mandibular Bone: Assessment of Potential for Implant Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein, Yara K; Smith, Angie; Dunning, Cynthia E; Tassi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of orthodontic mini-implants during insertion is a limiting factor for their clinical success. The purpose of this study was to determine the fracture potential of commonly used self-drilling orthodontic mini-implants when placed into simulated thick, dense mandibular bone. Six mini-implant systems were assessed for the potential for fracture (Aarhus, Medicon; Dual-Top, Jeil Medical; OrthoEasy, Forestadent; tomas-pin, Dentaurum; Unitek, 3M; and VectorTAS, Ormco). First, mini-implants were inserted manually, without predrilling, into bone substitutes (Sawbones) with a 3-mm-thick, dense (1.64 g/cm(3)) cortical layer. A custom-made insertion device was used for placement of mini-implants. A sixaxis force/torque transducer was secured at the base of the bone blocks to measure the maximum torque experienced during insertion. Measured insertion torques were compared with previously reported fracture torques, yielding a torque ratio (insertion torque as a percentage of fracture torque), which was used as an indicator of the potential for mini-implant fracture. Mini-implants that experienced torque ratios ≥ 75% upon insertion underwent further testing, following the manufacturer's recommendations for predrilling in thick, dense bone conditions. Significant differences in torque ratios were found among all mini-implants, except between OrthoEasy and Dual-Top, and OrthoEasy and VectorTAS. Overall, Aarhus had the highest torque ratio (91% ± 3%), with Unitek showing the lowest ratio (37% ± 3%). Aarhus and tomas-pin mini-implants displayed torque ratios ≥ 75% and experienced fracture upon insertion. When the manufacturer's specific predrilling recommendations were followed, no changes in torque ratio were found for Aarhus and tomas-pin. However, while Aarhus continued to fracture upon insertion, all tomas-pin mini-implants were inserted fully without fracture following predrilling. These findings support the safe use of Unitek, VectorTAS, Dual-Top, and Ortho

  10. Neural differentiation potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: misleading marker gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montzka Katrin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to pluripotent embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells have been considered to be multipotent, being somewhat more restricted in their differentiation capacity and only giving rise to cell types related to their tissue of origin. Several studies, however, have reported that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are capable of transdifferentiating to neural cell types, effectively crossing normal lineage restriction boundaries. Such reports have been based on the detection of neural-related proteins by the differentiated MSCs. In order to assess the potential of human adult MSCs to undergo true differentiation to a neural lineage and to determine the degree of homogeneity between donor samples, we have used RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry to investigate the basal expression of a range of neural related mRNAs and proteins in populations of non-differentiated MSCs obtained from 4 donors. Results The expression analysis revealed that several of the commonly used marker genes from other studies like nestin, Enolase2 and microtubule associated protein 1b (MAP1b are already expressed by undifferentiated human MSCs. Furthermore, mRNA for some of the neural-related transcription factors, e.g. Engrailed-1 and Nurr1 were also strongly expressed. However, several other neural-related mRNAs (e.g. DRD2, enolase2, NFL and MBP could be identified, but not in all donor samples. Similarly, synaptic vesicle-related mRNA, STX1A could only be detected in 2 of the 4 undifferentiated donor hMSC samples. More significantly, each donor sample revealed a unique expression pattern, demonstrating a significant variation of marker expression. Conclusion The present study highlights the existence of an inter-donor variability of expression of neural-related markers in human MSC samples that has not previously been described. This donor-related heterogeneity might influence the reproducibility of transdifferentiation protocols as

  11. Advanced regenerative heat recovery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, A.; Jasti, J. K.

    1982-02-01

    A regenerative heat recovery system was designed and fabricated to deliver 1500 scfm preheated air to a maximum temperature of 1600 F. Since this system is operating at 2000 F, the internal parts were designed to be fabricated with ceramic materials. This system is also designed to be adaptable to an internal metallic structure to operate in the range of 1100 to 1500 F. A test facility was designed and fabricated to test this system. The test facility is equipped to impose a pressure differential of up to 27 inches of water column in between preheated air and flue gas lines for checking possible leakage through the seals. The preliminary tests conducted on the advanced regenerative heat recovery system indicate the thermal effectiveness in the range of 60% to 70%. Bench scale studies were conducted on various ceramic and gasket materials to identify the proper material to be used in high temperature applications. A market survey was conducted to identify the application areas for this heat recovery system. A cost/benefit analysis showed a payback period of less than one and a half years.

  12. Gingiva as a new and the most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells from the oral cavity to be used in regenerative therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Górski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs, many researchers have focused their attention on new sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Consequently, MSCs that display self-renewal capacity, multidifferentiation potential and immunomodulatory properties have been isolated from human oral tissues, including tooth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Oral MSCs involve dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs, dental follicle stem cells (DFCs, stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP and gingival stem cells (GMSCs. Current research on oral stem cells is expanding at an unprecedented rate. That being the case, a plethora of in vitro differentiation assays, immunodeficient animal transplantations and preclinical trials have demonstrated that these cells exhibit strong potential for both regenerative dentistry and medicine. Oral MSCs have proved their capability to repair cornea, dental pulp, periodontal, bone, cartilage, tendon, neural, muscle and endothelial tissues without neoplasm formation as well as to treat inflammatory diseases and immune disorders. This article describes the current understanding of oral MSCs and their prospective applications in cell-based therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Special attention is placed on GMSCs as they are easily accessible and may be obtained in a convenient and minimally invasive way.

  13. Gingiva as a new and the most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells from the oral cavity to be used in regenerative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Bartłomiej

    2016-08-17

    Since the discovery of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), many researchers have focused their attention on new sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Consequently, MSCs that display self-renewal capacity, multidifferentiation potential and immunomodulatory properties have been isolated from human oral tissues, including tooth, periodontal ligament, and gingiva. Oral MSCs involve dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle stem cells (DFCs), stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) and gingival stem cells (GMSCs). Current research on oral stem cells is expanding at an unprecedented rate. That being the case, a plethora of in vitro differentiation assays, immunodeficient animal transplantations and preclinical trials have demonstrated that these cells exhibit strong potential for both regenerative dentistry and medicine. Oral MSCs have proved their capability to repair cornea, dental pulp, periodontal, bone, cartilage, tendon, neural, muscle and endothelial tissues without neoplasm formation as well as to treat inflammatory diseases and immune disorders. This article describes the current understanding of oral MSCs and their prospective applications in cell-based therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Special attention is placed on GMSCs as they are easily accessible and may be obtained in a convenient and minimally invasive way.

  14. Silver nanoparticle based antibacterial methacrylate hydrogels potential for bone graft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, M. Isabel; Perni, Stefano; Tommasi, Giacomo; Morris, Nathanael Glyn; Hawkins, Karl; López-Cabarcos, Enrique; Prokopovich, Polina

    2015-01-01

    Infections are frequent and very undesired occurrences after orthopedic procedures; furthermore, the growing concern caused by the rise in antibiotic resistance is progressively dwindling the efficacy of such drugs. Artificial bone graft materials could solve some of the problems associated with the gold standard use of natural bone graft such as limited bone material, pain at the donor site and rejections if donor tissue is used. We have previously described new acrylate base nanocomposite hydrogels as bone graft materials. In the present paper, we describe the integration of silver nanoparticles in the polymeric mineralized biomaterial to provide non-antibiotic antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Two different crosslinking degrees were tested and the silver nanoparticles were integrated into the composite matrix by means of three different methods: entrapment in the polymeric hydrogel before the mineralization; diffusion during the process of calcium phosphate crystallization and adsorption post-mineralization. The latter being generally the most effective method of encapsulation; however, the adsorption of silver nanoparticles inside the pores of the biomaterial led to a decreasing antibacterial activity for adsorption time longer than 2 days. PMID:25746278

  15. Selection of phosphorus solubilizing bacteria with biocontrol potential for growth in phosphorus rich animal bone charcoal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, J.; Nijhuis, E.H.; Sommeus, E.

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria with the ability to solubilize phosphorus (P) and to improve plant health were selected and tested for growth and survival in P-rich animal bone charcoal (ABC). ABC is suggested to be suitable as a carrier for biocontrol agents, offering them a protected niche as well as delivering

  16. Bone ingrowth potential of electron beam and selective laser melting produced trabecular-like implant surfaces with and without a biomimetic coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, J.E.; Hannink, G.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; Buma, P.

    2013-01-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of trabecular-like implant surfaces produced by either selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM), with or without a biomimetic calciumphosphate coating, was examined in goats. For histological analysis and histomorphometry of bone ingrowth depth and

  17. [The potential of cone beam computed tomography of the temporal bones in the patients presenting with otosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpishchenko, S A; Zubareva, A A; Filimonov, V N; Shavgulidze, M A; Azovtseva, E A

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the potential of cone beam computed tomography of the temporal bones in the patients presenting with otosclerosis for the detection of surgically significant specific structural features of the labyrinth wall of the tympanic cavity. More than 400 tomograms of the temporal bones were obtained with the use of a cone beam tomographwere available for the investigation during the period from 2012 till 2016. The study was carried out in several steps, viz. the search for the optimal (for the given instrument) position of the patient, the experimental stage, the retrospective analysis of the tomograms and the comparison of the temporal bones of different types (pneumatic, mixed, and sclerotic) in individual patients, the comparison of the results of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with the intraoperative observations, and the modification of the algorithm for the analysis of temporal bone cone beam tomograms. The study included a total of 16 patients (15 women at the age from 32 to 56 years and one managed 58 years) presenting with the clinical diagnosis of otosclerosis. The results of the study were used to elaborate the algorithm for the analysis of cone beam tomograms of the temporal bones to be performed inthe stage by stage manner including the qualitative analysis of tomograms, evaluation of their quantitative parameters and additional characteristics to be taken into consideration when planning the surgical interventions on the labyrinth wall and the tympanic cavity as a preparation for the stapedoplastic treatment. The results of CBCT obtained in the present study were compared with the surgical observations. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the method were estimated to be 100% and 83% respectively. It is concluded that cone beam computed tomography can be employed as a component of the diagnostic algorithm prior to the planning of surgical interventions onthe medial wall of the tympanic cavity

  18. Path Analysis Identifies Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κB Ligand, Osteoprotegerin, and Sclerostin as Potential Mediators of the Tophus-bone Erosion Relationship in Gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhana, Ashika; Aati, Opetaia; Gamble, Gregory D; Callon, Karen E; Doyle, Anthony J; Roger, Mark; McQueen, Fiona M; Horne, Anne; Reid, Ian R; Cornish, Jillian; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2016-02-01

    To determine the relationship between tophus, erosion and bone remodeling factors in gout. Computed tomography bone erosion and circulating bone factors were measured in adults with tophaceous gout. Multiple regression modeling and path analysis were used to determine predictors of erosion. Tophus number, Māori or Pacific ethnicity, creatinine, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and sclerostin were independently associated with erosion. Path analysis showed a direct effect of tophus number on erosion, partially mediated through OPG, RANKL, and sclerostin. Tophus number is strongly associated with bone erosion in gout. Circulating RANKL, OPG, and sclerostin are potential mediators of tophus-related erosion.

  19. Emdogain in regenerative periodontal therapy. A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculean, Anton; Windisch, Péter; Döri, Ferenc; Keglevich, Tibor; Molnár, Balint; Gera, István

    2007-10-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures (i.e. the new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone). Results from basic research have pointed to the important role of the enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) in the periodontal wound healing. Histological results from animal and human studies have shown that treatment with EMD promotes periodontal regeneration. Moreover, clinical studies have indicated that treatment with EMD positively influences periodontal wound healing in humans. The goal of the current overview is to present, based on the existing evidence, the clinical indications for regenerative therapy with EMD. Surgical periodontal treatment of deep intrabony defects with EMD promotes periodontal regeneration. The application of EMD in the context of non-surgical periodontal therapy has failed to result in periodontal regeneration. Surgical periodontal therapy of deep intrabony defects with EMD may lead to significantly higher improvements of the clinical parameters than open flap debridement alone. The results obtained following treatment with EMD are comparable to those following treatment with GTR and can be maintained over a longer period. Treatment of intrabony defects with a combination of EMD + GTR does not seem to additionally improve the results compared to treatment with EMD alone or GTR alone. The combination of EMD and some types of bone grafts/bone substitutes may result in certain improvements in the soft and hard tissue parameters compared to treatment with EMD alone. Treatment of recession-type defects with coronally repositioned flaps and EMD may promote formation of cementum, periodontal ligament and bone, and may significantly increase the width of the keratinized tissue. Application of EMD seems to provide better long-term results than coronally repositioned flaps alone. Application of EMD may enhance periodontal regeneration in mandibular Class II

  20. Characterisation of a new bioadhesive system based on polysaccharides with the potential to be used as bone glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Bettina; Volkmer, Elias; Kokott, Andreas; Augat, Peter; Ohnmacht, Michael; Sedlmayr, Nicole; Schieker, Matthias; Claes, Lutz; Mutschler, Wolf; Ziegler, Günter

    2009-10-01

    Although gluing bone is in theory a very attractive alternative to classical fracture treatment, this method is not yet clinically established due to the lack of an adhesive which would meet all the necessary requirements. We therefore developed a novel two-component bioadhesive system with the potential to be used as a bone adhesive based on biocompatible and degradable biopolymers (chitosan, oxidised dextran or starch). After mixing in water, the two components covalently cross-link by forming a Schiff's base. By the same mechanism, the glue binds to any other exposed amino group such as for example those exposed in fractured bone, even in the presence of water. Modified chitosan was synthesised from commercially available chitosan by deacetylation and was then reduced in molecular weight by heating in acid. The amount of free amino groups was analysed by IR. The molecular weight was determined by viscosimetry. Starch or dextran were oxidised with periodic acid to generate aldehyde groups, which were quantified by titration. l-Dopa was conjugated to oxidised dextran or starch in analogy to the gluing mechanism of mussels. Biomechanical studies revealed that the new glue is superior to fibrin glue, but has less adhesive strength than cyanoacrylates. In vitro cell testing demonstrated excellent biocompatibility, rendering this glue a potential candidate for clinical use.

  1. Chondrogenic potential of bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells on a novel, auricular-shaped, nanocomposite scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavi H Patel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of the human auricle remains a challenge to plastic surgeons, and current approaches are not ideal. Tissue engineering provides a promising alternative. This study aims to evaluate the chondrogenic potential of bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells on a novel, auricular-shaped polymer. The proposed polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-modified poly(hexanolactone/carbonateurethane/urea nanocomposite polymer has already been transplanted in patients as the world’s first synthetic trachea, tear duct and vascular bypass graft. The nanocomposite scaffold was fabricated via a coagulation/salt-leaching method and shaped into an auricle. Adult bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells were isolated, cultured and seeded onto the scaffold. On day 21, samples were sent for scanning electron microscopy, histology and immunofluorescence to assess for neocartilage formation. Cell viability assay confirmed cytocompatability and normal patterns of cellular growth at 7, 14 and 21 days after culture. This study demonstrates the potential of a novel polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-modified poly(hexanolactone/carbonateurethane/urea scaffold for culturing bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells in chondrogenic medium to produce an auricular-shaped construct. This is supported by scanning electron microscopy, histological and immunofluorescence analysis revealing markers of chondrogenesis including collagen type II, SOX-9, glycosaminoglycan and elastin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of stem cell application on an auricular-shaped scaffold for tissue engineering purposes. Although many obstacles remain in producing a functional auricle, this is a promising step forward.

  2. Revisiting bone targeting potential of novel hydroxyapatite based surface modified PLGA nanoparticles of risedronate: Pharmacokinetic and biochemical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Purnima; Ahmad, Iqbal; Thomas, Shindu C; Pandey, Shweta; Vohora, Divya; Gupta, Sarika; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Talegaonkar, Sushama

    2016-06-15

    Hydroxyapatite based biodegradable mPEG-PLGA nanoparticles of risedronate (mPEG-PLGA-RIS-HA) were prepared by water miscible dialysis method for synergistic treatment of osteoporosis. The bone targeting potential of prepared nanoparticles was evaluated by performing the cell viability study and protein estimation in pre-osteoblast cell line (MC3T3E1). Biochemical and in-vivo pharmacokinetic studies on osteoporotic rat model treated with different formulations were performed. Under the biochemical study ALP, TRAP, HxP and Calcium levels were determined. Osteoporotic model treated with prepared nanoparticles indicated significant effect on bone. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed 6-fold and 4-fold increase in the relative bioavailability after intravenous and oral administration of nanoparticles respectively as compared to marketed formulation confirming better effective drug transport. Biochemical investigations also showed a significant change in biomarker level which ultimately lead to bone formation/resorption. A stability analysis has also been carried out according to ICH guidelines (Q1AR2) and shelf life was found to be 1year and 4 months for the prepared formulation. Thus the results of present studies indicated that mPEG-PLGA-RIS-HA NPs has a great potential for sustained delivery of RIS for the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis and to minimize the adverse effects of RIS typically induced by its oral administration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Materials science tools for regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Wade Nicholas

    Regenerative therapies originating from recent technological advances in biology could revolutionize medicine in the coming years. In particular, the advent of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), with their ability to become any cell in the adult body, has opened the door to an entirely new way of treating disease. However, currently these medical breakthroughs remain only a promise. To make them a reality, new tools must be developed to surmount the new technical hurdles that have arisen from dramatic departure from convention that this field represents. The collected work presented in this dissertation covers several projects that seek to apply the skills and knowledge of materials science to this tool synthesizing effort. The work is divided into three chapters. The first deals with our work to apply Raman spectroscopy, a tool widely used for materials characterization, to degeneration in cartilage. We have shown that Raman can effectively distinguish the matrix material of healthy and diseased tissue. The second area of work covered is the development of a new confocal image analysis for studying hPSC colonies that are chemical confined to uniform growth regions. This tool has important application in understanding the heterogeneity that may slow the development of hPSC -based treatment, as well as the use of such confinement in the eventually large-scale manufacture of hPSCs for therapeutic use. Third, the use of structural templating in tissue engineering scaffolds is detailed. We have utilized templating to tailor scaffold structures for engineering of constructs mimicking two tissues: cartilage and lung. The work described here represents several important early steps towards large goals in regenerative medicine. These tools show a great deal of potential for accelerating progress in this field that seems on the cusp of helping a great many people with otherwise incurable disease.

  4. Changes in Regenerative Capacity through Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Maximina H.

    2015-01-01

    Most organisms experience changes in regenerative abilities through their lifespan. During aging, numerous tissues exhibit a progressive decline in homeostasis and regeneration that results in tissue degeneration, malfunction and pathology. The mechanisms responsible for this decay are both cell intrinsic, such as cellular senescence, as well as cell-extrinsic, such as changes in the regenerative environment. Understanding how these mechanisms impact on regenerative processes is essential to devise therapeutic approaches to improve tissue regeneration and extend healthspan. This review offers an overview of how regenerative abilities change through lifespan in various organisms, the factors that underlie such changes and the avenues for therapeutic intervention. It focuses on established models of mammalian regeneration as well as on models in which regenerative abilities do not decline with age, as these can deliver valuable insights for our understanding of the interplay between regeneration and aging. PMID:26512653

  5. REGEN: Ancestral Genome Reconstruction for Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João C. Setubal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ancestral genome reconstruction can be understood as a phylogenetic study with more details than a traditional phylogenetic tree reconstruction. We present a new computational system called REGEN for ancestral bacterial genome reconstruction at both the gene and replicon levels. REGEN reconstructs gene content, contiguous gene runs, and replicon structure for each ancestral genome. Along each branch of the phylogenetic tree, REGEN infers evolutionary events, including gene creation and deletion and replicon fission and fusion. The reconstruction can be performed by either a maximum parsimony or a maximum likelihood method. Gene content reconstruction is based on the concept of neighboring gene pairs. REGEN was designed to be used with any set of genomes that are sufficiently related, which will usually be the case for bacteria within the same taxonomic order. We evaluated REGEN using simulated genomes and genomes in the Rhizobiales order.

  6. REGEN: Ancestral Genome Reconstruction for Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuan; Heath, Lenwood S; Setubal, João C

    2012-07-18

    Ancestral genome reconstruction can be understood as a phylogenetic study with more details than a traditional phylogenetic tree reconstruction. We present a new computational system called REGEN for ancestral bacterial genome reconstruction at both the gene and replicon levels. REGEN reconstructs gene content, contiguous gene runs, and replicon structure for each ancestral genome. Along each branch of the phylogenetic tree, REGEN infers evolutionary events, including gene creation and deletion and replicon fission and fusion. The reconstruction can be performed by either a maximum parsimony or a maximum likelihood method. Gene content reconstruction is based on the concept of neighboring gene pairs. REGEN was designed to be used with any set of genomes that are sufficiently related, which will usually be the case for bacteria within the same taxonomic order. We evaluated REGEN using simulated genomes and genomes in the Rhizobiales order.

  7. The Protein Content of Extracellular Vesicles Derived from Expanded Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived CD133+ and Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Partially Explains Why both Sources are Advantageous for Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulski, Addeli B B; Capriglione, Luiz G; Batista, Michel; Marcon, Bruna H; Senegaglia, Alexandra C; Stimamiglio, Marco A; Correa, Alejandro

    2017-04-01

    Adult stem cells have beneficial effects when exposed to damaged tissue due, at least in part, to their paracrine activity, which includes soluble factors and extracellular vesicles (EVs). Given the multiplicity of signals carried by these vesicles through the horizontal transfer of functional molecules, human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) and CD133 + cell-derived EVs have been tested in various disease models and shown to recover damaged tissues. In this study, we profiled the protein content of EVs derived from expanded human CD133 + cells and bone marrow-derived hMSCs with the intention of better understanding the functions performed by these vesicles/cells and delineating the most appropriate use of each EV in future therapeutic procedures. Using LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified 623 proteins for expanded CD133 + -EVs and 797 proteins for hMSCs-EVs. Although the EVs from both origins were qualitatively similar, when protein abundance was considered, hMSCs-EVs and CD133 + -EVs were different. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis in CD133 + -EVs revealed proteins involved in a variety of angiogenesis-related functions as well proteins related to the cytoskeleton and highly implicated in cell motility and cellular activation. In contrast, when overrepresented proteins in hMSCs-EVs were analyzed, a GO cluster of immune response-related genes involved with immune response-regulating factors acting on phagocytosis and innate immunity was identified. Together our data demonstrate that from the point of view of protein content, expanded CD133 + -EVs and hMSCs-EVs are in part similar but also sufficiently different to reflect the main beneficial paracrine effects widely reported in pre-clinical studies using expanded CD133 + cells and/or hBM-MSCs.

  8. Telomerase expression extends the proliferative life-span and maintains the osteogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Janne Lytoft; Rosada, Cecilia; Serakinci, Nedime

    2002-01-01

    . The transduced cells have now undergone more than 260 population doublings (PD) and continue to proliferate, whereas control cells underwent senescence-associated proliferation arrest after 26 PD. The cells maintained production of osteoblastic markers and differentiation potential during continuous subculturing......, did not form tumors, and had a normal karyotype. When implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient mice, the transduced cells formed more bone than did normal cells. These results suggest that ectopic expression of telomerase in hMSCs prevents senescence-associated impairment of osteoblast functions.......Human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) were stably transduced by a retroviral vector containing the gene for the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT). Transduced cells (hMSC-TERTs) had telomerase activity, and the mean telomere length was increased as compared with that of control cells...

  9. Potential of Osteoblastic Cells Derived from Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue Associated with a Polymer/Ceramic Composite to Repair Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Gileade P; Lopes, Helena B; Almeida, Adriana L G; Abuna, Rodrigo P F; Gimenes, Rossano; Souza, Lucas E B; Covas, Dimas T; Beloti, Marcio M; Rosa, Adalberto L

    2017-09-01

    One of the tissue engineering strategies to promote bone regeneration is the association of cells and biomaterials. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate if cell source, either from bone marrow or adipose tissue, affects bone repair induced by osteoblastic cells associated with a membrane of poly(vinylidene-trifluoroethylene)/barium titanate (PVDF-TrFE/BT). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were isolated from rat bone marrow and adipose tissue and characterized by detection of several surface markers. Also, both cell populations were cultured under osteogenic conditions and it was observed that MSC from bone marrow were more osteogenic than MSC from adipose tissue. The bone repair was evaluated in rat calvarial defects implanted with PVDF-TrFE/BT membrane and locally injected with (1) osteoblastic cells differentiated from MSC from bone marrow, (2) osteoblastic cells differentiated from MSC from adipose tissue or (3) phosphate-buffered saline. Luciferase-expressing osteoblastic cells derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue were detected in bone defects after cell injection during 25 days without difference in luciferin signal between cells from both sources. Corroborating the in vitro findings, osteoblastic cells from bone marrow combined with the PVDF-TrFE/BT membrane increased the bone formation, whereas osteoblastic cells from adipose tissue did not enhance the bone repair induced by the membrane itself. Based on these findings, it is possible to conclude that, by combining a membrane with cells in this rat model, cell source matters and that bone marrow could be a more suitable source of cells for therapies to engineer bone.

  10. Regenerative Treatment of Periodontal Intrabony Defects Using Autologous Dental Pulp Stem Cells: A 1-Year Follow-Up Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimetti, Mario; Ferrarotti, Francesco; Gamba, Mara Noemi; Giraudi, Marta; Romano, Federica

    The present case series aimed to explore the potential clinical benefits of the application of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in the regenerative treatment of deep intrabony defects. A total of 11 isolated intrabony defects in 11 chronic periodontitis patients were accessed with a minimally invasive flap and filled with DPSCs loaded on a collagen sponge. A tooth requiring extraction for impaction or malpositioning was used as an autologous source for DPSCs. An average clinical attachment level gain of 4.7 ± 1.5 mm associated with a residual mean probing depth (PD) of 3.2 ± 0.9 mm and remarkable stability of the gingival margin was observed at 1 year. Complete pocket closure (PD < 3 mm) was achieved in 63.6% of the experimental sites. Clinical outcomes were supported by the radiographic analysis showing a bone fill of 3.6 ± 1.9 mm.

  11. Human histologic evaluation of anorganic bovine bone mineral combined with recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor BB in maxillary sinus augmentation: case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevins, Myron; Garber, David; Hanratty, James J; McAllister, Bradley S; Nevins, Marc L; Salama, Maurice; Schupbach, Peter; Wallace, Steven; Bernstein, Simon M; Kim, David M

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this proof-of-principle study was to examine the potential for improved bone regenerative outcomes in maxillary sinus augmentation procedures when recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor BB (0.3 mg/mL) is combined with particulate anorganic bovine bone mineral. The surgical outcomes in all treated sites were uneventful at 6 to 8 months, with sufficient regenerated bone present to allow successful placement of maxillary posterior implants. Large areas of dense, well-formed lamellar bone were seen throughout the intact core specimens in more than half of the grafted sites. Abundant numbers of osteoblasts were noted in concert with significant osteoid in all sites, indicating ongoing osteogenesis. A number of cores demonstrated efficient replacement of the normally slowly resorbing anorganic bovine bone mineral matrix particles with newly formed bone when the matrix was saturated with recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor BB.

  12. Oxygen isotope composition of the bone phosphate of Australian kangaroos: Potential as a palaeoenvironmental recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayliffe, Linda K.; Chivas, Allan R.

    1990-09-01

    δ 18O determinations of bone phosphate (δ 18O p) have been performed on a suite of modern kangaroos and wallabies (known collectively as Macropods) that come from a wide variety of climatic zones within Australia. Macropod δ 18O p values range from 16 to over 30%. (V-SMOW) and are found to correlate with environmental relative humidities. As Macropods are herbivorous mammals with low drinking water requirements that consume large amounts of plant leaf water, it is likely that the δ 18O p signature of Macropods is reflecting leaf water fractionation processes that are controlled by relative humidity. These results indicate that δ 18O p from fossil bones of Macropods and similar drought-tolerant herbivorous mammals may yield palaeohumidity estimates.

  13. Potential association of posttraumatic stress disorder and decreased bone mineral density in repatriated prisoners of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Robert E; Hoyt, Robert E; Moore, Jeffrey L; Linnville, Steven; Segovia, Francine; Ambrose, Michael R

    2011-03-01

    We conducted a retrospective evaluation of bone mineral density data collected during routine medical follow-up evaluations of 241 Vietnam-era male repatriated prisoners of war, with and without the lifetime diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and 79 subjects in a comparison group. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans evaluated total hip and lumbar spine T-scores. A multivariate analysis of covariance was performed on the data using age, body mass index, ethnicity, and reported alcohol consumption as covariates. There was a significant effect of group on total hip, but not lumbar spine, T-scores. Pairwise comparisons revealed statistically lower total hip T-scores in repatriates with a lifetime history of PTSD in comparison to both the comparison group and repatriates without a lifetime history of PTSD. In this study of elderly repatriated prisoners of war, we noted an association between a lifelong history of PTSD and decreased bone mineral density at the hip.

  14. ALVEOLAR BONE REGENERATION AFTER DEMINERALIZED FREEZE DRIED BONE ALOGRAFT (DFDBA BONE GRAFTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Oktawati

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal treatment by conventional way will result in healing repair, which easily cause recurrence. Modification of treatment should be done to get an effective result, that is the regeneration of alveolar bone and to reduce inflammation. The objective of this study is to determine the alveolar bone regeneration after using DFDBA (Demineralized Freeze Dried Bone Allograft. Quasi experimental designs with pre and post test method was used in this study. From 13 patients, 26 defects got conventional or regenerative treatment. The indicator of alveolar bone regenaration in bone height in radiographic appearance and level of osteocalsin in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF were checked before and after the treatment, then the changes that occurred were analyzed. The result of the research showed that alveolar bone regeneration only occurred to the group of regenerative treatment using DFDBA. The conclusion is the effective periodontal tissue regeneration occurred at regenerative treatment by using DFDBA, and the osteocalsin in GCF can be used as indicator of bone growth.

  15. Actinide(IV) Deposits on Bone: Potential Role of the Osteopontin-Thorium Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creff, Gaëlle; Safi, Samir; Roques, Jérôme; Michel, Hervé; Jeanson, Aurélie; Solari, Pier-Lorenzo; Basset, Christian; Simoni, Eric; Vidaud, Claude; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2016-01-04

    In case of a nuclear event, contamination (broad or limited) of the population or of specific workers might occur. In such a senario, the fate of actinide contaminants may be of first concern, in particular with regard to human target organs like the skeleton. To improve our understanding of the toxicological processes that might take place, a mechanistic approach is necessary. For instance, ∼50% of Pu(IV) is known from biokinetic data to accumulate in bone, but the underlining mechanisms are almost unknown. In this context, and to obtain a better description of the toxicological mechanisms associated with actinides(IV), we have undertaken the investigation, on a molecular scale, of the interaction of thorium(IV) with osteopontin (OPN) a hyperphosphorylated protein involved in bone turnover. Thorium is taken here as a simple model for actinide(IV) chemistry. In addition, we have selected a phosphorylated hexapeptide (His-pSer-Asp-Glu-pSer-Asp-Glu-Val) that is representative of the peptidic sequence involved in the bone interaction. For both the protein and the biomimetic peptide, we have determined the local environment of Th(IV) within the bioactinidic complex, combining isothermal titration calorimetry, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, theoretical calculations with density functional theory, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Th LIII edge. The results demonstrate a predominance of interaction of metal with the phosphate groups and confirmed the previous physiological studies that have highlighted a high affinity of Th(IV) for the bone matrix. Data are further compared with those of the uranyl case, representing the actinyl(V) and actinyl(VI) species. Last, our approach shows the importance of developing simplified systems [Th(IV)-peptide] that can serve as models for more biologically relevant systems.

  16. Tocilizumab potentially prevents bone loss in patients with anticitrullinated protein antibody-positive rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ming Chen

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is associated with a high risk of osteoporosis and fracture. Interleukin (IL-6 inhibitors may suppress osteoclast activation. Anticitrullinated protein antibody (ACPA titers are inversely associated with bone mineral density (BMD. However, the differential effect of ACPA on bone turnover marker (BTM and BMD changes after IL-6 inhibition remains unclear. This prospective study recruited patients with active RA with inadequate response to methotrexate or biologics. BMD was measured before and after 2-year tocilizumab (TCZ treatment. Serum osteocalcin, N-terminal propeptide of type I collagen (P1NP, and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX levels were assessed at the baseline and after treatment. We enrolled 76 patients with RA (89.5% women, age: 57.2 ± 13.3 years receiving TCZ. The 28-joint disease activity score was negatively correlated with BMD and T-scores of the lumbar spine and bilateral femoral neck. ACPA-positive patients had lower lumbar spine and femoral neck T-scores. After 2-year TCZ treatment, CTX levels significantly decreased (0.32 ± 0.21 vs. 0.26 ± 0.17, p = 0.038. Femoral neck BMD increased significantly (0.71 ± 0.22 vs. 0.69 ± 0.55, p = 0.008. Decreased CTX levels and improved BMD were observed only in ACPA-positive patients. After treatment, femoral neck BMD significantly increased only in patients receiving a glucocorticoid dose of ≥5 mg/day. Two-year TCZ treatment reduced bone resorption and increased femoral BMD in ACPA-positive patients. The net effects of glucocorticoids and IL-6 inhibition on BMD imply that strict inflammation control might affect bone metabolism.

  17. Investigations of genotoxic potential of levamisole hydrochloride in bone marrow cells of Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulić Milan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was performed under in vivo conditions on bone marrow cells of Wistar rats. The following doses of levamisole hydrochloride were tested: a therapeutic dose of 2.2 mg/kg bm, a dose of 4.4 mg/kg bm, LD50 -25% mg/kg bm, and LD50 -75% mg/kg bm. We followed the effect of levamisole hydrochloride on kinetics of the cell cycle and the appearance of structural and numeric changes in chromosomes in bone marrow cells. The therapeutic dose of levamisole of 2.2 mg/kg bm exhibited a capability to increase mitotic activity in the observed cells, thus confirming knowledge of the immunostimulative effect of this dose of the medicine under in vivo conditions. The other tested doses of levamisole in this experiment, observed in comparison with the control group, had an opposite effect, namely, they caused a reduction in the mitotic activity of bone marrow cells. All the examined doses in vivo exhibited the ability to induce numeric (aneuploid and polyploid and structural (lesions, breaks and insertions chromosomal aberrations. It can be concluded on the grounds of these findings that the examined doses have a genotoxic effect.

  18. A Novel Composite PMMA-based Bone Cement with Reduced Potential for Thermal Necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yang; Li, Ailing; Zhou, Fang; Pan, Xiaoyu; Liang, Fuxin; Qu, Xiaozhong; Qiu, Dong; Yang, Zhenzhong

    2015-06-03

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (VP) and balloon kyphoplasty (BKP) are now widely used to treat patients who suffer painful vertebral compression fractures. In each of these treatments, a bone cement paste is injected into the fractured vertebral body/bodies, and the cement of choice is a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement. One drawback of this cement is the very high exothermic temperature, which, it has been suggested, causes thermal necrosis of surrounding tissue. In the present work, we prepared novel composite PMMA bone cement where microcapsules containing a phase change material (paraffin) (PCMc) were mixed with the powder of the cement. A PCM absorbs generated heat and, as such, its presence in the cement may lead to reduction in thermal necrosis. We determined a number of properties of the composite cement. Compared to the values for a control cement (a commercially available PMMA cement used in VP and BKP), each composite cement was found to have significantly lower maximum exothermic temperature, increased setting time, significantly lower compressive strength, significantly lower compressive modulus, comparable biocompatibility, and significantly smaller thermal necrosis zone. Composite cement containing 20% PCMc may be suitable for use in VP and BKP and thus deserves further evaluation.

  19. Regenerative Therapies for Diabetic Microangiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bassi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycaemia occurring in diabetes is responsible for accelerated arterial remodeling and atherosclerosis, affecting the macro- and the microcirculatory system. Vessel injury is mainly related to deregulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin/insulin-precursors production, generation of advanced glycation end-products, reduction in nitric oxide synthesis, and oxidative and reductive stress. It occurs both at extracellular level with increased calcium and matrix proteins deposition and at intracellular level, with abnormalities of intracellular pathways and increased cell death. Peripheral arterial disease, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke are the main causes of morbidity/mortality in diabetic patients representing a major clinical and economic issue. Pharmacological therapies, administration of growth factors, and stem cellular strategies are the most effective approaches and will be discussed in depth in this comprehensive review covering the regenerative therapies of diabetic microangiopathy.

  20. Stem Cell, Regenerative Medicine and Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Of the estimated trillion cells that build up our bodies, only a little number can self-renew and give rise to many different cell types. These unspecialized cells are called stem cells. Stem cell division and differentiation is fundamental to the development of the mature organism. Stem cells have recently attracted significant attention largely due to their potential medical benefits in the fields of therapeutic cloning and regenerative medicine.

  1. Current overview on dental stem cells applications in regenerative dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Teeth are the most natural, noninvasive source of stem cells. Dental stem cells, which are easy, convenient, and affordable to collect, hold promise for a range of very potential therapeutic applications. We have reviewed the ever-growing literature on dental stem cells archived in Medline using the following key words: Regenerative dentistry, dental stem cells, dental stem cells banking, and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. Relevant articles covering topics related to dental...

  2. Regenerative endodontic treatment for necrotic immature permanent premolar: A report of case

    OpenAIRE

    Sheetal B Ghivari; Deepti Khanchandani; Asim Jamadar

    2017-01-01

    Regenerative endodontic procedures provide new hope of converting nonvital tooth into vital once again. These potential regenerative approaches include root canal revascularization, postnatal stem-cell therapy, pulp implant, scaffold implant, three-dimensional cell printing, injectable scaffolds, and gene therapy. In this article, we describe successful revascularization treatment of necrotic permanent premolar tooth. Clinical and radiographic examination showed pulp involvement due to deep p...

  3. Alkaline RFC Space Station prototype - 'Next step Space Station'. [Regenerative Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackler, I. M.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell, a candidate technology for the Space Station's energy storage system, is described. An advanced development program was initiated to design, manufacture, and integrate a regenerative fuel cell Space Station prototype (RFC SSP). The RFC SSP incorporates long-life fuel cell technology, increased cell area for the fuel cells, and high voltage cell stacks for both units. The RFC SSP's potential for integration with the Space Station's life support and propulsion systems is discussed.

  4. Progressing a human embryonic stem-cell-based regenerative medicine therapy towards the clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Whiting, Paul; Kerby, Julie; Coffey, Peter; da Cruz, Lyndon; McKernan, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Since the first publication of the derivation of human embryonic stem cells in 1998, there has been hope and expectation that this technology will lead to a wave of regenerative medicine therapies with the potential to revolutionize our approach to managing certain diseases. Despite significant resources in this direction, the path to the clinic for an embryonic stem-cell-based regenerative medicine therapy has not proven straightforward, though in the past few years progress has been made. H...

  5. Increasing Dietary Phosphorus Intake from Food Additives: Potential for Negative Impact on Bone Health123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Taketani, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    It is important to consider whether habitual high phosphorus intake adversely affects bone health, because phosphorus intake has been increasing, whereas calcium intake has been decreasing in dietary patterns. A higher total habitual dietary phosphorus intake has been associated with higher serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and lower serum calcium concentrations in healthy individuals. Higher serum PTH concentrations have been shown in those who consume foods with phosphorus additives. These findings suggest that long-term dietary phosphorus loads and long-term hyperphosphatemia may have important negative effects on bone health. In contrast, PTH concentrations did not increase as a result of high dietary phosphorus intake when phosphorus was provided with adequate amounts of calcium. Intake of foods with a ratio of calcium to phosphorus close to that found in dairy products led to positive effects on bone health. Several randomized controlled trials have shown positive relations between dairy intake and bone mineral density. In our loading test with a low-calcium, high-phosphorus lunch provided to healthy young men, serum PTH concentrations showed peaks at 1 and 6 h, and serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) concentrations increased significantly at 8 h after the meal. In contrast, the high-calcium, high-phosphorus meal suppressed the second PTH and FGF23 elevations until 8 h after the meal. This implies that adequate dietary calcium intake is needed to overcome the interfering effects of high phosphorus intake on PTH and FGF23 secretion. FGF23 acts on the parathyroid gland to decrease PTH mRNA and PTH secretion in rats with normal kidney function. However, increased serum FGF23 is an early alteration of mineral metabolism in chronic kidney disease, causing secondary hyperthyroidism, and implying resistance of the parathyroid gland to the action of FGF23 in chronic kidney disease. These findings suggest that long-term high-phosphorus diets may impair bone health

  6. Increasing dietary phosphorus intake from food additives: potential for negative impact on bone health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Taketani, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    It is important to consider whether habitual high phosphorus intake adversely affects bone health, because phosphorus intake has been increasing, whereas calcium intake has been decreasing in dietary patterns. A higher total habitual dietary phosphorus intake has been associated with higher serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and lower serum calcium concentrations in healthy individuals. Higher serum PTH concentrations have been shown in those who consume foods with phosphorus additives. These findings suggest that long-term dietary phosphorus loads and long-term hyperphosphatemia may have important negative effects on bone health. In contrast, PTH concentrations did not increase as a result of high dietary phosphorus intake when phosphorus was provided with adequate amounts of calcium. Intake of foods with a ratio of calcium to phosphorus close to that found in dairy products led to positive effects on bone health. Several randomized controlled trials have shown positive relations between dairy intake and bone mineral density. In our loading test with a low-calcium, high-phosphorus lunch provided to healthy young men, serum PTH concentrations showed peaks at 1 and 6 h, and serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) concentrations increased significantly at 8 h after the meal. In contrast, the high-calcium, high-phosphorus meal suppressed the second PTH and FGF23 elevations until 8 h after the meal. This implies that adequate dietary calcium intake is needed to overcome the interfering effects of high phosphorus intake on PTH and FGF23 secretion. FGF23 acts on the parathyroid gland to decrease PTH mRNA and PTH secretion in rats with normal kidney function. However, increased serum FGF23 is an early alteration of mineral metabolism in chronic kidney disease, causing secondary hyperthyroidism, and implying resistance of the parathyroid gland to the action of FGF23 in chronic kidney disease. These findings suggest that long-term high-phosphorus diets may impair bone health

  7. REAC regenerative treatment efficacy in experimental chondral lesions: a pilot study on ovine animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Passino E

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Eraldo Sanna Passino,1,2 Stefano Rocca,1 Sabrina Caggiu,1 Nicolò Columbano,1,2 Alessandro Castagna,3 Vania Fontani,3–5 Salvatore Rinaldi3–51Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy; 2Comparative Surgery Research Laboratory, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy; 3Department of Regenerative Medicine, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, Italy; 4Research Department, Rinaldi Fontani Foundation, Florence, Italy; 5Research Department, IRF Shanghai Biomedical Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Radioelectric asymmetric conveyor (REAC technology is a platform designed to optimize cell polarity. Cell polarity is a universal biological phenomenon that is implicated in cell differentiation, proliferation, morphogenesis, aging, and rejuvenation. In this work, we investigate a timing and administration protocol for tissue optimization regenerative treatment type C, in order to treat aging-related chondral damage or injuries and gain insights into regenerative processes of articular cartilage in humans. The chondral lesion produced in this study in an animal model (6 knee joints of 4 adult sheep was 6 mm in diameter and about 2 mm deep. These lesions, which did not involve subchondral bone, tend to increase in size and depth and are not completely repaired with normal hyaline articular cartilage since adult articular cartilage is avascular and has a very slow turnover at the cellular and molecular level. Moreover, the hydration of articular cartilage is reduced with aging and with decreased mitotic activity, synthesis, and population size of chondrocytes. Six months posttreatment, lesions appeared filled, though not completely, with newly generated tissue of the light opalescent color of healthy articular cartilage, which otherwise covered the underlying subchondral bone. The newly formed tissue surface appeared to be quite regular. Nearly complete regeneration of subchondral bone occurred, with

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine: Focus on articular cartilage and intervertebral disc regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Stephen M; Kalamegam, Gauthaman; Pushparaj, Peter N; Matta, Csaba; Memic, Adnan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Mobasheri, Reza; Poletti, Fabian L; Hoyland, Judith A; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-04-15

    Musculoskeletal disorders represent a major cause of disability and morbidity globally and result in enormous costs for health and social care systems. Development of cell-based therapies is rapidly proliferating in a number of disease areas, including musculoskeletal disorders. Novel biological therapies that can effectively treat joint and spine degeneration are high priorities in regenerative medicine. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM-MSCs), adipose tissue (AD-MSCs) and umbilical cord (UC-MSCs) show considerable promise for use in cartilage and intervertebral disc (IVD) repair. This review article focuses on stem cell-based therapeutics for cartilage and IVD repair in the context of the rising global burden of musculoskeletal disorders. We discuss the biology MSCs and chondroprogenitor cells and specifically focus on umbilical cord/Wharton's jelly derived MSCs and examine their potential for regenerative applications. We also summarize key components of the molecular machinery and signaling pathways responsible for the control of chondrogenesis and explore biomimetic scaffolds and biomaterials for articular cartilage and IVD regeneration. This review explores the exciting opportunities afforded by MSCs and discusses the challenges associated with cartilage and IVD repair and regeneration. There are still many technical challenges associated with isolating, expanding, differentiating, and pre-conditioning MSCs for subsequent implantation into degenerate joints and the spine. However, the prospect of combining biomaterials and cell-based therapies that incorporate chondrocytes, chondroprogenitors and MSCs leads to the optimistic view that interdisciplinary approaches will lead to significant breakthroughs in regenerating musculoskeletal tissues, such as the joint and the spine in the near future. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diffusion of protease into meat & bone meal for solubility improvement and potential inactivation of the BSE prion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A Coll

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Government-imposed feed bans have created a need for new applications for meat & bone meal (MBM. Many potential new applications require MBM protein to be both soluble and free of infectious prion. Treatment with protease is generally effective in reducing insoluble, thermally-denatured proteins to soluble peptides. It has been reported in the literature that certain proteases, including Versazyme, are able to degrade infectious prions in a system where the prions are readily accessible to proteolytic attack. Prions distributed within MBM, however, may conceivably be protected from proteases.The overall rate of proteolytic MBM digestion depends greatly on whether the protease can penetrate deep within individual particles, or if the protease can only act near the surface of the particle. This research examined the barriers to the diffusion of Versazyme into particles of MBM. Confocal microscopy demonstrated differences in the density distributions between the bone and the soft tissue particles of MBM. By tracking the diffusion of fluorescently labeled Versazyme through individual particles, it was found that bone particles show full Versazyme penetration within 30 minutes, while penetration of soft tissue particles can take up to four hours, depending on the particle's diameter. From the variety of normal proteins comprising MBM, a specific protein was chosen to serve as a prion surrogate based on characteristics including size, solubility, distribution and abundance. This surrogate was used to measure the effect of several factors on Versazyme diffusion.Results showed that surrogate distributed in bone particles was more susceptible to degradation than that in soft tissue particles. Three factors controllable by unit operations in an industrial-scale process were also tested. It was found that removing the lipid content and hydrating MBM prior to incubation both significantly increased the rate of surrogate degradation. In a test of particle

  10. Management of fenestration using bone allograft in conjunction with platelet-rich fibrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Bhatsange

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fenestration and dehiscence are said to be anatomical variations of cortical bone and not true pathological entities. They represent window-like defects covered by periosteum and overlying gingiva with or without the intact marginal bone. The etiology of such defects is still unclear, though many hypotheses such as occlusal traumatism, trauma, and variation in root bone angulation have been put forward. Diagnosis of such defects is challenging clinically, and they cannot be appreciated in conventional radiographs. In many instances, they are accidentally discovered during periodontal and oral surgical procedures. These defects, if not treated, can affect prognosis and complicate healing of the affected teeth. Treatment of such cortical bony defects is challenging and involves the use of potential regenerative materials to aid in regeneration. This case report describes the successful management of such a defect, discovered through exploratory flap approach, using PRF in conjunction with bone allograft.

  11. [Evaluation of using cone beam computed tomography as a regular test before and after periodontal regenerative surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, J; Meng, H X

    2018-02-18

    To test the accuracy and credibility of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on measuring the height and volume of alveolar bone defects before periodontal regeneration surgery. By comparing the bone density measured by CBCT before and after the operation, the time to evaluate the efficacy of the periodontal regenerative surgery would be determined. Periodontal regenerative surgeries were performed on three-wall bone defects of ten teeth in nine patients. The height of bone defects was measured using both periapical film of distant parallel technique and CBCT before periodontal regenerative surgery. Before the surgery, CBCT data were used to measure the volume of the bone defects and the bone density around the defective areas. The height of the bone defects was measured during periodontal regeneration surgery, and the volume of the defective areas was obtained with bone wax in operation. CBCT was taken 6, 12 and 24 weeks after surgery to measure the bone density in the regenerated region. The Wilcoxon test showed that the height of the bone defects measured preoperatively using periapical film was (0.822±0.222) mm deeper than the intraoperative measurement results, and the difference was statistically significant (P0.05). The regression analysis and the Bland-Altman method also showed that the results of CBCT measurement were more accurate. The Wilcoxon test showed that the bone defect volume measured by CBCT preoperatively was accurate, and the difference between the preoperative and the intraoperative measurements was not statistically significant, ranging from 0.38 to 2.83 mm3 (P>0.05). The bone density of the regenerated areas measured by CBCT was (0.49±0.03) times in the sixth week, (0.74±0.09) times in the twelfth week and (1.16±0.11) times in the twentieth week as that of the areas around the bone defects after the surgery. The present data suggest that using CBCT before periodontal regenerative surgery could result in accurate measurement of height and

  12. New Regenerative Cycle for Vapor Compression Refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark J. Bergander

    2005-08-29

    The main objective of this project is to confirm on a well-instrumented prototype the theoretically derived claims of higher efficiency and coefficient of performance for geothermal heat pumps based on a new regenerative thermodynamic cycle as comparing to existing technology. In order to demonstrate the improved performance of the prototype, it will be compared to published parameters of commercially available geothermal heat pumps manufactured by US and foreign companies. Other objectives are to optimize the design parameters and to determine the economic viability of the new technology. Background (as stated in the proposal): The proposed technology closely relates to EERE mission by improving energy efficiency, bringing clean, reliable and affordable heating and cooling to the residential and commercial buildings and reducing greenhouse gases emission. It can provide the same amount of heating and cooling with considerably less use of electrical energy and consequently has a potential of reducing our nations dependence on foreign oil. The theoretical basis for the proposed thermodynamic cycle was previously developed and was originally called a dynamic equilibrium method. This theory considers the dynamic equations of state of the working fluid and proposes the methods for modification of T-S trajectories of adiabatic transformation by changing dynamic properties of gas, such as flow rate, speed and acceleration. The substance of this proposal is a thermodynamic cycle characterized by the regenerative use of the potential energy of two-phase flow expansion, which in traditional systems is lost in expansion valves. The essential new features of the process are: (1) The application of two-step throttling of the working fluid and two-step compression of its vapor phase. (2) Use of a compressor as the initial step compression and a jet device as a second step, where throttling and compression are combined. (3) Controlled ratio of a working fluid at the first and

  13. Stem Cell Therapy: Repurposing Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine Beyond Cell Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Eleonora; Lippert, Trenton; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2018-02-27

    Stem cells exhibit simple and naive cellular features, yet their exact purpose for regenerative medicine continues to elude even the most elegantly designed research paradigms from developmental biology to clinical therapeutics. Based on their capacity to divide indefinitely and their dynamic differentiation into any type of tissue, the advent of transplantable stem cells has offered a potential treatment for aging-related and injury-mediated diseases. Recent laboratory evidence has demonstrated that transplanted human neural stem cells facilitate endogenous reparative mechanisms by initiating multiple regenerative processes in the brain neurogenic areas. Within these highly proliferative niches reside a myriad of potent regenerative molecules, including anti-inflammatory cytokines, proteomes, and neurotrophic factors, altogether representing a biochemical cocktail vital for restoring brain function in the aging and diseased brain. Here, we advance the concept of therapeutically repurposing stem cells not towards cell replacement per se, but rather exploiting the cells' intrinsic properties to serve as the host brain regenerative catalysts.

  14. Nanotechnologies and regenerative medical approaches for space and terrestrial medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattoni, Alessandro; Tasciotti, Ennio; Fine, Daniel; Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S; Sakamoto, Jason; Hu, Ye; Weiner, Bradley; Ferrari, Mauro; Parazynski, Scott

    2012-11-01

    One purpose of the International Space Station (ISS) is to explore powerful new areas of biomedical science in microgravity. Recent advances in nanotechnology applied to medicine--what we now refer to as nano-medicine--and regenerative medicine have enormous untapped potential for future space and terrestrial medical applications. Novel means for drug delivery and nanoscale screening tools will one day benefit astronauts venturing to Mars and places beyond, while the space laboratory will foster advances in nanotechnologies for diagnostic and therapeutic tools to help our patients here on Earth. Herein we review a series of nanotechnologies and selected regenerative medical approaches and highlight key areas of ongoing and future investigation that will benefit both space and terrestrial medicine. These studies target significant areas of human disease such as osteoporosis, diabetes, radiation injury, and many others.

  15. Stem cells: a promising source for vascular regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammal, Hassan; Harmouch, Chaza; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Laurent-Maquin, Dominique; Labrude, Pierre; Menu, Patrick; Kerdjoudj, Halima

    2014-12-15

    The rising and diversity of many human vascular diseases pose urgent needs for the development of novel therapeutics. Stem cell therapy represents a challenge in the medicine of the twenty-first century, an area where tissue engineering and regenerative medicine gather to provide promising treatments for a wide variety of diseases. Indeed, with their extensive regeneration potential and functional multilineage differentiation capacity, stem cells are now highlighted as promising cell sources for regenerative medicine. Their multilineage differentiation involves environmental factors such as biochemical, extracellular matrix coating, oxygen tension, and mechanical forces. In this review, we will focus on human stem cell sources and their applications in vascular regeneration. We will also discuss the different strategies used for their differentiation into both mature and functional smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

  16. Recent Progress Using Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cardiac Regenerative Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Hajime; Shiba, Yuji

    2017-06-23

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have gained interest for cell-based regenerative therapies because of their capacity to differentiate into most somatic cell types, including cardiomyocytes. Remarkable progress in the generation of PSC-derived cardiomyocytes has been made in this decade, and recent preclinical transplantation studies using various animal models have provided proof-of-principle for their use in heart regeneration. However, several obstacles preclude their effective and safe clinical application for cardiac repair, including the need for approaches that prevent tumorigenesis, arrhythmogenesis, and immune rejection. In this review, we focus on recent progress in the field of PSC-based cardiac regenerative therapy, including the remaining hurdles and potential approaches to circumventing them.

  17. Derivation and application of pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaqiang; Zhou, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are cells that can differentiate into any type of cells in the body, therefore have valuable promise in regenerative medicine of cell replacement therapies and tissue/organ engineering. PSCs can be derived either from early embryos or directly from somatic cells by epigenetic reprogramming that result in customized cells from patients. Here we summarize the methods of deriving PSCs, the various types of PSCs generated with different status, and their versatile applications in both clinical and embryonic development studies. We also discuss an intriguing potential application of PSCs in constructing tissues/organs in large animals by interspecies chimerism. All these emerging findings are likely to contribute to the breakthroughs in biological research and the prosperous prospects of regenerative medicine.

  18. Effect of regenerative braking on energy-efficient train control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepmaker, G.M.; Goverde, R.M.P.

    2015-01-01

    An important topic to reduce the energy consumption in railways is the use of energy-efficient train control (EETC). Modern trains allow regen-erative braking where the released kinetic energy can be reused. This regener-ative braking has an effect on the optimal driving regimes compared to trains

  19. Electrospun hydroxyapatite-functionalized PLLA scaffold: potential applications in sternal bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, Alberto; Spadaccio, Cristiano; Sedati, Pietro; De Marco, Federico; Carotti, Simone; Lusini, Mario; Vadalà, Gianluca; Di Martino, Alberto; Morini, Sergio; Chello, Massimo; Covino, Elvio; Denaro, Vincenzo; Trombetta, Marcella

    2011-07-01

    Sternal synthesis after median sternotomy, a conventional access practice in thoracic and cardiac surgery, is at the basis of severe complications, often impairing the clinical outcome of surgical interventions. In this work, we propose the use of an acellular biomaterial scaffold, to be interposed across the fracture rime during closure operations, directly exposing the biomaterial to bone marrow, in order to expedite healing process. A rabbit model of median sternotomy was performed and an electrospun scaffold composed of a hydroxyapatite-loaded absorbable biopolymer (poly-L: -lactide), shaped into a fibrillar structure, was used. CT follow-up confirmed a complete healing in the scaffold-treated group 1 week before the control. Histological evaluation demonstrated presence of newly formed bone trabeculae among scaffold fibers showing a higher degree of maturity with respect to the control untreated group. The proposed approach is able to both guide a more rapid healing and modulate inflammatory response across the wound site, resulting in improved healing and tissue remodeling with respect to conventional closure technique.

  20. TLR Stimulation of Bone Marrow Lymphoid Precursors from Childhood Acute Leukemia Modifies Their Differentiation Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Dorantes-Acosta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemias are the most frequent childhood malignancies worldwide and remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of relapsed patients. While remarkable progress has been made in characterizing genetic aberrations that may control these hematological disorders, it has also become clear that abnormalities in the bone marrow microenvironment might hit precursor cells and contribute to disease. However, responses of leukemic precursor cells to inflammatory conditions or microbial components upon infection are yet unexplored. Our previous work and increasing evidence indicate that Toll-like receptors (TLRs in the earliest stages of lymphoid development in mice and humans provide an important mechanism for producing cells of the innate immune system. Using highly controlled co-culture systems, we now show that lymphoid precursors from leukemic bone marrow express TLRs and respond to their ligation by changing cell differentiation patterns. While no apparent contribution of TLR signals to tumor progression was recorded for any of the investigated diseases, the replenishment of innate cells was consistently promoted upon in vitro TLR exposure, suggesting that early recognition of pathogen-associated molecules might be implicated in the regulation of hematopoietic cell fate decisions in childhood acute leukemia.

  1. Potencial terapêutico das células-tronco de medula óssea no tratamento da epilepsia Therapeutic potential of bone marrow stem cells in epilepsy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Julia M. Carrion

    2009-05-01

    is frequently irreversible, regenerative strategies could represent a new path towards better treatment options. In our laboratory, we have been studying the therapeutic potential of bone marrow stem cells in controlling recurrent spontaneous seizures associated to the pilocarpine model of epilepsy with excellent results. We are also running the first study using bone marrow stem cell transplantation in the treatment of epilepsy in humans.

  2. Marching towards regenerative cardiac therapy with human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Kevin O; Xu, Chunhui

    2013-06-01

    Damage in cardiac tissues from ischemia or other pathological conditions leads to heart failure; and cell loss or dysfunction in pacemaker tissues due to congenital heart defects, aging, and acquired diseases can cause severe arrhythmias. The promise of successful therapies with stem cells to treat these conditions has remained elusive to the scientific community. However, recent advances in this field have opened new opportunities for regenerative cardiac therapy. Transplantation of cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells has the potential to alleviate heart disease. Since the initial derivation of human embryonic stem cells, significant progress has been made in the generation and characterization of enriched cardiomyocytes and the demonstration of the ability of these cardiomyocytes to survive, integrate, and function in animal models. The scope of therapeutic potential from pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes has been further expanded with the invention of induced pluripotent stem cells, which can be induced to generate functional cardiomyocytes for regenerative cardiac therapy in a patient specific manner. The reprogramming technology has also inspired the recent discovery of direct conversion of fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells, which may allow endogenous cardiac repair. Regenerative cardiac therapy with human pluripotent stem cells is now moving closer to clinic testing.

  3. Supporting regenerative medicine by integrative dimensionality reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulas, F; Zagar, L; Zupan, B; Bellazzi, R

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of the developmental potential of stem cells is a crucial step towards their clinical application in regenerative medicine. It has been demonstrated that genome-wide expression profiles can predict the cellular differentiation stage by means of dimensionality reduction methods. Here we show that these techniques can be further strengthened to support decision making with i) a novel strategy for gene selection; ii) methods for combining the evidence from multiple data sets. We propose to exploit dimensionality reduction methods for the selection of genes specifically activated in different stages of differentiation. To obtain an integrated predictive model, the expression values of the selected genes from multiple data sets are combined. We investigated distinct approaches that either aggregate data sets or use learning ensembles. We analyzed the performance of the proposed methods on six publicly available data sets. The selection procedure identified a reduced subset of genes whose expression values gave rise to an accurate stage prediction. The assessment of predictive accuracy demonstrated a high quality of predictions for most of the data integration methods presented. The experimental results highlighted the main potentials of proposed approaches. These include the ability to predict the true staging by combining multiple training data sets when this could not be inferred from a single data source, and to focus the analysis on a reduced list of genes of similar predictive performance.

  4. Reflective Self-Regenerative Systems Architecture Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pu, Carlton; Blough, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we develop the Reflective Self-Regenerative Systems (RSRS) architecture in detail, describing the internal structure of each component and the mutual invocations among the components...

  5. 3D Biomaterial Microarrays for Regenerative Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) biomaterial microarrays hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine because of their ability to accelerate the design and fabrication of biomimetic materials. Such tissue-like biomaterials can provide an appropriate microenvironment for stimulating and controlling stem...

  6. Lattice Regenerative Cooling Methods (LRCM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate a novel cooling concept called Lattice Regenerative Cooling Methods (LRCM) for future high thrust in-space propulsion...

  7. Supplementation of fat grafts with adipose-derived regenerative cells in reconstructive surgery [Stammzellangereicherte Fetttransplantation in der rekonstruktiven Chirurgie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herold, C.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: The fraction of regenerative cells in adipose tissue has been described to be even higher than in bone marrow. Adipose tissue itself is excessively available in most patients. Given that adipose tissue is abundant in majority of patients adipose derrived stem cells (ASCs have come under scrutiny for regenerative procedures in reconstructive surgery.Material and methods: ASCs were extracted by the Celution system for enrichment of fat grafts that were administered in patients with decreased wound healing, soft tissue or scar defects.Results: All patients were satisfied after reconstruction with ASCs augmented fat grafts and no side effects were observed. Discussion: The Celution system provides fast recovery of ASCs which can be immediately utilized for appropriate application. Since a high number of stem cells are harvested from fat tissue no expansion of cells is needed as described for bone marrow derived stem cells. Enrichment of fat graft with ASCs is of great interest due to their reported angiogenetic effect. The reported cases demonstrate the potential of ASCs in the field of regenerative medicine and encourage further application in reconstructive surgery.[german] Einleitung: Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass der Anteil regenerativer Zellen im Fettgewebe höher als im Knochenmark ist. Fettgewebe hingegen ist bei den meisten Patienten exzessiv vorhanden. Das legt den Einsatz von ASCs (adipose derived stem cells bei regenerativen Anwendungen in der rekonstruktiven Chirurgie nahe.Material und Methoden: Mit dem Celution System von Cytori Therapeutics Inc. prozessierte, ASC angereicherte Fetttransplantate werden an vier Patienten mit Weichteildefiziten und störenden Narben sowie Wundheilungsstörungen angewendet.Ergebnisse: Insbesondere bei Patienten mit Weichteildefiziten und Narben konnte eine suffiziente Volumenaugmentation und ansprechende Verbesserung der Narben erzielt werden. Es wurden keine Nebenwirkungen

  8. Growth and Potential Damage of Human Bone-Derived Cells Cultured on Fresh and Aged C60/Ti Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopova, Ivana; Lavrentiev, Vasily; Vacik, Jiri; Bacakova, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Thin films of binary C60/Ti composites, with various concentrations of Ti ranging from ~ 25% to ~ 70%, were deposited on microscopic glass coverslips and were tested for their potential use in bone tissue engineering as substrates for the adhesion and growth of bone cells. The novelty of this approach lies in the combination of Ti atoms (i.e., widely used biocompatible material for the construction of stomatological and orthopedic implants) with atoms of fullerene C60, which can act as very efficient radical scavengers. However, fullerenes and their derivatives are able to generate harmful reactive oxygen species and to have cytotoxic effects. In order to stabilize C60 molecules and to prevent their possible cytotoxic effects, deposition in the compact form of Ti/C60 composites (with various Ti concentrations) was chosen. The reactivity of C60/Ti composites may change in time due to the physicochemical changes of molecules in an air atmosphere. In this study, we therefore tested the dependence between the age of C60/Ti films (from one week to one year) and the adhesion, morphology, proliferation, viability, metabolic activity and potential DNA damage to human osteosarcoma cells (lines MG-63 and U-2 OS). After 7 days of cultivation, we did not observe any negative influence of fresh or aged C60/Ti layers on cell behavior, including the DNA damage response. The presence of Ti atoms resulted in improved properties of the C60 layers, which became more suitable for cell cultivation. PMID:25875338

  9. Recent considerations in regenerative endodontic treatment approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Aksel

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Although the regenerative treatment approaches have good clinical outcomes in the majority of case reports, the outcomes are unpredictable. Since the current clinical protocols for regenerative endodontics do not fully fulfill the triad of tissue engineering ((growth factors, scaffold and stem cells, further translational studies are required to achieve more pulp- and dentin-like tissue in the root canal system to achieve pulp regeneration.

  10. Scaffold of chitosan-sodium alginate and hydroxyapatite with application potential for bone regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, Marcia de A.; Alves, Thais F.R.; Lopes, Francielly C.C.N; Oliveira Junior, Jose Martins de; Pontes, Katiusca S.; Fogaca, Bruna A.C.; Chaud, Marco V.

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold for organic tissue regeneration are architectural, three-dimensional, porous, biocompatible and biodegradable devices. The first challenges to be met in the development of these devices to mimic the biomechanical properties of the target tissue. The aim of this study was to develop and to characterize scaffolds composed of chitosan (Ch), sodium alginate (SA), hydroxyapatite (HA). The scaffolds were obtained by lyophilization. HA has been incorporated into the polymer dispersion in Ch-AS concentration of 20 and 60%. The mechanical properties of the scaffold were determined by tensile and compression tests. Swelling capacity was assessed in the presence of simulated saliva, purified water, HCl 0.01M, NaOH 0.01M. The calcium content was quantified using fluorescence X-rays. Analysis of the results indicates that the Qt-AS-HA-60% scaffold obtained by lyophilization meets promising properties for bone tissue regeneration. (author)

  11. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, John L. (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Dublin, CA); Zapata, Luis E. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

  12. Role of Osteal Macrophages in Bone Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wook Cho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages have been shown to have pleiotropic functions in various pathophysiologies, especially in terms of anti-inflammatory and regenerative activity. Recently, the novel functions of bone marrow resident macrophages (called osteal macrophages were intensively studied in bone development, remodeling and tissue repair processes. This review discusses the current evidence for a role of osteal macrophages in bone modeling, remodeling, and fracture healing processes.

  13. [A regenerative anemia in infants: 2 cases of Pearson´s syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Zabarte Fernández, José M; Rodríguez-Vigil Iturrate, Carmen; Martínez Faci, Cristina; García Jiménez, Inmaculada; Murillo Sanjuan, Laura; Muñoz Mellado, Ascensión

    2017-02-01

    Anemia is very common in infants. Although its causes are usually not severe and treatable, proper etiologic diagnosis should be established. When anemia is non-regenerative, it can be caused by aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, bone marrow infiltration or hematopoietic factors deficiencies. Another possible cause is Pearson's syndrome, a rare mitochondrial disease that causes non-regenerative anemia associated with other cytopenias, pancreatic insufficiency, lactic acidosis and great variability in clinical presentation conditioned by heteroplasmy. It is characteristic to find in bone marrow studies variable vacuolization in erythroblastic progenitors and ring sideroblasts. The diagnosis is established by genetic study of mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid performed by Southern blot analysis (complete mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid amplification by polymerase chain reaction -long), obtaining 70-80% deletion of 4977 bp (NMD 8343-13459). There is no curative therapy and support treatment is the only available nowadays. Death is frequent in early years of life. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  14. Regenerative fuel cell engineering - FY99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Inbody; Rodney L. Borup; James C. Hedstrom; Jose Tafoya; Byron Morton; Lois Zook; Nicholas E. Vanderborgh

    2000-01-01

    The authors report the work conducted by the ESA-EPE Fuel Cell Engineering Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY99 on regenerative fuel cell system engineering. The work was focused on the evaluation of regenerative fuel cell system components obtained through the RAFCO program. These components included a 5 kW PEM electrolyzer, a two-cell regenerative fuel cell stack, and samples of the electrolyzer membrane, anode, and cathode. The samples of the electrolyzer membrane, anode, and cathode were analyzed to determine their structure and operating characteristics. Tests were conducted on the two-cell regenerative fuel cell stack to characterize its operation as an electrolyzer and as a fuel cell. The 5 kW PEM electrolyzer was tested in the Regenerative Fuel Cell System Test Facility. These tests served to characterize the operation of the electrolyzer and, also, to verify the operation of the newly completed test facility. Future directions for this work in regenerative fuel cell systems are discussed.

  15. Current overview on challenges in regenerative endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Regenerative endodontics provides hope of converting the non-vital tooth into vital once again. It focuses on substituting traumatized and pathological pulp with functional pulp tissue. Current regenerative procedures successfully produce root development but still fail to re-establish real pulp tissue and give unpredictable results. There are several drawbacks that need to be addressed to improve the quality and efficiency of the treatment. Aim: The aim of this review article is to discuss major priorities that ought to be dealt before applications of regenerative endodontics flourish the clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using filter terms Review, published in the last 10 years and Dental journals. Keywords used for research were “regenerative endodontics,” “dental stem cells,” “growth factor regeneration,” “scaffolds,” and “challenges in regeneration.” This review article screened about 150 articles and then the relevant information was compiled. Results: Inspite of the impressive growth in regenerative endodontic field, there are certain loopholes in the existing treatment protocols that might sometimes result in undesired and unpredictable outcomes. Conclusion: Considerable research and development efforts are required to improve and update existing regenerative endodontic strategies to make it an effective, safe, and biological mode to save teeth. PMID:25657518

  16. "Black bone" MRI: a potential alternative to CT when imaging the head and neck: report of eight clinical cases and review of the Oxford experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, K A; Watt-Smith, S R; Golding, S J

    2012-11-01

    The potential risks associated with ionising radiation are well documented. We have previously reported the "black bone" MRI sequence, useful when imaging cortical bone. The objective of this paper is to report our initial experience of this technique in patients undergoing imaging of the head and neck region. Using the departmental database those patients having had "black bone" sequences of the head and neck performed as part of their MRI examination in the preceding 5 years were identified. The radiological reports were reviewed to identify those cases where "black bone" or conventional MRI sequences had been performed in place of the requested CT, and the patient medical records for these cases were reviewed. Medical record review was also conducted for those cases where it was considered that the pathological condition requiring imaging would ordinarily be investigated with CT. The "black bone" sequence had been performed in 69 patients as part of routine MRI of the head and neck. Of these, 67% (n=46) were performed in combination with CT imaging, the majority of cases being primary tumours. In four cases, an MRI was performed in place of the requested CT scan. We present eight clinical cases illustrating the potential benefits of the "black bone" sequence. "Black bone" MRI offers a radiation-free method of imaging the head and neck, and has been successfully utilised in a range of benign and malignant conditions affecting this region. Advances in knowledge Adoption of this approach, where feasible, would be a significant advance in radiation protection.

  17. Natural products for treatment of bone erosive diseases: The effects and mechanisms on inhibiting osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jing; Hao, Dingjun; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yi; Yang, Hao

    2016-07-01

    Excessive bone resorption plays a central role on the development of bone erosive diseases, including osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. Osteoclasts, bone-resorbing multinucleated cells, are differentiated from hemopoietic progenitors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Regulation of osteoclast differentiation is considered an effective therapeutic target to the treatment of pathological bone loss. Natural plant-derived products, with potential therapeutic and preventive activities against bone-lytic diseases, have received increasing attention in recent years because of their whole regulative effects and specific pharmacological activities, which are more suitable for long-term use than chemically synthesized medicines. In this review, we summarized the detailed research progress on the active compounds derived from medical plants with potential anti-resorptive effects and their molecular mechanisms on inhibiting osteoclast formation and function. The active ingredients derived from natural plants that are efficacious in suppressing osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption include flavonoids, terpenoids (sesquiterpenoids, diterpenoids, triterpenoids), glycosides, lignans, coumarins, alkaloids, polyphenols, limonoids, quinones and others (steroid, oxoxishhone, fatty acid). Studies have shown that above natural products exert the inhibitory effects via regulating many factors involved in the process of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption, including the essential cytokines (RANKL, M-CSF), transcription factors (NFATc1, c-Fos), signaling pathways (NF-κB, MAPKs, Src/PI3K/Akt, the calcium ion signaling), osteoclast-specific genes (TRAP, CTSK, MMP-9, integrin β3, OSCAR, DC-STAMP, Atp6v0d2) and local factors (ROS, LPS, NO). The development of osteoclast-targeting natural products is of great value for the prevention or treatment of bone diseases and for bone regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential response of bone and kidney to ACEI in db/db mice: A potential effect of captopril on accelerating bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiao-Li; Sha, Nan-Nan; Shu, Bing; Zhao, Yong-Jian; Wang, Xin-Luan; Xiao, Hui-Hui; Shi, Qi; Wong, Man-Sau; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2017-04-01

    The components of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are expressed in the kidney and bone. Kidney disease and bone injury are common complications associated with diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, on the kidney and bone of db/db mice. The db/db mice were orally administered by gavage with captopril for 8weeks with db/+ mice as the non-diabetic control. Serum and urine biochemistries were determined by standard colorimetric methods or ELISA. Histological measurements were performed on the kidney by periodic acid-schiff staining and on the tibial proximal metaphysis by safranin O and masson-trichrome staining. Trabecular bone mass and bone quality were analyzed by microcomputed tomography. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting were applied for molecular analysis on mRNA and protein expression. Captopril significantly improved albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis in db/db mice, and these effects might be attributed to the down-regulation of angiotensin II expression and the expression of its down-stream profibrotic factors in the kidney, like connective tissue growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Urinary excretion of calcium and phosphorus markedly increased in db/db mice in response to captopril. Treatment with captopril induced a decrease in bone mineral density and deterioration of trabecular bone at proximal metaphysis of tibia in db/db mice, as shown in the histological and reconstructed 3-dimensional images. Even though captopril effectively reversed the diabetes-induced changes in calcium-binding protein 28-k and vitamin D receptor expression in the kidney as well as the expression of RAS components and bradykinin receptor-2 in bone tissue, treatment with captopril increased the osteoclast-covered bone surface, reduced the osteoblast-covered bone surface, down-regulated the expression of type 1 collagen and transcription factor runt-related transcription

  19. Clinical concepts for regenerative therapy in intrabony defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortellini, Pierpaolo; Tonetti, Maurizio S

    2015-06-01

    Evidence indicates that periodontal regeneration is an efficacious and predictable procedure for the treatment of isolated and multiple intrabony defects. Meta-analyses from systematic reviews indicate an added benefit, in terms of clinical attachment level gain, when demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft, barrier membranes and active biologic products/compounds are applied in addition to open flap debridement. On the other hand, a consistent amount of variability of the outcomes is evident among different studies and within the experimental population of each study. This variability is explained, at least in part, by different patient and defect characteristics. Patient-related factors include smoking habit, compliance with home oral hygiene and residual inflammation after cause-related therapy. Defect-associated factors include defect depth and radiographic angle, the number of residual bony walls, pocket depth and the degree of hypermobility. In addition, surgical-related variables, such as surgical skill, clinical experience and knowledge, and application of the different regenerative materials, have a significant impact on clinical outcomes. This paper presents a strategy to optimize the clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration. The surgical design of the flap, the use of different regenerative materials and the application of appropriate passive sutures are discussed in this review along with the scientific foundations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Methods to validate tooth-supporting regenerative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padial-Molina, Miguel; Marchesan, Julie T; Taut, Andrei D; Jin, Qiming; Giannobile, William V; Rios, Hector F

    2012-01-01

    In humans, microbially induced inflammatory periodontal diseases are the primary initiators that disrupt the functional and structural integrity of the periodontium (i.e., the alveolar bone, the periodontal ligament, and the cementum). The reestablishment of its original structure, properties, and function constitutes a significant challenge in the development of new therapies to regenerate tooth-supporting defects. Preclinical models represent an important in vivo tool to critically evaluate and analyze the key aspects of novel regenerative therapies, including (1) safety, (2) effectiveness, (3) practicality, and (4) functional and structural stability over time. Therefore, these models provide foundational data that supports the clinical validation and the development of novel innovative regenerative periodontal technologies. Steps are provided on the use of the root fenestration animal model for the proper evaluation of periodontal outcome measures using the following parameters: descriptive histology, histomorphometry, immunostaining techniques, three-dimensional imaging, electron microscopy, gene expression analyses, and safety assessments. These methods will prepare investigators and assist them in identifying the key end points that can then be adapted to later stage human clinical trials.

  1. Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sheng; Ding, Fei; Gong, Leiiei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is produced by the resident cells in tissues and organs, and secreted into the surrounding medium to provide biophysical and biochemical support to the surrounding cells due to its content of diverse bioactive molecules. Recently, the extracellular matrix has been used as a promising approach for tissue engineering. Emerging studies demonstrate that extracellular matrix scaffolds are able to create a favorable regenerative microenvironment, promote tissue-specific remodeling, and act as an inductive template for the repair and functional reconstruction of skin, bone, nerve, heart, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, and other organs. In the current review, we will provide a critical overview of the structure and function of various types of extracellular matrix, the construction of three-dimensional extracellular matrix scaffolds, and their tissue engineering applications, with a focus on translation of these novel tissue engineered products to the clinic. We will also present an outlook on future perspectives of the extracellular matrix in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. The application of an enamel matrix protein derivative (Emdogain) in regenerative periodontal therapy: a review.

    OpenAIRE

    Sculean, A.; Schwarz, F.; Becker, J.; Brecx, M.

    2007-01-01

    Regenerative periodontal therapy aims at reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures such as new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Findings from basic research indicate that enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) has a key role in periodontal wound healing. Histological results from animal and human studies have shown that treatment with EMD promotes periodontal regeneration. Moreover, clinical studies have indicated that treatment with EMD positively i...

  3. Electric field as a potential directional cue in homing of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to cutaneous wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimolag, Eliza; Borowczyk-Michalowska, Julia; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Skupien-Rabian, Bozena; Karnas, Elzbieta; Lasota, Slawomir; Sroka, Jolanta; Drukala, Justyna; Madeja, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells are thought to participate and enhance the healing process contributing to skin cells or releasing regulatory cytokines. Directional cell migration in a weak direct current electric field (DC-EF), known as electrotaxis, may be a way of cell recruitment to the wound site. Here we examined the influence of electric field on bone marrow adherent cells (BMACs) and its potential role as a factor attracting mesenchymal stem cells to cutaneous wounds. We observed that in an external EF, BMAC movement was accelerated and highly directed with distinction of two cell populations migrating toward opposite poles: mesenchymal stem cells migrated toward the cathode, whereas macrophages toward the anode. Analysis of intracellular pathways revealed that macrophage electrotaxis mostly depended on Rho family small GTPases and calcium ions, but interruption of PI3K and Arp2/3 had the most pronounced effect on electrotaxis of MSCs. However, in all cases we observed only a partial decrease in directionality of cell movement after inhibition of certain proteins. Additionally, although we noticed the accumulation of EGFR at the cathodal side of MSCs, it was not involved in electrotaxis. Moreover, the cell reaction to EF was very dynamic with first symptoms occurring within <1min. In conclusion, the physiological DC-EF may act as a factor positioning bone marrow cells within a wound bed and the opposite direction of MSC and macrophage movement did not result either from utilizing different signalling or redistribution of investigated cell surface receptors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Strontium-89 for prostate cancer with bone metastases. The potential of cancer control and improvement of overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Isao

    2014-01-01

    Strontium-89 (Sr-89) has been considered to have a tumoricidal effect with minimal adverse events. However, few reports have investigated these effects in detail. In this study, we examined the tumoricidal and pain-relief effects of Sr-89 on prostate cancer with bone metastasis as well as survival. A retrospective study was performed involving 31 prostate cancer patients with bone metastasis treated with Sr-89. Using prostate specific antigen (PSA) as an evaluation criterion of cancer control, patients were divided into PSA responder and non-responder groups, and the survival rates of these groups were compared. In addition, using the total amount of painkillers administered as an evaluation criterion of pain relief, patients were divided into pain responder and non-responder groups, and the survival rates of these groups were also compared. As secondary investigation items, age, PSA (ng/ml), pain site, extent of the disease, the presence or absence of castration-resistant prostatic cancer (CRPC), the presence or absence of a past medical history of treatment with docetaxel in CRPC cases, Gleason Score, hemoglobin (g/dl), platelet (Plt) (/μl), serum carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ng/ml), and bone-alkaline phosphatase (BAP) (U/l) were investigated. Longer survival was expected for the PSA responder group than for the PSA non-responder group, and whether the spine was the pain site and the presence or absence of CRPC were useful as predictors of this. Plt was suggested to be a useful indicator. Furthermore, the survival time was significantly longer in the pain responder group than in the pain non-responder group, and whether the pain site was present in the spine was considered to be a predictor; however, no significant difference was noted in any of the items assumed to be biomarkers. Sr-89 has the potential to control PSA and prolong survival. A large-scale prospective study of the therapeutic effect of Sr-89 is expected. (author)

  5. Multifunctional nanodiamonds in regenerative medicine: Recent advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Jonathan; Pacelli, Settimio; Paul, Arghya

    2017-09-10

    With recent advances in the field of nanomedicine, many new strategies have emerged for diagnosing and treating diseases. At the forefront of this multidisciplinary research, carbon nanomaterials have demonstrated unprecedented potential for a variety of regenerative medicine applications including novel drug delivery platforms that facilitate the localized and sustained release of therapeutics. Nanodiamonds (NDs) are a unique class of carbon nanoparticles that are gaining increasing attention for their biocompatibility, highly functional surfaces, optical properties, and robust physical properties. Their remarkable features have established NDs as an invaluable regenerative medicine platform, with a broad range of clinically relevant applications ranging from targeted delivery systems for insoluble drugs, bioactive substrates for stem cells, and fluorescent probes for long-term tracking of cells and biomolecules in vitro and in vivo. This review introduces the synthesis techniques and the various routes of surface functionalization that allow for precise control over the properties of NDs. It also provides an in-depth overview of the current progress made toward the use of NDs in the fields of drug delivery, tissue engineering, and bioimaging. Their future outlook in regenerative medicine including the current clinical significance of NDs, as well as the challenges that must be overcome to successfully translate the reviewed technologies from research platforms to clinical therapies will also be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Human dental pulp stem cells: Applications in future regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potdar, Pravin D; Jethmalani, Yogita D

    2015-06-26

    Stem cells are pluripotent cells, having a property of differentiating into various types of cells of human body. Several studies have developed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from various human tissues, peripheral blood and body fluids. These cells are then characterized by cellular and molecular markers to understand their specific phenotypes. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are having a MSCs phenotype and they are differentiated into neuron, cardiomyocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, liver cells and β cells of islet of pancreas. Thus, DPSCs have shown great potentiality to use in regenerative medicine for treatment of various human diseases including dental related problems. These cells can also be developed into induced pluripotent stem cells by incorporation of pluripotency markers and use for regenerative therapies of various diseases. The DPSCs are derived from various dental tissues such as human exfoliated deciduous teeth, apical papilla, periodontal ligament and dental follicle tissue. This review will overview the information about isolation, cellular and molecular characterization and differentiation of DPSCs into various types of human cells and thus these cells have important applications in regenerative therapies for various diseases. This review will be most useful for postgraduate dental students as well as scientists working in the field of oral pathology and oral medicine.

  7. Alkaline Materials and Regenerative Endodontics: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Kahler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Periapical health is the primary goal of endodontic treatment in mature and immature teeth. In addition, the goals of treatment of immature teeth with arrested root development include root growth to length and maturation of the apex, as well as thickening of the canal wall. These goals are valid for immature teeth that have been subjected to trauma and dental caries or that are the result of developmental anomalies that expose the tooth to the risk of pulp necrosis and consequently result in the cessation of root maturation. Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs have been described as a “paradigm shift” in the treatment of immature teeth with pulp necrosis and underdeveloped roots, as there is the potential for further root maturation and return of vitality. Treatment with REPs is advocated as the treatment of choice for immature teeth with pulp necrosis. REP protocols involve the use of alkaline biomaterials, primarily sodium hypochlorite, calcium hydroxide, mineral trioxide aggregates and Biodentine, and are the essential components of a successful treatment regimen.

  8. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Fernandes Vianna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells. Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics.

  9. Regenerative Medicine for Battlefield Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Dentistry Indiana-University-Purdue University Indianapolis 1121 W. Michigan St. Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA 3 School of Informatics and Computing...Compared to mammals, amphibians have the advantage of ease and low cost of maintenance, rapid wound healing , no requirement for bone fixation, ease of...period of two hours, and then returned to artificial pond water. The wounds healed within one week without other treatment. 15 Defects of 50

  10. Engineered, axially-vascularized osteogenic grafts from human adipose-derived cells to treat avascular necrosis of bone in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Tarek; Osinga, Rik; Todorov, Atanas; Haumer, Alexander; Tchang, Laurent A; Epple, Christian; Allafi, Nima; Menzi, Nadia; Largo, René D; Kaempfen, Alexandre; Martin, Ivan; Schaefer, Dirk J; Scherberich, Arnaud

    2017-11-01

    Avascular necrosis of bone (AVN) leads to sclerosis and collapse of bone and joints. The standard of care, vascularized bone grafts, is limited by donor site morbidity and restricted availability. The aim of this study was to generate and test engineered, axially vascularized SVF cells-based bone substitutes in a rat model of AVN. SVF cells were isolated from lipoaspirates and cultured onto porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds within a perfusion-based bioreactor system for 5days. The resulting constructs were inserted into devitalized bone cylinders mimicking AVN-affected bone. A ligated vascular bundle was inserted upon subcutaneous implantation of constructs in nude rats. After 1 and 8weeks in vivo, bone formation and vascularization were analyzed. Newly-formed bone was found in 80% of SVF-seeded scaffolds after 8weeks but not in unseeded controls. Human ALU+cells in the bone structures evidenced a direct contribution of SVF cells to bone formation. A higher density of regenerative, M2 macrophages was observed in SVF-seeded constructs. In both experimental groups, devitalized bone was revitalized by vascularized tissue after 8 weeks. SVF cells-based osteogenic constructs revitalized fully necrotic bone in a challenging AVN rat model of clinically-relevant size. SVF cells contributed to accelerated initial vascularization, to bone formation and to recruitment of pro-regenerative endogenous cells. Avascular necrosis (AVN) of bone often requires surgical treatment with autologous bone grafts, which is surgically demanding and restricted by significant donor site morbidity and limited availability. This paper describes a de novo engineered axially-vascularized bone graft substitute and tests the potential to revitalize dead bone and provide efficient new bone formation in a rat model. The engineering of an osteogenic/vasculogenic construct of clinically-relevant size with stromal vascular fraction of human adipose, combined to an arteriovenous bundle is described. This

  11. Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy for Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Fourteen days post hMSC administration , non-invasive imaging showed an overall delay of tumor growth in mice treated with either OPGwt or OPGmut when...F. Salem, Q. Gong, A. Witkiewicz, D. T. Denhardt, C. J. Yeo, and H. A. Arafat. 2010. Induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 by nicotine in...review, and/or revision of themanuscript:A. Sawant, J. Deshane, S. Ponnazhagan Administrative , technical, or material support (i.e., reporting or orga

  12. Development of Novel Biocomposite Scaffold of Chitosan-Gelatin/Nanohydroxyapatite for Potential Bone Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Yang; Liu, Ouyang; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Shuai; Feng, Xiao-Bo; Shao, Zeng-Wu; Yang, Cao; Yang, Shu-Hua; Hong, Ji-Bo

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a three-dimensional chitosan-gelatin/nanohydroxyapatite (ChG/nHaP) scaffold was successfully fabricated and characterized in terms of swelling, degradation, cell proliferation, cell attachment, and mineralization characterizations. The ChG/nHaP scaffold was fabricated with a mean pore size of 100-180 μm. Our results showed that the physicochemical and biological properties of the scaffolds were affected by the presence of HaP. The swelling and degradation characteristics of the ChG scaffold were remarkably decreased by the addition of HaP. On the other hand, the presence of HaP remarkably improved the MC3T3-E1 cell attachment and cell growth in the scaffold membrane. The biocompatible nature of the ChG/nHaP scaffold leads to the development of finely scaled mineral deposits on the scaffold membrane. Thus, HaP played an important role in improving the biological performance of the scaffold. Therefore, the ChG/nHaP scaffold could be applied as a suitable material for bone tissue engineering applications.

  13. FACILE SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF CELLULOSE-CHITOSAN-HYDROXYAPATITE COMPOSITE MATERIAL, A POTENTIAL MATERIAL FOR BONE TISSUE ENGINEERING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mututuvari, Tamutsiwa M.; Harkins, April L.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is often used as a bone-implant material because it is biocompatible and osteoconductive. However, HAp possesses poor rheological properties and it is inactive against disease-causing microbes. To improve these properties, we developed a green method to synthesize multifunctional composites containing: (1) cellulose (CEL) to impart mechanical strength; (2) chitosan (CS) to induce antibacterial activity thereby maintaining a microbe-free wound site; and (3) HAp. In this method, CS and CEL were co-dissolved in an ionic liquid (IL) and then regenerated from water. HAp was subsequently formed in situ by alternately soaking [CEL+CS] composites in aqueous solutions of CaCl2 and Na2HPO4. At least 88% of IL used was recovered for reuse by distilling the aqueous washings of [CEL+CS]. The composites were characterized using FTIR, XRD and SEM. These composites retained the desirable properties of their constituents. For example, the tensile strength of the composites was enhanced 1.9X by increasing CEL loading from 20% to 80%. Incorporating CS in the composites resulted in composites which inhibited the growth of both Gram positive (MRSA, S. aureus and VRE) and Gram negative (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) bacteria. These findings highlight the potential use of [CEL+CS+HAp] composites as scaffolds in bone tissue engineering. PMID:23595871

  14. Potential Bone to Implant Contact Area of Short Versus Standard Implants: An In Vitro Micro-Computed Tomography Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Alessandro; DʼIsidoro, Orlando; Bambini, Fabrizio; Putignano, Angelo

    2016-02-01

    To compare the available potential bone-implant contact (PBIC) area of standard and short dental implants by micro-computed tomography (μCT) assessment. Three short implants with different diameters (4.5 × 6 mm, 4.1 × 7 mm, and 4.1 × 6 mm) and 2 standard implants (3.5 × 10 mm and 3.3 × 9 mm) with diverse design and surface features were scanned with μCT. Cross-sectional images were obtained. Image data were manually processed to find the plane that corresponds to the most coronal contact point between the crestal bone and implant. The available PBIC was calculated for each sample. Later on, the cross-sectional slices were processed by a 3-dimensional (3D) software, and 3D images of each sample were used for descriptive analysis and display the microtopography and macrotopography. The wide-diameter short implant (4.5 × 6 mm) showed the higher PBIC (210.89 mm) value followed by the standard (178.07 mm and 185.37 mm) and short implants (130.70 mm and 110.70 mm). Wide-diameter short implants show a surface area comparable with standard implants. Micro-CT analysis is a promising technique to evaluate surface area in dental implants with different macrodesign, microdesign, and surface features.

  15. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  16. Motor-Evoked Potential Confirmation of Functional Improvement by Transplanted Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell in the Ischemic Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dong-Kyu; Park, Sang-In; Han, Young-Min; Jang, Kyung-Sool; Park, Moon-Seo; Chung, Young-An; Kim, Min-Wook; Maeng, Lee-So; Huh, Pil-Woo; Yoo, Do-Sung; Jung, Seong-Whan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on the motor pathway in the transient ischemic rat brain that were transplanted through the carotid artery, measuring motor-evoked potential (MEP) in the four limbs muscle and the atlantooccipital membrane, which was elicited after monopolar and bipolar transcortical stimulation. After monopolar stimulation, the latency of MEP was significantly prolonged, and the amplitude was less reduced in the BMSC group in comparison with the control group (P < .05). MEPs induced by bipolar stimulation in the left forelimb could be measured in 40% of the BMSC group and the I wave that was not detected in the control group was also detected in 40% of the BMSC group. Our preliminary results imply that BMSCs transplanted to the ischemic rat brain mediate effects on the functional recovery of the cerebral motor cortex and the motor pathway. PMID:21772790

  17. Motor-Evoked Potential Confirmation of Functional Improvement by Transplanted Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell in the Ischemic Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Kyu Jang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs on the motor pathway in the transient ischemic rat brain that were transplanted through the carotid artery, measuring motor-evoked potential (MEP in the four limbs muscle and the atlantooccipital membrane, which was elicited after monopolar and bipolar transcortical stimulation. After monopolar stimulation, the latency of MEP was significantly prolonged, and the amplitude was less reduced in the BMSC group in comparison with the control group (<.05. MEPs induced by bipolar stimulation in the left forelimb could be measured in 40% of the BMSC group and the I wave that was not detected in the control group was also detected in 40% of the BMSC group. Our preliminary results imply that BMSCs transplanted to the ischemic rat brain mediate effects on the functional recovery of the cerebral motor cortex and the motor pathway.

  18. Microtomographic and morphometric characterization of a bioceramic bone substitute in dental implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Meleo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, bone tissue regeneration studies have led to a deeper knowledge of chemical and structural features of the best biomaterials to be used as replacements for lost bone structures, with the autologus bone still today the only graft material able to ostegenerate, osteinduct and/or osteoconduct. The difficulties of the small available amount of autologus bone, together with morbidity of a second surgical operation on the same patient, have been overcome using both synthetic and biologic substitute bones. The possibility of investigating morphometric characteristics of substitute bones makes it possible to evaluate the predictability of regenerative processes and, so far, a range of different methods have been used for the purpose. X-ray microtomography (micro-CT is a miniaturized form of conventional tomography, able to analyze the internal structure of small objects, performing three-dimensional images with high spatial resolution (<10 micron pixel size. For a correct analysis, samples need not be altered or treated in any way, as micro-CT is a non-invasive and non-destructive technique. It shows promising results in biomaterial studies and tissue engineering. This work shows the potential applications of this microtomographic technique by means of an in vitro analysis system, in characterizing morphometric features of human bone tissue, and contributes to the use of this technique in studies concerning biomaterials and bioscaffolds inserted in bone tissue.

  19. Endochondral Priming: A Developmental Engineering Strategy for Bone Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Fiona E; McNamara, Laoise M

    2017-04-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have significant potential to treat bone pathologies by exploiting the capacity for bone progenitors to grow and produce tissue constituents under specific biochemical and physical conditions. However, conventional tissue engineering approaches, which combine stem cells with biomaterial scaffolds, are limited as the constructs often degrade, due to a lack of vascularization, and lack the mechanical integrity to fulfill load bearing functions, and as such are not yet widely used for clinical treatment of large bone defects. Recent studies have proposed that in vitro tissue engineering approaches should strive to simulate in vivo bone developmental processes and, thereby, imitate natural factors governing cell differentiation and matrix production, following the paradigm recently defined as "developmental engineering." Although developmental engineering strategies have been recently developed that mimic specific aspects of the endochondral ossification bone formation process, these findings are not widely understood. Moreover, a critical comparison of these approaches to standard biomaterial-based bone tissue engineering has not yet been undertaken. For that reason, this article presents noteworthy experimental findings from researchers focusing on developing an endochondral-based developmental engineering strategy for bone tissue regeneration. These studies have established that in vitro approaches, which mimic certain aspects of the endochondral ossification process, namely the formation of the cartilage template and the vascularization of the cartilage template, can promote mineralization and vascularization to a certain extent both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, this article outlines specific experimental challenges that must be overcome to further exploit the biology of endochondral ossification and provide a tissue engineering construct for clinical treatment of large bone/nonunion defects and obviate the need for

  20. Cell and biomolecule delivery for regenerative medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ian O; Ma, Peter X, E-mail: mapx@umich.ed [Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Regenerative medicine is an exciting field that aims to create regenerative alternatives to harvest tissues for transplantation. In this approach, the delivery of cells and biological molecules plays a central role. The scaffold (synthetic temporary extracellular matrix) delivers cells to the regenerative site and provides three-dimensional environments for the cells. To fulfil these functions, we design biodegradable polymer scaffolds with structural features on multiple size scales. To enhance positive cell-material interactions, we design nano-sized structural features in the scaffolds to mimic the natural extracellular matrix. We also integrate micro-sized pore networks to facilitate mass transport and neo tissue regeneration. We also design novel polymer devices and self-assembled nanospheres for biomolecule delivery to recapitulate key events in developmental and wound healing processes. Herein, we present recent work in biomedical polymer synthesis, novel processing techniques, surface engineering and biologic delivery. Examples of enhanced cellular/tissue function and regenerative outcomes of these approaches are discussed to demonstrate the excitement of the biomimetic scaffold design and biologic delivery in regenerative medicine. (topical review)

  1. Cultivating regenerative medicine innovation in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Dominique S; Thorsteinsdóttir, Halla; Singer, Peter A; Daar, Abdallah S

    2010-01-01

    While China has become a significant contributor and prolific publisher in regenerative medicine, its role in the field is not well understood. We analyze how capacity in regenerative medicine was built in China to identify some of its main strengths and challenges. This case study of regenerative medicine in China is primarily based on interviews with experts in China, including researchers, policy makers, clinicians, representatives of firms and regulators. Our analysis shows that diverse groups are active in this field in China. Leading research groups are contributing extensively to international peer-reviewed journals. Strong governmental support and recruitment of highly trained Chinese scientists from abroad has made it possible for China to rapidly build up capacity in regenerative medicine. However, some hospitals in China are offering stem cell therapies with limited scientific evidence supporting their efficacy/safety, and international skepticism of medical research in China presents a challenge to the development of the field. China has been able to catapult itself into the forefront of regenerative medicine but needs to address current regulatory challenges in order to secure its position in this emerging field.

  2. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α: A Potential Factor for the Enhancement of Osseointegration between Dental Implants and Tissue-Engineered Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duohong Zou

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tissue-engineered bones are widely utilized to protect healthy tissue, reduce pain, and increase the success rate of dental implants. one of the most challenging obstacles lies in obtaining effective os-seointegration between dental implants and tissue-engineered structures. Deficiencies in vascularization, osteogenic factors, oxygen, and other nutrients inside the tissue-engineered bone during the early stages following implantation all inhibit effective osseointe-gration. Oxygen is required for aerobic metabolism in bone and blood vessel tissues, but oxygen levels inside tissue-engineered bone are not suf-ficient for cell proliferation. HIF-1α is a pivotal regulator of hypoxic and ischemic vascular responses, driving transcriptional activation of hundreds of genes involved in vascular reactivity, angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, and osteogenesis.The hypothesis: Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α seems a potential factor for the enhancement of osseointegration between dental implants and tissue-engineered bone.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Enhancement of HIF-1α protein expression is recognized as the most promising approach for angiogenesis, because it can induce multiple angiogenic targets in a coordinated manner. Therefore, it will be a novel potential therapeutic methods targeting HIF-1α expression to enhance osseointegration be-tween dental implants and tissue-engineered bone.

  3. A Novel Surgical Procedure for Er:YAG Laser-Assisted Periodontal Regenerative Therapy: Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoichi; Aoki, Akira; Sakai, Kazuto; Mizutani, Koji; Meinzer, Walter; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate an Er:YAG laser (ErL) application for periodontal regenerative surgery in angular bone defects at nine sites in six patients. Debridement was thoroughly performed using a combination of curettage with a Gracey-type curette and ErL irradiation at a panel setting of 70 mJ/pulse and 20 Hz with sterile saline spray. After applying an enamel matrix derivative and autogenous bone grafting, ErL was used to form a blood clot coagulation on the grafted bone surface at 50 mJ/pulse and 20 Hz without water spray for approximately 30 seconds. Twelve months after surgery the mean probing depth had improved from 6.2 mm to 2.0 mm, the mean clinical attachment level had reduced from 7.5 mm to 3.4 mm, and bleeding on probing had improved from (+) to (-). Mean intrabony defect depth decreased from 6.0 mm before surgery to 1.0 mm 12 months after surgery. A novel procedure for periodontal regenerative surgery applying ErL irradiation for thorough decontamination during debridement as well as blood coagulation following autogenous bone grafting seems to have achieved favorable and stable healing of periodontal pockets with significant clinical improvement and desirable regeneration of angular bone defects, including one-wall defects.

  4. Does size difference in allogeneic cancellous bone granules loaded with differentiated autologous cultured osteoblasts affect osteogenic potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Uk; Chung, Yang-Guk; Kim, Seok-Jung; Oh, Il-Hoan; Kim, Yong-Sik; Ju, Sung-Hun

    2014-02-01

    We study the efficacy of bone regeneration by using two differently sized allogeneic cancellous bone granules loaded with autologous cultured osteoblasts in a rabbit model. Critical-sized bone defects of the radial shaft were made in 40 New Zealand White rabbits. Small allogeneic bone granules (150-300 μm in diameter) loaded with cultured differentiated autologous osteoblasts were implanted into one forearm (SBG group) and large bone granules (500-710 μm) loaded with osteoblasts were implanted into the forearm of the other side (LBG group). Radiographic evaluations were performed at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks and histology and micro-CT image analysis were carried out at 6 and 12 weeks post-implantation. On radiographic evaluation, the LBG group showed a higher bone quantity index at 3 and 6 weeks post-implantation (P bone volume and surface area than the SBG group at 6 weeks (P bone formation and maturation in the SBG group. Thus, the two differently sized allogeneic bone granules loaded with co-cultured autologous osteoblasts show no differences in the amount of bone regeneration, although the SBG group exhibits faster progression of bone regeneration and remodeling. This method might therefore provide benefits, such as a short healing time and easy application in an injectable form, in a clinical setting.

  5. Novel modeling of combinatorial miRNA targeting identifies SNP with potential role in bone density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Coronnello

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators that bind to their target mRNAs through base complementarity. Predicting miRNA targets is a challenging task and various studies showed that existing algorithms suffer from high number of false predictions and low to moderate overlap in their predictions. Until recently, very few algorithms considered the dynamic nature of the interactions, including the effect of less specific interactions, the miRNA expression level, and the effect of combinatorial miRNA binding. Addressing these issues can result in a more accurate miRNA:mRNA modeling with many applications, including efficient miRNA-related SNP evaluation. We present a novel thermodynamic model based on the Fermi-Dirac equation that incorporates miRNA expression in the prediction of target occupancy and we show that it improves the performance of two popular single miRNA target finders. Modeling combinatorial miRNA targeting is a natural extension of this model. Two other algorithms show improved prediction efficiency when combinatorial binding models were considered. ComiR (Combinatorial miRNA targeting, a novel algorithm we developed, incorporates the improved predictions of the four target finders into a single probabilistic score using ensemble learning. Combining target scores of multiple miRNAs using ComiR improves predictions over the naïve method for target combination. ComiR scoring scheme can be used for identification of SNPs affecting miRNA binding. As proof of principle, ComiR identified rs17737058 as disruptive to the miR-488-5p:NCOA1 interaction, which we confirmed in vitro. We also found rs17737058 to be significantly associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD in two independent cohorts indicating that the miR-488-5p/NCOA1 regulatory axis is likely critical in maintaining BMD in women. With increasing availability of comprehensive high-throughput datasets from patients ComiR is expected to become an essential

  6. Emerging regenerative approaches for periodontal reconstruction: a consensus report from the AAP Regeneration Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, David L; Cobb, Charles M; Bashutski, Jill D; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Lin, Zhao; Mandelaris, George A; McAllister, Bradley S; Murakami, Shinya; Rios, Hector F

    2015-02-01

    Historically, periodontal regeneration has focused predominantly on bone substitutes and/or barrier membrane application to provide for defect fill and/or selected cell repopulation of the lesion. More recently, a number of technologies have evolved that can be viewed as emerging therapeutic approaches for periodontal regeneration, and these technologies were considered in the review paper and by the consensus group. The goal of this consensus report on emerging regenerative approaches for periodontal hard and soft tissue reconstruction was to develop a consensus document based on the accompanying review paper and on additional materials submitted before and at the consensus group session. The review paper was sent to all the consensus group participants in advance of the consensus conference. In addition and also before the conference, individual consensus group members submitted additional material for consideration by the group. At the conference, each consensus group participant introduced themselves and provided disclosure of any potential conflicts of interest. The review paper was briefly presented by two of the authors and discussed by the consensus group. A discussion of each of the following topics then occurred based on the content of the review: a general summary of the topic, implications for patient-reported outcomes, and suggested research priorities for the future. As each topic was discussed based on the review article, supplemental information was then added that the consensus group agreed on. Last, an updated reference list was created. The application of protein and peptide therapy, cell-based therapy, genetic therapy, application of scaffolds, bone anabolics, and lasers were found to be emerging technologies for periodontal regeneration. Other approaches included the following: 1) therapies directed at the resolution of inflammation; 2) therapies that took into account the influence of the microbiome; 3) therapies involving the local regulation

  7. Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, S I; Pereira, H; Silva-Correia, J; Van Dijk, C N; Espregueira-Mendes, J; Oliveira, J M; Reis, R L

    2014-03-06

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has caused a revolution in present and future trends of medicine and surgery. In different tissues, advanced TERM approaches bring new therapeutic possibilities in general population as well as in young patients and high-level athletes, improving restoration of biological functions and rehabilitation. The mainstream components required to obtain a functional regeneration of tissues may include biodegradable scaffolds, drugs or growth factors and different cell types (either autologous or heterologous) that can be cultured in bioreactor systems (in vitro) prior to implantation into the patient. Particularly in the ankle, which is subject to many different injuries (e.g. acute, chronic, traumatic and degenerative), there is still no definitive and feasible answer to 'conventional' methods. This review aims to provide current concepts of TERM applications to ankle injuries under preclinical and/or clinical research applied to skin, tendon, bone and cartilage problems. A particular attention has been given to biomaterial design and scaffold processing with potential use in osteochondral ankle lesions.

  8. Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, S. I.; Pereira, H.; Silva-Correia, J.; Van Dijk, C. N.; Espregueira-Mendes, J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Reis, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has caused a revolution in present and future trends of medicine and surgery. In different tissues, advanced TERM approaches bring new therapeutic possibilities in general population as well as in young patients and high-level athletes, improving restoration of biological functions and rehabilitation. The mainstream components required to obtain a functional regeneration of tissues may include biodegradable scaffolds, drugs or growth factors and different cell types (either autologous or heterologous) that can be cultured in bioreactor systems (in vitro) prior to implantation into the patient. Particularly in the ankle, which is subject to many different injuries (e.g. acute, chronic, traumatic and degenerative), there is still no definitive and feasible answer to ‘conventional’ methods. This review aims to provide current concepts of TERM applications to ankle injuries under preclinical and/or clinical research applied to skin, tendon, bone and cartilage problems. A particular attention has been given to biomaterial design and scaffold processing with potential use in osteochondral ankle lesions. PMID:24352667

  9. Possible mechanisms of retinal function recovery with the use of cell therapy with bone marrow-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Camargo Siqueira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow has been proposed as a potential source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. In the eye, degeneration of neural cells in the retina is a hallmark of such widespread ocular diseases as age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa. Bone marrow is an ideal tissue for studying stem cells mainly because of its accessibility. Furthermore, there are a number of well-defined mouse models and cell surface markers that allow effective study of hematopoiesis in healthy and injured mice. Because of these characteristics and the experience of bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of hematological disease such as leukemia, bone marrow-derived stem cells have also become a major tool in regenerative medicine. Those cells may be able to restore the retina function through different mechanisms: A cellular differentiation, B paracrine effect, and C retinal pigment epithelium repair. In this review, we described these possible mechanisms of recovery of retinal function with the use of cell therapy with bone marrow-derived stem cells.

  10. Treadmill exercise with bone marrow stromal cells transplantation potentiates recovery of locomotor function after spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, You-Mi; Seo, Tae-Beom; Kim, Chang-Ju; Ji, Eun-Sang

    2017-06-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) is regarded as a promising candidate for the spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, we investigated whether treadmill exercise potentiate the effect of BM-SCs transplantation on the functional recovery in the SCI rats. The spinal cord contusion injury applied at the T9-T10 level using the impactor. Cultured BMSCs were transplanted into the lesion at 1 week after SCI induction. Treadmill exercise was conducted for 6 weeks. Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) scale for locomotor function was determined. Sprouting axons in the lesion cavity were detected by immunofluorescence staining for neurofilament-200. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and synapsin-I expressions were analyzed using western blotting. BMSCs transplantation improved BBB score and increased expressions of neurofilament-200, BDNF, and synapsin-I in the SCI rats. Treadmill exercise potentiated the improving effect of BMSCs transplantation on BBB score in the SCI rats. This potentiating effect of treadmill exercise could be ascribed to the enhancement of BDNF expression in the SCI rats.

  11. Regulation of regenerative periodontal healing by NAMPT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokhbehsaim, Marjan; Keser, Sema; Jäger, Andreas; Jepsen, Søren; Deschner, James

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. Obese individuals have an increased risk of periodontitis, and elevated circulating levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) may be a pathomechanistic link between both diseases. Recently, increased levels of NAMPT have also been found in patients with periodontitis, irrespective of the presence of obesity. This in vitro study sought to examine the effects of NAMPT on the regenerative capacity of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and, thereby, periodontal healing. PDL cells treated with enamel matrix derivative (EMD), which was used to mimic regenerative healing conditions in vitro, were grown in the presence and absence of NAMPT for up to 14 d. EMD stimulated significantly (P periodontal regeneration are counteracted by NAMPT. Enhanced levels of NAMPT, as found in obesity and periodontal inflammation, may compromise the regenerative capacity of PDL cells and, thereby, periodontal healing in the presence of EMD.

  12. Stem cell therapy for enhancement of bone consolidation in distraction osteogenesis: A contemporary review of experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Lin, S; Wang, B; Gu, W; Li, G

    2017-06-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) mobilises bone regenerative potential and avoids the complications of other treatments such as bone graft. The major disadvantage of DO is the length of time required for bone consolidation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used to promote bone formation with some good results. We hereby review the published literature on the use of MSCs in promoting bone consolidation during DO. Studies differed in animal type (mice, rabbit, dog, sheep), bone type (femur, tibia, skull), DO protocols and cell transplantation methods. The majority of studies reported that the transplantation of MSCs enhanced bone consolidation or formation in DO. Many questions relating to animal model, DO protocol and cell transplantation regime remain to be further investigated. Clinical trials are needed to test and confirm these findings from animal studies. Cite this article: Y. Yang, S. Lin, B. Wang, W. Gu, G. Li. Stem cell therapy for enhancement of bone consolidation in distraction osteogenesis: A contemporary review of experimental studies. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:385-390. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.66.BJR-2017-0023. © 2017 Li et al.

  13. Umbilical cord blood: a trustworthy source of multipotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaing, Tang-Her

    2014-01-01

    It is conservatively estimated that one in three individuals in the US might benefit from regenerative medicine therapy. However, the relation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to human blastocysts always stirs ethical, political, moral, and emotional debate over their use in research. Thus, for the reasonably foreseeable future, the march of regenerative medicine to the clinic will depend upon the development of non-ESC therapies. Current sources of non-ESCs easily available in large numbers can be found in the bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord blood (UCB). UCB provides an immune-compatible source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. Owing to inconsistent results, it is certainly an important and clinically relevant question whether UCB will prove to be therapeutically effective. This review will show that UCB contains multiple populations of multipotent stem cells, capable of giving rise to hematopoietic, epithelial, endothelial, and neural tissues both in vitro and in vivo. Here we raise the possibility that due to unique immunological properties of both the stem cell and non-stem cell components of cord blood, it may be possible to utilize allogeneic cells for regenerative applications without needing to influence or compromise the recipient immune system.

  14. New state of nanofibers in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Farideh; Abhari, Alireza; Nejati-Koshki, Kazem; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2017-03-01

    Regenerative medicine has discovered engineered nanofiber scaffolds enhancing regeneration process. These agents have an attractive property to mimic the native environment. They are excellent agents in binding the extracellular matrix of a cell to another cell. They help in the growth and multiplication of the cell and help in the differentiation of the cells which are required before the regeneration process. Regenerative medicine focuses on cellular therapies, origins of stem and progenitor cells, and on explaining how they persevere (or do not) in adult organisms and improvement of biomaterials. The focus of this review is on the application of nanofiber scaffolds.

  15. Collagen type I from bovine bone. Effect of animal age, bone anatomy and drying methodology on extraction yield, self-assembly, thermal behaviour and electrokinetic potential

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraro, Vincenza; Gaillard-Martinie, Brigitte; Sayd, Thierry; Chambon, Christophe; Anton, Marc; Sante-Lhoutellier, Veronique

    2017-01-01

    Natural collagen is easily available from animal tissues such as bones. Main limitations reported in the use of natural collagen are heterogeneity and loss of integrity during recovery. However, its natural complexity, functionality and bioactivity still remain to be achieved through synthetic and recombinant ways. Variability of physicochemical prope...

  16. [Our first experiences with autologous transplantation of bone marrow stem cells to treat pseudarthrosis, delayed fracture healing and long bone defects fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sír, M; Procházka, V; Gumulec, J; Pleva, L

    2009-03-01

    Traumatology and orthopaedics have undergone substantial progress in the use of new, sophisticated techniques, implants and navigation methods. Nevertheless, these new methods continue to fail in some instances. Regenerative medicine using the growth potential of stem cells that posses the ability to regenerate damaged tissues represent one of the possible ways forward. There is a potential for more comprehensive utilization of bone marrow stem cells that had for many years been used in transplant medicine. Traumatology and orthopaedics could utilise stem cells in the treatment of bone defects, i.e. in the treatment of pseudarthrosis, delayed fracture healing, defect fractures and aseptic bone necroses. Bone formation and growth is a complex, predominantly anabolic, process with a range of feedbacks. Nevertheless, it is the bone marrow where the necessary progenitors of bone growth are located. These are mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as well as thrombocytes containing a range of necessary growth factors. A number of studies showed positive results for stem cells treatment of pseudarthrosis, with only a fraction, however, being statistically significant in human medicine. This method was used in 11 patients of the Traumatology Centre of the Faculty Hospital in Ostrava, Czech Republic in 2008. The researched patients were treated for pseudarthrosis of long bones, delayed multifragmentary fracture haling and defect fractures of long bones. Autologous concentrate of bone marrow stem cells was applied in one session into the area of bone defect in a patient lightly anaesthetised with propofol. The results from this small sample of patients are not yet available. However, we are sharing our first experiences with this treatment option.

  17. Serum Heme Oxygenase-1 and BMP-7 Are Potential Biomarkers for Bone Metabolism in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-ling Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 has been reported to play a regulatory role in osteoclastogenesis. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP pathways induce osteoblastic differentiation and bone remodeling. Aims. To identify serum levels of HO-1, BMP-7, and Runt related-transcription factor 2 (Runx2 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and ankylosing spondylitis (AS and to investigate the relationships between HO-1, BMP-7, Runx2, and other common biomarkers for bone metabolism. Results. Serum levels of HO-1 and BMP-7 were revealed to be significantly higher in patients with RA or AS than in healthy controls (p<0.01. In RA group, HO-1 was positively correlated with BMP-7, Runx2, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b (TRAP-5b (p<0.05, resp., BMP-7 was positively correlated with Runx2 and TRAP-5b (p<0.05, resp., and Runx2 was negatively correlated with N-terminal midfragment of osteocalcin (NMID (p<0.05. In AS group, we observed identical correlation between HO-1 and BMP-7, but opposite correlations between BMP-7 and TRAP-5b and between Runx2 and NMID, when comparing with the RA cohort. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that HO-1 and BMP-7 are potential biomarkers for bone metabolism in patients with RA and AS. The different correlations between the bone markers point to distinct differences in bone remodeling pathways in the two types of arthritis.

  18. Bone ingrowth potential of electron beam and selective laser melting produced trabecular-like implant surfaces with and without a biomimetic coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemond, J E; Hannink, G; Verdonschot, N; Buma, P

    2013-03-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of trabecular-like implant surfaces produced by either selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM), with or without a biomimetic calciumphosphate coating, was examined in goats. For histological analysis and histomorphometry of bone ingrowth depth and bone implant contact specimens were implanted in the femoral condyle of goats. For mechanical push out tests to analyse mechanical implant fixation specimens were implanted in the iliac crest. The follow up periods were 4 (7 goats) and 15 weeks (7 goats). Both the SLM and EBM produced trabecular-like structures showed a variable bone ingrowth after 4 weeks. After 15 weeks good bone ingrowth was found in both implant types. Irrespective to the follow up period, and the presence of a coating, no histological differences in tissue reaction around SLM and EBM produced specimens was found. Histological no coating was detected at 4 and 15 weeks follow up. At both follow up periods the mechanical push out strength at the bone implant interface was significantly lower for the coated SLM specimens compared to the uncoated SLM specimens. The expected better ingrowth characteristics and mechanical fixation strength induced by the coating were not found. The lower mechanical strength of the coated specimens produced by SLM is a remarkable result, which might be influenced by the gross morphology of the specimens or the coating characteristics, indicating that further research is necessary.

  19. Scaffold-cell bone engineering in a validated preclinical animal model: precursors vs differentiated cell source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, A; Henkel, J; Woodruff, M A; Saifzadeh, S; Kirby, G; Zaiss, S; Gohlke, J; Reichert, J C; Nerlich, M; Schuetz, M A; Hutmacher, D W

    2017-07-01

    The properties of osteoblasts (OBs) isolated from the axial skeleton (tOBs) differ from OBs of the orofacial skeleton (mOBs) due to the different embryological origins of the bones. The aim of the study was to assess and compare the regenerative potential of allogenic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells with allogenic tOBs and allogenic mOBs in combination with a mPCL-TCP scaffold in critical-sized segmental bone defects in sheep tibiae. After 6 months, the tibiae were explanted and underwent biomechanical testing, micro-computed tomography (microCT) and histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Allogenic MPCs demonstrated a trend towards a better outcome in biomechanical testing and the mean values of newly formed bone. Biomechanical, microCT and histological analysis showed no significant differences in the bone regeneration potential of tOBs and mOBs in our in vitro study, as well as in the bone regeneration potential of different cell types in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Bone Regeneration from PLGA Micro-Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Ortega-Oller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA is one of the most widely used synthetic polymers for development of delivery systems for drugs and therapeutic biomolecules and as component of tissue engineering applications. Its properties and versatility allow it to be a reference polymer in manufacturing of nano- and microparticles to encapsulate and deliver a wide variety of hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules. It additionally facilitates and extends its use to encapsulate biomolecules such as proteins or nucleic acids that can be released in a controlled way. This review focuses on the use of nano/microparticles of PLGA as a delivery system of one of the most commonly used growth factors in bone tissue engineering, the bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2. Thus, all the needed requirements to reach a controlled delivery of BMP2 using PLGA particles as a main component have been examined. The problems and solutions for the adequate development of this system with a great potential in cell differentiation and proliferation processes under a bone regenerative point of view are discussed.

  1. Bone Regeneration from PLGA Micro-Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; O'Valle, Francisco; Jódar-Reyes, Ana Belén; Peula-García, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) is one of the most widely used synthetic polymers for development of delivery systems for drugs and therapeutic biomolecules and as component of tissue engineering applications. Its properties and versatility allow it to be a reference polymer in manufacturing of nano- and microparticles to encapsulate and deliver a wide variety of hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules. It additionally facilitates and extends its use to encapsulate biomolecules such as proteins or nucleic acids that can be released in a controlled way. This review focuses on the use of nano/microparticles of PLGA as a delivery system of one of the most commonly used growth factors in bone tissue engineering, the bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). Thus, all the needed requirements to reach a controlled delivery of BMP2 using PLGA particles as a main component have been examined. The problems and solutions for the adequate development of this system with a great potential in cell differentiation and proliferation processes under a bone regenerative point of view are discussed.

  2. Tissue source determines the differentiation potentials of mesenchymal stem cells: a comparative study of human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liangliang; Liu, Yamei; Sun, Yuxin; Wang, Bin; Xiong, Yunpu; Lin, Weiping; Wei, Qiushi; Wang, Haibin; He, Wei; Wang, Bin; Li, Gang

    2017-12-06

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess intrinsic regeneration capacity as part of the repair process in response to injury, such as fracture or other tissue injury. Bone marrow and adipose tissue are the major sources of MSCs. However, which cell type is more effective and suitable for cell therapy remains to be answered. The intrinsic molecular mechanism supporting the assertion has also been lacking. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs) and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ATSCs) were isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue obtained after total hip arthroplasty. ATSCs and BMSCs were incubated in standard growth medium. Trilineage differentiation including osteogenesis, adipogenesis, and chondrogenesis was performed by addition of relevant induction mediums. The expression levels of trilineage differentiation marker genes were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR. The methylation status of CpG sites of Runx2, PPARγ, and Sox9 promoters were checked by bisulfite sequencing. In addition, ectopic bone formation and calvarial bone critical defect models were used to evaluate the bone regeneration ability of ATSCs and BMSCs in vivo. The results showed that BMSCs possessed stronger osteogenic and lower adipogenic differentiation potentials compared to ATSCs. There was no significant difference in the chondrogenic differentiation potential. The CpG sites of Runx2 promoter in BMSCs were hypomethylated, while in ATSCs they were hypermethylated. The CpG sites of PPARγ promoter in ATSCs were hypomethylated, while in BMSCs they were hypermethylated. The methylation status of Sox9 promoter in BMSCs was only slightly lower than that in ATSCs. The epigenetic memory obtained from either bone marrow or adipose tissue favored MSC differentiation along an osteoblastic or adipocytic lineage. The methylation status of the main transcription factors controlling MSC fate contributes to the differential differentiation capacities of different source-derived MSCs.

  3. MRI tracking of SPIO labelled stem cells in a true regenerative environment, the regenerating limb of the axolotl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Hagensen, Mette

    displayed no significant effect on the rate of regeneration. Discussion: SPIO labelling for MRI cell tracking has shown promising results for regenerative therapies using stem cells. This study contributes to broaden the potential of SPIOs to track regenerating tissue in an inherently regenerative model......, facilitating the use of SPIOs in future chemically or genetically induced regenerative therapies. In addition, this study concludes that SPIO labelling and MRI tracking of axolotl stem cells allow for non-invasive longitudinal studies in this model, increasing the potential to draw knowledge from......Introduction: Regeneration is a widespread phenomenon functioning to maintain and restore normal form and function of cells, tissues, and in some cases organs or appendages. While mammals like mice and rats are typically employed as experimental models in regenerative research, these animals...

  4. Nanoengineered implant as a new platform for regenerative nanomedicine using 3D well-organized human cell spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Laetitia; Idoux-Gillet, Ysia; Wagner, Quentin; Eap, Sandy; Brasse, David; Schwinté, Pascale; Arruebo, Manuel; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    In tissue engineering, it is still rare today to see clinically transferable strategies for tissue-engineered graft production that conclusively offer better tissue regeneration than the already existing technologies, decreased recovery times, and less risk of complications. Here a novel tissue-engineering concept is presented for the production of living bone implants combining 1) a nanofibrous and microporous implant as cell colonization matrix and 2) 3D bone cell spheroids. This combination, double 3D implants, shows clinical relevant thicknesses for the treatment of an early stage of bone lesions before the need of bone substitutes. The strategy presented here shows a complete closure of a defect in nude mice calvaria after only 31 days. As a novel strategy for bone regenerative nanomedicine, it holds great promises to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of living bone implants. PMID:28138241

  5. Blood Vessel Formation and Bone Regeneration Potential of the Stromal Vascular Fraction Seeded on a Calcium Phosphate Scaffold in the Human Maxillary Sinus Floor Elevation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Farré-Guasch

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone substitutes are used as alternatives for autologous bone grafts in patients undergoing maxillary sinus floor elevation (MSFE for dental implant placement. However, bone substitutes lack osteoinductive and angiogenic potential. Addition of adipose stem cells (ASCs may stimulate osteogenesis and osteoinduction, as well as angiogenesis. We aimed to evaluate the vascularization in relation to bone formation potential of the ASC-containing stromal vascular fraction (SVF of adipose tissue, seeded on two types of calcium phosphate carriers, within the human MSFE model, in a phase I study. Autologous SVF was obtained from ten patients and seeded on β-tricalcium phosphate (n = 5 or biphasic calcium phosphate carriers (n = 5, and used for MSFE in a one-step surgical procedure. After six months, biopsies were obtained during dental implant placement, and the quantification of the number of blood vessels was performed using histomorphometric analysis and immunohistochemical stainings for blood vessel markers, i.e., CD34 and alpha-smooth muscle actin. Bone percentages seemed to correlate with blood vessel formation and were higher in study versus control biopsies in the cranial area, in particular in β-tricalcium phosphate-treated patients. This study shows the safety, feasibility, and efficiency of the use of ASCs in the human MSFE, and indicates a pro-angiogenic effect of SVF.

  6. Culture Systems for Regenerative Kidney Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    which is normally expressed in proximal and distal convoluted tubules and loops of Henle in humans, but is decreased or absent in adult mouse kidneys ...Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells into Intermediate Mesoderm That Forms Tubules Expressing Kidney Proximal Tubular Markers. Journal of the...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0468 TITLE: Culture Systems for Regenerative Kidney Therapy

  7. REGENERATIVE DESIGN PRACTICES IN NIGERIA: A CASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2017-07-01

    Jul 1, 2017 ... construction professionals within the study area were derived using Yaro Yamane's formular. A total of ... Regenerative design emerged to reconnect human aspirations and activities with the natural systems. ... mainstream practices by the designers – Architects, Engineers, Environmental managers and.

  8. Regenerative Payload for GSAT-3 & Advanced Communication ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Regenerative Payload for GSAT-3 & Advanced Communication Series Satellite. GSAT-4. 8 Ka -Band Spot Beams; 8 Narrow Band (64Kbps) Channels/ Beam; 1 Wide Band (2Mbps) Channel/ Beam;; 64 Kbps Signaling Channel; On-Board Switch Matrix; 8 Channel ...

  9. Regenerative electronic biosensors using supramolecular approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, X.; Rajan, N.; Routenberg, D.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Reed, M.

    2013-01-01

    A supramolecular interface for Si nanowire FETs has been developed with the aim of creating regenerative electronic biosensors. The key to the approach is Si-NWs functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), to which receptor moieties can be attached with an orthogonal supramolecular linker. Here we

  10. Development of hydrogels for regenerative engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Avci-Adali, Meltem; Alarçin, Emine; Cheng, Hao; Kashaf, Sara Saheb; Li, Yuxiao; Chawla, Aditya; Jang, Hae Lin; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-05-01

    The aim of regenerative engineering is to restore complex tissues and biological systems through convergence in the fields of advanced biomaterials, stem cell science, and developmental biology. Hydrogels are one of the most attractive biomaterials for regenerative engineering, since they can be engineered into tissue mimetic 3D scaffolds to support cell growth due to their similarity to native extracellular matrix. Advanced nano- and micro-technologies have dramatically increased the ability to control properties and functionalities of hydrogel materials by facilitating biomimetic fabrication of more sophisticated compositions and architectures, thus extending our understanding of cell-matrix interactions at the nanoscale. With this perspective, this review discusses the most commonly used hydrogel materials and their fabrication strategies for regenerative engineering. We highlight the physical, chemical, and functional modulation of hydrogels to design and engineer biomimetic tissues based on recent achievements in nano- and micro-technologies. In addition, current hydrogel-based regenerative engineering strategies for treating multiple tissues, such as musculoskeletal, nervous and cardiac tissue, are also covered in this review. The interaction of multiple disciplines including materials science, cell biology, and chemistry, will further play an important role in the design of functional hydrogels for the regeneration of complex tissues. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Sushmita [Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Group, Leeds Dental Institute, University of Leeds, LS29LU (United Kingdom); Kirkham, Jennifer [Biomineralisation Group, Leeds Dental Institute, University of Leeds, LS29LU (United Kingdom); NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds LS74SA (United Kingdom); Wood, David [Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Group, Leeds Dental Institute, University of Leeds, LS29LU (United Kingdom); Curran, Stephen [Smith and Nephew Research Centre, YO105DF (United Kingdom); Yang, Xuebin, E-mail: X.B.Yang@leeds.ac.uk [Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Group, Leeds Dental Institute, University of Leeds, LS29LU (United Kingdom); NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds LS74SA (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes wer