WorldWideScience

Sample records for bone neoplasms revision

  1. Bone morbidity in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, Sarah; Ocias, Lukas Frans; Vestergaard, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the classical Philadelphia chromosome-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms including essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and primary myelofibrosis often suffer from comorbidities, in particular, cardiovascular diseases and thrombotic events. Apparently, there is al...... mastocytosis (SM) where pathogenic mechanisms for bone manifestations probably involve effects of mast cell mediators on bone metabolism, the mechanisms responsible for increased fracture risk in other chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms are not known........ Chronic inflammation has been suggested to explain the initiation of clonal development and progression in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Decreased bone mineral density and enhanced fracture risk are well-known manifestations of many chronic systemic inflammatory diseases. As opposed to systemic...

  2. Primary bone neoplasms; Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Canine appendicular osteosarcoma is a serious cancer that causes lameness due to its aggressive local effects and death due to early and widespread metastases. Amputation alone is palliative, with a 10% rate of survival to 1 year. Cisplatin chemotherapy (with or without doxorubicin) improves the chances of survival, but metastatic cancer is still the cause of death in most affected dogs. Limb sparing may be a viable alternative in some dogs

  3. Primary bone neoplasms; Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Canine appendicular osteosarcoma is a serious cancer that causes lameness due to its aggressive local effects and death due to early and widespread metastases. Amputation alone is palliative, with a 10% rate of survival to 1 year. Cisplatin chemotherapy (with or without doxorubicin) improves the chances of survival, but metastatic cancer is still the cause of death in most affected dogs. Limb sparing may be a viable alternative in some dogs.

  4. Primary bone neoplasms in dogs: 90 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Trost

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of necropsy and biopsy cases of 90 primary bone tumors (89 malignant and one benign in dogs received over a period of 22 years at the Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, was performed. Osteosarcoma was the most prevalent bone tumor, accounting for 86.7% of all malignant primary bone neoplasms diagnosed. Most cases occurred in dogs of large and giant breeds with ages between 6 and 10-years-old. The neoplasms involved mainly the appendicular skeleton, and were 3.5 times more prevalent in the forelimbs than in the hindlimbs. Osteoblastic osteosarcoma was the predominant histological subtype. Epidemiological and pathological findings of osteosarcomas are reported and discussed.

  5. [Repairing bone defects of benign bone neoplasm by grafting of bioactive glass combined with autologous bone marrow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongwei; Sun, Junying; Wang, Yong; Yang, Xing; Zhu, Ershan

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the clinical application of grafting with bioactive glass (BG) and autologous bone marrow for defect after resection and curettage of benign bone neoplasm. From January 2004 to May 2007, 34 patients with bone defects were repaired. There were 21 males and 13 females with a mean age of 25.6 years (8 to 56 years). There were 14 cases of simple bone cysts, 6 cases of fibrous dysplasia, 3 cases of osteoid osteoma, 4 cases of non-ossifying fibroma, 2 cases of enchondroma and 3 cases of giant cell tumor of bone. Tumor sizes varied from 2.0 cm x 1.5 cm x 1.0 cm to 9.0 cm x 3.0 cm x 2.5 cm. Benign bone neoplasm was removed thoroughly with a curet or osteotome, bone defects ranged from 3.0 cm x 2.0 cm x 1.5 cm to 11.0 cm x 3.5 cm x 3.0 cm, which was closed-up with the mixtures of BG and autogenous red bone marrow. Six cases of pathologic fracture were fixed with steel plate or intramedullary nail. The postoperative systemic and local reactions were observed, and the regular X-ray examinations were performed to observe the bone healing. All the patients had good wound healing after operation. There was no yellow effusion nor white crystal and skin rash appeared around wound, indicating no allergic reaction occurred. A follow-up of 1 to 4 years (mean 24.6 months) showed satisfactory healing without complications. At averaged 16 weeks after operation, patients with bone tumor in lower limbs resumed walking independently and those with bone tumor in upper limbs resumed holding object. There was no tumor recurrence during follow-up. Radiographically, the interface between the implanted bone and host bone became fuzzy 1 month after implantation. Two months after operation, the BG was absorbed gradually, new bone formation could be seen in the defects. Four months after operation, implanted bone and host bone merged together, bone density increased. Six to ten months after operation, the majority of the implanted BG was absorbed and substituted for new bone, bone

  6. The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Elias; Pileri, Stefano A.; Harris, Nancy Lee; Stein, Harald; Siebert, Reiner; Advani, Ranjana; Ghielmini, Michele; Salles, Gilles A.; Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2016-01-01

    A revision of the nearly 8-year-old World Health Organization classification of the lymphoid neoplasms and the accompanying monograph is being published. It reflects a consensus among hematopathologists, geneticists, and clinicians regarding both updates to current entities as well as the addition of a limited number of new provisional entities. The revision clarifies the diagnosis and management of lesions at the very early stages of lymphomagenesis, refines the diagnostic criteria for some entities, details the expanding genetic/molecular landscape of numerous lymphoid neoplasms and their clinical correlates, and refers to investigations leading to more targeted therapeutic strategies. The major changes are reviewed with an emphasis on the most important advances in our understanding that impact our diagnostic approach, clinical expectations, and therapeutic strategies for the lymphoid neoplasms. PMID:26980727

  7. The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A revision of the nearly 8-year-old World Health Organization classification of the lymphoid neoplasms and the accompanying monograph is being published. It reflects a consensus among hematopathologists, geneticists, and clinicians regarding both updates to current entities as well as the addition of a limited number of new provisional entities.

  8. Philadelphia chromosome-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms: revised management recommendations from European LeukemiaNet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbui, Tiziano; Tefferi, Ayalew; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Passamonti, Francesco; Silver, Richard T; Hoffman, Ronald; Verstovsek, Srdan; Mesa, Ruben; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Hehlmann, Rȕdiger; Reiter, Andreas; Cervantes, Francisco; Harrison, Claire; Mc Mullin, Mary Frances; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Koschmieder, Steffen; Marchetti, Monia; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Finazzi, Guido; Kroeger, Nicolaus; Griesshammer, Martin; Birgegard, Gunnar; Barosi, Giovanni

    2018-02-27

    This document updates the recommendations on the management of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-neg MPNs) published in 2011 by the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) consortium. Recommendations were produced by multiple-step formalized procedures of group discussion. A critical appraisal of evidence by using Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was performed in the areas where at least one randomized clinical trial was published. Seven randomized controlled trials provided the evidence base; earlier phase trials also informed recommendation development. Key differences from the 2011 diagnostic recommendations included: lower threshold values for hemoglobin and hematocrit and bone marrow examination for diagnosis of polycythemia vera (PV), according to the revised WHO criteria; the search for complementary clonal markers, such as ASXL1, EZH2, IDH1/IDH2, and SRSF2 for the diagnosis of myelofibrosis (MF) in patients who test negative for JAK2V617, CALR or MPL driver mutations. Regarding key differences of therapy recommendations, both recombinant interferon alpha and the JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib are recommended as second-line therapies for PV patients who are intolerant or have inadequate response to hydroxyurea. Ruxolitinib is recommended as first-line approach for MF-associated splenomegaly in patients with intermediate-2 or high-risk disease; in case of intermediate-1 disease, ruxolitinib is recommended in highly symptomatic splenomegaly. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for transplant-eligible MF patients with high or intermediate-2 risk score. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is also recommended for transplant-eligible MF patients with intermediate-1 risk score who present with either refractory, transfusion-dependent anemia, blasts in peripheral blood > 2%, adverse cytogenetics, or high-risk mutations. In these situations, the transplant procedure should be

  9. Bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis of bone invasions of face and skull epitheliomas and ORL neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocquard, Claude.

    1975-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy has been considerably improved by the use of technetium 99m-labelled organic phosphates: the physical characteristics are almost ideal for detection and the extemporaneous labelling of the product is convenient. This study on 75 patients has proved the value of bone scintigraphy in evaluating the bone invasion of tumoral lesions affecting the face and skull. An 88% agreement was found for scintigraphy, radiography giving 81%. The technique allows a fast assessment of whole-body bone invasion from one examination, with no extra injection of radioactive product, and it is therefore possible to orient the radiological enquiry without having to X-ray the whole skeleton, which reduces the amount of irradiation delivered to the organism. From these observations it may be concluded that scintigraphy is a simple, harmless method, with many advantages, but its limits must be known and it must always be interpreted as a function of other clinical and radiological data. It should be systematic in research on the local spreading of face and skull epitheliomas, in neoplasms of the ORL sphere and in the search for bone metastases [fr

  10. The 2016 revision to the World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arber, Daniel A; Orazi, Attilio; Hasserjian, Robert; Thiele, Jürgen; Borowitz, Michael J; Le Beau, Michelle M; Bloomfield, Clara D; Cazzola, Mario; Vardiman, James W

    2016-05-19

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues was last updated in 2008. Since then, there have been numerous advances in the identification of unique biomarkers associated with some myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemias, largely derived from gene expression analysis and next-generation sequencing that can significantly improve the diagnostic criteria as well as the prognostic relevance of entities currently included in the WHO classification and that also suggest new entities that should be added. Therefore, there is a clear need for a revision to the current classification. The revisions to the categories of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia will be published in a monograph in 2016 and reflect a consensus of opinion of hematopathologists, hematologists, oncologists, and geneticists. The 2016 edition represents a revision of the prior classification rather than an entirely new classification and attempts to incorporate new clinical, prognostic, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic data that have emerged since the last edition. The major changes in the classification and their rationale are presented here. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Radioisotopic methods for the study of bone sarcoma and soft tissue neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongora, R.

    1988-01-01

    Radioisotopic methods are widely applied to investigations of bone sarcoma and soft tissue neoplasms. We have at our disposal molecules with osseous, tumoral or vascular tropism. Their use, as single agents or combination, is helpful in positive and differential diagnosis and provides nosological informations. They are also useful in treatment monitoring and in long-term follow-up.

  12. Bone sarcoma as a second malignant neoplasm in children: influence of radiation and genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, A.T.; Strong, L.C.; Li, F.P.; D'angio, G.J.; Schweisguth, O.; Freeman, A.I.; Jenkin, R.D.T.; Morris-Jones, P.; Nesbit, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Osteosarcoma or chondrosarcoma developed as a second malignant neoplasm (SMN) in 40 of 188 individuals with SMN whose first neoplasm occurred in childhood. A genetic susceptibility to cancer was found in 23; the SMN developed in an irradiated field in 32; both factors were present in 16; neither in one. When a genetic predisposition was present, radiation shortened the interval to SMN. The intervals between tumors and the age at which the bone sarcomas developed in relation to genetic disease and therapy were analyzed by a two-mutation hypothesis

  13. Proliferative, reparative, and reactive benign bone lesions that may be confused diagnostically with true osseous neoplasms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wick, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic problems attending intraosseous and parosteal pseudoneoplastic lesions can be radiographic, or histological, or both. Proliferations in this category may contain cellular fibro-osseous or chondro-osseous tissues that are difficult to separate microscopically from those seen in various true neoplasms of the bones. This review considers the clinicopathologic features of fibrous dysplasia, benign fibro-osseous lesions of the jawbones, osteofibrous dysplasia, metaphyseal fibrous defect, giant-cell reparative granuloma, "brown tumor" of hyperparathyroidism, synovial chondrometaplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, tumefactive chronic osteomyelitis, proliferative Paget disease, and polyvinylpyrrolidone storage disease of bone.

  14. Intra-arterial DSA in hypervascular bone neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlart, I.P.; Merk, J.; Baehren, W.

    1984-11-01

    In order to evaluate intra-arterial DSA in malignant bone tumors (osteosarcoma n=2, aggressive osteoblastoma n=1) three patients were examined angiographically including conventional arteriography and DSA. Compared with conventional angiograms DSA imaging demonstrated a reduced peripheral vascular information due to reduced spatial resolution. Advantages of DSA were an improved visualization of tumor blush and atypical venous return and in addition a reduction of volume rsp. concentration of the contrast material using a iodine concentration of 200 mg/ml for preoperative vascular mapping and of 300 mg/ml for diagnostic tumor imaging.

  15. Intra-arterial DSA in hypervascular bone neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Merk, J.; Baehren, W.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate intra-arterial DSA in malignant bone tumors (osteosarcoma n=2, aggressive osteoblastoma n=1) three patients were examined angiographically including conventional arteriography and DSA. Compared with conventional angiograms DSA imaging demonstrated a reduced peripheral vascular information due to reduced spatial resolution. Advantages of DSA were an improved visualization of tumor blush and atypical venous return and in addition a reduction of volume rsp. concentration of the contrast material using a iodine concentration of 200 mg/ml for preoperative vascular mapping and of 300 mg/ml for diagnostic tumor imaging. (orig.) [de

  16. Prognostic value of C-reactive protein levels in patients with bone neoplasms: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyi; Luo, Xujun; Liu, Zhongyue; Chen, Yanqiao; Li, Zhihong

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of retrospective studies that investigated the association of preoperative C-reactive protein (CRP) levels with the overall survival (OS) of patients with bone neoplasms. A detailed literature search was performed in the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Embase and PubMed databases up to August 28, 2017, for related research publications written in English. We extracted the data from these studies and combined the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the correlation between CRP levels and OS in patients with bone neoplasms. Five studies with a total of 816 participants from several countries were enrolled in this current meta-analysis. In a pooled analysis of all the publications, increased serum CRP levels had an adverse prognostic effect on the overall survival of patients with bone neoplasms. However, the combined data showed no significant relationship between the level of CRP and OS in Asian patients (HR = 1.73; 95% CI: 0.86-3.49; P = 0.125). Similar trends were observed in patients with bone neoplasms when stratified by ethnicity, histology, metastasis and study sample size. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that increased CRP expression indicates a poorer prognosis in patients with bone neoplasms. More prospective studies are needed to confirm the prognostic significance of CRP levels in patients with bone neoplasms.

  17. Myeloid Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subtil, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    The classification of myeloid neoplasms has undergone major changes and currently relies heavily on genetic abnormalities. Cutaneous manifestations of myeloid neoplasms may be the presenting sign of underlying bone marrow disease. Dermal infiltration by neoplastic cells may occur in otherwise normal skin or in sites of cutaneous inflammation. Leukemia cutis occasionally precedes evidence of blood and/or bone marrow involvement (aleukemic leukemia cutis). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nodular Fasciitis of the Posterior Chest Wall With Bone Invasion Mimicking a Malignant Neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Nicholas J; Finley, David J; Tsapakos, Michael J; Wong, Sandra L; Linos, Konstantinos

    2017-05-01

    Nodular fasciitis is a self-limiting benign fibroblastic/myofibroblastic proliferation, which typically presents as a rapidly growing mass resembling an aggressive lesion clinically. It can also mimic a sarcoma histologically, hence the frequent characterization as "pseudosarcoma." We describe a case of a 53-year-old man who presented with a posterior chest wall mass that on imaging showed erosion into the adjacent ribs. After resection, the diagnosis of nodular fasciitis was rendered. Bone erosion by nodular fasciitis is extremely rare and can resemble a malignant neoplasm radiologically. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Practical Implications of the 2016 Revision of the World Health Organization Classification of Lymphoid and Myeloid Neoplasms and Acute Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, John P; Martin, Peter; Roboz, Gail J

    2017-08-10

    A major revision of the WHO classification of lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia was released in 2016. A key motivation for this update was to include new information available since the 2008 version with clinical relevance for the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of patients. With > 100 entities described, it is important for the clinician to understand features that may be important in daily practice, whereas researchers need to incorporate the new classification scheme into study development and analysis. In this review, we highlight the key aspects of the 2016 update with particular importance to routine patient care and clinical trial design.

  20. Management of metaphyseal bone loss in revision knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Francesco; Beltrame, Arianna; Colombo, Elia; Miani, Enrick; Bassini, Fabrizio

    2017-06-07

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is usually made more complex by the presence of bone defects, which may be caused by periprosthethic infection, polyethylene wear, implant loosening or fractures. The main aim of the present work is to review the available literature to understand the current options to manage with the bone loss during knee revisions. Available English literature for bone defects in revision TKAs has been evaluated looking at treatment options and their results in terms of clinical and radiological outcomes and failure rates. Anderson Orthopaedic Research Institute (AORI) classification is the most frequently used because it helps in the choice of the most suitable treatment. Several options are available in the management of metaphyseal bone loss in revision knee arthroplasty. For small and contained defects (AORI type 1) cement with or without screws and auto- or allograft morcellized bone are available. In uncontained but mild defects (AORI type 2A) metal augments should be use while large and uncontained defects (AORI type 2B and 3) are best addressed with structural allograft or metal filling devices (cones and sleeves). Stemmed components, either cemented or cementless, are recommended to reduce the strain at the interface implant-host. The treatment of bone defects in revision TKAs has evolved during the last years providing different options with good results at a short/medium term follow up. With the increasing revision burden, further scientific evidence is requested to identify the best approach for each patient. Long-term clinical outcome as well as implant survival after revision TKA are still sub-optimal and depend upon many factors including cause for revision, surgical approach, type of implants used and various patient factors.

  1. [Bone defects in revision knee arthroplasty: filling with bone allograft plus platelet-derived growth factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macule-Beneyto, Francisco; Segur-Vilalta, Josep; Vilchez-Cavazos, Felix; Esteban-Navarro, Pedro; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Acosta-Olivo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of a revision knee arthroplasty is the management of bone loss. The OBJECTIVE of the study is to show the capability to augment bone mineral density in areas with bone loss with platelet-derived growth factors. Randomized, prospective, blinded study in patients who underwent a total knee replacement revision with tibial-damaged metaphyseal bone were randomly allocated to have a revision total knee arthroplasty and to fill the bone defects with lyophilized bone allograft mixed with platelet growth factors (experimental group, n= 9) or with lyophilized bone allograft alone (control group, n= 7). To evaluate bone mineral density between groups, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was performed preoperatively, at 1 month, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. The study was comprised of a total of 16 patients. We found no significant differences observed during the follow-up between groups in mineral bone density. Use of platelet-derived growth factors does not improve bone mineral density in patients with revision knee arthroplasty.

  2. Trisacryl Gelatin Microspheres Versus Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles in the Preoperative Embolization of Bone Neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basile, Antonio; Rand, Thomas; Lomoschitz, Fritz; Toma, Cyril; Lupattelli, Tommaso; Kettenbach, Joachim; Lammer, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of trisacryl gelatin microspheres versus polyvinyl alcohol particles (PVA) in the preoperative embolization of bone neoplasms, on the basis of intraoperative blood loss quantified by the differences in preoperative and postoperative hematic levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit and erythrocytes count. From January 1997 to December 2002, preoperative embolization of bone tumors (either primary or secondary) was carried out in 49 patients (age range 12/78), 20 of whom were treated with trysacril gelatin microspheres (group A) and 29 with PVA particles (group B). The delay between embolization and surgery ranged from 1 to 13 days in group A and 1 to 4 days in group B. As used in international protocols, we considered hematic levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit and erythrocytes count for the measurement of intraoperative blood loss then the differences in pre- and postoperative levels were used as statistical comparative parameters. We compared the values of patients treated with embospheres (n = 10) and PVA (n = 18) alone, and patients treated with (group A = 10; group B = 11) versus patients treated without other additional embolic materials in each group (group A = 10; group B = 18). According to the Student's t-test (p < 0.05), the difference of hematic parameters between patients treated by embospheres and PVA alone were significant; otherwise there was no significant difference between patients treated with only one embolic material (embospheres and PVA) versus those treated with other additional embolic agents in each group. The patients treated with microspheres had a minor quantification of intraoperative blood loss compared to those who received PVA particles. Furthermore, they had a minor increase of bleeding related to the delay time between embolization and surgery. The use of additional embolic material did not improve the efficacy of the procedure in either group of patients

  3. Bone stock in revision femoral arthroplasty: a new evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas, François; Girard, Julien; Roche, Olivier; Migaud, Henri; Bonnomet, François; Goldschild, Mathias; Le Béguec, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to finalize a method allowing a qualitative and numerical evaluation of the bone stock and to confirm its reproducibility, to verify the relationship between the secondary bone stock value and the functional results, and to determine the main factors influencing the value of the bone stock. A clinical and radiological evaluation was performed in a group of 150 revisions of total hip replacements according to a new method taking into account cortical bone thickness, bone density and bone defects. Interobserver reproducibility was evaluated at an average of 0.6 and intra-observer reproducibility was considered good at 0.8. Between the initial bone stock and at the last follow-up, no significant difference was noticed. For secondary bone stock considered as "very good or good", the gain was +38.1 points versus +29.9 points for patients evaluated as "average or poor" (p stock assessment and at last follow-up, a significant relation was found in numerical values for the global type of primary fixation and in the presence of osteopenia (p stock can result in less favourable functional results. The numerical scores confirm the importance of strategic choices during surgery in order to manage bone stock preservation.

  4. The uniqueness of morphological features of pure erythroid leukemia in myeloid neoplasm with erythroid predominance: A reassessment using criteria revised in the 2016 World Health Organization classification

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Po-Shen; Liu, Yao-Chung; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Po-Min; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Liu, Chia-Jen; Liu, Jin-Hwang

    2017-01-01

    We reviewed 97 consecutive cases of myeloid neoplasm with erythroid predominance (MN-EP) between 2000 and 2015. Following 2016 WHO classification, MN-EP patients were classified into four groups. Eight pure erythroid leukemia (PEL) (including t-MN and AML-MRC morphologically fulfilled criteria for PEL) patients had dismal outcomes (median OS: 1 month) and showed more bone marrow fibrosis, worse performance status (PS) and higher serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) at diagnosis than the other gr...

  5. Clinical study of 89Sr therapy with radiosensitization by nicotinamide and carbogen in multiple bone metastasis of malignant neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yajie; Wang Shubin; Guo Yiling; Chen Zuowei; Zhang Yingnan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the curative effect and side effects of 89 Sr therapy with radiosensitization by nicotinamide and carbogen in multiple bone metastasis of malignant neoplasms. Methods: Ninety-seven patients were divided into 4 groups respectively: group A, 89 Sr + nicotinamide + carbogen (24 patients); group B, 89 Sr + nicotinamide(22 patients); group C, 89 Sr + carbogen (25 patients); group D, 89 Sr, (26 patients). 89 SrCl was intravenously injected at a dose of 1.48-2.22 MBq/kg. Nicotinamide was taken orally 1 hour before 89 SrCl injection, 6 g/day, tid, d1-d5. Aspiration of carbogen(95%O 2 + 5%CO 2 ) gases, 6 L/min, 10 minutes, qd, d1-d5. Results: The effective rate of pain control and QOL improvement in A group were higher than in groups B, C and D (91.7% VS 77.3%, 76.0% and 69.2%, P=0.048). The lesions assessed by SPECT imaging in every group was not significantly different at three months after treatment. I to II degree toxic effect on bone marrow appeared in every group and there were no significantly inter-group differences. Conclusions: Combinative therapy using 89 Sr + nicotinamide + carbogen is more effective to treat multiple metastatic bone pain and for improvement of QOL. The side effects are not increased. (authors)

  6. Extensive Bone Marrow Necrosis in a Case of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Transformed from a Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Shapiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Extensive necrosis affecting more than 50% of the bone marrow is an extremely rare histopathological finding. Relatively little is known about its clinical significance because it is most commonly identified at autopsy - whether it is an independent prognostic marker or whether it is a surrogate marker of underlying disease burden remains unclear. We describe herein a case of a 66-year-old patient with acute myeloid leukemia who presented with acute bone marrow failure and was found to have extensive necrosis. We include presenting clinical features, pathology attained at biopsy, and the challenge of treatment. Bone marrow necrosis is a rare but important clinicopathological entity whose recognition may herald the way for more effective prognostication of underlying disease.

  7. Does lactoferrin behave as an immunohistochemical oncofetal marker in bone and cartilage human neoplasms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieni, Antonio; Barresi, Valeria; Grosso, Maddalena; Speciale, Giuseppe; Rosa, Michele A; Tuccari, Giovanni

    2011-06-01

    By immunohistochemistry, lactoferrin (LF) has been extensively investigated in human neoplastic tissues; moreover, LF is able to promote bone growth in a murine model. Until now, no systematic studies on human osteocartilagineous fetal samples have been performed in comparison to corresponding neoplastic specimens to verify if LF may represent an oncofetal marker in this field of pathology. By a monoclonal antibody (clone 1A1; Biodesign International; w.d. 1:75) the distribution pattern of LF in bones of 25 human fetal tissues (8-34 gestation weeks), 10 adults (47-82 years) and 30 cartilage as well as 27 bone tumours (9-76 years) was analyzed. LF was encountered in 23/57 cases of osteocartilagineous tumors and namely in 10/10 giant cell tumours, 5/7 osteoid osteomas, 3/3 chondroblastomas, 3/3 chondromyxoid fibromas, 1/1 myeloma, 1/1 adamantinoma. No LF immunoexpression was detected in osteosarcomas, chondrosarcomas, ossifying fibromas, osteochondroma and enchondromas. In embryo-fetal tissues, LF immunoreactivity was localized in mesenchymal cells as well as in chondroblasts at the 8th gestational week and in immature osteocytes and osteoblasts up to the 18th gestation week, with a considerable decrease by the 24th week. No LF expression was found in any bone district since the 30th and up to the 34th week of gestation as well as in corresponding adult samples. Our findings indicate a role for LF as a bone growth regulator in the early phases of the human endochondral ossification, although the hypothesis of LF as oncofetal marker appears questionable in bone tumours.

  8. Multiple Revision Surgeries and Acetabular Bone Defect Size May Predict Daily Activity After Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shinya; Hashimoto, Shingo; Takayama, Koji; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Nishida, Kotaro; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2017-05-01

    We identified preoperative predictors and size of acetabular bone defects for poor return to daily activity after revision total hip arthroplasty. Our analysis was based on outcomes of 140 cases of revision total hip arthroplasty, performed for any reason between May 2001 and March 2013. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and body mass index (BMI) measured preoperatively, and the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) activity score and JOA score measured at the 2-year follow-up were evaluated. Acetabular bone defects were classified according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons grading system, with further classification of the location and severity of each acetabular bone defect. We compared preoperative clinical factors and postoperative clinical outcomes statistically. We found a significant association between the number of revision surgeries and worse postoperative JOA scores and UCLA activity scores. There were significant differences in postoperative JOA scores and UCLA activity scores between patients with partial and global acetabular bone defects. Multiple revision surgeries and the size of the acetabular bone defect were predictors of both poorer clinical outcome and greater restriction in postoperative daily activities. Closer attention to the postoperative management of patients with a lower preoperative status is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acetabular reconstruction with impaction bone grafting and cemented polyethylene socket in total hip revision arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostensalo, I; Seppänen, M; Virolainen, P; Mokka, J; Koivisto, M; Mäkelä, K T

    2015-12-01

    Bone deficiency in revision total hip arthroplasty is a challenge to the surgeon. One option for restoration of the bone stock is impaction bone grafting and use of a cemented socket. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term clinical outcome of impaction bone grafting and cemented socket revisions. A total of 59 patients (60 hips) underwent revision arthroplasty with impaction bone grafting and application of a cemented socket on the acetabular side in the Turku University Hospital from 1999 to 2004. The study end-point was re-revision for any reason. The cumulative percentages for survival were followed and estimated with Kaplan-Meier curves. Associations between occurrence of re-revision and potential risk factors were analyzed with logistic regression. Results were quantified by odd ratios and 95% confidence intervals. The mean age of the patients was 69 years (33% male). A total of 3% of the patients had a class I Paprosky acetabular defect, 38% had class II, and 55% had class III. The overall survival rate was 73%. The mean follow-up time was 7 years. The most common reason for re-revision was aseptic loosening of the acetabular component (13 patients, 81% of re-revisions). Cox's regression analysis did not identify any risk factors for re-revision. Our results were inferior compared to some previous studies. Impaction bone grafting of acetabular defects in revision total hip arthroplasty may not always provide a reliable bone stock in long-term. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2015.

  10. General Information about Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and diagnose chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Myeloproliferative neoplasms are a group of diseases in which the bone marrow makes ... the patient’s bloodstream. Transfusion therapy Transfusion therapy ( blood transfusion ) is a method of giving red blood cells, white blood ...

  11. Systematic review of the use of bone cement in ossicular chain reconstruction and revision stapes surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, Inge; van den Berg, Jelle W G; Smit, Adriana L; Grolman, Wilko

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To evaluate the effectiveness of bone cement on mean postoperative air-bone gap (ABG) and the proportion of ABG closure to within 20 dB in patients undergoing ossicular chain reconstruction or revision stapes surgery. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Embase, and Central. METHODS: A

  12. The uniqueness of morphological features of pure erythroid leukemia in myeloid neoplasm with erythroid predominance: A reassessment using criteria revised in the 2016 World Health Organization classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Po-Shen; Liu, Yao-Chung; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Po-Min; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Liu, Chia-Jen; Liu, Jin-Hwang

    2017-01-01

    We reviewed 97 consecutive cases of myeloid neoplasm with erythroid predominance (MN-EP) between 2000 and 2015. Following 2016 WHO classification, MN-EP patients were classified into four groups. Eight pure erythroid leukemia (PEL) (including t-MN and AML-MRC morphologically fulfilled criteria for PEL) patients had dismal outcomes (median OS: 1 month) and showed more bone marrow fibrosis, worse performance status (PS) and higher serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) at diagnosis than the other groups. In the univariate analysis, risks of death in MN-EP patients included the morphologic features of PEL, very poor cytogenetic risk by IPSS-R, bone marrow fibrosis, leukocytosis, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, high LDH, and poor PS. In the multivariate analysis, independent predictors of death were morphologic features of PEL (adjusted hazards ratio [HR] 3.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-9.74, p = 0.018), very poor cytogenetic risk by IPSS-R (adjusted HR 2.73, 95% CI 1.22-6.10, p = 0.015), hypoalbuminemia (< 3.7 g/dl) (adjusted HR 2.33, 95% CI 1.10-4.91, p = 0.026) and high serum LDH (≥ 250 U/L) (adjusted HR 2.36, 95% CI 1.28-4.36, p = 0.006). Poor or unfavorable risk in different cytogenetic risk systems independently predicted death and UKMRC-R was the best model.

  13. The effects of hydroxyapatite coating and bone allograft on fixation of loaded experimental primary and revision implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søballe, Kjeld; Mouzin, Olivier R G; Kidder, Louis A

    2003-01-01

    We used our established experimental model of revision joint replacement to examine the roles of hydroxyapatite coating and bone graft in improving the fixation of revision implants. The revision protocol uses the Søballe micromotion device in a preliminary 8-week period of implant instability...

  14. Colon neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura F, K.

    1991-01-01

    The main aspects of colon neoplasms are described, including several factors that predispose the disease, the occurrence, the main biomedical radiography and the evaluation after the surgery. (C.G.C.)

  15. Femoral component revision with use of impaction bone-grafting and a cemented polished stem.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, B.W.; Arts, J.J.C.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Buma, P.; Slooff, T.J.J.H.; Gardeniers, J.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of revision of the femoral component of a hip arthroplasty with use of an impaction bone-grafting technique and a cemented polished stem. METHODS: Thirty-three consecutive femoral reconstructions that were

  16. Bone growth into a revised porous-coated patellar implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L N; Lund, B; Gotfredsen, K

    1990-01-01

    A noncemented and clinically stable porous-coated patellar component (PCA) was removed from a patient after 11 months because of infection. It was sectioned and examined histologically in undecalcified, thin-ground sections. The bone ingrowth into the porous space was measured at eight levels. Ea...

  17. Bone morphogenic protein-2 use in revision total hip arthroplasty with acetabular defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodzo, Scott R; Boyle, Keely K; Pavlesen, Sonja; Rachala, Sridhar

    2018-04-01

    The restoration of acetabular bone stock during revision hip arthroplasty remains a challenge. There have been no clinical series reporting the efficacy of bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in the revision hip setting. We retrospectively reviewed the radiographs and records of 15 patients who received rhBMP-2 mixed with allograft bone chips (+BMP), and 14 who received allograft bone chips alone (-BMP) for their acetabular defect during revision total hip arthroplasty with a mean two-year follow up. Radiographs were evaluated for acetabular defect size, superior cup migration, and changes in the lateral cup abduction angle. Modified Harris hip scores were used for evaluation of clinical outcomes. Patients in the +BMP group compared to the -BMP group had significantly larger amounts of cancellous bone chips used (72.1 ± 35.5 cc vs. 38.6 ± 14.1 cc; p = 0.003). Mean rhBMP-2 used per case was 7.4 ± 3.1 mg in the +BMP group. Three patients in the -BMP group had cup migration which was not observed in the +BMP group. Mean Harris hip scores (HHS) improved post-operatively in both groups (40.1 ± 20.9 to 71.9 ± 19, p revision THA. Cost of this synthetic biologic versus the added clinical benefit should be carefully considered when being used in the revision hip setting.

  18. The Use of Structural Allograft in Primary and Revision Knee Arthroplasty with Bone Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul A. Kuchinad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone loss around the knee in the setting of total knee arthroplasty remains a difficult and challenging problem for orthopaedic surgeons. There are a number of options for dealing with smaller and contained bone loss; however, massive segmental bone loss has fewer options. Small, contained defects can be treated with cement, morselized autograft/allograft or metal augments. Segmental bone loss cannot be dealt with through simple addition of cement, morselized autograft/allograft, or metal augments. For younger or higher demand patients, the use of allograft is a good option as it provides a durable construct with high rates of union while restoring bone stock for future revisions. Older patients, or those who are low demand, may be better candidates for a tumour prosthesis, which provides immediate ability to weight bear and mobilize.

  19. Primary bone neoplasms in dogs: 90 cases Neoplasmas ósseos primários em cães: 90 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Trost

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of necropsy and biopsy cases of 90 primary bone tumors (89 malignant and one benign in dogs received over a period of 22 years at the Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, was performed. Osteosarcoma was the most prevalent bone tumor, accounting for 86.7% of all malignant primary bone neoplasms diagnosed. Most cases occurred in dogs of large and giant breeds with ages between 6 and 10-years-old. The neoplasms involved mainly the appendicular skeleton, and were 3.5 times more prevalent in the forelimbs than in the hindlimbs. Osteoblastic osteosarcoma was the predominant histological subtype. Epidemiological and pathological findings of osteosarcomas are reported and discussed.Através de um estudo retrospectivo dos casos de biópsias e necropsias de cães recebidos no Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, num período de 22 anos, constatou-se a ocorrência de 90 casos de neoplasmas ósseos primários, sendo 89 malignos e um benigno. Dentre os 89 neoplasmas ósseos malignos, osteossarcoma foi o mais prevalente, correspondendo a 86,7% de todos o neoplasmas ósseos diagnosticados na espécie. A maioria dos casos ocorreu em cães de raças grandes e gigantes e entre seis e 10 anos de idade. Os neoplasmas envolvendo o esqueleto apendicular predominaram e foram 3,5 vezes mais prevalentes nos membros anteriores que nos posteriores. O subtipo histológico predominante foi o osteoblástico. Este estudo aborda os aspectos epidemiológicos e patológicos importantes para o diagnóstico de osteossarcomas.

  20. Increased Risk of Revision After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Allografts Compared With Autografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletis, Gregory B; Chen, Jason; Inacio, Maria C S; Love, Rebecca M; Funahashi, Tadashi T

    2017-05-01

    The use of allograft tissue for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) remains controversial. To compare the risk of aseptic revision between bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autografts and BPTB allografts. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. A retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data was conducted using the Kaiser Permanente ACLR Registry. A cohort of patients who underwent primary unilateral ACLR with BPTB autografts and BPTB allografts was identified. Aseptic revision was the endpoint. The type of graft and allograft processing method (nonprocessed, <1.8-Mrad, and ≥1.8-Mrad irradiation) were the exposures of interest evaluated. Age (≤21 and ≥22 years) was evaluated as an effect modifier. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and race. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards models were employed. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs are provided. The BPTB cohort consisted of 5586 patients: 3783 (67.7%) were male, 2359 (42.2%) were white, 1029 (18.4%) had allografts (nonprocessed: 155; <1.8 Mrad: 525; ≥1.8 Mrad: 288), and 4557 (81.6%) had autografts. The median age was 34.9 years (interquartile range [IQR], 25.4-44.0) for allograft cases and 22.0 years (IQR, 17.6-30.0) for autograft cases. The estimated cumulative revision rate at 2 years was 4.1% (95% CI, 2.9%-5.9%) for allografts and 1.7% (95% CI, 1.3%-2.2%) for autografts. BPTB allografts had a significantly higher adjusted risk of revision than BPTB autografts (HR, 4.54; 95% CI, 3.03-6.79; P < .001). This higher risk of revision was consistent with all allograft processing methods when compared with autografts and was also consistently higher in patients with allografts regardless of age. When BPTB allograft tissue was used for ACLR, an overall 4.54 times adjusted higher risk of revision was observed compared with surgery performed with a BPTB autograft. Whether the tissue was irradiated with either high- or low-dose radiation, chemically processed, or not processed at

  1. [Hip revision arthroplasty in massive bone loss of acetabulum with the use of reinforcement ring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Tomasz; Kmieć, Krzysztof; Pogonowicz, Ewa; Sibiński, Marcin; Synder, Marek; Kozłowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was the assessment of results after acetabular revision arthtoplasty with the use of reinforcement ring ReconShell (BBrown - Aesculap) and homogenous bone grafts. There were 49 patients in the study (42 women and 7 men) in the age from 30 to 88 years. The follow-up period ranged from 4 to 48 months. Before operation the mean Harris hip score was 31.14 and at last follow-up 71.64 points. Aseptic loosening of reconstruction ring was found in 3 patients. During next revision good integration of bone grafts, that were implanted into acetabulum at previous operation was found. In one hip revision of loose polietylen cup was performed. Three patient had early dislocation of hip endoprothesis, that were treated successfully in abduction casts. Next 2 patients had re-revision performed for recurrent dislocations. One patient had implants removal for septic loosening. Prolonged wound healing was noticed in 5 patients. Two patients had temporary and one permanent common peroneal nerve palsy. Two patients had temporary femoral nerve palsy. The use of reconstruction rings in massive bone loss of the acetabulum after cup loosening gives satisfactory clinical results. After the procedure patients have stabile joint that allows for weight bearing. Despite relatively high number of complications (most of which are temporary) this procedure is worth recommending.

  2. Bone Metabolism after Total Hip Revision Surgery with Impacted Grafting: Evaluation using H215O and [18F]fluoride PET; A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmerman, Olivier; Raijmakers, Pieter; Heyligers, Ide; Comans, Emile; Lubberink, Mark; Teule, Gerrit; Lammertsma, Adriaan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate bone blood flow and bone formation in patients after total hip revision surgery with impacted bone grafting using H2 15O and [18F]fluoride positron emission tomography (PET). Procedures: To asses bone blood flow and bone metabolism in bone allograft after impaction grafting,

  3. Vascular neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, H B

    1980-07-01

    Vascular neoplasms in the broad sense represent a very common group of tumors or hamartomas that show great variability in gross appearance, microscopic appearance, and clinical course. Generally, neoplasms are composed of one cell type, but vascular neoplasms are collections of endothelial-lined tubes or tubules with connective tissue walls that may contain smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and nerve elements according to the specific tissues of origin. The classification of vascular neoplasms as outlined in this article attempts to delineate each tumor or hamartoma according to its histologic appearance and clinical behavior. The clinical course ranges from completely benign, self-involuting malformations such as the strawberry hemangioma to highly malignant angiosarcomas with their rapid growth and frequent metastases. Defects in the lymphatic system show gradations from simple lymphangiomas through lymphedema and lymphangiectasia, which can probably be explained by faulty embryologic development. Management of these lesions has been discussed, including brief descriptions of most of the currently accepted treatment methods for these frequently encountered clinical problems.

  4. Myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roaldsnes, Christina; Holst, René; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET) and myelofibrosis (MF) are clonal disorders collectively named as myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Published data on epidemiology of MPN after the discovery of the JAK2 mutation and the 2008 WHO classifications are scarce. We...

  5. Experimental in-vitro bone cements disintegration with ultrasonic pulsating water jet for revision arthroplasty

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hloch, Sergej; Foldyna, Josef; Pude, F.; Kloc, J.; Zeleňák, Michal; Hvizdoš, P.; Monka, P.; Smolko, I.; Ščučka, Jiří; Kozak, D.; Sedmak, A.; Mihalčinová, E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 6 (2015), s. 1609-1616 ISSN 1330-3651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : bone cement * revision arthroplasty * ultrasonic pulsating water jet Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 0.464, year: 2015 http://www.tehnicki-vjesnik.com/web/public/archive

  6. Lymphoma in Taiwan: Review of 1347 neoplasms from a single institution according to the 2016 Revision of the World Health Organization Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Sung Chuang

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: We analyzed the largest series of lymphomas to date from Taiwan and concluded that HL was rare and T-cell neoplasms comprised around 17% of all NHLs in Taiwan. The relative frequency of the major lymphoma types is similar in East Asian countries, with only a minor difference, but the overall pattern in the East is quite different from that in the West, with the latter showing a higher frequency of HL and a lower rate of T-cell neoplasms.

  7. Autologous Bone Grafting and Revision Plating in a Case of Persistent High Tibial Osteotomy Non-Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Tan Shi; Koon, Wong Merng

    2016-01-01

    Uni-compartmental knee arthritis may be treated with several surgical options including uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty and high tibial osteotomy. Non-union is a well-established and common complication that may arise from the latter option and few reports have shown successful treatment of persistent non-union of high tibial osteotomy. We present a case of persistent non-union after high tibial osteotomy treated with autologous iliac crest bone grafting and revision plating. At 1 year post-operative interval, successful union was achieved after revision internal fixation. In addition, a good functional outcome was achieved. In this patient with persistent non-union following high tibial osteotomy, the aim of revision was to restore alignment and effect bone healing while preserving adequate tibial bone stock. Revision plating with autologous bone grafting is a good surgical strategy in the treatment ofpersistent non-union with hardware failure.

  8. Management of severe periacetabular bone loss combined with pelvic discontinuity in revision hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Max J; Schmolders, Jan; Michel, Robert D; Randau, Thomas M; Wimmer, Matthias D; Kohlhof, Hendrik; Wirtz, Dieter C; Gravius, Sascha

    2014-12-01

    Revision of failed total hip arthroplasty with massive acetabular bone loss resulting in pelvic discontinuity represents a rare but challenging problem. The objective of this study was to present short to mid-term results of revision total hip arthroplasty with a custom-made acetabular implant in a consecutive series of patients with pelvic discontinuity. We retrospectively reviewed 18 consecutive patients with massive acetabular bone loss (Paprosky Type 3B) resulting in pelvic discontinuity reconstructed with revision total hip arthroplasty using a custom-made acetabular component. The prosthesis was created on the basis of a thin-cut 1-mm computed tomography (CT) scan of the pelvis. Initial stability of the implant was obtained by screw fixation. Harris hip score and sequential radiographs were used to evaluate the clinical and radiographic results. At an average follow up of 30 months (range 17-62 months) 16 of 18 (88.9%) custom-made implants were considered radiographically stable without signs of acetabular migration of more than 2 mm in the horizontal or vertical direction, implant rotation or screw breakage. Complications included two periprosthetic joint infections treated with explantation of the implant. Three patients had recurrent dislocations postoperatively. The mean Harris hip score improved from 28 ± 12 points preoperatively to 69 ± 13 points at the time of last follow up. Treatment of acetabular bone loss and pelvic discontinuity with a custom-made acetabular component can provide a durable solution with good clinical and radiographic results.

  9. Antibiotic bone cement's effect on infection rates in primary and revision total knee arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleppel, Donald; Stirton, Jacob; Liu, Jiayong; Ebraheim, Nabil A

    2017-12-18

    To compare infection rates in primary and revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures using antibiotic impregnated bone cement (AIBC) to those rates in procedures not using AIBC. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted in search for randomized controlled trials/studies (RCTs) pertaining to the field of antibiotic AIBC vs non-AIBC groups in both primary and revision TKA procedures. The primary literature search performed was to identify all RCTs that assessed AIBC in primary and revision TKA procedures. This search was done strictly through the PubMed database using the article "filters" setting that identified and separated all RCTs from the overall search. The original search was "Primary/revision total knee arthroplasty using AIBC". Other key terms and phrases were included in the search as well. Eligible articles that were used in the "results" of this review met the following criteria: (1) Involved primary or revision TKA procedures (for any reason); (2) included TKA outcome infection rate information; (3) analyzed an AIBC group vs a non-AIBC control group; (4) were found through the RCT filter or hand search in PubMed; and (5) published 1985-2017. Exclusion criteria was as follows: (1) Patients that were not undergoing primary or revision TKA procedures; (2) articles that did not separate total hip arthroplasity (THA) vs TKA results if both hip and knee revisions were evaluated; (3) papers that did not follow up on clinical outcomes of the procedure; (4) extrapolation of data was not possible given published results; (5) knee revisions not done on human patients; (6) studies that were strictly done on THAs; (7) articles that were not found through the RCT filter or through hand search in PubMed; (8) articles that did not evaluate AIBC used in a prosthesis or a spacer during revision; (9) articles that did not compare an AIBC group vs a non-AIBC control group; and (10) articles that were published before 1985. In total, 11 articles were deemed

  10. Inserting the Ulnar Prosthesis into Radius as a Novel Salvage Surgery for Revision Total Elbow Arthroplasty with Massive Bone Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Mao-Qi; Jiang, Ji-Le; Jiang, Xie-Yuan; Zha, Ye-Jun; Li, Ting

    2016-08-20

    Infection and aseptic loosening are common complications of total elbow arthroplasty (TEA) and often require revision surgery. However, bone defects, along with other complications, bring an extra difficulty to the second surgery, especially for patients with a massive bone defect in the proximal ulna. Several methods including allograft or autograft have been introduced into practice, but none sufficiently solves these problems. We conducted a new surgical method for patients with a massive ulnar bone defect needing revision TEA. During revision arthroplasty, the ulnar prosthesis was inserted into the radius as a salvage procedure. Four consecutive patients received revision arthroplasty with this method between 2013 and 2016. Patients' data were collected to evaluate the clinical outcome. All patients had a Grade III ulnar bone defect. At the last follow-up session, all patients reported a painless, functional elbow joint. Three patients suffered from a periprosthetic infection that was completely cured using the two-stage method. No major complications, including infection, aseptic loosening, or wound problems were found. One patient had a transient ulnar neuritis, and another had a transient radial neuritis. Both patients had full recovery at the last follow-up session. Inserting an ulnar prosthesis into the radius is a novel procedure for patients with a massive bone defect due to infection or aseptic loosening. It is a safe, quick, and effective treatment with a promising short-term outcome. This method should be provided as a salvage procedure for patients with a nonreconstructable ulnar bone defect.

  11. Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Vivian Kvist; Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Riis-Nielsen, Torben

    This report is a revised analysis of the Danish data on CO2 emissions from forest, afforestation and deforestation for the period 1990 - 2008 and a prognosis for the period until 2020. Revision have included measurements from 2009 in the estimations. The report is funded by the Ministry of Climate...

  12. The Effect of Subluxation of Articulating Antibiotic Spacers on Bone Defects and Degree of Constraint in Revision Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Adrian C K; Howard, James L; Macdonald, Steven J; Teeter, Matthew G; Lanting, Brent A

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether subluxation of articulating antibiotic spacers is associated with the bone defects found and constraint required when re-implanting the knee arthroplasty components. Staged revisions for infections of primary total knee arthroplasties between 2004 and 2012 were examined. Radiographic sagittal and coronal subluxations of 72 knees were measured prior to second stage revision. Coronal subluxation was found to be associated with increased requirement for constrained knee systems (P<0.035). Sagittal subluxation was associated with greater tibia bone defects (P<0.037). Careful surgical technique and monitoring of articulating spacers should be done to avoid subluxation after stage 1 revision. If subluxation of the articulating spacer is present, constrained revision knee systems as well as augments should be available at time of re-implantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomechanical evaluation of tibial bone adaptation after revision total knee arthroplasty: A comparison of different implant systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Paz Quilez

    Full Text Available The best methods to manage tibial bone defects following total knee arthroplasty remain under debate. Different fixation systems exist to help surgeons reconstruct knee osseous bone loss (such as tantalum cones, cement, modular metal augments, autografts, allografts and porous metaphyseal sleeves However, the effects of the various solutions on the long-term outcome remain unknown. In the present work, a bone remodeling mathematical model was used to predict bone remodeling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA revision. Five different types of prostheses were analyzed: one with a straight stem; two with offset stems, with and without supplements; and two with sleeves, with and without stems. Alterations in tibia bone density distribution and implant Von Mises stresses were quantified. In all cases, the bone density decreased in the proximal epiphysis and medullary channels, and an increase in bone density was predicted in the diaphysis and around stem tips. The highest bone resorption was predicted for the offset prosthesis without the supplement, and the highest bone formation was computed for the straight stem. The highest Von Mises stress was obtained for the straight tibial stem, and the lowest was observed for the stemless metaphyseal sleeves prosthesis. The computational model predicted different behaviors among the five systems. We were able to demonstrate the importance of choosing an adequate revision system and that in silico models may help surgeons choose patient-specific treatments.

  14. BONE ALLOGRAFTING IN REVISION KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: HISTOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF STRUCTURAL ALLOGRAFTS 54 MONTHS FOLLOW UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Kuliaba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compensation of large bone defects by AORI third type classification is the most difficult problem the audit knee arthroplasty. In this situation, the surgeon have to choose between three possibilities: to use metal cones/sleeves, and, in cases with severely damaged metaepiphysis, to use structural allografts or oncological megaimplants. No doubt, it is interesting to follow the processes that are taking place with massive structural allografts implanted into the human body long time ago. This article presents the case study of the rheumatoid arthritis patient’s treatment with a severe lesion of the knee joint, subjected to repeated revision surgeries, last two of which are made with the use of massive structural allograft of femur. Morphological study of a massive distal femur allograft in 54 months after surgery showed that superficial ingrowth of connective tissue and blood vessels happens on the allograft’s border with its partial restructuring of the bone tissue at the border with the recipient bone. However, the most of allograft remains unchanged even after 54 months after surgery.

  15. Impaction grafting in revision total elbow arthroplasty due to aseptic loosening and bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Yong Girl; Cho, Nam Su; Parke, Chong Suck

    2013-06-05

    With the increase in the number of total elbow arthroplasties being performed, there has been a parallel increase in revision surgery. There is limited information about the outcome of impaction grafting following failed elbow arthroplasty. We retrospectively analyzed sixteen cases of revision arthroplasty performed following aseptic loosening of a semiconstrained total elbow replacement. There were three men and thirteen women with a mean age of 58.4 years (range, twenty-eight to seventy-five years). Fourteen elbows had loosening of both the humeral and the ulnar component, and two elbows had only humeral loosening. Two elbows had perforation of the humeral cortex by the humeral component, and one had perforation of the ulnar cortex. Grade-II bone loss as described by King et al. was found in three elbows; grade III, in six elbows; and grade IV, in seven elbows. The impaction grafting was performed with only allograft in thirteen elbows, and it was done with allograft as well as autograft from the iliac crest in the other three elbows. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.4 years (range, 4.1 to 11.2 years). The mean Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) for pain significantly improved from 15.0 points preoperatively to 32.8 points at the time of latest follow-up (p = 0.003). The mean arc of flexion also significantly increased, from 60.3° to 115.6° (p < 0.01). Stability according to the MEPS significantly increased from a mean of 2.2 points to a mean of 9.4 points (p = 0.001). The mean total MEPS improved from 41.0 points to 82.8 points (p = 0.001). The result was excellent for four elbows, good for eleven, and fair for one. Follow-up radiographs demonstrated fifteen cases with grade-I resorption of the bone graft and one case with grade-II resorption. A type-I radiolucent line was observed in twelve of the elbows; type II, in three; and type IV, in one. Additional surgery was required in two cases. Impaction grafting is an effective technique when revision total

  16. Femoral component revision with use of impaction bone-grafting and a cemented polished stem. Surgical technique.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, B.W.; Arts, J.J.C.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Buma, P.; Slooff, T.J.J.H.; Gardeniers, J.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of revision of the femoral component of a hip arthroplasty with use of an impaction bone-grafting technique and a cemented polished stem. METHODS: Thirty-three consecutive femoral reconstructions that were

  17. Proximal femoral replacement in contemporary revision total hip arthroplasty for severe femoral bone loss: a review of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viste, A; Perry, K I; Taunton, M J; Hanssen, A D; Abdel, M P

    2017-03-01

    Loss or absence of proximal femoral bone in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains a significant challenge. While the main indication for the use of proximal femoral replacements (PFRs) is in the treatment of malignant disease, they have a valuable role in revision THA for loosening, fracture and infection in patients with bone loss. Our aim was to determine the clinical outcomes, implant survivorship, and complications of PFRs used in revision THA for indications other than malignancy. A retrospective review of 44 patients who underwent revision THA using a PFR between 2000 and 2013 was undertaken. Their mean age was 79 years (53 to 97); 31 (70%) were women. The bone loss was classified as Paprosky IIIB or IV in all patients. The mean follow-up was six years (2 to 12), at which time 22 patients had died and five were lost to follow-up. The mean Harris Hip Score improved from 42.8 (25.9 to 82.9) pre-operatively to 68.5 (21.0 to 87.7) post-operatively (p = 0.0009). A total of two PFRs had been revised, one for periprosthetic infection eight years post-operatively and one for aseptic loosening six years post-operatively. The Kaplan-Meier survivorship free of any revision or removal of an implant was 86% at five years and 66% years at ten years. A total of 12 patients (27%) had a complication including six with a dislocation. PFRs provide a useful salvage option for patients, particularly the elderly with massive proximal femoral bone loss who require revision THA, with significant clinical improvement. While the survivorship of the implant is good at five years, dislocation continues to be the most common complication. The judicious use of larger femoral heads, dual-mobility constructs, or constrained liners may help to minimise the risk of dislocation. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:325-9. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  18. [High bone consolidation rates after humeral head-preserving revision surgery in non-unions of the proximal humerus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, S D; Schnetzke, M; Hudel, I; Studier-Fischer, S; Grützner, P A; Gühring, T

    2014-12-01

    Fractures of the subcapital and proximal humerus shaft region are common fractures of the human skeleton. Their treatment should provide an early functional after-care of the shoulder joint, that is prone to arthrofibrosis. Although the upper extremity is not weight-bearing the occurrence of proximal humerus non-unions leads to severe impairment with inability to work and restrictions of activity of daily life. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an operative revision of proximal humerus non-unions with reosteosynthesis and application of distant autologous bone grafts can lead to sufficient bone healing. The second aim was to find out whether patients achieved an acceptable functional outcome, as alternatively patients could be treated by reconstruction with a shoulder prosthesis. 27 patients (female = 15, male = 12) with reosteosynthesis of the proximal humerus and proximal humeral shaft due to non-union after initially operative fracture treatment were included between 2008 and 2014. Average age of patients was 56 years (23-87), 48% had no comorbidities, while 52% of the patients had at least 1 comorbidity such as diabetes, hypertension or nicotine abusus. The mean number of prior surgical intervention was 1.2 (1-3). The mean time between initial surgery and re-osteosynthesis was 12.3 months. Patients with signs of infection pseudarthrosis were excluded. The initial type of osteosynthesis was with plates (n = 16; thereof PHILOS Plate n = 14), and intramedullary nails (T2, Targon Nail, PHN, Seidel Nail; n = 11). Revision surgery was done with plate osteosynthesis (n = 26; thereof PHILOS Plate n = 4; LC Plate n = 10; angle plate n = 12). In 23 patients (89%) a distant bone transplantation was done from the iliac crest, and 1 patient received allogenous bone. Three patients (11%) received bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP 7) in combination with distant bone graft. Intraoperative swabs from the pseudarthrosis area

  19. Management of femur and tibia metaphyseal bone defects during revision total knee arthroplasty – methods and outcomes (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Y. Bovkis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is becoming an increasingly common treatment for a wide variety of diseases, as well as treatment for consequences from knee injury. The number of primary joint replacement operations have been steadily climbing. As a result, the number of revision procedures have also grown, accounting for 6–8% of arthroplasties. The problem of bone defects compensation remains one of the greatest challenges faced by the surgeon during revision TKA and usually requires a comprehensive approach, careful preoperative planning and preparation. The compensation of small, in depth and extent, bone defects (AORI Type I and II does not present serious difficulties and their methods are well developed. Whereas the compensation of massive defects (Type 3 is extremely difficult. Until recently, structural allografts were the only method available to surgeons and still remain relevant and demonstrate good results. In recent years, as an alternative, it has become possible to use sleeves and cones made of porous metal, which are also showing very promising mid-term results. This review demonstrates the results from recent studies of mid-term and long-term outcomes of revision TKA, in which different methods of bone defect compensation were used. The clinical evidence did not demonstrate any obvious advantage of using one method over another, therefore, research in this area continues to remain relevant.

  20. Oncocytic Variant of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Rare Case of Sporadic Multifocal and Bilateral RET Wild-Type Neoplasm with Revision of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinciguerra, Gian Luca Rampioni; Noccioli, Niccolò; Cippitelli, Claudia; Minucci, Angelo; Capoluongo, Ettore; Bartolazzi, Armando

    2016-11-17

    Oncocytic variant of medullary thyroid carcinoma (OV-MTC) is a very unusual entity, up to date only 17 cases have been reported in the literature. MTC is a neuro-endocrine malignancy arising from the para-follicular C cells of the thyroid gland. It generally has a slight female predominance and appears as a single lesion. However in the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndrome 2, linked to the point mutation of RET oncogene, multifocal MTCs may also occur. Herein, we report the case of a 75 years old man with a rare form of sporadic multifocal and bilateral OV-MTC expressing wild-type RET gene. The histological and molecular features of this rare entity are presented and discussed with revision of the pertinent literature.

  1. Oncocytic variant of medullary thyroid carcinoma: a rare case of sporadic multifocal and bilateral RET wild-type neoplasm with revision of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Luca Rampioni Vinciguerra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Oncocytic variant of medullary thyroid carcinoma (OV-MTC is a very unusual entity, up to date only 17 cases have been reported in the literature. MTC is a neuro-endocrine malignancy arising from the para-follicular C cells of the thyroid gland. It generally has a slight female predominance and appears as a single lesion. However in the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndrome 2, linked to the point mutation of RET oncogene, multifocal MTCs may also occur. Herein, we report the case of a 75 years old man with a rare form of sporadic multifocal and bilateral OV-MTC expressing wild-type RET gene. The histological and molecular features of this rare entity are presented and discussed with revision of the pertinent literature.

  2. Porous metal revision shells for management of contained acetabular bone defects at a mean follow-up of six years: a comparison between up to 50% bleeding host bone contact and more than 50% contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternheim, A; Backstein, D; Kuzyk, P R T; Goshua, G; Berkovich, Y; Safir, O; Gross, A E

    2012-02-01

    We report the use of porous metal acetabular revision shells in the treatment of contained bone loss. The outcomes of 53 patients with ≤ 50% acetabular bleeding host bone contact were compared with a control group of 49 patients with > 50% to 85% bleeding host bone contact. All patients were treated with the same type of trabecular metal acetabular revision shell. The mean age at revision was 62.4 years (42 to 80) and the mean follow-up of both groups was 72.4 months (60 to 102). Clinical, radiological and functional outcomes were assessed. There were four (7.5%) mechanical failures in the ≤ 50% host bone contact group and no failures in the > 50% host bone contact group (p = 0.068). Out of both groups combined there were four infections (3.9%) and five recurrent dislocations (4.9%) with a stable acetabular component construct that were revised to a constrained liner. Given the complexity of the reconstructive challenge, porous metal revision acetabular shells show acceptable failure rates at five to ten years' follow-up in the setting of significant contained bone defects. This favourable outcome might be due to the improved initial stability achieved by a high coefficient of friction between the acetabular implant and the host bone, and the high porosity, which affords good bone ingrowth.

  3. Bone mineral density changes of the proximal tibia after revision total knee arthroplasty. A randomised study with the use of porous tantalum metaphyseal cones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus L; Petersen, Michael M; Schrøder, Henrik M

    2012-01-01

    Forty patients were enrolled in a prospective randomised study using conventional method or "Trabecular Metal Cone" (TM Cone) (Zimmer inc., Warsaw, USA) for reconstruction of bone loss of the proximal tibia during revision total knee arthroplasty (rTKA). The aim was to evaluate changes in bone mi...

  4. The use of customized cages in revision total hip arthroplasty for Paprosky type III acetabular bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuanqing; Xu, Chen; Xu, Jiawei; Li, Huiwu; Liu, Fengxiang; Yu, Degang; Zhu, Zhenan

    2015-10-01

    Revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) is challenging if severe periacetabular bone loss is present. Here we describe a method that uses a customised cage to reconstruct an acetabulum with a massive bone defect. Designed with the aid of the rapid prototyping technique, a customised cage with a hook, crest and flange or braids was made, and then utilized to reconstruct severe compromised acetabulum in revision THA since 2001. Twenty-two patients (23 hips) were included in this study. The mean patient age at the time of surgery was 60.9 years (range, 38-80 years). Three hips had massive acetabular bone defects of Paprosky type IIIA and 20 of type IIIB. The Harris hip score was used to evaluate hip function. Radiographs were taken to evaluate loosening of the cage and resorption of allograft bone. The average follow up was 81.6 ± 24.9 months. The mean Harris hip score improved from 39.6 pre-operatively to 80.9 at the final follow-up. There were no instances of deep infection, severe venous thrombosis, and nerve palsy. One patient who had an intra-operative rupture of the superior acetabular artery was successfully treated using the haemostatic suturing technique. Two patients experienced dislocation at post-operative days four and six, respectively, and both were treated with closed reduction and skin traction for three weeks. The present study demonstrates that a customised cage may be a promising option for THA revision of severely compromised acetabula. Extended follow-up is necessary to evaluate the long-term performance of this approach.

  5. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Results of a Single-stage Approach Using Allograft Dowel Bone Grafting for Femoral Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Gilmore, Carl J; Hamann, Joshua C; Gaskin, Cree M; Carroll, John J; Hart, Joseph M; Miller, Mark D

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to present results of single-stage revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using an allograft bone dowel for isolated femoral bony deficiency. Sixteen patients underwent single-stage revision ACL reconstruction using an allograft bone dowel for isolated femoral bony deficiency between 2007 and 2012. Twelve patients (75%) completed study visits, which included CT scans as well as completion of validated outcomes measures. The average KT-1000 side-to-side difference was 1.0 mm ± 2.9 mm. The average International Knee Documentation Committee score was 70.2 ± 17.8, the Tegner score was 4.8 ± 2.8, and the visual analog scale pain score was 2.8 ± 2.4. An analysis of CT scans showed that all 12 dowels had excellent (>75%) incorporation. A single-stage approach for revision ACL reconstruction using allograft dowels for isolated femoral bony deficiency yields objective and subjective outcomes comparable to those reported in the literature for two-stage and other single-stage techniques, with good incorporation of the dowels. Retrospective case series, level IV.

  6. Porous metal cones: gold standard for massive bone loss in complex revision knee arthroplasty? A systematic review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divano, Stefano; Cavagnaro, Luca; Zanirato, Andrea; Basso, Marco; Felli, Lamberto; Formica, Matteo

    2018-04-18

    Revision knee arthroplasty is increasing, and in that case, bone loss management is still a challenging problem. In the last years, the body of literature and interest surrounding porous metal cones has grown, but few systematic evaluations of the existing evidence have been performed. The aim of our systematic review is to collect and critically analyze the available evidence about metal cones in revision knee arthroplasty especially focusing our attention on indications, results, complications, and infection rate of these promising orthopaedic devices. We performed a systematic review of the available English literature, considering the outcomes and the complications of tantalum cones. The combinations of keyword were "porous metal cones", "knee revision", "bone loss", "knee arthroplasty", "periprosthetic joint infection", and "outcome". From the starting 312 papers available, 20 manuscripts were finally included. Only one included study has a control group. The main indication for metal cones is type IIb and III defects according AORI classification. Most of the papers show good clinical and radiological outcomes with low rate of complications. The examined studies provide encouraging clinical and radiological short-to-mid-term outcomes. Clinical studies have shown a low rate of aseptic loosening, intraoperative fractures, infection rate and a lower failure rate than the previous treatment methods. Higher quality papers are needed to draw definitive conclusions about porous metal cones.

  7. Myeloproliferative neoplasm stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Adam J; Mullally, Ann

    2017-03-23

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) arise in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment as a result of the acquisition of somatic mutations in a single HSC that provides a selective advantage to mutant HSC over normal HSC and promotes myeloid differentiation to engender a myeloproliferative phenotype. This population of somatically mutated HSC, which initiates and sustains MPNs, is termed MPN stem cells. In >95% of cases, mutations that drive the development of an MPN phenotype occur in a mutually exclusive manner in 1 of 3 genes: JAK2 , CALR , or MPL The thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, is the key cytokine receptor in MPN development, and these mutations all activate MPL-JAK-STAT signaling in MPN stem cells. Despite common biological features, MPNs display diverse disease phenotypes as a result of both constitutional and acquired factors that influence MPN stem cells, and likely also as a result of heterogeneity in the HSC in which MPN-initiating mutations arise. As the MPN clone expands, it exerts cell-extrinsic effects on components of the bone marrow niche that can favor the survival and expansion of MPN stem cells over normal HSC, further sustaining and driving malignant hematopoiesis. Although developed as targeted therapies for MPNs, current JAK2 inhibitors do not preferentially target MPN stem cells, and as a result, rarely induce molecular remissions in MPN patients. As the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the clonal dominance of MPN stem cells advances, this will help facilitate the development of therapies that preferentially target MPN stem cells over normal HSC. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. Vascularity in thyroid neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjaer; Andersen, Niels Frost; Melsen, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability of four different methods (vascular grading, Chalkley count, microvessel density (MVD) and stereological estimation) for quantifying intratumoral microvascularity in thyroid neoplasms, by comparing the variability within and between...... count should be the preferred method for assessing microvascularity in thyroid neoplasms. The diagnostic evaluation revealed a tendency towards higher degree of vascularity in FA compared to both FC and PC for all methods. No statistically significant association was seen between vascular density...

  9. Temporary arthrodesis using fixator rods in two-stage revision of septic knee prothesis with severe bone and tissue defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhner, Eric; Pfitzner, Tilman; Preininger, Bernd; Zippelius, Timo; Perka, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes a new temporary arthrodesis procedure, which aims for septic knee prosthesis replacement, in particular for larger bone and soft tissue defects. Our technique offers high stability and full weight-bearing capacity of the knee joint. The study included 16 patients with major bone defects (AORI type IIb or greater) after receiving a radical debridement and a septic two-stage revision total knee arthroplasty. After removing the infected prosthesis and debridement, two AO fixator rods were positioned into the intramedullary space of the femur and tibia. Subsequently, both rods were joined tube-to-tube and adjusted in the center of the knee joint. Finally, the whole cavity of the knee joint was filled with PMMA. The number of previous surgeries, bacterial spectrum, risk factors for further infection and reinfection rates was recorded. Immediately after the temporary arthrodesis, radiographs of the knee with the enclosed spacers were taken in order to compare to previous radiographs and avoiding to miss possible spacer loosening. Nine of sixteen patients underwent more than two revision surgeries before receiving our new arthrodesis technique. No cases of spacer loosening were observed in all 16 patients; further, there were no peri-implant fractures, and four persistent infections were noted. Temporary arthrodesis using AO fixator rods offers a high stability without loosening. Its potential to replace conventional augmentation techniques should be taken into account, particularly in the case of larger bone and tissue defects. In clinical practice, the cemented spacer using AO fixator rods could be an alternative technique for temporary knee arthrodesis after septic debridement. Retrospective case series, Level IV.

  10. [Aseptic loosening of total ankle replacement : Two-stage revision with bone augmentation of osseous defects and secondary prosthesis implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, A; Wiewiorski, M; Valderrabano, V

    2017-06-01

    To remove loosened ankle prosthesis components, perform osseous defect augmentation, and reimplant definitive prosthesis components to preserve ankle range of motion. Aseptic loosening of the tibial and/or talar ankle prosthesis components with substantial bone defect. General surgical/anesthesiological risks, infections, critical soft tissue conditions, nonmanageable hindfoot instability, neurovascular impairment of the lower extremity, neuroarthropathy, substantial nonreconstructable osseous defects with or without cysts on the tibial and/or talar side, noncompliance, primary total ankle replacement (TAR) using intramedullary fixation (stem fixation), severely reduced bone quality, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, smoking, unrealistic patients' expectations, high activity in sports. Exposure of the ankle joint using the previous incision. Mobilization and removal of loosened prosthesis components. Debridement of bone stock. Assessment and measurement of osseous defects. Harvesting of iliac crest autograft. Screw fixation of iliac crest autograft. Placement of polyethylene inlay as a spacer. Wound closure in layers at the ankle and the iliac crest. Implantation of definitive prosthesis components. A soft wound dressing. Thromboprophylaxis recommended. Mobilization on postoperative day 1 using a stabilizing walking boot/cast for 6 weeks (sole contact but no weight bearing). Clinical and radiographic follow-up 3 months postoperatively including computed tomography to assess osseous consolidation. After the second surgery, patient mobilization on postoperative day 1 with 15 kg partial weight bearing using a stabilizing walking boot/cast for 6 weeks. Following clinical and radiographic follow-up at 6 weeks, full weight bearing is initiated gradually. From January 2007 to December 2012, a two-stage revision TAR was performed in 5 patients (46.8 and 71.4 years). The time between the initial TAR and revision was 2.4-11.5 years. No intra

  11. Hip-inspired implant for revision of failed reverse shoulder arthroplasty with severe glenoid bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Glenoid reconstruction and inverted glenoid re-implantation is strongly advocated in revisions of failed reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). Nevertheless, severe glenoid deficiency may preclude glenoid reconstruction and may dictate less favorable solutions, such as conversion to hemiarthropasty or resection arthropasty. The CAD/CAM shoulder (Stanmore Implants, Elstree, UK), a hip arthroplasty-inspired implant, may facilitate glenoid component fixation in these challenging revisions where glenoid reconstruction is not feasible. We questioned (1) whether revision arthroplasty with the CAD/CAM shoulder would alleviate pain and improve shoulder function in patients with failed RSA, not amenable to glenoid reconstruction, (2) whether the CAD/CAM hip-inspired glenoid shell would enable secure and durable glenoid component fixation in these challenging revisions. Patients and methods 11 patients with failed RSAs and unreconstructable glenoids underwent revision with the CAD/CAM shoulder and were followed-up for mean 35 (28–42) months. Clinical outcomes included the Oxford shoulder score, subjective shoulder value, pain rating, physical examination, and shoulder radiographs. Results The average Oxford shoulder score and subjective shoulder value improved statistically significantly after the revision from 50 to 33 points and from 17% to 48% respectively. Pain rating at rest and during activity improved significantly from 5.3 to 2.3 and from 8.1 to 3.8 respectively. Active forward flexion increased from 25 to 54 degrees and external rotation increased from 9 to 21 degrees. 4 patients required reoperation for postoperative complications. No cases of glenoid loosening occurred. Interpretation The CAD/CAM shoulder offers an alternative solution for the treatment of failed RSA that is not amenable to glenoid reconstruction. PMID:24650026

  12. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  13. The sit-to-stand movement: differences in performance between patients after primary total hip arthroplasty and revision total hip arthroplasty with acetabular bone impaction grafting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, M.C.; Schreurs, B.W.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the functional performance of patients after revision total hip arthroplasty with major acetabular bone impaction grafting. In general, these patients are assumed to perform worse due to a more advanced stage of periarticular tissue degeneration and multiple

  14. Hip-inspired implant for revision of failed reverse shoulder arthroplasty with severe glenoid bone loss

    OpenAIRE

    Uri, Ofir; Bayley, Ian; Lambert, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Glenoid reconstruction and inverted glenoid re-implantation is strongly advocated in revisions of failed reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). Nevertheless, severe glenoid deficiency may preclude glenoid reconstruction and may dictate less favorable solutions, such as conversion to hemiarthropasty or resection arthropasty. The CAD/CAM shoulder (Stanmore Implants, Elstree, UK), a hip arthroplasty-inspired implant, may facilitate glenoid component fixation in these challen...

  15. Use of a trabecular metal cone made of tantalum, to treat bone defects during revision knee arthroplasty,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan de Paula Mozella

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: the aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical technique and determine the initial results, with a minimum follow-up of two years, from total knee arthroplasty revisions in which trabecular metal cones made of tantalum were used at the Knee Surgery Center of the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics (INTO or at the authors' private clinic between July 2008 and December 2010.METHODS: ten patients were included in the study prospectively, through clinical and radiographic evaluations.RESULTS: seven patients presented evolution without complications relating to the tantalum cones used. Five of these patients said that they did not have any pain and all of them were able to walk without needing crutches. In all the cases, we observed that osseointegration of the tantalum cones had occurred. No migration or loosening of the implants was observed, nor was osteolysis.CONCLUSION: use of trabecular metal cones made of tantalum for treating AORI type II or II bone defects was capable of providing efficient structural support to the prosthetic revision implants, in evaluations with a short follow-up.

  16. No red cell alloimmunization or change of clinical outcome after using fresh frozen cancellous allograft bone for acetabular reconstruction in revision hip arthroplasty: a follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittag Falk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Possible immunization to blood group or other antigens and subsequent inhibition of remodeling or incorporation after use of untreated human bone allograft was described previously. This study presents the immunological, clinical and radiological results of 30 patients with acetabular revisions using fresh frozen non-irradiated bone allograft. Methods AB0-incompatible (donor-recipient bone transplantation was performed in 22 cases, Rh(D incompatible transplantation in 6 cases. The mean follow up of 23 months included measuring Harris hip score and radiological examination with evaluation of remodeling of the bone graft, implant migration and heterotopic ossification. In addition, all patients were screened for alloimmunization to Rh blood group antigens. Results Compared to the whole study group, there were no differences in clinical or radiological measurements for the groups with AB0- or Rh(D-incompatible bone transplantation. The mean Harris Hip Score was 80.6. X-rays confirmed total remodeling of all allografts with no acetabular loosening. At follow up, blood tests revealed no alloimmunization to Rh blood group donor antigens. Conclusions The use of fresh frozen non-irradiated bone allograft in acetabular revision is a reliable supplement to reconstruction. The risk of alloimmunization to donor-blood group antigens after AB0- or Rh-incompatible allograft transplantation with a negative long-term influence on bone-remodeling or the clinical outcome is negligible.

  17. Anal channel neoplasm: a neoplasm radio chemo curable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Lopez, M.; Avondet, I.; Vazquez, J.; Santini Blasco, A.

    1997-01-01

    Presently work is made an exhaustive revision of the anatomy of the region, the history of the treatments and of the current treatments of channel cancer anal. It makes emphasis in the importance of the conservative treatment with radiochemotherapy (RQT). The present is a prospective study,longitudinal and descriptive. Material and method: between January of 1989 and December of 1994 20 patients attended with cancer of anal channel with an illness metastasis. An average age it was of 62.4 years.The sex, 16 men and 4 women. The performance status 0,1 or 2 of the scale of the ECOQ. In the pathological anatomy: 15 patient epidermic neoplasm, 5 patient basal neoplasm. State I: 2 patients, II: 12 patients, III: 6 patients, IV: 0 patients.Treatment: the radiotherapy one carries out with cobalt 60 and it irradiates the primary tumour and the ganglion structures region, pelvic and inguinal. It surrendered to Gy/dia from Monday to Friday up to 50 Gy. The chemotherapy one carries out with mitomicine C 10 mg/ previous day to the radiotherapy and 5-UGH 1 intravenous g/my in infusion the days from 1 to 4 and from 29 to 32 after the radiotherapy.Results: to) control locorregional patient RC-16 (80%) ,RP 2 patients (10%) , without answer or with progression lesional a patient (5%) .b) State vital: living 15 patients, died 5 patients(continuation 12 to 60 months) .e)Tolerance: there were not deaths for the gastrointestinal treatment and haematological with toxicity moderate.To conclude:1) The radiochemotherapy is the treatment of elect.2)A feasible treatment of being carried out in our environment.3)Required of a good relationship predictable interdisciplinary.4)Toxicity and tolerable.5)Results of conservation of the sphincter in 80%(AU) [es

  18. The use of allograft bone during the course of femoral reconstruction in hip revision arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, A.; Morgan, F.; Imran Ilyas

    1999-01-01

    We have studied 61 patients who underwent femoral revision surgery requiring allograft reconstruction of the skeleton between 1987 and 1995. The group had a mean age of 68 years with a mean follow-up of 5.1 years. The preoperative Harris hip score was increased from 30 points to a postoperative score of 69 points. A rerevision rate of 20% was noted. Segmental anomalies were classified according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons system. Subgroups were analysed according to the classification and relative indications for the use of impaction allografting, corticocancellous strut grafting, anatomic specific allografts and calcar allografts were devised. This paper details the results of those subgroups and outlines pitfalls and problems associated with complex surgery of this type

  19. Revision hip arthroplasty with an extensively 
porous-coated stem - excellent long-term 
results also in severe femoral bone stock loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Per B; Jensen, Niels J F; Kampmann, Jens; Bæk Hansen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    During the last 25 years uncemented hip stem revision relying on diaphyseal fixation has shown improving clinical results and stem survival. The purpose of this study was to present the long-term results of hip revision with the SOLUTION stem (DePuy, Warsaw Indiana).
Ninety-three consecutive SOLUTION hip stem revisions in 84 patients with a mean age of 69 years (range 33-86 years) were reviewed. Of these, clinical and radiographic follow-up examination by an independent observer was possible in 36 hips/29 patients after mean 14 years (range 10-18 years). Stem re-revision was documented by our own files and by the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Registry. 
Stem re-revision had been performed in two hips for aseptic loosening, one due to deep infection and in one patient due to stem fracture. The 18 years cumulative survival, free of re-revision for any reason was calculated as 94.4% (88.9-99.8)% and for aseptic loosening to 97.6% (94.3-100%). Intraoperative complications were frequent with incidence of shaft fractures (14/93) and perforations (9/93) showing a significant learning curve. Mean Harris Hip Score was 85 (range 53-99). Osseointegration was seen in 34/36 stems with two stems fibrous fixated. Stress shielding was significant associated with stem diameters ≥15 mm. Severe preoperative bone deficiency had no negative bearing on stem survival and no significant influence on osseointegration of the stem or on Harris Hip Score. 
 Femoral stem revision with an extensively porous-coated monoblock chrome-cobalt stem seems to be a reliable and reproducible technique resulting in excellent long-term survivorship and clinical outcome. It can be used in femurs with deficient bone stock.

  20. A novel technique for impaction bone grafting in acetabular reconstruction of revision total hip arthroplasty using an ex vivo compaction device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Haruhiko; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Morishima, Takkan

    2011-01-01

    Impaction bone grafting allows restoration of the acetabular bone stock in revision hip arthroplasty. The success of this technique depends largely on achieving adequate initial stability of the component. To obtain well-compacted, well-graded allograft aggregates, we developed an ex vivo compaction device to apply it in revision total hip arthroplasty on the acetabular side, and characterized mechanical properties and putative osteoconductivity of allograft aggregates. Morselized allograft bone chips were compacted ex vivo using the creep technique and subsequent impaction technique to form the bone aggregates. Impaction allograft reconstruction of the acetabulum using an ex vivo compaction device was performed on eight hips. The mechanical properties and three-dimensional micro-CT-based structural characteristics of the bone aggregates were investigated. In clinical practice, this technique offered good reproducibility in reconstructing the cavity and the segmental defects of the acetabulum, with no migration and no loosening of the component. In vitro analysis showed that the aggregates generated from 25 g fresh-frozen bone chips gained compression stiffness of 13.5-15.4 MPa under uniaxial consolidation strain. The recoil of the aggregates after compaction was 2.6-3.9%. The compression stiffness and the recoil did not differ significantly from those measured using a variety of proportions of large- and small-sized bone chips. Micro-CT-based structural analysis revealed average pore sizes of 268-299 μm and average throat diameter of pores in the bone aggregates of more than 100 μm. These sizes are desirable for osteoconduction, although large interconnected pores of more than 500 μm were detectable in association with the proportion of large-sized bone chips. Cement penetration into the aggregates was related to the proportion of large-sized bone chips. This study introduces the value of an ex vivo compaction device in bone graft compaction in clinical

  1. Risk factors for neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachner, A.; Grosche, B.

    1991-06-01

    A broad survey is given of risk factors for neoplasms. The main carcinogenic substances (including also ionizing radiation and air pollution) are listed, and are correlated with the risk factors for various cancers most frequently explained and discussed in the literature. The study is intended to serve as a basis for a general assessment of the incidence of neoplasms in children, and of cancer mortality in the entire population of Bavaria in the years 1983-1989, or 1979-1988, respectively, with the principal idea of drawing up an environment-related health survey. The study therefore takes into account not only ionizing radiation as a main risk factor, but also other risk factors detectable within the ecologic context, as e.g. industrial installations and their effects, refuse incineration plants or waste dumps, or the social status. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Myeloid neoplasms in the World Health Organization 2016 classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asou, Norio

    In the 2016 revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification, the categories of myeloid neoplasms have not been revised significantly from the 2008 fourth edition. However, recent discovery of molecular abnormalities provides a new perspective regarding the diagnostic and prognostic markers. In myeloproliferative neoplasms, the identification of CALR gene mutation, in addition to the JAK2 and MPL mutations, has impacted the diagnostic criteria. In myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia, in addition to alterations in the transcription factors and signal transduction pathways, discovery of gene mutations in the epigenetic regulators that are involved in DNA methylation, histone modification, cohesin complex, and RNA splicing, by comprehensive genetic analyses, has improved our understanding of the pathobiology of these diseases. Moreover, recent large-scale sequencing studies have revealed the acquisition of clonal somatic mutations, in the myeloid neoplasm-associated genes of the hematopoietic cells. Such mutations were detected in people with normal blood cell counts, without any apparent disease. Presence of these mutations confers an increased risk for subsequent hematological neoplasms, indicating the concept of clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential. This updated WHO classification incorporates the criteria of new clinical, prognostic, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic findings in myeloid neoplasms.

  3. Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasma cell neoplasms occur when abnormal plasma cells or myeloma cells form tumors in the bones or soft tissues of the body. Multiple myeloma, plasmacytoma, lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) are different types of plasma cell neoplasms. Find out about risk factors, symptoms, diagnostic tests, prognosis, and treatment for these diseases.

  4. Femoral Component Revision with Use of Impaction Bone-Grafting and a Cemented Polished Stem: A Concise Follow-up, at Fifteen to Twenty Years, of a Previous Report*

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Te Stroet, M.A.; Gardeniers, J.W.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Rijnen, W.H.C.; Slooff, T.J.J.H.; Schreurs, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported our results for thirty-three consecutive femoral component revisions with impaction bone-grafting, performed with the X-change femoral revision system and a cemented polished Exeter stem, at a minimum of eight years of follow-up. The present updated study shows the results

  5. Reconstruction techniques in the treatment of vertebral neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, R; Boriani, S; Casadei, R; Bandiera, S; De Iure, F; Campanacci, L; Demitri, S; Orsini, U; Di Fiore, M

    1997-01-01

    The authors present a new system for the topographical description of vertebral neoplasms. The general criteria of reconstruction after curettage or vertebral resection are evaluated. The literature is reviewed in terms of the use of prostheses, bone grafts, cement and stabilization systems in the treatment of tumors of the spine. Indications for the different methods are discussed.

  6. MR appearance of skeletal neoplasms following cryotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, M.L. [Dept. of Radiology SB-05, Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States); Lough, L.R. [Pitts Radiological Associates, Columbia, SC (United States); Shuman, W.P. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Lazerte, G.D. [Dept. of Pathology RC-72, Washington Univ., Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Conrad, E.U. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery RK-10, Washington Univ., Medical Center of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Cryotherapy is an increasingly popular mode of therapy adjunctive to surgical curettage in the treatment of certain skeletal neoplasms, such as giant cell tumors or chondrosarcomas. The magnetic resonance (MR) findings following cryotherapy have not been previously reported. We reviewed the MR findings in seven patients with skeletal neoplasms following curettage and cryotherapy. In six cases we found a zone of varying thickness extending beyond the surgical margins, corresponding to an area of cryoinjury to medullary bone. This zone displayed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, consistent with the presence of marrow edema. This zone of edema almost certainly reflects underlying thermal osteonecrosis. This zone may vary in size and intensity over time as the area of cryoinjury evolves or resolves. MR is currently the imaging procedure of choice for follow-up of most musculoskeletal neoplasms. Knowledge of the MR findings following cryotherapy should help prevent confusion during the interpretation of follow-up MR examinations. (orig.)

  7. MR appearance of skeletal neoplasms following cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, M.L.; Lough, L.R.; Shuman, W.P.; Lazerte, G.D.; Conrad, E.U.

    1994-01-01

    Cryotherapy is an increasingly popular mode of therapy adjunctive to surgical curettage in the treatment of certain skeletal neoplasms, such as giant cell tumors or chondrosarcomas. The magnetic resonance (MR) findings following cryotherapy have not been previously reported. We reviewed the MR findings in seven patients with skeletal neoplasms following curettage and cryotherapy. In six cases we found a zone of varying thickness extending beyond the surgical margins, corresponding to an area of cryoinjury to medullary bone. This zone displayed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, consistent with the presence of marrow edema. This zone of edema almost certainly reflects underlying thermal osteonecrosis. This zone may vary in size and intensity over time as the area of cryoinjury evolves or resolves. MR is currently the imaging procedure of choice for follow-up of most musculoskeletal neoplasms. Knowledge of the MR findings following cryotherapy should help prevent confusion during the interpretation of follow-up MR examinations. (orig.)

  8. Myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative neoplasms: updates on the overlap syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Swapna; Gerds, Aaron T

    2018-04-01

    Myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) is a rare and distinct group of myeloid neoplasms with overlapping MDS and MPN features. Next generation sequencing studies have led to an improved understanding of MDS/MPN disease biology by identifying recurrent somatic mutations. Combining the molecular findings to patho-morphologic features has improved the precision of diagnosis and prognostic models in MDS/MPN. We discuss and highlight these updates in MDS/MPN nomenclature and diagnostic criteria per revised 2016 WHO classification of myeloid neoplasms in this article. There is an ongoing effort for data integration allowing for comprehensive genomic characterization, development of improved prognostic tools, and investigation for novel therapies using an international front specific for MDS/MPN. In this article, we discuss updates in prognostic models and current state of treatment for MDS/MPN.

  9. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demas, B.E.; Hricak, H.; Braga, C.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four women with suspected gestational trophoblastic neoplasms were evaluated prospectively to identify imaging algorithms optimal for treatment planning. All underwent chest radiography, chest CT, hepatic and cranial CT or MR imaging, and pelvic MR imaging. Ten also underwent pelvic CT, 13 pelvic US. The most sensitive imaging combination was chest CT, hepatic and cranial CT or MR imaging, and pelvic MR imaging. However, correct assignment to ACOG therapeutic categories was achieved by means of history, physical examination, beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin measurements, and chest radiography in 81% of patients. Hepatic and cranial imaging defined the need for radiation therapy. Chest CT was needed only when chest radiographs were negative. Pelvic imaging aided diagnosis but did not assist in treatment planning

  10. Results of uncemented distal locked prosthesis in revision hip arthroplasty with proximal femoral bone loss: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Agarwala

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Uncemented distal locked prosthesis provide adequate stability in revision THA, aiding the reconstruction of bony deficiencies while avoiding the disadvantages of fully porous or cemented implants.

  11. (unicameral) bone cysts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When encountering a radiologically benign lucent bone lesion in a child, a simple bone cyst is a reasonable diagnostic consideration. Simple or unicameral bone cysts are expansile, serous-fluid-containing defects, that are not true neoplasms. Peak age ranges between 3 and 14 years in. 80% of cases. The incidence is ...

  12. One stage revision single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with impacted morselized bone graft following a failed double-bundle reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Jong Ra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction has theoretical benefits such as more accurate reproduction of ACL anatomy, it is technically more demanding surgery. This report describes the case of a one stage revision single-bundle ACL reconstruction after primary double-bundle ACL reconstruction. A professional dancer had an ACL previously reconstructed with a double-bundle technique, but the femoral tunnels were malpositioned resulting in residual laxity and rotational instability. The previous femoral tunnel positions were vertical and widened. The previous vertical tunnels were filled with impacted bone graft and a revision single-bundle ACL reconstruction was performed via the new femoral tunnel with a 2 O'clock position between the previous two tunnels. After 10 months of postoperative rehabilitation, the patient returned to professional dancing with sound bony union and without any residual instability.

  13. Outcome of revision total knee arthroplasty with the use of trabecular metal cone for reconstruction of severe bone loss at the proximal tibia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus L; Olsen, Nikolaj Winther; Schrøder, Henrik M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relative effectiveness of different methods for reconstructing large bone loss at the proximal tibia in revision total knee arthroplasty (rTKA) has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcome after the use of trabecular metal......). RESULTS: Clinical and radiological follow-up data were available in 30 patients and missing in six patients: two died and four patients had re-revision (reinfection (n=2), aseptic loosening (n=1), and knee hyperextension (n=1)). Knee- and function scores (follow-up 43 months (range 12-84 months)) improved...... treatment in terms of surgical efficacy, clinical results and radiological results and was evidently at least as effective as the other options reviewed in the literature. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV....

  14. Risk factors of aseptic bone resorption: a study after autologous bone flap reinsertion due to decompressive craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dünisch, Pedro; Walter, Jan; Sakr, Yasser; Kalff, Rolf; Waschke, Albrecht; Ewald, Christian

    2013-05-01

    In patients who have undergone decompressive craniectomy, autologous bone flap reinsertion becomes necessary whenever the cerebral situation has consolidated. However, aseptic necrosis of the bone flap remains a concern. The aim of this study was to report possible perioperative complications in patients undergoing autologous bone flap reinsertion and to identify the risk factors that may predispose the bone flap to necrosis. All patients admitted to the authors' neurosurgical department between September 1994 and June 2011 and who received their own cryoconserved bone flap after decompressive craniectomy were studied. The grade of the bone flap necrosis was classified into 2 types. Type II bone necrosis was characterized by aseptic resorption with circumscribed or complete lysis of tabula interna and externa requiring surgical revision. To define predisposing factors, a multivariate analysis was performed using bone necrosis as the dependent variable. Among the 372 patients (mean age 48.6 years, 57.4% males) who received 414 bone flaps during the observation period, 134 (36.0%) had a diffuse traumatic brain injury, 69 (18.5%) had subarachnoid hemorrhage, 58 (15.6%) had cerebral infarction, 56 (15.1%) had extraaxial bleeding, 43 (11.6%) had intracerebral bleeding, and 12 (3.2%) had a neoplasm. Surgical relevant Type II bone flap necrosis occurred in 85 patients (22.8%) and 91 bone flaps, after a median time of 15 months (interquartile range [IQR], 10-33 months). In a multivariate analysis with Type II necrosis as the dependent variable, bone flap fragmentation with 2 (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.59-7.01, p bone flap necrosis. In patients undergoing bone flap reinsertion after craniotomy, aseptic bone necrosis is an underestimated problem during long-term follow-up. Especially in younger patients with an expected good neurological recovery and a fragmented bone flap, an initial allograft should be considered because of an increased risk for aseptic bone flap necrosis.

  15. Proximal femoral allografts for reconstruction of bone stock in revision arthroplasty of the hip. A nine to fifteen-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackley, H R; Davis, A M; Hutchison, C R; Gross, A E

    2001-03-01

    Revision of a femoral component in a patient who has severe bone loss is a complex problem that is likely to increase with the increasing numbers of patients who have multiple revision hip arthroplasties. A valuable option in such a situation is use of a long-stem prosthesis that is cemented to a proximal femoral allograft but not to the host bone. Between April 1984 and December 1989, sixty-three total hip arthroplasties in sixty consecutive patients were revised with a proximal femoral allograft-prosthesis construct. The average length of the allograft was 15 cm. The average age of the patients at the time of the revision was 62.5 years. All patients had undergone at least one previous total hip arthroplasty, and an average of 3.8 previous total hip arthroplasties had been performed in the series. Each patient was assigned a modified Harris hip score. Radiographs were examined for trochanteric union, allograft-host union, endosteal and periosteal resorption, component loosening, and fracture. At an average of eleven years (range, nine years and four months to fifteen years) after the revision, forty-five patients were alive, fourteen patients had died, and one patient had been lost to follow-up. The patients who had died or had been lost to follow-up had had a total of fifteen allografts (24%) and had been followed for an average of five years and seven months (range, two years and four months to eight years). The average preoperative Harris hip score for the sixty-three hips was 30 points (range, 6 to 65 points). At the latest follow-up evaluation, the average score for the hips with the original graft in situ was 71 points (range, 47 to 95 points). Five hips failed because of infection, and four of them were successfully revised. Three hips failed because of aseptic loosening, at an average of ten years and three months; two were successfully revised, and the third was awaiting revision at the time of writing. An additional operation was performed in three hips

  16. Familial Myelodysplastic/Acute Leukemia Syndromes—Myeloid Neoplasms with Germline Predisposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Lyrio Rafael Baptista

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although most cases of myeloid neoplasms are sporadic, a small subset has been associated with germline mutations. The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification included these cases in a myeloid neoplasm group with a predisposing germline mutational background. These patients must have a different management and their families should get genetic counseling. Cases identification and outline of the major known syndromes characteristics will be discussed in this text.

  17. Familial Myelodysplastic/Acute Leukemia Syndromes—Myeloid Neoplasms with Germline Predisposition

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, Renata Lyrio Rafael; dos Santos, Anna Cláudia Evangelista; Gutiyama, Luciana Mayumi; Solza, Cristiana; Zalcberg, Ilana Renault

    2017-01-01

    Although most cases of myeloid neoplasms are sporadic, a small subset has been associated with germline mutations. The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification included these cases in a myeloid neoplasm group with a predisposing germline mutational background. These patients must have a different management and their families should get genetic counseling. Cases identification and outline of the major known syndromes characteristics will be discussed in this text.

  18. Inserting the Ulnar Prosthesis into Radius as a Novel Salvage Surgery for Revision Total Elbow Arthroplasty with Massive Bone Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Qi Gong

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Inserting an ulnar prosthesis into the radius is a novel procedure for patients with a massive bone defect due to infection or aseptic loosening. It is a safe, quick, and effective treatment with a promising short-term outcome. This method should be provided as a salvage procedure for patients with a nonreconstructable ulnar bone defect.

  19. Cryotherapy of skeletal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, M.L.; Lough, L.R.; Shuman, W.P.; Conrad, E.U.

    1989-01-01

    The authors reviewed MR examinations in six patients with giant cell tumor or chondrosarcoma who had undergone surgical curettage and subsequent cryotherapy. In five cases, the authors found a zone of varying thickness extending beyond the surgical margins consistent with cryotherapy injury to medullary bone. This zone appeared dark or intermediate in intensity on T1-weighted images and bright on T2-weighted and short inversion recovery (STIR) images, suggesting tissue edema. In one case, this marginal zone grew for 3 months as the cryotherapy injury evolved. These findings should be expected after cryotherapy and should not be confused with recurrent tumor

  20. Comparison of Clinical Efficacy Between Modular Cementless Stem Prostheses and Coated Cementless Long-Stem Prostheses on Bone Defect in Hip Revision Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huibin; Chen, Fang; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Qian

    2016-02-29

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the clinical efficacy of modular cementless stem and coated cementless long-stem prostheses in hip revision arthroplasty. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-five patients with complete hip revision surgery data during January 2005 to March 2015 were selected from the People's Hospital of Linyi City and randomly divided into a S-ROM group (implanted with cementless modular stem prostheses, n=32) and a SLR-PLUS group (implanted with cementless coated long-stem prostheses, n=33). Harris score was used to evaluate the hip function of the patients in order to measure the clinical efficacy of the prostheses in total hip arthroplasty. Anteroposterior pelvic radiographs and lateral pelvic radiographs were taken and each patient's hip arthroplasty condition was recorded. Kaplan-Meier method was applied to compare the cumulative 5-year non-revision rate between the 2 prostheses and log-rank method was used to inspect the statistical data. RESULTS The Harris scores of both the S-ROM group and the SLR-PLUS group were significantly higher at 12 months after the operation than those before the operation (both P0.05), while the Harris scores of the patients with type IIIA/IIIB in the S-ROM group were both significantly higher than those of the same types in the SLR-PLUS group at 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the operation (all Prevision rate between the type I/II patients in the S-ROM group (92.31%) and the patients of the same types in the SLR-PLUS group (85.71%) (P>0.05). However, the cumulative 5-year non-revision rate of the type IIIA/IIIB patients in the S-ROM group (89.47%) was significantly different from the patients of the same types in the SLR-PLUS group (42.11%) (Phip revision arthroplasty were clinically more effective in the treatment of type IIIA and IIIB bone defects than the coated long-stem prostheses according to the Harris score and the cumulative 5-year non-revision rate.

  1. Treatment of Severe Bone Defects During Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty with Structural Allografts and Porous Metal Cones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, Nicholas A; Mueller, Sebastian; Gondan, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic loosening and focal osteolysis are the most common reasons for knee arthroplasty failure. The best treatment remains unclear. We reviewed the literature on the treatment of revision knee arthroplasty using bony structural allografts (476 cases) and porous metal cones (223 cases......) to determine if a difference in the revision failure rates was discernable. The failure rates were compared using a logistic regression model with adjustment for discrepancies in FU time and number of grafts used (femoral, tibial, or both). In this analysis, the porous implant shows a significantly decreased...

  2. A comparison of the reliability and validity of bone stock loss classification systems used for revision hip surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzard, Charles; Blom, Ashley; Taylor, A; Smith, Evert; Learmonth, Ian

    2003-08-01

    Three femoral (Paprosky, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons [AAOS], and Endo-Klinik) and 2 acetabular (Paprosky, AAOS) bone stock loss classification systems were evaluated for reliability. Four observers (2 consultants, 2 registrars) graded the bone loss in 25 patients using preoperative radiographs. Grading was repeated after a minimum of 2 weeks. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability was investigated. The kappa statistic was used to assess levels of agreement. Intraobserver agreement ranged from poor to good. Interobserver agreement ranged from fair to moderate. The validity of the Paprosky classification system was evaluated, comparing preoperative bone stock loss assessment with intraoperative findings. Agreement levels of moderate (femoral classification system) to good (acetabular classification system) were achieved. Bone stock loss classification systems are shown to be inconsistent and unreliable.

  3. Dendritic cell neoplasms: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairouz, Sebastien; Hashash, Jana; Kabbara, Wadih; McHayleh, Wassim; Tabbara, Imad A

    2007-10-01

    Dendritic cell neoplasms are rare tumors that are being recognized with increasing frequency. They were previously classified as lymphomas, sarcomas, or histiocytic neoplasms. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies dendritic cell neoplasms into five groups: Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, Langerhans' cell sarcoma, Interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma/tumor, Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma/tumor, and Dendritic cell sarcoma, not specified otherwise (Jaffe, World Health Organization classification of tumors 2001; 273-289). Recently, Pileri et al. provided a comprehensive immunohistochemical classification of histiocytic and dendritic cell tumors (Pileri et al., Histopathology 2002;59:161-167). In this article, a concise overview regarding the pathological, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of follicular dendritic, interdigitating dendritic, and Langerhans' cell tumors is presented.

  4. Histogenesis of salivary gland neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Batsakis, J G

    1977-06-01

    In an attempt to explain the histogenesis of salivary gland tumors, a bicellular theory of origin has been presented. This theory is supported by indirect evidence from light and electron microscopy. Two cells, the excretory duct reserve cell and the intercalated duct reserve cell, are presented as the hypothetical cells of origin for salivary gland neoplasms. It is argued that the excretory duct reserve cell gives rise to squamous cell carcinomas and mucoepidermoid carcinomas, and that the intercalated duct reserve cell gives rise to all others. It It is also shown that myoepithelial cells are responsible in part for the wide histologic variation of these neoplasms.

  5. Oral spindle cell neoplasms: a review of 307 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Richard C K; Regezi, Joseph A

    2003-06-01

    The infrequent exposure of pathologists to soft tissue spindle cell neoplasms coupled with overlapping histologic patterns can often make diagnosis challenging. We reviewed all nonodontogenic spindle cell neoplasms seen between 1982 and 2002 (86,162 total accessions). Diagnoses were reclassified according to current standards supplemented with immunohistochemistry. Of the 307 neoplasms reviewed (0.36% of total accessions), neural tumors were the most common benign entities, accounting for 21% of total cases. Kaposi's sarcoma was the most common malignancy, accounting for 67% of all cases. Diagnoses were revised for 57 cases. Schwannoma and neurofibroma were most commonly revised to palisaded encapsulated neuroma. There were 8 myofibromas and 1 inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. There were no oral leiomyomas; that is, all 4 originally reported cases were reclassified as myofibroma, palisaded encapsulated neuroma, and solitary fibrous tumor. With the exception of Kaposi's sarcoma, oral soft tissue sarcomas were rare; most benign lesions were neural in origin. The relatively high prevalence of some tumors, such as myofibroma, likely reflects the use of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of spindle cell tumors.

  6. [Analysis of validity and reliability of three radiographic classification systems for preoperative assessment of bone stock loss in revision total hip arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käfer, W; Fraitzl, C R; Kinkel, S; Puhl, W; Kessler, S

    2004-01-01

    It was the purpose of this prospective study to analyze validity and reliability of three different radiographic classification systems, which are used to assess bone stock loss prior to revision total hip arthroplasty. Investigation was performed using the classification systems according to 1) Paprosky et al., 2) Hungerford et al., and 3) the German Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (DGOT). Twenty-eight consecutive patients with diagnosis of aseptic failure of total hip arthroplasty were enrolled in the study. Interrater agreement was analyzed by evaluating the classifications preoperatively by three investigators with different level of clinical experience using a blinded observer technique. Validity was analyzed by comparison of preoperative radiographic findings (n = 3) and an intraoperative control by visualization and palpation (n = 1). Spearman coefficient of correlation (r(s)) was used to establish levels of agreement among multiple ordinal variables. Interrater reliability testing using paired comparison between the three investigators revealed non-homogeneous coefficients of correlation (r(s): Paprosky femur: 0.45 - 0.67, acetabulum: 0.38 - 0.63; Hungerford: 0.46 - 0.66; DGOT femur: 0.38 - 0.59, acetabulum: 0.42 - 0.76). Paired analysis of correlation between preoperative and intraoperative findings again showed non-homogeneous coefficients of correlation (r(s): Paprosky femur: 0.59 - 0.68, acetabulum: 0.39 - 0.70; Hungerford: 0.39 - 0.74; DGOT femur: 0.44 - 0.60, acetabulum: 0.36 - 0.76). In general, defects were grossly underestimated preoperatively. The level of experience did not influence the validity of measurements. Our results indicate that these classifications do not provide valid and reliable assessment of femoral and acetabular bone stock loss prior to revision total hip arthroplasty.

  7. Superficial Vancomycin Coating of Bone Cement in Orthopedic Revision Surgery: A Safe Technique to Enhance Local Antibiotic Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerstorfer, Florian; Fischerauer, Stefan; Sadoghi, Patrick; Schwantzer, Gerold; Kuehn, Klaus Dieter; Leithner, Andreas; Glehr, Mathias

    2017-05-01

    The use of antibiotic-loaded cement has become a well-accepted method to develop high local antibiotic concentrations in revision surgery of infected arthroplasty. A new surgical technique has been established to further increase the local antibiotic concentration and thereby minimizes the risk of reinfection. Our study aim was to investigate the safety of additional superficial vancomycin coating (SVC) by analyzing postoperative joint and serum vancomycin concentrations, as well as the creatinine levels of patients with orthopedic revision surgery. A longitudinal case series was performed by reviewing collected data of patients who were treated by SVC during revision surgery (1- or 2-stage exchange) because of prosthetic joint infections. Vancomycin levels were obtained, local from drains and systemic from blood samples, on postoperative days 1 to 5. Furthermore, preoperative and postoperative serum creatinine levels were analyzed. Highest median local vancomycin levels were documented on postoperative day 1 with 546.8 μg/mL (range, 44.4-1485 μg/mL) in the reimplantation group and 408.7 μg/mL (range, 24.7-1650 μg/mL) in the spacer group. Median serum vancomycin level was 4.4 μg/mL (range, vancomycin without leading to systemic side effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Raman spectroscopy of skin neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moryatov, A. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Kaganov, O. I.; Orlov, A. E.; Zaharov, V. P.; Batrachenko, I. A.; Artemiev, D. N.; Blinov, N. V.

    2017-09-01

    Skin melanoma is spread inhomogeneously worldwide, particularly in Samara region there are high figures of skin neoplasms sick rate as well—18.6%. Research goal: to develop a new method of early non-invasive differential diagnostics of skin neoplasms. Registration of Raman spectrum was implemented in the distance of 3-4 mm, the spectrum registration from pathologically changed zone was subsequently conducted, then from healthy skin zone. The test time for 1 patient was no longer than 3-5 min. In a range of experiments ex vivo there were the following results: melanoma—24, basal cell cancer—25, squamosus cell sarcinoma—7, nevus pigmentosis—9, other malignant neoplasms—6; in vivo: melanoma—9, basal cell cancer—8, nevus pigmentosis—2, other benign neoplasms—2. The first results of the research dedicated to studying permissive opportunities of Raman spectroscopy, with successive two-phase analysis of received parameters display high efficiency of method of differential diagnostic for skin melanoma and other malignant neoplasms, pigment and benign skin neoplasms. Safety and rapidity of the research reveal a high potential of the technique.

  9. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myeloproliferative neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Gastrointestinal Surgery of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carsten Palnæs; Olsen, Ingrid Marie Holst; Knigge, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Surgery is the only treatment that may cure the patient with gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) and should always be considered as the first-line treatment if radical resection can be achieved. Even in cases where radical surgery is not possible, palliative resection may...

  11. Prevalence, Diagnosis and Management of Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms: Current Status and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are found with increasing prevalence, especially in elderly asymptomatic individuals. Although the overall risk of malignancy is very low, the presence of these pancreatic cysts is associated with a large degree of anxiety and further medical investigation due to concerns about malignancy. This review discusses the different cystic neoplasms of the pancreas and reports diagnostic strategies based on clinical features and imaging data. Surgical and nonsurgical management of the most common cystic neoplasms, based on the recently revised Sendai guidelines, is also discussed, with special reference to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN; particularly the branch duct variant), which is the lesion most frequently identified incidentally. IPMN pathology, its risk for development into pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the pros and cons of current guidelines for management, and the potential role of endoscopic ultrasound in determining cancer risk are discussed. Finally, surgical treatment, strategies for surveillance of pancreatic cysts, and possible future directions are discussed. PMID:26343068

  12. Paediatric atypical spitzoid melanocytic neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen F. Egan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous malignant melanoma is a rare occurrence in children, with an incidence of less than one case per million per year in children under ten years of age. However this statistic is reportedly increasing. Mortality rates in paediatric melanoma are not well described, however reports suggest that 5-year survival rates are improving beyond those of adults. This may be partly attributable to more intensive classification and staging of melanocytic lesions. Atypical spitzoid neoplasms (ASN are a subcategorisation of the diagnostic spectrum which extends from Spitz naevi to spitzoid melanoma, and are relatively more common than the latter. The clinical and histopathological features of such lesions are imprecise, leading to difficulties in making diagnoses and subsequent management. This report documents one such case arising within an atypical spitzoid melanocytic neoplasm and the clinical process undertaken. In particular we wished to highlight the molecular diagnostics utilised and their impact on the decision-making pathway.

  13. A 3- to 18-Year Follow-Up of Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty With Impacted Bone Allografts and Cemented Lubinus SP II Stem. Clinical, Radiographic, and Survivorship Analysis With Comparison to the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigbrand, Hampus; Ullmark, Gösta

    2017-09-01

    We present the first medium- to long-term follow-up of revision total hip arthroplasty using impaction bone grafting (IBG) combined with the matte and collared Lubinus SP II stem for cases of severe osteolysis and stem loosening. Sixty-nine femoral revisions were identified for 67 patients consecutively operated with revision femoral arthroplasty using IBG and a cemented Lubinus SP II stem. The mean age was 69 years (standard deviation, 9.9). We retrospectively analyzed 68 cases (1 was lost to follow-up). At the time of the revision surgery, all had substantial femoral bone loss. Fifteen of the revisions were performed due to deep infection. The patients were analyzed by clinical score and radiography. At follow-up, 4 femoral components (6%) had been rerevised or assessed as failure. Of these 4, 3 were assessed as mechanical failure, and 1 for dislocation; none was for infection. Three cups (4%) had been revised for dislocation; 1 of these also had a stem exchange. Three cases (4%) had been reoperated for a periprosthetic fracture in distal femur without stem exchange. Radiologic results were excellent and the clinical Merle d'Aubignè-Postel score had improved from a mean of 12.2 preoperatively to 17.5 at follow-up. IBG combined with the Lubinus SP II stem is safe and results in a low rate of periprosthetic fractures and dislocations. The medium- to long-term clinical result was excellent, with regeneration of living bone in the femur. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales G, R.; Cano P, R.; Mendoza P, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  15. High-Grade B-Cell Neoplasm with Surface Light Chain Restriction and Tdt Coexpression Evolved in a MYC-Rearranged Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: A Dilemma in Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Sameh Soliman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to World Health Organization (WHO classification (2008, B-cell neoplasms are classified into precursor B-cell or a mature B-cell phenotype and this classification was also kept in the latest WHO revision (2016. We are reporting a male patient in his fifties, with tonsillar swelling diagnosed as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, germinal center. He received 6 cycles of RCHOP and showed complete metabolic response. Two months later, he presented with severe CNS symptoms. Flow cytometry on bone marrow (BM showed infiltration by CD10-positive Kappa-restricted B-cells with loss of CD20 and CD19, and downregulation of CD79b. Moreover, the malignant population showed Tdt expression. BM Cytogenetics revealed t(8;14(q24;q32 within a complex karyotype. Retrospectively, MYC and Tdt immunostains performed on original diagnostic tissue and came negative for Tdt and positive for MYC. It has been rarely reported that mature B-cell neoplasms present with features of immaturity; however the significance of Tdt acquisition during disease course was not addressed before. What is unique in this case is that the emerging disease has acquired an immaturity marker while retaining some features of the original mature clone. No definitive WHO category would adopt high-grade neoplasms that exhibit significant overlapping features between mature and immature phenotypes.

  16. Cytology of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    Cytology of bone is a useful diagnostic tool. Aspiration of lytic or proliferative lesions can assist with the diagnosis of inflammatory or neoplastic processes. Bacterial, fungal, and protozoal organisms can result in significant osteomyelitis, and these organisms can be identified on cytology. Neoplasms of bone including primary bone tumors such as osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma, synovial cell sarcoma, and histiocytic sarcoma and tumors of bone marrow including plasma cell neoplasia and lymphoma and metastatic neoplasia can result in significant bone lysis or proliferation and can be diagnosed effectively with cytology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prenatal ultrasound findings of fetal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Song, Mi Jin; Min, Jee Yeon; Han, Byoung Hee; Lee, Young Ho; Cho, Byung Jae; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2002-01-01

    A variety of neoplasms can develop in each tetal organ. Most fetal neoplasms can be detected by careful prenatal ultrasonographic examination. Some neoplosms show specific ultrasonographic findings suggesting the differential diagnosis, but others do not. Knowledge of the presence of a neoplasm in the fetus may alter the prenatal management of a pregnancy and the mode of delivery, and facilitates immediate postnatal treatment. During the last five years, we experienced 32 cases of fetal neoplasms in a variety of organs. We describe their typical and ultrasonographic findings with correlating postnatal CT, MRI, and pathologic findings

  18. Actinomycosis of the parotid masquerading as malignant neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, Bipin T; Sebastian, Paul; Ramachandran, K; Pandey, Manoj

    2004-01-01

    Primary actinomycosis of the parotid gland is of rare occurrence and can mimic a malignant neoplasm both clinically as well as radiologically. We present here a case of primary actinomycosis of the parotid gland presenting with a parotid mass lesion with erosion of skull bones. Clinical presentation of cervico-facial actinomycosis is characterized by the presence of a suppurative or indurative mass with discharging sinuses. The lesion demonstrates characteristic features on fine needle aspiration cytology and histology, however at times the findings are equivocal

  19. Actinomycosis of the parotid masquerading as malignant neoplasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran K

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary actinomycosis of the parotid gland is of rare occurrence and can mimic a malignant neoplasm both clinically as well as radiologically. Case presentation We present here a case of primary actinomycosis of the parotid gland presenting with a parotid mass lesion with erosion of skull bones. Conclusions Clinical presentation of cervico-facial actinomycosis is characterized by the presence of a suppurative or indurative mass with discharging sinuses. The lesion demonstrates characteristic features on fine needle aspiration cytology and histology, however at times the findings are equivocal.

  20. Targeting angiogenesis-dependent calcified neoplasms using combined polymer therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Segal

    Full Text Available There is an immense clinical need for novel therapeutics for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent calcified neoplasms such as osteosarcomas and bone metastases. We developed a new therapeutic strategy to target bone metastases and calcified neoplasms using combined polymer-bound angiogenesis inhibitors. Using an advanced "living polymerization" technique, the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT, we conjugated the aminobisphosphonate alendronate (ALN, and the potent anti-angiogenic agent TNP-470 with N-(2-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide (HPMA copolymer through a Glycine-Glycine-Proline-Norleucine linker, cleaved by cathepsin K, a cysteine protease overexpressed at resorption sites in bone tissues. In this approach, dual targeting is achieved. Passive accumulation is possible due to the increase in molecular weight following polymer conjugation of the drugs, thus extravasating from the tumor leaky vessels and not from normal healthy vessels. Active targeting to the calcified tissues is achieved by ALN's affinity to bone mineral.The anti-angiogenic and antitumor potency of HPMA copolymer-ALN-TNP-470 conjugate was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. We show that free and conjugated ALN-TNP-470 have synergistic anti-angiogenic and antitumor activity by inhibiting proliferation, migration and capillary-like tube formation of endothelial and human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Evaluation of anti-angiogenic, antitumor activity and body distribution of HPMA copolymer-ALN-TNP-470 conjugate was performed on severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID male mice inoculated with mCherry-labeled MG-63-Ras human osteosarcoma and by modified Miles permeability assay. Our targeted bi-specific conjugate reduced VEGF-induced vascular hyperpermeability by 92% and remarkably inhibited osteosarcoma growth in mice by 96%.This is the first report to describe a new concept of a narrowly-dispersed combined polymer therapeutic designed to target both tumor and

  1. Malignant nerve-sheath neoplasms in neurofibromatosis: distinction from benign tumors by using imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, E.; Huntrakoon, M.; Wetzel, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve-sheath neoplasms frequently complicate neurofibromatosis causing pain, enlarging masses, or neurologic deficits. However, similar findings sometimes also occur with benign nerve neoplasms. Our study was done retrospectively to determine if imaging techniques can differentiate malignant from benign nerve tumors in neurofibromatosis. Eight patients with symptomatic neoplasms (three benign, five malignant) were studied by CT in eight, MR in six, and 67 Ga-citrate scintigraphy in seven. Uptake of 67 Ga occurred in all five malignant lesions but not in two benign neoplasms studied. On CT or MR, all eight lesions, including three benign neoplasms, showed inhomogeneities. Of five lesions with irregular, infiltrative margins on CT or MR, four were malignant and one was benign. Of three lesions with smooth margins, one was malignant and two were benign. One malignant neoplasm caused irregular bone destruction. Accordingly, CT and MR could not generally distinguish malignant from benign lesions with certainty. However, both CT and MR provided structural delineation to help surgical planning for both types of lesion. 67 Ga scintigraphy appears promising as a screening technique to identify lesions with malignant degeneration in patients with neurofibromatosis. Any area of abnormal radiogallium uptake suggests malignancy warranting further evaluation by CT or MR. Biopsy of any questionable lesion is essential

  2. Meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms in Johannesburg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Worldwide there are varying reports on the prevalence of meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms. Different reports state intracranial meningiomas, gliomas or metastatic tumours as the most common tumour among intracranial neoplasms. We present our institutions' experience of patients with intracranial ...

  3. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Health Professional Plasma Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma Cell Neoplasms Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  4. [Mucinous neoplasms of the vermiform appendix, Pseudomyxoma peritonei, and the new WHO classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reu, S; Neumann, J; Kirchner, T

    2012-02-01

    Mucinous neoplasms of the appendix are rare tumors, some of them characterized by an enigmatic discrepancy between a benign morphologic appearance and an aggressive biologic potential, associated with a poor prognosis and high mortality. The clinical picture of pseudomyxoma peritonei is, with few exceptions, caused by mucinous appendiceal neoplasms and differs in many aspects from usual peritoneal carcinomatosis. The controversy regarding terminology, diagnostic criteria, classification and therapy of these tumors has lasted for decades. The revised edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Digestive System proposes a uniform reporting system for mucinous appendiceal neoplasms and the peritoneal disease associated with it, thereby creating a comparable basis for pathological diagnosis, clinical therapy and further scientific studies.

  5. Chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms and subsequent cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, H.; Farkas, Dora Kormendine; Christiansen, C.F.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms, including essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV), and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), are at increased risk of new hematologic malignancies, but their risk of nonhematologic malignancies remains unknown. In the present study, we...... diagnosed with a chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm during 1977-2008. We compared the incidence of subsequent cancer in this cohort with that expected on the basis of cancer incidence in the general population (standardized incidence ratio). Overall, ET, PV, and CML patients were at increased risk...... conclude that patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms are at increased risk of developing a new malignant disease....

  6. Recurrent Benign Salivary Gland Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Robert Lee; Nicolai, Piero

    2016-01-01

    The most important causes of recurrence of benign pleomorphic adenoma are enucleation with intraoperative spillage and incomplete tumor excision in association with characteristic histologic findings for the lesion (incomplete pseudocapsule and the presence of pseudopodia). Most recurrent pleomorphic adenomas (RPAs) are multinodular. MRI is the imaging method of choice for their assessment. Nerve integrity monitoring may reduce morbidity of RPA surgery. Although treatment of RPA must be individualized, total parotidectomy is generally recommended given the multicentricity of the lesions. However, surgery alone may be inadequate for controlling RPA over the long term. There is growing evidence from retrospective series that postoperative radiotherapy results in significantly better local control. A high percentage of RPAs are incurable. All patients should therefore be informed about the possibility of needing multiple treatment procedures, with possible impairment of facial nerve function, and radiation therapy for RPA. Reappearance of Warthin tumor is a metachronous occurrence of a new focus or residual incomplete excision of all primary multicentric foci of Warthin tumor. Selected cases can be observed. Conservative surgical management can include partial superficial parotidectomy or extracapsular dissection. Not uncommonly, other major and minor salivary gland neoplasms, including myoepithelioma, basal cell adenoma, oncocytoma, canalicular adenoma, cystadenoma, and ductal papilloma, follow an indolent course after surgical resection, with rare cases of recurrence. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Brain and spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Bragg, D.G.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional means of detecting CNS neoplasms include plain film studies, isotope brain scans, angiography, pneumoencephalography, and myelography. Computed tomography (CT) scanning has replaced nearly all of these studies in both the initial detection and follow-up of brain tumors. Air studies (pneumoencephalography and ventriculography) have been virtually eliminated, except in certain unusual circumstances when two positions need to be checked, or hydrocephalus followed. The nuclear brain scan has a very limited role at present, being useful primarily for detecting skull or meningeal metastases. Myelography, however, remains a valuable imaging tool for the assessment of tumors of the spinal canal. CT scanning has not only improved our ability to detect smaller brain tumors, but also CT guided stereotactic biopsy techniques provide a safer means of obtaining tissue from these smaller lesions, regardless of location. Surgical techniques, guided by CT sterotactic techniques, show promise as well, but the impact of these therapeutic techniques on survival statistics remains to be defined. CT has revolutionized the approach to the detection and diagnosis of space-occupying lesions in the brain. Tumors can be detected at a smaller site

  8. Molecular diagnostics of myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, Stephen E; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Asp, Julia; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Carillo, Serge; Haslam, Karl; Kjaer, Lasse; Lippert, Eric; Mansier, Olivier; Oppliger Leibundgut, Elisabeth; Percy, Melanie J; Porret, Naomi; Palmqvist, Lars; Schwarz, Jiri; McMullin, Mary F; Schnittger, Susanne; Pallisgaard, Niels; Hermouet, Sylvie

    2015-10-01

    Since the discovery of the JAK2 V617F mutation in the majority of the myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis ten years ago, further MPN-specific mutational events, notably in JAK2 exon 12, MPL exon 10 and CALR exon 9 have been identified. These discoveries have been rapidly incorporated into evolving molecular diagnostic algorithms. Whilst many of these mutations appear to have prognostic implications, establishing MPN diagnosis is of immediate clinical importance with selection, implementation and the continual evaluation of the appropriate laboratory methodology to achieve this diagnosis similarly vital. The advantages and limitations of these approaches in identifying and quantitating the common MPN-associated mutations are considered herein with particular regard to their clinical utility. The evolution of molecular diagnostic applications and platforms has occurred in parallel with the discovery of MPN-associated mutations, and it therefore appears likely that emerging technologies such as next-generation sequencing and digital PCR will in the future play an increasing role in the molecular diagnosis of MPN. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. RENAL DAMAGE WITH MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Kolina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between renal damage and malignant neoplasms is one of the most actual problems of the medicine of internal diseases. Very often, exactly availability of renal damage determines the forecast of cancer patients. The range of renal pathologies associated with tumors is unusually wide: from the mechanical effect of the tumor or metastases on the kidneys and/or the urinary tract and paraneoplastic manifestations in the form of nephritis or amyloidosis to nephropathies induced with drugs or tumor lysis, etc. Thrombotic complications that develop as a result of exposure to tumor effects, side effects of certain drugs or irradiation also play an important role in the development of the kidney damage. The most frequent variants of renal damage observed in the practice of medical internists (therapists, urologists, surgeons, etc., as well as methods of diagnosis and treatment approaches are described in the article. Timely and successful prevention and treatment of tumor-associated nephropathies give hope for retaining renal functions, therefore, a higher life standard after completion of anti-tumor therapy. Even a shortterm episode of acute renal damage suffered by a cancer patient must be accompanied with relevant examination and treatment. In the caseof transformation of acute renal damage into the chronic kidney disease, such patients need systematic and weighted renoprotective therapy and correct dosing of nephrotoxic drugs.

  10. Mid-Term Outcomes and Complications with Cementless Distal Locking Hip Revision Stem with Hydroxyapatite Coating for Proximal Bone Defects and Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Lluis; Haddad, Sleiman; Minguell, Joan; Amat, Carles; Corona, Pablo S

    2015-06-01

    We revised the first 100 revision total hip arthroplasties using a cementless distal locking revision stem conducted in our referral centre. Average follow-up was 9.2 years (range: 5.5-12 years). Harris Hip Score improved from 42.5 to 81.6, and none had thigh pain at last follow-up. No significant stress shielding, osteolysis, or radiologic loosening was found. All patients showed radiological evidence of secondary implant osseointegration. Overall survival was 97% with three patients being revised: two stem ruptures and one subsidence. We could trace these complications to technical errors. These findings suggest that a diaphyseal fixation of the revision stem with distal locking can provide the needed primary axial and rotational stability of the prosthesis. This would allow further bony ingrowth, enhanced by the hydroxyapatite coating. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cytokeratins in epithelia of odontogenic neoplasms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crivelini, MM; de Araujo, VC; de Sousa, SOM; de Araujo, NS

    Neoplasms and tumours related to the odontogenic apparatus may be composed only of epithelial tissue or epithelial tissue associated with odontogenic ectomesenchyme. The immunohistochemical detection of different cytokeratins (CKs) polypeptides and vimentin has made it easier to explain the

  12. Somatostatin-Immunoreactive Pancreaticoduodenal Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund Luna, Iben; Monrad, Nina; Binderup, Tina

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neuroendocrine neoplasms in the pancreas and duodenum with predominant or exclusive immunoreactivity for somatostatin (p-dSOMs) are rare, and knowledge on tumour biology, treatment, survival and prognostic factors is limited. This study aimes to describe clinical, pathological, and bio......OBJECTIVE: Neuroendocrine neoplasms in the pancreas and duodenum with predominant or exclusive immunoreactivity for somatostatin (p-dSOMs) are rare, and knowledge on tumour biology, treatment, survival and prognostic factors is limited. This study aimes to describe clinical, pathological...

  13. Benign bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilday, D.L.; Ash, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    There is little information in the literature concerning the role of bone scanning in benign bone neoplasms except for sporadic reports. Since the advent of /sup 99m/Tc-polyphosphate, bone imaging has proven feasible and useful in locating the cause of bone pain, such as in osteoid osteomas, which are not always radiologically apparent, and in evaluating whether or not a radiologic lesion is indeed benign and solitary. Blood-pool images are particularly important in neoplastic disease, since the absence of hyperemia in the immediate postinjection period favors the diagnosis of a benign neoplasm, as does low-grade uptake on the delayed study. The scan, including pinhole magnification images, is especially valuable in diagnosing lesions in the spine and pelvis, which are poorly seen radiologically. We have studied various types of benign bone tumors, including simple and aneurysmal bone cysts, fibrous cortical defects, and nonossifying fibromas, all of which had minimal or no increased uptake of the radiopharmaceutical, unless traumatized. Although osteochondromas and enchondromas showed varied accumulation of activity, the scan was useful in differentiating these from sarcomatous lesions. All osteoid osteomas demonstrated marked activity, and could be accurately located preoperatively, as could the extent of fibrous dysplasia. The bone scan in the reticuloses also showed abnormal accumulation of activity, and aided in arriving at the prognosis and treatment of histiocytic bone lesions

  14. Metastases to bone in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieco, P.T.; Azouz, E.M.; Hoeffel, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is a relatively common intracranial neoplasm in childhood. Its extraneural spread was, until recently, thought to be a rare occurrence. Metastases are most commonly to bone. Five patients with medulloblastoma metastatic to bone are presented, and findings are compared to those of previous reports. Two of the five cases showed patchy extensive osteosclerosis of the pelvis and/or proximal femora. One case had concurrent lymph node involvement. In patients with past or present medulloblastoma and bone pain, metastases to bone should be excluded. Medulloblastoma metastatic to bone is a rare cause of extensive osteosclerosis. (orig.)

  15. Mouse models of myeloproliferative neoplasms: JAK of all grades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, several groups identified a single gain-of-function point mutation in the JAK2 kinase that was present in the majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. Since this discovery, much effort has been dedicated to understanding the molecular consequences of the JAK2V617F mutation in the haematopoietic system. Three waves of mouse models have been produced recently (bone marrow transplantation, transgenic and targeted knock-in, which have facilitated the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of JAK2V617F-positive MPNs, providing potential platforms for designing and validating novel therapies in humans. This Commentary briefly summarises the first two types of mouse models and then focuses on the more recently generated knock-in models.

  16. Orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H; Hitchon, Patrick W; Smoker, Wendy R K; Lee, Andrew G; Nerad, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to report an orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive orbital neoplasm. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon but can mimic neoplasm. One potential mechanism for the orbital roof destruction is a post-traumatic "growing orbital roof fracture." The growing fracture has been reported mostly in children but can occur in adults. Alternative potential etiologies for the encephalocele are discussed, including Gorham syndrome. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon in adults, and the findings can superficially resemble an orbital neoplasm. Radiographic and clinical features that might suggest the correct diagnosis include a prior history of trauma, overlying frontal lobe encephalomalacia without significant mass effect or edema, and an orbital roof defect. The "growing fracture" mechanism may be a potential explanation for the orbital roof destruction in some cases.

  17. Intrathoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-06-01

    Neoplasms of the thoracic cavity are as diverse as the structures and tissues that comprise the thorax. This paper summarizes the clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment of thoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat. Specific diagnostic techniques are evaluated, as is the utility of imaging techniques for clinical staging. Surgery is recommended as the treatment of choice for intrathoracic neoplasms, with exception for multiple tumor masses, metastasis, or poor patient health. Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hyperthermia are discussed individually or in combination with surgery or each other. Prognosis for specific tumors is discussed, as is lymph node involvement as a prognostic indicator. As the use of newer diagnostic procedures become more available in veterinary medicine, it should be possible to offer patients a variety of positive choices that will enhance their survival and quality of life

  18. Bone scintigraphy. A contribution to oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, J.C.M.

    1987-01-01

    The bone scintiscanning is evaluated including aspects as accuracy, precision and no invasiveness of the method in diagnosis. A review of radiotracers used in this technique is presented. The value of bone scintiscanning as a diagnostic technique and also as clinic follow up in neoplasms is discussed. (M.A.C.)

  19. Revising Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten Wølch; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    out by specialised revisers, but by staff translators, who revise the work of colleagues and freelancers on an ad hoc basis. Corrections are mostly given in a peer-to-peer fashion, though the work of freelancers and inexperienced in-house translators is often revised in an authoritative (nonnegotiable...

  20. Pigmented poroid neoplasm mimicking nodular melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Tsuyoshi; Ansai, Shin-ichi; Ueno, Takashi; Kawana, Seiji

    2010-06-01

    We reported the case of a 92-year-old woman with a pigmented and non-pigmented surface of the pedunculated nodule on her lower leg. Microscopic examination revealed that this nodule consisted of a component of small, dark, homogenous, poroid cells and cuticular cells in the dermis. The histopathological features of the lesion were consistent with poroid neoplasm. Immunohistochemistry showed that HMB-45 and Melan-A were positive in malanocytes and melanophages of the pigmented areas. Unlike most poroid neoplasms, this case showed pigmented lesion mimicked nodular melanoma.

  1. Challenges in Consolidated Reporting of Hematopoietic Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Robert S; Arber, Daniel A

    2013-12-01

    This article focuses on the challenges of generating comprehensive diagnostic reports in hematopathology. In particular, two main challenges that diagnosticians face are (1) interpreting and understanding the rapid advances in molecular and genetic pathology, which have gained increasing importance in classifications of hematopoietic neoplasms, and (2) managing the logistics of reporting ancillary studies and incorporating them effectively into a final synthesized report. This article summarizes many important genetic findings in hematopoietic neoplasms, which are required for accurate diagnoses, and discusses practical issues to generating accurate and complete hematopathology reports. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines 2013 for the treatment of uterine body neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebina, Yasuhiko; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Mikami, Mikio; Nagase, Satoru; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Kato, Hidenori; Kubushiro, Kaneyuki; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi; Ino, Kazuhiko; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The third version of the Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines for the treatment of uterine body neoplasms was published in 2013. The guidelines comprise nine chapters and nine algorithms. Each chapter includes a clinical question, recommendations, background, objectives, explanations, and references. This revision was intended to collect up-to-date international evidence. The highlights of this revision are to (1) newly specify costs and conflicts of interest; (2) describe the clinical significance of pelvic lymph node dissection and para-aortic lymphadenectomy, including variant histologic types; (3) describe more clearly the indications for laparoscopic surgery as the standard treatment; (4) provide guidelines for post-treatment hormone replacement therapy; (5) clearly differentiate treatment of advanced or recurrent cancer between the initial treatment and the treatment carried out after the primary operation; (6) collectively describe fertility-sparing therapy for both atypical endometrial hyperplasia and endometrioid adenocarcinoma (corresponding to G1) and newly describe relapse therapy after fertility-preserving treatment; and (7) newly describe the treatment of trophoblastic disease. Overall, the objective of these guidelines is to clearly delineate the standard of care for uterine body neoplasms in Japan with the goal of ensuring a high standard of care for all Japanese women diagnosed with uterine body neoplasms.

  3. Hip-inspired implant for revision of failed reverse shoulder arthroplasty with severe glenoid bone loss. Improved clinical outcome in 11 patients at 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uri, Ofir; Bayley, Ian; Lambert, Simon

    2014-04-01

    Glenoid reconstruction and inverted glenoid re-implantation is strongly advocated in revisions of failed reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). Nevertheless, severe glenoid deficiency may preclude glenoid reconstruction and may dictate less favorable solutions, such as conversion to hemiarthropasty or resection arthropasty. The CAD/CAM shoulder (Stanmore Implants, Elstree, UK), a hip arthroplasty-inspired implant, may facilitate glenoid component fixation in these challenging revisions where glenoid reconstruction is not feasible. We questioned (1) whether revision arthroplasty with the CAD/CAM shoulder would alleviate pain and improve shoulder function in patients with failed RSA, not amenable to glenoid reconstruction, (2) whether the CAD/CAM hip-inspired glenoid shell would enable secure and durable glenoid component fixation in these challenging revisions. 11 patients with failed RSAs and unreconstructable glenoids underwent revision with the CAD/CAM shoulder and were followed-up for mean 35 (28-42) months. Clinical outcomes included the Oxford shoulder score, subjective shoulder value, pain rating, physical examination, and shoulder radiographs. The average Oxford shoulder score and subjective shoulder value improved statistically significantly after the revision from 50 to 33 points and from 17% to 48% respectively. Pain rating at rest and during activity improved significantly from 5.3 to 2.3 and from 8.1 to 3.8 respectively. Active forward flexion increased from 25 to 54 degrees and external rotation increased from 9 to 21 degrees. 4 patients required reoperation for postoperative complications. No cases of glenoid loosening occurred. The CAD/CAM shoulder offers an alternative solution for the treatment of failed RSA that is not amenable to glenoid reconstruction.

  4. A revised classification system and recommendations from the Baltimore consensus meeting for neoplastic precursor lesions in the pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basturk, Olca; Hong, Seung Mo; Wood, Laura D.; Adsay, N. Volkan; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge; Biankin, Andrew V.; Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kato, Yo; Klimstra, David S.; Klöppel, Günter; Krasinskas, Alyssa; Longnecker, Daniel S.; Matthaei, Hanno; Offerhaus, G. Johan A; Shimizu, Michio; Takaori, Kyoichi; Terris, Benoit; Yachida, Shinichi; Esposito, Irene; Furukawa, Toru

    2015-01-01

    International experts met to discuss recent advances and to revise the 2004 recommendations for assessing and reporting precursor lesions to invasive carcinomas of the pancreas, including pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), mucinous cystic

  5. Revision of 120 tibial infected non-unions with bone and soft tissue loss treated with epidermato-fascial osteoplasty according to Umiarov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Redento; Maccabruni, Anna; Bertani, Barbara; Tuvo, Gabriella; Lucanto, Stefano; Pedrotti, Luisella

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of tibial infected non-unions with bone and soft tissue loss has to solve three problems: infection, lack of bone continuity and lack of skin coverage. The aims of treatment are infection healing, bone consolidation with preservation of limb length and soft tissue reconstruction. The most important stage in the planning is an accurate débridement. Soft tissue reconstruction can be achieved using plastic surgery, and bone reconstruction is accomplished with bone grafts or induced membrane technique, but these methods may present disadvantages and risks. Epidermato-fascial osteoplasty is a modified procedure of compression-distraction osteosynthesis that was first described by Umiarov in 1982. This procedure offers the advantages of exactly classifying the phases of simultaneous bone and soft tissue regeneration, and of eliminating large tissue losses without previous closure of soft tissues or use of grafts, because the transported fragment takes fascia and skin along during the transport and closes the edges of the soft tissue gap until the epidermic and fascial reconstruction is complete. A total of 120 patients underwent this kind of surgery between 1986 and 2010 and were followed up for 2-26 years. Average age was 34 years (range 21-57 years). Cultures were positive for Staphylococcus in all cases, and for Pseudomonas in 27 cases. Adequate antibiotic therapy was administered in collaboration with the Infectious Diseases Specialist. Tibial bone resection was from 6 to 18cm (average 9.5cm). The Ilizarov apparatus was used with the oblique wire technique for bone transport in all patients. No intraoperative complications were observed. One patient died 40 days after the operation because of pulmonary embolism. The duration of treatment for the remaining 119 patients was 7-18 months. In all cases, infection eradication, healing of regenerate bone, consolidation at the docking site (with the aid of an autoplastic bone graft in only 11 patients), and

  6. Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Isabel Bittencourt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloproliferative diseases without the Philadelphia chromosome marker (Ph-, although first described 60 years ago, only became the subject of interest after the turn of the millennium. In 2001, the World Health Organization (WHO defined the classification of this group of diseases and in 2008 they were renamed myeloproliferative neoplasms based on morphological, cytogenetic and molecular features. In 2005, the identification of a recurrent molecular abnormality characterized by a gain of function with a mutation in the gene encoding Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 paved the way for greater knowledge of the pathophysiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms. The JAK2 mutation is found in 90-98% of polycythemia vera and in about 50% essential thrombocytosis and primary myelofibrosis. In addition to the JAK2 mutation, other mutations involving TET2 (ten-eleven translocation, LNK (a membrane-bound adaptor protein; IDH1/2 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 enzyme; ASXL1 (additional sex combs-like 1 genes were found in myeloproliferative neoplasms thus showing the importance of identifying molecular genetic alterations to confirm diagnosis, guide treatment and improve our understanding of the biology of these diseases. Currently, polycythemia vera, essential thrombocytosis, myelofibrosis, chronic neutrophilic leukemia, chronic eosinophilic leukemia and mastocytosis are included in this group of myeloproliferative neoplasms, but are considered different situations with individualized diagnostic methods and treatment. This review updates pathogenic aspects, molecular genetic alterations, the fundamental criteria for diagnosis and the best approach for each of these entities.

  7. Solid and papillary neoplasm of the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L J; Hansen, A B; Burcharth, F

    1992-01-01

    In two cases of solid and papillary neoplasm of the pancreas (SPN), positive staining for argyrophil granules, chromogranin-A, neuron-specific enolase, chymotrypsin, alpha 1-antitrypsin, vimentin, cytokeratin, and estrogen receptors was present. Ultrastructurally, neurosecretory as well as zymoge...

  8. Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas | Waithaka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare pancreatic tumour predominantly affecting young women. We present two cases in young female patients. Both tumours were surgically removed as abdominal masses, one from the pancreatic tail and the other posterior to the stomach with an unclear organ of origin. On gross ...

  9. Myeloproliferative neoplasms in five multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2013-01-01

    The concurrence of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) is unusual. We report five patients from a localized geographic area in Denmark with both MS and MPN; all the patients were diagnosed with MPNs in the years 2007-2012. We describe the patients' history and treatment...

  10. The new WHO nomenclature: lymphoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Susan J; Rodak, Bernadette F

    2002-01-01

    The development of the WHO classification of lymphoid neoplasms is a remarkable example of cooperation and communication between pathologists and oncologists from around the world. Joint classification committees of the major hematopathology societies will periodically review and update this classification, facilitating further progress in the understanding and treatment of hematologic malignancies.

  11. Radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms are presented. The results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment of tumors are studied. On the whole it is noted that radiation treatment of initial spinal cord tumours is not practised on a large scale because of low radiostability of spinal cord

  12. Radiologic features of cystic, endocrine and other pancreatic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balci, N. Cem; Semelka, Richard C.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents imaging features of cystic, endocrine and other pancreatic neoplasms. Microcystic adenoma which is composed of small cysts ( 2 cm) are accounted for mucinous cystic neoplasms, its variant along pancreatic duct is ductectatic mucinous cystic neoplasm. Endocrine tumors of pancreas are hypervascular and can be depicted on early dynamic enhanced crosssectional imaging modalities or on angiography when they are <1 cm. Pancreatic metastases and lymphomas are rare neoplasms which should also be included in differential diagnosis for pancreatic masses

  13. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nangalia, J.; Massie, C.E.; Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Loo, P. Van; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O'Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS: We performed exome sequencing

  14. INTRACRANIAL NEOPLASMS IN IBADAN, NIGERIA B.J. OLASODE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-01-01

    Jan 1, 2000 ... embryogenetic classifications of intracranial neoplasms in which terms like neuroblastoma, spongioblastoma, astroblastoma and ependymoblastoma were coined to indicate neoplasms arising from these primitive cells(1). Advances in our understanding of the morphobiology of intracranial neoplasms have ...

  15. Bone marrow oedema associated with benign and malignant bone tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, S.L.J. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, B31 2AP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steven.james@roh.nhs.uk; Panicek, D.M. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Davies, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, B31 2AP (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-15

    Bone marrow oedema is associated with a wide variety of pathological processes including both benign and malignant bone tumours. This imaging finding in relation to intraosseous tumours can aid in providing a more focused differential diagnosis. In this review, we will discuss the MR imaging of bone marrow oedema surrounding intraosseous neoplasms. The different pulse sequences used in differentiating underlying tumour from surrounding oedema are discussed along with the role of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI. Benign lesions commonly associated with bone marrow oedema include osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, chondroblastoma and Langerhan's cell histiocytosis. Metastases and malignant primary bone tumours such as osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma and chondrosarcoma may also be surrounded by bone marrow oedema. The imaging findings of these conditions are reviewed and illustrated. Finally, the importance of bone marrow oedema in assessment of post chemotherapeutic response is addressed.

  16. Bone marrow oedema associated with benign and malignant bone tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, S.L.J.; Panicek, D.M.; Davies, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow oedema is associated with a wide variety of pathological processes including both benign and malignant bone tumours. This imaging finding in relation to intraosseous tumours can aid in providing a more focused differential diagnosis. In this review, we will discuss the MR imaging of bone marrow oedema surrounding intraosseous neoplasms. The different pulse sequences used in differentiating underlying tumour from surrounding oedema are discussed along with the role of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI. Benign lesions commonly associated with bone marrow oedema include osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, chondroblastoma and Langerhan's cell histiocytosis. Metastases and malignant primary bone tumours such as osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma and chondrosarcoma may also be surrounded by bone marrow oedema. The imaging findings of these conditions are reviewed and illustrated. Finally, the importance of bone marrow oedema in assessment of post chemotherapeutic response is addressed

  17. Chodroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst in the sphenoid sinus: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Yu, In Kyu; Kim, Seong Min; Kim, Ju Heon; Lee, Seung Yeon [Eulji University Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Chondroblastomas are rare benign cartilaginous neoplasms found in young patients. These tumors typically arise in the epiphysis or apophysis of a long bone. Chondroblastomas arising in the skull and facial bones are extremely rare. We describe a rare case of a patient presenting with chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst in the sphenoid sinus that mimicked invasive sinusitis or malignant bone tumor.

  18. Clinical features of pancreatic cystic neoplasms and its therapeutic strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jiali

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The detection rate of pancreatic cystic neoplasms obviously increases with the development of imaging technology. However, it is still difficult to make the differential diagnosis between different types of pancreatic cystic neoplasms. For pancreatic cystic neoplasms, the physical condition of the patient, tumor size, location, patient preference, and other potential factors should be considered to develop an individualized treatment. The incidence rate of complications is high, although the operative mortality of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is very low. Therefore, it is necessary to strictly make the treatment decision for pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

  19. The challenge of non-union in subtrochanteric fractures with breakage of intramedullary nail: evaluation of outcomes in surgery revision with angled blade plate and allograft bone strut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollo, G; Tartaglia, N; Falzarano, G; Pichierri, P; Stasi, A; Medici, A; Meccariello, L

    2017-12-01

    Subtrochanteric fractures have a bimodal age distribution. They usually require open reduction and internal fixation. Closed reduction and intramedullary nail fixation rate are increased for this type of fracture. As a result, the hardware breakage and non-union rate is high among such patients. Our purpose is to evaluate the outcomes of the role of blade plate and bone strut allograft in the management of subtrochanteric non-union by femoral nailing. We reported a group of 22 patients with subtrochanteric non-union, associated with breakage of the intramedullary nail with medial femoral allograft bone and lateral blade plate and wire (PS) s; and a group of 13 patients with subtrochanteric non-union, associated with breakage of the intramedullary nail treated with lateral blade plate and screws (CG). The chosen criteria to evaluate the two group during the clinical and radiological follow-up were the quality of life, measured by The Short Form (12) Health Survey (SF-12), the hip function and quality of life related to it, measured by the Harris Hip Score (HHS), bone healing, measured by Radiographic Union Score (RUS) by XR and CT at 1 year after the surgery, and postoperative complications. The evaluation endpoint was set at 12 months. The Bone healing measured by RUS occurred and also the full recovery before the first trauma measured by SF-12 and HHS are better in PS group. We only had three unimportant complications in PS while four breakage hardware in CG. We conclude that in complicated non-unions, the use of blade plate and bone strut allograft has a definite positive role in the management of such cases.

  20. Migrated herniated disc mimicking a neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Benjamin; Hermann, George

    2010-12-01

    Disc sequestration is defined as migration of a herniated disc fragment into the epidural space such that it is completely separated from the parent disc. We report a case of a migrated herniated disc that was initially pathologically diagnosed as a cartilage neoplasm. In addition to confounding morphological features, this interpretation may have been influenced by an initial radiological interpretation that did not include herniated disc in the differential diagnosis of a spinal lesion with prominent peripheral contrast enhancement. MR imaging is most helpful in considering other lesions in the differential diagnosis including abscess, hematoma, and primary or metastatic neoplasms. Pathologically, degenerative changes in herniated discs, including clustering of chondrocytes and neovascularization, may be severe resulting in a pseudoneoplastic appearance. Increased awareness of the radiological and pathological features of migrated herniated disc should limit confusion with other tumors.

  1. Intrathoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Very little is known regarding the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in companion animals. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms. Most studies of thoracic neoplasia have focused on the pathology of primary and metastatic neoplasms of the lung with little attention given to diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Although the cited incidence rate for primary respiratory tract neoplasia is low, 8.5 cases per 100,000 dogs and 5.5 cases per 100,000 cats, intrathoracic masses often attract attention out of proportion to their actual importance since they are often readily visualized on routine thoracic radiographs.

  2. Surgery for Malignant Submandibular Gland Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Natalie L; Chinn, Steven B; Bradley, Patrick J; Weber, Randal S

    2016-01-01

    For many decades, surgery has been the primary treatment for malignant submandibular gland neoplasms. Nonetheless, due to the heterogeneity and rarity of submandibular gland malignant tumors and the high frequency of chronic benign processes in this region, management can be complex. Preoperative investigations, such as fine-needle aspiration and imaging, are critical to achieve the correct diagnosis so that appropriate surgery can be planned. In general, for malignant submandibular gland neoplasms, the minimal treatment necessary is excision of the submandibular gland with level I lymph node dissection. Salivary gland cancer in the submandibular gland is generally more aggressive than the same histologic type in the parotid gland. Neck dissection may be required and primarily depends on the stage and histological grade. Adjuvant therapy most frequently consists of radiation and can improve overall survival. Some factors that influence prognosis after surgical treatment include the histologic grade, stage at presentation, and positive surgical margins. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Osteosarcoma of the jaw bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindia, M L

    2001-10-01

    Currently, it has been established that osteosarcoma (OS) of bone is not a stereotyped disease, and several varieties have been identified by clinical findings, radiographic and histopathologic appearances. Generally, it is the most common primary malignant bone neoplasm that accounts for at least 30% of all primary tumours of bone. In the jaw bones, OS accounts for about 4% of all the primary malignant neoplasms. In the general skeleton, the highest incidence is observed in the second decade of life; the neoplasm is said to be unusual before the age of 5 years and very rare after age 50 years. The aetiology and precise pathogenesis of this disease remain unknown. A diagnosis of clinically and radiologically suspicious OS requires meticulous histologic examination. However, histologic diagnosis may also be difficult since the different varieties of OS may have different morphological patterns in different sample sites. Currently, the two therapeutic modalities used in the primary treatment of OS include radical surgery and cytotoxic chemotherapy. In the general skeleton, the use of surgery alone results in a 90% rate of recurrence of OS. Notably, the advent of adjuvant and neoadjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy as an adjunct to radical surgery has greatly improved the prognosis of many cases of OS of the jaw bones.

  4. Neoplasms HIV associated Kaposi sarcoma not

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, K.; Sosa, A.; Krygier, G.; Muse, I.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract - The incidence of malignancies in virus carriers acquired immunodeficiency (HIV) has increased in conjunction with the disease during the past decade. 40% of all AIDS patients develop cancer during the course of HIV infection. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and cervical cancer have an impact extremely high in HIV infected patients, and they are considered as disease AIDS-defining stage. Many reports suggest that other neoplasms they can have a high impact on the population of HIV carrier, including head and neck carcinoma, rectal cancer - anal, plasma cytomas, and melanoma lung cancer. Methods - We examined the spectrum of cancer in HIV-infected patients, specifically neoplasms except Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed between 1/1998 - 6/2004. Information on age, sex, factors was gathered risk for AIDS, neoplasms and mortality rate. Results: The total number of patients in our study was 21 patients, what 15 were male (71%) and 6 females (29%); the median age was 36 (29-70). Tumors were reported: 11 Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (52%), 2 Hodgkin's lymphoma (6.6%), 1 medullary thyroid cancer (6.6%), 1 melanoma (6.6%), 1 rectal cancer (5%) and three head and neck cancers (14%), 1 cancer 1 lung and breast cancer. Five of the patients were intravenous drug abusers (24%); 4 patients were homosexual, bisexual March 8 straight, on 6 patients know the data. Conclusions - The spectrum of malignancies associated with infection HIV in our study was similar to that described in other populations. ratio between the immune system and the epidemiology of the virus-induced tumors is to importance to identify new therapeutic approaches in the treatment and / or prevention of these neoplasms

  5. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2016-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  6. Mucinous Neoplasms of the Vermiform Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2010-06-01

    Most epithelial neoplasms of the vermiform appendix are of mucinous type and can be stratified into 3 main diagnostic categories: (1) adenoma, (2) mucinous neoplasms of uncertain malignant potential or low-grade mucinous neoplasm, and (3) adenocarcinoma. Clinically, appendiceal mucinous adenomas and adenocarcinomas may present as right lower abdominal pain mimicking acute appendicitis, a mass, or pseudomyxoma peritonei. Nomenclature currently in use to describe and diagnose mucinous tumors of the appendix, particularly those of low morphologic grade, varies among surgical pathologists and centers, resulting in different histologic and clinical features being attributed to these entities in the literature. It may be of help, as already attempted by some investigators, to simply apply algorithmic parameters for such lesions (grade of the primary lesion, extensiveness and composite of extra-appendiceal involvement, and so forth), instead of adopting rigid classification categories. This approach allows for more objective data to be collected in hopes that it will provide a more nuanced understanding of the clinical behavior of the spectrum of mucinous appendiceal tumors. Remaining focused on histopathologic parameters of the primary and secondary sites of involvement may help in avoiding circular reasoning. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  8. Ameloblastic fibroma: a stage in the development of a hamartomatous odontoma or a true neoplasm? Critical analysis of 162 previously reported cases plus 10 new cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Amos; Vered, Marilena

    2013-11-01

    To analyze neoplastic and hamartomatous variants of ameloblastic fibromas (AFs). Analysis of 172 cases (162 previously reported, 10 new). AF emerged as a lesion primarily of children and adolescents (mean age, 14.9 years), with about 80% diagnosed when odontogenesis is completed (age, 22 years are considered true neoplasms, while those in younger patients may be either true neoplasms or odontomas in early stages of development. Although the histopathology of hamartomatous and neoplastic variants of AF are indistinguishable, clinical and radiologic features can be of some help to distinguish between them. Asymptomatic small unilocular lesions with no or minimal bone expansion in young individuals are likely to be developing odontomas, and large, expansile lesions with extensive bone destruction are neoplasms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 1, benign lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, W.C. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Klein, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Pitt, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Siegal, G.P. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Departments of Pathology, Cell Biology, and Surgery, and the Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2006-11-15

    This two-part review presents an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. This first part presents a brief review of methods in molecular pathology along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. Malignant chondroid neoplasms will be considered in the second part of this review. (orig.)

  10. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 1, benign lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, W.C.; Klein, M.J.; Pitt, M.J.; Siegal, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    This two-part review presents an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. This first part presents a brief review of methods in molecular pathology along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. Malignant chondroid neoplasms will be considered in the second part of this review. (orig.)

  11. Metastases in cranean of differential neoplasm tyroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Chapuis, D.; Garrido Vazquez, P.; Vallverdu Carbajal, M.

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of matastases are presented in cranial calota of differentiated neoplasm of tyroids, one of them without other distance lesions ,in which the cranial tumours was the element that it take was to the diagnose. For the local control the surgical resection of the metastasis is recommended in calota, associated to external radiotherapy , while that the total thyroidectomy allows the detection and treatment of other metastasis with Iodine. In this situation the prediction it is unfavourable, with a half survive of 4,5 year(AU) [es

  12. Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbui, T.; Barosi, G.; Birgegard, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a review of critical concepts and produce recommendations on the management of Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms, including monitoring, response definition, first- and second-line therapy, and therapy for special issues. Key questions were selected according...... for splenectomy include symptomatic portal hypertension, drug-refractory painful splenomegaly, and frequent RBC transfusions. The risk of allogeneic stem-cell transplantation-related complications is justified in transplantation-eligible patients whose median survival time is expected to be less than 5 years....

  13. Cytokine Regulation of Microenvironmental Cells in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Hoermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN refers to a heterogeneous group of diseases including not only polycythemia vera (PV, essential thrombocythemia (ET, and primary myelofibrosis (PMF, but also chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, and systemic mastocytosis (SM. Despite the clinical and biological differences between these diseases, common pathophysiological mechanisms have been identified in MPN. First, aberrant tyrosine kinase signaling due to somatic mutations in certain driver genes is common to these MPN. Second, alterations of the bone marrow microenvironment are found in all MPN types and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Finally, elevated levels of proinflammatory and microenvironment-regulating cytokines are commonly found in all MPN-variants. In this paper, we review the effects of MPN-related oncogenes on cytokine expression and release and describe common as well as distinct pathogenetic mechanisms underlying microenvironmental changes in various MPN. Furthermore, targeting of the microenvironment in MPN is discussed. Such novel therapies may enhance the efficacy and may overcome resistance to established tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in these patients. Nevertheless, additional basic studies on the complex interplay of neoplastic and stromal cells are required in order to optimize targeting strategies and to translate these concepts into clinical application.

  14. Application of MRI for the Diagnosis of Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Bejer-Oleńska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study was to determine the most commonly diagnosed neoplasms in the MRI scanned patient population and indicate correlations based on the descriptive variables. Methods. The SPSS software was used to determine the incidence of neoplasms within the specific diagnoses based on the descriptive variables of the studied population. Over a five year period, 791 patients and 839 MRI scans were identified in neoplasm category (C00-D48 according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems ICD-10. Results. More women (56% than men (44% represented C00-D48. Three categories of neoplasms were recorded. Furthermore, benign neoplasms were the most numerous, diagnosed mainly in patients in the fifth decade of life, and included benign neoplasms of the brain and other parts of the central nervous system. Conclusions. Males ≤ 30 years of age with neoplasms had three times higher MRI scans rate than females of the same age group; even though females had much higher scans rate in every other category. The young males are more often selected for these scans if a neoplasm is suspected. Finally, the number of MRI-diagnosed neoplasms showed a linear annual increase.

  15. Absent Sternum as the First Manifestation of Bone Metastasis on Bone Scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Myung Hee; Lim, Seok Tae; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Yim, Chang Yeol [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The sternum is known as a relatively common site for bone metastases by a variety of malignant neoplasms. The usual finding is increased radiotracer uptake on bone scintigraphy, and cold metastasis is distinctly unusual. In addition, total non visualization of the sternum presenting as bone metastasis is extremely rare. We describe two cases with similar findings (absent sternum showing no activity of the sternal segments on bone scintigraphy), which corresponded to metastatic involvement. These findings were shown to be the first manifestation of hepatocellular carcinoma in one patient and bone metastasis in another patient with ovarian cancer.

  16. BLASTIC PLASMACYTOID DENDRITIC CELL NEOPLASM --A RAPIDLY EVOLVING ENTITY. CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrese, Elena; Solovăstru, Laura Gheucă; Dimofte, G; Ferariu, D; Porumb, V; Vâţă, D; Iancul, Luminita Smaranda

    2015-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN), CD4+/CD56+hematodermic neoplasm was formally known as blastic NK-cell lymphoma. It is in fact a form of acute myeloid leukemia notable for highly aggressive behavior with cutaneous, lymph node and bone marrow involvement. This entity is derived from plasmocytoid dendritic cells and has a predilection for extranodal sites, especially the skin. Elderly male patients are the most affected and the prognostic is poor. The first case was reported in 1994 and sice then, single cases and a few small series have been published. This article presents the case of a previously healthy 56-years-old man, who presented himself to a skin eruption consisting in multiple, large dermal ulcerated tumors, located on the trunk and scalp. The lesions were painless and grew in size rapidly. Physical examination was normal except for the skin lesions. Histological examination of a biopsy specimen and immunohistochemical studies (positive for next markers: CD4, CD 45, CD56, CD68, Ki 67) revealed the rare diagnostic-blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm.

  17. Role of indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy in the management of thrombocytopenic patients with malignant neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oriuchi, N.; Korkmaz, M.; Kim, E.E.; Delpassand, E.S.; Wong, F.; Podoloff, D.A. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Wallace, S. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1998-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the role of indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy in the treatment of thrombocytopenia in patients with malignant neoplasms. The study involved 20 consecutive patients with thrombocytopenia associated with malignant neoplasms or hematological disorders and without evidence of underproduction of megakaryocytes due to chemotherapy or bone marrow infiltration by the malignancy. Splenic sequestration of platelets was evaluated by measuring spenic uptake of {sup 111}In-labelled platelets, and findings were correlated with the outcome of splenectomy and medication. Of the 20 patients, 13 had splenic sequestration of platelets. Seven of the 13 patients underwent splenectomy; six of these seven patients experienced a complete response. The other six patients received medication only and showed no response. Of the seven patients without splenic sequestration of platelets, five received medication, and four of them responded to it. {sup 111}In-labelled platelet scintigraphy has a role in selecting appropriate therapy and predicting its efficacy in patients with thrombocytopenia associated with malignant neoplasms. (orig.)

  18. Role of indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy in the management of thrombocytopenic patients with malignant neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriuchi, N.; Korkmaz, M.; Kim, E.E.; Delpassand, E.S.; Wong, F.; Podoloff, D.A.; Wallace, S.

    1998-01-01

    This study was done to investigate the role of indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy in the treatment of thrombocytopenia in patients with malignant neoplasms. The study involved 20 consecutive patients with thrombocytopenia associated with malignant neoplasms or hematological disorders and without evidence of underproduction of megakaryocytes due to chemotherapy or bone marrow infiltration by the malignancy. Splenic sequestration of platelets was evaluated by measuring spenic uptake of 111 In-labelled platelets, and findings were correlated with the outcome of splenectomy and medication. Of the 20 patients, 13 had splenic sequestration of platelets. Seven of the 13 patients underwent splenectomy; six of these seven patients experienced a complete response. The other six patients received medication only and showed no response. Of the seven patients without splenic sequestration of platelets, five received medication, and four of them responded to it. 111 In-labelled platelet scintigraphy has a role in selecting appropriate therapy and predicting its efficacy in patients with thrombocytopenia associated with malignant neoplasms. (orig.)

  19. Peptichemio in pretreated patients with plasmacell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, A; Salvagno, L; Chiarion-Sileni, V; Bolzonella, S; De Besi, P; Frizzarin, M; Pappagallo, G L; Fosser, V P; Fornasiero, A; Segati, R

    1986-09-01

    Twenty-one patients with alkylator-resistant plasmacell neoplasms were treated with Peptichemio (PTC) at a dose of 40 mg/m2 for 3 days every 3 weeks or, in the case of persistent leukopenia and/or thrombocytopenia, at the single dose of 70 mg/m2 every 2-3 weeks according to haematological recovery. Seventeen patients, 10 with multiple myeloma and seven with extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP), were fully evaluable. Six of 17 patients (35%) responded: three of seven EMP patients had a complete remission and 3 of 10 multiple myeloma patients had an objective response greater than 50%. The median duration of response was 8.5 months. An EMP patient obtained a complete response lasting for 16 months. The most frequent toxic effect were phlebosclerosis, occurring in all the patients, and myelosuppression, which was severe in only one case. PTC appears to be an active drug in patients with plasmacell neoplasms even if resistant to alkylating agents.

  20. Patterns of second malignant neoplasms in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, A.T.; D'Angio, G.J.; Mike, V.; Banfi, A.; Harris, C.; Jenkin, R.D.T.; Schwartz, A.

    1977-01-01

    A search of the records of 10 pediatric oncology centers revealed 102 children with more than one malignant neoplasm. In this group of 102 patients, all pediatric cancers were seen as initial lesions, but Wilms' tumor and retinoblastoma were over-represented and leukemia and brain tumors underrepresented. Survival variation as well as tumor susceptibility may be responsible for this disproportion. Osteosarcomas and chondrosarcomas were the most frequent second malignant neoplasms (SMN). Embryonal tumors were rare as SMN and adult-type tumors (carcinomas) appeared at earlier than expected ages, whether arising after irradiation or not related to that form of therapy. Radiation was associated with 69 SMN, genetic disease accounted for 27 SMN and both conditions were noted in 15 SMN. In the group of 21 patients for whom neither radiation nor a known genetic disorder could be implicated, there were three with colon carcinoma and glioma and five with leukemia or lymphoma and glioma. These combinations may reflect new tissue-specific hereditary cancer syndromes

  1. Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms; Neuroendokrine Neoplasien des Pankreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiderwellen, K.; Lauenstein, T.C. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Essen (Germany); Sabet, A.; Poeppel, T.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Essen (Germany); Lahner, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Endokrinologie und Stoffwechselerkrankungen, Essen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2 % of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. (orig.) [German] Neuroendokrine Neoplasien (NEN) des Pankreas stellen mit einem Anteil von 1-2 % aller pankreatischen Tumoren eine seltene Differenzialdiagnose dar. Ein Teil der Tumoren ist hormonell aktiv und faellt klinisch durch charakteristische Symptome auf, wohingegen der ueberwiegende Anteil hormonell inaktiv ist. Bildgebende Verfahren wie Sonographie, Computertomographie (CT), Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) und nicht zuletzt Positronenemissionstomographie (PET oder kombiniert als PET/CT) spielen eine zentrale Rolle fuer Erstdiagnose, Therapieplanung und -kontrolle. Die Endosonographie und die multiphasische CT stellen die Referenzmethoden zur Lokalisation des Primaertumors dar. Fuer die Differenzierung insbesondere kleiner Leberlaesionen bietet die MRT die hoechste Aussagekraft. Fuer das Ganzkoerperstaging und bestimmte Aspekte der Therapieplanung lassen sich die Somatostatinrezeptorszintigraphie und v. a. die Somatostatinrezeptor-PET/CT heranziehen. (orig.)

  2. The incidence of malignancy in neoplasms of the submandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To test the validity of the reported high incidence (50%) of malignancy in neoplasms of the submandibular salivary gland, and to compare it with that of the parotid gland. Methods. This is a retrospective analysis of major salivary gland neoplasms in 127 patients who were treated between August 1988 and ...

  3. Multiple neoplasms, single primaries, and patient survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer MH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Magid H Amer Department of Medicine, St Rita's Medical Center, Lima, OH, USA Background: Multiple primary neoplasms in surviving cancer patients are relatively common, with an increasing incidence. Their impact on survival has not been clearly defined. Methods: This was a retrospective review of clinical data for all consecutive patients with histologically confirmed cancer, with emphasis on single versus multiple primary neoplasms. Second primaries discovered at the workup of the index (first primary were termed simultaneous, if discovered within 6 months of the index primary were called synchronous, and if discovered after 6 months were termed metachronous. Results: Between 2005 and 2012, of 1,873 cancer patients, 322 developed second malignancies; these included two primaries (n=284, and three or more primaries (n=38. Forty-seven patients had synchronous primaries and 275 had metachronous primaries. Patients with multiple primaries were predominantly of Caucasian ancestry (91.0%, with a tendency to develop thrombosis (20.2%, had a strong family history of similar cancer (22.3%, and usually presented with earlier stage 0 through stage II disease (78.9%. When compared with 1,551 patients with a single primary, these figures were 8.9%, 15.6%, 18.3%, and 50.9%, respectively (P≤0.001. Five-year survival rates were higher for metachronous cancers (95% than for synchronous primaries (59% and single primaries (59%. The worst survival rate was for simultaneous concomitant multiple primaries, being a median of 1.9 years. The best survival was for patients with three or more primaries (median 10.9 years and was similar to the expected survival for the age-matched and sex-matched general population (P=0.06991. Conclusion: Patients with multiple primaries are usually of Caucasian ancestry, have less aggressive malignancies, present at earlier stages, frequently have a strong family history of similar cancer, and their cancers tend to have indolent

  4. File list: Unc.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: His.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  14. File list: Unc.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: His.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Treatment Options for Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... response ) and help fight infections caused by certain parasites . In chronic eosinophilic leukemia , there are too many eosinophils in the blood , bone marrow , and other tissues . Chronic eosinophilic leukemia ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... response ) and help fight infections caused by certain parasites . In chronic eosinophilic leukemia , there are too many eosinophils in the blood , bone marrow , and other tissues . Chronic eosinophilic leukemia ...

  18. Prognostic factors in childhood intracranial neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampil, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-six cases of primary intracranial neoplasm in children (over 1 year but under 13 years of age) seen at the university medical center between 1951 and 1982 were reviewed because of concern as to the results and after-effects of applied therapy. The overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 17 %. Several factors of possible prognostic relevance, such as patient's age, intracranial location of the tumor, application or nonapplication of therapy, single or multiple modes of therapy, and extent of surgery, were analyzed. Completeness of surgical removal of the tumor proved to be the only statistically significant factor that correlated with survival. There was only one recorded case of severe learning disability and abnormal neuropsychologic development among the 12 living patients. The influence of patient's age (and technical factors) at the time of irradiation in correlation with the child's subsequent posttreatment functional performance, as reported in the literature, is reviewed. (author)

  19. Proteotypic classification of spontaneous and transgenic mammary neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikaelian, Igor; Blades, Natalie; Churchill, Gary A; Fancher, Karen; Knowles, Barbara B; Eppig, Janan T; Sundberg, John P

    2004-01-01

    Mammary tumors in mice are categorized by using morphologic and architectural criteria. Immunolabeling for terminal differentiation markers was compared among a variety of mouse mammary neoplasms because expression of terminal differentiation markers, and especially of keratins, provides important information on the origin of neoplastic cells and their degree of differentiation. Expression patterns for terminal differentiation markers were used to characterize tumor types and to study tumor progression in transgenic mouse models of mammary neoplasia (mice overexpressing Neu (Erbb2), Hras, Myc, Notch4, SV40-TAg, Tgfa, and Wnt1), in spontaneous mammary carcinomas, and in mammary neoplasms associated with infection by the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). On the basis of the expression of terminal differentiation markers, three types of neoplasm were identified: first, simple carcinomas composed exclusively of cells with a luminal phenotype are characteristic of neoplasms arising in mice transgenic for Neu, Hras, Myc, Notch4, and SV40-TAg; second, 'complex carcinomas' displaying luminal and myoepithelial differentiation are characteristic of type P tumors arising in mice transgenic for Wnt1, neoplasms arising in mice infected by the MMTV, and spontaneous adenosquamous carcinomas; and third, 'carcinomas with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)' are a characteristic feature of tumor progression in Hras-, Myc-, and SV40-TAg-induced mammary neoplasms and PL/J and SJL/J mouse strains, and display de novo expression of myoepithelial and mesenchymal cell markers. In sharp contrast, EMT was not detected in papillary adenocarcinomas arising in BALB/cJ mice, spontaneous adenoacanthomas, neoplasms associated with MMTV-infection, or in neoplasms arising in mice transgenic for Neu and Wnt1. Immunohistochemical profiles of complex neoplasms are consistent with a stem cell origin, whereas simple carcinomas might originate from a cell committed to the

  20. Multiple neoplasms, single primaries, and patient survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, Magid H

    2014-01-01

    Multiple primary neoplasms in surviving cancer patients are relatively common, with an increasing incidence. Their impact on survival has not been clearly defined. This was a retrospective review of clinical data for all consecutive patients with histologically confirmed cancer, with emphasis on single versus multiple primary neoplasms. Second primaries discovered at the workup of the index (first) primary were termed simultaneous, if discovered within 6 months of the index primary were called synchronous, and if discovered after 6 months were termed metachronous. Between 2005 and 2012, of 1,873 cancer patients, 322 developed second malignancies; these included two primaries (n=284), and three or more primaries (n=38). Forty-seven patients had synchronous primaries and 275 had metachronous primaries. Patients with multiple primaries were predominantly of Caucasian ancestry (91.0%), with a tendency to develop thrombosis (20.2%), had a strong family history of similar cancer (22.3%), and usually presented with earlier stage 0 through stage II disease (78.9%). When compared with 1,551 patients with a single primary, these figures were 8.9%, 15.6%, 18.3%, and 50.9%, respectively (P≤0.001). Five-year survival rates were higher for metachronous cancers (95%) than for synchronous primaries (59%) and single primaries (59%). The worst survival rate was for simultaneous concomitant multiple primaries, being a median of 1.9 years. The best survival was for patients with three or more primaries (median 10.9 years) and was similar to the expected survival for the age-matched and sex-matched general population (P=0.06991). Patients with multiple primaries are usually of Caucasian ancestry, have less aggressive malignancies, present at earlier stages, frequently have a strong family history of similar cancer, and their cancers tend to have indolent clinical behavior with longer survival rates, possibly related to genetic predisposition

  1. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, J.; Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  2. Hematological follow-up studies on patients with thyroid neoplasms after 131I therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chone, B.; Engelken, G.; Schenck, P.

    1978-01-01

    Based on 391 thyroid neoplasms diagnostic hematological follow-up studies were registered in 34 patients with an overall J-131-dose of more than 500 mCi including the following parameters: 1. Peripheral blood control. 2. Bone marrow aspiration. 3. Cell volume distribution size of leukocytes after preparative enrichment. If in doubt a bone marrow scintigraphy was added. The adjunctive diagnostic procedure was correlated with histological criteria of thyroid carcinoma and J-131 retention after therapeutic application of radioiodine. In particular, a case report is given regarding a patient of 66 years with follicular thyroid carcinoma receiving 990 mCi J-131 during a period of 11 years after having had total thyroidectomy twice. The development of acute leucemia followed by death happened 16 years later. The moment of bone marrow transformation was determined exactly. The value of blood parameters can be calculated as follows: 1. Peripheral blood controls are limited by lack of efficiency. 2. Biopsy of bone marrow can detect hypoplastic alteration being latent in circulating blood for some years, even of J-131 cumulation dose below 500 mCi. 3. The analysis of distribution size of leukocytes represents a functional aspect after radiation induced in injury of bone marrow. (author)

  3. Bone scintigraphy in lesions of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.; Wasilewski, A.; Deitmer, T.

    1982-01-01

    The value of 3-phase-scintigraphy in bone lesions of the skull with a new seeking agent 99mTc-2,3-dicarboxypropane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (DPD) is studied. A high soft tissue-bone-ratio of DPD is emphasized. For this reason DPD is used for bone scintigraphy of the skull, because the mass of soft tissue in relation to bone is high and a higher clearance improves the interpretation of the images of the first two phases. An increased tracer uptake is found for skeletal neoplasms (malignant and benign lesions) and for acute osteomyelitis. By contrast, the chronic inflammatory bone lesions showed normal tracer uptake. This new bone seeking agent allows to localize and differentiate tumorous or acute inflammatory lesions and chronic inflammatory bone lesions of the skull

  4. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bones can also ...

  5. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 2, malignant lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, W.C.; Klein, M.J.; Pitt, M.J.; Siegal, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-part review presenting an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. The first part presented a brief review of modern methods in molecular pathology, along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. This second part reviews the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in malignant chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. (orig.)

  6. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 2, malignant lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, W.C. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Klein, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Pitt, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Siegal, G.P. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Departments of Pathology, Cell Biology, and Surgery, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2006-12-15

    This is the second part of a two-part review presenting an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. The first part presented a brief review of modern methods in molecular pathology, along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. This second part reviews the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in malignant chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. (orig.)

  7. Small-bowel neoplasms in patients undergoing video capsule endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondonotti, E; Pennazio, M; Toth, E

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIM: Small-bowel tumors account for 1% - 3% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Recent studies with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) suggest that the frequency of these tumors may be substantially higher than previously reported. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency...... of the neoplasm seen in 29 centers of 10 European Countries. RESULTS: Of 5129 patients undergoing VCE, 124 (2.4%) had small-bowel tumors (112 primary, 12 metastatic). Among these patients, indications for VCE were: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (108 patients), abdominal pain (9), search for primary neoplasm...

  8. [Trace elements of bone tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikov, V M; Zaĭchik, V E; Bizer, V A

    1983-01-01

    Due to activation analysis involving the use of neutrons from a nuclear reactor, the concentrations of 11 trace elements: scandium, iron, cobalt, mercury, rubidium, selenium, silver, antimony, chrome, zinc and terbium in intact bone and skeletal tumors were measured. 76 specimens of bioptates and resected material of operations for bone tumors and 10 specimens of normal bone tissue obtained in autopsies of cases of sudden death were examined. The concentrations of trace elements and their dispersion patterns in tumor tissue were found to be significantly higher than those in normal bone tissue. Also, the concentrations of some trace elements in tumor differed significantly from those in normal tissue; moreover, they were found to depend on the type and histogenesis of the neoplasm.

  9. A case of branch duct type intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct treated by open surgery after 11 years of follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    FUJITA, MITSURU; WAKUI, NORITAKA; YAMAUCHI, YOSHIYA; TAKEDA, YUKI; SATO, TAKEMASA; UEKI, NOBUO; OTSUKA, TAKAFUMI; OBA, NOBUYUKI; NISHINAKAGAWA, SHUTA; MINAGAWA, MASAMI; TAKEDA, YASUSHI; SHIONO, SAORI; KOJIMA, TATSUYA

    2013-01-01

    The intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB) is a novel disease concept that was recently classified as a biliary cystic tumor by the revised World Health Organization classification. This is the case report of a 70-year-old female patient who experienced repeated episodes of obstructive jaundice and cholangitis since 2000, attributed to a mucus-producing hepatic tumor. Surgery was advised due to the repeated episodes; however, the patient refused. In May, 2011, the patient deve...

  10. Epidemiology of hemopoietic system neoplasms in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheo, E Q; Calcagno, E J; de Sijvarger, S R; Calabria, S I; Maccione, E; Besuschio, S C; Magnasco, J H; Barros, C; Muriel, F S; de Soto, Z C

    1979-08-01

    The mortality caused by blood neoplasms in Argentina shows great irregularity. This was found to be caused in certain ways by (a) differences in the sexes and ages of the populations studied; (b) differences in available health services; and (c) environmental factors. Thus high rates and clusters of lymphomas and multiple mylomas were observed in zones with arsenical water, for example.In rural districts, the rates are lower, especially among old-aged people.Lower rates of leukemias were also observed among Spaniards compared to Italians (p=0.001) residing in Argentina. Turkish, Syrian, and Lebanese showed higher rates than Argentinians, Spaniards, or Italians.The results of a case-control study are given in which the following were observed: (a) Among the ancestors of cases HSN there are fewer Spaniards (not significant) and Latin-Americans (p=0.03) and more people who were born in Central or Eastern Europe (p=0.01). (b) In case group, there was more frequent contact with animals, especially dogs; and a greater exposure to petroleum and its products, and to insecticides.

  11. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: Part I. Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the field of medicine. In this article, the first of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to neoplasms, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inheritance of the chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjan, Ajenthen; Penninga, E; Jelsig, Am

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review investigated the inheritance of the classical chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) including polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), primary myelofibrosis (PMF) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Sixty-one articles were included and provided 135...

  13. [Approach to diagnosis and management of myeloproliferative neoplasm variants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumori, Toru; Kirito, Keita

    2015-08-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) variants are defined as relatively uncommon myeloid neoplasms which do not meet the criteria for either classical MPN or myelodysplastic syndrome. Due to the lack of specific markers, it has been challenging to accurately diagnose these malignant diseases. Recent studies have revealed new genetic abnormalities in MPN variants. These research advances are anticipated to open new approaches to not only achieving accurate diagnosis but also novel therapeutic options for these diseases.

  14. Squamous neoplasms arising within tattoos: clinical presentation, histopathology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, A L; Wanat, K A; Farah, R S

    2017-08-01

    Tattooing, which involves the placement of ink into the skin, is an ancient decorative technique that has remained popular in modern society. Tattoos have long been known to cause cutaneous reactions, which include the emergence of neoplasms such as keratoacanthoma (KA) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in tattooed areas of the skin. We review the clinical presentations, histology and treatment options for squamous neoplasms, primarily KA and SCC, arising in tattoos. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow in hematological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.C. vande; Lecouvet, F.E.; Maldague, B.; Malghem, J.; Michaux, L.; Ferrant, A.

    1998-01-01

    Despite its lack of specificity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the bone marrow has the potential to play a role in the management of patients with primary neoplastic disorders of the hematopoietic system, including lymphomas, leukemias and multiple myeloma. In addition to its use in the assessment of suspected spinal cord compression, bone marrow MRI could be used as a prognostic method or as a technique to assess the response to treatment. The current review addresses the common patterns of bone marrow involvement observed in primary neoplasms of the bone marrow, basic technical principles of bone marrow MRI, and several applications of MRI in selected clinical situations. (orig.) (orig.)

  16. CT characteristics of primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yufeng; Wang Jichen [Department of Radiology, Peking University First Hospital, No. 8, Xishike Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100034 (China); Peng Yun [Imaging Center, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China); Zeng Jinjin, E-mail: jzeng5567@yahoo.co [Imaging Center, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China)

    2010-09-15

    Primary retroperitoneal neoplasms are uncommon in children. Retroperitoneal neoplasms are either mesodermal, neurogenic, germ cell ectodermal or lymphatic in origin. In general, primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children have different spectrum and prevalence compared to those in adults. Neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, benign teratoma and lymphoma are the common retroperitoneal neoplasms. In this review, the clinical and CT futures of common retroperitoneal neoplasms in children are described. Coarse, amorphous, and mottled calcification are very common in neuroblastoma. Paraganglioma tends to show marked and early enhancement and may present with clinical symptoms associated with the excess catecholamine. Sarcomas are often very large and have heterogeneous appearance. Imaging cannot be reliably used to identify the type of retroperitoneal sarcomas due to overlapped radiographic features. In children, lipoblastoma is the most common lipomatous tumor in the retroperitoneum. The percentage of visible fat in tumor varies depending on the cellular composition of the lesion. The CT characteristics of teratoma are quite variable, which may be cystic, solid, on a combination of both. Typically teratoma appears as a large complex mass containing fluid, fat, fat-fluid level, and calcifications. Lymphoma is often homogeneous on both enhanced and unenhanced CT scans. Necrosis and calcification are rare on CT. In conclusion, making a final histological diagnosis of retroperitoneal tumor base on CT features is not often possible; however, CT can help to develop a differential diagnosis and determine the size and extent of the retroperitoneal neoplasms.

  17. Outcomes following splenectomy in patients with myeloid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rialon, Kristy L; Speicher, Paul J; Ceppa, Eugene P; Rendell, Victoria R; Vaslef, Steven N; Beaven, Anne; Tyler, Douglas S; Blazer, Dan G

    2015-03-15

    Myeloid neoplasms are classified into five major categories. These patients may develop splenomegaly and require splenectomy to alleviate mechanical symptoms, to ameliorate transfusion-dependent cytopenias, or to enhance stem cell transplantation. The objective of this study was to determine which clinical variables significantly impacted morbidity, mortality, and survival in patients with myeloid neoplasms undergoing splenectomy, and to determine if operative outcomes have improved over time. The records of all patients with myeloid neoplasms undergoing splenectomy from 1993 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Eighty-nine patients (n = 89) underwent splenectomy for myeloid neoplasms. Over half of patients who had symptoms preoperatively had resolution of their symptoms post-splenectomy. The morbidity rate was 38%, with the most common complications being bleeding (14%) or infection (20%). Thirty-day mortality rate was 18% and median survival after splenectomy was 278 days. Decreased survival was associated with a diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm, anemia, abnormal white blood cell count, and hypoalbuminemia. Patients who underwent stem cell transplantation did not show an increased risk for morbidity or mortality. Patients with myeloid neoplasms have a poor prognosis after splenectomy and the decision to operate is a difficult one, associated with high morbidity and mortality. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Radiological symptomatology of primary malignant bone tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenz, W.; Rau, W.

    1982-01-27

    The main radiological procedure for recognition of bone tumors is the plain film. The roentgen morphology of malignant neoplasms frequently is so characteristic that the grade of aggressivity may be evaluated and classification is possible. Even pathologists specialized in osteology do not diagnose a microscopic section without knowing the radiological findings. The so-called 'leave me alone lesions' are so characteristic in the plain film that bone biopsy and/or surgical intervention are not necessary. Further procedures like angiography and computed tomography will not influence the specific diagnosis but determine the exact site of the lesion, its spread into the surrounding soft tissue and bone marrow.

  19. Anus neoplasm: study of a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Lima Fernandes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anus neoplasm accounts for 2 to 4% of colorectal tumors, being more prevalent around the seventh and the eighth decades. Females are mostly affected, and the ratio is 3:1. Its increased prevalence amongst the population in the past years is probably related to the higher number of people that are affected by sexually transmitted diseases, mainly human papillomavirus (types 16 and 18, mostly and/or the human immunodeficiency virus. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings and anatomopathological tests. The treatment of choice is radiochemotherapy, and the rescue surgery with abdominoperineal resection is used for recurrence and persistence cases. A retrospective and prospective longitudinal observational study was performed with 11 patients diagnosed with anal neoplasm from 2004 to 2010. Six (54.5% were females and five (45.5% were males. The incidence was higher in the sixth decade, at the mean age of 54.45 years. The most frequent histological type observed was the epidermoid carcinoma, and the most frequent cell differentiation type was the moderately differentiated. Chemotharapy associated with radiotherapy was used in 81.9% of the patients, and abdominoperineal resection was necessary as a rescue surgery in 18.2% of the patients.Neoplasias do ânus correspondem de 2 a 4% dos tumores de intestino grosso, sendo predominante nas sétima e oitava décadas. A maior prevalência é em gênero feminino, com proporção de 3:1. O aumento da prevalência na população nos últimos anos provavelmente está relacionado ao número maior de pessoas com doenças sexualmente transmissíveis, principalmente o papilomavírus humano (tipos 16 e 18, mais comumente e/ou o vírus da imunodeficiência humana. O diagnóstico é feito a partir de achados clínicos somados ao exame anatomopatológico. O tratamento de escolha baseia-se na radioquimioterapia, sendo a cirurgia de resgate com amputação abdominoperineal utilizada para casos de recidiva ou persist

  20. Constraint choice in revision knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasso, Michele; Beaufils, Philippe; Schiavone Panni, Alfredo

    2013-07-01

    Along with the increase in primary total knee arthroplasty, there has been an increase in the number of revisions. The aim of this study was to propose a selection algorithm for the knee revision constraint according to the state of ligaments and to the bone defects Anderson Orthopaedic Research Institute Classification [AORI] classification. The hypothesis was that this algorithm would facilitate the appropriate choice of prosthesis constraint, thus providing stable components and a good long-term survivorship of the knee revisions. Sixty consecutive revision knee arthroplasties in 57 patients were prospectively evaluated. Prostheses implanted at revision included postero-stabilised, condylar constrained and rotating hinged, relative to the state of the ligaments and of the bone loss around the knee. The median follow-up was nine years (range, 4-12). The median IKS knee and function scores and HSS score were 41 (15-62), 21.5 (12-43) and 34 (23-65) points, respectively, before the operation, and 81 (48-97), 79 (56-92) and 83.5 (62-98) points (p < 0.001) at the latest follow-up evaluation. The median ROM increased from 74° (29-110°) preoperatively to 121° (98-132°) (p < 0.01) at the final follow-up. Re-revision was necessary in five (8.3%) patients. A selection algorithm for the revision implant constraint based on the state of ligaments and the bone loss AORI classification could provide stable knee reconstructions and long-term success of knee revisions.

  1. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: update on molecular biology, diagnosis, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Wasif; Zhang, Ling; Horna, Pedro; Sokol, Lubomir

    2014-10-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematological malignancy with an aggressive clinical course. Most patients with BPDCN have skin lesions and simultaneous involvement of the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and lymph nodes. A search of PubMed and Medline was conducted for English-written articles relating to BPDCN, CD4(+)CD56(+) hematodermic neoplasm, and blastic natural killer cell lymphoma. Data regarding diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment were analyzed. BPDCN is derived from precursor plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The diagnosis of BPDCN is based on the characteristic cytology and immunophenotype of malignant cells coexpressing CD4, CD56, CD123, blood dendritic cell antigens 2 and 4, and CD2AP markers. Multiple chromosomal abnormalities and gene mutations previously reported in patients with myeloid and selected lymphoid neoplasms were identified in approximately 60% of patients with BPDCN. Prospectively controlled studies to guide treatment decisions are lacking. The overall response rate with aggressive acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type induction regimens was as high as 90%, but the durability of response was short. Median survival rates ranged between 12 and 16 months. Patients with relapsed disease may respond to L-asparaginase-containing regimens. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, particularly when performed during the first remission, may produce durable remissions in selected adults. BPDCN is a rare aggressive disease that typically affects elderly patients. The most commonly affected nonhematopoietic organ is the skin. Although BPDCN is initially sensitive to conventional chemotherapy regimens, this response is relatively short and long-term prognosis is poor. In the near future, novel targeted therapies may improve outcomes for patients with BPDCN.

  2. Association of increased circulating catecholamine and glucocorticoid levels with risk of psychological problems in oral neoplasm patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixu Xie

    Full Text Available Noradrenergic pathways and glucocorticoid-mediated signal pathways have been implicated in the growth and progression of oral cancer. Patients with oral neoplasms can have high psychological distress levels, but the effects of stress-related hormones on oral neoplasm growth are unknown.We have investigated the relationships between pre-surgical measurements of psychological problems with Symptom Checklist-90-revised Inventory (SCL90-R, tumor histology, circulating blood catecholamine and glucocorticoid levels among 75 oral neoplasm patients, including 40 oral cancer patients and 35 benign oral tumor patients.The results showed that most dimension scores of SCL90-R did not show a significant difference between the two groups except depression (p = 0.0201 and obsessive-compulsion (p = 0.0093, with the scores for these symptoms being higher among oral cancer group versus the benign oral tumor group. The differences of total score, average score and other monomial factor scores were not statistically significant. The mean concentrations of catecholamine and glucocorticoid in peripheral blood of the oral cancer group were higher than those in benign oral tumor group (p<0.01. We also examined whether associations observed between biobehavioral measures and circulating blood catecholamine and glucocorticoid levels extended to other compartments in the oral cancer group.These findings suggest that stress hormones may affect oral cancer behavior by influencing the tumor micro-environment though the circulating blood.

  3. Solid variant aneurysmal bone cyst in the distal fibular metaphysis: radiologic and pathologic challenges to diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Johnson, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Solid variant aneurysmal bone cyst is a rare benign bone lesion, representing a small fraction of all aneurysmal bone cysts. The imaging appearance and histologic features may overlap with other benign and malignant neoplasms, posing a diagnostic dilemma for clinicians, pathologists, and radiologists. We present a case of solid variant aneurysmal bone cyst of the distal fibula and review the radiologic and histologic features important for diagnosis.

  4. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangalia, J; Massie, C E; Baxter, E J; Nice, F L; Gundem, G; Wedge, D C; Avezov, E; Li, J; Kollmann, K; Kent, D G; Aziz, A; Godfrey, A L; Hinton, J; Martincorena, I; Van Loo, P; Jones, A V; Guglielmelli, P; Tarpey, P; Harding, H P; Fitzpatrick, J D; Goudie, C T; Ortmann, C A; Loughran, S J; Raine, K; Jones, D R; Butler, A P; Teague, J W; O'Meara, S; McLaren, S; Bianchi, M; Silber, Y; Dimitropoulou, D; Bloxham, D; Mudie, L; Maddison, M; Robinson, B; Keohane, C; Maclean, C; Hill, K; Orchard, K; Tauro, S; Du, M-Q; Greaves, M; Bowen, D; Huntly, B J P; Harrison, C N; Cross, N C P; Ron, D; Vannucchi, A M; Papaemmanuil, E; Campbell, P J; Green, A R

    2013-12-19

    Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2. (Funded by the Kay

  5. Topics in histopathology of sweat gland and sebaceous neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansai, Shin-Ichi

    2017-03-01

    This article reviews several topics regarding sweat gland and sebaceous neoplasms. First, the clinicopathological characteristics of poroid neoplasms are summarized. It was recently reported that one-fourth of poroid neoplasms are composite tumors and one-fourth are apocrine type lesions. Recent progress in the immunohistochemical diagnosis of sweat gland neoplasms is also reviewed. CD117 can help to distinguish sweat gland or sebaceous tumors from other non-Merkel cell epithelial tumors of the skin. For immunohistochemical differential diagnosis between sweat gland carcinoma (SGC) other than primary cutanesous apocrine carcinoma and skin metastasis of breast carcinoma (SMBC), a panel of antibodies may be useful, including p63 (SGC + , SMBC - ), CK5/6 (SGC + , SMBC - ), podoplanin (SGC + , SMBC - ) and mammaglobin (SGC - , SMBC + ). Comparison of antibodies used for immunohistochemical diagnosis of sebaceous carcinoma (SC) suggests that adipophilin has the highest sensitivity and specificity. Some authors have found that immunostaining for survivin, androgen receptor and ZEB2/SIP1 has prognostic value for ocular SC, but not extraocular SC. In situ SC is rare, especially extraocular SC, but there have been several recent reports that actinic keratosis and Bowen's disease are the source of invasive SC. Finally, based on recent reports, classification of sebaceous neoplasms into three categories is proposed, which are sebaceoma (a benign neoplasm with well-defined architecture and no atypia), borderline sebaceous neoplasm (low-grade SC; an intermediate tumor with well-defined architecture and nuclear atypia) and SC (a malignant tumor with invasive growth and evident nuclear atypia). © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  6. Solute carrier transporters: potential targets for digestive system neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie J

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jing Xie,1,2 Xiao Yan Zhu,1,2 Lu Ming Liu,1,2 Zhi Qiang Meng1,2 1Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Digestive system neoplasms are the leading causes of cancer-related death all over the world. Solute carrier (SLC superfamily is composed of a series of transporters that are ubiquitously expressed in organs and tissues of digestive systems and mediate specific uptake of small molecule substrates in facilitative manner. Given the important role of SLC proteins in maintaining normal functions of digestive system, dysregulation of these protein in digestive system neoplasms may deliver biological and clinical significance that deserves systemic studies. In this review, we critically summarized the recent advances in understanding the role of SLC proteins in digestive system neoplasms. We highlighted that several SLC subfamilies, including metal ion transporters, transporters of glucose and other sugars, transporters of urea, neurotransmitters and biogenic amines, ammonium and choline, inorganic cation/anion transporters, transporters of nucleotide, amino acid and oligopeptide organic anion transporters, transporters of vitamins and cofactors and mitochondrial carrier, may play important roles in mediating the initiation, progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance of digestive system neoplasms. Proteins in these SLC subfamilies may also have diagnostic and prognostic values to particular cancer types. Differential expression of SLC proteins in tumors of digestive system was analyzed by extracting data from human cancer database, which revealed that the roles of SLC proteins may either be dependent on the substrates they transport or be tissue specific. In addition, small molecule modulators that pharmacologically regulate the functions of SLC proteins were discussed for their possible

  7. [Intracranial tumor behavior of plasma cell neoplasms. Report of 2 cases and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Elizalde, Ramiro; Lemus-Rodríguez, Yazmín; Godínez-Rubí, Marisol; Madrigal-Saray, Arturo; Muñoz-Serrano, José Antonio; Velásquez-Santana, Héctor

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasmatic cell neoplasm that is characterized by skeletal destruction, renal failure, anemia and hypercalcemia. The skull plasmacytomas represent less than 1% of the head and neck tumors, they can be the primary lesion or occur as a secondary manifestation of multiple myeloma in 20-30% of the patients, or they can even manifest several years later after the diagnosis of plasmacytoma. Although some of the lesions may be surgically accessible, the aggressive natural behavior will complicate the evolution of the patients. We present two cases of Mexican women with intracranial plasmacytomas, one of them associated with multiple myeloma. The first case was a 24 year-old woman diagnosed with a multiple myeloma with plasmacytic-plasmablastic bone infiltration that was removed in 90%. She presented a local recurrence that required a second intervention for removal. The second case was a 62 year-old female with a malignant intracranial tumor of plasma cells that was totally resected. Both patients received adjuvant treatment based on chemotherapy and radiation therapy with favorable results. The patients died at 5 and 1.5 years respectively due to renal failure secondary to systemic disease. We propose chemotherapy and radiation therapy as an essential part of treatment for this condition, as the aggressive behavior of the neoplasms can complicate the evolution, despite being surgically accessible.

  8. Rationale for revision and proposed changes of the WHO diagnostic criteria for polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbui, T; Thiele, J; Vannucchi, A M; Tefferi, A

    2015-08-14

    The 2001/2008 World Health Organization (WHO)-based diagnostic criteria for polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) were recently revised to accomodate new information on disease-specific mutations and underscore distinguishing morphologic features. In this context, it seems to be reasonable to compare first major diagnostic criteria of the former WHO classifications for myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) and then to focus on details that have been discussed and will be proposed for the upcoming revision of diagnostic guidelines. In PV, a characteristic bone marrow (BM) morphology was added as one of three major diagnostic criteria, which allowed lowering of the hemoglobin/hematocrit threshold for diagnosis, which is another major criterion, to 16.5 g/dl/49% in men and 16 g/dl/48% in women. The presence of a JAK2 mutation remains the third major diagnostic criterion in PV. Subnormal serum erythropoietin level is now the only minor criterion in PV and is used to capture JAK2-unmutated cases. In ET and PMF, mutations that are considered to confirm clonality and specific diagnosis now include CALR, in addition to JAK2 and MPL. Also in the 2015 discussed revision, overtly fibrotic PMF is clearly distinguished from early/prefibrotic PMF and each PMF variant now includes a separate list of diagnostic criteria. The main rationale for these changes was to enhance the distinction between so-called masked PV and JAK2-mutated ET and between ET and prefibrotic early PMF. The proposed changes also underscore the complementary role, as well as limitations of mutation analysis in morphologic diagnosis. On the other hand, discovery of new biological markers may probably be expected in the future to enhance discrimination of the different MPN subtypes in accordance with the histological BM patterns and corresponding clinical features.

  9. SOLID PSEUDOPAPILLARY NEOPLASM OF THE PANCREAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlotto, Jorge Roberto Marcante; Torrez, Franz Robert Apodaca; Gonzalez, Adriano Miziara; Linhares, Marcelo Moura; Triviño, Tarcisio; Herani-Filho, Benedito; Goldenberg, Alberto; Lopes-Filho, Gaspar de Jesus; Lobo, Edson José

    2016-01-01

    The solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare tumor of the pancreas. However, it´s etiology still maintain discussions. To analyze it´s clinical data, diagnosis and treatment. A retrospective study of medical records of all patients treated from January 1997 until July 2015. Were identified 17 cases. Most patients were women (94.11%) and the average age was 32.88 years. The main complaint was abdominal mass (47.05%). The most frequent location was in the body/tail of the pancreas (72.22%) and the most frequently performed surgery was distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy (64.70%). No patient had metastases at diagnosis. Conservative surgery for pancreatic parenchyma was performed in only three cases. The rate of complications in the postoperative period was 35.29% and the main complication was pancreatic fistula (29.41%). No patient underwent adjuvant treatment. The treatment is surgical and the most common clinical presentation is abdominal mass. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was the most frequently performed surgery for its treatment. A neoplasia sólida pseudopapilar é tumor raro de pâncreas de tratamento cirúrgico. No entanto, sua causa ainda gera discussões. Analisar os dados clínicos, do diagnóstico e do tratamento da dessa neoplasia. Estudo retrospectivo com dados médicos de pacientes tratados entre janeiro de 1997 a julho de 2015. Foram identificados 17 casos. A maioria era de mulheres (94,11%) e a média de idade foi de 32,88 anos. A principal queixa era massa abdominal (47,05%). A localização mais frequente era no corpo/cauda do pâncreas (72,22%) e a operação mais realizada foi a pancreatectomia corpocaudal com esplenectomia (64,70%). Nenhum caso apresentou metástase no momento do diagnóstico. Operação conservadora de parênquima pancreático foi realizada em apenas três casos. A taxa de complicações no pós-operatório foi de 35,29% e a principal complicação foi fístula pancreática (29,41%). Nenhum paciente realizou

  10. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the occipital condyle imitating a malignant neoplasm - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sznajder, K.; Skrzelewski, S.

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor is a non-neoplastic process of unknown etiology characterized by proliferation of connective tissue with an inflammatory infiltrate. IPT most frequently arises in the orbit, but can also be found in the larynx, the paranasal sinus and rarely in the skull base. We present the case of a 20-year-old patient with a 4-month history of headache and insomnia. Neurological examination showed limited head mobility and hypoglossal nerve dysfunction. The patient was afebrile and no abnormalities in blood tests were found. CT revealed the presence of a tumor mass destructing the right occipital condyle. MRI was performed and the mass was surgically removed. The histological diagnosis was non-specific chronic inflammatory granulation tissue. Inflammatory pseudotumors can often mimic malignant neoplasms, especially in cases where bone destruction is observed. IPT of the occipital condyle is a rare but aggressive lesion that should be treated by surgical excision. (author)

  11. Apophysitis of the ischial tuberosity mimicking a neoplasm on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Akisue, Toshihiro; Nakatani, Tetsuya; Kawamoto, Teruya; Hitora, Toshiaki; Marui, Takashi; Kurosaka, Masahiro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kobe (Japan)

    2004-12-01

    We present multimodality imaging features of an ischial tuberosity apophysitis in a 13-year-old boy who was an active baseball pitcher. Roentgenography of the pelvis and computed tomography showed mild irregularity in the inferior margin of the left ischial tuberosity. T1-weighted MRI showed a wide area with low signal intensity in the left ischial body; T2-weighted fat-suppression images showed areas with markedly high signal intensity in the ischial apophysis and body and the surrounding periosteum; contrast-enhanced T1-weighted fat-suppression MRI showed that the ischial body, surrounding periosteum, and origin of the hamstring muscles strongly enhanced; technetium-99m scintigraphic scans showed increased isotope uptake in the entire ischial body. Histological specimens obtained from the bone showed increased osteoblastic activity, edema, and proliferation of benign spindle cells and small vessels in the bone marrow spaces. In the present case, because MR imaging demonstrated extensive signal abnormalities involving the apophysis, periosteum, and intramedullary portion of bone, a neoplasm could not be excluded, and a biopsy was undertaken. (orig.)

  12. The value of recognizing suspect diagnoses in the triple diagnosis of giant cell tumor of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotru Mrinalini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor (GCT of bone is the most frequently over-diagnosed neoplasm in orthopedic pathology because giant cells are a common component of many neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions of bone. Triple diagnosis, requiring substantial individual and collective inputs by orthopedic surgeons, radiologists and pathologists, is the preferred method for the workup of patients with suspected bone neoplasms. At each stage in triple diagnosis, deviations from the typical must be regarded as clues to alternate diagnoses: the greater the deviation, the more a diagnosis of GCT must be considered suspect. A suspect diagnosis must trigger renewed analysis of the available data and a diligent search to exclude alternate diagnoses.

  13. Primary clear cell sarcoma of bone: a unique site of origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelczer, R.K.; Wenger, D.E.; Wold, L.E.

    1999-01-01

    Clear cell sarcoma is a rare soft tissue neoplasm, accounting for less than 1% of soft tissue sarcomas. We are presenting a case of a clear cell sarcoma of bone which, to our knowledge, is the only report of a primary clear cell sarcoma of bone. (orig.)

  14. [Indications for liver transplantation in neoplasms of the liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, R E; Mischinger, H J; Trauner, M; Pristautz, H

    1993-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation for hepatic neoplasms is controversial. In the past, liver transplantation was utilized to treat various advanced hepatic neoplasms such as hepatocellular carcinoma including the fibrolamellar variant, cholangiocellular carcinoma, epithelioid hemangio-endothelioma, and liver metastases. In many cases, total hepatectomy with orthotopic liver replacement is the only treatment option with intent to cure because of reduced liver function in cirrhotic patients limiting resectability. On the other hand, results of transplantation are poor; for hepatocellular carcinoma, the 5-year-survival probability averages only 20%. Thus, hepatic neoplasms have to compete with benign liver diseases for a limited supply of donor organs. However, success rates of liver transplantation were higher for fibrolamellar carcinoma and for epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. New treatment strategies for hepatocellular carcinoma including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemoembolization are currently being investigated. Results of liver transplantation for cholangiocellular carcinoma or hepatic metastases have been disappointing. Single cases have been successfully treated with the "cluster operation" designed by Starzl in 1988.

  15. Interdisciplinary Management of Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are increasingly recognized due to the frequent use of abdominal imaging. It is reported that up to 20% of abdominal cross-sectional scans identify incidental asymptomatic pancreatic cysts. Proper characterization of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is important not only to recognize premalignant lesions that will require surgical resection, but also to allow nonoperative management of many cystic lesions that will not require resection with its inherent morbidity. Though reliable biomarkers are lacking, a wide spectrum of diagnostic modalities are available to evaluate pancreatic cystic neoplasms, including radiologic, endoscopic, laboratory, and pathologic analysis. An interdisciplinary approach to management of these lesions which incorporates recent, specialty-specific advances in the medical literature is herein suggested.

  16. Paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, P; Bardin, T; Laredo, J D; Ziza, J M; D'Anglejan, G; Lansaman, J; Bucki, B; Forest, M; Kuntz, D

    1994-05-01

    To determine the clinical, radiologic, and histologic features of calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion. The records of 6 patients with paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis and adjacent bone cortex erosion were reviewed. Calcific tendinitis involved the linea aspera in 4 patients, the bicipital groove in 1 patient, and the deltoid insertion in another. Calcium deposits were associated with cortical bone erosions, revealed on plain radiographs in 4 patients and computed tomography scans in 2. Bone scans were performed in 2 patients and showed local hyperfixation of the isotope. In 4 patients, suspicion of a neoplasm led to a biopsy. Calcium deposits appeared to be surrounded by a foreign body reaction with numerous giant cells. Apatite crystals were identified by transmission electron microscopy and elemental analysis in 1 surgical sample. Paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion is an uncommon presentation of apatite deposition disease.

  17. Solute carrier transporters: potential targets for digestive system neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Zhu, Xiao Yan; Liu, Lu Ming; Meng, Zhi Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Digestive system neoplasms are the leading causes of cancer-related death all over the world. Solute carrier (SLC) superfamily is composed of a series of transporters that are ubiquitously expressed in organs and tissues of digestive systems and mediate specific uptake of small molecule substrates in facilitative manner. Given the important role of SLC proteins in maintaining normal functions of digestive system, dysregulation of these protein in digestive system neoplasms may deliver biological and clinical significance that deserves systemic studies. In this review, we critically summarized the recent advances in understanding the role of SLC proteins in digestive system neoplasms. We highlighted that several SLC subfamilies, including metal ion transporters, transporters of glucose and other sugars, transporters of urea, neurotransmitters and biogenic amines, ammonium and choline, inorganic cation/anion transporters, transporters of nucleotide, amino acid and oligopeptide organic anion transporters, transporters of vitamins and cofactors and mitochondrial carrier, may play important roles in mediating the initiation, progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance of digestive system neoplasms. Proteins in these SLC subfamilies may also have diagnostic and prognostic values to particular cancer types. Differential expression of SLC proteins in tumors of digestive system was analyzed by extracting data from human cancer database, which revealed that the roles of SLC proteins may either be dependent on the substrates they transport or be tissue specific. In addition, small molecule modulators that pharmacologically regulate the functions of SLC proteins were discussed for their possible application in the treatment of digestive system neoplasms. This review highlighted the potential of SLC family proteins as drug target for the treatment of digestive system neoplasms.

  18. Canine Central Nervous System Neoplasm Phenotyping Using Tissue Microarray Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzbarth, I; Heinrich, F; Herder, V; Recker, T; Wohlsein, P; Baumgärtner, W

    2017-05-01

    Tissue microarrays (TMAs) represent a useful technique for the simultaneous phenotyping of large sample numbers and are particularly suitable for histopathologic tumor research. In this study, TMAs were used to evaluate semiquantitatively the expression of multiple antigens in various canine central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms and to identify markers with potential discriminative diagnostic relevance. Ninety-seven canine CNS neoplasms, previously diagnosed on hematoxylin and eosin sections according to the World Health Organization classification, were investigated on TMAs, with each tumor consisting of 2 cylindrical samples from the center and the periphery of the neoplasm. Tumor cells were phenotyped using a panel of 28 monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, and hierarchical clustering analysis was applied to group neoplasms according to similarities in their expression profiles. Hierarchical clustering generally grouped cases with similar histologic diagnoses; however, gliomas especially exhibited a considerable heterogeneity in their positivity scores. Multiple tumor groups, such as astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, significantly differed in the proportion of positive immunoreaction for certain markers such as p75 NTR , AQP4, GFAP, and S100 protein. The study highlights AQP4 and p75 NTR as novel markers, helping to discriminate between canine astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma. Furthermore, the results suggest that p75 NTR and proteolipid protein may represent useful markers, whose expression inversely correlates with malignant transformation in canine astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, respectively. Tissue microarray was demonstrated to be a useful and time-saving tool for the simultaneous immunohistochemical characterization of multiple canine CNS neoplasms. The present study provides a detailed overview of the expression patterns of different types of canine CNS neoplasms.

  19. Histiocytoid hemangioma of bone: A benign lesion which may mimic angiosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone, R.O.; Nguyen, V.; Hudkins, P.; Merriwether, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Histiocytoid hemangioma is a related family of endothelial cell neoplasms, which was described by Rosai at al. in 1979 and which encompasses a group of osseous, vascular and cutaneous neoplasms. These neoplasms bear a close resemblance to the angiosarcoma/hemangioendothelioma family of malignant neoplasms. A case of histiocytoid hemangioma is reported that presented as a multicentric osseous lesion and was initially diagnosed as angiosarcoma. The patient has had a remarkably benign course and at a later data developed skin and bone lesions diagnosed as angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia identical to the initial lesion. This represents the first reported case of identical osseous and cutaneous lesions of the histiocytoid hemangioma group in the same patient and lends credence to Rosai's concept. A review of the literature concerning angiosarcoma/hemangioendothelioma of the bone is presented with the conclusion that some lesions considered to represent multicentric angiosarcoma may represent the more benign histiocytoid hemangioma. (orig.)

  20. Unicentric Castleman’s Disease Masquerading Pancreatic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s disease is a rare nonclonal proliferative disorder of the lymph nodes with an unknown etiology. Common locations of Castleman’s disease are mediastinum, neck, axilla, and abdomen. Castleman’s disease of a peripancreatic location masquerading as pancreatic neoplasm is an even rarer entity. On search of published data, we came across about 17 cases published on peripancreatic Castleman’s disease until now. Here we are reporting a case of retropancreatic Castleman's disease masquerading as retroperitoneal neoplasm in a 46-year-old male patient.

  1. Assessing the occupational nature of malignant lung neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevc, J.; Klener, V.; Plank, V.

    1989-01-01

    The development of lung carcinoma in uranium miners is discussed. In spite of the decreasing radiation risks in mines, the absolute number of neoplasms has increased since the 1960's; this is due to the increasing number of miners, improved diagnostic methods and the aging of miners who thus enter higher age groups where a higher incidence of neoplasms can be expected. The probabilistic method was shown to be of help in deciding whether individual cases of lung carcinoma should be considered an occupational disease; new possible improvements of the method are suggested. (J.J.). 12 refs

  2. Secondary neoplasms of the larynx from a colonic adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dadkhah, Naser; Hahn, Christoffer

    2015-01-01

    Secondary neoplasms of the larynx are rare and account for 0.09-0,4% of all laryngeal tumours. Cutaneous melanomas are the preponderant primaries metastasizing to the larynx, fol-lowed by renal cell carcinomas, breast and lung carcinomas. Colonic adenocarcinoma metastases to the larynx are extrem......Secondary neoplasms of the larynx are rare and account for 0.09-0,4% of all laryngeal tumours. Cutaneous melanomas are the preponderant primaries metastasizing to the larynx, fol-lowed by renal cell carcinomas, breast and lung carcinomas. Colonic adenocarcinoma metastases to the larynx...

  3. Femoral revision with a primary cementless stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaud, O; Cambas, P M; Tabutin, J

    2016-04-01

    The use of a primary cementless component is a tempting option for revision total hip arthrosplasty (reTHA), however, the results of this type of revision have not been clearly determined. The goal of this retrospective study was to determine: if revision with a primary anatomical cementless femoral stem gives adequate bone fixation; the rate of secondary subsidence or recurrent loosening; the survival rate with this device. Revision with a primary anatomical cementless femoral stem results in a low rate of subsidence and recurrent loosening. This retrospective series of 43 reTHA performed between 1994 and 2012 included 43 patients, mean age 66 years old (37-90) with a minimum follow-up of 24months. There were grade 1 (n=24) or 2A (n=19) bone defects according to the Paprosky classification. The causes of revision were: aseptic loosening in 27, septic loosening in 6, malposition of the implant in 7 and periprosthetic fractures in 3. Clinical (Postel Merle d'Aubigné [PMA] and Harris scores), and radiological (subsidence) assessment was performed, as well as survival analysis (with a 95% confidence interval). All components were changed through posterolateral approach without femorotomy. In four cases de-escalation (use of a primary component for secondary revision of a prior revision component) was performed. There were no perioperative fractures or perforations. After a mean 47months (24-134), the mean PMA score increased from 10 (5-15) to 16 (11-18), and the Harris score from 58 (20-80) to 85 (66-96). Radiological assessment did not show any extensive radiolucencies or secondary subsidence. Only 3 components were placed in a varus position, with no clinical consequences. One patient had subsequent revision for recurrent dislocations. Estimated survival at 80months by Kaplan-Meier analysis was 85% (CI 95%: 64-100%). There are very few studies in the literature (7 series) on this topic, which shows the reluctance of surgeons to use this technique. Placement of a

  4. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  5. The Continuing Value of Ultrastructural Observation in Central Nervous System Neoplasms in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Rae Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS neoplasms are the second most common childhood malignancy after leukemia and the most common solid organ neoplasm in children. Diagnostic dilemmas with small specimens from CNS neoplasms are often the result of multifactorial etiologies such as frozen or fixation artifact, biopsy size, or lack of knowledge about rare or unfamiliar entities. Since the late 1950s, ultrastructural examination has been used in the diagnosis of CNS neoplasms, though it has largely been replaced by immunohistochemical and molecular cytogenetic studies. Nowadays, pathologic diagnosis of CNS neoplasms is achieved through intraoperative cytology, light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and molecular cytogenetic results. However, the utility of electron microscopy (EM in the final diagnosis of CNS neoplasms and investigation of its pathogenetic origin remains critical. Here, we reviewed the distinguishing ultrastructural features of pediatric CNS neoplasms and emphasize the continuing value of EM in the diagnosis of CNS neoplasms.

  6. Childhood neoplasms presenting at autopsy: A 20-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Victoria A; Booth, John; Palm, Liina; Ashworth, Michael; Jacques, Thomas S; Sebire, Neil J

    2017-09-01

    The aims of the review are to establish the number of undiagnosed neoplasms presenting at autopsy in a single centre and to determine the incidence and most common causes of sudden unexpected death due to neoplasia in infancy and childhood (SUDNIC). Retrospective observational study of paediatric autopsies performed on behalf of Her Majesty's Coroner over a 20-year period (1996-2015; n = 2,432). Neoplasms first diagnosed at autopsy were identified from an established database and cases meeting the criteria for sudden unexpected death were further categorised. Thirteen previously undiagnosed neoplasms were identified, including five haematological malignancies, two medulloblastomas, two neuroblastomas, two cardiac tumours and two malignancies of renal origin. Eight cases met the criteria for SUDNIC (0.33% of autopsies), the commonest group of which were haematological malignancies (n = 3). Neoplasms presenting as unexpected death in infancy and childhood and diagnosed at autopsy are rare. The findings suggest that haematological malignancies are the commonest cause of SUDNIC and highlight the importance of specialist autopsy in cases of sudden unexpected death. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The radiotherapy value in recurrence control mammary neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Lopez, M.; Santini Blasco, A.

    1996-01-01

    In base on the retrospective analysis of 250 patient carrying of mammals neoplasms recurrence, their general characteristics are determined and the results are emphasized obtained by the radiotherapy, as well as the list that the indicative predict. It culminates in the necessity of indicating the adyuvance postoperative radiotherapy when factors unfavorable presage of recurrence(AU ) [es

  8. [Epidermoid neoplasm of the fourth ventricle. Report of two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Franco, Jorge Arturo; Vallejo-Moncada, Cristóbal; Collado-Arce, Griselda; Villalpando-Navarrete, Edgar; Sandoval-Balanzario, M

    2013-01-01

    epidermoid neoplasm (EN) accounts for 1 % of whole intracranial neoplasms. Usually, it is found at the cerebello-pontine angle and the location in the fourth ventricle (FV) is rare. The aim was to report two cases of EN of the FV. case 1: a female 22 year old presented with an intense headache with a history of 3 months. At the hospital entry, symptoms and signs of high intracranial pressure were found. Tomography images showed hydrocephalus with high pressure in the FV. She was treated with a shunt from ventricular to peritoneal cavity. After that an encapsulated neoplasm was drawn. It had a pearled aspect. The histology report showed an EN originating in the FV. Case 2: a female 44 year old with a history of five years of dizziness; three years before admission she presented intermittent diplopia and disophagia. At the hospital admission the patient presented paresis of the 6th and 7th cranial nerve. The tomography and the magnetic resonance studies showed a mass in the FV. The neoplasm was extirpated. the EN of the FV is an infrequent benign lesion. Magnetic resonance is the standard diagnostic study, but it could lead to confusion with neurocisticercosis. The extirpation and the treatment of the hydrocephalus are indicated.

  9. Solid pseudopapillary epithelial neoplasm – a rare but curable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Solid pseudopapillary epithelial neoplasms (SPENs) of the pancreas are rare but curable tumours that have a low-grade malignant potential and occur almost exclusively in young women, with an excellent prognosis after complete resection. This study examines the clinicopathological characteristics of these ...

  10. A retrospective study of ocular neoplasms in Benin City, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The frequency of retinoblastoma was higher than previously reported while the frequency of choroidal malanoma was less than that seen in Literature. This may necessitate the need for further studies on retinoblastomas in Nigeria. KEY WORDS: Ocular Neoplasms, Malignant tumors, age, sex. Global Jnl Medical Sciences ...

  11. Situs inversus with renal neoplasm: a case report.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Situs inversus with renal neoplasm: a case report. Je\\vell J MCS FACCP. Senior Consultant. Bowa K hlBChB hlsc (Glasgonl). Regstrar. Uni~ersity~Teaching Hospital, School of hledicine. University of Zambia. Correspondence to: Dr. Jewel1 J, Dept. of Surgery, UTH, P 0 Box 501 10, LUSAICA, ZAhlBIX. This is a case report ...

  12. Histologic and Immunohistochemical classification of 41 bovine adrenal gland neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Anette Blak; Leifsson, Páll S.; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of the adrenal glands are among the most frequent tumors in cattle; however, few studies have been conducted to describe their characteristics. The aim of this study was to classify 41 bovine adrenal neoplasms from 40 animals based on macroscopic and histologic examination, including...

  13. A Survey Of Cutaneous Neoplasms Among Horses Used For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Survey Of Cutaneous Neoplasms Among Horses Used For Cultural Festivals In Borno State, Nigeria. ... Histologically, the papillomas were deeply subdivided into epithelial lobules with the outer and inner aspects of the epithelium running approximately parallel to each other. Irregular sub-dermal masses or cords of ...

  14. Guideline for PET/CT imaging of neuroendocrine neoplasms with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-conjugated somatostatin receptor targeting peptides and {sup 18}F-DOPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozkurt, Murat Fani [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Virgolini, Irene; Decristoforo, Clemens [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Balogova, Sona [Comenius University and St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia); Tenon Hospital AP-HP and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Beheshti, Mohsen [St. Vincent' s Hospital, PET-CT Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, Linz (Austria); Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Salzburg (Austria); Rubello, Domenico [Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET Center and Medical Physics and Radiology, Rovigo (Italy); Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-DIMES, Bologna (Italy); Kjaer, Andreas [National University Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Delgado-Bolton, Roberto [San Pedro Hospital and Centre for Biomedical Research of La Rioja (CIBIR), Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) and Nuclear Medicine, Logrono (Spain); Kunikowska, Jolanta [Medical University of Warsaw, Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas University, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Giammarile, Francesco [University of Lyon, Nuclear Medicine, Lyon (France)

    2017-08-15

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms are a heterogenous group of tumours, for which nuclear medicine plays an important role in the diagnostic work-up as well as in the targeted therapeutic options. This guideline is aimed to assist nuclear medicine physicians in recommending, performing, reporting and interpreting the results of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) PET/CT imaging using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-conjugated peptides, as well as {sup 18}F-DOPA imaging for various neuroendocrine neoplasms. The previous procedural guideline by EANM regarding the use PET/CT tumour imaging with {sup 68}Ga-conjugated peptides has been revised and updated with the relevant and recent literature in the field with contribution of distinguished experts. (orig.)

  15. Age-specific incidence of all neoplasms after colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Fabio; Randimbison, Lalao; Blanc-Moya, Rafael; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    Patients diagnosed with a specific neoplasm tend to have a subsequent excess risk of the same neoplasm. The age incidence of a second neoplasm at the same site is approximately constant with age, and consequently the relative risk is greater at younger age. It is unclear whether such a line of reasoning can be extended from a specific neoplasm to the incidence of all neoplasms in subjects diagnosed with a defined neoplasm. We considered the age-specific incidence of all non-hormone-related epithelial neoplasms after a first primary colorectal cancer (n = 9542) in the Vaud Cancer Registry data set. In subjects with a previous colorectal cancer, the incidence rate of all other epithelial non-hormone-related cancers was stable around 800 per 100,000 between age 30 and 60 years, and rose only about twofold to reach 1685 at age 70 to 79 years and 1826 per 100,000 at age 80 years or older. After excluding synchronous cancers, the rise was only about 1.5-fold, that is, from about 700 to 1000. In the general population, the incidence rate of all epithelial non-hormone-related cancers was 29 per 100,000 at age 30 to 39 years, and rose 30-fold to 883 per 100,000 at age 70 to 79 years. Excluding colorectal cancers, the rise of all non-hormone-related cancers was from 360 per 100,000 at age 40 to 49 years to 940 at age 70 to 79 years after colorectal cancer, and from 90 to 636 per 100,000 in the general population (i.e., 2.6- vs. 7.1-fold). The rise of incidence with age of all epithelial non-hormone-related second cancers after colorectal cancer is much smaller than in the general population. This can possibly be related to the occurrence of a single mutational event in a population of susceptible individuals, although alternative models are plausible within the complexity of the process of carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  17. Survival after Radiofrequency Ablation for 100 Cases of Lung Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baodong LIU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Surgical resection is the preferred treatment in selected patients with pulmonary neoplasms. In older than 70 years or have compromised cardiopulmonary status or coexistent medical problems patients, radiofrequency ablation (RFA may offer an alternative option. The aim of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic effects after RFA in 100 patients with pulmonary neoplasms. Methods One handred cases of unresectable lung tumors with 106 lesions were underwent RFA therapy. To evaluate the therapeutic effect and complications of lung tumors using spiral CT scanning and SPECT in 1-3 months after RFA. Results One hundred patients underwent RFA for lung neoplasms (62 men, 38 women; median age, 66.6 years; range, 36 to 91 years. Eighty-six patients with primary lung neoplasms and 14 patients with pulmonary metastases underwent RFA. Treatment was complete in all cases, no treatment-related deaths occurred in all of the 100 patients and serious morbidity associated with the procedures. The median overall survival for the entire group of patients was 13.0 months, the one and two years overall survival for total of were 51% and 32.5% respectively. No differences in overall survival noted between patients with primary and metastases lung neoplasms (P=0.922. The median overall survival for the early stage of patients was 28.0 months, 2-year overall survival for early stage primary lung cancer patients were 57.7%. Conclusion RFA is a safe and effective procedure in selective lung tumors. CT-guided radiofrequency ablation is a minimally invasive treatment option. RFA could act as an alternative treatment to inoperable lung cancer.

  18. Tyrosine-rich crystals associated with oncocytic salivary gland neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilcrease, M Z; Nelson, F S; Guzman-Paz, M

    1998-07-01

    Crystalloids have been identified ultrastructurally within the epithelial cells of Warthin's tumors, but there have been no studies characterizing crystals or crystalloids in Warthin's tumors by light microscopy. The finding of abundant needle-shaped crystals in a fine-needle aspirate of a cystadenoma of the parotid prompted us to examine the prevalence of crystals and crystalloids in oncocytic salivary gland neoplasms. Ninety-seven oncocytic neoplasms (93 Warthin's tumors, 3 cystadenomas, and 1 oncocytoma) excised at our institution between 1950 and 1996 were examined, to identify crystals. Neoplasms with crystals were further characterized by means of a variety of histochemical stains and electron microscopy. Ninety-nine pleomorphic adenomas were similarly reviewed. Seven cases with crystals were identified. Five of these were Warthin's tumors, 1 was a cystadenoma, and 1 was an oncocytoma. The crystals were noted within tumor cysts but were not limited to the neoplasms. The crystals were predominantly either needle-shaped or tabular, but some cases contained mixtures of both as well as intermediate forms. They stained pink with hematoxylin-eosin, although the tabular forms also exhibited a focal yellow hue. The crystals were not discernible under polarized light. They stained a red-brown color with Millon's reagent, which indicated the presence of tyrosine. Trichrome, periodic acid-Schiff stain with diastase, alcian blue (pH 2.5), and Congo red stains were negative. Electron microscopy revealed sharply defined, elongate, electron-dense structures with periodicity, both extracellular and within epithelial cells. No crystals or crystalloids were identified in any of 99 pleomorphic adenomas reviewed. The findings indicate that tyrosine-rich crystals associated with several oncocytic salivary gland neoplasms are morphologically, histochemically, and ultrastructurally distinct from previously described tyrosine-rich crystalloids and collagenous crystalloids of

  19. Effectiveness and side-effects of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for neuroendocrine neoplasms in Germany: A multi-institutional registry study with prospective follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörsch, Dieter; Ezziddin, Samer; Haug, Alexander; Gratz, Klaus Friedrich; Dunkelmann, Simone; Miederer, Matthias; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Krause, Bernd Joachim; Bengel, Frank M; Bartenstein, Peter; Biersack, Hans-Jürgen; Pöpperl, Gabriele; Baum, R P

    2016-05-01

    Monocentric and retrospective studies indicate effectiveness of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy targeting somatostatin receptors of neuroendocrine neoplasms. We assessed overall and progression-free survival and adverse events of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy by a multi-institutional, board certified registry with prospective follow-up in five centres in Germany. A total of 450 patients were included and followed for a mean of 24.4 months. Most patients had progressive low- or intermediate grade neuroendocrine neoplasms and 73% were pretreated with at least one therapy. Primary neuroendocrine neoplasms were mainly derived of pancreas (38%), small bowel (30%), unknown primary (19%) or bronchial system (4%). Patients were treated with Lutetium-177 in 54%, with Yttrium-90 in 17% and with both radionuclides in 29%. Overall and progression-free survival was determined with Kaplan-Meier curves and uni-variate log rank test Cox models. Median overall survival of all patients was 59 (95% confidence interval [CI] 49-68.9) months. Overall survival was significantly inferior in the patients treated with Yttrium-90 solely (hazard ratio, 3.22; 95% CI, 1.83-5.64) compared to any peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with Lutetium-177. Grade II (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% CI, 0.79-5.32) and grade III (hazard ratio, 4.22; 95% CI, 1.41-12.06) neuroendocrine neoplasms had significantly worse overall survival than grade I neuroendocrine neoplasms. Patients with small neuroendocrine neoplasms of small bowel had significantly increased survival (hazard ratio, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.18-0.87) compared to neuroendocrine neoplasms of other locations. Median progression-free survival was 41 (35.9-46.1) months and significantly inferior in patients treated with Yttrium solely (hazard ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.71-4.55). Complete remission was observed in 5.6% of patients, 22.4% had a partial remission, 47.3% were stable and 4% were progressive as best response. Adverse events of bone marrow

  20. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: InP.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 Input control Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... SRX739213 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms ...SRX739214,SRX739215,SRX739217,SRX739216,SRX739213 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  7. File list: NoD.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 No description Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  9. File list: DNS.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  11. File list: NoD.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 No description Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... SRX739215,SRX739214,SRX739216,SRX739217 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... SRX739214,SRX739215,SRX739217,SRX739216 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... SRX739215,SRX739214,SRX739216,SRX739217 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  1. File list: DNS.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms ...SRX739215,SRX739213,SRX739214,SRX739216,SRX739217 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  4. File list: ALL.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms ...SRX739215,SRX739213,SRX739214,SRX739216,SRX739217 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  6. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  7. File list: DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  10. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  15. File list: InP.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 Input control Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms SRX739213 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 Input control Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... SRX739213 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... SRX739215,SRX739214,SRX739216,SRX739217 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  1. File list: NoD.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 No description Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  2. File list: NoD.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 No description Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  3. File list: InP.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 Input control Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... SRX739213 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  4. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone ... to people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether ...

  5. Copyright Revision in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    The article discusses the history of copyright laws, the directions which copyright revision can take, and the rationale behind revision. Regulations for protecting various media such as sound recordings, performances, and cable television are discussed. (JAB)

  6. Food habits in atomic bomb survivors suffering from malignant neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Kazue; Inoue, Hisako; Uchino, Chito

    1984-01-01

    Food habits were surveyed in patients admitted to 13 hospitals in Nagasaki prefecture and other prefectures to compare the incidence of malignant neoplasms according to the food intake between atomic bomb exposed group and non-exposed group. The incidence of malignant neoplasms was significantly higher in male patients having the low intake of milk and salted fish than in those having the high intake of them in atomic bomb exposed group, while it was significantly higher in male patients having the low intake of potatoes and milk and in female patients having the low intake of boiled fish paste than in those having the high intake of them in non-exposed group. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Histopathological evaluation of parotid gland neoplasms in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombe, R F; Lam, A K; O'Neill, J

    2016-01-01

    Parotid gland tumours are complex neoplasms with a broad histological range. The parotid gland is also a common site of face and scalp skin cancer metastases. Parotidectomies performed by ENT department in the Gold Coast health district from 2006 to 2013. A total of 158 specimens were examined. Of these, 53.80 per cent were benign and 46.20 per cent were malignant. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common tumour (29.11 per cent), followed by cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (23.42 per cent) and Warthin's tumour (12.03 per cent). Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma accounted for a large proportion of parotid masses in our case series, reflecting the high prevalence of non-melanoma skin cancer in Australia. Primary parotid neoplasms had similar incidence rates to other studies.

  8. Lesions and Neoplasms of the Penis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Debra S

    2016-01-01

    In addition to practitioners who care for male patients, with the increased use of high-resolution anoscopy, practitioners who care for women are seeing more men in their practices as well. Some diseases affecting the penis can impact on their sexual partners. Many of the lesions and neoplasms of the penis occur on the vulva as well. In addition, there are common and rare lesions unique to the penis. A review of the scope of penile lesions and neoplasms that may present in a primary care setting is presented to assist in developing a differential diagnosis if such a patient is encountered, as well as for practitioners who care for their sexual partners. A familiarity will assist with recognition, as well as when consultation is needed.

  9. Basaloid Carcinoma of the Breast Mimicking Cutaneous Basaloid Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solus, Jason F; Goyal, Amrita; Duncan, Lyn M; Nazarian, Rosalynn M

    2015-09-01

    Basaloid carcinoma of the breast (BCB) is a rare, triple-negative aggressive primary breast tumor that can closely mimic cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), neuroendocrine tumors, adnexal neoplasms, and other primary breast tumors. Accurate diagnosis of this tumor is critical for appropriate clinical management. We add to the literature 2 female patients with BCB presenting with a nipple mass. Histopathologic findings from both patients showed dermal nests and cords of atypical basaloid cells with epidermal involvement, closely resembling cutaneous BCC. A panel of immunohistochemical stains, including the novel use of CK17, is essential for differentiating BCB from mimickers. BCB is a rare primary breast tumor that follows an aggressive clinical course and closely mimics many basaloid neoplasms, including cutaneous BCC clinicopathologically. Increased awareness of BCB among dermatologists and dermatopathologists is critical for accurate diagnosis and patient care.

  10. Bone graft materials in fixation of orthopaedic implants in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Bone graft is widely used within orthopaedic surgery especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion. The early implant fixation in the revision situation of loose joint prostheses is important for the long-term survival. Bone autograft has been considered as gold standard in many...... orthopaedic procedures, whereas allograft is the gold standard by replacement of extensive bone loss. However, the use of autograft is associated with donor site morbidity, especially chronic pain. In addition, the limited supply is a significant clinical challenge. Limitations in the use of allograft include...... skeletal bones. The osteoconductive properties of the composite might be improved by adding bone marrow aspirate (BMA), which can be harvested during surgery. Other alternatives to bone graft are demineralised bone matrix (DBM) and human cancellous bone (CB). DBM is prepared by acid extraction of human...

  11. Calcar bone graft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargar, W.L.; Paul, H.A.; Merritt, K.; Sharkey, N.

    1986-01-01

    A canine model was developed to investigate the use of an autogeneic iliac bone graft to treat the calcar deficiency commonly found at the time of revision surgery for femoral component loosening. Five large male mixed-breed dogs had bilateral total hip arthroplasty staged at three-month intervals, and were sacrificed at six months. Prior to cementing the femoral component, an experimental calcar defect was made, and a bicortical iliac bone graft was fashioned to fill the defect. Serial roentgenograms showed the grafts had united with no resorption. Technetium-99 bone scans showed more uptake at three months than at six months in the graft region. Disulfine blue injection indicated all grafts were perfused at both three and six months. Thin section histology, fluorochromes, and microradiographs confirmed graft viability in all dogs. Semiquantitative grading of the fluorochromes indicated new bone deposition in 20%-50% of each graft at three months and 50%-80% at six months. Although the calcar bone graft was uniformly successful in this canine study, the clinical application of this technique should be evaluated by long-term results in humans.

  12. Rectum neoplasms treatment advanced with radio and chemotherapy before - surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luongo Cespedes, A.; Aguiar Vitacca, S.

    1993-01-01

    In Uruguay the colorectal neoplasms has a can rate of mobility. The surgery has 13-26% local recurrence. The irradiation before surgery has demonstrated to improve the resect and the local control.The objective of this protocol it is to decrease the percentage of local relapse , using radiotherapy(RT) before surgery and concomitant chemotherapy that potencies the effect of the RT, improvement this way the therapeutic quotient (AU) [es

  13. Endoscopic Diagnosis of Leiomyosarcoma of the Esophagus, a Rare Neoplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Ravini, Mario; Torre, Massimo; Zanasi, Giulio; Vanini, Marco; Camozzi, Mario

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of leiomyosarcoma of the distal third of the esophagus in a 51-year-old woman presenting with a six-month history of severe epigastric pain, disphagia and weight loss. The diagnosis, suspected on endoscopic examination, was preoperatively acheived by biopsy and immunohistological stain. Surgical treatment was undertaken with good results. Differentiation between leiomyosarcoma and more common esophageal neoplasm may be difficult if based on radiographic and endoscopic appeara...

  14. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  15. MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS IN CHILDREN: CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Yu. Rykov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment efficacy for children with cancer depends on the diagnosis timeliness since the earlier expert care has been started, the higher likelihood there is to achieve remission. In this regard, a special role belongs to primary care physicians — district pediatricians who should timely recognize the malignant neoplasm and refer the patient to a pediatric oncologist for advice. Wherein, a limited number of primary patients and atypical course of oncological diseases are the causes of a decrease in oncological alertness. This lecture is aimed at a wide range of specialists (pediatricians, radiologists, pathologists and devoted to clinical manifestations and diagnosis of malignant neoplasms in children — hemoblastosis and solid tumours. The suggested algorithms for the examination of patients will allow to make a diagnosis faster and timely initiate expert care in specialized departments. The article is illustrated with unique pictures — images of histological specimens, MRI, and CT of patients with the most neglected cases of malignant neoplasms being the result of diagnostic errors of pediatricians. 

  16. Molecularly-Driven Doublet Therapy for Recurrent CNS Malignant Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-20

    Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Anaplastic Ependymoma; Anaplastic Ganglioglioma; Anaplastic Meningioma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma, Anaplastic; Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Brain Cancer; Brain Tumor; Central Nervous System Neoplasms; Choroid Plexus Carcinoma; CNS Embryonal Tumor With Rhabdoid Features; Ganglioneuroblastoma of Central Nervous System; CNS Tumor; Embryonal Tumor of CNS; Ependymoma; Glioblastoma; Glioma; Glioma, Malignant; Medulloblastoma; Medulloblastoma; Unspecified Site; Medulloepithelioma; Neuroepithelial Tumor; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Neuroepithelial; Papillary Tumor of the Pineal Region (High-grade Only); Pediatric Brain Tumor; Pineal Parenchymal Tumor of Intermediate Differentiation (High-grade Only); Pineoblastoma; Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Medulloblastoma; Refractory Brain Tumor; Neuroblastoma. CNS; Glioblastoma, IDH-mutant; Glioblastoma, IDH-wildtype; Medulloblastoma, Group 3; Medulloblastoma, Group 4; Glioma, High Grade; Neuroepithelial Tumor, High Grade; Medulloblastoma, SHH-activated and TP53 Mutant; Medulloblastoma, SHH-activated and TP53 Wildtype; Medulloblastoma, Chromosome 9q Loss; Medulloblastoma, Non-WNT Non-SHH, NOS; Medulloblastoma, Non-WNT/Non-SHH; Medulloblastoma, PTCH1 Mutation; Medulloblastoma, WNT-activated; Ependymoma, Recurrent; Glioma, Recurrent High Grade; Glioma, Recurrent Malignant; Embryonal Tumor, NOS; Glioma, Diffuse Midline, H3K27M-mutant; Embryonal Tumor With Multilayered Rosettes (ETMR); Ependymoma, NOS, WHO Grade III; Ependymoma, NOS, WHO Grade II; Medulloblastoma, G3/G4; Ependymoma, RELA Fusion Positive

  17. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trottier AM

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Amy M Trottier, Sonia Cerquozzi, Carolyn J Owen Division of Hematology and Hematological Malignancies, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN is a rare CD4+ CD56+ myeloid malignancy that is challenging to diagnose and treat. BPDCN typically presents with nonspecific cutaneous lesions with or without extra-cutaneous manifestations before progressing to leukemia. Currently, there is no standard of care for the treatment of BPDCN and various approaches have been used including acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and lymphoma-based regimens with or without stem cell transplantation. Despite these treatment approaches, the prognosis of BPDCN remains poor and there is a lack of prospective data upon which to base treatment decisions. Recent work examining the mutational landscape and gene expression profiles of BPDCN has identified a number of potential therapeutic targets. One such target is CD123, the α subunit of the human interleukin-3 receptor, which is the subject of intervention studies using the novel agent SL-401. Other investigational therapies include UCART123, T-cell immunotherapy, and venetoclax. Prospective trials are needed to determine the best treatment for this uncommon and aggressive neoplasm. Keywords: BPDCN, myeloid, neoplasm, cutaneous, dendritic cell

  18. Valor da avaliação radiográfica pré-operatória dos defeitos ósseos no joelho nas revisões de artroplastia Value of preoperative radiographic evaluations on knee bone defects for revision arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Masasi Iamaguchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o valor da avaliação radiográfica pré-operatória nas revisões de artroplastias totais do joelho. MÉTODOS: Trinta e um joelhos operados no período de 2006 a 2008 em uma série consecutiva de casos de cirurgia de revisão de artroplastia total de joelho foram analisados retrospectivamente. CRITÉRIOS ANALISADOS: número de cunhas ou enxertos ósseos estruturados utilizados para preenchimento dos defeitos ósseos; localização das cunhas e enxertos ósseos utilizados e espessura média do polietileno utilizada. A classificação AORI era estabelecida previamente através de radiografias pré-operatórias segundo critérios preestabelecidos. Após a análise, os joelhos foram divididos em quatro grupos (I, IIA, IIB e III. RESULTADOS: O número médio de cunhas ou enxertos ósseos utilizados em cada joelho variou de maneira crescente entre os grupos (grupo I: 1,33; grupo IIA: 2; grupo IIB: 4,33; grupo III: 4,83 (P = 0,0012. As localizações mais comuns foram: medial na tíbia e posteromedial no fêmur. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante na espessura do polietileno utilizado. CONCLUSÃO: A classificação AORI para defeitos ósseos no joelho baseada em radiografias pré-operatórias mostrou correlação crescente com a necessidade de utilização de cunhas e/ou enxertos estruturados na revisão de artroplastia total do joelho. Porém, até 46% dos joelhos dos grupos I e IIA apresentaram falhas ósseas de até 5mm não diagnosticadas através das radiografias pré-operatórias.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the value of preoperative radiographic evaluations for total knee arthroplasty (TKA revision. METHODS: Thirty-one knees that were operated between 2006 and 2008, in a consecutive series of cases of TKA revision surgery were analyzed retrospectively. THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA WERE EVALUATED: number of wedges or structured bone grafts used for filling the bone defects; locations of the wedges and bone grafts used; and

  19. The effects of bone marrow aspirate, bone graft, and collagen composites on fixation of titanium implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan; Ding, Ming; Sandri, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Replacement of extensive local bone loss especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion is a significant clinical challenge. Allograft and autograft have been considered as gold standards for bone replacement. However, there are several disadvantages such as donor site pain, bacterial...... on the early fixation of bone implants in this sheep model. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2012....

  20. Trabecular metal acetabular revision system (cup-cage construct to address the massive acetabular defects in revision arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Malhotra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of total hip replacements in the younger clique has added to the demand for revision procedures. Revision situations are often encountered with infection, loss of bone stock and bone defects. There are various methods of reconstruction of acetabular defects. The management options of type 3B Paprosky acetabular defects are limited with allograft and conventional cages. Trabecular metal technology has evolved to address these bone defects. Trabecular metal acetabular revision system (TMARS cup-cage construct is a new technique to address massive acetabular defects. We describe a case of failed hip reconstruction done for a Giant cell tumour of proximal femur managed by a two stage procedure, initial debridement and second stage reconstruction of acetabulum with TMARS cup-cage construct and femur with allograft prosthesis composite.

  1. An aggressive osteoblastoma in the left iliac bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Joon; Yang, Seoung Oh; Jo, Han Gi; Cho, Chul Koo; Ro, In Woo

    1986-01-01

    Osteoblastoma is an uncommon primary neoplasm of bone, accounting for 1% of primary bone tumors. Osteoblastomas are benign bone tumors, but recurrences and malignant transformation of osteoblastoma were reported. So Jaffe and Dorf-man proposed the term of 'aggressive osteoblastoma' in which the tumor had intermediate biological natures among the osteoblastomas. Aggressive osteoblastoma is very rare and biological, pathological features of it is different from the conventional osteoblastoma. We experienced one case of aggressive osteoblastoma in the left ilium and describes the radiological, pathological findings of an aggressive osteoblastoma with review of the literatures.

  2. An aggressive osteoblastoma in the left iliac bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Joon; Yang, Seoung Oh; Jo, Han Gi; Cho, Chul Koo; Ro, In Woo [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-12-15

    Osteoblastoma is an uncommon primary neoplasm of bone, accounting for 1% of primary bone tumors. Osteoblastomas are benign bone tumors, but recurrences and malignant transformation of osteoblastoma were reported. So Jaffe and Dorf-man proposed the term of 'aggressive osteoblastoma' in which the tumor had intermediate biological natures among the osteoblastomas. Aggressive osteoblastoma is very rare and biological, pathological features of it is different from the conventional osteoblastoma. We experienced one case of aggressive osteoblastoma in the left ilium and describes the radiological, pathological findings of an aggressive osteoblastoma with review of the literatures.

  3. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  4. Tumor taxonomy for the developmental lineage classification of neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Jules J

    2004-01-01

    The new 'Developmental lineage classification of neoplasms' was described in a prior publication. The classification is simple (the entire hierarchy is described with just 39 classifiers), comprehensive (providing a place for every tumor of man), and consistent with recent attempts to characterize tumors by cytogenetic and molecular features. A taxonomy is a list of the instances that populate a classification. The taxonomy of neoplasia attempts to list every known term for every known tumor of man. The taxonomy provides each concept with a unique code and groups synonymous terms under the same concept. A Perl script validated successive drafts of the taxonomy ensuring that: 1) each term occurs only once in the taxonomy; 2) each term occurs in only one tumor class; 3) each concept code occurs in one and only one hierarchical position in the classification; and 4) the file containing the classification and taxonomy is a well-formed XML (eXtensible Markup Language) document. The taxonomy currently contains 122,632 different terms encompassing 5,376 neoplasm concepts. Each concept has, on average, 23 synonyms. The taxonomy populates 'The developmental lineage classification of neoplasms,' and is available as an XML file, currently 9+ Megabytes in length. A representation of the classification/taxonomy listing each term followed by its code, followed by its full ancestry, is available as a flat-file, 19+ Megabytes in length. The taxonomy is the largest nomenclature of neoplasms, with more than twice the number of neoplasm names found in other medical nomenclatures, including the 2004 version of the Unified Medical Language System, the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terminology, the National Cancer Institute's Thesaurus, and the International Classification of Diseases Oncolology version. This manuscript describes a comprehensive taxonomy of neoplasia that collects synonymous terms under a unique code number and assigns each

  5. Environmental exposure to cooking oil fumes and cervical intraepithelial neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, M.-T.; Lee, L.-H.; Ho, C.-K.; Wu, S.-C.; Lin, L.-Y.; Cheng, B.-H.; Liu, C.-L.; Yang, C.-Y.; Tsai, H.-T.; Wu, T.-N.

    2004-01-01

    The fumes from cooking oil, similar to cigarette smoke, contain numerous carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, etc. In this study, we examined the association between exposure to cooking oil fumes and the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasm. The study population in this nested case-control study consisted of women above the age of 19 years living in Chia-Yi County, located in the southwestern Taiwan, who had received pap smear screening between October, 1999, and December, 2000 (n=32,466). The potential cases were women having lesions greater than cervical intraepithelium neoplasm II (≥CIN2) reconfirmed by cervical biopsy (n=116). The potential controls (case: control=1:2) were age-matched (±2 years) and residence-matched women who had normal pap smears within 6 months of the cases. In total, 100 cases and 197 controls were completely interviewed by public health nurses about cooking methods, ventilation, and other potential risk factors. Women who cooked at home in a kitchen (n=269) without the presence of a fume extractor at least once a week between the ages of 20 and 40 had a 2.29 times higher risk [95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08-4.87] of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasm than those who did not cook once a week in such a kitchen during the same age span, after adjusting for other potential confounders. This finding was further strengthened by the finding that women who did not use the fume extractors had a 2.47 times higher risk (95% CI=1.15-5.32) of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasm than women who cooked in kitchens with fume extractors that were always switched on while cooking. We also found a joint protective effect of fume extractor use among women older than 40 years (n=202) if they used the extractors during both age spans of their lives, ages 20-40 and >40 years. Comparing our findings on women more than 40 years old who used fume extractors during

  6. Patients with a resected pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm have a better prognosis than patients with an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm : A large single institution series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffin, James F; Page, Andrew J; Samaha, Georges J; Christopher, Adrienne; Bhaijee, Feriyl; Pezhouh, Maryam K; Peters, Niek A.; Hruban, Ralph H.; He, Jin; Makary, Martin A; Lennon, Anne Marie; Cameron, John L; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Weiss, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) are rare pancreas tumors distinguished from intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) by the presence of ovarian-type stroma. Historical outcomes for MCNs vary due to previously ambiguous diagnostic criteria resulting in confusion with

  7. Patients With Nonpolypoid (Flat and Depressed) Colorectal Neoplasms at Increased Risk for Advanced Neoplasias, Compared With Patients With Polypoid Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Sarah K; Soetikno, Roy; Rouse, Robert V; Lai, Hobart; Kaltenbach, Tonya

    2017-02-01

    Nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms (NP-CRNs) are more likely to contain high-grade dysplasia or early-stage cancer than polypoid neoplasms. We aimed to determine the long-term outcomes of patients with at least 1 NP-CRN. We performed a longitudinal cohort study of 4454 patients at a Veterans' Affairs hospital who underwent colonoscopy from 2000 through 2005; 341 were found to have 1 or more NP-CRNs and were matched (3:1) with patients found to have 1 or more polypoid neoplasms (controls, n = 1025). We collected and analyzed data on baseline colonoscopy findings and first follow-up colonoscopy results through August 2014. We calculated the incidence of advanced neoplasia at first follow-up colonoscopy, as defined by the presence of ≥1 tubular or sessile serrated adenomas ≥10 mm in diameter, tubulovillous adenoma, high-grade dysplasia, or invasive cancer. A significantly higher proportion of patients with 1 or more NP-CRNs (16.0%) were found to have advanced neoplasia at their first follow-up colonoscopy than controls (8.6%); the adjusted risk ratio was 1.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.05-2.6; P = .03). A significantly higher proportion of patients with 1 or more NP-CRNs were found to have additional NP-CRNs at the follow-up colonoscopy (17%) than controls (7%; relative risk, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-3.5; P < .001). Similar proportions of patients in each group developed cancers after colonoscopy. In a longitudinal cohort study, we found that patients with NP-CRN were more likely to develop additional NP-CRNs and to have advanced neoplasms at their first follow-up colonoscopy than patients with only polypoid neoplasms. However, patients with NP-CRN were not more likely to develop cancers after colonoscopy when surveillance guidelines were followed. Larger studies are needed to determine risk of colorectal cancer in patients with NP-CRN. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Chondroblastoma of the sphenoid bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrocíni, Tomas Gomes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chondroblastoma is an uncommon cartilaginous benign neoplasm, highly destructive, which specifically appears in the epiphysis of long bones in young patients. Its occurrence is extremely rare in the cranial base, normally occurring in the temporal bone. Objective: To describe a rare case in a patient presenting with a sphenoid bone chondroblastoma that invaded the middle cranial cavity, submitted to a successful surgical resection, without recurrence after 2 years. Case Report: W.J.S, 37 years old, male, forwarded to the otorhinolaryngology service with persistent and strong otalgia for 3 months. He had normal otoscopy and without visible tumorations. The computerized tomography confirmed tumor mass in the left infra-temporal cavity, invading the middle cranial cavity. The biopsy suggested giant cells tumor. After wide resection by frontal approach via orbitozygomatic osteotomy. During the surgery, we confirmed tomographic statements and didn't find temporal bone involvement. The histopathological exam confirmed chondroblastoma. After 18 months after the surgery, he doesn't present with complaints, without motor, sensitive deficits or of cranial nerves and without recurrence tomographic signals. Conclusion: The importance of differential diagnosis of chondroblastoma is remarkable in the cranial base lesions and its therapeutic approach, whose objective must always be the major possible resection with the maximum function conservation.

  9. Bone geometry, bone mineral density, and micro-architecture in patients with myelofibrosis: a cross-sectional study using DXA, HR-pQCT, and bone turnover markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Sarah; Vestergaard, Hanne; Hansen, Stinus; Shanbhogue, Vikram Vinod; Shanbhoque, Vikram Vinod; Stahlberg, Claudia Irene; Hermann, Anne Pernille; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2015-07-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (MF) is a severe chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm, progressing towards a terminal stage with insufficient haematopoiesis and osteosclerotic manifestations. Whilst densitometry studies have showed MF patients to have elevated bone mineral density, data on bone geometry and micro-structure assessed with non-invasive methods are lacking. We measured areal bone mineral density (aBMD) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Bone geometry, volumetric BMD, and micro-architecture were measured using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT). We compared the structural parameters of bones by comparing 18 patients with MF and healthy controls matched for age, sex, and height. Blood was analysed for biochemical markers of bone turnover in patients with MF. There were no significant differences in measurements of bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density, and micro-structure between MF patients and matched controls. Estimated bone stiffness and bone strength were similar between MF patients and controls. The level of pro-collagen type 1 N-terminal pro-peptide (P1NP) was significantly increased in MF, which may indicate extensive collagen synthesis, one of the major diagnostic criteria in MF. We conclude that bone mineral density, geometry, and micro-architecture in this cohort of MF patients are comparable with those in healthy individuals.

  10. Multiple neoplasms among cervical cancer patients in the material of the lower Silesian cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmajłowicz, Barbara; Kornafel, Jan; Błaszczyk, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    According to the definition by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), primary multiple neoplasms are two or more neoplasms of different histopathological build in one organ, or two or more tumors occurring in one patient, regardless of the time of their occurrence (synchronic - up to 6 months, metachronous - after 6 months), coming from an organ or a tissue and not being an infiltration from another neoplasm, a relapse or a metastasis. It was the aim of the study to analyze the frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasms among patients suffering from uterine cervix cancer, with a special interest in coexistent neoplasms, the time of their occurrence and total 5-year survivals. The data from the Lower Silesian Cancer Registry concerning the years 1984-2009 formed the material of the present study. 5.3% of all cervix neoplasms occurred as multiple cancers. Cervix neoplasms were 13.4% of multiple neoplasms. On average, cervical cancer occurred as a subsequent cancer in 6 patients yearly (60.7% of the occurrences of cervical cancer were in the period of 5 years following treatment for the first neoplasm). 5-year survival in patients suffering from primarily multiple cervix neoplasms constituted 57% and was convergent with the results for all patients suffering from cervical cancer. Cervical cancer as the first neoplasm occurred in 287 patients, on average in 11 patients annually. In the period of the first 5 years after the treatment of cervical cancer, there were 42.8% occurrences of other cancers. Cervical neoplasms most frequently coexisted with cancers of the breast, lung and large intestine. The frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasm among cervical cancer patients is increasing. Most frequently they coexist with other tobacco-related neoplasms, those related to HPV infections and with secondary post-radiation neoplasms. These facts should be taken into consideration during post-treatment observation and when directing diagnostic

  11. Pelvic Reconstruction With a Free Vascularized Distal Femur for Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Kerkhove, M.P.; Posthuma de Boer, J.; Jiya, T.U.; Winters, H.A.H.; Saouti, R.

    2012-01-01

    The reconstruction of massive structural acetabular defects after revision arthroplasty presents a unique challenge to the orthopedic surgeon. This report describes such a salvage procedure where an autologous vascularized distal femur was used to reconstruct acetabular bone stock with subsequent

  12. Tumor-Induced Osteomalacia Caused by Primary Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Secreting Neoplasm in Axial Skeleton: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Y. Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 66-year-old woman with tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO caused by fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23 secreting mesenchymal tumor localized in a lumbar vertebra and review other cases localized to the axial skeleton. She presented with nontraumatic low back pain and spontaneous bilateral femur fractures. Laboratory testing was remarkable for low serum phosphorus, phosphaturia, and significantly elevated serum FGF-23 level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the lumbar spine showed a focal lesion in the L-4 vertebra which was hypermetabolic on positron emission tomography (PET scan. A computed tomography (CT guided needle biopsy showed a low grade spindle cell neoplasm with positive FGF-23 mRNA expression by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, confirming the diagnosis of a phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor mixed connective tissue variant (PMTMCT. The patient elected to have surgery involving anterior resection of L-4 vertebra with subsequent normalization of serum phosphorus. Including the present case, we identified 12 cases of neoplasms localized to spine causing TIO. To our knowledge, this paper represents the first documented case of lumbar vertebra PMT causing TIO. TIO is a rare metabolic bone disorder that carries a favorable prognosis. When a lesion is identifiable, surgical intervention is typically curative.

  13. [Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 705 salivary glands neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Magdalena; Bień, Stanisław; Okła, Sławomir; Zyłka, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiological data concerning the rare group of tumors derived from salivary glands recorded in the National Cancer Registry is insufficient because it records only malignant salivary glands tumors. The epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 699 patients with salivary glands tumors (n=705). The data were retrieved from ENT Department District Hospital in Kielce (01.09.1989-28.02.2001) and from Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Holy Cross Cancer Centre in Kielce (01.03.2001-31.12.2008). In the analyzed group of 699 patients with 705 salivary glands tumors women predominated, consisting 54,2% of all group. The average age in group of malignant tumors was higher than in nonmalignant group. The risk of malignant neoplasms development increased with patient age. In the analyzed group of 705 salivary glands tumors the nonmalignant neoplasms dominated-78,3%. Out of all cases, 547 (77,6%) were localized in the parotid gland, 80 (11,3%) in submandibular gland and 78 (11,1%) in minor salivary glands. Nonmalignant tumors were more frequent in the parotid gland (82,8%) and submandibular gland (71,3%), whereas in minor salivary glands nonmalignant and malignant neoplasms the occurrence was nearly the same. In general-the smaller the salivary gland, the risk of development malignant tumors was higher. In group of nonmalignant salivary gland tumors two histopathological types dominated - pleomorphic adenoma and Warthin's tumor, which comprised 91,8% of the whole group. In the group of 153 malignant salivary gland tumors the most common histopathology were - adenoid cystic carcinoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. In the analyzed period of 20 years' time, the incidence of salivary glands tumors increased with high siginificance, both for nonmalignant, as well malignant tumors. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. Stemmed femoral knee prostheses: effects of prosthetic design and fixation on bone loss.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenthe, G.H. van; Willems, P.C.P.H.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Huiskes, R.

    2002-01-01

    Although the revision rates for modern knee prostheses have decreased drastically, the total number of revisions a year is increasing because many more primary knee replacements are being done. At the time of revision, bone loss is common, which compromises prosthetic stability. To improve

  15. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980...... and 2007. RESULTS: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 186), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 69), and nonmeningioma brain tumor (n = 116) were the most common types of SMNs and had the poorest outcome (5-year survival rate, 18.1% ± 2.9%, 31.1% ± 6.2%, and 18.3% ± 3.8%, respectively). Five-year survival...

  16. Branchial osteogenetic neoplasm in barbel Barbus barbus plebejus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manera, M; Biavati, S

    1999-09-14

    A branchial osteogenetic neoplasm affecting a barbel Barbus barbus plebejus (Valenciennes, 1829) is described. The osteoblasts' pleomorphism, the lack of a well-developed and complete separation, the presence of eccentric, terminal proliferative edges infiltrating the lining tissues and the abundant tumour matrix suggest a histopathological diagnosis of a 'productive osteoblastic osteosarcoma'. The occurrence of eosinophilic granule cells (EGCs) scattered among neoplastic tissue is discussed in relation to the neoplastic growth and the inflammatory reaction, with reference to recent discoveries in mammalian mast cell biology.

  17. Hypothetical atopic dermatitis-myeloproliferative neoplasm (AD-MPN syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki eKawakami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs are hematopoietic malignancies caused by uncontrolled proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Recent studies have described several mutant mice exhibiting both AD-like skin inflammation and MPN. Common pathways for skin inflammation encompass overexpression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and reduced signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor in the epidermis, while overproduction of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor by keratinocytes and constitutive activation of Stat5 in hematopoietic stem cells are important for the development of MPN. The murine studies suggest the existence of a similar human disease tentatively termed the AD-MPN syndrome.

  18. Inflammatory demyelinating pseudotumor with hemorrhage masquerading high grade cerebral neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agrawal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Demyelinating pseudotumors are rare, benign, solitary intracranial space occupying lesions which masquerade cerebral neoplasms. Contrast MRI shows open ring enhancement which is fairly specific for this entity. Advanced MRI techniques like MR spectroscopy and magnetizing transfer techniques can help differentiating these lesions. NAA/Cr ratio is significantly elevated in central regions of demyelinating pseudotumors than in gliomas and other lesions. Presence of abundant foamy macrophages, lymphoid inflammatory infiltrates around blood vessels, sheets of gemistocytic astrocytes with well-developed processes, well defined border of the lesion absence of neovascularity and necrosis should help us diagnose demyelinating pseudotumor fairly confidently on histopathology.

  19. Distinct molecular features of different macroscopic subtypes of colorectal neoplasms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Konda

    Full Text Available Colorectal adenoma develops into cancer with the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes. We studied the underlying molecular and clinicopathological features to better understand the heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasms (CRNs.We evaluated both genetic (mutations of KRAS, BRAF, TP53, and PIK3CA, and microsatellite instability [MSI] and epigenetic (methylation status of nine genes or sequences, including the CpG island methylator phenotype [CIMP] markers alterations in 158 CRNs including 56 polypoid neoplasms (PNs, 25 granular type laterally spreading tumors (LST-Gs, 48 non-granular type LSTs (LST-NGs, 19 depressed neoplasms (DNs and 10 small flat-elevated neoplasms (S-FNs on the basis of macroscopic appearance.S-FNs showed few molecular changes except SFRP1 methylation. Significant differences in the frequency of KRAS mutations were observed among subtypes (68% for LST-Gs, 36% for PNs, 16% for DNs and 6% for LST-NGs (P<0.001. By contrast, the frequency of TP53 mutation was higher in DNs than PNs or LST-Gs (32% vs. 5% or 0%, respectively (P<0.007. We also observed significant differences in the frequency of CIMP between LST-Gs and LST-NGs or PNs (32% vs. 6% or 5%, respectively (P<0.005. Moreover, the methylation level of LINE-1 was significantly lower in DNs or LST-Gs than in PNs (58.3% or 60.5% vs. 63.2%, P<0.05. PIK3CA mutations were detected only in LSTs. Finally, multivariate analyses showed that macroscopic morphologies were significantly associated with an increased risk of molecular changes (PN or LST-G for KRAS mutation, odds ratio [OR] 9.11; LST-NG or DN for TP53 mutation, OR 5.30; LST-G for PIK3CA mutation, OR 26.53; LST-G or DN for LINE-1 hypomethylation, OR 3.41.We demonstrated that CRNs could be classified into five macroscopic subtypes according to clinicopathological and molecular differences, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  20. Radiological findings of two neoplasms with perivascular epithelioid cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Diestelkamp, BS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas constitute a rare subset of mesenchymal neoplasms classified by the World Health Organization in 2002. We present two cases of PEComas; the first is a cervical PEComa in a 35-year-old woman with no known past medical history who presented with a palpable pelvic mass; the second is an adnexal PEComa in a 39-year-old woman with a history of colitis who presented with abdominal pain and diarrhea. The rarity of these tumors has led to little information about imaging characteristics which we hope these two cases will help expand.

  1. Distinct Molecular Features of Different Macroscopic Subtypes of Colorectal Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Kenichi; Konishi, Kazuo; Yamochi, Toshiko; Ito, Yoichi M.; Nozawa, Hisako; Tojo, Masayuki; Shinmura, Kensuke; Kogo, Mari; Katagiri, Atsushi; Kubota, Yutaro; Muramoto, Takashi; Yano, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Yoshiya; Kihara, Toshihiro; Tagawa, Teppei; Makino, Reiko; Takimoto, Masafumi; Imawari, Michio; Yoshida, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal adenoma develops into cancer with the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes. We studied the underlying molecular and clinicopathological features to better understand the heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasms (CRNs). Methods We evaluated both genetic (mutations of KRAS, BRAF, TP53, and PIK3CA, and microsatellite instability [MSI]) and epigenetic (methylation status of nine genes or sequences, including the CpG island methylator phenotype [CIMP] markers) alterations in 158 CRNs including 56 polypoid neoplasms (PNs), 25 granular type laterally spreading tumors (LST-Gs), 48 non-granular type LSTs (LST-NGs), 19 depressed neoplasms (DNs) and 10 small flat-elevated neoplasms (S-FNs) on the basis of macroscopic appearance. Results S-FNs showed few molecular changes except SFRP1 methylation. Significant differences in the frequency of KRAS mutations were observed among subtypes (68% for LST-Gs, 36% for PNs, 16% for DNs and 6% for LST-NGs) (P<0.001). By contrast, the frequency of TP53 mutation was higher in DNs than PNs or LST-Gs (32% vs. 5% or 0%, respectively) (P<0.007). We also observed significant differences in the frequency of CIMP between LST-Gs and LST-NGs or PNs (32% vs. 6% or 5%, respectively) (P<0.005). Moreover, the methylation level of LINE-1 was significantly lower in DNs or LST-Gs than in PNs (58.3% or 60.5% vs. 63.2%, P<0.05). PIK3CA mutations were detected only in LSTs. Finally, multivariate analyses showed that macroscopic morphologies were significantly associated with an increased risk of molecular changes (PN or LST-G for KRAS mutation, odds ratio [OR] 9.11; LST-NG or DN for TP53 mutation, OR 5.30; LST-G for PIK3CA mutation, OR 26.53; LST-G or DN for LINE-1 hypomethylation, OR 3.41). Conclusion We demonstrated that CRNs could be classified into five macroscopic subtypes according to clinicopathological and molecular differences, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal

  2. Endoscopic diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma of the esophagus, a rare neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravini, M; Torre, M; Zanasi, G; Vanini, M; Camozzi, M

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of leiomyosarcoma of the distal third of the esophagus in a 51-year-old woman presenting with a six-month history of severe epigastric pain, disphagia and weight loss. The diagnosis, suspected on endoscopic examination, was preoperatively acheived by biopsy and immunohistological stain. Surgical treatment was undertaken with good results. Differentiation between leiomyosarcoma and more common esophageal neoplasm may be difficult if based on radiographic and endoscopic appearance. Preoperative histological confirmation is therefore mandatory to schedule a wide surgical excision.

  3. Bone Anchored Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in improving the hearing of people with conduction or mixed hearing loss. The Technology The (BAHA) is a bone conduction hearing device that includes a titanium fixture permanently implanted into the mastoid bone of the skull and an external percutaneous sound processor. The sound processor is attached to the fixture by means of a skin penetrating abutment. Because the device bypasses the middle ear and directly stimulates the cochlea, it has been recommended for individuals with conduction hearing loss or discharging middle ear infection. The titanium implant is expected to last a lifetime while the external sound processor is expected to last 5 years. The total initial device cost is approximately $5,300 and the external sound processor costs approximately $3,500. Review of BAHA by the Medical Advisory Secretariat The Medical Advisory Secretariat’s review is a descriptive synthesis of findings from 36 research articles published between January 1990 and May 2002. Summary of Findings No randomized controlled studies were found. The evidence was derived from level 4 case series with relative small sample sizes (ranging from 30-188). The majority of the studies have follow-up periods of eight years or longer. All except one study were based on monaural BAHA implant on the side with the best bone conduction threshold. Safety Level 4 evidence showed that BAHA has been be implanted safely in adults and children with success rates of 90% or higher in most studies. No mortality or life threatening morbidity has been reported. Revision rates for tissue reduction or resiting were generally under 10% for adults but have been reported to be as high as 25% in pediatric studies. Adverse skin reaction around the skin penetration site was the most common complication reported. Most of these

  4. JAK2/IDH-mutant–driven myeloproliferative neoplasm is sensitive to combined targeted inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Anna Sophia; Somasundara, Amritha Varshini Hanasoge; Spitzer, Barbara; Intlekofer, Andrew M.; Ahn, Jihae; Shank, Kaitlyn; Rapaport, Franck T.; Patel, Minal A.; Papalexi, Efthymia; Shih, Alan H.; Chiu, April; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Akbay, Esra A.; Steadman, Mya; Nagaraja, Raj; Yen, Katharine; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Rampal, Raajit; Thompson, Craig B.

    2018-01-01

    Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) frequently progress to bone marrow failure or acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and mutations in epigenetic regulators such as the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) are associated with poor outcomes. Here, we showed that combined expression of Jak2V617F and mutant IDH1R132H or Idh2R140Q induces MPN progression, alters stem/progenitor cell function, and impairs differentiation in mice. Jak2V617F Idh2R140Q–mutant MPNs were sensitive to small-molecule inhibition of IDH. Combined inhibition of JAK2 and IDH2 normalized the stem and progenitor cell compartments in the murine model and reduced disease burden to a greater extent than was seen with JAK inhibition alone. In addition, combined JAK2 and IDH2 inhibitor treatment also reversed aberrant gene expression in MPN stem cells and reversed the metabolite perturbations induced by concurrent JAK2 and IDH2 mutations. Combined JAK2 and IDH2 inhibitor therapy also showed cooperative efficacy in cells from MPN patients with both JAK2mut and IDH2mut mutations. Taken together, these data suggest that combined JAK and IDH inhibition may offer a therapeutic advantage in this high-risk MPN subtype. PMID:29355841

  5. Bleomycin/interleukin-12 electrochemogenetherapy for treating naturally occurring spontaneous neoplasms in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S D; Fulmer, A; Buckholz, J; Zhang, B; Cutrera, J; Shiomitsu, K; Li, S

    2010-08-01

    On the basis of superior outcomes from electrochemogenetherapy (ECGT) compared with electrochemotherapy in mice, we determined the efficacy of ECGT applied to spontaneous canine neoplasms. Intralesional bleomycin (BLM) and feline interleukin-12 DNA injection combined with translesional electroporation resulted in complete cure of two recurrent World Health Organization stage T(2b)N(0)M(0) oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and one T(2)N(0)M(0) acanthomatous ameloblastoma. Three remaining dogs, which had no other treatment options, had partial responses to ECGT; one had mandibular T(3b)N(2b)M(1) melanoma with pulmonary and lymph node metastases; one had cubital T(3)N(0)M(1) histiocytic sarcoma with spleen metastases; and one had soft palate T(3)N(0)M(0) fibrosarcoma. The melanoma dog had decrease in the size of the primary tumor before recrudescence and euthanasia. The histiocytic sarcoma dog had resolution of the primary tumor, but was euthanized because of metastases 4 months after the only treatment. The dog with T(3)N(0)M(0) fibrosarcoma had tumor regression with recrudescence. Treatment was associated with minimal side effects and was easy to perform, was associated with repair of bone lysis in cured dogs, improved quality of life for dogs with partial responses and extended overall survival time. ECGT seems to be a safe and resulted in complete responses in SCC and acanthomatous ameloblastoma.

  6. Stromal cells expressing hedgehog-interacting protein regulate the proliferation of myeloid neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobune, M; Iyama, S; Kikuchi, S; Horiguchi, H; Sato, T; Murase, K; Kawano, Y; Takada, K; Ono, K; Kamihara, Y; Hayashi, T; Miyanishi, K; Sato, Y; Takimoto, R; Kato, J

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant reactivation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been described in a wide variety of human cancers including cancer stem cells. However, involvement of the Hh-signaling system in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment during the development of myeloid neoplasms is unknown. In this study, we assessed the expression of Hh-related genes in primary human CD34 + cells, CD34 + blastic cells and BM stromal cells. Both Indian Hh (Ihh) and its signal transducer, smoothened (SMO), were expressed in CD34 + acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-derived cells. However, Ihh expression was relatively low in BM stromal cells. Remarkably, expression of the intrinsic Hh-signaling inhibitor, human Hh-interacting protein (HHIP) in AML/MDS-derived stromal cells was markedly lower than in healthy donor-derived stromal cells. Moreover, HHIP expression levels in BM stromal cells highly correlated with their supporting activity for SMO + leukemic cells. Knockdown of HHIP gene in stromal cells increased their supporting activity although control cells marginally supported SMO + leukemic cell proliferation. The demethylating agent, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine rescued HHIP expression via demethylation of HHIP gene and reduced the leukemic cell-supporting activity of AML/MDS-derived stromal cells. This indicates that suppression of stromal HHIP could be associated with the proliferation of AML/MDS cells

  7. Intra-abdominal migration of a k-wire during revision total hip arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin T. Hug, MD; Navin D. Fernando, MD, FRCS(C)

    2017-01-01

    Revision total hip arthroplasty in the setting of severe acetabular bone loss is a challenging problem that is becoming more common. Kirschner wires are often used during acetabular revision for temporary fixation of trial components. We describe an intraoperative migration of a Kirschner wire through the acetabulum into the peritoneal cavity, requiring acute laparoscopic removal.

  8. Total femoral allograft with simultaneous revision total hip and knee arthroplasty: 18 year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan N. Harris, DO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Massive allograft can be a useful option in revision total joint arthroplasty for treatment of significant bone loss. In rare cases, revision hip and knee arthroplasty procedures can be performed simultaneously using massive allograft-prosthetic composites. We present an 18 year follow up of a patient who received a simultaneous revision hip and knee total femoral allograft and discuss recent literature as it relates to this case.

  9. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm presenting as leukemia without cutaneous involvement in a 25 years male patient: Unusual presentation of a rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaira Qayoom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN is a rare, aggressive neoplasm classified under "acute myeloid leukemia (AML and related precursor neoplasm" by current WHO classification. Elderly male are commonly affected with cutaneous lesion being the hallmark of disease presentation. The disease progresses rapidly and sooner or later involves bone marrow and peripheral blood. Cases presenting primarily as leukemia without cutaneous involvement is a rarity with about 29 cases reported in literature till date. Characteristic immunophenotype of CD4 + /CD56 +/− cells expressing antigens associated with plasmacytoid dendritic cells like CD123, TCL1, BDCA2/CD303, cutaneous lymphocyte-associated and interferon dependent molecule MxA, in absence of any other lineage specific marker confirms the diagnosis. The disease has a poor survival and no standardized therapeutic strategy in the current scenario. A case of 25-year-male presenting with leukemic BPDCN without cutaneous involvement is presented here, who was treated with AML like protocol followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but succumbed to the disease within 8 months of diagnosis. The present case is being first to be reported from India.

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood cells) are removed from the blood or bone marrow of the patient ( autologous transplant) or a donor ( allogeneic transplant) and are ... the patient's stem cells from the blood or bone marrow are used; or two autologous stem cell transplants followed by an autologous or ...

  11. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood cells) are removed from the blood or bone marrow of the patient ( autologous transplant) or a donor ( allogeneic transplant) and are ... the patient's stem cells from the blood or bone marrow are used; or two autologous stem cell transplants followed by an autologous or ...

  12. Loosening After Acetabular Revision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, Nicholas A.; Weiss, Stefan; Klotz, Matthias C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The best method of revision acetabular arthroplasty remains unclear. Consequently, we reviewed the literature on the treatment of revision acetabular arthroplasty using revision rings (1541 cases; mean follow-up (FU) 5.7 years) and Trabecular Metal, or TM, implants (1959 cases; mean FU 3.7 years......) to determine if a difference with regard to revision failure could be determined. Failure rates of the respective implants were compared statistically using a logistic regression model with adjustment for discrepancies in FU time. In our study, TM shows statistically significant decreased loosening rates...... relative to revision rings for all grades including severe acetabular defects and pelvic discontinuity. The severe defects appear to benefit the most from TM....

  13. Obesity and related risk of myeloproliferative neoplasms among israeli adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiba, Adi; Duek, Adrian; Afek, Arnon; Derazne, Estela; Leiba, Merav

    2017-07-01

    Obesity has been associated with various malignancies, but a clear association between overweight and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) has not been established. This study assessed the association between adolescent obesity and future risk for MPN. Data on 2,516,256 Israeli adolescents, who underwent a compulsory general health examination at ages 16 to 19, between 1967 and 2011, were linked to the National Cancer Registry in this nationwide, population-based cohort study. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for MPN associated with BMI measured at adolescence. The mean follow-up of 19.86 ± 12.15 years reflected 49,977,521 person years, during which 433 examinees developed MPN, primarily chronic myelogenous leukemia, polycythemia vera, and essential thrombocythemia. Obesity (BMI ≥ 95th percentile) in adolescence significantly predicted increased risk of MPN with HR (adjusted for sex) of 1.81 (95% confidence interval 1.13-2.92, P = 0.014). Adolescent obesity might be related to an increased incidence of myeloproliferative neoplasms. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  14. [The lymph nodes imprint for the diagnosis of lymphoid neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peniche-Alvarado, Carolina; Ramos-Peñafiel, Christian Omar; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos; Romero-Guadarrama, Mónica; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Rozen-Fuller, Etta; Martínez-Tovar, Adolfo; Collazo-Jaloma, Juan; Mendoza-García, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    lymphoma is the most frequent lymphoid neoplasm in our country. Its diagnosis is based on histopathological findings. The lymph node imprint has been used for more than 40 years. The aim was to establish the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of lymph node imprint and estimate the inter-observer rate. we did an observational, retrospective, prolective study, based on the lymph node imprint obtained by excisional biopsies over a period of 6 years. the inclusion criteria was met on 199 samples, 27.1 % were considered as reactive (n = 54), 16.1 % Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 32), 40.2 % (n = 80) non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 16.6 % (n = 33) as metastatic carcinoma. Comparing with the final histopathology report, the sensitivity and specificity of lymph node imprint were 88 % (0.81-0.95) and 64 % (0.55-0.73) respectively, the positive predictive value was 67 % (0.59-0.76) and the negative predictive value was 86 % (0.79-0.94). The interobserver kappa index was 0.467. the lymph node imprint remains as a useful tool for the diagnosis of lymphoid neoplasm. The agreement between observers was acceptable.

  15. Altered glutamyl-aminopeptidase activity and expression in renal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Lorena; Larrinaga, Gorka; Sanz, Begoña; Perez, Itxaro; Sánchez, Clara E; Cándenas, M Luz; Pinto, Francisco M; Gil, Javier; Casis, Luis; López, José I

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the knowledge of renal neoplasms have demonstrated the implication of several proteases in their genesis, growth and dissemination. Glutamyl-aminopeptidase (GAP) (EC. 3.4.11.7) is a zinc metallopeptidase with angiotensinase activity highly expressed in kidney tissues and its expression and activity have been associated wtih tumour development. In this prospective study, GAP spectrofluorometric activity and immunohistochemical expression were analysed in clear-cell (CCRCC), papillary (PRCC) and chromophobe (ChRCC) renal cell carcinomas, and in renal oncocytoma (RO). Data obtained in tumour tissue were compared with those from the surrounding uninvolved kidney tissue. In CCRCC, classic pathological parameters such as grade, stage and tumour size were stratified following GAP data and analyzed for 5-year survival. GAP activity in both the membrane-bound and soluble fractions was sharply decreased and its immunohistochemical expression showed mild staining in the four histological types of renal tumours. Soluble and membrane-bound GAP activities correlated with tumour grade and size in CCRCCs. This study suggests a role for GAP in the neoplastic development of renal tumours and provides additional data for considering the activity and expression of this enzyme of interest in the diagnosis and prognosis of renal neoplasms

  16. Transmission of a common intestinal neoplasm in zebrafish by cohabitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, A R; Watral, V; Sichel, S; Spagnoli, S; Banse, A V; Mittge, E; Sharpton, T J; Guillemin, K; Kent, M L

    2017-10-11

    Intestinal neoplasms are common in zebrafish (Danio rerio) research facilities. These tumours are most often seen in older fish and are classified as small cell carcinomas or adenocarcinomas. Affected fish populations always contain subpopulations with preneoplastic lesions, characterized by epithelial hyperplasia or inflammation. Previous observations indicated that these tumours are unlikely caused by diet, water quality or genetic background, suggesting an infectious aetiology. We performed five transmission experiments by exposure of naïve fish to affected donor fish by cohabitation or exposure to tank effluent water. Intestinal lesions were observed in recipient fish in all exposure groups, including transmissions from previous recipient fish, and moribund fish exhibited a higher prevalence of neoplasms. We found a single 16S rRNA sequence, most similar to Mycoplasma penetrans, to be highly enriched in the donors and exposed recipients compared to unexposed control fish. We further tracked the presence of the Mycoplasma sp. using a targeted PCR test on individual dissected intestines or faeces or tank faeces. Original donor and exposed fish populations were positive for Mycoplasma, while corresponding unexposed control fish were negative. This study indicates an infectious aetiology for these transmissible tumours of zebrafish and suggests a possible candidate agent of a Mycoplasma species. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Dermal Squamomelanocytic Tumor: Neoplasm of Uncertain Biological Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirsad Dorić

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of exceedingly rare cutaneous neoplasm with histological features of malignancy and uncertain biological potential. The nodular, darkly pigmented facial tumor with central exulceration, size 12x10x7 mm, of the skin 61-year-old man preauricular left was completely exised.Histologically tumor consists of atypical squamous cells, which express signs of moderate to significant pleomorphism, mitotically active, with foci forming of parakeratotic horn cysts (“pearls”. Characteristically tumor also consists of large number of atypical melanocytes with multifocal pattern, inserted between atypical squamous cells, and which contain large amount of dark brown pigment melanin. Immunohistochemically, squamous cells stain positively with keratin (CK116, melanocytes were stained with S -100 protein, HMB 45, and vimentin, but failed to stain with CK 116.To our knowledge this is the sixth reported case in world literature. The follow-up time of four years no evidence of recurrence or metastasis, similar all reported cases, but it is too short period in estimation to guarantee a benign course. However, it appears that this group of neoplasm may have different prognosis from pure squamous carcinoma or malignant melanoma.

  18. Endoscopic approach for a laryngeal neoplasm in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Maia Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal and tracheal tumors are rare in pets; some piece of information on their disease behavior, therapy and evolution are limited. Neoplasms in this area are a diagnostic challenge. In many cases, they can be biopsied and excised using endoscopic instruments, but there is no report of this in canines. The goal of this study is to report a successful case of a laryngeal neoplasm removal through endoscopy. A head and neck radiogram revealed a mass in the laryngeal lumen protruding into the trachea. The patient then underwent an endoscopy to confirm the radiographic diagnosis and to surgically remove the tumor. The histopathological diagnosis was poorly differentiated carcinoma. The most appropriate treatment for laryngeal tumors is the resection of the submucosa or a partial laryngectomy however, partial and total laryngectomies are associated with many postoperative complications. In contrast, the endoscopic approach allows for highly magnified visualization of the lesion in situ, which facilitates the surgical removal of the mass through videosurgery. With little manipulation of the affected area, the chances of postoperative complications are reduced, leading to a more rapid recovery.

  19. [Cytopathological alterations and risk factors for uterine cervical neoplasm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Simone Cristina Castanho Sabaini; Prates, Letícia; Carvalho, Maria Dalva de Barros; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Pelloso, Sandra Marisa

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify the occurrence of citopathological alterations and risk factors of Uterine Cervical Neoplasm in women attended by SUS--the Public Healthcare System--in a district situated in the North of Paraná State, Brazil from 2001 to 2006. It was a descriptive transversal observational study. The data collection consisted in collection of test results from medical records and interviews. It was achieved 6.356 tests and, 1.02% (65) of the women examined presented alterations. From the tests made 4.869 (70,8%) were from women aged between 25 and 59 years. And 38,5% of the tests presented Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasm (CIN) I, 32,3% CIN II, 18,5% CIN I and Human Papiloma Virus (HPV). It was interviewed 25 women from the total sample. Most of them presented a risk factor as: smoking habits, sexually transmitted diseases, use of hormonal contraceptive, number of sexual partners, early sexual intercourse. This study concludes that is required educative and more effective actions in order to reduce the alterations, meanly among teenagers.

  20. Classifying the evolutionary and ecological features of neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maley, Carlo C.; Aktipis, Athena; Graham, Trevor A.; Sottoriva, Andrea; Boddy, Amy M.; Janiszewska, Michalina; Silva, Ariosto S.; Gerlinger, Marco; Yuan, Yinyin; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Anderson, Karen S.; Gatenby, Robert; Swanton, Charles; Posada, David; Wu, Chung-I; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Hwang, E. Shelley; Polyak, Kornelia; Anderson, Alexander R. A.; Brown, Joel S.; Greaves, Mel; Shibata, Darryl

    2018-01-01

    Neoplasms change over time through a process of cell-level evolution, driven by genetic and epigenetic alterations. However, the ecology of the microenvironment of a neoplastic cell determines which changes provide adaptive benefits. There is widespread recognition of the importance of these evolutionary and ecological processes in cancer, but to date, no system has been proposed for drawing clinically relevant distinctions between how different tumours are evolving. On the basis of a consensus conference of experts in the fields of cancer evolution and cancer ecology, we propose a framework for classifying tumours that is based on four relevant components. These are the diversity of neoplastic cells (intratumoural heterogeneity) and changes over time in that diversity, which make up an evolutionary index (Evo-index), as well as the hazards to neoplastic cell survival and the resources available to neoplastic cells, which make up an ecological index (Eco-index). We review evidence demonstrating the importance of each of these factors and describe multiple methods that can be used to measure them. Development of this classification system holds promise for enabling clinicians to personalize optimal interventions based on the evolvability of the patient’s tumour. The Evo- and Eco-indices provide a common lexicon for communicating about how neoplasms change in response to interventions, with potential implications for clinical trials, personalized medicine and basic cancer research. PMID:28912577

  1. Bilateral aneurysmal bone cyst of the mandible: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal HK Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC, usually considered a reactive lesion of bone rather than a cyst or true neoplasm, is believed to represent an exaggerated, localized, proliferative response of vascular tissue in bone. The case described here is of a 40-year-old female patient presenting with gradually increasing bilateral mandibular swelling of more than 1 year duration. The radiographic and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images showed bilateral, multilocular expansile radiolucent lesions in the mandible in the premolar-molar region. On considering the blood aspirate obtained and the histopathologic findings, the patient was diagnosed with bilateral aneurysmal bone cysts in the mandible, with probable pre-existing bone lesion.

  2. Giant cell tumor of the metatarsal bone: case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites Filho, Paulo R.; Escuissato, Dante L.; Gasparetto, Taisa P. Davaus; Sakamoto, Danielle; Ioshii, Sergio; Marchiori, Edson

    2007-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone is a rare neoplasm and account for 5% of all primary bone tumors. It is common in the knee and wrist, but rare in the small bones of the foot. The authors report a 32-year old male patient presented with a four-month history of right foot pain. Plain radiographs showed an expansive lytic lesion involving the first right metatarsal bone. Computed tomography scan demonstrated a radiolucent lesion with well-defined borders. Biopsy was performed and the histological diagnostic was giant cell tumor. The authors emphasize the correlation between the imaging and histological findings. (author)

  3. Guided bone regeneration following surgical treatment of a rare variant of Pindborg tumor: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Ronaldo C; Oliveira, Marina R; Silva, Amanda C; Ferreira, Delano H; Almeida, Oslei P

    2014-03-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor is a benign neoplasm, but its local destructive potential may lead to the formation of major bone defects. Microscopically, there are some histological variants. Among them, we highlight the clear cell variant due to its more aggressive behavior and a higher incidence of relapse. In this context, it is pertinent to describe the clear cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. Despite the large bone defect formed in the posterior region of the mandible, conservative treatment associated with guided bone regeneration assured complete bone formation and the absence of recurrence in an 8-year follow-up period.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of gentamicin eluted from a regenerating bone graft substitute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stravinskas, M; Horstmann, P; Ferguson, J

    2016-01-01

    in combination with bone regeneration. Gentamicin release was measured in four setups: 1) in vitro elution in Ringer's solution; 2) local elution in patients treated for trochanteric hip fractures or uncemented hip revisions; 3) local elution in patients treated with a bone tumour resection; and 4) local elution...

  5. [Modified Exeter technique in revision hip surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomasson, E; Guingand, O; Terracher, R; Mazel, C

    2008-06-01

    The Exeter technique opened new perspectives for the treatment of femoral bone stock loss in revision hip arthroplasty. Implant migration in the cement sheath is, however, a frequent finding. According to the promoters of the technique, this would favor transformation of the allograft into living bone. For others it is a worrisome problem since it alters the heterogeneous cement sheath, leading to loosening and final surgical revision, with an incidence up to 20%. We propose an analysis of the mid-term results of the modified Exeter technique with the objective of cementing the distal part of the implant directly into the recipient bone in order to achieve satisfactory primary stability. The purpose of this work was to analyze the consequences of this method on the long-term evolution of the allograft. After preparing the femur, a specific gun is filled with allograph dough obtained from frozen femoral heads fragmented with an acetabular reamer. The Mersilene mesh enables the deposit of a tube of graft material at the desired level. The implant is sealed after impaction of the graft to enable direct distal cementing in contact with the recipient bone. Partial weight bearing is allowed as early as the fifth day and increased progressively to complete weight bearing at three months. Forty-five patients (46 hips) were treated between June 1996 and January 2002. Six patients were not retained for analysis due to insufficient follow-up. For three patients, graft outcome could not be properly assessed due to a major complication. In addition, two patients died and one was lost to follow-up. In all 39 patients (40 hips) were analyzed at mean follow-up of 84 months (range 48-110). There were no cases of revision for femoral loosening. Femoral bone loss was mainly moderate to severe type II and III hips (Sofcot classification) but limited in height (no grade IV in the Endo-Klinik classification). Clinical outcome was excellent in 13 hips, good in 16, fair in nine and poor

  6. A simple technique to remove well-fixed acetabular components in revision of total hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqi Zhang, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Removing well-fixed acetabular components can be a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons in revision of total hip arthroplasty. Acetabular bone loss, fracture, and other complications occurred in extracting implants may result in instability and fail of revision. Thus, instruments are developed to avoid such complications. We report a simple technique by drilling a tunnel on the superolateral quadrant of acetabulum and using an offset staff to remove acetabular components without many matching units. The procedure of removing well-fixed acetabular components is a simple, efficient, inexpensive, bone stock preserving technique. Keywords: Total hip arthroplasty, Acetabular revision, Removing acetabular components

  7. Molecular mechanisms associated with leukemic transformation of MPL-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Philip A; Ortmann, Christina A; Stegelmann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    , was not detected in 172 patients with a myeloproliferative neoplasm. In patients with a prior MPL W515L-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasm, leukemic transformation was accompanied by MPL-mutant leukemic blasts, was seen in the absence of prior cytoreductive therapy and often involved loss of wild-type MPL...

  8. Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis as a risk factor for colonic neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Izumi; Kato, Jun; Tamai, Hideyuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Maekita, Takao; Yoshimura, Noriko; Ichinose, Masao

    2014-01-01

    To summarize the current views and insights on associations between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related chronic gastritis and colorectal neoplasm, we reviewed recent studies to clarify whether H. pylori infection/H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal neoplasm. Recent studies based on large databases with careful control for confounding variables have clearly demonstrated an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm associated with H. pylori infection. The correlation between H. pylori-related chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and colorectal neoplasm has only been examined in a limited number of studies. A recent large study using a national histopathological database, and our study based on the stage of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis as determined by serum levels of H. pylori antibody titer and pepsinogen, indicated that H. pylori-related CAG confers an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm, and more extensive atrophic gastritis will probably be associated with even higher risk of neoplasm. In addition, our study suggested that the activity of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is correlated with colorectal neoplasm risk. H. pylori-related chronic gastritis could be involved in an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm that appears to be enhanced by the progression of gastric atrophy and the presence of active inflammation. PMID:24587623

  9. Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis as a risk factor for colonic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Izumi; Kato, Jun; Tamai, Hideyuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Maekita, Takao; Yoshimura, Noriko; Ichinose, Masao

    2014-02-14

    To summarize the current views and insights on associations between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related chronic gastritis and colorectal neoplasm, we reviewed recent studies to clarify whether H. pylori infection/H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal neoplasm. Recent studies based on large databases with careful control for confounding variables have clearly demonstrated an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm associated with H. pylori infection. The correlation between H. pylori-related chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and colorectal neoplasm has only been examined in a limited number of studies. A recent large study using a national histopathological database, and our study based on the stage of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis as determined by serum levels of H. pylori antibody titer and pepsinogen, indicated that H. pylori-related CAG confers an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm, and more extensive atrophic gastritis will probably be associated with even higher risk of neoplasm. In addition, our study suggested that the activity of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is correlated with colorectal neoplasm risk. H. pylori-related chronic gastritis could be involved in an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm that appears to be enhanced by the progression of gastric atrophy and the presence of active inflammation.

  10. Hürthle Cell Neoplasms of Thyroid in South-Western Region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Thyroid Hürthle cell neoplasm (THCN) is relatively rare. OBJECTIVE: To describe the presentation, diagnostic approach and management of THCN in our institution. METHODS: This was a retrospective chart review of all thyroid Hürthle cell neoplasms diagnosed at Aseer Central Hospital (ACH), Saudi ...

  11. Giant solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura: a rare but usually benign intrathoracic neoplasm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodtger, Uffe; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Skov, Birgit Guldhammer

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low forced expiratory volume (FEV(1)) and low performance status usually preclude surgical treatment of lung neoplasms. Earlier case reports have suggested that curative, safe surgery is possible in extrapulmonal intrathoracic neoplasms. METHODS: A case report of an 83-year-old women ...

  12. Interferon-alpha in the treatment of Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch

    2011-01-01

    The Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms encompass essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). A major break-through in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these neoplasms occurred in 2005 by the discovery of the JAK2 V617F...

  13. Classification of types of intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas: a consensus study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furukawa, Toru; Klöppel, Günter; Volkan Adsay, N.; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Horii, Akira; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kato, Yo; Klimstra, David S.; Longnecker, Daniel S.; Lüttges, Jutta; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Shimizu, Michio; Sunamura, Makoto; Suriawinata, Arief; Takaori, Kyoichi; Yonezawa, Suguru

    2005-01-01

    Now that more than two decades have passed since the first reports of intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), it has become clear that IPMN consists of a spectrum of neoplasms with both morphological and immunohistochemical variations. At a meeting of international experts on pancreatic

  14. [Incidence of haematological neoplasms in Castilla y León, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, José Antonio; Vázquez, Lourdes; Ramos, Fernando; Cuevas, Beatriz; Martín, Alejandro; Smucler, Alicia; Guerola, Dulce Nombre; Cantalapiedra, Alberto; Alonso, José María; Fernández, Silvia; Díez, Eva; Rodríguez, María Jesús; Calmuntia, María José; Aguilar, Carlos; Sierra, Magdalena; Gracia, José Antonio; Cebeira, María José; Cantalejo, Rosa

    2015-06-08

    We aimed to assess the incidence of haematological neoplasms (HNs) in Castilla y León (2,5 million inhabitants) and its distribution by age, gender and histological type. The epidemiological profile based on the described variables of the 10,943 HNs diagnosed during a 10-years period was analyzed, compared with other studies. The overall age-adjusted incidence was 29.4 cases/10(5) inhabitants-year, with some geographical differences. The mean age was 67.3 years, with a turning point between the 6th-7th decades of life from which there was a very significant increase of incidence. Two relevant facts where simultaneous with advancing age: decreased lymphoid neoplasms incidence and increased low degree neoplasms incidence. Lymphoid low degree neoplasms accounted for half of the registered processes, showed the greatest preference for male and reached the mode before the rest of neoplasms. Myeloid neoplasms incidence (9.5) was higher than that reported in other European registries, specially compared to southern European countries, opposite to lymphoid neoplasms incidence (20.0). A higher myeloid neoplasms incidence and lower lymphoid one than expected was observed. The turning point of incidence is between the 6th-7th decades of life, with a preference for male that decreases with age. There is an increased incidence of HNs in the area where a higher density of potentially polluting facilities is concentrated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Uptodate in the assessment and management of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliari, D; Saviano, A; Serricchio, M L; Dal Lago, A A; Brizi, M G; Lanza, F; Manfredi, R; Gasbarrini, A; Attili, F

    2017-06-01

    Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms (IPMNs) are the most common cystic tumors of the pancreas and are considered premalignant lesions. IPMNs are characterized by the papillary growth of the ductal epithelium with rich mucin production, which is responsible for cystic segmental or diffuse dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) and/or its branches. According to the different involvement of pancreatic duct system, IPMNs are divided into main duct type (MD-IPMN), branch duct type (BD-IPMN), and mixed type (MT-IPMN). IPMNs may be incidentally discovered in asymptomatic patients, particularly in those with BD-IPMNs, when imaging studies are performed for unrelated indications. The increase in their frequency may reflect the combined effects of new diagnostic techniques, the improvement of radiologic exams and progress in the recognition of the pathology. MD-IPMNs present a higher risk of malignant progression than BD-IPMNs; as a consequence, all the guidelines strictly suggest the need of surgery for MD- and MT- IPMNs with MPD > 10 mm, while the management of BD-IPMNs is still controversial and depends on several cysts and patients features. The choice between non-operative and surgical management depends on the distinction between benign and invasive IPMN forms, assessment of malignancy risk, patient's wellness and its preferences. This manuscript revises the different guidelines for the management of IPMNs that have been published in different world countries: the international (Sendai 2006 and Fukuoka 2012), the 2013 European, the 2014 Italian, and finally the 2015 American guidelines. In summary, this review will integrate the recent insights in the combination of diagnostic techniques, such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), pathology classification, and management of IPMNs.

  16. Perforated colorectal neoplasms: Correlation of clinical, barium, and CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulnick, D.H.; Megibow, A.J.; Gordon, R.; Balthazar, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Findings on clinical, barium enema, and CT examinations in 24 patients with perforated colorectal neoplasms were retrospectively reviewed. In 12 patients with fever and leukocytosis, the clinical diagnoses were diverticulitis (n=8), appendicitis (n=2), pelvic inflammatory disease (n=2), and perforation of a known carcinoma (n=1). In 12 nontoxic patients, the clinical diagnoses were malignancy (n=8), obstruction (n=3) and an abdominal mass (n=1). In 18 barium enema examinations, the radiologic impression was uncomplicated carcinoma (n=9), perforated carcinoma (n=6), and diverticulitis (n=3). Twenty-two CT examinations revealed pericolic inflammation in all cases and macroperforation in 12. The primary tumor was evident in 14 patients, liver metastases were found in six, and ascites was present in three. CT findings influenced the management of patients initially suspected of having inflammatory conditions

  17. Autopsy findings of malignant neoplasms treated with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Atsushi; Ito, Jun; Tatezawa, Takashi; Nishimura, Toshinobu; Niibe, Hideo.

    1984-01-01

    Autopsy findings in 26 cases of malignant neoplasms treated with radiation were analysed and following results were obtained. 1. Causes of death except for neoplastic extension were 58% (15/26) and infection was the single predominant cause of death (73% : 11/15) with 50% (4/8) in lung cancer. 2. Distant metastases were found in 73% (19/26). In 7 cases, no obvious metastasis was found before and after autopsy. On the other hand, the patients with metastases over 2 organs before autopsy revealed metastases in 82% (9/11) to the other organs at autopsy. 3. Radiation therapy was effective and the primary tumor disappeared completely in 71% (10/14) with curative irradiation. In metastatic lesions, tumor cells were almost disappeared with dosage over 40 Gy. (author)

  18. Multiple primary malignant neoplasms in breast cancer patients in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenker, J.G.; Levinsky, R.; Ohel, G.

    1984-01-01

    The data of an epidemiologic study of multiple primary malignant neoplasms in breast cancer patients in Israel are presented. During the 18-year period of the study 12,302 cases of breast carcinoma were diagnosed, and, of these, 984 patients (8%) had multiple primary malignant tumors. Forty-seven of these patients developed two multiple primary cancers. A significantly higher than expected incidence of second primary cancers occurred at the following five sites: the opposite breast, salivary glands, uterine corpus, ovary, and thyroid. Cancers of the stomach and gallbladder were fewer than expected. Treatment of the breast cancer by irradiation was associated with an increased risk of subsequent cancers of lung and hematopoietic system. The prognosis was mainly influenced by the site and malignancy of the second primary cancer. The incidence of multiple primary malignancies justifies a high level of alertness to this possibility in the follow-up of breast cancer patients

  19. Localization of gonadotropin binding sites in human ovarian neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, R.; Kitayama, S.; Yamoto, M.; Shima, K.; Ooshima, A.

    1989-01-01

    The binding of human luteinizing hormone and human follicle-stimulating hormone to ovarian tumor biopsy specimens from 29 patients was analyzed. The binding sites for human luteinizing hormone were demonstrated in one tumor of epithelial origin (mucinous cystadenoma) and in one of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor). The binding sites for human follicle-stimulating hormone were found in three tumors of epithelial origin (serous cystadenoma and mucinous cystadenoma) and in two of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor and theca-granulosa cell tumor). The surface-binding autoradiographic study revealed that the binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the stromal tissue. The results suggest that gonadotropic hormones may play a role in the growth and differentiation of a certain type of human ovarian neoplasms

  20. Thyroid neoplasms after radiation therapy for adolescent acne vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paloyan, E.; Lawrence, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    There is a potential hazard of thyroid cancer after exposure to external irradiation for the treatment of adolescent acne vulgaris. We noted a 60% incidence of thyroid carcinoma among 20 patients with such a history, who were operated on for thyroid nodules during a five-year period. Eighty-three percent of the patients with carcinoma had either a follicular or a mixed papillary-follicular carcinoma; 17% had a papillary carcinoma; 33% had regional node metastases; none had evidence of distant metastases. The interval between radiation exposure and thyroidectomy ranged from nine to 41 years. This association of thyroid neoplasms and a prior history of radiation for acne vulgaris may be coincidental and therefore remains to be proved by retrospective surveys of large numbers of treated patients with appropriate controls

  1. CT diagnosis of hyperdense intracranial neoplasms. Review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Reiichi; Ando, Kumiko; Tominaga, Satoru; Nakao, Norio; Ikeda, Jouta; Takemura, Yuriko; Morikawa, Tsutomu

    1999-01-01

    In contrast to typical astrocytic tumors that show hypodense areas on computed tomographic images, some intracranial tumors show hyperdense areas on CT images. The major reasons for hyperdensity on CT images are hypercellular lesions, intratumoral calcification, and intratumoral hemorrhage. Malignant lymphomas, germinomas, and medulloblastomas show homogenous hyperdensity on CT images because of their hypercellularity. Tumorous lesions such as subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, central neurocytomas, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas often present with hyperdense calcified lesions on CT images. Intratumoral hemorrhage also causes hyperdensity on CT images, and is often associated with metastatic brain tumors, glioblastomas, pituitary adenomas, and rarely with any of the other intracranial tumors. Although magnetic resonance imaging is now the major diagnostic tool for diseases of the central nervous system, the first imaging studies for patients with neurologic symptoms are still CT scans. Hyperdense areas on CT images are a clue to making an accurate diagnosis of intracranial neoplasms. (author)

  2. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  3. Katz's revisability paradox dissolved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, Allard; Verhaegh, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Quine's holistic empiricist account of scientific inquiry can be characterized by three constitutive principles: noncontradiction, universal revisability and pragmatic ordering. We show that these constitutive principles cannot be regarded as statements within a holistic empiricist's scientific

  4. Aggressive management of peritoneal carcinomatosis from mucinous appendiceal neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Frances; Mavanur, Arun; Sathaiah, Magesh; Steel, Jennifer; Lenzner, Diana; Ramalingam, Lekshmi; Holtzman, Matthew; Ahrendt, Steven; Pingpank, James; Zeh, Herbert J; Bartlett, David L; Choudry, Haroon A

    2012-05-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) in the setting of mucinous appendiceal neoplasms is characterized by the intraperitoneal accumulation of mucinous ascites and mucin-secreting epithelial cells that leads to progressive compression of intra-abdominal organs, morbidity, and eventual death. We assessed postoperative and oncologic outcomes after aggressive surgical management by experienced surgeons. We analyzed clinicopathologic, perioperative, and oncologic outcome data in 282 patients with PC from appendiceal adenocarcinomas between 2001 and 2010 from a prospective database. Kaplan–Meier survival curves and multivariate Cox-regression models were used to identify prognostic factors affecting oncologic outcomes. Adequate cytoreduction was achieved in 82% of patients (completeness of cytoreduction score (CC)-0: 49%; CC-1: 33%). Median simplified peritoneal cancer index (SPCI), operative time, and estimated blood loss were 14 (range, 0–21), 483.5 min (range, 46–1,402), and 800 ml (range, 0–14,000), respectively. Pathology assessment demonstrated high-grade tumors in 36% of patients and lymph node involvement in 23% of patients. Major postoperative morbidity occurred in 70 (25%) patients. Median overall survival was 6.72 years (95% confidence interval (CI), 4.17 years not reached), with 5 year overall survival probability of 52.7% (95% CI, 42.4, 62%). In a multivariate Cox-regression model, tumor grade, age, preoperative SPCI and chemo-naïve status at surgery were joint significant predictors of overall survival. Tumor grade, postoperative CC-score, prior chemotherapy, and preoperative SPCI were joint significant predictors of time to progression. Aggressive management of PC from mucinous appendiceal neoplasms, by experienced surgeons, to achieve complete cytoreduction provides long-term survival with low major morbidity.

  5. Active Surveillance for Renal Neoplasms with Oncocytic Features is Safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Patrick O; Jewett, Michael A S; Bhatt, Jaimin R; Evans, Andrew J; Timilsina, Narhari; Finelli, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Oncocytomas are benign tumors often diagnosed incidentally on imaging. Small case series have suggested that the growth kinetics of oncocytomas are similar to those of malignant renal tumors. Biopsy material may be insufficient to exclude a diagnosis of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. We evaluated and compared the growth rates of oncocytoma and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma to improve our understanding of their natural history. This was a single center, retrospective study of patients diagnosed with lesions suggestive of oncocytoma or chromophobe renal cell carcinoma between 2003 and 2014. The growth rates were estimated using a mixed effect linear model. Patient and lesion characteristics were tested using a similar model for association with growth rate. Of the 95 lesions (oncocytoma 81, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma 14) included in the analysis 98% were diagnosed on biopsy. The annual growth rate was 0.14 cm and 0.38 cm for oncocytoma (median followup 34 months) and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (median followup 25 months), respectively (p=0.5). Baseline lesion size was significantly associated with growth (p renal cell carcinomas (67%) followed up to the 3-year mark had grown. Of these, 8 underwent surgery (6 in the chromophobe renal cell carcinoma group). The initial diagnosis was confirmed in all. Overall 5 patients died, all of nonrenal related causes. Although the majority of oncocytic renal neoplasms will grow with time, surveillance appears to remain safe. Patients opting for this strategy should be made aware that a diagnosis of oncocytoma following biopsy is associated with some degree of uncertainty due to the difficulty of differentiating them from other oncocytic renal neoplasms. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms; Perkutane Thermoablation von Nierentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, J. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie/Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Passau (Germany); Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  7. Spectrum of Intestinal Neoplasms: A study of 400 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminder Singh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study is a five-year analysis of all the tumors of small and large intestine received in the Pathology Department of Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana. Methods: All the cases were grossly and microscopically examined and were staged according to Astler Coller Staging and classified and subtyped according to WHO classification. The important differences between the small and large intestine tumors were also analyzed. Results: There were 400 cases out of which 356 were in large intestine while 44 were in the small intestine. There were only 56 benign neoplasms while 344 were malignant tumors. Adenomas were the most common benign tumors while majority of malignant tumors were adenocarcinomas. Lymphomas, mesenchymal tumors, and carcinoid tumors were much more common in a small intestine as compared to large intestine. Majority of adenocarcinomas were located in the large intestine with most of them being moderately differentiated having Astler Coller Stage B II. Mucinous carcinomas had the worst prognosis as compared to adenocarcinomas. Anal canal had mainly squamous cell carcinomas. Conclusions: Tumors of large intestine were much commoner than of small intestine. There was a higher incidence of tumor in males with M:F ratio of 2.2:1. Mean age of presentation of benign tumor was younger, i.e., 32.6 years when compared to 54.5 years for malignant tumors. Tubular adenoma was the most common benign tumor and adenocarcinoma the commonest malignant neoplasm. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2015; 3(1.000: 19-23

  8. Tapered modular fluted titanium stems for femoral fixation in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambough, Jeffrey B; Mason, J Bohannon; Riesgo, Aldo M; Fehring, Thomas K

    2018-03-01

    Consensus regarding femoral stem fixation options in revision total knee arthroplasty remains controversial. Tapered, modular, fluted titanium (TMFT) stems have an excellent track record in total hip arthroplasty for their ability to provide axial and rotational stability in situations of compromised host bone. We present 3 successfully treated cases in which the Food & Drug Administration granted permission to use custom TMFT stems in situations of failed femoral fixation in multiple revised knees. These stems hold promise to achieve stable fixation in revision total knee arthroplasty where host metadiaphyseal bone is deficient. Implant manufactures should consider dedicating future resources to create adapters that can link existing successful TMFT stems currently used in hip arthroplasty to revision total knee components when host bone is severely compromised.

  9. Broken bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Broken bone URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ... following steps to reduce your risk of a broken bone: Wear protective ... pads. Create a safe home for young children. Place a gate at stairways ...

  10. Enumerating bone marrow blasts from nonerythroid cellularity improves outcome prediction in myelodysplastic syndromes and permits a better definition of the intermediate risk category of the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Xavier; Arenillas, Leonor; Luño, Elisa; Senent, Leonor; Arnan, Montserrat; Ramos, Fernando; Pedro, Carme; Tormo, Mar; Montoro, Julia; Díez-Campelo, María; Blanco, María Laura; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Xicoy, Blanca; Bonanad, Santiago; Jerez, Andrés; Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Ferrer, Ana; Sanz, Guillermo F; Florensa, Lourdes

    2017-07-01

    The Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) has been recognized as the score with the best outcome prediction capability in MDS, but this brought new concerns about the accurate prognostication of patients classified into the intermediate risk category. The correct enumeration of blasts is essential in prognostication of MDS. Recent data evidenced that considering blasts from nonerythroid cellularity (NECs) improves outcome prediction in the context of IPSS and WHO classification. We assessed the percentage of blasts from total nucleated cells (TNCs) and NECs in 3924 MDS patients from the GESMD, 498 of whom were MDS with erythroid predominance (MDS-E). We assessed if calculating IPSS-R by enumerating blasts from NECs improves prognostication of MDS. Twenty-four percent of patients classified into the intermediate category were reclassified into higher-risk categories and showed shorter overall survival (OS) and time to AML evolution than those who remained into the intermediate one. Likewise, a better distribution of patients was observed, since lower-risk patients showed longer survivals than previously whereas higher-risk ones maintained the outcome expected in this poor prognostic group (median OS risk of dying with AML. Regarding MDS-E, 51% patients classified into the intermediate category were reclassified into higher-risk ones and showed shorter OS and time to AML. In this subgroup of MDS, IPSS-R was capable of splitting our series in five groups with significant differences in OS only when blasts were assessed from NECs. In conclusion, our easy-applicable approach improves prognostic assessment of MDS patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. File list: InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Input control Neural Nerve Sheath Neopl...asms http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  12. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Input control Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Input control Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  19. Cement-in-cement femoral component revision in the multiply revised total hip arthroplasty: results with a minimum follow-up of five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandiford, N A; Jameson, S S; Wilson, M J; Hubble, M J W; Timperley, A J; Howell, J R

    2017-02-01

    We present the clinical and radiological results at a minimum follow-up of five years for patients who have undergone multiple cement-in-cement revisions of their femoral component at revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). We reviewed the outcome on a consecutive series of 24 patients (10 men, 14 women) (51 procedures) who underwent more than one cement-in-cement revision of the same femoral component. The mean age of the patients was 67.5 years (36 to 92) at final follow-up. Function was assessed using the original Harris hip score (HHS), Oxford Hip Score (OHS) and the Merle D'Aubigné Postel score (MDP). The mean length of follow-up was 81.7 months (64 to 240). A total of 41 isolated acetabular revisions were performed in which stem removal facilitated access to the acetabulum, six revisions were conducted for loosening of both components and two were isolated stem revisions (each of these patients had undergone at least two revisions). There was significant improvement in the OHS (p = 0.041), HHS (p = 0.019) and MDP (p = 0.042) scores at final follow-up There were no stem revisions for aseptic loosening. Survival of the femoral component was 91.9% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 71.5 to 97.9) at five years and 91.7% (95% CI 70 to 97) at ten years (number at risk 13), with stem revision for all causes as the endpoint. Cement-in-cement revision is a viable technique for performing multiple revisions of the well cemented femoral component during revision total hip arthroplasty at a minimum of five years follow-up. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:199-203. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  20. Bone loss following knee arthroplasty: potential treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasso, Michele; Beaufils, Philippe; Cerciello, Simone; Schiavone Panni, Alfredo

    2014-04-01

    The management of bone loss is a crucial aspect of the revision knee arthroplasty. Bone loss can hinder the correct positioning and alignment of the prosthetic components, and can prevent the achievement of a stable bone-implant interface. There is still controversy regarding the optimal management of knee periprosthetic bone loss, especially in large defects for which structural grafts, metal or tantalum augments, tantalum cones, porous metaphyseal sleeves, and special prostheses have been advocated. The aim of this review was to analyze all possible causes of bone loss and the most advanced strategies for managing bony deficiency within the knee joint reconstruction. Most significant and recent papers about the management of bone defects during revision knee arthroplasty were carefully analyzed and reviewed to report the most common causes of bone loss and the most effective strategies to manage them. Modular metal and tantalum augmentation showed to provide more stable and durable knee revisions compared to allografts, limited by complications such as graft failure, fracture and resorption. Moreover, modular augmentation may considerably shorten operative times with a potential decrease of complications, above all infection which has been frequently associated to the use of allografts. Modular augmentation may significantly reduce the need for allografting, whose complications appear to limit the long-term success of knee revisions.

  1. Cost of palliative radiation to the bone for patients with bone metastases secondary to breast or prostate cancer

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    Hess Gregory

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To estimate the costs (paid amounts of palliative radiation episodes of care (REOCs to the bone for patients with bone metastases secondary to breast or prostate cancer. Methods Claims-linked medical records from patients at 98 cancer treatment centers in 16 US states were analyzed. Inclusion criteria included a primary neoplasm of breast or prostate cancer with a secondary neoplasm of bone metastases; ≥2 visits to ≥1 radiation center during the study period (1 July 2008 through 31 December 2009 on or after the metastatic cancer diagnosis date; radiation therapy to ≥1 bone site; and ≥1 complete REOC as evidenced by a >30-day gap pre- and post-radiation therapy. Results The total number of REOCs was 220 for 207 breast cancer patients and 233 for 213 prostate cancer patients. In the main analysis (which excluded records with unpopulated costs the median number of fractions per a REOC for treatment of metastases was 10. Mean total radiation costs (i.e., radiation direct cost + cost of radiation-related procedures and visits per REOC were $7457 for patients with breast cancer and $7553 for patients with prostate cancer. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses excluding patients with unpopulated costs. Conclusions In the US, current use of radiation therapy for bone metastases is relatively costly and the use of multi-fraction schedules remains prevalent.

  2. Osteosarcoma of the maxillofacial bones in Kenyans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindia, M L; Guthua, S W; Awange, D O; Wakoli, K A

    1998-04-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a highly malignant tumour and is the most common primary neoplasm of bone; although rare, especially in the maxillofacial skeleton. This article presents 14 Kenyan cases of OS of the maxillofacial bones seen between January 1991 and July 1997: 11 in the mandible, two in the maxilla and one in the right zygomatic arch. Patients ranged in age from one week to 50 years (Mean = 29.7), with an equal gender distribution. While pain and rapid swelling were the commonest clinical features, the radiographic and histopathological characteristics were as varied as has been described elsewhere. Generally, effective management of most of the cases was poor due to late presentation for treatment.

  3. Increased risk of second malignant neoplasms in adolescents and young adults with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jean S; DuBois, Steven G; Coccia, Peter F; Bleyer, Archie; Olin, Rebecca L; Goldsby, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe the incidence and characteristics of secondary malignant neoplasms (SMNs) in adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors compared with those in younger and older cancer survivors. Children aged ≤ 14 years, AYAs aged 15 to 39, and older adults aged ≥ 40 years at the time of primary diagnosis who were reported as cancer survivors in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program between 1973 and 2011 were compared in this population-based analysis. The primary analysis was the risk that an SMN would occur ≥ 5 years after the original diagnosis for patients who had the more common AYA cancers (leukemia, lymphoma, testicular malignancy, ovarian malignancy, melanoma, and cancers of the thyroid, breast, soft tissue, or bone). The standardized incidence ratio (SIR), absolute excess risk (AER), and cumulative incidence of SMN for the selected cancers were assessed. The risk of SMN for the entire cohort also was analyzed. Of the 148,558 AYA survivors who were diagnosed with a selected cancer, 7384 developed an SMN 5 years after their original diagnosis. The SIRs (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) were 1.58 (95% CI, 1.55-1.62) for AYAs, 4.26 (95% CI, 3.77-4.80) for children, and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.09-1.11) for older adults, and the AERs were 22.9, 16.6, and 14.7, respectively. The cumulative incidence of SMN at 30 years was 13.9% for the AYA group. The most common SMNs in AYAs were breast cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, genital cancers, and melanoma. AYAs who had received radiation therapy had a higher cumulative incidence of SMN. AYAs who survive cancer for more than 5 years have a higher relative risk of SMN compared with the general population and have a higher absolute risk of SMN compared with younger or older cancer survivors. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  4. Acute Delayed or Late Infection of Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty Treated with Debridement/Antibiotic-loaded Cement Beads and Retention of the Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jun-Dong; Kim, In-Sung; Lee, Sang-Soo; Yoo, Je-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The treatment of infected revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) is very challenging due to retained revision prosthesis, poor bone stock and soft tissue condition derived from previous revision surgeries, and comorbidities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and short-term outcomes of aggressive debridement and use of antibiotic-loaded cement beads with retention of the prosthesis for acute delayed or late infection of revision THAs. Materials and Methods T...

  5. Diagnostic and therapeutic implications of genetic heterogeneity in myeloid neoplasms uncovered by comprehensive mutational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While growing use of comprehensive mutational analysis has led to the discovery of innumerable genetic alterations associated with various myeloid neoplasms, the under-recognized phenomenon of genetic heterogeneity within such neoplasms creates a potential for diagnostic confusion. Here, we describe two cases where expanded mutational testing led to amendment of an initial diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia with subsequent altered treatment of each patient. We demonstrate the power of comprehensive testing in ensuring appropriate classification of genetically heterogeneous neoplasms, and emphasize thoughtful analysis of molecular and genetic data as an essential component of diagnosis and management.

  6. Pitfalls in the staging of cancer of the major salivary gland neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Elliott R; Saindane, Amit M

    2013-02-01

    The major salivary glands consist of the parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands. Most neoplasms in other subsites in the head and neck are squamous cell carcinoma, but tumors of the salivary glands may be benign or malignant. Surgical treatment differs if the lesion is benign, and therefore preoperative fine needle aspiration is important in salivary neoplasms. The role of imaging is to attempt to determine histology, predict likelihood of a lesion being malignant, and report an imaging stage. This article reviews the various histologies, imaging features, and staging of major salivary gland neoplasms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm presenting as paraneoplastic small plaque para-psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyriac A Philips

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To present and discuss a novel association between branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and paraneoplastic parapsoriasis. We present the case of a middle-aged male presenting with skin lesions that were suggestive of parapsoriasis, resistant to treatment, and in whom a diagnosis of branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas was eventually made. A curative Whipple's surgery led to complete resolution of the skin lesions within 3 weeks. Paraneoplastic parapsoriasis in association with intraductal papillary mucinous pancreatic neoplasm has never been reported before.

  8. Branch Duct-type Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm Presenting as Paraneoplastic Small Plaque Para-psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Cyriac A.; Augustine, Philip; Kumar, Lijesh; Joseph, George; Mahadevan, Pushpa

    2018-01-01

    To present and discuss a novel association between branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and paraneoplastic parapsoriasis. We present the case of a middle-aged male presenting with skin lesions that were suggestive of parapsoriasis, resistant to treatment, and in whom a diagnosis of branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas was eventually made. A curative Whipple's surgery led to complete resolution of the skin lesions within 3 weeks. Paraneoplastic parapsoriasis in association with intraductal papillary mucinous pancreatic neoplasm has never been reported before. PMID:29441297

  9. CK13 in craniopharyngioma versus related odontogenic neoplasms and human enamel organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Sissy, N A; Rashad, N A

    1999-05-01

    The monoclonal antibody NCL-CK13 was studied in specimens of craniopharyngioma, ameloblastoma and calcifying odontogenic cyst neoplasms and the mandible and maxillae of normal human fetuses. There was a decrease in NCL-CK13 as the dental lamina developed, with a complete loss in the enamel organ. The neoplastic epithelia of the neoplasms revealed a clear phenotypic and immunohistochemical reactive relationship to the stratified embroyonic mucosa, away from the enamel organ. This suggests that these neoplasms might have their histogenesis from early stage epithelium, the oral part of the dental lamina or its remnants.

  10. [Bladder neoplasm in a patient with panarteritis nodosa treated with cyclophosphamide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanell, J; Gallego, O S; Bellmunt, J; Vicente, P; Morales, S; Solé, L A

    1992-05-01

    Cyclophosphamide is used both in the treatment of malignant and non-malignant diseases. Urinary neoplasms secondary to its use have been described. We discuss the case of a patient with panarteritis nodosa treated with cyclophosphamide during 63 months, with a total dose of 210 grams, and that showed a bladder neoplasm 8 years after beginning of the treatment. In patients receiving a total dose of cyclophosphamide over 85 grams, a follow-up of ten years minimum should be performed aimed to the early detection of secondary neoplasms.

  11. Branch Duct-type Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm Presenting as Paraneoplastic Small Plaque Para-psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Cyriac A; Augustine, Philip; Kumar, Lijesh; Joseph, George; Mahadevan, Pushpa

    2018-01-01

    To present and discuss a novel association between branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and paraneoplastic parapsoriasis. We present the case of a middle-aged male presenting with skin lesions that were suggestive of parapsoriasis, resistant to treatment, and in whom a diagnosis of branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas was eventually made. A curative Whipple's surgery led to complete resolution of the skin lesions within 3 weeks. Paraneoplastic parapsoriasis in association with intraductal papillary mucinous pancreatic neoplasm has never been reported before.

  12. Neoplasia hematodérmica CD4+ CD56+ en la infancia Hematodermic CD4+ CD56+ neoplasm in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica A. Rojas Bilbao

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available La neoplasia hematodérmica CD4+ CD56+ con fenotipo de célula dendrítica plasmocitoide es una rara y agresiva neoplasia recientemente reconocida por la WHO-EORTC classification. Afecta adultos de edad media y ancianos, siendo muy pocos los casos descriptos en niños. Presentamos el caso de una niña de 12 años con grave retraso mental, estigmas genéticos y múltiples lesiones cutáneas localizadas en miembros inferiores y superiores. Histológicamente se observó un infiltrado dérmico difuso de células pequeñas y medianas con expresión de CD4, CD56, CD43 y S100 así como de marcadores dendríticos plasmocitoides: CD 123 y BDCA-2 confirmados por citometría de flujo, sin compromiso de sangre periférica ni médula ósea. Cumpliendo dos semanas de tratamiento para leucemia linfoblástica aguda evolucionó con remisión clínica de las lesiones cutaneas.Hematodermic CD4+ CD56+ neoplasm with plasmacytoid dendritic cell phenotype is a rare and aggressive neoplasm recently recognized by the WHO-EORTC classification. It generally appears in elderly adults, exceptionally in childhood. We present a 12-year-old girl with severe mental retardation, genetic clinical features and multiple nodular cutaneous lesions on legs and arms. Histologically the nodules showed diffuse dermal infiltrate of medium and small cells and expression of CD4, CD56, CD43, S100 and plasmacytoid dendritic markers: CD123, BDCA-2 under flow cytometry study. Peripheral blood and bone marrow were not involved. Clinical remission of cutaneous lesions was observed after two weeks of acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy.

  13. [EVALUATION OF FIBULAR HEAD RESECTION IN PROSTHETIC REPLACEMENT FOR NEOPLASMS OF PROXIMAL TIBIA IN LIMB SALVAGE SURGERY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaobing; Ye, Zhaoming

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effects of fibular head resection in prosthetic replacement for neoplasms of the proximal tibia in limb salvage surgery. Between July 1999 and March 2013, 76 patients with neoplasms of the proximal tibia underwent tumor resection, prosthetic replacement, and gastrocnemius medial head flap transfer. Among them, 38 patients underwent fibular head resection (group A) and 38 underwent fibular head preservation (group B). There was no significant difference in gender, age, side, tumor classification and stage, and disease duration between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The complications and the position of the components were observed, and American society for bone tumors scoring system (MSTS93) was used to evaluate the joint function. All patients were followed up 12-150 months (mean, 87 months). Incision infection occurred in 1 patient (2.63%) of group A and 6 patients (15.79%) of group B, showing significant difference (χ2 = 3.934, P = 0.047). Necrosis of gastrocnemius medial head flap was found in 1 patient of group A and 2 patients of group B. Prosthetic loosening and instability of the knee were observed in 4 and 2 cases of group A and in 6 and 4 cases of group B, respectively. In groups A and B, there were 3 and 5 cases of local recurrence, 7 and 6 cases of distant metastasis, and 8 and 7 deaths, respectively. According to MSTS93, the results were excellent in 23 cases, good in 10 cases, fair in 3 cases, and poor in 2 cases, with an excellent and good rate of 86.84% in group A; the results were excellent in 21 cases, good in 11 cases, fair in 3 cases, and poor in 3 cases, with an excellent and good rate of 84.21% in group B; and no significant difference was found in the excellent and good rate between 2 groups (χ2 = 0.106, P = 0.744). Fibular head resection in prosthetic replacement for neoplasms of the proximal tibia in limb salvage surgery is beneficial to intra-operative tissue coverage, and it can reduce trauma by skin transplantation and related

  14. Pediatric adrenocortical neoplasms: can imaging reliably discriminate adenomas from carcinomas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynt, Kelsey A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Smith, Ethan A.; Strouse, Peter J.; Davenport, Matthew S.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Else, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature describing and comparing the imaging features of adrenocortical adenomas and carcinomas in children and adolescents. To document the CT and MRI features of adrenocortical neoplasms in a pediatric population and to determine whether imaging findings (other than metastatic disease) can distinguish adenomas from carcinomas. We searched institutional medical records to identify pediatric patients with adrenocortical neoplasms. Pre-treatment CT and MRI examinations were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus, and pertinent imaging findings were documented. We also recorded relevant histopathological, demographic, clinical follow-up and survival data. We used the Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test to compare parametric and nonparametric continuous data, and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses to evaluate the diagnostic performances of tumor diameter and volume for discriminating carcinoma from adenoma. A P-value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Among the adrenocortical lesions, 9 were adenomas, 15 were carcinomas, and 1 was of uncertain malignant potential. There were no differences in mean age, gender or sidedness between adenomas and carcinomas. Carcinomas were significantly larger than adenomas based on mean estimated volume (581 ml, range 16-2,101 vs. 54 ml, range 3-197 ml; P-value = 0.003; ROC area under the curve = 0.92) and mean maximum transverse plane diameter (9.9 cm, range 3.0-14.9 vs. 4.4 cm, range 1.9-8.2 cm; P-value = 0.0001; ROC area under the curve = 0.92). Carcinomas also were more heterogeneous than adenomas on post-contrast imaging (13/14 vs. 2/9; odds ratio [OR] = 45.5; P-value = 0.001). Six of 13 carcinomas and 1 of 8 adenomas contained calcification at CT (OR = 6.0; P-value = 0.17). Seven of 15 children with carcinomas exhibited metastatic disease at diagnosis, and three had inferior vena cava invasion. Median

  15. Pediatric adrenocortical neoplasms: can imaging reliably discriminate adenomas from carcinomas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynt, Kelsey A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Smith, Ethan A.; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Davenport, Matthew S.; Caoili, Elaine M. [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Else, Tobias [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-08-15

    There is a paucity of literature describing and comparing the imaging features of adrenocortical adenomas and carcinomas in children and adolescents. To document the CT and MRI features of adrenocortical neoplasms in a pediatric population and to determine whether imaging findings (other than metastatic disease) can distinguish adenomas from carcinomas. We searched institutional medical records to identify pediatric patients with adrenocortical neoplasms. Pre-treatment CT and MRI examinations were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus, and pertinent imaging findings were documented. We also recorded relevant histopathological, demographic, clinical follow-up and survival data. We used the Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test to compare parametric and nonparametric continuous data, and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses to evaluate the diagnostic performances of tumor diameter and volume for discriminating carcinoma from adenoma. A P-value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Among the adrenocortical lesions, 9 were adenomas, 15 were carcinomas, and 1 was of uncertain malignant potential. There were no differences in mean age, gender or sidedness between adenomas and carcinomas. Carcinomas were significantly larger than adenomas based on mean estimated volume (581 ml, range 16-2,101 vs. 54 ml, range 3-197 ml; P-value = 0.003; ROC area under the curve = 0.92) and mean maximum transverse plane diameter (9.9 cm, range 3.0-14.9 vs. 4.4 cm, range 1.9-8.2 cm; P-value = 0.0001; ROC area under the curve = 0.92). Carcinomas also were more heterogeneous than adenomas on post-contrast imaging (13/14 vs. 2/9; odds ratio [OR] = 45.5; P-value = 0.001). Six of 13 carcinomas and 1 of 8 adenomas contained calcification at CT (OR = 6.0; P-value = 0.17). Seven of 15 children with carcinomas exhibited metastatic disease at diagnosis, and three had inferior vena cava invasion. Median

  16. Mortalidade por neoplasmas em mulheres em idade reprodutiva - 15 a 49 anos - no estado de São Paulo, Brasil, de 1991 a 1995 Mortality owing to neoplasms in women during the reproductive age (15 to 49 years in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, from 1991 to 1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. HADDAD

    2001-09-01

    Classification of Diseases, 9 th revision, and estimates of the female population according to age groups were provided by the SEADE Foundation. Specific coefficients for 100 thousand women for each year as well as the medians of the coefficients related to 5 years, and the percentage of underlying causes of death by subgroups were calculated. RESULTS: In young women (15 to 29 years highest rates were found for the subgroup "Malignant neoplasm of lymphatic and hematopoiethic tissues", followed by the subgroup "Malignant neoplasm of bones, connective tissue, skin and breast". In women aged 30 to 49 years, the leading underlying causes of death were those included in the last subgroup, followed by the subgroups "Malignant neoplasm of genitourinary organs", "Malignant neoplasm of digestive organs and peritoneum", and "Malignant neoplasm of lymphatic and hematopoietic tissues". The highest specific rates of underlying causes of death for women aged 15-29 were myeloid and lymphoid leukemias, and for women aged 30-49 were in decreasing rank," breast cancer"; "uterine cervix cancer" and "not specified uterine part cancer"; "stomach cancer"; "tracheal, bronchial and lung cancer" and "ovarian and other uterine annexes". CONCLUSION: Preventive measures to eliminate or lower the risk factors exposure and to promote early diagnosis and prompt treatment of these neoplasms should be enhanced in order to avoid possible future pregnancy complications and to prolong survival of women of reproductive age.

  17. Bone Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... posts Join Mayo Clinic Connect Bone scan About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  18. Bone Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Body X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Bone Biopsy Sponsored by Please note ...

  19. Bone sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudry, P.

    2008-01-01

    Bone sarcomas are malignancies with peak incidence in adolescents and young adults. The most frequent are osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma/PNET, in an older adults are seen chondrosarcomas, other ones are rare. In general, biology of sarcomas is closely related to pediatric malignancies with fast growth, local aggressiveness, tendency to early hematogenic dissemination and chemo sensitivity. Diagnostics and treatment of bone sarcomas should be done in well experienced centres due to low incidence and broad issue of this topic. An interdisciplinary approach and staff education is essential in due care of patients with bone sarcoma. If these criteria are achieved, the cure rate is contemporary at 65 - 70 %, while some subpopulation of patients has chance for cure up to 90 %. Osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma/PNET are discussed below as types of most frequent bone sarcoma. (author)

  20. Bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Charlotte Ørsted; Hansen, Rikke Rie; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal conditions are common causes of chronic pain and there is an unmet medical need for improved treatment options. Bone pain is currently managed with disease modifying agents and/or analgesics depending on the condition. Disease modifying agents affect the underlying pathophysiology...... of the disease and reduce as a secondary effect bone pain. Antiresorptive and anabolic agents, such as bisphosphonates and intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34), respectively, have proven effective as pain relieving agents. Cathepsin K inhibitors and anti-sclerostin antibodies hold, due to their disease...... modifying effects, promise of a pain relieving effect. NSAIDs and opioids are widely employed in the treatment of bone pain. However, recent preclinical findings demonstrating a unique neuronal innervation of bone tissue and sprouting of sensory nerve fibers open for new treatment possibilities....

  1. Porous hydroxyapatite for artificial bone applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sopyan et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HA has been used clinically for many years. It has good biocompatibility in bone contact as its chemical composition is similar to that of bone material. Porous HA ceramics have found enormous use in biomedical applications including bone tissue regeneration, cell proliferation, and drug delivery. In bone tissue engineering it has been applied as filling material for bone defects and augmentation, artificial bone graft material, and prosthesis revision surgery. Its high surface area leads to excellent osteoconductivity and resorbability providing fast bone ingrowth. Porous HA can be produced by a number of methods including conversion of natural bones, ceramic foaming technique, polymeric sponge method, gel casting of foams, starch consolidation, microwave processing, slip casting, and electrophoretic deposition technique. Some of these methods have been combined to fabricate porous HA with improved properties. These combination methods have yielded some promising results. This paper discusses briefly fundamental aspects of porous HA for artificial bone applications as well as various techniques used to prepare porous HA. Some of our recent results on development of porous HA will be presented as well.

  2. Revision endoscopic sinonasal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillano, Pablo; Rubio, Fabián; Naser, Alfredo; Nazar, Rodolfo

    Endoscopic sinonasal surgery is the procedure of choice in the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis and sinonasal polyposis refractory to medical treatment, with high rates of success (76% to 97.5%). However, 2.5%-24% of those patients will require revision surgery (RESS). In this study, we present the clinical, anatomical, radiological and histological features of patients receiving RESS in our centre during a 3-year period. A retrospective review of clinical, anatomical, radiological and histopathological data of patients receiving revision endoscopic sinonasal surgery between 2012 and 2014 was carried out. From 299 surgery procedures performed, 27 (9%) were revision surgeries. The mean patient age was 46 years, with a male/female ratio of 1.4/1. The most frequent preoperative and postoperative diagnosis was chronic polypoid rhinosinusitis. The mean time since the previous surgery was 6.1 years, with 11.9 months of mean follow-up since that surgery. Stenotic antrostomy was found during revision in 81.5% of the patients and incomplete anterior ethmoidectomy and persistent uncinate process, in 59.3%. In radiology, 70.4% of patients had persistent anterior ethmoidal cells. Antrostomy or widening of antrostomy was performed in 96.3% of cases and anterior ethmoidectomy or completion of it was performed in 66.7%. Polyps, stenotic antrostomy and incomplete ethmoidectomy were the most frequent causes of revision surgery, in concordance with the procedures performed. The patients had long periods of time without follow-up between surgeries. Further investigation is necessary to generate measures to reduce the number of revision surgeries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  3. Two rare presentations of plasma cell neoplasm | Omoti | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) in a 50year old woman and another case of solitary plasmacytoma of bone (SPB) with myeloma in a 34year old young man is reported. Atypical features of the SPB with myeloma patient were: a) age of the patient; b) lack of typical features of multiple myeloma (renal failure, ...

  4. Pterygium: degeneration, exuberant wound healing or benign neoplasm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurbuanto Tradjutrisno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pterygium is a condition characterized by the encroachment of a fleshy triangle of conjunctival tissue into the cornea. Despite various studies, the pathogenesis of pterygium remains unclear. Chronic exposure to sun is the only factor of which the role has been clearly documented by epidemiologic and in vitro studies. Recent studies have provided data such as loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability, decreased apoptosis, increased growth factors, increased p53 expression, telomerase activity, and presence of oncogenic viruses, which support the concept that pterygia can be considered a neoplastic condition. Some of results are contradictory and some features were only found in a proportion of pterygia; this may be due to differences in methodology and study population, but may also be indicative of multiple causative factors. This implies that the pterygium should be viewed as a final common outcome of various etiological factors, such as geography and ethnicity, with ultraviolet radiation-induced damage as the main factor. Thus the pterygium remains an enigma, having the features of an exuberant growth but also those of a benign neoplasm. In this connection there is a need for a unifying theory capable of explaining all of the characteristics of the pterygium.

  5. Pterygium: degeneration, exuberant wound healing or benign neoplasm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurbuanto Tradjutrisno

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Pterygium is a condition characterized by the encroachment of a fleshy triangle of conjunctival tissue into the cornea. Despite various studies, the pathogenesis of pterygium remains unclear. Chronic exposure to sun is the only factor of which the role has been clearly documented by epidemiologic and in vitro studies. Recent studies have provided data such as loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability, decreased apoptosis, increased growth factors, increased p53 expression, telomerase activity, and presence of oncogenic viruses, which support the concept that pterygia can be considered a neoplastic condition. Some of results are contradictory and some features were only found in a proportion of pterygia; this may be due to differences in methodology and study population, but may also be indicative of multiple causative factors. This implies that the pterygium should be viewed as a final common outcome of various etiological factors, such as geography and ethnicity, with ultraviolet radiation-induced damage as the main factor. Thus the pterygium remains an enigma, having the features of an exuberant growth but also those of a benign neoplasm. In this connection there is a need for a unifying theory capable of explaining all of the characteristics of the pterygium.

  6. Current trend of malignant neoplasms among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tadao

    1984-01-01

    A survey was made on 7,589 admitted patients and 1,965 autopsy cases. The overall incidence of malignant neoplasms tended to decrease in the group exposed to atomic bomb within 2 km in autopsy cases and to increase in admitted patients. The incidence of pulmonary cancer tended to increase in both autopsy cases and admitted patients. The incidence of gastric cancer tended to increase up to 1975, and thereafter tended to decrease. The incidence of liver cancer tended to increase in both autopsy cases and admitted patients, which was marked in males. The incidence of leukemia was high in the group exposed to atomic bomb within 2 km in autopsy cases, and in the group within 1 km and the group which entered the city after the explosion in admitted patients. The incidence of malignant lymphoma tended to decrease, and the incidence of carcinoma of the colon tended to gradually increase in both autopsy cases and admitted patients. The incidence of multiple carcinomas tended to increase in both atomic bomb exposed group and non-exposed group, being higher in atomic bomb group than in non-exposed group. The incidence of breast cancer became constant since 1970. The incidence of carcinoma of the thyroid gland tended to decrease, although it was high in the group exposed near the explosion. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Upper lip malignant neoplasms. A study of 59 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama; Güemes-Meza, Agustín; Villavicencio-Valencia, Verónica; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2012-05-01

    To present the demographic data, clinico-pathologic features and therapeutic outcome of a series of upper lip malignancies. Retrospective study at a single Cancer Institution in Mexico City during a 14-year period. There were 59 cases, (30 males and 29 females); age range: 14 to 106 years (mean: 73 yr.). Antecedents of ultraviolet light and tobacco exposure were found in 20 (33.9%) and 16 cases (27%) respectively. There were 35 squamous cell carcinomas (59.3%), 19 basal cell carcinomas (32.2%) and one case each (1.7%) of adenocarcinoma NOS, adenoid cystic carcinoma, angiosarcoma, Merkel cell carcinoma and melanoma. There were 14 cases in stage I (23.7%), 14 in stage II (23.7%), 3 in stage III (5.1%) 14 in stage IV (23.7%) and 14 were not classified (23.7%). There were no significant differences with respect to the overall survival curve and the disease-free survival curve among surgical treatment and radiotherapy. In addition, there was not statistically significant difference in the overall survival and disease-free survival among squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma cases with respect to the type of treatment. Upper lip malignant neoplasms are infrequent lesions. The present series describes the main clinico-pathological features in a hospital-based population in Mexico city and demonstrates some differences with respect to those found in the lower lip.

  8. Salivary Gland Neoplasms: Does Morphological Diversity Reflect Tumor Heterogeneity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rito, Miguel; Fonseca, Isabel

    2017-09-21

    Salivary gland tumor classification encompasses a vast list of benign and malignant neoplasms. Their morphological diversity is recognized not only between different entities but also within individual tumors. Tumor categories as described by the World Health Organization reflect, in part, a true genetic heterogeneity (e.g., translocations involving CRTC1 and CRTC3-MAML2 genes in mucoepidermoid carcinoma and MYB-NFIB fusion in adenoid cystic carcinoma). Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma shows diversity in its histological appearance, but recurrent rearrangements on PLAG1 and HMGA2 are common to its benign precursor. More recently, new categories have been defined, like secretory carcinoma with the t(12;15) (p13;q25) ETV6-NTRK3 translocation and clear-cell carcinoma with EWSR1-ATF1 fusion. Recent studies on cribriform adenocarcinoma of minor salivary gland origin and epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma point to a correlation with their morphological features. All of these advances show that the search of a histogenetic and genetic basis for salivary gland tumors is helping to clarify morphological categories and unraveling new ones. Nevertheless, currently morphology is still the hallmark of tumor classification and the gold standard. The therapeutic options for advanced tumors remain very limited but the discovery of translocation-generated gene fusions and increased knowledge of the genomic information of salivary gland tumors is creating opportunities for the development of specific targeted therapies. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas in a male patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Yoshida

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs make up a morphologic family of similar appearing tumors arising in the ovary and various extraovarian organs such as pancreas, hepatobiliary tract and mesentery. MCNs of the pancreas occur almost exclusively in women. Here, we report a rare case of MCN in a male patient. A 39-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with the chief complaint of back pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a multilocular cyctic mass 6.3 cm in diameter in the pancreatic tail. In addition, the outer wall and septae with calcification were demonstrated in the cystic lesion. On magnetic resonance imaging , the cystic fluid had low intensity on T1-weighted imaging and high intensity on T2-weighted imaging. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP showed neither communication between the cystic lesion and the main pancreatic duct nor encasement of the main pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasonography revealed neither solid component nor thickness of the septae in the cystic lesion. Consequently, we performed distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy under the diagnosis of cystic neoplasia of the pancreas. Histopathologically, the cystic lesion showed two distinct component: an inner epithelial layer and an outer densely cellular ovarian-type stromal layer. Based on these findings, the cystic lesion was diagnosed as MCN.

  10. Meningioma as second malignant neoplasm after oncological treatment during childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H.L.; Gebhardt, U. [Klinikum Oldenburg (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology; Warmuth-Metz, M. [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Pietsch, T. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology; Soerensen, N. [Evangelisches Krankenhaus, Oldenburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kortmann, R.D. [University Hospital Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2012-05-15

    A total of 38 patients (18 female/20 male) with childhood meningioma were recruited from the German registry HIT-Endo (1989-2009). In 5 cases meningioma occurred as second malignant neoplasm (SMN). Histologies were confirmed by reference assessment in all cases (SMN: 2 WHO I, 1 WHO II, 2 WHO III). The SMNs were diagnosed at a median age of 12.4 years with a median latency of 10.2 years after primary malignancy (PMN; 4 brain tumors, 1 lymphoblastic leukemia; median age at diagnosis 2.7 years). Meningioma occurred as SMN in the irradiated field of PMN (range 12-54 Gy). The outcome after treatment of SMN meningioma (surgery/irradiation) was favorable in terms of psychosocial status and functional capacity in 4 of 5 patients (1 death). We conclude that survivors of childhood cancer who were exposed to radiation therapy at young age harbor the risk of developing meningioma as a SMN at a particularly short latency period in case of high dose exposure. (orig.)

  11. Pancreatic carcinosarcoma mimics malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing-Qi; Liu, Qiao-Fei; Chang, Xiao-Yan; Hu, Ya; Chen, Jie; Guo, Jun-Chao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Carcinosarcoma, an extremely rare pancreatic primary tumor, is characterized by coexistence of both carcinomatous and sarcomatous components. Due to its rarity, the clinical manifestation and imaging features have not been recognized. An accurate diagnostic method has not been available and a widely accepted guidelines instructing treatment has not been established. Patient concerns: We present an uncommon case of pancreatic carcinosarcoma (PCS) which has been preoperatively diagnosed as pancreatic malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. A radical resection, including total pancreatectomy (TP) and splenectomy, was performed. Diagnosis: The diagnosis of PCS was confirmed by postoperative pathology. Interventions: A radical resection, including TP and splenectomy, was performed. The patient was followed up by abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan and blood tumor marker examination. Outcomes: The patient is still alive and self-sufficient 7 months after the surgery. No evidence of tumor recurrence is found during follow-up. Lessons: Although, until recently, there are no widely accepted guidelines instructing treatment for PCS, a radical resection is still a possible way. All the pancreatic neoplastic patients with high surgical risk should be transferred to a specialized high-volume pancreatic center to get precise preoperative evaluation, fine operation technique, and careful postoperative management. PMID:28591030

  12. Possible risk for gestational trophoblastic neoplasm in perimenopause and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Branka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasms (GTN are group of diseases which are known as fertilization disorders and may appear as Complete hydatidiform mole, Mole partialis, Invasive mole, Placental site trophoblastic tumor, Choriocarcinoma. Malignant disease precedes in approxi mately 50% of patients. All cases of GTN must be registrated. The Followe up programme period may last 6 months to 2 years until three sequential beta hCG values are negative. The risk of repeated GTN is low but patient has to be informed that risk is 1 : 74. GTN can appear in perimenopausal or menopausal women. That is the reason why each rapid enlargement of uterus especially with uterine bleeding followed with multiple cystic formations (grape like cysts needs a serious examination on GTN. Patient can complain of nausea, vomiting, painful breasts or hiperthyoidism. Legal abortion can precede GTN in perimenopausal women. In the great number of women with GTN the last pregnancy was 5 or more than 5 years before GTN is diagnosed. During 5 year period from june 1999. till june 2004, 58 GTN cases were diagnosed on our Department. 7 women with confirmed GTN were in perimenopause or menopause. All cases were hystologicalu confirmed with clinical low clinical score. In 1999. (March-June unpowerishment Uranium was used during war in Former Yugoslavia. Potential effect on reproductive potential could be analyzed after collecting data from the whole territory of Serbia and Montenegro in next years. All GTN patients are clinically, laboratory and ultrasonographicaly examined and staged according to FIGO 2002. recommendations

  13. Parathyroid carcinoma: an unusual presentation of a rare neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti, Sharma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Parathyroid carcinoma is an extremely rare malignant endocrine neoplasm that is very challenging in its diagnosis as well as its treatment. Clinically the disease is detected earlier in patients who present with hyperparathyroidism with signs of profound hypercalcemia. Differentiation between benign and malignant disease of the parathyroid is challenging both for the clinician and for the pathologist. Complete surgical resection at the time of first operation offers the best chance of cure. Even after radical excision which is the standard management, local recurrence and metastases are frequent. The disease usually has a slow indolent course and most patients suffer from complications of hypercalcemia rather than tumor invasion or metastasis.We report a case of a 31-year-old woman who presented with renal colic. Various hematological, biochemical and radiological investigations were performed and a slightly enlarged right parathyroid was found. A clinical diagnosis of parathyroid adenoma was made and a right parathyroidectomy was done. Intraoperatively the surgeon had no suspicion of malignancy but microscopically the lesion was malignant and a final diagnosis of parathyroid carcinoma was rendered based on the criteria of invasion. Since there is no gold standard, a multidisciplinary approach, including the entire clinical, biochemical, radiological and pathological profile of the disease aids in an accurate diagnosis. Here we are reporting a case of a functional parathyroid carcinoma presenting in a relatively young patient with all the biochemical and radiological investigations and findings pointing towards a benign parathyroid disease.

  14. Mesothelial neoplasms presenting as, and mimicking, ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Haresh; Merino, Maria J

    2010-11-01

    Mesotheliomas of the abdominal cavity are rare tumors that primarily involve the peritoneum, mesentery, and omentum. The involvement of the viscera is usually secondary to bulky and extensive serosal disease. We describe 7 cases of mesothelioma in which the initial manifestation was that of an ovarian mass. All patients underwent surgery with a primary diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Clinical histories, gross features, and histology slides were reviewed. Immunostains were performed on all cases and electron microscopy was performed in 2 cases. The patients ranged in age from 22 to 52 years and the lesions ranged in size from 3.8 to 9 cm. Of the 7 cases, 4 were predominantly cystic and 3 were solid. Histologically, all cystic tumors were multicystic mesothelioma, whereas the 3 solid tumors were diffuse malignant mesotheliomas. One patient had a borderline mucinous tumor with the mesothelioma occurring as a mural nodule, an association not described earlier. The oldest patient in this series had a diffuse malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum with predominant ovarian surface involvement. Mesothelial neoplasms can present as ovarian masses in young women. Awareness of this presentation is important to establish appropriate management.

  15. Allergy and the risk of selected digestive and laryngeal neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosetti, C; Talamini, R; Franceschi, S; Negri, E; Giacosa, A; La Vecchia, C

    2004-06-01

    The relation between allergy and cancer has been investigated within an integrated series of case-control studies of digestive tract and laryngeal neoplasms conducted in Italy since the early 1990s. These included 598 patients with incident, histologically confirmed cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx, 304 of the oesophagus, 1225 of the colon, 728 of the rectum, 460 of the larynx and 4999 controls, selected among patients admitted to the same network of hospitals as cases for acute, non-neoplastic diseases. Inverse associations with history of allergy were found for all cancer sites examined (odds ratio=0.44 for oral cavity and pharynx, 0.80 for oesophagus, 0.76 for colon, 0.54 for rectum and 0.33 for larynx). The associations were consistent in strata of age and sex, and when subjects with a first diagnosis of allergy 5 or more years before cancer diagnosis or hospital admission were considered. The present study therefore provides further evidence for a possible protective effect of prior history of allergy on cancer risk.

  16. Morphological clues to the appropriate recognition of hereditary renal neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, Holger; Ohashi, Riuko; Gandhi, Jatin S; Amin, Mahul B

    2018-02-14

    An important emerging role of the surgical pathologist besides the traditional tasks of establishment of the diagnosis and documentation of prognostic and predictive factors, is to recognize the possibility of a hereditary condition in cases where the histology is suggestive for a familial cancer syndrome. In recent years, the knowledge regarding all of the above roles, including the role of recognition of familial cancer, has particularly expanded in renal neoplasms with the close scrutiny to morphology, molecular correlates and clinical features of the different sub-types of renal cell carcinoma. Awareness of these clinically distinctive sub-types and their associated histologic clues will prompt the pathologist for further immunohistochemical or molecular work up, to look for clinical information to support the suspected diagnosis of familial cancer, to alert managing physician/s to look for stigmata of history of familial cancer, which will permit triaging patients and their families for appropriate genetic counseling. This review provides a comprehensive review of the known sub-types of renal cell carcinoma that have a predilection to occur in the setting of hereditary disease; examples include renal cancers occurring in the background of von Hippel Lindau disease, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, Birt Hogg Dube syndrome and succinate dehydrogenase deficiency. Herein we focus on diagnostic clues for renal tumors occurring in a non-pediatric setting that should prompt their correct recognition and reiterate the importance of the correct diagnosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathogenesis of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Role and Mechanisms of Chronic Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot-Corbel, Edith; Gardie, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a heterogeneous group of clonal diseases characterized by the excessive and chronic production of mature cells from one or several of the myeloid lineages. Recent advances in the biology of MPNs have greatly facilitated their molecular diagnosis since most patients present with mutation(s) in the JAK2, MPL, or CALR genes. Yet the roles played by these mutations in the pathogenesis and main complications of the different subtypes of MPNs are not fully elucidated. Importantly, chronic inflammation has long been associated with MPN disease and some of the symptoms and complications can be linked to inflammation. Moreover, the JAK inhibitor clinical trials showed that the reduction of symptoms linked to inflammation was beneficial to patients even in the absence of significant decrease in the JAK2-V617F mutant load. These observations suggested that part of the inflammation observed in patients with JAK2-mutated MPNs may not be the consequence of JAK2 mutation. The aim of this paper is to review the different aspects of inflammation in MPNs, the molecular mechanisms involved, the role of specific genetic defects, and the evidence that increased production of certain cytokines depends or not on MPN-associated mutations, and to discuss possible nongenetic causes of inflammation. PMID:26538820

  18. Endoscopic removal of PMMA in hip revision surgery with a CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazy, John; Kollmer, Charles; Uppal, Gurvinder S.; Lane, Gregory J.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1991-05-01

    Purpose: to compare CO2 laser to mechanical means of PMMA removal in total hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients requiring hip revision surgery were studied and compared to historical controls. Cement was removed from the femoral canal utilizing a 30 centimeter laparoscope. A CO2 laser waveguide was passed through the laparoscope into the femoral canal and a TV camera was placed over the eye piece to permit visualization of the depths of the femoral canal on a video monitor. The leg was placed in a horizontal position which avoided the pooling of blood or saline in the depths of the femur. Under direct vision the distal plug could be vaporized with a 40 centimeter CO2 laser waveguide. Power settings of 20 to 25 watts and a superpulsed mode were used. A 2 mm suction tube was welded to the outside of the laparoscope permitting aspiration of the products of vaporization. Results: Of 45 hip revisions there were no shaft perforation, fractures or undue loss of bone stock. There was no statistically different stay in hospital time, blood loss or operative time between the CO2 revision group compared to the non-laser revision group, in which cement was removed by mechanical methods. Conclusions: Mechanical methods used in removing bone cement using high speed burrs, reamers, gouges, and osteotomies is technically difficult and fraught with complications including shaft fracture, perforations, and unnecessary loss of bone stock. The authors' experience using the CO2 laser in hip revision surgery has permitted the removal of bone cement. Use of a modified laparoscope has allowed for precise, complete removal of bone cement deep within the femoral shaft without complication or additional operative time. The authors now advocate the use of a CO2 laser with modified laparoscope in hip revision surgery in which bone cement is to be removed from within the femoral shaft.

  19. Analysis of errors during medical and computerized diagnostics of spherical lung neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozmogov, A.I.; Petruk, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Reasons for errors in medical and computerized diagnostics of spherical lung neoplasms are studied based on material of 212 case records and clinicoroentgenological data; it should promote improvement of their diagnostics

  20. An extremely rare neoplasm, histiocytic sarcoma: A report of two cases with an aggressive clinical course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Kayikcioglu

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: HS is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm of the monocytic/macrophage lineage, with no standardized chemotherapy regimen for multisystemic disease. Metastatic patients have a more aggressive clinical course than those with unifocal disease.

  1. Microsatellite Status of Primary Colorectal Cancer Predicts the Incidence of Postoperative Colorectal Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Aki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yoko; Hata, Keisuke; Ishihara, Soichiro; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Few studies have evaluated the risk of postoperative colorectal neoplasms stratified by the nature of primary colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we revealed it on the basis of the microsatellite (MS) status of primary CRC. We retrospectively reviewed 338 patients with CRC and calculated the risk of neoplasms during postoperative surveillance colonoscopy in association with the MS status of primary CRC. A propensity score method was applied. We identified a higher incidence of metachronous rectal neoplasms after the resection of MS stable CRC than MS instable CRC (adjusted HR 5.74, p=0.04). We also observed a higher incidence of colorectal tubular adenoma in patients with MSS CRC (adjusted hazard ratio 7.09, pcolorectal cancer influenced the risk of postoperative colorectal neoplasms. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. Diverticular disease of the vermiform appendix: a diagnostic clue to underlying appendiceal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupre, Marc P; Jadavji, Irfan; Matshes, Evan; Urbanski, Stefan J

    2008-12-01

    Acquired diverticula of the vermiform appendix are rare and arise as a result of different pathogenetic mechanisms. One of the etiologies includes proximally located, often unsuspected small neoplasms. Although the association of appendiceal diverticulosis and neoplasia is known, it remains underemphasized in the teaching and practice of surgical pathology. To investigate the frequency of appendiceal neoplasms with acquired diverticulosis, we conducted a retrospective analysis of all appendectomy specimens received in our institution for a 55-month period (January 2002-July 2006). A total of 1361 appendectomy specimens were identified. Diverticulosis was diagnosed in 23 (1.7%) of all cases. Eleven (48%) appendectomy specimens with diverticulosis also harbored an appendiceal neoplasm. The association of appendiceal neoplasms with diverticulosis was statistically significant (P appendix in this setting does not create a significant impact on the workload within the pathologic laboratory.

  3. Medicines and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Medici a ne n s d Bone Loss Some types of medicines can cause bone loss, making your bones weak, if used for a long time. Use over a short time ... old bone and replaces it with new bone. Bone loss occurs when old bone breaks down faster than ...

  4. Renal Function Outcomes for Multifocal Renal Neoplasms Managed by Radiofrequency Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Pushpender, E-mail: pugupta@wakehealth.edu; Allen, Brian C., E-mail: bcallen2@wakehealth.edu; Chen, Michael Y., E-mail: mchen@wakehealth.edu; Childs, David D., E-mail: dchilds@wakehealth.edu; Kota, Gopi, E-mail: gkota@wakehealth.edu; Zagoria, Ronald J., E-mail: rzagoria@wakehealth.edu [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate renal function changes related to radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of multifocal renal neoplasms. Methods: This is an institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective study of all patients treated with computed tomography guided RFA for multifocal renal neoplasms at one institution. Fifty-seven subjects, mean age 70 (range 37-88) years, underwent RFA of 169 renal neoplasms (average size 2.0 cm). Subjects had between 2 and 8 (mean 2.96) neoplasms ablated. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was measured before and after RFA. Complications related to RFA were recorded. Results: eGFR decreased on average of 4.4 % per tumor treated and 6.7 % per ablation session (average 1.76 tumors treated per session). For subjects with the largest neoplasm measuring >3 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 14.5 % during the course of their treatment. If the largest neoplasm measured 2-3 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 7.7 %, and if the largest neoplasm measured <2 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 3.8 %. Subjects with reduced baseline renal function were more likely to have a greater decline in eGFR after RFA. There was a minor complication rate of 6.3 % (6 of 96 sessions), none of which required treatment, and a major complication rate of 4.2 % (4 of 96 sessions). Conclusion: RFA for the treatment of multifocal renal neoplasms results in mild decline of renal function.

  5. Interferon-alpha in the treatment of Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, H.C.; Larsen, T.S.; Riley, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    The Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms encompass essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). A major break-through in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these neoplasms occurred in 2005 by the discovery of the JAK2 V617F mu...... and potentially cure after long-term immune therapy with IFN-alpha2 is discussed and foreseen as an achievable goal in the future....

  6. Branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm presenting as paraneoplastic small plaque para-psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Cyriac A Philips; Philip Augustine; Lijesh Kumar; George Joseph; Pushpa Mahadevan

    2018-01-01

    To present and discuss a novel association between branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and paraneoplastic parapsoriasis. We present the case of a middle-aged male presenting with skin lesions that were suggestive of parapsoriasis, resistant to treatment, and in whom a diagnosis of branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas was eventually made. A curative Whipple's surgery led to complete resolution of the skin lesions within 3 weeks. Paraneoplasti...

  7. Geographical distribution for malignant neoplasm of the pancreas in relation to selected climatic factors in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada Masafumi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant neoplasm of the pancreas has become one of the leading causes of death from malignant neoplasm in Japan (the 5th in 2003. Although smoking is believed to be a risk factor, other risk factors remain unclear. Mortality from malignant neoplasm of the pancreas tends to be higher in northern Japan and in northern European countries. A recent study reported that standardized mortality ratios (SMRs for malignant neoplasm of the pancreas were negatively correlated to global solar radiation level. People residing in regions with lower solar radiation and lower temperatures may be at higher risk of development of malignant neoplasm of the pancreas. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the relationship between SMRs for malignant neoplasm of the pancreas and climatic factors, such as the amount of global solar radiation and the daily maximum temperature in Japan. Results The study used multiple linear regression models. Number of deaths and demographic data from 1998 to 2002 were used for the calculation of SMR. We employed mesh climatic data for Japan published in 2006 by the Japan Meteorological Agency. Regression coefficients for the amount of global solar radiation and the daily maximum temperature in males were -4.35 (p = 0.00034 and -2.81 (p Conclusion This study suggested that low solar radiation and low temperature might relate to the increasing risk of malignant neoplasm of the pancreas. Use of group data has a limitation in the case of evaluating environmental factors affecting health, since the impact of climatic factors on the human body varies according to individual lifestyles and occupations. Use of geographical mesh climatic data, however, proved useful as an index of risk or beneficial factors in a small study area. Further research using individual data is necessary to elucidate the relationship between climatic factors and the development of malignant neoplasm of the pancreas.

  8. Hemosiderin laden macrophages and hemosiderin within follicular cells distinguish benign follicular lesions from follicular neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffar Reema

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Published criteria to distinguish benign colloid nodules from follicular neoplasms emphasize only three interdependent features: size of follicles, amount of colloid, and cellularity. There is a need for the validation of other independent criteria. Methods: This study quantified the significance of cystic change, defined as presence of macrophages, and the presence of hemosiderin in either the macrophages or follicular cells. The cohort consisted of 165 patients with fine needle aspiration (FNA and histologic follow-up of either goiter (101, follicular adenoma (47, or follicular carcinoma (17. Papillary thyroid carcinomas and Hürthle cell neoplasms were excluded from the cohort, because these categories are known to show cystic change and hemosiderin. FNAs were reviewed blindly with the most cellular slide scored for the presence of macrophages and/or hemosiderin. Results: Hemosiderin within macrophages were seen in 67% (68 of 101 of the goiters and only 6% (four of 64 of follicular neoplasms ( P < .0001. All four follicular neoplasms with hemosiderin in macrophages were adenomas. Three of these four had equivocal features of a benign colloid nodule histologically. None of the 17 follicular carcinomas had hemosiderin in macrophages ( P < .12. Macrophages without hemosiderin also strongly distinguished goiters from neoplasms (83% vs 17% but appears less useful as a criterion since macrophages were present within 3 of 17 follicular carcinomas. Hemosiderin within follicular epithelial cells was present in 18% (18 of 101 of goiters, whereas none of the 64 follicular neoplasms had intraepithelial hemosiderin ( P < .0003. Conclusions: If papillary thyroid carcinoma and Hürthle cell neoplasm are ruled out, our findings indicate that the presence of hemosiderin virtually excludes a clinically significant follicular neoplasm.

  9. Revision of Pachycentria (Melastomataceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clausing, Gudrun

    2000-01-01

    A revision of Pachycentria Blume, which includes the monotypic Pogonanthera Blume, is presented. Pachycentria comprises eight species and one subspecies. Two species, P. vogelkopensis and P. hanseniana, are newly described. The genus is distinguished from other genera in the Medinillinae by a small

  10. Revising China's Environmental Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, G.; Zhang, L.; Mol, A.P.J.; Lu, Y.; Liu, Wenling; Liu, J.

    2013-01-01

    China's Environmental Protection Law (EPL) is the main national environmental legislative framework. Yet the environmental legal system is incomplete, and implementation and enforcement of environmental laws have shown major shortcomings (1–3). A controversial attempt to revise the EPL could have

  11. Revision of the Sarcospermataceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, H.J.; Varossieau, W.W.

    1938-01-01

    The genus Sarcosperma was excluded from the Sapotaceae by the first-named writer in 1925, the group being considered as of family rank. In 1926 the same author published a concise and fragmentary revision of the monotypic order, in which two new Malaysian species were described. The continental

  12. Revision of Oxandra (Annonaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junikka, L.; Maas, P.J.M.; Maas-van de Kamer, H.; Westra, L.Y.Th.

    2016-01-01

    A taxonomic revision is given of the Neotropical genus Oxandra (Annonaceae). Within the genus 27 species are recognized, 4 of which are new to science. Most of the species are occurring in tropical South America, whereas a few (6) are found in Mexico and Central America and two in the West Indies

  13. Revision without ordinals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivello, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    We show that Herzberger’s and Gupta’s revision theories of truth can be recast in purely inductive terms, without any appeal neither to the transfinite ordinal numbers nor to the axiom of Choice. The result is presented in an abstract and general setting, emphasising both its validity for a wide

  14. Revising Russian History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertsch, James V.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the production of new history textbooks that appeared after the breakup of the Soviet Union. Argues that the radical revisions in official history in this context are shaped by the Bakhtinian process of "hidden dialogicality." Suggests that the importance of hidden dialogicality between narrative forms must be considered. (SC)

  15. Belief and Its Revision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bewersdorf, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The role of experience for belief revision is seldom explicitly discussed. This is surprising as it seems obvious that experiences play a major role for most of our belief changes. In this work, the two most plausible views on the role of experience for belief change are investigated: the view that

  16. Revising and editing for translators

    CERN Document Server

    Mossop, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Revising and Editing for Translators provides guidance and learning materials for translation students learning to edit texts written by others, and professional translators wishing to improve their self-revision ability or learning to revise the work of others. Editing is understood as making corrections and improvements to texts, with particular attention to tailoring them to the given readership. Revising is this same task applied to draft translations. The linguistic work of editors and revisers is related to the professional situations in which they work. Mossop offers in-depth coverage of a wide range of topics, including copyediting, style editing, structural editing, checking for consistency, revising procedures and principles, and translation quality assessment. This third edition provides extended coverage of computer aids for revisers, and of the different degrees of revision suited to different texts. The inclusion of suggested activities and exercises, numerous real-world examples, a proposed gra...

  17. The use of a non-invasive extendable prosthesis at the time of revision arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilg, M M; Gaston, C L; Jeys, L; Abudu, A; Tillman, R M; Stevenson, J D; Grimer, R J; Parry, M C

    2018-03-01

    Aims The use of a noninvasive growing endoprosthesis in the management of primary bone tumours in children is well established. However, the efficacy of such a prosthesis in those requiring a revision procedure has yet to be established. The aim of this series was to present our results using extendable prostheses for the revision of previous endoprostheses. Patients and Methods All patients who had a noninvasive growing endoprosthesis inserted at the time of a revision procedure were identified from our database. A total of 21 patients (seven female patients, 14 male) with a mean age of 20.4 years (10 to 41) at the time of revision were included. The indications for revision were mechanical failure, trauma or infection with a residual leg-length discrepancy. The mean follow-up was 70 months (17 to 128). The mean shortening prior to revision was 44 mm (10 to 100). Lengthening was performed in all but one patient with a mean lengthening of 51 mm (5 to 140). Results The mean residual leg length discrepancy at final follow-up of 15 mm (1 to 35). Two patients developed a deep periprosthetic infection, of whom one required amputation to eradicate the infection; the other required two-stage revision. Implant survival according to Henderson criteria was 86% at two years and 72% at five years. When considering revision for any cause (including revision of the growing prosthesis to a non-growing prosthesis), revision-free implant survival was 75% at two years, but reduced to 55% at five years. Conclusion Our experience indicates that revision surgery using a noninvasive growing endoprosthesis is a successful option for improving leg length discrepancy and should be considered in patients with significant leg-length discrepancy requiring a revision procedure. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:370-7.

  18. HISTOPATHOLOGIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THYROID GLAND NEOPLASMS IN THOMSON'S GAZELLES ( EUDORCUS THOMSONII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Stephanie J; Garner, Michael M; Kiupel, Matti

    2018-03-01

    Published reports of neoplasms in Thomson's gazelles ( Eudorcas thomsonii) are very rare, but thyroid tumors were the most common neoplasm of this species, accounting for 12% of reported pathologies in a 1998-2012 retrospective study of cases submitted for histologic review of grossly enlarged thyroid glands. This report describes the histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of thyroid neoplasms in 10 Thomson's gazelles from five different zoological collections. Neoplasms were submitted as biopsies from six gazelles or collected during necropsy from four gazelles. The most common clinical findings included a palpable mass on the ventral neck and progressive weight loss. Radiographic mineral density was detected in one of the neoplastic masses. Histologically, the neoplasms were classified as microfollicular thyroid adenoma ( n = 2), solid thyroid adenoma ( n = 2), papillary thyroid adenoma ( n = 1), and solid thyroid carcinoma ( n = 5). Neoplastic cells in all 10 neoplasms were positive for thyroid transcription factor 1 and thyroglobulin, but negative for calcitonin. While five cases had histologic features of malignancy, there was no evidence of metastatic disease either clinically (biopsies) or on necropsy. Numerous concurrent diseases, including cardiomyopathies and nephropathies, were present and led to choice for euthanasia in several cases.

  19. Hemosiderin laden macrophages and hemosiderin within follicular cells distinguish benign follicular lesions from follicular neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffar, Reema; Mohanty, Sambit K; Khan, Ashraf; Fischer, Andrew H

    2009-01-19

    Published criteria to distinguish benign colloid nodules from follicular neoplasms emphasize only three interdependent features: size of follicles, amount of colloid, and cellularity. There is a need for the validation of other independent criteria. This study quantified the significance of cystic change, defined as presence of macrophages, and the presence of hemosiderin in either the macrophages or follicular cells. The cohort consisted of 165 patients with fine needle aspiration (FNA) and histologic follow-up of either goiter (101), follicular adenoma (47), or follicular carcinoma (17). Papillary thyroid carcinomas and Hürthle cell neoplasms were excluded from the cohort, because these categories are known to show cystic change and hemosiderin. FNAs were reviewed blindly with the most cellular slide scored for the presence of macrophages and/or hemosiderin. Hemosiderin within macrophages were seen in 67% (68 of 101) of the goiters and only 6% (four of 64) of follicular neoplasms (Phemosiderin in macrophages were adenomas. Three of these four had equivocal features of a benign colloid nodule histologically. None of the 17 follicular carcinomas had hemosiderin in macrophages (Phemosiderin also strongly distinguished goiters from neoplasms (83% vs 17%) but appears less useful as a criterion since macrophages were present within 3 of 17 follicular carcinomas. Hemosiderin within follicular epithelial cells was present in 18% (18 of 101) of goiters, whereas none of the 64 follicular neoplasms had intraepithelial hemosiderin (Phemosiderin virtually excludes a clinically significant follicular neoplasm.

  20. A new hip epiphyseal prosthesis: design revision driven by a validated numerical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, S; Taddei, F; Cristofolini, L; Schileo, E; Rushton, N; Viceconti, M

    2011-12-01

    An innovative epiphyseal device has been recently proposed claiming an effective bone-prosthesis load transfer and a nearly physiological bone stresses distribution. However preliminary experimental tests showed a 23% weakening of the femoral neck after implantation. Aim of this study was to revise the prosthesis geometry with the goal of enhancing the femoral neck strength after implantation, while maintaining unchanged the initial conceptual design. To this aim, the risk of femoral neck fractures, prosthesis fractures, aseptic loosening and excessive bone resorption were addressed through a validated finite element procedure following a systematic approach. The initial prosthesis geometry was revised to reduce each investigated failure risk below the threshold of acceptance (100%). The new geometry was re-assessed to verify the effectiveness of the revision. The first design was predicted to locally induce high bone strains and cement stresses, which translated in a risk of bone and cement failure exceeding the threshold of acceptance (>100%). The revised design preserved a good stability of the device, contemporary reducing the risk for bone (45%) and cement (60%) failure. If results will be confirmed by statistical and clinical experimentations, current clinical indications for hip epiphyseal devices might be extended. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimation of tumour risk at low dose from experimental results after incorporation of short-lived bone-seeking alpha emitters 224Ra and 227Th in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, A.; Mueller, W.A.; Goessner, W.; Hug, O.

    1976-01-01

    As a revision of older and recent data of experimental bone-tumour induction in mice after single and repeated incorporation of short-lived 224 Ra and 227 Th, the following indications for estimation of tumour risk at low dose can be given. (1) Dose rate has considerable influence on tumour risk following internal irradiation, but the relative increase of risk with decreasing dose rate is dose dependent. (2) At a tumour risk of about 10% the range of incidence in repeated experiments is high. It therefore seems difficult to find the exact dose-effect relationships in low-risk experiments. (3) On the other hand, the lower incidence at lower dose level seems to be, rather, a risk of the second half of lifespan. In addition, the high range of the rate of spontaneously occurring neoplasms at greater age does not permit exact statements about the whole lifespan. (4) However, one can tentatively assume that it should be possible to find dose limits for the tumour risk during the first half of the lifespan. (5) Besides radiation dose, other cofactors may interfere at the low-dose and low-risk level. There is no significant decrease in osteosarcoma risk if the incorporation period starts after stunting of growth. The greater risk in female mice than in males indicates hormones as an example of cofactors for the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. (author)

  2. Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty With a Monoblock Splined Tapered Grit-Blasted Titanium Stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Michael D; Kearns, Sean M; Bohl, Daniel D; Haughom, Bryan D; Levine, Brett R

    2017-12-01

    In revision total hip arthroplasty (THA), proximal femoral bone loss creates a challenge of achieving adequate stem fixation. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of a monoblock, splined, tapered femoral stem in revision THA. Outcomes of revision THA using a nonmodular, splined, tapered femoral stem from a single surgeon were reviewed. With a minimum of 2-year follow-up, there were 68 cases (67 patients). Paprosky classification was 3A or greater in 85% of the cases. Preoperative and postoperative Harris Hip Scores (HHS), radiographic subsidence and osseointegration, limb length discrepancy, complications, and reoperations were analyzed. The Harris Hip Score improved from 37.4 ± SD 19.4 preoperatively to 64.6 ± SD 21.8 at final follow-up (P revision procedures-8 for septic indications and 8 for aseptic indications. Subsidence occurred at a rate of 3.0% and dislocation at 7.4%. Limb length discrepancy of more than 1 cm after revision was noted in 13.6% of patients. Bone ingrowth was observed in all but 4 patients (94.1%). At 4-year follow-up, Kaplan-Meier estimated survival was 72.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 57.0-83.8) for all causes of revision, 86.6% (95% CI 72.0-93.9) for all aseptic revision, and 95.5% (95% CI 86.8-98.5) for aseptic femoral revision. Although complications were significant, revision for femoral aseptic loosening occurred in only 3 patients. Given the ability of this monoblock splined tapered stem to adequately provide fixation during complex revision THA, it remains a viable option in the setting of substantial femoral bone defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of bone marrow aspirate, bone graft and collagen composites on fixation of bone implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan; Ding, Ming; Overgaard, Søren

    2007-01-01

     Introduction: Replacement of extensive local bone loss especially in revision joint arthroplasties is a significant clinical challenge. Autogenous and allogenic cancellous bone grafts have been the gold standard in reconstructive orthopaedic surgery, but it is well known that there is morbidity...... to be sought. Hydroxyapatite and collagen composites have the potential in mimicking and replacing skeletal bones. Aim: This study attempted to determine the effect of hydroxyapatite/collagen composites in the fixation of bone implants. The composites used in this study is produced by Institute of Science...... part of the implant. Specimens are preserving now at - 20°C and wait for the push-out test which is destructive and will be performed on an 858 Bionex MTS hydraulic material testing machine (MTS system cooperation, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA). The specimens for histological analysis were taken from...

  4. Malignant neoplasms of digestive organs (C15-C26) in the Osijek-Baranja County, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milas, Josip; Samardzić, Senka; Miskulin, Maja; Mihaljević, Silvio; Males, Josip; Puntarić, Dinko

    2014-03-01

    The Institute of Public Health for the Osjek-Baranja County (OBC) has processed the data on cancer patients that were collected from mandatory county hospitals data reports, county bureaus of statistics and the County Register of Deaths. The cancers were defined according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision (ICD-10), codes of malignant neoplasms of digestive organs (C15-C26). The aim of this article is to show the size of the problem and the burden of the health care system caused by cancers of the digestive system (C15-C26) in the OBC in the period 2001-2006. This article deals with cancer incidence and mortality data, appertaining age distribution, cancer survival, median age at diagnosis and at death and length of stay in hospitals. The overall incidence and mortality rate from cancer group C15-C26 (101.1 and 80/100,000, respectively, EU standard population) declined in all age groups, comparing the data originating from the 2001-2003 period to the data referring to the 2004-2006 period. The median age at diagnosis of cancer was 67.8 years with a shift of 0.91 year up in second period (the median age in the first period was 67.3 years and in the second one 68.2 years). The median age at diagnosis of cancer in females was 69.7 years while in males was 66.3 years, which represents a difference of 2.9 years in favour of females. The overall relative survival rate of all ages was 23.6%. This figure was slightly bigger for females (24.3%) than for males (23.1%). Concerning all age groups, the number of hospital admissions of males increased during the observation period while the number of hospital admissions of women decreased at the same time. The average length of stay over the six years did not changed significantly. Group of cancer C15-C26 was the most common group of cancers regarding both genders. The five-year relative survival as one of the reliable benchmarks of the quality of the health

  5. Thermal and epithermal neutrons in the treatment of neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, W.H.; Wellum, G.; Tolpin, E.; Messer, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported in the preparation and testing of boron compounds for use as targets in the neutron capture therapy of neoplasms. The synthesis and structural confirmation of the disulfide, B 1 H 11 SSB 12 H 11 -4 is reported as well as a new structural model for its mono-oxidized derivative, B 12 H 11 SOSB 12 H 11 -4 , which showed useful tumor:blood concentration ratios in rats after three I. V. injections. The material, B 12 H 11 (SH) 2 -2 , was isolated and identified from impure Cs 2 B 12 H 11 SH. The former anion was shown to be responsible, in its oxidized form, for the excellent tumor uptake results shown by impure B 12 H 11 SH -2 in the past. As a consequence of this work, a borane polymer was synthesized which has shown extremely encouraging tumor uptake properties. The synthesis of this polymer depended on our production and characterization of the first stable thiyl radical at room temperature, B 12 H 11 -S: -2 . The retesting of certain phosphate boranes is reported. And a reagent, namely acetyl sulfenyl chloride, lSCOCH 3 , has been found which will produce B 12 H 11 SH -2 in a laboratory synthesis. The ability of sulfur derivatives of B 12 H 11 SH -2 to bind to proteins was examined, as was the blood distribution of two of these interesting boranes. The amount of non-protein bound borane was related to the rate of blood clearance of the borane in rats. Progress is also reported on dog irradiation experiments. (U.S.)

  6. Second Malignant Neoplasms and Cardiovascular Disease Following Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Andrea K.; Allan, James M.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Kennedy, Ann R.; Xu, X. George; Purdy, James A.; Applegate, Kimberly; Yahalom, Joachim; Constine, Louis S.; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Boice, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are among the most serious and life-threatening late adverse effects experienced by the growing number of cancer survivors worldwide and are due in part to radiotherapy. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) convened an expert scientific committee to critically and comprehensively review associations between radiotherapy and SMNs and CVD, taking into account radiobiology; genomics; treatment (ie, radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy and other therapies); type of radiation; and quantitative considerations (ie, dose–response relationships). Major conclusions of the NCRP include: 1) the relevance of older technologies for current risk assessment when organ-specific absorbed dose and the appropriate relative biological effectiveness are taken into account and 2) the identification of critical research needs with regard to newer radiation modalities, dose–response relationships, and genetic susceptibility. Recommendation for research priorities and infrastructural requirements include 1) long-term large-scale follow-up of extant cancer survivors and prospectively treated patients to characterize risks of SMNs and CVD in terms of radiation dose and type; 2) biological sample collection to integrate epidemiological studies with molecular and genetic evaluations; 3) investigation of interactions between radiotherapy and other potential confounding factors, such as age, sex, race, tobacco and alcohol use, dietary intake, energy balance, and other cofactors, as well as genetic susceptibility; 4) focusing on adolescent and young adult cancer survivors, given the sparse research in this population; and 5) construction of comprehensive risk prediction models for SMNs and CVD to permit the development of follow-up guidelines and prevention and intervention strategies. PMID:22312134

  7. From bone biology to bone analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenau, E.; Saggese, G.; Peter, F.; Baroncelli, G.I.; Shaw, N.J.; Crabtree, N.J.; Zadik, Z.; Neu, C.M.; Noordam, C.; Radetti, G.; Hochberg, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Bone development is one of the key processes characterizing childhood and adolescence. Understanding this process is not only important for physicians treating pediatric bone disorders, but also for clinicians and researchers dealing with postmenopausal and senile osteoporosis. Bone densitometry has

  8. Revision for prosthetic joint infection following hip arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenguerrand, E.; Whitehouse, M. R.; Beswick, A. D.; Jones, S. A.; Porter, M. L.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We used the National Joint Registry for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man (NJR) to investigate the risk of revision due to prosthetic joint infection (PJI) for patients undergoing primary and revision hip arthroplasty, the changes in risk over time, and the overall burden created by PJI. Methods We analysed revision total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed due to a diagnosis of PJI and the linked index procedures recorded in the NJR between 2003 and 2014. The cohort analysed consisted of 623 253 index primary hip arthroplasties, 63 222 index revision hip arthroplasties and 7585 revision THAs performed due to a diagnosis of PJI. The prevalence, cumulative incidence functions and the burden of PJI (total procedures) were calculated. Overall linear trends were investigated with log-linear regression. Results We demonstrated a prevalence of revision THA due to prosthetic joint infection of 0.4/100 procedures following primary and 1.6/100 procedures following revision hip arthroplasty. The prevalence of revision due to PJI in the three months following primary hip arthroplasty has risen 2.3-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 4.1) between 2005 and 2013, and 3.0-fold (95% CI 1.1 to 8.5) following revision hip arthroplasty. Over 1000 procedures are performed annually as a consequence of hip PJI, an increase of 2.6-fold between 2005 and 2013. Conclusions Although the risk of revision due to PJI following hip arthroplasty is low, it is rising and, coupled with the established and further predicted increased incidence of both primary and revision hip arthroplasty, this represents a growing and substantial treatment burden. Cite this article: E. Lenguerrand, M. R. Whitehouse, A. D. Beswick, S. A. Jones, M. L. Porter, A. W. Blom. Revision for prosthetic joint infection following hip arthroplasty: Evidence from the National Joint Registry. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:391–398. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.66.BJR-2017-0003.R1. PMID:28642256

  9. Aseptic revision total hip arthroplasty in the elderly : quantifying the risks for patients over 80 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovonratwet, P; Malpani, R; Ottesen, T D; Tyagi, V; Ondeck, N T; Rubin, L E; Grauer, J N

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the rate of perioperative complications following aseptic revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients aged ≥ 80 years with that in those aged revision THA were identified in the 2005 to 2015 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database and stratified into two age groups: those aged revision THA is associated with greater risks in patients aged ≥ 80 years compared with younger patients. This is important for counselling and highlights the need for medical optimization in these vulnerable patients. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:143-51. ©2018 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  10. Bone mineral content and bone metabolism in young adults with severe periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wowern von, N.; Westergaard, J.; Kollerup, G.

    2001-01-01

    Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis......Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis...

  11. Facts about Broken Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Broken Bones KidsHealth / For Kids / Broken Bones What's in this ... sticking through the skin . What Happens When a Bone Breaks? It hurts to break a bone! It's ...

  12. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... the cut, then pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  13. Effects of hydroxyapatite coating of cups used in hip revision arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Coating of acetabular revision implants with hydroxyapatite (HA) has been proposed to improve ingrowth and stability. We investigated whether HA coating of revision cups can reduce the risk of any subsequent re-revision. Methods We studied uncemented cups either with or without HA coating that were used at a primary acetabular revision and registered in the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register (SHAR). 2 such cup designs were identified: Harris-Galante and Trilogy, both available either with or without HA coating. These cups had been used as revision components in 1,780 revisions of total hip arthroplasties (THA) between 1986 and 2009. A Cox proportional hazards model including the type of coating, age at index revision, sex, cause of cup revision, cup design, the use of bone graft at the revision procedure, and the type of cup fixation at primary THA were used to calculate adjusted risk ratios (RRs with 95% CI) for re-revision for any reason or due to aseptic loosening. Results 71% of the cups were coated with HA and 29% were uncoated. At a mean follow-up time of 6.9 (0–24) years, 159 (9%) of all 1,780 cups had been re-revised, mostly due to aseptic loosening (5%), dislocation (2%), or deep infection (1%). HA coating had no significant influence on the risk of re-revision of the cup for any reason (RR = 1.4, CI: 0.9–2.0) or due to aseptic loosening (RR = 1.1, 0.6–1.9). In contrast, HA coating was found to be a risk factor for isolated liner re-revision for any reason (RR = 1.8, CI: 1.01–3.3). Age below 60 years at the index cup revision, dislocation as the cause of the index cup revision, uncemented cup fixation at primary THA, and use of the Harris-Galante cup also increased the risk of re-revision of the cup. In separate analyses in which isolated liner revisions were excluded, bone grafting was found to be a risk factor for re-revision of the metal shell due to aseptic loosening (RR = 2.1, CI: 1.05–4.2). Interpretation We found no

  14. Cellular Therapy to Obtain Rapid Endochondral Bone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    surgery, and both autografts and allografts have been commonly used in spinal fusion, revision total hip arthroplasty , maxillofacial reconstruction...idiopathic scoliosis. Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2003 Apr 15;28(8):793-798. 2. Goldberg VM. Selection of bone grafts for revision total hip arthroplasty ...grafting4. This number does not include the millions of total joint arthroplasties , spinal arthrodeses, maxillofacial surgeries and implant

  15. [Biological downsizing : Acetabular defect reconstruction in revision total hip arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koob, S; Scheidt, S; Randau, T M; Gathen, M; Wimmer, M D; Wirtz, D C; Gravius, S

    2017-02-01

    Periacetabular bony defects remain a great challenge in revision total hip arthroplasty. After assessment and classification of the defect and selection of a suitable implant the primary stable fixation and sufficient biological reconstitution of a sustainable bone stock are essential for long term success in acetabular revision surgery. Biological defect reconstruction aims for the down-sizing of periacetabular defects for later revision surgeries. In the field of biological augmentation several methods are currently available. Autologous transplants feature a profound osseointegrative capacity. However, limitations such as volume restrictions and secondary complications at the donor site have to be considered. Structural allografts show little weight bearing potential in the long term and high failure rates. In clinical practice, the usage of spongious chips implanted via impaction bone grafting technique in combination with antiprotrusio cages for the management of contained defects have shown promising long time results. Nevertheless, when dealing with craniolateral acetabular and dorsal column defects, the additional implantation of macroporous metal implants or augments should be considered since biological augmentation has shown little clinical success in these particular cases. This article provides an overview of the current clinically available biological augmentation methods of peri-acetabular defects. Due to the limitations of autologous and allogeneic bone transplants in terms of size and availability, the emerging field of innovative implantable tissue engineering constructs gains interest and will also be discussed in this article.

  16. Bone metastasis versus bone marrow metastasis? Integration of diagnosis by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission/computed tomography in advanced malignancy with super bone scan: Two case reports and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yang Lin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Super scan pattern on technetium-99m methyldiphosphonate (Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy is a special condition of extremely high bone uptake relative to soft tissue with absent or faint renal radioactivity visualization, which is usually seen in diffuse bone metastases or discrete endocrine entities. Here, two cases with super bone scan are presented. One was a young man diagnosed with gastric cancer. The other was a middle-aged woman with a history of breast cancer with recent recurrence. Both cases had 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT diagnosis simultaneously. Based on imaging of 18F-FDG PET/CT, diffusely incremental 18F-FDG avidity in spine/pelvis on PET and subtle erosion of cortical bone on CT were seen. The cytological results of bone marrow biopsy showed evidence of malignant metastasis. However, there were several focal discrepant findings between the 18F-FDG PET/CT and Tc-99m MDP bone scan. According to integration of both imaging findings and the result of bone marrow biopsy, we believe that the disseminated malignant spread in bone marrow is a primitive alternation in the super bone scan and that it is also as a result of neoplasm-related endocrine factors.

  17. Osteoclasts prefer aged bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, K; Leeming, Diana Julie; Byrjalsen, I

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the age of the bones endogenously exerts control over the bone resorption ability of the osteoclasts, and found that osteoclasts preferentially develop and resorb bone on aged bone. These findings indicate that the bone matrix itself plays a role in targeted remodeling...... of aged bones....

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of massive bone allografts with histologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffner, E.G.; Soulen, R.L.; Ryan, J.R.; Qureshi, F.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to better understand the MRI appearance of massive bone allografts. The MRI findings of three massive bone allografts imaged in vivo were correlated with the histologic findings following removal of the allografts. A fourth allograft, never implanted, was imaged and evaluated histologically. Allografts were placed for the treatment of primary or recurrent osteosarcoma. The in-vivo allografts have a heterogeneous appearance on MRI which we attribute to the revascularization process. Fibrovascular connective tissue grows into the graft in a patchy, focal fashion, down the medullary canal from the graft-host junction and adjacent to the periosteum. The marrow spaces are initially devoid of normal cellular elements and occupied by fat and gelatinous material. This normal postoperative appearance of massive bone allografts must not be interpreted as recurrent neoplasm or infection in the allograft. Recognition of these complications rests on features outside the marrow. (orig./MG)

  19. Bone marker gene expression in calvarial bones: different bone microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amer, Osama

    2017-12-01

    In calvarial mice, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into osteoprogenitor cells and then differentiate into osteoblasts that differentiate into osteocytes, which become embedded within the bone matrix. In this case, the cells participating in bone formation include MSCs, osteoprogenitor cells, osteoblasts and osteocytes. The calvariae of C57BL/KaLwRijHsD mice consist of the following five bones: two frontal bones, two parietal bones and one interparietal bone. This study aimed to analyse some bone marker genes and bone related genes to determine whether these calvarial bones have different bone microenvironments. C57BL/KaLwRijHsD calvariae were carefully excised from five male mice that were 4-6 weeks of age. Frontal, parietal, and interparietal bones were dissected to determine the bone microenvironment in calvariae. Haematoxylin and eosin staining was used to determine the morphology of different calvarial bones under microscopy. TaqMan was used to analyse the relative expression of Runx2, OC, OSX, RANK, RANKL, OPG, N-cadherin, E-cadherin, FGF2 and FGFR1 genes in different parts of the calvariae. Histological analysis demonstrated different bone marrow (BM) areas between the different parts of the calvariae. The data show that parietal bones have the smallest BM area compared to frontal and interparietal bones. TaqMan data show a significant increase in the expression level of Runx2, OC, OSX, RANKL, OPG, FGF2 and FGFR1 genes in the parietal bones compared with the frontal and interparietal bones of calvariae. This study provides evidence that different calvarial bones, frontal, parietal and interparietal, contain different bone microenvironments.

  20. Review of Animal Models of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K. Simmons

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer bone metastases are associated with a poor prognosis and are considered incurable. Insight into the formation and growth of prostate cancer bone metastasis is required for development of new imaging and therapeutic strategies to combat this devastating disease. Animal models are indispensable in investigating cancer pathogenesis and evaluating therapeutics. Multiple animal models of prostate cancer bone metastasis have been developed, but few effectively model prostatic neoplasms and osteoblastic bone metastases as they occur in men. This review discusses the animal models that have been developed to investigate prostate cancer bone metastasis, with a focus on canine models and also includes human xenograft and rodent models. Adult dogs spontaneously develop benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer with osteoblastic bone metastases. Large animal models, such as dogs, are needed to develop new molecular imaging tools and effective focal intraprostatic therapy. None of the available models fully reflect the metastatic disease seen in men, although the various models have provided important insight into the metastatic process. As additional models are developed and knowledge from the different models is combined, the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer bone metastasis can be deciphered and targeted for development of novel therapies and molecular diagnostic imaging.

  1. Modular Fluted Tapered Stems in Aseptic Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel, Matthew P; Cottino, Umberto; Larson, Dirk R; Hanssen, Arlen D; Lewallen, David G; Berry, Daniel J

    2017-05-17

    Modular fluted tapered stems have become the most commonly employed category of femoral component in revision hip arthroplasty in North America as a result of favorable early results and simplicity of use. Despite wide adoption, the majority of published data are limited to relatively small series with modest follow-up. The goal of the current study was to determine the success rate and factors associated with success, failure, and complications of the use of modular fluted tapered stems in aseptic revision total hip arthroplasties (THAs) in a large patient cohort. We identified 519 aseptic femoral revisions during which a modular fluted tapered stem was utilized. Clinical outcomes, Kaplan-Meier survivorship, radiographic outcomes, and complications were assessed. The mean age at revision arthroplasty was 70 years, the mean body mass index (BMI) was 29 kg/m, and the mean duration of follow-up was 4.5 years (range, 2 to 14 years). The mean Harris hip score (HHS) improved significantly from 51 points preoperatively to 76 points at 2 years (p revisions had been performed: 6 because of aseptic loosening, 4 because of infection, 3 because of instability, 2 because of periprosthetic fracture, and 1 because of stem fracture. The 10-year survivorship was 96% with revision for any reason as the end point and 90% with any reoperation as the end point. Of the patients who were alive and had not undergone revision at the time of final follow-up, 12 had stem subsidence but all but 1 of these stems had stabilized after subsiding. Postoperative complications were noted in 12% of the cases. Repeat revision due to femoral component loosening was not correlated with the preoperative bone-loss category or patient demographic factors. In this large series, femoral revision with a modular fluted tapered stem provided a high rate of osseointegration and sustained improvement in clinical scores at the time of the last follow-up. There was also a high rate of successful implant fixation

  2. Revision surgery after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation in the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niethammer, Thomas R; Niethammer, Thomas; Valentin, Siegfried; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Gülecyüz, Mehmet F; Gülecyüz, Mehmet; Pietschmann, Matthias F; Pietschmann, Matthias; Müller, Peter E; Müller, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an established treatment for full thickness cartilage defects in the knee joint. However, little is known about cases when revision surgery is needed. The aim of the present study is to investigate the complication rates and the main reasons for revision surgery after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation in the knee joint. It is of particular interest to examine in which cases revision surgery is needed and in which cases a "wait and see" strategy should be used. A total of 143 consecutive patients with 171 cartilage defects were included in this study with a minimum follow-up of two years. All defects were treated with third generation ACI (NOVACART®3D). Clinical evaluation was carried out after six months, followed by an annual evaluation using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective score and the visual analogue scale (VAS) for rest and during activity. Revision surgery was documented. The revision rate was 23.4 % (n = 36). The following major reasons for revision surgery were found in our study: symptomatic bone marrow edema (8.3 %, n = 3), arthrofibrosis (22.2 %, n = 8) and partial graft cartilage deficiency (47.2 %, n = 17). The following revision surgery was performed: retrograde drilling combined with Iloprost infusion therapy for bone marrow oedema (8.4 %, n = 3), arthroscopic arthrolysis of the suprapatellar recess (22.2 %, n = 8) and microfracturing/antegrade drilling (47.3 %, n = 17). Significant improvements of clinical scores after revision surgery were observed. Revision surgery after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation is common and is needed primarily in cases with arthrofibrosis, partial graft cartilage deficiency and symptomatic bone marrow oedema resulting in a significantly better clinical outcome.

  3. [Ceramic-on-Ceramic in Total Hip Replacement Revision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchi, Davide; Gathen, Martin; Streicher, Robert; Wirtz, Dieter Christian

    2018-02-27

    C bearing in revision THA are revisions for aseptic loosening or recurrent dislocation in young patients, fractures of ceramic components, large acetabular defects or in patients that are allergic to bone cement components. Nevertheless, prospectively designed or randomized studies are lacking and needed to confirm CoC as optimal solution for revision THA cases. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. The impact of thyroid nodule size on the risk of malignancy in follicular neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Yasin; Mohamed, Salah Eldin H; Deniwar, Ahmed; Al-Qurayshi, Zaid H; Khan, Amna N; Moroz, Krzysztof; Friedlander, Paul; Kandil, Emad

    2015-03-01

    Studies have shown that the risk of malignancy in follicular neoplasms is as high as 30%. Often, surgery is recommended for such lesions, not for therapeutic purposes but as a diagnostic method, leading to increased hospital costs and related morbidities. Recent studies have suggested that tumor size predicts malignant potential of these follicular neoplasms. Our aim was to identify the impact of nodule size on the risk of malignancy for such lesions. A retrospective medical chart review was undertaken for patients who underwent thyroid surgery at a single academic North American Institution. A total of 120 follicular lesions, follicular neoplasms (Bethesda category IV) or follicular lesions of undetermined significance (Bethesda category III) in 110 patients undergoing thyroid surgery were evaluated. Nodule size as measured by ultrasound, fine-needle aspiration cytological results, and final histopathology reports were reviewed. Analysis was performed by classification according to nodule size: malignant on final pathological examination. The malignancy rate in nodulesmalignancy rate for follicular neoplasms. Hence, we recommend against routine total thyroidectomy for patients with follicular neoplasms based on the size criteria. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Factors associated with phyllodes tumor of the breast after core needle biopsy identifies fibroepithelial neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Daniel J; Salmans, Jessica A; Lassinger, Brian K; Contreras, Alejandro; Gutierrez, Carolina; Bonefas, Elizabeth; Liscum, Kathleen R; Silberfein, Eric J

    2012-11-01

    Phyllodes tumors represent less than 1% of all breast neoplasms and can mimic fibroadenoma on core needle biopsy (CNB). The treatment of fibroepithelial (FE) neoplasms identified on CNB is controversial. We sought to identify factors that were associated with phyllodes tumors after CNB suggested FE neoplasm. A retrospective database was queried for all patients diagnosed with FE neoplasm on CNB at Ben Taub General Hospital over a 10-y period. One hundred twenty-three patients were identified and demographic, clinical, and outcome data were analyzed. Of the 123 patients, 46 (37%) were found to have fibroadenomatous features and 59 (48%) were found to have FE features. All went on to have surgical excision. Forty (38%) contained phyllodes tumors, and 65 (62%) found no phyllodes tumor on final pathology. There were significant differences in the median size of the masses (4 cm versus 2.4 cm P phyllodes tumors and the group that did not on preoperative imaging. Further evaluation did not show any significant differences on preoperative imaging between benign and borderline/malignant phyllodes tumors. Hispanic ethnicity correlated with a higher chance of phyllodes tumor after CNB (P phyllodes tumor, surgical excision remains the standard of care; however, patients with suspicious FE neoplasms represent a treatment dilemma as many will prove to be benign. Preoperative size and the density of the mass on imaging and ethnicity were associated with phyllodes tumors on final pathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Simultaneous Occurrence of Different Follicular Neoplasms within the Same Thyroid Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şefika Burçak Polat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Neoplasms of the thyroid gland are classified according to the cells they originate from and commonly develop from cells of follicular origin. The most common differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC are papillary and follicular carcinomas. Coexistence of two different histological types of primary follicular thyroid neoplasm is a rare condition. There are previous reports of concomitant medullary and papillary thyroid cancers. However, there is scarce data about the simultaneous occurrence of the two different histological types of primary follicular thyroid tumors and this is the first study on that subject. Material and Method: From January 2007 to September 2014, our institutional database was reviewed for patients who underwent thyroid surgery for various indications. Medical records and cytopathology reports of those patients were examined retrospectively. Simultaneous neoplasms of follicular origin were noted. Results: A total of 3.700 patients were operated. Histopathological examination revealed a benign pattern in 2.686 (73% patients and a malignant pattern in 1.014 (27% patients. Among the patients with the diagnosis of DTC, only 20 (1.9% had a concomitant neoplasm within the same thyroid gland. Discussion: Such simultaneous tumors may be a part of a familial tumor syndrome or an unidentified novel gene mutation playing role in the pathogenesis of more than one type of tumor. Based on the current evidence, the synchronous occurrence of those neoplasms in a given patient is likely coincidental in the literature. Further studies on larger patient population with standardized genetic characterization are needed.

  7. Low grade Schwann cell neoplasms with leptomeningeal dissemination: clinicopathologic and autopsy findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Erika F.; Blakeley, Jaishri; Langmead, Shannon; Olivi, Alessandro; Tufaro, Anthony; Tabbarah, Abeer; Berkenblit, Gail; Sacks, Justin M.; Newsome, Scott D.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination of low grade Schwann cell neoplasms is an exceptionally rare occurrence, and has not been well documented in the literature. We encountered two cases of leptomeningeal dissemination of low grade Schwann cell neoplasms. Patient 1 was a 63-year-old woman with NF1 and a progressive low grade MPNST developing from a diffuse/plexiform orbital neurofibroma that arose in childhood. The neoplasm demonstrated local and leptomeningeal dissemination intracranially leading to the patient’s death. There was partial loss of H3K27 tri-methylation, p16 and collagen IV. Patient 2 was a 60-year-old man without NF1 who presented with cranial nerve symptoms and a disseminated neoplasm with a Schwann cell phenotype. The neoplasm stabilized after irradiation and chemotherapy but the patient died of medical complications. Autopsy findings documented disseminated leptomeningeal disease in the intracranial and spinal compartment. H3K27M tri-methylation was preserved. The clinicopathologic and autopsy findings are studied and presented, and the literature is reviewed. PMID:27666764

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection is an independent risk factor of early and advanced colorectal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Jun; Kim, Eun Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young-Ho; Baek, Sun-Young; Kim, Kyunga; Hong, Sung Noh

    2017-06-01

    The role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the development of colorectal neoplasm remains controversial. We examined the association between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasm in a large sample of healthy participants who underwent screening colonoscopy. A cross-sectional study of 8916 men, who participated in a regular health-screening examination that included an H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin G antibody test and colonoscopy, was conducted to evaluate the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasm. Multivariable analyses adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, regular exercise, regular aspirin use, and family history of colorectal cancer showed that the odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) for any adenoma and advanced neoplasm was 1.32 (1.07-1.61) and 1.90 (1.05-3.56) in participants with H. pylori infection and without H. pylori infection, respectively. The association persisted after further adjustment for inflammatory markers or metabolic variables including fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Regarding the location, a positive association was confined to cases with proximal adenomas and was observed similarly in all the evaluated subgroups. In a large-scale study, carefully controlled for confounding factors, involving asymptomatic participants without a history of colonoscopy, H. pylori infection was significantly associated with the risk of any colorectal adenoma and advanced colorectal neoplasm. Prospective studies are necessary to determine whether H. pylori eradication can reduce this risk. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Classification tree analysis of second neoplasms in survivors of childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jazbec, Janez; Todorovski, Ljupčo; Jereb, Berta

    2007-01-01

    Reports on childhood cancer survivors estimated cumulative probability of developing secondary neoplasms vary from 3,3% to 25% at 25 years from diagnosis, and the risk of developing another cancer to several times greater than in the general population. In our retrospective study, we have used the classification tree multivariate method on a group of 849 first cancer survivors, to identify childhood cancer patients with the greatest risk for development of secondary neoplasms. In observed group of patients, 34 develop secondary neoplasm after treatment of primary cancer. Analysis of parameters present at the treatment of first cancer, exposed two groups of patients at the special risk for secondary neoplasm. First are female patients treated for Hodgkin's disease at the age between 10 and 15 years, whose treatment included radiotherapy. Second group at special risk were male patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who were treated at the age between 4,6 and 6,6 years of age. The risk groups identified in our study are similar to the results of studies that used more conventional approaches. Usefulness of our approach in study of occurrence of second neoplasms should be confirmed in larger sample study, but user friendly presentation of results makes it attractive for further studies

  10. The synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in patients with stomach cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Su; Jung, Woon Tae; Kim, Cha Young; Ha, Chang Yoon; Min, Hyun Ju; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae Hyo

    2011-10-01

    The association between stomach cancer and colorectal cancer is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in patients with stomach cancer. A total of 123 patients with stomach cancer (86 male) and 246 consecutive, age- and sex-matched persons without stomach cancer were analyzed from July 2005 to June 2010. All of them underwent colonoscopy within 6 months after undergoing gastroscopy. The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher in the stomach cancer group (35.8%) than in the control group (17.9%) (P stomach cancer (odds ratio [OR], 3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71 to 5.63). In particular, the difference in the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was more prominent in the patients above 50 years old (OR, 3.54; 95% CI, 1.80 to 6.98). The results showed that the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was higher in patients with stomach cancer than in those without stomach cancer. Therefore, patients with stomach cancer should be regarded as a high-risk group for colorectal neoplasms, and colonoscopy should be recommended for screening.

  11. Significance of acquired diverticular disease of the vermiform appendix: a marker of regional neoplasms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, Klaus; Hjorth, Sofie Vetli; Engel, Ulla; Schlesinger, Nis Hallundbæk; Holck, Susanne

    2012-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of acquired diverticulum of the appendix (DA), including incipient forms and its possible significance as a marker of local/regional neoplasms. The pathology database at Hvidovre Hospital was searched for appendix specimens, received between 2001 and 2010, coded for DA or for a space-occupying lesion. Slides were reviewed to determine DA status and the nature of lesions possibly causing DA. Among 4413 appendix specimens, DA were identified in 39 (0.9%, CI 0.6% to 1.2%) cases, 17 (43.6%, 28.0% to 59.2%) of which additionally harboured an appendiceal neoplasm/neoplastic precursor, whereas this figure was 1.2% (CI 0.9% to 1.6%) for non-DA specimens (p<0.0001). Six of the 39 DA specimens comprised incipient DA, three of which coexisted with appendiceal neoplasms. In addition, local/regional non-neoplastic lesions (six cases) and colorectal carcinomas (four cases) coexisted with DA. DA has significance as a putative marker of local/regional neoplasms. Therefore, a DA specimen proved significantly more likely to harbour a neoplastic growth than a non-DA counterpart. Submission for microscopy of the entire DA specimen, whether transmural or only incipient, and a comment in the pathology report on the occasional concurrence of local/regional neoplasms in this setting seem appropriate. The observation of DA may thus provide a valuable contribution in the diagnostic process.

  12. [Frontier in bone biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Bone is an active organ in which bone mass is maintained by the balance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption, i.e., coupling of bone formation and bone resorption. Recent advances in molecular bone biology uncovered the molecular mechanism of the coupling. A fundamental role of osteocyte in the maintenance of bone mass and whole body metabolism has also been revealed recently. Moreover, neurons and neuropeptides have been shown to be intimately involved in bone homeostasis though inter-organ network, in addition to "traditional" regulators of bone metabolism such as soluble factors and cytokines

  13. Revision total knee arthroplasty with the use of trabecular metal cones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus L; Petersen, Michael Mygind; Schrøder, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    analysis at 24 months showed the same net direction of rotation for the groups around the y-, z-axis and around the x-, y-axis for translation. Tibial revision implants with TM Cone result in an early stable situation with less irregular migration pattern than revision without TM Cone....... Orthopaedic Research Institute bone loss classification and NexGen revision system were used. Radiostereometric analysis was performed with 24 months of follow-up. Maximum total point motion: stable migration was seen in the TM Cone group. No statistically significant difference was found. Segment motion...

  14. Outcomes and complication rates of different bone grafting modalities in long bone fracture nonunions: a retrospective cohort study in 182 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flierl, Michael A; Smith, Wade R; Mauffrey, Cyril; Irgit, Kaan; Williams, Allison E; Ross, Erin; Peacher, Gabrielle; Hak, David J; Stahel, Philip F

    2013-09-09

    Novel bone substitutes have challenged the notion of autologous bone grafting as the 'gold standard' for the surgical treatment of fracture nonunions. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that autologous bone grafting is equivalent to other bone grafting modalities in the management of fracture nonunions of the long bones. A retrospective review of patients with fracture nonunions included in two prospective databases was performed at two US level 1 trauma centers from January 1, 1998 (center 1) or January 1, 2004 (center 2), respectively, until December 31, 2010 (n = 574). Of these, 182 patients required adjunctive bone grafting and were stratified into the following cohorts: autograft (n = 105), allograft (n = 38), allograft and autograft combined (n = 16), and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) with or without adjunctive bone grafting (n = 23). The primary outcome parameter was time to union. Secondary outcome parameters consisted of complication rates and the rate of revision procedures and revision bone grafting. The autograft cohort had a statistically significant shorter time to union (198 ± 172-225 days) compared to allograft (416 ± 290-543 days) and exhibited a trend towards earlier union when compared to allograft/autograft combined (389 ± 159-619 days) or rhBMP-2 (217 ± 158-277 days). Furthermore, the autograft cohort had the lowest rate of surgical revisions (17%) and revision bone grafting (9%), compared to allograft (47% and 32%), allograft/autograft combined (25% and 31%), or rhBMP-2 (27% and 17%). The overall new-onset postoperative infection rate was significantly lower in the autograft group (12.4%), compared to the allograft cohort (26.3%) (P grafting appears to represent the bone grafting modality of choice with regard to safety and efficiency in the surgical management of long bone fracture nonunions.

  15. Hip Arthroplasty and its Revision in a Child: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharehdaghi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Hasan; Eshraghi, Reza; Mousavian, Alireza; Assadian, Maryam

    2015-07-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the leading cause of hip replacement in young children. However, arthroplasty in this population is challenging with several concerns about quality of the growing bone, young age for revision surgery, and difficulties in potential several revisions. In this study we introduce a case of a 12-year old who is one of the youngest patients to undergo revision hip arthroplasty. The index operation was done as a hybrid replacement, cemented for stem and press fit for acetabular component. Two years later revision was done with severe femoral deficiency. This second procedure was challenging but with short-term promising results. So we reviewed the literature for arthroplasty in this young population regarding recent findings and trends. According to the literature survival of the prosthesis is longer with a cemented acetabular component and press fit stem; however, there are evidences that show poor outcome of joint replacement after the first revision in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients.

  16. Multilobular tumor of the zygomatic bone in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Leonardi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Multilobular tumor of bone (MTB (also known as Multilobular Osteochondrosarcoma is an uncommon bone tumor frequently located on the skull of dogs, rarely on the ribs or pelvis. These neoplasms are slow growing, locally invasive, and have the potential to compress and invade the brain. A 10-year-old mixed breed dog was presented with a history of approximately 4 months of progressive growth of a left zygomatic mass. Radiographic investigation revealed a finely granular or stippled non homogeneous radiopaque mass involving the zygomatic arch. After surgery, grossly the neoplasm consisted of multiple, variably sized, grayish-white to yellow nodules separated by collagenous septa of different thickness. Histologically, the tumor was characterized by the presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid and cartilage, separated by a net of fibrous septae. This neoplastic pattern was consistent with a typical multilobular tumor of bone and based on clinical, radiographical, gross and light microscopic findings the definitive diagnosis was made. While reviewing veterinary literature only few cases of MTB were found in dogs.

  17. Chondroblastoma of the cuboid with an associated aneurysmal bone cyst: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepah Yasir

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the case of a young adult who presented with a painful foot due to chondroblastoma associated with an aneurismal bone cyst. Chondroblastoma is a rare benign cartilaginous neoplasm that accounts for approximately 1% of all bone tumors and characteristically arises in the epiphysis of a long bone, particularly the humerus, tibia, and femur. Chondroblastoma can affect people of all ages. It is, however, most common in children and young adults between the ages of 10 and 20 years. Association of chondroblastoma with aneurysmal bone cyst is well documented however this association has only once been reported in the cuboid. Imaging techniques should be supplemented with an open biopsy for the final diagnosis. Management with curettage, use of high speed burr and bone grafting has shown very good outcomes.

  18. Cases of diffusely increased 18F FDG uptake in bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2009-01-01

    A whole body imaging of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT provides assessment of FDG uptake in bone marrow and other systemic organs. Diffuse increase of FDG uptake in bone marrow can be associated with leukocytosis, infection, anemia, administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor or erythropoietin. and cytokine-producing neoplasms and myeloproliferative syndromes, and etc, and this finding can be an important sign indicative of hyper-metabolism in hemopoietic tissue associated by various etiology. Diffuse increase of FDG uptake in bone marrow affect on FDG uptake in other organs or primary lesions, and must be differentiated from diffuse bone marrow involvement of malignant tumors. In this paper, we report cases of diffuse increase of FDG uptake in bone marrow experienced in our hospital, and discuss the mechanisms and diagnostic importance of this finding, by referring to the published literatures. (author)

  19. Serous Cystadenoma of the Pancreas Presenting as a Third Primary Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydın Şeref Köksal

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Serous cystadenomas are the most common cystic neoplasms of the pancreas. They may occur solely or coexist with other neoplasms. A 10 cm mass involving the body of the pancreas was observed in the computed tomography of a 61-year-old man with a previous history of bladder and prostate carcinoma. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of the mass demonstrated multiple small cysts associated with a central calcified scar. A distal pancreatectomy was performed. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of serous microcystic adenoma. This is the first report of a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas with two metachronous neoplasms. This feature should be kept in mind during the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with serous cystadenoma.

  20. Neoplasms of the apocrine sweat glands in 44 dogs and 10 cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaher, K M; Anderson, W I; Scott, D W

    1990-10-20

    Neoplasms of the apocrine sweat glands accounted for 2.0 per cent and 3.6 per cent, respectively, of all canine and feline skin neoplasms diagnosed during a period of three years. They occurred in dogs from six to 17 years of age of both sexes, and golden retrievers appeared to be predisposed; they occurred in cats from six to 17 years of age and there were no breed or sex predilections. In both species, the neoplasms were usually solitary and occurred anywhere on the body; they were nearly always carcinomas and histologically were usually of the solid type. There were no clinical measurements that made it possible to distinguish reliably between benign and malignant lesions. No distant metastases were recorded, even though 22.5 per cent of the canine carcinomas had invaded the lymphatic system.