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Sample records for bone disorder ckd-mbd

  1. Circulating levels of sclerostin but not DKK1 associate with laboratory parameters of CKD-MBD.

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    Geert J Behets

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence indicates that a disturbed Wnt-β-catenin signaling may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone and mineral disorder (CKD-MBD. Data on the impact of CKD on circulating levels of the Wnt antagonists sclerostin and Dickkopf related protein 1 (DKK1 and the relationship with laboratory parameters of CKD-MBD are incomplete.We analyzed serum sclerostin and DKK1 in 308 patients across the stages of chronic kidney disease (kDOQI stage 1-2 n = 41; CKD stage 3 n = 54; CKD stage 4-5 n = 54; hemodialysis n = 100; peritoneal dialysis n = 59 as well as in 49 healthy controls. We investigated associations with demographics, renal function, parameters of mineral metabolism including 25(OH vitamin D, 1,25(OH2 vitamin D, biointact fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23, and parathyroid hormone (PTH, and bone turnover markers.Serum sclerostin, but not DKK1, increases in more advanced stages of CKD and associates with PTH, phosphate, and 1,25(OH2 vitamin D concentrations. Bone turnover markers are highest in hemodialysis patients presenting the combination of high PTH with low sclerostin level. Serum DKK1 levels are lower in CKD patients than in controls and are not associated with laboratory parameters of mineral metabolism. Interestingly, a direct association between DKK1 and platelet count was observed.In CKD, serum levels of the Wnt inhibitors DKK1 and sclerostin are unrelated, indicating different sites of origin and/ or different regulatory mechanisms. Sclerostin, as opposed to DKK1, may qualify as a biomarker of CKD-MBD, particularly in dialysis patients. DKK1 serum levels, remarkably, correlate almost uniquely with blood platelet counts.

  2. Calciphylaxis: Beyond CKD-MBD.

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    Fernández, María; Morales, Enrique; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Polanco, Natalia; Hernández, Eduardo; Mérida, Eva; Praga, Manuel

    Calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (CUA), also called calciphylaxis, is a rare but potentially fatal vascular disorder that almost exclusively affects patients with chronic renal failure. The objective of this study was to analyse various risk factors for developing CUA and its subsequent clinical course according to the treatment received. A retrospective study that included patients diagnosed with CUA from December 1999 to December 2015. Various risk factors, clinical course and treatment options were analysed. A total of 28 patients (53.6% females) with a mean age of 67.2±11.8 (38-88) years were included. At the time of diagnosis, 53.6% were on haemodialysis, 25% were kidney transplant patients and 21.4% had normal renal function. The use of steroids (100%, P=.001) was the main risk factor in renal transplant patients. Skin lesions resolved in 60.7% (especially in those receiving multitargeted therapy). Patient survival at 12 months was 29% in transplant patients, 57% in haemodialysis patients and 100% in normal renal function patients (log-rank 6.88, P=.032). Chronic renal failure (P=.03) and hypoalbuminaemia (P=.02) were the main risk factor for CUA mortality. Although the incidence of CUA remains low, CUA mortality is very high, Special attention to its occurrence in kidney transplant patients and «non-renal» CUA forms is required. Oral anticoagulants and steroids appear to be the main risk factors, CUA is a challenge; a registry of patients and determining standard therapy are required. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. The evolving world of chronic kidney disease mineral bone disorder

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    Bellasi, A.; Galassi, A.; Cozzolino, M.; Di Iorio, B.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease – mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. In vitro and animal models suggest that phosphorous, calcium, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D abnormalities, mediate the cardiovascular and bone diseases that characterise CKD-MBD and increase the risk of death. Currently, mineral abnormalities are corrected through phosphorous restriction, phosphate binders, calcimimetics and vitamin D administration. Nonetheless, data in...

  4. The Evolving World of Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral Bone Disorder

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    Antonio Bellasi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease – mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. In vitro and animal models suggest that phosphorous, calcium, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D abnormalities, mediate the cardiovascular and bone diseases that characterise CKD-MBD and increase the risk of death. Currently, mineral abnormalities are corrected through phosphorous restriction, phosphate binders, calcimimetics and vitamin D administration. Nonetheless, data in humans that support the use of these compounds are still scarce, mainly based on observational studies. Thus, a considerable number of doubts and questions still challenge clinicians dealing with CKD patients and mineral metabolism imbalances. We herein critically review clinical evidence that support the use of different drugs in CKD-MBD.

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder in the Elderly Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

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    Heaf, James Goya

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to review the literature concerning the treatment of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) in the elderly peritoneal dialysis (PD) patient. ♦ RESULTS: Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder is a major problem in the elderly PD patient...

  6. A critical appraisal of chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorders clinical practice guidelines using the AGREE II instrument.

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    Sekercioglu, Nigar; Al-Khalifah, Reem; Ewusie, Joycelyne Efua; Elias, Rosilene M; Thabane, Lehana; Busse, Jason W; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Iorio, Alfonso; Isayama, Tetsuya; Martínez, Juan Pablo Díaz; Florez, Ivan D; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2017-02-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD) suffer high rates of morbidity and mortality, in particular related to bone and cardiovascular outcomes. The management of CKD-MBD remains challenging. The objective of this systematic survey is to critically appraise clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) addressing CKD-MBD. Data sources included MEDLINE, EMBASE, the National Guideline Clearinghouse, Guideline International Network and Turning Research into Practice up to May 2016. Teams of two reviewers, independently and in duplicate, screened titles and abstracts and potentially eligible full text reports to determine eligibility and subsequently appraised the guidelines using the Advancing Guideline Development, Reporting and Evaluation in Health Care instrument II (AGREE). Sixteen CPGs published from 2003 to 2015 addressing the diagnosis and management of CKD-MBD in adult patients (11 English, two Spanish, one Italian, one Portuguese and one Slovak) proved eligible. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guideline performed best with respect to AGREE II criteria; only three other CPGs warranted high scores on all domains. All other guidelines received scores of under 60% on one or more domains. Major discrepancies in recommendations were not, however, present, and we found no association between quality of CPGs which was not associated with resulting recommendations. Most guidelines assessing CKD-MBD suffer from serious shortcomings using AGREE criteria although limitations with respect to AGREE criteria do not necessarily lead to inappropriate recommendations.

  7. Impact of surgical parathyroidectomy on chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD - A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Mugurel Apetrii

    Full Text Available For more than 6 decades, many patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD have undergone surgical parathyroidectomy (sPTX for severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT mainly based historical clinical practice patterns, but not on evidence of outcome.We aimed in this meta-analysis to evaluate the benefits and harms of sPTX in patients with SHPT. We searched MEDLINE (inception to October 2016, EMBASE and Cochrane Library (through Issue 10 of 12, October 2016 and website clinicaltrials.gov (October 2016 without language restriction. Eligible studies evaluated patients reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR, below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 (CKD 3-5 stages with hyperparathyroidism who underwent sPTX. Reviewers working independently and in duplicate extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The final analysis included 15 cohort studies, comprising 24,048 participants. Compared with standard treatment, sPTX significantly decreased all-cause mortality (RR 0.74 [95% CI, 0.66 to 0.83] in End Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD patients with biochemical and / or clinical evidence of SHPT. sPTX was also associated with decreased cardiovascular mortality (RR 0.59 [95% CI, 0.46 to 0.76] in 6 observational studies that included almost 10,000 patients. The available evidence, mostly observational, is at moderate risk of bias, and limited by indirect comparisons and inconsistency in reporting for some outcomes (eg. short term adverse events, including documented voice change or episodes of severe hypocalcaemia needing admission or long-term adverse events, including undetectable PTH levels, risk of fractures etc.. Taken together, the results of this meta-analysis would suggest a clinically significant beneficial effect of sPTX on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in CKD patients with SHPT. However, given the observational nature of the included studies, the case for a properly conducted, independent randomised controlled trial comparing surgery with medical therapy and featuring many different outcomes from mortality to quality of life (QoL is now very strong.

  8. Vitamin D, Phosphate and Fibroblast Growth Factor 23: A role in the pathogenesis and management of Chronic Kidney Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral and Bone Disorder

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    Damasiewicz, Matthew John

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined by the presence of proteinuria or decreased kidney function, with a prevalence of 10-15% in the adult population. CKD can progress to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and is associated with progressive abnormalities of bone and mineral metabolism, defined as CKD mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The use of vitamin D in CKD, the optimal level for initiating treatment and the use of current and novel biomarkers in the management of ...

  9. Diagnosis, Evaluation, Prevention, and Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder: Synopsis of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes 2017 Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

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    Ketteler, Markus; Block, Geoffrey A; Evenepoel, Pieter; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Herzog, Charles A; McCann, Linda; Moe, Sharon M; Shroff, Rukshana; Tonelli, Marcello A; Toussaint, Nigel D; Vervloet, Marc G; Leonard, Mary B

    2018-02-20

    The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) 2017 Clinical Practice Guideline Update for the Diagnosis, Evaluation, Prevention, and Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD) is a selective update of the prior CKD-MBD guideline published in 2009. The guideline update and the original publication are intended to assist practitioners caring for adults with CKD and those receiving long-term dialysis. Development of the guideline update followed an explicit process of evidence review and appraisal. The approach adopted by the Work Group and the evidence review team was based on systematic reviews of relevant trials, appraisal of the quality of the evidence, and rating of the strength of recommendations according to the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. Searches of the English-language literature were conducted through September 2015 and were supplemented with targeted searches through February 2017. Final modification of the guidelines was informed by a public review process involving numerous stakeholders, including patients, subject matter experts, and industry and national organizations. The update process resulted in the revision of 15 recommendations. This synopsis focuses primarily on recommendations for diagnosis of and testing for CKD-MBD and treatment of CKD-MBD that emphasizes decreasing phosphate levels, maintaining calcium levels, and addressing elevated parathyroid hormone levels in adults with CKD stage G3a to G5 and those receiving dialysis. Key elements include basing treatment on trends in laboratory values rather than a single abnormal result and being cautious to avoid hypercalcemia when treating secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  10. Report on 2012 ISN Nexus symposium: 'Bone and the kidney'

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    Drüeke, Tilman B; Olgaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    in the fascinating world of the many hormones and factors involved in mineral homeostasis, bone disease, and vascular calcification of patients with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The possibility of exchanging cutting-edge insights and discussing clinically relevant information on all......The Copenhagen 2012 Nexus symposium on 'Bone and the Kidney' followed the 'bench to bedside' approach of the Nexus symposia organized by the International Society of Nephrology. The main goal of the present symposium was to provide a unique forum for scientists and clinicians with an interest...... aspects of the bone-kidney axis was open to all participants. The numerous lectures given at the symposium addressed current knowledge and recent advances in kidney and bone physiology, as well as the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapy of CKD-MBD, inspired by the intention to enhance the translation...

  11. The Kidney-Vascular-Bone Axis in the Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder.

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    Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-03-01

    The last 25 years have been characterized by dramatic improvements in short-term patient and allograft survival after kidney transplantation. Long-term patient and allograft survival remains limited by cardiovascular disease and chronic allograft injury, among other factors. Cardiovascular disease remains a significant contributor to mortality in native chronic kidney disease as well as cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease more than doubles that of the general population. The chronic kidney disease (CKD)-mineral bone disorder (MBD) is a syndrome recently coined to embody the biochemical, skeletal, and cardiovascular pathophysiology that results from disrupting the complex systems biology between the kidney, skeleton, and cardiovascular system in native and transplant kidney disease. The CKD-MBD is a unique kidney disease-specific syndrome containing novel cardiovascular risk factors, with an impact reaching far beyond traditional notions of renal osteodystrophy and hyperparathyroidism. This overview reviews current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the CKD-MBD, including emerging concepts surrounding the importance of circulating pathogenic factors released from the injured kidney that directly cause cardiovascular disease in native and transplant chronic kidney disease, with potential application to mechanisms of chronic allograft injury and vasculopathy.

  12. Calcium Regulation and Bone Mineral Metabolism in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Vickram Tejwani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD. CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD.

  13. A New Murine Model of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder

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    Bianca Frauscher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with mineral and bone disorder (MBD, which is the main cause of the extensively increased cardiovascular mortality in the CKD population. We now aimed to establish a new murine experimental CKD-MBD model. Dilute brown non-Agouti (DBA/2 mice were fed with high-phosphate diet for 4 (HPD4 or 7 (HPD7 days, then with standard chow diet (SCD and subsequently followed until day 84. They were compared to DBA/2 mice maintained on SCD during the whole study period. Both 4 and 7 days HPD-fed mice developed phosphate nephropathy with tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, decreased glomerular filtration rate, and increased serum urea levels. The abdominal aorta of HPD-treated mice showed signs of media calcification. Histomorphometric analysis of HPD-treated mice showed decreased bone volume/tissue volume, low mineral apposition rate, and low bone formation rate as compared to SCD-fed mice, despite increased parathyroid hormone levels. Overall, the observed phenotype was more pronounced in the HPD7 group. In summary, we established a new, noninvasive, and therefore easy to perform reproducible CKD-MBD model, which showed media calcification, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and low-turnover bone disease.

  14. The use of bone turnover markers in chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders.

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    Chiang, Cherie

    2017-03-01

    Bone turnover markers assist in fracture risk prediction, management and monitoring of osteoporosis in patients without chronic kidney disease (CKD). The use in CKD-mineral bone disorder (MBD) has been limited as many of these markers and breakdown products are renally excreted, including the most commonly used and well standardized procollagen type I N propeptide and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen. Of the markers unaffected by renal function, bone specific alkaline phosphatase is associated with mortality and fracture rate in CKD subjects and is now available on several automated analysers. When used in combination with PTH, bone specific alkaline phosphatase as a bone formation marker correlated well with bone biopsy histomorphometry in predicting adynamic bone disease. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b is a resorption marker that is under development for automation. Both high and low bone turnover in CKD-MBD patients are associated with increased fracture and mortality risk. Bone biopsy as the gold standard to differentiate between adynamic bone disease and osteitis fibrosa is limited by availability and cost. Appropriate use of bone turnover markers is vital in the decision to commence anti-resorptive agents, and to monitor efficacy in order to avoid over suppression of bone turnover, which may lead to stress fractures. Further efforts are required to develop markers unaffected by renal function with standardized cut-off values and fracture as well as vascular calcification end-points. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  15. Diagnostic Workup for Disorders of Bone and Mineral Metabolism in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in the Era of KDIGO Guidelines

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    Luigi Francesco Morrone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes is an international nonprofit organization devoted to “improve the care and outcomes of kidney disease patients worldwide through promoting coordination, collaboration, and integration of initiatives to develop and implement clinical practice guidelines.” The mineral and bone disorder (MBD in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD has been the first area of interest of KDIGO international initiative. KDIGO guidelines on CKD-MBD were published in 2009 with the intent to modify the previous KDOQI guidelines that had failed to consistently change the global outcome of CKD patients. After the publication of KDOQI guidelines for bone metabolism and disease in 2003, a large number of observational data emerged in literature linking disordered mineral metabolism with adverse clinical outcomes. Notwithstanding this large body of observational data, a paucity of evidence from high-quality clinical trials was available for the development of KDIGO guidelines. Herein, a summary will be provided of the most important findings of KDIGO guidelines regarding the diagnostic workup and clinical monitoring of CKD-MBD patients.

  16. Dietary interventions for mineral and bone disorder in people with chronic kidney disease.

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    Liu, Zhuangzhu; Su, Guobin; Guo, Xinfeng; Wu, Yifan; Liu, Xusheng; Zou, Chuan; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Qianchun; Xu, Yuan; Ma, Weizhong

    2015-09-16

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a systemic dysfunction of mineral and bone metabolism in people with CKD. Recent research shows that phosphate retention plays a significant role in the development of CKD-MBD. Compared with drug therapies, dietary interventions may be simple, inexpensive and feasible for phosphate retention. However, there is little evidence to support these interventions. Our objective was to assess the benefits and harms of any dietary intervention for preventing and treating CKD-MBD. We searched Cochrane Kidney and Transplant's Specialised Register to 27 August 2015 through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. We also searched the Chinese Biomedicine Database (CBM) (1976 to August 2015), China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI) (1979 to August 2015), and VIP (1989 to August 2015). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs looking at dietary interventions for prevention or treatment of CKD-MBD were eligible for inclusion. Two authors independently assessed the eligibility, methodological quality, and extracted data. Continuous outcomes (serum calcium level, serum phosphorus level, calcium × phosphate product, parathyroid hormone (PTH), fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) and alkaline phosphatase) were expressed as mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Dichotomous outcomes (mortality) were expressed as risk ratio (RR) with 95% CI. We used a random-effects model to meta-analyse studies. Nine studies were included in this review which analysed 634 participants. Study duration ranged from 4 to 24 weeks. The interventions included calcium-enriched bread, low phosphorus intake, low protein intake, very low protein intake, post haemodialysis supplements and hypolipaemic diet. Only one study reported death; none of the included studies reported cardiovascular events or fractures. There was insufficient reporting of design and

  17. Optimization of bone health in children before and after renal transplantation: current perspectives and future directions

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    Kristen eSgambat

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The accrual of healthy bone during the critical period of childhood and adolescence sets the stage for lifelong skeletal health. However, in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD, disturbances in mineral metabolism and endocrine homeostasis begin early on, leading to alterations in bone turnover, mineralization, and volume, and impairing growth. Risk factors for CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD include nutritional vitamin D deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, increased fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23, altered growth hormone and insulin like growth factor-1 (GH/IGF-1 axis, delayed puberty, malnutrition, and metabolic acidosis. After kidney transplantation, nutritional vitamin D deficiency, persistent hyperparathyroidism, tertiary FGF23 excess, hypophosphatemia, hypomagnesaemia, immunosuppressive therapy, and alteration of sex hormones continue to impair bone health and growth. As function of the renal allograft declines over time, CKD-MBD associated changes are reactivated, further impairing bone health. Strategies to optimize bone health post-transplant include healthy diet, weight-bearing exercise, correction of vitamin D deficiency and acidosis, electrolyte abnormalities, steroid avoidance, and consideration of recombinant human growth hormone therapy. Other drug therapies have been used in adult transplant recipients, but there is insufficient evidence for use in the pediatric population at the present time. Future therapies to be explored include anti-FGF23 antibodies, FGF23 receptor blockers, and treatments targeting the colonic microbiota by reduction of generation of bacterial toxins and adsorption of toxic end products that affect bone mineralization.

  18. The consequences of chronic kidney disease on bone metabolism and growth in children.

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    Bacchetta, Justine; Harambat, Jérôme; Cochat, Pierre; Salusky, Isidro B; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine

    2012-08-01

    Growth retardation, decreased final height and renal osteodystrophy (ROD) are common complications of childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD), resulting from a combination of abnormalities in the growth hormone (GH) axis, vitamin D deficiency, hyperparathyroidism, hypogonadism, inadequate nutrition, cachexia and drug toxicity. The impact of CKD-associated bone and mineral disorders (CKD-MBD) may be immediate (serum phosphate/calcium disequilibrium) or delayed (poor growth, ROD, fractures, vascular calcifications, increased morbidity and mortality). In 2012, the clinical management of CKD-MBD in children needs to focus on three main objectives: (i) to provide an optimal growth in order to maximize the final height with an early management with recombinant GH therapy when required, (ii) to equilibrate calcium/phosphate metabolism so as to obtain acceptable bone quality and cardiovascular status and (iii) to correct all metabolic and clinical abnormalities that can worsen bone disease, growth and cardiovascular disease, i.e. metabolic acidosis, anaemia, malnutrition and 25(OH)vitamin D deficiency. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the mineral, bone and vascular abnormalities associated with CKD in children in terms of pathophysiology, diagnosis and clinical management.

  19. Influence of vitamin D receptor polymorphisms on biochemical markers of mineral bone disorders in South African patients with chronic kidney disease.

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    Waziri, Bala; Dix-Peek, Therese; Dickens, Caroline; Duarte, Raquel; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2018-02-07

    It remains unclear whether genetic factors may explain the reported variation in the levels of biochemical markers of chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorders (CKD- MBD) across ethnic groups. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the influence of vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms on secondary hyperparathyroidism and its association with vitamin D levels in black and white South African study participants. This was a cross sectional study involving 272 CKD stage 3- 5D patients and 90 healthy controls. The four major VDR polymorphisms (Bsm 1, Fok 1, Taq 1, and Apa1) were genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR -RFLP) method. In addition, biochemical markers of CKD-MBD were measured to determine their associations with the four VDR polymorphisms. With the exception of Taq I polymorphism, the distribution of the VDR polymorphisms differed significantly between blacks and whites. In hemodialysis patients, the Bb genotype was significantly associated with moderate secondary hyperparathyroidism (OR, 3.88; 95 CI 1.13-13.25, p = 0.03) and severe hyperparathyroidism (OR, 2.54; 95 CI 1.08-5.96, p = 0.03). This was consistent with the observed higher levels of median parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 and mean phosphate in patients with Bb genotype. This candidate risk genotype (Bb) was over represented in blacks compared to whites (71.0% versus 55.6%, p kidney disease. In addition, study participants with FokFf genotype are at increased of developing severe 25 -hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] deficiency.

  20. Prevalence and severity of disordered mineral metabolism in patients with chronic kidney disease: A study from a tertiary care hospital in India

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    Sanjay Vikrant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disordered mineral metabolism is common complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, there are limited data on the pattern of these disturbances in Indian CKD population. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD over a period of 3 years. The biochemical markers of CKD-MBD, namely, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH, and 25-hydoxyvitamin Vitamin D3 (25OHD, were measured in newly diagnosed CKD Stage 3–5 and prevalent CKD Stage 5D adult patients. Results: A total of 462 patients of CKD Stage 3–5D were studied. The frequency of various biochemical abnormalities was hypocalcemia (23.8%, hypercalcemia (5.4%, hypophosphatemia (2.8%, hyperphosphatemia (55.4%, raised alkaline phosphatase (56.9%, secondary hyperparathyroidism (82.7%, and hypoparathyroidism (1.5%. 25OHD was done in 335 (72.5% patients and 90.4% were found to have Vitamin D deficiency. About 70.6% of the patients had iPTH levels were above kidney disease outcomes quality initiative (KDOQI target range. Nondiabetic CKD as compared to diabetic CKD had a higher alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.016, a higher iPTH (P = 0.001 a higher proportion of patients with iPTH above KDOQI target range (P = 0.09, and an elevated alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.004. The 25OHD levels were suggestive of severe Vitamin D deficiency in 33.7%, Vitamin D deficiency in 45.4%, and Vitamin D insufficiency in 11.3% patients. There was a significant positive correlation between iPTH with alkaline phosphatase (r = 0.572, P = 0.001, creatinine (r = 0.424, P = 0.001, and phosphorus (r = 0.241, P = 0.001 and a significant negative correlation with hemoglobin (r = −0.325, 0.001, age (r = −0.169, P = 0.002, and 25OHD (r = −0.126, P = 0.021. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, an elevated alkaline phosphatase was a significant predictor of hyperparathyroidism (odds ratio 9.7, 95

  1. [[GUIDELINES FOR THE PREVENTION, MONITORING AND THERAPY OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE-METABOLIC BONE DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

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    Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina; Pavlović, Draško; Šmalcelj, Ružica; Tomić-Brzac, Hrvojka; Orlic, Lidija; Radić, Josipa; Vujičić, Božidar; Lovčić, Vesna; Pavić, Eva; Klarić, Dragan; Gulin, Marijana; Spasovski, Goce; Ljutić, Dragan; Danic, Davorin; Prgomet, Drago; Resić, Halima; Ratković, Marina; Kes, Petar; Raćki, Sanjin

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a systemic disease with numerous complications associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Chronic kidney disease-metabolic bone disease (CKD-MBD) starts at early stages of CKD with phosphorus accumulation and consequent initiation of numerous events that result with the development of secondary hyperparathyroidism with changes on bones and extraskeletal tissues. The most important and clinically most relevant consequences of CKD-MBD are vascular calcifications which contribute to cardiovascular mortality. Patients with the increased risk for the development of CKD-MBD should be recognized and treated. Prevention is the most important therapeutic option. The first step should be nutritional counseling with vitamin supplementation if necessary and correction of mineral status. Progression of CKD requires more intensive medicamentous treatment with the additional correction of metabolic acidosis and anemia. Renal replacement therapy should be timely initiated, with the adequate dose of dislaysis. Ideally, preemptive renal transplantion should be offered in individuals without contraindication for immunosuppressive therapy.

  2. A potential kidney-bone axis involved in the rapid minute-to-minute regulation of plasma Ca2+

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    Nordholm, Anders; Mace, Maria L; Gravesen, Eva

    2015-01-01

    .41 ± 0.02 mM (p regulation of p-Ca(2+) independent of PTH, C-PTH and CT. CONCLUSIONS: P-Ca(2......-point' of p-Ca(2+) on bone surface, independently of PTH and calcitonin. Our results point toward existence of an as yet unknown factor/mechanism, which mediates the axis between kidney and bone, and which is involved in the very rapid regulation of p-Ca(2+).......BACKGROUND: Understanding the regulation of mineral homeostasis and function of the skeleton as buffer for Calcium and Phosphate has regained new interest with introduction of the syndrome "Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder"(CKD-MBD). The very rapid minute-to-minute regulation...

  3. Klotho & Activin A in kidney injury Plasma Klotho is maintained in unilateral obstruction despite no upregulation of Klotho biosynthesis in contralateral kidney

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    Nordholm, Anders; Mace, Maria L; Gravesen, Eva

    2018-01-01

    In a new paradigm of etiology related to Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD) kidney injury may cause induction of factors in the injured kidney that are released into the circulation and thereby initiate and maintain renal fibrosis and CKD-MBD. Klotho is believed to amelior......In a new paradigm of etiology related to Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD) kidney injury may cause induction of factors in the injured kidney that are released into the circulation and thereby initiate and maintain renal fibrosis and CKD-MBD. Klotho is believed...... to ameliorate renal fibrosis and CKD-MBD, while ActivinA might have detrimental effects. The unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO) model is used here to examine this concept by investigating early changes related to renal fibrosis in obstructed kidney, untouched contralateral kidney and vasculature, which might...

  4. Oral and maxillofacial manifestations of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder: a multicenter retrospective study.

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    Pontes, Flávia Sirotheau Corrêa; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte; de Souza, Lucas Lacerda; Dos Santos da Mata Rezende, Diogo; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Jorge, Jacks; da Silva, Wagner Gomes; Pires, Fábio Ramôa; Rocha, André Caroli; de Campos, Wladimir Gushiken; Caldato, Milena Coelho Fernandes; Martin, Regina Matsunaga; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo

    2018-01-01

    To describe the oral and maxillofacial manifestations of patients diagnosed with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders. Over a 13-year period, clinicopathologic data of patients diagnosed with CKD-MBD who had oral and maxillofacial alterations were retrieved from the files of 4 Brazilian institutions. Data included clinical, radiographic, microscopic, and biochemical findings; treatment employed; and follow-up status. Twenty-one cases were identified, with 13 patients diagnosed as brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism (BTH) and 8 as osteitis fibrosa/renal osteodystrophy (OF/RO) (4 of them clinically consistent with Sagliker syndrome). The mean age was 32.7 years, and the mandible was the most affected site (42.8%). OF/RO had an ill-defined "ground glass" radiographic appearance, and BTH produced well-defined radiolucent images. Biochemically the following mean values were obtained: parathormone 1511.07 pg/mL, calcium 9.25 mg/dL, phosphorus 5.19 mg/dL, alkaline phosphatase 941.55 U/L, urea 125.42 mg/dL, and creatinine 7.14 mg/dL. Treatment comprised vitamin D and calcium intake, parathyroidectomy, hemodialysis, renal transplantation, and local surgery. During follow-up, 5 patients with BTH were free of lesions, whereas 2 affected by OF/RO/Sagliker syndrome died. Oral and maxillofacial manifestations of BTH and OF/RO are uncommon, but they can be associated with an important life-threatening scenario. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. FGF23 neutralization improves chronic kidney disease-associated hyperparathyroidism yet increases mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhoub, Victoria; Shatzen, Edward M; Ward, Sabrina C; Davis, James; Stevens, Jennitte; Bi, Vivian; Renshaw, Lisa; Hawkins, Nessa; Wang, Wei; Chen, Ching; Tsai, Mei-Mei; Cattley, Russell C; Wronski, Thomas J; Xia, Xuechen; Li, Xiaodong; Henley, Charles; Eschenberg, Michael; Richards, William G

    2012-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) and serum elevations in the phosphaturic hormone FGF23, which may be maladaptive and lead to increased morbidity and mortality. To determine the role of FGF23 in the pathogenesis of CKD-MBD and development of secondary HPT, we developed a monoclonal FGF23 antibody to evaluate the impact of chronic FGF23 neutralization on CKD-MBD, secondary HPT, and associated comorbidities in a rat model of CKD-MBD. CKD-MBD rats fed a high-phosphate diet were treated with low or high doses of FGF23-Ab or an isotype control antibody. Neutralization of FGF23 led to sustained reductions in secondary HPT, including decreased parathyroid hormone, increased vitamin D, increased serum calcium, and normalization of bone markers such as cancellous bone volume, trabecular number, osteoblast surface, osteoid surface, and bone-formation rate. In addition, we observed dose-dependent increases in serum phosphate and aortic calcification associated with increased risk of mortality in CKD-MBD rats treated with FGF23-Ab. Thus, mineral disturbances caused by neutralization of FGF23 limited the efficacy of FGF23-Ab and likely contributed to the increased mortality observed in this CKD-MBD rat model.

  6. FGF23 neutralization improves chronic kidney disease–associated hyperparathyroidism yet increases mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhoub, Victoria; Shatzen, Edward M.; Ward, Sabrina C.; Davis, James; Stevens, Jennitte; Bi, Vivian; Renshaw, Lisa; Hawkins, Nessa; Wang, Wei; Chen, Ching; Tsai, Mei-Mei; Cattley, Russell C.; Wronski, Thomas J.; Xia, Xuechen; Li, Xiaodong; Henley, Charles; Eschenberg, Michael; Richards, William G.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) and serum elevations in the phosphaturic hormone FGF23, which may be maladaptive and lead to increased morbidity and mortality. To determine the role of FGF23 in the pathogenesis of CKD-MBD and development of secondary HPT, we developed a monoclonal FGF23 antibody to evaluate the impact of chronic FGF23 neutralization on CKD-MBD, secondary HPT, and associated comorbidities in a rat model of CKD-MBD. CKD-MBD rats fed a high-phosphate diet were treated with low or high doses of FGF23-Ab or an isotype control antibody. Neutralization of FGF23 led to sustained reductions in secondary HPT, including decreased parathyroid hormone, increased vitamin D, increased serum calcium, and normalization of bone markers such as cancellous bone volume, trabecular number, osteoblast surface, osteoid surface, and bone-formation rate. In addition, we observed dose-dependent increases in serum phosphate and aortic calcification associated with increased risk of mortality in CKD-MBD rats treated with FGF23-Ab. Thus, mineral disturbances caused by neutralization of FGF23 limited the efficacy of FGF23-Ab and likely contributed to the increased mortality observed in this CKD-MBD rat model. PMID:22728934

  7. Profile of chronic kidney disease related-mineral bone disorders in newly diagnosed advanced predialysis diabetic kidney disease patients: A hospital based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S; Beatrice, A M; Ghosh, A; Pramanik, S; Bhattacharjee, R; Ghosh, S; Raychaudhury, A; Mukhopadhyay, S; Chowdhury, S

    2017-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease related-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) has been poorly studied in pre-dialysis Indian CKD population. There are limited data on the pattern of these disturbances in diabetic CKD patients. Therefore, a study was conducted to find out the profile of mineral bone disorders in T2DM patients with pre-dialysis CKD. In this cross-sectional design, diabetic patients with newly-diagnosed stage 4 and 5 CKD were evaluated. Serum levels of calcium, phosphorus, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), 25 hydroxy vitamin D and total alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured in all patients. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). A total of 72 eligible patients participated (44 males, 28 females; age 54.2±11.7). Patients with CKD Stage 5 had a lower level of corrected serum calcium and significantly higher level of inorganic phosphorus, total ALP and iPTH as compared to stage 4 patients. Overall, 38.5% were hypocalcemic, 31.43% were hyperphosphatemic. 24.2% of CKD subjects were vitamin D deficient (110pg/ml) was detected in nearly 43% of patients. In stage 5, only 32% patients was found to have hyperparathyroidism (iPTH>300pg/ml). There was a good correlation between iPTH and total ALP (r=0.5, p=0.0001) in this cohort. 25 (OH) vitamin D was inversely correlated with ALP (r=-0.39, P=0.001) and showed negative correlation with urine ACR (r=-0.37, P=0.002). As a group, the osteoporotic CKD subjects exhibited higher iPTH (220.1±153.8 vs. 119±108pg/ml, p<0.05) as compared to those who were osteopenic or had normal bone density. There was significant correlation between BMD and iPTH (adjusted r=-0.436; P=0.001). In the multivariate regression model, we found intact PTH to predict BMD even after adjustment of all the confounders. The current study showed that adynamic bone disease is prevalent even in pre-dialysis CKD population. High bone turnover disease may not be the most prevalent type in diabetic CKD. However, it

  8. [Teriparatide:benefit and safety for bone disease in CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Suguru; Ei, Isei; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-09-01

    Teriparatide, 1-34 parathyroid hormone, is one of effective treatments for osteoporosis. Teriparatide shows an anabolic effect for bone formation, as a result, increases bone mineral density as well as prevention of fractures in the general population. On the other hand, there are a few report about the effect of teriparatide on increase of bone mineral density in maintenance hemodialysis patients. In addition to CKD-MBD, osteoporosis is also an important pathological change in ESRD patients, therefore its safety and efficacy should be discussed in more detail.

  9. Relationship between Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Biochemical and Bone Histomorphometric Alterations in a Chronic Kidney Disease Rat Model Undergoing Parathyroidectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Wei Liao

    Full Text Available Phosphate burden in chronic kidney disease (CKD leads to elevated serum fibroblast factor-23 (FGF-23 levels, secondary hyperparathyroidism and chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD. However dissociated hyperphosphatemia and low serum FGF-23 concentrations have been observed in experimentally parathyoridectomized rats. The relationships between serum mineral, hormone, and bone metabolism may be altered in the presence of CKD. The aim of our study was to investigate whether a consistent relationship existed between serum FGF-23 levels, specific serum biochemical markers, and histomorphometric parameters of bone metabolism in a parathyroidectomized CKD animal model.Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: parathyroidectomy (PTX and CKD (PTX+CKD, 9 rats, CKD without PTX (CKD, 9 rats, and neither PTX nor CKD (sham-operated control, 8 rats; CKD was induced by partial nephrectomy. At 8 weeks after partial nephrectomy, serum biomarkers were measured. Bone histomorphometries of the distal femoral metaphyseal bone were analyzed. The mean serum FGF-23 levels and mean bone formation rate were the highest in the CKD group and the lowest in the PTX+CKD group. Bone volume parameters increased significantly in the PTX+CKD group. Pearson's correlation revealed that serum FGF-23 levels associated with those of intact parathyroid hormone, phosphate, collagen type I C-telopeptide, and calcium. Univariate linear regression showed that serum FGF-23 values correlated with bone formation rate, bone volume, and osteoid parameters. Stepwise multivariate regression analysis revealed that circulating FGF-23 values were independently associated with bone volume and thickness (β = -0.737; p < 0.001 and β = -0.526; p = 0.006, respectively. Serum parathyroid hormone levels independently correlated with bone formation rate (β = 0.714; p < 0.001 while collagen type I C-telopeptide levels correlated with osteoid parameter.Serum FGF-23 levels

  10. The consequences of pediatric renal transplantation on bone metabolism and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchetta, Justine; Ranchin, Bruno; Demède, Delphine; Allard, Lise

    2013-10-01

    During childhood, growth retardation, decreased final height and renal osteodystrophy are common complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD). These problems remain present in patients undergoing renal transplantation, even though steroid-sparing strategies are more widely used. In this context, achieving normal height and growth in children after transplantation is a crucial issue for both quality of life and self-esteem. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of pathophysiology of CKD-mineral bone disorder (MBD) in children undergoing renal transplantation and to propose keypoints for its daily management. In adults, calcimimetics are effective for posttransplant hyperparathyroidism, but data are missing in the pediatric population. Fibroblast growth factor 23 levels are associated with increased risk of rejection, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. A recent meta-analysis also demonstrated the effectiveness of rhGH therapy in short transplanted children. In 2013, the daily clinical management of CKD-MBD in transplanted children should still focus on simple objectives: to optimize renal function, to develop and promote steroid-sparing strategies, to provide optimal nutritional support to maximize final height and avoid bone deformations, to equilibrate calcium/phosphate metabolism so as to provide acceptable bone quality and cardiovascular status, to correct all metabolic and clinical abnormalities that can worsen both bone and growth (mainly metabolic acidosis, anemia and malnutrition), promote good lifestyle habits (adequate calcium intake, regular physical activity, no sodas consumption, no tobacco exposure) and eventually to correct native vitamin D deficiency (target of 25-vitamin D >75 nmol/l).

  11. Various musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic renal insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.Y.; Ong, K.O.

    2013-01-01

    Musculoskeletal manifestations in chronic renal insufficiency are caused by complex bone metabolism alterations, now described under the umbrella term of chronic kidney disease mineral- and bone-related disorder (CKD-MBD), as well as iatrogenic processes related to renal replacement treatment. Radiological imaging remains the mainstay of disease assessment. This review aims to illustrate the radiological features of CKD-MBD, such as secondary hyperparathyroidism, osteomalacia, adynamic bone disease, soft-tissue calcifications; as well as features associated with renal replacement therapy, such as aluminium toxicity, secondary amyloidosis, destructive spondyloarthropathy, haemodialysis-related erosive arthropathy, tendon rupture, osteonecrosis, and infection

  12. Longitudinal Evaluation of FGF23 Changes and Mineral Metabolism Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Stubbs, Jason R.; He, Nan; Idiculla, Arun; Gillihan, Ryan; Liu, Shiguang; David, Valentin; Hong, Yan; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic and vitamin D-regulatory hormone of putative bone origin that is elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The mechanisms responsible for elevations of FGF23 and its role in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) remain uncertain. We investigated the association between FGF23 serum levels and kidney disease progression, as well as the phenotypic features of CKD-MBD in a Col4a3 null mouse mo...

  13. Bone disease in haemoglobin disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersi Voskaridou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone disease represents a prominent cause of morbidity in patients with thalassaemia and other haemoglobin disorders. The delay in sexual maturation, the presence of diabetes and hypothyroidism, the parathyroid gland dysfunction, the haemolytic anaemia, the progressive marrow expansion, the iron toxicity on osteoblasts, the iron chelators, and the deficiency of growth hormone or insulin growth factors have been identified as major causes of osteoporosis in thalassaemia. Adequate hormonal replacement, effective iron chelation, improvement of hemoglobin levels, calcium and vitamin D administration, physical activity, and smoking cessation are the main to-date measures for the management of the disease. During the last decade, novel pathogenetic data suggest that the reduced osteoblastic activity, which is believed to be the basic mechanism of bone loss in thalassemia, is accompanied by a comparable or even greater increase in bone resorption. Therefore, potent inhibitors of osteoclast activation, such as the aminobisphosphonates, arise as key drugs for the management of osteoporosis in thalassaemia patients and other haemoglobin disorders.

  14. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agool, Ali; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Vellenga, Edo; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.

    Noninvasive imaging techniques have been used in the past for visualization the functional activity of the bone marrow compartment. Imaging with radiolabelled compounds may allow different bone marrow disorders to be distinguished. These imaging techniques, almost all of which use

  15. Quality of care and monitoring in paediatric end stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Huis, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis quality of care and monitoring of chronic kidney disease - mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is assessed. Practices and policies with regards to transplantation, growth hormone and hypertension are inventories and compared with current guidelines and

  16. Bone Health in Adrenal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom-Jun Kim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Secondary osteoporosis resulting from specific clinical disorders may be potentially reversible, and thus continuous efforts to find and adequately treat the secondary causes of skeletal fragility are critical to ameliorate fracture risk and to avoid unnecessary treatment with anti-osteoporotic drugs. Among the hyperfunctional adrenal masses, Cushing's syndrome, pheochromocytoma, and primary aldosteronism are receiving particularly great attention due to their high morbidity and mortality mainly by increasing cardiovascular risk. Interestingly, there is accumulating experimental and clinical evidence that adrenal hormones may have direct detrimental effects on bone metabolism as well. Thus, the present review discusses the possibility of adrenal disorders, especially focusing on pheochromocytoma and primary aldosteronism, as secondary causes of osteoporosis.

  17. Eating disorders and bone metabolism in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lauren; Micali, Nadia; Misra, Madhusmita

    2017-08-01

    Eating Disorders are psychiatric disorders associated with a high risk for low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures. Low BMD is a consequence of undernutrition, changes in body composition, and hormonal alterations. This review summarizes recent findings regarding novel strategies for assessing bone outcomes in patients with eating disorders, factors contributing to altered bone metabolism, and possible therapeutic strategies. Emerging research in this field suggests that not only anorexia nervosa, but also bulimia nervosa results in lower BMD compared to controls. To date studies of bone structure, and all randomized controlled trials examining the impact of various therapies on bone outcomes in anorexia nervosa, have focused on adolescent girls and women. We discuss the impact of anorexia nervosa on bone structure, and associations of resting energy expenditure, marrow adipose tissue (including the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fat), and cold activated brown adipose tissue with BMD and bone structure. Promising strategies for treatment include physiological estrogen replacement (rather than oral contraceptives) in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa, and bisphosphonates, as well as teriparatide, in adult women with anorexia nervosa. Recent data on (i) BMD and bone structure in adolescent girls and women with eating disorders, (ii) factors that contribute to altered bone metabolism, and (iii) randomized controlled trials reporting positive effects of physiologic estrogen replacement, bisphosphonates and teriparatide on bone health, provide us with a greater understanding of the impact of eating disorders on bone and novel management strategies.

  18. Dental Manifestations of Pediatric Bone Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Juan F

    2017-12-01

    Several bone disorders affecting the skeleton often are manifest in the maxillofacial region. This review presents the most common bone disorders in children and their dental-oral manifestations: fibrous dysplasia, Paget's disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, renal osteodystrophy, hypophosphatasia, and osteoporosis. The specific intraoral characteristics will reviewed in detail. Recent studies confirmed the close relationship between the mandible and the maxilla with the most prevalent systemic bone disorders in children. This review will help practitioners to integrate the oral health into the systemic health and improve the multidisciplinary approach of pediatric patients between medicine and dentistry.

  19. PET in Benign Bone Marrow Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bruggen, Wouter; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Vellenga, Edo; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.

    This review aims to describe the current status of benign bone marrow (BM) imaging using PET. BM imaging is important as the BM is not only involved in poiesis of different vital cell lines and. can be affected by primary BM disorders, but it is also frequently affected by several extramedullary

  20. Psychiatric disorders in bone marrow transplant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.G.; Irfan, M.; Shamsi, T.S.; Hussain, M.

    2007-01-01

    To identify the psychiatric illnesses in patients with hematological/oncological disorders encountered during blood and bone marrow transplantation. All consecutive patients, aged 15 years and above, who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria and underwent blood and bone marrow transplantation, were enrolled in this study. Psychiatric assessment comprised of a semi-structured interview based on Present Status Examination (PSE). The psychiatric diagnosis was made on the basis of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) system of classification devised by W.H.O. Eighty patients, who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, were inducted in this study. Thirty (37.5%) cases were found to have psychiatric disorders. Out of the total, 60 (75%) were males and 20 (25%) females. Adjustment disorder was the most frequent diagnosis (n=12), followed by major depression (n=7). Rest of the diagnoses made were generalized anxiety disorder, acute psychotic disorder, delirium and depressive psychosis. High psychiatric morbidity associated with blood and bone marrow transplantation was observed. It indicates the importance of psychiatric intervention during the isolation period of BMT as well as pre-transplant psychiatric assessment and counseling regarding procedure. (author)

  1. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agool, Ali [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Center Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, P.O. Box 30,001, Groningen (Netherlands); Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, P.O. Box 30,001, Groningen (Netherlands); Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, P.O. Box 30,001, Groningen (Netherlands); Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vellenga, Edo [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Hematology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Noninvasive imaging techniques have been used in the past for visualization the functional activity of the bone marrow compartment. Imaging with radiolabelled compounds may allow different bone marrow disorders to be distinguished. These imaging techniques, almost all of which use radionuclide-labelled tracers, such as {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid, {sup 99m}Tc-sulphur colloid, {sup 111}In-chloride, and radiolabelled white blood cells, have been used in nuclear medicine for several decades. With these techniques three separate compartments can be recognized including the reticuloendothelial system, the erythroid compartment and the myeloid compartment. Recent developments in research and the clinical use of PET tracers have made possible the analysis of additional properties such as cellular metabolism and proliferative activity, using {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 18}F-FLT. These tracers may lead to better quantification and targeting of different cell systems in the bone marrow. In this review the imaging of different bone marrow targets with radionuclides including PET tracers in various bone marrow diseases are discussed. (orig.)

  2. A New Data Analysis System to Quantify Associations between Biochemical Parameters of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Rodriguez

    Full Text Available In hemodialysis patients, deviations from KDIGO recommended values of individual parameters, phosphate, calcium or parathyroid hormone (PTH, are associated with increased mortality. However, it is widely accepted that these parameters are not regulated independently of each other and that therapy aimed to correct one parameter often modifies the others. The aim of the present study is to quantify the degree of association between parameters of chronic kidney disease and mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD.Data was extracted from a cohort of 1758 adult HD patients between January 2000 and June 2013 obtaining a total of 46.141 records (10 year follow-up. We used an advanced data analysis system called Random Forest (RF which is based on self-learning procedure with similar axioms to those utilized for the development of artificial intelligence. This new approach is particularly useful when the variables analyzed are closely dependent to each other.The analysis revealed a strong association between PTH and phosphate that was superior to that of PTH and Calcium. The classical linear regression analysis between PTH and phosphate shows a correlation coefficient is 0.27, p<0.001, the possibility to predict PTH changes from phosphate modification is marginal. Alternatively, RF assumes that changes in phosphate will cause modifications in other associated variables (calcium and others that may also affect PTH values. Using RF the correlation coefficient between changes in serum PTH and phosphate is 0.77, p<0.001; thus, the power of prediction is markedly increased. The effect of therapy on biochemical variables was also analyzed using this RF.Our results suggest that the analysis of the complex interactions between mineral metabolism parameters in CKD-MBD may demand a more advanced data analysis system such as RF.

  3. Calcifilaxis: más allá de CKD-MBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernández

    2017-09-01

    Conclusión: Aunque la incidencia de la CUA sigue siendo baja, su mortalidad es muy elevada, por lo que debe prestarse especial atención a la presentación de la CUA en los trasplantados renales y en las formas «no renales». Los anticoagulantes orales y los esteroides aparecen como principales factores de riesgo. La CUA es un reto: necesitamos un registro de nuestros pacientes y establecer una terapia estándar.

  4. Prevalence of CKD-MBD in pre-dialysis patients using biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dialysis patients were sim- ilarly studied, it was found that blacks had significantly lower levels of 25(OH) D but higher levels of calcium, phosphorus and PTH. This high secondary hyperpar- athyroidism (SHPT) and 25(OH) D deficiency occurs.

  5. Single-center open-label randomized study of anemia management improvement in ESRD patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellasi Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Whether anemia and mineral bone abnormalities (chronic kidney disease–mineral bone disorder [CKD-MBD] are associated still remains to be elucidated. Both anemia and CKD-MBD have been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcome and poor quality of life. However, recent evidence suggests that use of large doses of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs to correct hemoglobin (Hb may be detrimental in CKD. The Optimal Anemia Treatment in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD (Optimal ESRD Treatment study will assess whether lowering of parathyroid hormone (PTH is associated with a reduction in ESA consumption. The Optimal ESRD Treatment study is a pilot single-center open-label study with blinded end point (a prospective randomized open blinded end-point [PROBE] design enrolling 50 patients on maintenance dialysis. Eligible patients with intact PTH (iPTH 300-540 pg/mL and Hb 10-11.5 g/dL will be randomized 1:1 to strict PTH control (150-300 pg/mL versus standard care (PTH range 300-540 pg/mL. Available drugs for CKD-MBD and anemia treatment will be managed by the attending physician to maintain the desired levels of PTH (according to study arm allocation and Hb (10-11.5 g/dL. Echocardiographic data for cardiac structure and function as well as arterial stiffness will be assessed at study inception and completion. The Optimal ESRD Treatment study should shed light on the complicated interplay of anemia and CKD-MBD and on the feasibility of clinical trials in this domain. The study results are expected in the spring of 2017.

  6. Biochemical markers of mineral bone disorder in South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Secondary hyperparathyroidism and 25–OH vitamin D deficiency were common in our haemodialysis patients. Hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphataemia were strong predictors for developing secondary hyperparathyroidism. Keywords: Biochemical markers, guidelines, mineral bone disorder, haemodialysis ...

  7. Ligand trap for the activin type IIA receptor protects against vascular disease and renal fibrosis in mice with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapova, Olga A; Fang, Yifu; Sugatani, Toshifumi; Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-06-01

    The causes of cardiovascular mortality associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are partly attributed to the CKD-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The causes of the early CKD-MBD are not well known. Our discovery of Wnt (portmanteau of wingless and int) inhibitors, especially Dickkopf 1, produced during renal repair as participating in the pathogenesis of the vascular and skeletal components of the CKD-MBD implied that additional pathogenic factors are critical. In the search for such factors, we studied the effects of activin receptor type IIA (ActRIIA) signaling by using a ligand trap for the receptor, RAP-011 (a soluble extracellular domain of ActRIIA fused to a murine IgG-Fc fragment). In a mouse model of CKD that stimulated atherosclerotic calcification, RAP-011 significantly increased aortic ActRIIA signaling assessed by the levels of phosphorylated Smad2/3. Furthermore, RAP-011 treatment significantly reversed CKD-induced vascular smooth muscle dedifferentiation as assessed by smooth muscle 22α levels, osteoblastic transition, and neointimal plaque calcification. In the diseased kidneys, RAP-011 significantly stimulated αklotho levels and it inhibited ActRIIA signaling and decreased renal fibrosis and proteinuria. RAP-011 treatment significantly decreased both renal and circulating Dickkopf 1 levels, showing that Wnt activation was downstream of ActRIIA. Thus, ActRIIA signaling in CKD contributes to the CKD-MBD and renal fibrosis. ActRIIA signaling may be a potential therapeutic target in CKD. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Calcium and bone disorders in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shriraam Mahadevan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant transplacental calcium transfer occurs during pregnancy, especially during the last trimester, to meet the demands of the rapidly mineralizing fetal skeleton. Similarly, there is an obligate loss of calcium in the breast milk during lactation. Both these result in considerable stress on the bone mineral homeostasis in the mother. The maternal adaptive mechanisms to conserve calcium are different in pregnancy and lactation. During pregnancy, increased intestinal absorption of calcium from the gut mainly due to higher generation of calcitriol (1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D helps in maintaining maternal calcium levels. On the other hand, during lactation, the main compensatory mechanism is skeletal resorption due to increased generation of parathormone related peptide (PTHrP from the breast. Previous studies suggest that in spite of considerable changes in bone mineral metabolism during pregnancy, parity and lactation are not significantly associated with future risk for osteoporosis. However, in India, the situation may not be the same as a significant proportion of pregnancies occur in the early twenties when peak bone mass is not yet achieved. Further, malnutrition, anemia and vitamin D deficiency are commonly encountered in this age group. This may have an impact on future bone health of the mother. It may also probably provide an opportunity for health care providers for prevention. Other metabolic bone diseases like hypoparathyroidism, hyperparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism are rarely encountered in pregnancy. Their clinical implications and management are also discussed.

  9. Management of Minerals and Bone Disorders after Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Molnar, Miklos Z; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Mucsi, Istvan; Bunnapradist, Suphamai

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Mineral and bone disorders (MBD), inherent complications of moderate and advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), occur frequently in kidney transplant recipients. However, much confusion exists about clinical application of diagnostic tools and preventive or treatment strategies to correct bone loss or mineral disarrays in transplanted patients. We have reviewed the recent evidence about prevalence and consequences of MBD in kidney transplant recipients and examined diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic options to this end. Recent findings Low turnover bone disease occurs more frequently after kidney transplantation according to bone biopsy studies. The risk of fracture is high, especially in the first several months after kidney transplantation. Alterations in minerals (calcium, phosphorus and magnesium) and biomarkers of bone metabolism (PTH, alkaline phosphatase, vitamin D and FGF-23) are observed with varying impact on post-transplant outcomes. Calcineurin inhibitors are linked to osteoporosis, whereas steroid therapy may lead to both osteoporosis and varying degrees of osteonecrosis. Sirolimus and everolimus might have a bearing on osteoblasts proliferation and differentiation or decreasing osteoclast mediated bone resorption. Selected pharmacologic interventions for treatment of MBD in transplant patients include steroid withdrawal, the use of bisphosphonates, vitamin D derivatives, calcimimetics, teriparatide, calcitonin and denosumab. Summary MBD following kidney transplantation is common and characterized by loss of bone volume and mineralization abnormalities often leading to low turnover bone disease. Although there are no well-established therapeutic approaches for management of MBD in renal transplant recipients, clinicians should continue individualizing therapy as needed. PMID:22614626

  10. ROLE OF BONE MARROW ASPIRATION IN DIAGNOSIS OF HAEMATOLOGICAL DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Nanwani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The bone marrow examination is an essential investigation for the diagnosis of disorders of the blood and bone marrow. This simple and relatively safe procedure is important, particularly in resource poor centres since access to adjuvant diagnostic techniques are often lacking or absent. MATERIALS AND METHODS 189 patients of all age groups were studied for haematological and non-haematological disorders by bone marrow aspiration in the Department of Pathology, MGM Medical College during the period of 2014 to 2016. RESULTS Majority of the patients who had bone marrow aspiration were aged 0-15 years. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.03. Most (97% of the marrow aspirate examined had definitive pathologic features, while 14 (7% were normal marrow elements. Out of 189 cases of bone marrow aspiration, acute leukaemia was the most common haematological disease diagnosed using this procedure. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was more common than acute myeloid leukaemia. Aplastic anaemia was seen in 16% cases. Megaloblastic anaemia occurred more commonly than other anaemias. Megaloblastic anaemia was seen in 13 cases (7% and microcytic anaemia was seen in 5 cases (3%. There were 10 cases (5% of Idiopathic Thrombocypenic Purpura. Myelodysplastic syndrome and multiple myeloma was seen in 7% and 2% cases respectively. Storage disorder was seen in 3 cases (2%, out of this 02 cases were Gaucher’s disease and one case was Niemann-Pick’s disease. CONCLUSION Bone marrow examination is an important step to arrive at the confirmatory diagnosis of many haematological disorders. This procedure remains a veritable tool in the diagnosis and management of a wide range of haematological diseases, especially in a resource poor centre.

  11. Recapping hemilaminoplasty for spinal surgical disorders using ultrasonic bone curette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Hidenori; Itoh, Yasunobu; Numazawa, Shinichi; Tomii, Masato; Watanabe, Kazuo; Hirano, Yoshitaka; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a novel method of the recapping hemilaminoplasty in a retrospective study of patients with spinal surgical disorders. This report describes the surgical technique and the results of hemilaminoplasty using an ultrasonic bone curette. The aim of this study was to examine the safety and effectiveness of the hemilaminoplasty technique with ultrasonic bone curette. Between April 2003 and July 2011, 33 patients with various spinal diseases (17 spinal tumors, 5 dural arteriovenous fistulas, 3 syringomyelia, 2 sacral perineural cysts, and 2 arachnoid cysts) were treated microsurgically by using an ultrasonic bone curette with scalpel blade and lightweight handpiece. The ultrasonic bone curette was used for division of lamina. After resection of the lesion, the excised lamina was replaced exactly in situ to its original anatomic position with a titanium plate and screw. Additional fusion technique was not required and the device was easy to handle. All patients were observed both neurologically and radiologically by dynamic plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scan. The operation was performed successfully and there were no instrument-related complications such as dural laceration, nerve root injury, and vessels injury. The mean number of resected and restored lamina was 1.7. CT confirmed primary bone fusion in all patients by 12 months after surgery. The ultrasonic bone curette is a useful instrument for recapping hemilaminoplasty in various spinal surgeries. This method allows anatomical reconstruction of the excised bone to preserve the posterior surrounding tissues.

  12. The Relationship of Disordered Eating Attitudes with Stress Level, Bone Turnover Markers, and Bone Mineral Density in Obese Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Okbay G?ne?, Asl?; Alika?ifo?lu, M?jgan; ?en Demird??en, Ezgi; Ergin?z, Ethem; Demir, T?rkay; Kucur, Mine; Ercan, Oya

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of stress caused by disordered eating attitudes on bone health in obese adolescents. Methods: A cross-sectional study comprising 80 obese adolescents was performed from November 2013 to September 2014. Twenty-four-hour urinary free cortisol levels were measured as a biological marker of stress. Bone turnover was evaluated using bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, serum osteocalcin, and urinary N-telopeptide concentrations. Bone mineral density was measured...

  13. Chronic kidney disease: mineral and bone disorder in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseling-Perry, Katherine; Salusky, Isidro B

    2013-03-01

    Childhood and adolescence are crucial times for the development of a healthy skeletal and cardiovascular system. Disordered mineral and bone metabolism accompany chronic kidney disease (CKD) and present significant obstacles to optimal bone strength, final adult height, and cardiovascular health. Early increases in bone and plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are associated with early defects in skeletal mineralization. Later in the course of CKD, secondary hyperparathyroidism--caused by a combination of declining calcitriol values and phosphate retention--results in high-turnover renal osteodystrophy whereas increased levels of both phosphate and FGF23 contribute to cardiovascular disease. Treatment of hyperphosphatemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism improves high-turnover bone disease but fails to correct defects in skeletal mineralization. Because overtreatment may result in adynamic bone disease, growth failure, hypercalcemia, and progression of cardiovascular calcifications, therapy therefore must be titrated carefully to maintain optimal serum biochemical parameters according to stage of CKD. Newer therapeutic agents and new treatment paradigms may suppress serum PTH levels effectively while limiting intestinal calcium absorption and skeletal FGF23 stimulation and may provide future therapeutic alternatives for children with CKD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Trajectories of CKD-MBD biochemical parameters over a 2-year period following diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism: a pharmacoepidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipozzi, Pierre; Ayav, Carole; Ngueyon Sime, Willy; Laurain, Emmanuelle; Kessler, Michèle; Brunaud, Laurent; Frimat, Luc

    2017-03-27

    To define groups of patients according to the changes of biochemical parameters, that is, serum calcium, phosphate and parathyroid hormone (PTH), over a 2-year follow-up period using group-based multi-trajectory modeling (GBMM) among a cohort of dialysis patients with newly diagnosed secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) (ie, PTH≥500 ng/L for the first time) and to compare their patient characteristics and treatments. Pharmacoepidemiological study. In the 12 dialysis units located in the French region of Lorraine. A total of 269 dialysis patients with newly diagnosed SHPT were prospectively included from December 2009 to May 2012 and followed-up for 2 years. We identified four distinct trajectory groups: 'rapid PTH drop' experiencing a rapid and sharp decrease (over weeks) in PTH level associated with decreasing phosphate level within normal range (n=34; 12.7%), 'gradual PTH decrease' experiencing a gradual and continuous decrease (over months) in PTH level and maintaining phosphate at a middle level throughout the study (n=98; 36.4%), 'slow PTH decrease with high phosphate' experiencing a slow decrease in PTH level associated with a relatively high phosphate level (n=105; 39.0%) and 'uncontrolled SHPT' with high levels of PTH and phosphate throughout the study (n=32; 11.9%). Patients in the 'uncontrolled SHPT' group were significantly (p<0.00001) younger than patients in other groups. Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) targets for PTH, phosphate and calcium were reached simultaneously for 14.9% of patients at baseline and 16.7% at the end of the study. Patients were given cinacalcet more frequently at months 3 and 6 in the 'rapid PTH drop' and at month 24 in the 'uncontrolled SHPT' groups. Over 2 years following a new SHPT diagnosis, a younger age and a higher rate of alkaline phosphatase were associated to a continuous uncontrolled SHPT. Patients with the lowest PTH at the end of the follow-up tended to receive more often cinacalcet. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02888639, post results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Nonenzymatic cross-linking pentosidine increase in bone collagen and are associated with disorders of bone mineralization in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitome, Jun; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Saito, Mitsuru; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Marumo, Keishi; Hosoya, Tatsuo

    2011-06-01

    Disorders of bone and mineral metabolism are common complications in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and lead to significantly increased fracture risk, morbidity, and mortality of cardiovascular disease due to ectopic calcifications, contributing to a worsening prognosis. Bone strength is determined by not only bone mineral density but also bone quality, which is dependent on bone collagen cross-links. Collagen cross-links are classified into enzymatic immature and mature types and nonenzymatic advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Pentosidine is well established as one of the AGEs that accumulates markedly in CKD patients. The chemistry, function, and clinical relevance of cross-links have been revealed, whereas bone quality and the relationship with bone mineralization in CKD patients are not clear. We performed transiliac bone biopsies on 22 dialysis patients (mean age 56 ± 9 years) with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism and measured cross-links by evaluating bone histomorphometry. Cross-links data were compared with age-matched non-CKD subjects (mean age 58 ± 8 years, n = 17). Enzymatic collagen cross-links were formed to a similar extent compared with non-CKD subjects and showed a positive correlation with plasma intact parathyroid hormone. Pentosidine was remarkably increased in dialysis patients and inversely correlated with bone-formation rate/bone volume and mineral apposition rate. This study suggests that AGE collagen cross-links strongly associate with disorders of bone metabolism in dialysis patients.

  16. BONE MARROW BIOPSY IN EVALUATION OF HAEMATOLOGICAL DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Rani Sahoo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Bone Marrow Trephine Biopsy (BMTB and aspiration is critical for diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and monitoring therapeutic response. BMTB is of greater value in assessing cellularity, degree of fibrosis, marrow architecture and especially when aspiration is dry tap. At the same time, it provides sample for immunohistochemistry. MATERIALSAND METHODS It is a single centre observational study conducted from July 2014 to July 2016 in Department of Pathology, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, which included both cell block and touch imprint along with trephine biopsy. Cases selected where lymphoma studied for pattern and extent of infiltration. Aspiration with dry tap and selected cases of myeloproliferative disorders, myelodysplastic syndrome, leukaemia (both acute and chronic, anaemia, multiple myeloma were studied. Jamshidi needle was used for biopsy. Samples obtained were formalin preserved, kept in decalcification solution (Hammersmith protocol and H and E slides prepared. Special stain-like reticulin and Masson’s trichrome were used for grading of fibrosis. Immunohistochemistry was done on selected cases of lymphoma. RESULTS Out of total 100 cases studied, 60 were of haematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms, 12 anaemia, 20 secondary metastasis, 8 miscellaneous (1 haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytic disease, 1 storage disease, 1 granulomatous and 5 ITP. CONCLUSION The study was conducted to establish the advantage of bone marrow biopsy in inadequate and failed aspiration, but both are complementary to each other and together provide a comprehensive evaluation of the bone marrow. Bone marrow fibrosis are well accessed and increased detection of tumour cells in suspected secondary metastasis. Special stains, IHC, cytogenetic study can be done over biopsy block.

  17. Do the Drugs Used to Treat Rheumatic Disorders Induce Bone Fragility? A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Súsanna við Streym; Vestergaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic disorders are linked to immuno-logical processes in the body; therefore, drugs used to treat these disorders may interfere with the immune system. The immune system shares several signaling mechanisms with bone cells, both directly via cytokines and prostaglandins, and indirectly via...... vitamin D, which is also an active immunological substance. As a result, drugs used to modulate the immune response may interfere with bone mineral density (BMD), bone biomechanical competence, and the risk of fractures [1–3]....

  18. Clinical practice recommendations for treatment with active vitamin D analogues in children with chronic kidney disease Stages 2-5 and on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Rukshana; Wan, Mandy; Nagler, Evi V; Bakkaloglu, Sevcan; Cozzolino, Mario; Bacchetta, Justine; Edefonti, Alberto; Stefanidis, Constantinos J; Vande Walle, Johan; Ariceta, Gema; Klaus, Günter; Haffner, Dieter; Schmitt, Claus Peter

    2017-07-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal synthesis of active vitamin D [1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D)] declines and is associated with hypocalcaemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism and the spectrum of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD). In advanced CKD, active vitamin D analogues, including alfacalcidol, calcitriol and paricalcitol, are routinely administered. There are few studies on the use of vitamin D analogues in children with CKD and on dialysis. It is difficult to define bone-specific outcomes that can guide treatment with active vitamin D analogues in children with CKD-MBD. A core working group (WG) of the European Society for Paediatric Nephrology (ESPN) CKD-MBD and Dialysis WGs has developed recommendations for the use of active vitamin D therapy in children with CKD and on dialysis. A second document in parallel with this one covers treatment recommendations for native vitamin D therapy. The WGs have performed an extensive literature review to include systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials in adults and children with CKD and prospective observational studies in children with CKD. The Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to develop and grade the recommendations. In the absence of applicable study data, the opinion of experts from the ESPN CKD-MBD and Dialysis WGs is provided, but clearly GRADE-ed as such and must be carefully considered by the treating physician and adapted to individual patient needs as appropriate. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  19. PA21, a novel phosphate binder, improves renal osteodystrophy in rats with chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, Atsushi; Tatemichi, Satoshi; Takeda, Hiroo; Kobayashi, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    The effects of PA21, a novel iron-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binder, on hyperphosphatemia and its accompanying bone abnormality in chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) were evaluated. Rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (CRF) were prepared by feeding them an adenine-containing diet for four weeks. They were also freely fed a diet that contained PA21 (0.5, 1.5, and 5%), sevelamer hydrochloride (0.6 and 2%) or lanthanum carbonate hydrate (0.6 and 2%) for four weeks. Blood biochemical parameters were measured and bone histomorphometry was performed for femurs, which were isolated after drug treatment. Serum phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels were higher in the CRF rats. Administration of phosphate binders for four weeks decreased serum phosphorus and PTH levels in a dose-dependent manner and there were significant decreases in the AUC0-28 day of these parameters in 5% PA21, 2% sevelamer hydrochloride, and 2% lanthanum carbonate hydrate groups compared with that in the CRF control group. Moreover, osteoid volume improved significantly in 5% of the PA21 group, and fibrosis volume and cortical porosity were ameliorated in 5% PA21, 2% sevelamer hydrochloride, and 2% lanthanum carbonate hydrate groups. These results suggest that PA21 is effective against hyperphosphatemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and bone abnormalities in CKD-MBD as sevelamer hydrochloride and lanthanum carbonate hydrate are, and that PA21 is a new potential alternative to phosphate binders.

  20. Treatment of a soft tissue calcification in a patient receiving peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Inger Kristine Lindhard; Broberg, Bo; Groenberg, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease patients suffer from Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD) leading to increased vascular and soft-tissue calcification. The prevalence of soft tissue calcification in dialysis patients is not well described, and most cases describe such calcifications in hemodialysis patients...... the treatment, the calcification diminished rapidly from a diameter of 26.6 to 2.9 cm, and the patient symptoms were relieved, leaving the patient with no pain or restriction in mobilization........ We describe a case of a massive soft tissue calcification in the right gluteal region in a peritoneal dialysis patient. The patient had severe pain and were disabled. The treatment was converted to an intensive hemodialysis regimen with a minimal calcium load and high dose of cinacalcet. During......Chronic Kidney Disease patients suffer from Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD) leading to increased vascular and soft-tissue calcification. The prevalence of soft tissue calcification in dialysis patients is not well described, and most cases describe such calcifications in hemodialysis patients...

  1. Late taste disorders in bone marrow transplantation: clinical evaluation with taste solutions in autologous and allogeneic bone marrow recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinone, M G; Rizzoni, D; Ferremi, P; Rossi, G; Izzi, T; Brusotti, C

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the type and the significance of taste disorders in allogeneic bone marrow transplanted patients. In a retrospective study the taste threshold of a cohort of 15 allogeneic bone marrow transplanted patients, 4-51 months after transplantation (mean: 30.6 +/- 15.8), was compared to the taste threshold of 8 autologous bone marrow recipients, 4-48 months after transplantation (mean: 24.12 +/- 12.18), and to the taste threshold of a group of 20 consecutive normal subjects. Allogeneic bone marrow transplanted patients showed a significant hypogeusia for salt (Pearson's chi square p = 0.0002; Yates' correction p = 0.0007) and sour (Pearson's chi square p = 0.001; Yates' correction p = 0.008). No significant variations were observed for sweet and bitter. Autologous bone marrow recipients did not show any significant variation of taste acuity for sweet, salt or sour; a constant reduction of the taste threshold for bitter was observed, but the values were not significantly different from normal (Pearson's chi square p = 0.47; Yates' correction p = 0.83). So, late and selective taste disorders are observed in allogeneic bone marrow transplanted patients. Since the severity of the disorders is not strictly related to the severity of chronic oral G.V.H.D., taste analysis could discover the slightest, clinically undetectable cases of chronic oral G.V.H.D. The mechanism of immune aggression on the sensorial taste cells is poorly understood. Further trials are needed to define variations of taste acuity not only after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, but also in systemic immune diseases.

  2. Assessment and clinical management of bone disease in adults with eating disorders: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Drabkin, Anne; Rothman, Micol S.; Wassenaar, Elizabeth; Mascolo, Margherita; Mehler, Philip S.

    2017-01-01

    Aim To review current medical literature regarding the causes and clinical management options for low bone mineral density (BMD) in adult patients with eating disorders. Background Low bone mineral density is a common complication of eating disorders with potentially lifelong debilitating consequences. Definitive, rigorous guidelines for screening, prevention and management are lacking. This article intends to provide a review of the literature to date and current options for prevention and t...

  3. Optimal management of bone mineral disorders in chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Andrew L; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-03-01

    The review summarizes recent studies on chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders, with a focus on new developments in disease management. The term chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder has come to describe an increasingly complex network of alterations in minerals and skeletal disorders that contribute to the significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. Clinical studies continue to suggest associations with clinical outcomes, yet current clinical trials have failed to support causality. Variability in practice exists as current guidelines for management of mineral bone disorders are often based on weak evidence. Recent studies implicate novel pathways for therapeutic intervention in clinical trials. Mineral bone disorders in chronic kidney disease arise from alterations in a number of molecules in an increasingly complex physiological network interconnecting bone and the cardiovascular system. Despite extensive associations with improved outcomes in a number of molecules, clinical trials have yet to prove causality and there is an absence of new therapies available to improve patient outcomes. Additional clinical trials that can incorporate the complexity of mineral bone disorders, and with the ability to intervene on more than one pathway, are needed to advance patient care.

  4. Perspective and priorities for improvement of parathyroid hormone (PTH) measurement – A view from the IFCC Working Group for PTH☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Sprague, Stuart; Almond, Alison; Cavalier, Etienne; Fraser, William D; Algeciras-Schimnich, Alicia; Singh, Ravinder; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Vesper, Hubert W.

    2017-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) measurement in serum or plasma is a necessary tool for the exploration of calcium/phosphate disorders, and is widely used as a surrogate marker to assess skeletal and mineral disorders associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), referred to as CKD-bone mineral disorders (CKD-MBD). CKD currently affects >10% of the adult population in the United States and represents a major health issue worldwide. Disturbances in mineral metabolism and fractures in CKD patients are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Appropriate identification and management of CKD-MBD is therefore critical to improving clinical outcome. Recent increases in understanding of the complex pathophysiology of CKD, which involves calcium, phosphate and magnesium balance, and is also influenced by vitamin D status and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23 production, should facilitate such improvement. Development of evidence-based recommendations about how best to use PTH is limited by considerable method-related variation in results, of up to 5-fold, as well as by lack of clarity about which PTH metabolites these methods recognise. This makes it difficult to compare PTH results from different studies and to develop common reference intervals and/or decision levels for treatment. The implications of these method-related differences for current clinical practice are reviewed here. Work being undertaken by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) to improve the comparability of PTH measurements worldwide is also described. PMID:27746210

  5. Perspective and priorities for improvement of parathyroid hormone (PTH) measurement - A view from the IFCC Working Group for PTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Sprague, Stuart; Almond, Alison; Cavalier, Etienne; Fraser, William D; Algeciras-Schimnich, Alicia; Singh, Ravinder; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Vesper, Hubert W

    2017-04-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) measurement in serum or plasma is a necessary tool for the exploration of calcium/phosphate disorders, and is widely used as a surrogate marker to assess skeletal and mineral disorders associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), referred to as CKD-bone mineral disorders (CKD-MBD). CKD currently affects >10% of the adult population in the United States and represents a major health issue worldwide. Disturbances in mineral metabolism and fractures in CKD patients are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Appropriate identification and management of CKD-MBD is therefore critical to improving clinical outcome. Recent increases in understanding of the complex pathophysiology of CKD, which involves calcium, phosphate and magnesium balance, and is also influenced by vitamin D status and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23 production, should facilitate such improvement. Development of evidence-based recommendations about how best to use PTH is limited by considerable method-related variation in results, of up to 5-fold, as well as by lack of clarity about which PTH metabolites these methods recognise. This makes it difficult to compare PTH results from different studies and to develop common reference intervals and/or decision levels for treatment. The implications of these method-related differences for current clinical practice are reviewed here. Work being undertaken by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) to improve the comparability of PTH measurements worldwide is also described. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. A clinical study of temporomandibular disorder. The value of bone scintigraphy as an aid to diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Masashi

    2000-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is still not defined with respect to the point of an entity, terminological problems, and clinical classification and gradings. Moreover, diagnostic problems of internal deranegement and osteodeformity at the temporomandibular joint such as type IV and mechanism of bone remodeling at condylar head are also still not clear. In this investigation, we tried to classify the severity and progressive grading according to the symptoms and objective laboratory data taken from soft tissues such as muscles related to mastication, discs and ligaments, and hard tissues such as condylar head and temporal bone changes around the temporomandibular joint. Preliminary diagnostic clinical tool of the assessment of temporomandibular joint by maens of bone scintigraphy was attributed to the additional diagnostic procedure and research for the bone remodeling for the temporomandibular disorder because this can be defined between subjective and objective symptoms in this disorder. Bone scintigraphy will solve many problems concerning undefined degenerative bone changes in TMD, enable more accurate diagnosis, and the selection of treatment and prognosis in future investigation. Also, it is believed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) nuclear bone imaging is a highly accurate diagnostic method for craniomandibular disorders. (author)

  7. The pathophysiological basis of bone tissue alterations associated with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Emanuela A; Lenzi, Andrea; Migliaccio, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and obesity are two major eating disorders present nowadays in Western countries. They are both characterized by striking body composition variations and hormonal alterations, which impact on skeletal metabolism, inducing bone tissue modifications and, thus, often cause an increased risk for fractures. AN and obesity are characterized by a severe reduction in fat mass and a high expression of it, respectively, and in both conditions hormones secreted or modulated by body fat content are important determinants of low bone density, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength. In addition, in both AN and obesity, increased marrow adiposity, which correlates with low bone density, has been observed. This review will discuss the pathophysiological basis of bone alterations associated with AN and obesity, conditions of extreme energy deficiency and excess, respectively.

  8. Wormian bones in osteogenesis imperfecta and other disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremin, B.; Goodman, H.; Spranger, J.; Beighton, P.

    1982-03-01

    When are Wormian bones significant is not an easy question to answer, but its relevance is important in relation to bone dysplasias such as osteogenesis imperfecta. Recognition will differ with age of patient, radiographic objectivity, and personal subjectivity. In order to attempt an answer, the skull radiographs of 81 cases of osteogenesis imperfecta of varying ages were examined for the presence of Wormian bones. These were compared against the incidence of Wormian bones in 500 skull radiographs of normal children. Significant Wormian bones as against normal developmental variants were considered to be those more than 10 in number, measuring greater than 6 mm by 4 mm, and arranged in a general mosaic pattern. They were found in all the cases of osteogenesis imperfecta but not in the normal skulls. The occurrence of significant Wormian bones in other bone dysplasias from our material and that of the literature was recorded. Other incidental findings in the skulls of the cases of osteogenesis imperfecta were also appraised.

  9. Restoring Bone Density in Women with Ovarian Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a type of estrogen) and testosterone (a predominantly male hormone that is also produced by women in smaller ... untreated group of 70 women with normal ovarian function. Results were published ... . Both hormone treatment regimens led to increases in bone mineral ...

  10. Recent Discoveries in Monogenic Disorders of Childhood Bone Fragility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkitie, Riikka E; Kämpe, Anders J; Taylan, Fulya; Mäkitie, Outi

    2017-08-01

    This review summarizes our current knowledge on primary osteoporosis in children with focus on recent genetic findings. Advances in genetic research, particularly next-generation sequencing, have found several genetic loci that associate with monogenic forms of inherited osteoporosis, widening the scope of primary osteoporosis beyond classical osteogenesis imperfecta. New forms of primary osteoporosis, such as those related to WNT1, PLS3, and XYLT2, have identified defects outside the extracellular matrix components and collagen-related pathways, in intracellular cascades directly affecting bone cell function. Primary osteoporosis can lead to severe skeletal morbidity, including abnormal longitudinal growth, compromised bone mass gain, and noticeable fracture tendency beginning at childhood. Early diagnosis and timely care are warranted to ensure the best achievable bone health. Future research will most likely broaden the spectrum of primary osteoporosis, hopefully provide more insight into the genetics governing bone health, and offer new targets for treatment.

  11. Association of Vitamin D Metabolites with Parathyroid Hormone, Fibroblast Growth Factor-23, Calcium, and Phosphorus in Dogs with Various Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, V J; Harjes, L M; Dembek, K; Young, G S; Chew, D J; Toribio, R E

    2017-05-01

    Hypovitaminosis D is associated with progression of renal disease, development of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism (RHPT), chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD), and increased mortality in people with CKD. Despite what is known regarding vitamin D dysregulation in humans with CKD, little is known about vitamin D metabolism in dogs with CKD. The purpose of our study was to further elucidate vitamin D status in dogs with different stages of CKD and to relate it to factors that affect the development of CKD-MBD, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), calcium, and phosphorus concentrations. Thirty-seven dogs with naturally occurring CKD were compared to 10 healthy dogs. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH) 2 D], and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [24,25(OH) 2 D], and PTH and FGF-23 concentrations were measured. Their association with serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations and IRIS stage was determined. Compared to healthy dogs, all vitamin D metabolite concentrations were significantly lower in dogs with International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) stages 3 and 4 CKD (r [creatinine]: -0.49 to -0.60; P Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Effects of the Use of Non-Calcium Phosphate Binders in the Control and Outcome of Vascular Calcifications: A Review of Clinical Trials on CKD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piergiorgio Bolasco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular calcifications produce a high impact on morbidity and mortality rates in patients affected by chronic kidney disease and mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD. Effects are manifested from the more advanced stages of CKD (stages 3-4, particularly in patients undergoing dialysis (CKD5D. In recent years, a large number of therapeutic options have been successfully used in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT, despite eliciting less marked effects on nonbone calcifications associated with CKD-MBD. In addition to the use of Vitamin D and analogues, more recently treatment with calcimimetic drugs has also been undertaken. The present paper aims to analyze comparative and efficacy studies undertaken to assess particularly the impact on morbidity and mortality rates of non-calcium phosphate binders. Moreover, the mechanism of action underlying the depositing of calcium and phosphate along blood vessel walls, irrespective of the specific contribution provided in reducing the typical phosphate levels observed in CKD largely at more advanced stages of the disease, will be investigated. The aim of this paper therefore is to evaluate which phosphate binders are characterised by the above action and the mechanisms through which these are manifested.

  13. Emerging drugs for secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Mario; Tomlinson, James; Walsh, Liron; Bellasi, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), a common, serious, and progressive complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD), is characterized by elevated serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), parathyroid gland hyperplasia, and mineral metabolism abnormalities. These disturbances may result in CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), which is associated with poor quality of life and short life expectancy. The goal of SHPT treatment is to maintain PTH, calcium, and phosphorus within accepted targeted ranges. This review highlights the pathogenesis of SHPT and current SHPT therapeutic approaches, including the use of low-phosphate diets, phosphate binders, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) and its analogs, calcimimetics, and parathyroidectomy in addition to discussing emerging drugs in development for SHPT. Numerous studies indicate that mineral abnormalities occur early in the course of CKD, are prevalent by the time patients enter dialysis, and foreshadow a risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Several newly developed compounds may potentially overcome the limitations of current SHPT therapies. If emerging therapies can reduce PTH, normalize mineral metabolism, promote treatment adherence, and reduce the risk of side effects, they may provide the requisite features for improving long-term outcomes in patients with SHPT receiving dialysis and reduce the risks of CKD-MBD.

  14. Adult bone marrow: which stem cells for cellular therapy protocols in neurodegenerative disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Laudet, Emerence; Neirinckx, Virginie; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy.

  15. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant for Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-09

    Mucopolysaccharidosis; Hurler Syndrome; Hunter Syndrome; Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome; Sly Syndrome; Alpha Mannosidosis; Fucosidosis; Aspartylglucosaminuria; Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD); Krabbe Disease; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD); Sphingolipidoses; Peroxisomal Disorders

  16. 18F-FLT PET in hematologic disorders : A novel technique to analyze the bone marrow compartment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agool, Ali; Schot, Bart W.; Jager, Pieter L.; Vellenga, Edo

    2006-01-01

    Few diagnostic procedures are available to determine the degree of bone marrow cellularity and the numbers of cycling cells in patients with bone marrow disorders. Noninvasive imaging of the bone marrow compartment may be helpful. The PET tracer 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxy-L-thymidine (F-18-FLT) has been

  17. Molecular, Phenotypic Aspects and Therapeutic Horizons of Rare Genetic Bone Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Faruqi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare disease afflicts less than 200,000 individuals, according to the National Organization for Rare Diseases (NORD of the United States. Over 6,000 rare disorders affect approximately 1 in 10 Americans. Rare genetic bone disorders remain the major causes of disability in US patients. These rare bone disorders also represent a therapeutic challenge for clinicians, due to lack of understanding of underlying mechanisms. This systematic review explored current literature on therapeutic directions for the following rare genetic bone disorders: fibrous dysplasia, Gorham-Stout syndrome, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, melorheostosis, multiple hereditary exostosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, craniometaphyseal dysplasia, achondroplasia, and hypophosphatasia. The disease mechanisms of Gorham-Stout disease, melorheostosis, and multiple hereditary exostosis are not fully elucidated. Inhibitors of the ACVR1/ALK2 pathway may serve as possible therapeutic intervention for FOP. The use of bisphosphonates and IL-6 inhibitors has been explored to be useful in the treatment of fibrous dysplasia, but more research is warranted. Cell therapy, bisphosphonate polytherapy, and human growth hormone may avert the pathology in osteogenesis imperfecta, but further studies are needed. There are still no current effective treatments for these bone disorders; however, significant promising advances in therapeutic modalities were developed that will limit patient suffering and treat their skeletal disabilities.

  18. X-ray imaging characterization of femoral bones in aging mice with osteopetrotic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Huang, Hong-Wen; Chang, Wei-Jeng

    2015-04-01

    Aging mice with a rare osteopetrotic disorder in which the entire space of femoral bones are filled with trabecular bones are used as our research platform. A complete study is conducted with a micro computed tomography (CT) system to characterize the bone abnormality. Technical assessment of femoral bones includes geometric structure, biomechanical strength, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone mineral content (BMC). Normal aging mice of similar ages are included for comparisons. In our imaging work, we model the trabecular bone as a cylindrical rod and new quantitative which are not previously discussed are developed for advanced analysis, including trabecular segment length, trabecular segment radius, connecting node number, and distribution of trabecular segment radius. We then identified a geometric characteristic in which there are local maximums (0.0049, 0.0119, and 0.0147 mm) in the structure of trabecular segment radius. Our calculations show 343% higher in percent trabecular bone volume at distal-metaphysis; 38% higher in cortical thickness at mid-diaphysis; 11% higher in cortical cross-sectional moment of inertia at mid-diaphysis; 42% higher in cortical thickness at femur neck; 26% higher in cortical cross-sectional moment of inertia at femur neck; 31% and 395% higher in trabecular BMD and BMC at distal-metaphysis; 17% and 27% higher in cortical BMD and BMC at distal-metaphysis; 9% and 53% higher in cortical BMD and BMC at mid-diaphysis; 25% and 64% higher in cortical BMD and BMC at femur neck. Our new quantitative parameters and findings may be extended to evaluate the treatment response for other similar bone disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment and clinical management of bone disease in adults with eating disorders: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabkin, Anne; Rothman, Micol S; Wassenaar, Elizabeth; Mascolo, Margherita; Mehler, Philip S

    2017-01-01

    To review current medical literature regarding the causes and clinical management options for low bone mineral density (BMD) in adult patients with eating disorders. Low bone mineral density is a common complication of eating disorders with potentially lifelong debilitating consequences. Definitive, rigorous guidelines for screening, prevention and management are lacking. This article intends to provide a review of the literature to date and current options for prevention and treatment. Current, peer-reviewed literature was reviewed, interpreted and summarized. Any patient with lower than average BMD should weight restore and in premenopausal females, spontaneous menses should resume. Adequate vitamin D and calcium supplementation is important. Weight-bearing exercise should be avoided unless cautiously monitored by a treatment team in the setting of weight restoration. If a patient has a Z-score less than expected for age with a high fracture risk or likelihood of ongoing BMD loss, physiologic transdermal estrogen plus oral progesterone, bisphosphonates (alendronate or risedronate) or teriparatide could be considered. Other agents, such as denosumab and testosterone in men, have not been tested in eating-disordered populations and should only be trialed on an empiric basis if there is a high clinical concern for fractures or worsening bone mineral density. A rigorous peer-based approach to establish guidelines for evaluation and management of low bone mineral density is needed in this neglected subspecialty of eating disorders.

  20. Brief Report: Bone Fractures in Children and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeyer, Ann M.; O'Rourke, Julia A.; Massa, Alexandra; Lee, Hang; Lawson, Elizabeth A.; McDougle, Christopher J.; Misra, Madhusmita

    2015-01-01

    Peripubertal boys with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have lower bone mineral density (BMD) than typically developing controls. However, it is not clear whether lower BMD in ASD results in an increased fracture rate. This study examined the rate of fractures in children and adults with and without ASD using a national database of emergency room…

  1. The risk of eating disorders and bone health in young adults: the mediating role of body composition and fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Miguel, Miriam; Torres-Costoso, Ana; Martínez-Andrés, María; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca; Díez-Fernández, Ana; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; García-Prieto, Jorge Cañete; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente

    2017-11-13

    To analyze the independent relationship between the risk of eating disorders and bone health and to examine whether this relationship is mediated by body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). In this cross-sectional study, bone-related variables, lean mass, fat mass (by DXA), risk of eating disorders (SCOFF questionnaire), height, weight, waist circumference and CRF were measured in 487 university students aged 18-30 years from the University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. ANCOVA models were estimated to test mean differences in bone mass categorized by body composition, CRF or risk of eating disorders. Subsequently, linear regression models were fitted according to Baron and Kenny's procedures for mediation analysis. The marginal estimated mean ± SE values of total body bone mineral density for the categories "no risk of eating disorders" and "risk of eating disorders" were 1.239 ± 0.126 eating disorders and bone health in young adults. Body composition and CRF mediate the association between the risk of eating disorders and bone health. These findings highlight the importance of maintaining a healthy weight and good CRF for the prevention of the development of eating disorders and for the maintenance of good bone health in young adults. Level V, cross-sectional descriptive study.

  2. Effects of unfractionated heparin on renal osteodystrophy and vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Li, Yingbin; Li, Qingnan; Zuo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Unfractionated heparin (UFH) is the most widely used anticoagulant in hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Many studies have verified that UFH can induce bone loss in subjects with normal bone, but few have focused on its effect on renal osteodystrophy. We therefore investigated this issue in adenine-induced CKD rats. As CKD also impairs mineral metabolism systemically, we also studied the impacts of UFH on serum markers of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) and vascular calcification. We administered low and high doses of UFH (1U/g and 2U/g body weight, respectively) to CKD rats and compared them with CKD controls. At sacrifice, the serum markers of CKD-MBD did not significantly differ among the two UFH CKD groups and the CKD control group. The mean bone mineral densities (BMDs) of the total femur and a region of interest (ROI) constituted of trabecular and cortical bone were lower in the high-dose UFH (H-UFH) CKD group than in the CKD control group (Prats indicated secondary hyperparathyroidism, and the femoral trabecular bone volume, but not cortical bone volume, significantly decreased with increasing UFH dose. The same decreasing trend was found in osteoblast parameters, and an increasing trend was found in osteoclast parameters; however, most differences were not significant. Moreover, no distinct statistical differences were found in the comparison of vascular calcium or phosphorus content among the CKD control group and the two UFH CKD groups. Therefore, we concluded that UFH could induce bone loss in CKD rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism, mainly by reducing the trabecular volume and had little effect on cortical bone volume. The underlying mechanism might involve inhibition of osteoblast activity and promotion of osteoclast activity by UFH. We did not find any effect of UFH on vascular calcification in CKD rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism. © 2013.

  3. Studies on 99Tcm-sulfur colloid bone marrow scintigraphy in myeloproliferative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong; Zhang Yifan; Jia Fangxian; Kang Fu; Jian Shiquan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the imaging features and changing patterns of bone marrow scintigraphy in myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) as well as its clinical significance. Methods: Bone marrow scintigraphy using 99 Tc m -sulfur colloid 370-550 MBq was performed on 85 MPD patients, including 40 cases of idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF), 15 of polycythemia vera (PV), 5 of essential thrombocythaemia (ET), 30 of chronic granulocytic leukemia. Also, 40 cases of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) were observed in this study. Results: Abnormal bone marrow imaging was found in 88.2% of the 85 patients. The suppression rate of central bone marrow (CBM) and expansion rate of peripheral bone marrow (PBM) in these MPD patients were 61.2% and 56.5%, respectively. The imaging patterns was classified into three types according to the distribution and activity of bone marrow. 1) reduced imaging (31.8%); 2) increased and expanded imaging (27.1%); 3) depressed and expanded imaging (29.4%). Splenomegaly with minimal residual marrow activity was typical for late stages of MPD. Expansion of PBM was the further feature, but of no major importance for improving hematopoiesis of MPD, and it tended to retract during clinical recovery in chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL). With expanding PBM, unmatched peripheral blood decreasing was found in MDS. The expansion pattern of PBM in different MPD was of relatively definite features. Conclusions: The imaging pattern of bone marrow was correlated with blood work-up data and clinical course or stages of MPD. Bone marrow scintigraphy may be proven useful in differential diagnosis and evaluation of clinical staging and prognosis of MPD

  4. Paracrystalline Disorder from Phosphate Ion Orientation and Substitution in Synthetic Bone Mineral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marisa, Mary E.; Zhou, Shiliang; Melot, Brent C.; Peaslee, Graham F.; Neilson, James R.

    2016-12-05

    Hydroxyapatite is an inorganic mineral closely resembling the mineral phase in bone. However, as a biological mineral, it is highly disordered, and its composition and atomistic structure remain poorly understood. Here, synchrotron X-ray total scattering and pair distribution function analysis methods provide insight into the nature of atomistic disorder in a synthetic bone mineral analogue, chemically substituted hydroxyapatite. By varying the effective hydrolysis rate and/or carbonate concentration during growth of the mineral, compounds with varied degrees of paracrystallinity are prepared. From advanced simulations constrained by the experimental pair distribution function and density functional theory, the paracrystalline disorder prevalent in these materials appears to result from accommodation of carbonate in the lattice through random displacement of the phosphate groups. Though many substitution modalities are likely to occur in concert, the most predominant substitution places carbonate into the mirror plane of an ideal phosphate site. Understanding the mineralogical imperfections of a biologically analogous hydroxyapatite is important not only to potential bone grafting applications but also to biological mineralization processes themselves.

  5. Risk factors associated with keel bone and foot pad disorders in laying hens housed in aviary systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerkens, J.L.T.; Delezie, E.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Kempen, I.; Zoons, J.; Ampe, B.; Tuyttens, F.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aviary systems for laying hens offer space and opportunities to perform natural behaviors. However, hen welfare can be impaired due to increased risk for keel bone and foot pad disorders in those systems. This cross-sectional study (N = 47 flocks) aimed to assess prevalences of keel bone and foot

  6. Use of Bone Marrow derived Stem Cells in patients with Cardiovascular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end stage heart failure have very few treatment options. The long waiting times for transplant and the complications associated with immunosuppression has led to the search for alternatives. Subsequent to the isolation and characterization of stem cells, tremendous advances have been made and the safety and feasibility of autologous bone marrow derived stem cells has been proven in preclinical studies. Clinical studies have also shown mobilized cells repair the infracted heart, improving function and survival. We have started a clinical study to evaluate the efficacy of bone marrow derived stem cells. Bone-marrow was aspirated from the right iliac crest and the stem cells were isolated by density gradient method and suspended according to the mode of delivery.From Jan 2007 till date 10 patients (8 adults, 2 children, age with end stage cardiovascular disorder of varied etiology (Ischemic left ventricular dysfunction - 6 patients, Primary pulmonary hypertension - 2 patients, Dilated cardiomyopathy -1 patient, Biventricular non-compaction -1 patient underwent stem cell therapy. All patients were evaluated and cardiac function was measured by using echocardiography and thallium scintigraphy. There were no procedure related complications. These patients are being regularly followed-up and one patient who has completed 6-month follow-up has shown improvement in perfusion as well as increase in ejection fraction of 10%. Stem cell therapy in patients with end-stage cardiovascular disorder might be a promising tool by means of angiogenesis and other paracrine mechanisms.

  7. Bone Mineral Density Accrual in Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Effects of Calcium Intake and Physical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Mahmood; Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of weight bearing exercise and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with autism spectrum disorders. For this reason 60 boy students with autism disorder (age 8-10 years old) were assigned to four groups with no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake, and physical…

  8. Potential association of posttraumatic stress disorder and decreased bone mineral density in repatriated prisoners of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Robert E; Hoyt, Robert E; Moore, Jeffrey L; Linnville, Steven; Segovia, Francine; Ambrose, Michael R

    2011-03-01

    We conducted a retrospective evaluation of bone mineral density data collected during routine medical follow-up evaluations of 241 Vietnam-era male repatriated prisoners of war, with and without the lifetime diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and 79 subjects in a comparison group. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans evaluated total hip and lumbar spine T-scores. A multivariate analysis of covariance was performed on the data using age, body mass index, ethnicity, and reported alcohol consumption as covariates. There was a significant effect of group on total hip, but not lumbar spine, T-scores. Pairwise comparisons revealed statistically lower total hip T-scores in repatriates with a lifetime history of PTSD in comparison to both the comparison group and repatriates without a lifetime history of PTSD. In this study of elderly repatriated prisoners of war, we noted an association between a lifelong history of PTSD and decreased bone mineral density at the hip.

  9. PA21, a novel phosphate binder, improves renal osteodystrophy in rats with chronic renal failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Yaguchi

    Full Text Available The effects of PA21, a novel iron-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binder, on hyperphosphatemia and its accompanying bone abnormality in chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD were evaluated. Rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (CRF were prepared by feeding them an adenine-containing diet for four weeks. They were also freely fed a diet that contained PA21 (0.5, 1.5, and 5%, sevelamer hydrochloride (0.6 and 2% or lanthanum carbonate hydrate (0.6 and 2% for four weeks. Blood biochemical parameters were measured and bone histomorphometry was performed for femurs, which were isolated after drug treatment. Serum phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH levels were higher in the CRF rats. Administration of phosphate binders for four weeks decreased serum phosphorus and PTH levels in a dose-dependent manner and there were significant decreases in the AUC0-28 day of these parameters in 5% PA21, 2% sevelamer hydrochloride, and 2% lanthanum carbonate hydrate groups compared with that in the CRF control group. Moreover, osteoid volume improved significantly in 5% of the PA21 group, and fibrosis volume and cortical porosity were ameliorated in 5% PA21, 2% sevelamer hydrochloride, and 2% lanthanum carbonate hydrate groups. These results suggest that PA21 is effective against hyperphosphatemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and bone abnormalities in CKD-MBD as sevelamer hydrochloride and lanthanum carbonate hydrate are, and that PA21 is a new potential alternative to phosphate binders.

  10. Vitamin D Deficiency in HIV Infection: Not Only a Bone Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Mansueto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypovitaminosis D is a worldwide disorder, with a high prevalence in the general population of both Western and developing countries. In HIV patients, several studies have linked vitamin D status with bone disease, neurocognitive impairment, depression, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, infections, autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. In this review, we focus on the most recent epidemiological and experimental data dealing with the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and HIV infection. We analysed the extent of the problem, pathogenic mechanisms, clinical implications, and potential benefits of vitamin D supplementation in HIV-infected subjects.

  11. Reversing LRP5-dependent osteoporosis and SOST deficiency-induced sclerosing bone disorders by altering WNT signaling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming-Kang; Kramer, Ina; Keller, Hansjoerg; Gooi, Jonathan H; Collett, Corinne; Jenkins, David; Ettenberg, Seth A; Cong, Feng; Halleux, Christine; Kneissel, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    The bone formation inhibitor sclerostin encoded by SOST binds in vitro to low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 5/6 Wnt co-receptors, thereby inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a central pathway of skeletal homeostasis. Lrp5/LRP5 deficiency results in osteoporosis-pseudoglioma (OPPG), whereas Sost/SOST deficiency induces lifelong bone gain in mice and humans. Here, we analyzed the bone phenotype of mice lacking Sost (Sost(-/-) ), Lrp5 (Lrp5(-/-) ), or both (Sost(-/-) ;Lrp5(-/-) ) to elucidate the mechanism of action of Sost in vivo. Sost deficiency-induced bone gain was significantly blunted in Sost(-/-) ;Lrp5(-/-) mice. Yet the Lrp5 OPPG phenotype was fully rescued in Sost(-/-) ;Lrp5(-/-) mice and most bone parameters were elevated relative to wild-type. To test whether the remaining bone increases in Sost(-/-) ;Lrp5(-/-) animals depend on Lrp6, we treated wild-type, Sost(-/-) , and Sost(-/-) ;Lrp5(-/-) mice with distinct Lrp6 function blocking antibodies. Selective blockage of Wnt1 class-mediated Lrp6 signaling reduced cancellous bone mass and density in wild-type mice. Surprisingly, it reversed the abnormal bone gain in Sost(-/-) and Sost(-/-) ;Lrp5(-/-) mice to wild-type levels irrespective of enhancement or blockage of Wnt3a class-mediated Lrp6 activity. Thus, whereas Sost deficiency-induced bone anabolism partially requires Lrp5, it fully depends on Wnt1 class-induced Lrp6 activity. These findings indicate: first, that OPPG syndrome patients suffering from LRP5 loss-of-function should benefit from principles antagonizing SOST/sclerostin action; and second, that therapeutic WNT signaling inhibitors may stop the debilitating bone overgrowth in sclerosing disorders related to SOST deficiency, such as sclerosteosis, van Buchem disease, and autosomal dominant craniodiaphyseal dysplasia, which are rare disorders without viable treatment options. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  12. Management of chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder: Korean working group recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunah Hwang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available For Korean dialysis patients, chronic kidney disease–mineral bone disorder is a serious burden because of cardiovascular calcification and mortality. However, recent epidemiologic data have demonstrated that many patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis are out of the target ranges of serum calcium, phosphorus, and intact parathyroid hormone. Thus, we felt the necessity for the development of practical recommendations to treat abnormal serum phosphorus, calcium, and iPTH in dialysis patients. In this paper, we briefly comment on the measurement of serum calcium, phosphorus, iPTH, dialysate calcium concentration, dietary phosphorus restriction, use of phosphate binders, and medical and surgical options to correct secondary hyperparathyroidism. In particular, for the optimal management of secondary hyperparathyroidism, we suggest a simplified medication adjustment according to certain ranges of serum phosphorus and calcium. Large-scale, well-designed clinical studies are required to support our strategies to control chronic kidney disease–mineral bone disorder in this country. Based on such data, our practice guidelines could be established and better long-term outcomes should be anticipated in our dialysis patients.

  13. Major depressive disorder is a risk factor for low bone mass, central obesity, and other medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizza, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric illnesses in the adult population. It is often associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Osteoporosis is also a major public health threat. Multiple studies have reported an association between depression and low bone mineral density, but a causal link between these two conditions is disputed. Here the most important findings of the POWER (Premenopausal, Osteoporosis Women, Alendronate, Depression) Study, a large prospective study of bone turnover in premenopausal women with major depression, are summarized. The endocrine and immune alterations secondary to depression that might affect bone mass, and the possible role of poor lifestyle in the etiology of osteoporosis in subjects with depression, are also reviewed, as is the potential effect of antidepressants on bone loss. It is proposed that depression induces bone loss and osteoporotic fractures, primarily via specific immune and endocrine mechanisms, with poor lifestyle habits as potential contributory factors.

  14. Nephrolithiasis, kidney failure and bone disorders in Dent disease patients with and without CLCN5 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglani, Franca; D'Angelo, Angela; Bertizzolo, Luisa Maria; Tosetto, Enrica; Ceol, Monica; Cremasco, Daniela; Bonfante, Luciana; Addis, Maria Antonietta; Del Prete, Dorella

    2015-01-01

    Dent disease (DD) is a rare X-linked recessive renal tubulopathy characterised by low-molecular-weight proteinuria (LMWP), hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis and/or nephrolithiasis. DD is caused by mutations in both the CLCN5 and OCRL genes. CLCN5 encodes the electrogenic chloride/proton exchanger ClC-5 which is involved in the tubular reabsorption of albumin and LMW proteins, OCRL encodes the inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase, and was initially associated with Lowe syndrome. In approximately 25 % of patients, no CLCN5 and OCRL mutations were detected. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether calcium phosphate metabolism disorders and their clinical complications are differently distributed among DD patients with and without CLCN5 mutations. Sixty-four male subjects were studied and classified into three groups: Group I (with CLCN5 mutations), Group II (without CLCN5 mutations) and Group III (family members with the same CLCN5 mutation). LMWP, hypercalciuria and phosphaturic tubulopathy and the consequent clinical complications nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, bone disorders, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) were considered present or absent in each patient. We found that the distribution of nephrolithiasis, bone disorders and CKD differs among patients with and without CLCN5 mutations. Only in patients harbouring CLCN5 mutations was age-independent nephrolithiasis associated with hypercalciuria, suggesting that nephrolithiasis is linked to altered proximal tubular function caused by a loss of ClC-5 function, in agreement with ClC-5 KO animal models. Similarly, only in patients harbouring CLCN5 mutations was age-independent kidney failure associated with nephrocalcinosis, suggesting that kidney failure is the consequence of a ClC-5 dysfunction, as in ClC-5 KO animal models. Bone disorders are a relevant feature of DD phenotype, as patients were mainly young males and this complication occurred independently of age. The triad of symptoms, LMWP

  15. Assessment of lumbar trabecular bone density by means of single energy quantitative CT in hospital control children and bone metabolic disorders, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Kazutoshi; Miyamoto, Akie; Imai, Kaoru; Mochizuki, Yumiko; Hayashi, Kitami; Mitsuishi, Yoichi; Fukuyama, Yukio; Kohno, Atsushi; Shigeta, Teiko

    1990-01-01

    We studied the 3rd lumbar vertebral trabecular bone mineral density in 59 cross-sectional pictures of quantitative computed tomography (QCT) with CaCO 3 phantom for 28 hospital control children and 30 cases of suspected bone metabolic disorders. The QCT value of bone mineral density of control children showed neither age dependency nor sexual difference before puberty: for males was 221.8±30.2 mg CaCO 3 /cm 3 (Mean±SD) under 4 years, 218.1±39.7 at 5∼9 years and 217.2±30.9 at 10∼15 years; and for females 220.9±18.3 under 4 years and 240.0±29.4 at 5∼9 years. The QCT values of bone mineral density in bed-ridden patients, children receiving glucocorticoids, and children receiving anticonvulsants were significantly lower than that in control children (p<0.005). The QCT value of bone mineral density of bed-ridden patients was significantly lower than that of children receiving glucocorticoids and of children receiving anticonvulsants (p<0.05, p<0.005 respectively). Our study confirmed that single energy quantitative CT was very useful in pediatric clinical application. (author)

  16. Use of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, the trabecular bone score and quantitative computed tomography in the evaluation of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    In subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who suffer a minimal trauma fracture, the problem is to differentiate between osteoporosis and the various forms of renal bone disease associated with CKD-mineral and bone disorder. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that renal osteodystrophy may coexist with osteoporosis. The World Health Organization's bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteopenia ( -2.5 < T-score < -1.0) and osteoporosis (a T-score ≤ -2.5) may be used in patients with CKD stages 1-3. In CKD stages 4-5, BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is less predictive and may underestimate fracture risk. The development of absolute fracture risk (AFR) algorithms, such as FRAX® and the Garvan absolute fracture risk calculator, to predict risk of fracture over a given time (usually 10 years) aims to incorporate non-BMD risk factors into the clinical assessment. FRAX® has been shown to be useful to assess fracture risk in CKD but may underestimate fracture risk in advanced CKD. The trabecular bone score is a measure of grey scale homogeneity obtained from spine DXA, which correlates to trabecular microarchitecture and is an independent risk factor for fracture. Recent data demonstrate the potential utility of the trabecular bone score adjustment of AFR through the FRAX® algorithm in subjects with CKD. Parameters of bone microarchitecture using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) or high-resolution pQCT are also able to discriminate fracture status in subjects with CKD. However, there are at present no convincing data that the addition of pQCT or high-resolution pQCT parameters to DXA BMD improves fracture discrimination. More advanced estimates of bone strength derived from measurements of micro-architecture, by QCT-derived finite element analysis may be incorporated into AFR algorithms in the future. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  17. Intravitreal Implantation of Genetically Modified Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells for Treating Retinal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Christopher J; Sanders, Douglas N; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Jensen, Cheryl A; Castaner, Leilani J; Kirk, Mark D; Katz, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    A number of retinal degenerative diseases may be amenable to treatment with continuous intraocular delivery of therapeutic agents that cannot be delivered effectively to the retina via systemic or topical administration. Among these disorders are lysosomal storage diseases resulting from deficiencies in soluble lysosomal enzymes. Most cells, including those of the retina, are able to take up these enzymes and incorporate them in active form into their lysosomes. In theory, therefore, continuous intraocular administration of a normal form of a soluble lysosomal enzyme should be able to cure the molecular defect in the retinas of subjects lacking this enzyme. Experiments were conducted to determine whether genetically modified bone marrow-derived stem cells implanted into the vitreous could be used as -vehicles for continuous delivery of such enzymes to the retina. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from normal mice were implanted into the vitreous of mice undergoing retinal degeneration as a result of a mutation in the PPT1 gene. The implanted cells appeared to survive indefinitely in the vitreous without proliferating or invading the retina. This indicates that intravitreal implantation of MSCs is likely a safe means of long-term delivery of proteins synthesized by the implanted cells. Experiments have been initiated to test the efficacy of using genetically modified autologous MSCs to inhibit retinal degeneration in a canine model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

  18. Bone Mineral Density Changes after Physical Training and Calcium Intake in Students with Attention Deficit and Hyper Activity Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab ameri, Elahe; Dehkhoda, Mohammad Reza; Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate the effects of weight bearing exercise and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with attention deficit and hyper activity (ADHD) disorder. For this reason 54 male students with ADHD (age 8-12 years old) were assigned to four groups with no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake, and physical…

  19. From bone biology to bone analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenau, E.; Saggese, G.; Peter, F.; Baroncelli, G.I.; Shaw, N.J.; Crabtree, N.J.; Zadik, Z.; Neu, C.M.; Noordam, C.; Radetti, G.; Hochberg, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Bone development is one of the key processes characterizing childhood and adolescence. Understanding this process is not only important for physicians treating pediatric bone disorders, but also for clinicians and researchers dealing with postmenopausal and senile osteoporosis. Bone densitometry has

  20. Clinical practice recommendations for native vitamin D therapy in children with chronic kidney disease Stages 2-5 and on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Rukshana; Wan, Mandy; Nagler, Evi V; Bakkaloglu, Sevcan; Fischer, Dagmar-C; Bishop, Nicholas; Cozzolino, Mario; Bacchetta, Justine; Edefonti, Alberto; Stefanidis, Constantinos J; Vande Walle, Johan; Haffner, Dieter; Klaus, Günter; Schmitt, Claus Peter

    2017-07-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widely prevalent and often severe in children and adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although native vitamin D {25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]} is thought to have pleiotropic effects on many organ systems, its skeletal effects have been most widely studied. The 25(OH)D deficiency is causally linked with rickets and fractures in healthy children and those with CKD, contributing to the CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD) complex. There are few studies to provide evidence for vitamin D therapy or guidelines for its use in CKD. A core working group (WG) of the European Society for Paediatric Nephrology (ESPN) CKD-MBD and Dialysis WGs have developed recommendations for the evaluation, treatment and prevention of vitamin D deficiency in children with CKD. We present clinical practice recommendations for the use of ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) in children with CKD Stages 2-5 and on dialysis. A parallel document addresses treatment recommendations for active vitamin D analogue therapy. The WG has performed an extensive literature review to include meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials in healthy children as well as children and adults with CKD, and prospective observational studies in children with CKD. The Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system has been used to develop and grade the recommendations. In the absence of applicable study data, the opinion of experts from the ESPN CKD-MBD and Dialysis WGs is provided, but clearly GRADE-ed as such and must be carefully considered by the treating physician, and adapted to individual patient needs as appropriate. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  1. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between eating disorders and bone density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, L; Aldridge, V; Clark, E M; Misra, M; Micali, N

    2016-06-01

    This meta-analysis investigates the effect of an eating disorder on bone mineral density in two eating disorder subtypes. Following conflicting findings in previous literature, this study finds that not only anorexia nervosa, but also bulimia nervosa has a detrimental effect on BMD. Key predictors of this relationship are discussed. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigates bone mineral density (BMD) in individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). AN has been associated with low BMD and a risk of fractures and mixed results have been obtained for the relationship between BN and BMD. Deciphering the effect these two ED subtypes on BMD will determine the effect of low body weight (a characteristic of AN) versus the effects of periods of restrictive eating and malnutrition which are common to both AN and BN. We conducted a systematic search through the electronic databases MedLine, EMBASE and PsychInfo and the Cochrane Library to investigate and quantify this relationship. We screened 544 articles and included 27 studies in a random-effect meta-analysis and calculated the standardised mean difference (SMD) in BMD between women with a current diagnosis of AN (n = 785) vs HCs (n = 979) and a current diagnosis of BN (n = 187) vs HCs (n = 350). The outcome measures investigated were spinal, hip, femoral neck and whole body BMD measured by DXA or DPA scanning. A meta-regression investigated the effect of factors including age, duration since diagnosis, duration of amenorrhea and BMI on BMD. The mean BMI of participants was 16.65 kg/m(2) (AN), 21.16 kg/m(2) (BN) and 22.06 kg/m(2) (HC). Spine BMD was lowest in AN subjects (SMD, -3.681; 95 % CI, -4.738, -2.625; p < 0.0001), but also lower in BN subjects compared with HCs (SMD, -0.472; 95 % CI, -0.688, -0.255; p < 0.0001). Hip, whole body and femoral neck BMD were reduced to a statistically significant level in AN but not BN

  2. Living with the unknown: Posttraumatic stress disorder in pediatric bone marrow transplantation survivors and their mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskıran, Gülseren; Sürer Adanır, Aslı; Özatalay, Esin

    2016-04-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is used to treat children with various hematologic, oncologic, and metabolic diseases. Although the treatment can be lifesaving, it is also physically and psychologically demanding for both the child and caregivers. In previous studies, BMT is found to be related with anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and psychosocial problems both in children and parents. The aim of this study was to investigate PTSD in pediatric BMT survivors and their mothers compared with the healthy controls. Twenty-seven BMT survivors and their mothers and 28 healthy peers and their mothers were recruited as the study group and as the comparison group, respectively. All children were interviewed using Child Posttraumatic Stress Disorder-Reaction Index (CPTSD-RI) for assessing posttraumatic stress responses. As for mothers, Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) was used. In healthy children and mothers, instead of BMT, the most important traumatic event reported by them was included. All data were analyzed by a neutral statistician from the Department of Biostatistics of the university. The BMT group, both children and mothers, obtained significantly higher PTSD rates than the control group (66.5% and 17.8%, respectively, in children; 57.6% and 7%, respectively, in mothers). However, there was a weak correlation between survivors' and mothers' posttraumatic stress responses. These findings suggest that BMT is a significant stressor for both children and mothers. Clinicians should be aware of psychiatric symptoms of children who underwent such a life-threatening condition. Combination of medical treatment with psychosocial support is imperative.

  3. Despite a high prevalence of menstrual disorders, bone health is improved at a weight-bearing bone site in world-class female rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïmoun, Laurent; Coste, Olivier; Georgopoulos, Neoklis A; Roupas, Nikolaos D; Mahadea, Krishna Kunal; Tsouka, Alexandra; Mura, Thibault; Philibert, Pascal; Gaspari, Laura; Mariano-Goulart, Denis; Leglise, Michel; Sultan, Charles

    2013-12-01

    Regular physical activity during puberty improves bone mass acquisition. However, it is unknown whether extreme intense training has the same favorable effect on the skeleton. We evaluated the bone mass acquisition in a unique cohort of world-class rhythmic gymnasts. A total of 133 adolescent girls and young women with a mean age of 18.7 ± 2.7 (14.4-26.7) years participated in this study: 82 elite rhythmic gymnasts (RGs) and 51 controls (CONs). Anthropometric variables and body composition were assessed, and all participants completed questionnaires on their general medical, menstrual, and training histories. Broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA in decibels per megahertz) was determined by quantitative ultrasound at the heel. RGs presented lower weight (-8.5%, P rhythmic gymnastics appeared to have a beneficial effect on the bone health of a weight-bearing site. This effect was nevertheless modulated by the age of menarche. The high mechanical loading generated by this activity may counterbalance the negative effect of menstrual disorders.

  4. LRP5 mutations in osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome and high-bone-mass disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Régis; Lacombe, Didier; de Vernejoul, Marie Christine

    2005-05-01

    The LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) is a member of the LDL receptor family, which also includes the VLDL receptor and the apolipoprotein E receptor 2. The LRP5 is a co-receptor of Wnt located on the osteoblast membrane between two other receptors, Frizzled and Kremen. Frizzled and LRP5 bind to Wnt, thereby stabilizing beta-catenin and activating bone formation. When the dickkopf protein (Dkk) binds to Kremen and LRP5, this last undergoes internalization and therefore becomes unable to bind Wnt; this leads to degradation of beta-catenin and to inhibition of bone formation. In humans, loss of LRP5 function causes osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome, which is characterized by congenital blindness and extremely severe childhood-onset osteoporosis (lumbar spine Z-score often LRP5, thereby increasing LRP5 function; the result is high bone mass due to uncoupling of bone formation and resorption. The Z-scores in this condition can exceed +6 at the hip and spine. The LRP5 and Wnt/beta-catenin reflect the level of bone formation and play a central role in bone mass accrual and normal distribution. Furthermore, LRP5 may contribute to mediate mechanical loads within bone tissue. Identification of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is a breakthrough in the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms affecting bone tissue and suggests new treatment targets for patients with osteoporosis or specific malignant conditions such as myeloma and sclerotic bone metastases.

  5. Recent Changes in Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorders and Associated Fractures After Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Peggy; Kiener, Clotilde; Javier, Rose-Marie; Braun, Laura; Cognard, Noelle; Gautier-Vargas, Gabriela; Heibel, Francoise; Muller, Clotilde; Olagne, Jerome; Moulin, Bruno; Ohlmann, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    The management of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders has recently changed. We investigated the modifications of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder with a special focus on the incidence of fractures in the first year after kidney transplantation (KT). We retrospectively compared 2 groups of patients who consecutively underwent transplantation at our center 5 years from each other. Group 1 consisted of patients (n = 152) transplanted between 2004 and 2006, whereas patients in group 2 (n = 137) underwent KT between 2009 and 2011. During the end-stage renal disease phase at the time of transplant, cinacalcet, and native vitamin D were used significantly more frequently in group 2. Median intact parathyroid hormone levels were lower and severe hyperparathyroidism decreased significantly. Vitamin D deficiency dropped from 64% to 20%. After transplantation, persistent hyperparathyroidism (parathyroid hormone > 130 ng/L) and bone turnover markers were significantly reduced in group 2. Native vitamin D supplementation increased over time, whereas the use of active vitamin D was unchanged. The 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels were significantly higher. The fracture incidence at 1 year decreased significantly (3.1% vs 9.1%; P = 0.047). No steroid sparing was observed in group 2. Bisphosphonates after KT were more frequently used in group 2. Recent changes in clinical practice are associated with reductions in pretransplant and posttransplant hyperparathyroidism, vitamin D deficiency, and fracture risk after KT.

  6. Eating disorders, menstrual dysfunction, weight change and DMPA use predict bone density change in college-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Jeri W; Ruffing, Jamie A; Zion, Marsha; Tendy, Susan; Yavorek, Trudy; Lindsay, Robert; Cosman, Felicia

    2016-03-01

    There are limited longitudinal studies that have evaluated bone mineral density (BMD) changes in college-aged women. Our objective was to simultaneously evaluate factors influencing 4-year BMD change. This was a longitudinal cohort study of healthy, physically active women in the US Military Academy (n=91; average age=18.4years). Assessments over four years included: height, weight, calcium intake, physical fitness, menstrual function (annual number cycles), oral contraceptives (OCs) or depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) use, and eating disorder behavior (Eating Disorder Inventory; (EDI)). BMD was measured annually at the lumbar spine and total hip by dual X-ray absorptiometry and calcaneal BMD by PIXI. Slope of 4year BMD change at each skeletal site (spine total hip and calcaneus) was calculated for each woman. BMD gains occurred at the spine in 50% and the hip in 36% of women. In unadjusted analyses, spine bone gain was positively related to menstrual cycle frequency (p=0.04). Spine and hip BMD loss occurred in those using DMPA (peating disorders, weight loss, menstrual dysfunction and DMPA use can have significant detrimental effects on BMD in young healthy physically active women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Longitudinal evaluation of FGF23 changes and mineral metabolism abnormalities in a mouse model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Jason R; He, Nan; Idiculla, Arun; Gillihan, Ryan; Liu, Shiguang; David, Valentin; Hong, Yan; Quarles, L Darryl

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic and vitamin D-regulatory hormone of putative bone origin that is elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The mechanisms responsible for elevations of FGF23 and its role in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) remain uncertain. We investigated the association between FGF23 serum levels and kidney disease progression, as well as the phenotypic features of CKD-MBD in a Col4a3 null mouse model of human autosomal-recessive Alport syndrome. These mice exhibited progressive renal failure, declining 1,25(OH)(2)D levels, increments in parathyroid hormone (PTH) and FGF23, late-onset hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, high-turnover bone disease, and increased mortality. Serum levels of FGF23 increased in the earliest stages of renal damage, before elevations in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine. FGF23 gene transcription in bone, however, did not increase until late-stage kidney disease, when serum FGF23 levels were exponentially elevated. Further evaluation of bone revealed trabecular osteocytes to be the primary cell source for FGF23 production in late-stage disease. Changes in FGF23 mirrored the rise in serum PTH and the decline in circulating 1,25(OH)(2)D. The rise in PTH and FGF23 in Col4a3 null mice coincided with an increase in the urinary fractional excretion of phosphorus and a progressive decline in sodium-phosphate cotransporter gene expression in the kidney. Our findings suggest elevations of FGF23 in CKD to be an early marker of renal injury that increases before BUN and serum creatinine. An increased production of FGF23 by bone may not be responsible for early increments in FGF23 in CKD but does appear to contribute to FGF23 levels in late-stage disease. Elevations in FGF23 and PTH coincide with an increase in urinary phosphate excretion that likely prevents the early onset of hyperphosphatemia in the face of increased bone turnover and a

  8. Bone histomorphometric changes in children with rheumatic disorders on chronic glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Jennifer; Holmyard, Douglas; Silverman, Earl; Sochett, Etienne; Grynpas, Marc

    2016-11-10

    Rheumatic diseases are associated with an increased fracture risk. The tissue level characteristics of the bone involvement in children have not been well elucidated. Our objectives were to describe the bone micro-architectural characteristics in children with rheumatic diseases on chronic glucocorticoids, and to determine associations between micro-architectural findings with clinical and radiological variables. Children on chronic glucocorticoids for an underlying rheumatic disease were referred for evaluation of bone fragility given the presence of vertebral compression fractures. A trans-iliac bone biopsy was performed as part of the clinical assessment. Histomorphometric analysis and quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBSE) of the biopsy samples were undertaken. Data of 15 children (14.0 ± 3.2 years) with a duration of glucocorticoid exposure of 6.2 ± 4.1 years and average prednisone dose of 14.1 ± 6.2 mg/m 2 /day were assessed. Histomorphometric analyses demonstrated significant decrease in trabecular thickness (p = 0.01), osteoid thickness (p glucocorticoid dose, height and body mass index Z score, but not bone mineral density or measures of disease activity. Using qBSE to measure bone mineralization, the subjects were shown to have a heterogeneous and hypermineralized profile, with higher cumulative glucocorticoid dose being associated with greater mineralization (p glucocorticoid dose.

  9. Skeletal effects and growth in children with chronic kidney disease: a 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swolin-Eide, Diana; Hansson, Sverker; Magnusson, Per

    2013-05-01

    This study was designed to follow the evolving process of growth, bone modeling and remodeling in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who are at risk of developing CKD-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Fifteen patients, 4-15 years, were included with a median glomerular filtration rate of 46 (range 12-74) mL/min/1.73 m(2). Growth, bone mineral density (BMD) and markers of bone and mineral metabolism were investigated over a 5-year period. The median height standard deviation score was -0.65 at the start and 0.1 after 5 years, with a range from -1.7 to 1.7, which implies that growth was acceptable. Total body, femoral neck, and lumbar spine BMD increased over the study period (p growth and bone turnover in children with CKD. Growth and BMD Z-scores were well preserved on a group basis; however, these parameters varied significantly on an individual basis. We suggest, therefore, that it is difficult to state an overall recommendation and growth, bone mass, and markers of bone and mineral metabolism should be monitored and treated individually in CKD children.

  10. Bone density, body composition, and psychopathology of anorexia nervosa spectrum disorders in DSM-IV vs DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorr, Melanie; Thomas, Jennifer J; Eddy, Kamryn T; Dichtel, Laura E; Lawson, Elizabeth A; Meenaghan, Erinne; Lederfine Paskal, Margaret; Fazeli, Pouneh K; Faje, Alexander T; Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K

    2017-04-01

    DSM-5 revised the diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa (AN) by eliminating the amenorrhea requirement, liberalizing weight and psychological criteria, and adding the formal diagnosis of "atypical AN" for individuals with AN psychological symptoms without low weight. We sought to determine whether bone density (BMD) is impaired in women diagnosed with AN using the new, more liberal, DSM-5 criteria. Cross-sectional study of 168 women, 18 - 45y: (1) AN by DSM-IV (DSM-IV AN) (n = 37), (2) AN by DSM-5 but not DSM-IV criteria (DSM-5 AN) (n = 33), (3) atypical AN (ATYPICAL AN) (n = 77), (4) healthy comparison group (HC) (n = 21). Measurements included dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Rating Scales. BMD Z-score DSM-IV, 82% of DSM-5, and 69% of ATYPICAL. Mean Z-scores were comparably low in DSM-IV and DSM-5, intermediate in ATYPICAL, and highest in HC. Lack of prior low weight or amenorrhea was, but history of overweight/obesity was not, protective against bone loss. Mean lean mass and percent fat mass were significantly lower in all AN groups than HC. DSM-IV, DSM-5, and ATYPICAL had comparable psychopathology. Despite liberalizing diagnostic criteria, many women diagnosed with AN and atypical AN using DSM-5 criteria have low BMD. Presence or history of low weight and/or amenorrhea remain important indications for DXA. Loss of lean mass, in addition to fat mass, is present in all AN groups, and may contribute to low BMD. The deleterious effect of eating disorders on BMD extends beyond those with current low weight and amenorrhea. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:343-351). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Bone mineral density, osteoporosis, and fractures among people with eating disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmi, M; Veronese, N; Correll, C U; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Caregaro, L; Vancampfort, D; Luchini, C; De Hert, M; Stubbs, B

    2016-05-01

    To provide meta-analytical evidence of bone mineral density (BMD), fractures, and osteoporosis rates in eating disorders (ED) vs. healthy controls (HCs). Three independent authors searched major electronic databases from inception till August 2015 for cross-sectional studies reporting BMD in people with ED (anorexia nervosa, (AN); bulimia nervosa, (BN); eating disorders not otherwise specified, (EDNOS)) vs. HCs. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) ±95% and confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for BMD, and odds ratios (ORs) for osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fractures. Overall, 57 studies were eligible, including 21 607 participants (ED = 6485, HCs = 15 122). Compared to HC, AN subjects had significantly lower BMD values at lumbar spine (SMD = -1.51, 95% CI = -1.75, -1.27, studies = 42), total hip (SMD = -1.56, 95%CI = -1.84, -1.28, studies = 23), intertrochanteric region (SMD = -1.80, 95%CI = -2.46, -1.14, studies = 7), trochanteric region (SMD = -1.05, 95%CI = -1.44, -0.66, studies = 7), and femoral neck (SMD = -0.98, 95%CI = -1.12, -0.77, studies = 20). Reduced BMD was moderated by ED illness duration and amenorrhea (P EDNOS vs. HC. People with AN have reduced BMD, increased odds of osteoporosis and risk of fractures. Proactive monitoring and interventions are required to ameliorate bone loss in AN. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Bone density, body composition, and psychopathology of anorexia nervosa spectrum disorders in DSM-IV vs DSM-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorr, Melanie; Thomas, Jennifer J.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Dichtel, Laura E.; Lawson, Elizabeth A.; Meenaghan, Erinne; Paskal, Margaret Lederfine; Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Faje, Alexander T.; Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective DSM-5 revised diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa (AN) by eliminating the amenorrhea requirement, liberalizing weight and psychological criteria, and adding the formal diagnosis of “atypical AN” for individuals with AN psychological symptoms without low weight. We sought to determine whether bone density (BMD) is impaired in women diagnosed with AN using the new, more liberal DSM-5 criteria. Method Cross-sectional study of 168 women, 18–45y: 1) AN by DSM-IV (DSM-IV)(n=37), 2) AN by DSM-5 but not DSM-IV criteria (DSM-5)(n=33), 3) atypical AN (ATYPICAL)(n=77), 4) healthy comparison group (HC)(n=21). Measurements included dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Rating Scales. Results BMD Z-score DSM-5, and 69% of ATYPICAL. Mean Z-scores were comparably low in DSM-IV and DSM-5, intermediate in ATYPICAL, and highest in HC. Lack of prior low weight or amenorrhea was, but history of overweight/obesity was not, protective against bone loss. Mean lean mass and percent fat mass were significantly lower in all AN groups than HC. DSM-IV, DSM-5 and ATYPICAL had comparable psychopathology. Discussion Despite liberalizing diagnostic criteria, many women diagnosed with AN and atypical AN using DSM-5 criteria have low BMD. Presence or history of low weight and/or amenorrhea remain important indications for DXA. Loss of lean mass, in addition to fat mass, is present in all AN groups, and may contribute to low BMD. The deleterious effect of eating disorders on BMD extends beyond those with current low weight and amenorrhea. PMID:27527115

  13. An analysis of the combination frequencies of constituent medicinal herbs in prescriptions for the treatment of bone and joint disorder in Korean medicine: determination of a group of candidate prescriptions for universal use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Kyoung Han

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to select prescriptions (mixtures of medicinal herbs used in the treatment of bone and joint disorders in Korean medicine, and through the analysis of medicinal herb combination frequencies, select a high-frequency medicinal herb combination group for further experimental and clinical research. Methods: We systematically searched for terms related to bone and joint disorder in the “Dongeuibogam (Dong yibaojian”, a seminal Korean medicine book. We reviewed the results of published papers regarding the effects in bone and joint disorders (especially in osteoporosis, osteomalacia, osteopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, and degenerative arthritis. Results: In total, 34 candidates of a medicinal herb combination for the treatment of bone and joint disorders(CMHCTBJDs and nine candidates of a medicinal herb for the treatment of bone and joint disorders(CMHTBJDs were selected. Conclusion: : The candidates of a medicinal herb combination for the treatment of bone and joint disorders (CMHCTBJDs and candidates of a medicinal herb for the treatment of bone and joint disorders(CMHTBJDs proposed in this study can be useful material for text mining to develop natural products with the effects in BJDs and also it has the potential to reduce the experimental and developmental time period. Keywords: Dongeuibogam (Dong yi bao gian, Text mining, Bone disorder

  14. WNT-mediated Modulation of Bone Metabolism: Implications for WNT Targeting to Treat Extraskeletal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Whitney A; Robling, Alexander G

    2017-10-01

    The WNT-signaling pathway is involved in cellular and tissue functions that control such diverse processes as body axis patterning, cellular proliferation, differentiation, and life span. The long list of molecules that can participate or modify WNT signaling makes this pathway one of the most complex in cell biology. In bone tissues, WNT signaling is required for proper skeletal development, and human mutations in various components of the cascade revealed insights into pharmacologic targeting that can be harnessed to improve skeletal health. In particular, mutations in genes that code for the WNT-signaling inhibitor sclerostin or the WNT coreceptor lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 have highlighted the potential therapeutic value of recapitulating those effects in patients with low bone mass. A constant challenge in this area is selectively modifying WNT components in the tissue of interest, as WNT has manifold effects in nearly every tissue.

  15. Utilization of chemical shift MRI in the diagnosis of disorders affecting pediatric bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfeld, Matthew; Ahlawat, Shivani; Safdar, Nabile

    2016-01-01

    MRI signal intensity of pediatric bone marrow can be difficult to interpret using conventional methods. Chemical shift imaging (CSI), which can quantitatively assess relative fat content, may improve the ability to accurately diagnose bone marrow abnormalities in children. Consecutive pelvis and extremity MRI at a children's hospital over three months were retrospectively reviewed for inclusion of CSI. Medical records were reviewed for final pathological and/or clinical diagnosis. Cases were classified as normal or abnormal, and if abnormal, subclassified as marrow-replacing or non-marrow-replacing entities. Regions of interest (ROI) were then drawn on corresponding in and out-of-phase sequences over the marrow abnormality or over a metaphysis and epiphysis in normal studies. Relative signal intensity ratio for each case was then calculated to determine the degree of fat content in the ROI. In all, 241 MRI were reviewed and 105 met inclusion criteria. Of these, 61 had normal marrow, 37 had non-marrow-replacing entities (osteomyelitis without abscess n = 17, trauma n = 9, bone infarction n = 8, inflammatory arthropathy n = 3), and 7 had marrow-replacing entities (malignant neoplasm n = 4, bone cyst n = 1, fibrous dysplasia n = 1, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis n = 1). RSIR averages were: normal metaphyseal marrow 0.442 (0.352-0.533), normal epiphyseal marrow 0.632 (0.566-698), non-marrow-replacing diagnoses 0.715 (0.630-0.799), and marrow-replacing diagnoses 1.06 (0.867-1.26). RSIR for marrow-replacing entities proved significantly different from all other groups (p < 0.05). ROC analysis demonstrated an AUC of 0.89 for RSIR in distinguishing marrow-replacing entities. CSI techniques can help to differentiate pathologic processes that replace marrow in children from those that do not. (orig.)

  16. Use of Bone Marrow derived Stem Cells in patients with Cardiovascular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham S; Naveen AT; Kirtivasan V; Prasad GN; Karthik Vaidyanathan; Rajesh V; Madhusankar N; Cherian KM

    2007-01-01

    Patients with end stage heart failure have very few treatment options. The long waiting times for transplant and the complications associated with immunosuppression has led to the search for alternatives. Subsequent to the isolation and characterization of stem cells, tremendous advances have been made and the safety and feasibility of autologous bone marrow derived stem cells has been proven in preclinical studies. Clinical studies have also shown mobilized cells repair the infracted heart, ...

  17. The acrophysis: a unifying concept for understanding enchondral bone growth and its disorders. II. Abnormal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestreich, Alan E. [Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, OH 45229-3039, Cincinnati (United States)

    2004-03-01

    In order to discuss and illustrate the effects common to normal and abnormal enchondral bone at the physes and at all other growth plates of the developing child, the term ''acrophysis'' was proposed. Acrophyses include the growth plates of secondary growth centers including carpals and tarsals and apophyses, and the growth plates at the nonphyseal ends of small tubular bones. Abnormalities at acrophyseal sites are analogous to those at the physeal growth plates and their metaphyses. For example, changes relating to the zone of provisional calcification (ZPC) are often important to the demonstration of such similarities. Lead lines were an early example of the concept of analogy from abnormality due to physeal and to acrophyseal disturbance. The ZPC is a key factor in understanding patterns of rickets and its healing. Examples (including hypothyroidism, scurvy and other osteoporosis, Ollier disease, achondroplasia, and osteopetrosis, as well as the family of frostbite, Kashin-Beck disease, and rat bite fever) illustrate the acrophysis principle and in turn their manifestations are explained by that principle. (orig.)

  18. The acrophysis: a unifying concept for understanding enchondral bone growth and its disorders. II. Abnormal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oestreich, Alan E.

    2004-01-01

    In order to discuss and illustrate the effects common to normal and abnormal enchondral bone at the physes and at all other growth plates of the developing child, the term ''acrophysis'' was proposed. Acrophyses include the growth plates of secondary growth centers including carpals and tarsals and apophyses, and the growth plates at the nonphyseal ends of small tubular bones. Abnormalities at acrophyseal sites are analogous to those at the physeal growth plates and their metaphyses. For example, changes relating to the zone of provisional calcification (ZPC) are often important to the demonstration of such similarities. Lead lines were an early example of the concept of analogy from abnormality due to physeal and to acrophyseal disturbance. The ZPC is a key factor in understanding patterns of rickets and its healing. Examples (including hypothyroidism, scurvy and other osteoporosis, Ollier disease, achondroplasia, and osteopetrosis, as well as the family of frostbite, Kashin-Beck disease, and rat bite fever) illustrate the acrophysis principle and in turn their manifestations are explained by that principle. (orig.)

  19. Molecular symphony of tooth - bone morphogenesis and related disorders, Part 2: Remodelling and defects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, P.; Matalová, Eva; Fleischmannová, Jana; Míšek, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 5 (2009), 14-21 ISSN 1210-4272 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC524/08/J032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : odontogenesis * osteogenesis * dental disorders Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry

  20. High prevalence of autoimmune disease in the rare inflammatory bone disorder sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis: survey of a Dutch cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkema, Pieter A; Luymes, Clare H; Witteveen, Janneke E; le Cessie, Saskia; Appelman-Dijkstra, Natasha M; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Hamdy, Neveen A T

    2017-01-25

    Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis (SCCH; ORPHA178311) is a rare inflammatory disorder of the axial skeleton, the precise pathophysiology of which remains to be established. We addressed the potential association of SCCH with autoimmune processes by evaluating the lifetime prevalence of autoimmune disease in 70 patients with adult-onset SCCH and 518 SCCH-unaffected first-degree relatives (parents, siblings and children). Danish hospital registry data for autoimmune diseases were used as reference data. The mean age of interviewed patients was 56.3 years (range 26-80 years) and 86% were female. Interviewed patients belonged to 63 families, with four families having clusters of 2-3 patients. A diagnosis of at least one autoimmune disease was reported in 20 SCCH patients (29%) and in 47 relatives (9.1%), compared to an estimated 3.9% prevalence of autoimmune disease in the Danish reference population. A diversity of autoimmune diseases was reported in SCCH patients and relatives, most frequently psoriasis vulgaris (14%). Palmoplantar pustulosis was reported by 28 patients (40%). In SCCH patients, inclusion of palmoplantar pustulosis as putative autoimmune disease increased the overall prevalence to 54%. The high prevalence of autoimmune disease in patients with sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis and their first-degree relatives suggests that autoimmunity may play a role in the still elusive pathophysiology of the intriguing osteogenic response to inflammation observed in this rare bone disorder.

  1. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC for CNS disorders – Strategy and tactics for clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kuroda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background – There is increasing evidence that the transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC significantly promote functional recovery after central nervous system (CNS damage in the animal models of various kinds of CNS disorders, including cerebral infarct, brain contusion and spinal cord injury. However, there are several shortages of information when considering clinical application of BMSC transplantation for patients with neurological disorders. In this paper, therefore, we discuss what we should clarify to establish cell transplantation therapy in clinical situation and describe our recent works for this purpose.Methods and Results – The BMSC have the ability to alter their gene expression profile and phenotype in response to the surrounding circumstances and to protect the neurons by producing some neurotrophic factors. They also promote neurite extension and rebuild the neural circuits in the injured CNS. Using optical imaging and MRI techniques, the transplanted BMSC can non-invasively be tracked in the living animals for at least 8 weeks after transplantation. Functional imaging such as PET scan may have the potential to assess the beneficial effects of BMSC transplantation. The BMSC can be expanded using the animal protein-free culture medium, which would maintain their potential of proliferation, migration, and neural differentiation.Conclusion – It is urgent issues to develop clinical imaging technique to track the transplanted cells in the CNS and evaluate the therapeutic significance of BMSC transplantation in order to establish it as a definite therapeutic strategy in clinical situation in the future

  2. Decision support methods for finding phenotype--disorder associations in the bone dysplasia domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razan Paul

    Full Text Available A lack of mature domain knowledge and well established guidelines makes the medical diagnosis of skeletal dysplasias (a group of rare genetic disorders a very complex process. Machine learning techniques can facilitate objective interpretation of medical observations for the purposes of decision support. However, building decision support models using such techniques is highly problematic in the context of rare genetic disorders, because it depends on access to mature domain knowledge. This paper describes an approach for developing a decision support model in medical domains that are underpinned by relatively sparse knowledge bases. We propose a solution that combines association rule mining with the Dempster-Shafer theory (DST to compute probabilistic associations between sets of clinical features and disorders, which can then serve as support for medical decision making (e.g., diagnosis. We show, via experimental results, that our approach is able to provide meaningful outcomes even on small datasets with sparse distributions, in addition to outperforming other Machine Learning techniques and behaving slightly better than an initial diagnosis by a clinician.

  3. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs accumulation in skin: relations with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Almeida França

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, main causes related with cardiovascular disease (CVD and bone mineral disorder (CKD-BMD. Uremic toxins, as advanced glycation end products (AGEs, are non-traditional cardiovascular risk factor and play a role on development of CKD-BMD in CKD. The measurement of skin autofluorescence (sAF is a noninvasive method to assess the level of AGEs in tissue, validated in CKD patients. Objective: The aim of this study is analyze AGEs measured by sAF levels (AGEs-sAF and its relations with CVD and BMD parameters in HD patients. Methods: Twenty prevalent HD patients (HD group and healthy subjects (Control group, n = 24, performed biochemical tests and measurements of anthropometric parameters and AGEs-sAF. In addition, HD group performed measurement of intact parathormone (iPTH, transthoracic echocardiogram and radiographies of pelvis and hands for vascular calcification score. Results: AGEs-sAF levels are elevated both in HD and control subjects ranged according to the age, although higher at HD than control group. Single high-flux HD session does not affect AGEs-sAF levels. AGEs-sAF levels were not related to ventricular mass, interventricular septum or vascular calcification in HD group. AGEs-sAF levels were negatively associated with serum iPTH levels. Conclusion: Our study detected a negative correlation of AGEs-sAF with serum iPTH, suggesting a role of AGEs on the pathophysiology of bone disease in HD prevalent patients. The nature of this relation and the clinical application of this non-invasive methodology for evaluation AGEs deposition must be confirmed and clarified in future studies.

  4. Infiltration patterns in monoclonal plasma cell disorders: correlation of magnetic resonance imaging with matched bone marrow histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrulis, Mindaugas [Institute of Pathology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Bäuerle, Tobias [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Goldschmidt, Hartmut [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Landgren, Ola [Multiple Myeloma Section, Metabolism Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda (United States); Schirmacher, Peter [Institute of Pathology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Hillengass, Jens, E-mail: jens.hillengass@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Objectives: To investigate how plasma cell infiltration patterns detected by MRI match the plasma cell distribution in bone marrow biopsy. Methods: We assessed 50 patients with monoclonal plasma cell disorders of all clinical stages. MRI infiltration pattern was compared with matched BM histology from the same anatomic region. Results: MRI revealed a minimal (n = 11, 22%), focal (n = 5, 10%), diffuse (n = 14, 28%) and mixed (n = 20, 40%) infiltration pattern. Diffuse MRI pattern was predominant in smoldering myeloma patients whereas the MRI patterns with “focal component” (i.e. focal and mixed) were most common in symptomatic myeloma (p < 0.01). In histology an interstitial (n = 13, 26%), nodular (n = 23, 46%) and packed marrow (n = 14, 28%) was found respectively. All three histological types of infiltration were observed in patients with diffuse and mixed MRI patterns. Minimal MRI pattern was found in all MGUS patients and was associated with an interstitial BM infiltration. In two patients with minimal MRI pattern an extensive micro-nodular BM infiltration was found in histology. Conclusions: Infiltration patterns in MRI represent different histological growth patterns of plasma cells, but the MRI resolution is not sufficient to visualize micro-nodular aggregates of plasma cells.

  5. Consumption of onion juice modulates oxidative stress and attenuates the risk of bone disorders in middle-aged and post-menopausal healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yat-Yin; Chiu, Hui-Fang; Lee, Hui-Hsin; Shen, You-Cheng; Venkatakrishnan, Kamesh; Wang, Chin-Kun

    2016-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a chronic inflammatory condition that is characterized by the loss of bone mineral density (BMD). The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of onion juice intake on the bone mineral density (BMD) and bone loss in corroboration with antioxidant effects in human (in vivo) as well as inhibitory effects on the differentiation of osteoclasts in the cell line (in vitro). For in vitro studies, the RAW 264.7 (osteoclast progenitor) cells were used to examine the anti-osteoclastogenic effect of onion. In the case of in vivo studies, twenty-four subjects were divided into two groups and advised to intake 100 mL of onion juice or placebo for 8 weeks. Anthropometric measurements and blood samples were collected at the initial, 2(nd), 6(th), 8(th) and 10(th) week. The result of in vitro studies indicated that onion extract would effectively inhibit the osteoclastogenesis and its differentiation. Significant changes in the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), free radicals, total antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and various antioxidants were observed in onion administered subjects. The BMD of three postmenopausal women was also found to be mildly improved on supplementation with onion juice. Onion juice consumption showed a positive modulatory effect on the bone loss and BMD by improving antioxidant activities and thus can be recommended for treating various bone-related disorders, especially osteoporosis.

  6. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  7. Gracile bone dysplasias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, Kazimierz [Department of Medical Imaging, The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Locked Bag 4001, Westmead 2145, NSW (Australia); Masel, John [Department of Radiology, Royal Children' s Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Sillence, David O. [Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Sydney (Australia); Arbuckle, Susan [Department of Anatomical Pathology, The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, NSW (Australia); Juttnerova, Vera [Oddeleni Lekarske Genetiky, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2002-09-01

    Gracile bone dysplasias constitute a group of disorders characterised by extremely slender bones with or without fractures. We report four newborns, two of whom showed multiple fractures. Two babies had osteocraniostenosis and one had features of oligohydramnios sequence. The diagnosis in the fourth newborn, which showed thin long bones and clavicles and extremely thin, poorly ossified ribs, is uncertain. Exact diagnosis of a gracile bone dysplasia is important for genetic counselling and medico-legal reasons. (orig.)

  8. Conservative treatment of bone tissue metabolic disorders among patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II with genetic abnormality of type I collagen formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Martsyniak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of the article is to determine the effect of conservative therapy on genetically caused disorders of bone tissue metabolism in patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II and genetic abnormality of type I collagen formation (VDDR(COL1. Materials and methods. At the premises of consulting and outpatient department of SI “Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics of the NAMS of Ukraine”, 13 patients having VDDR type II and genetic damage of type I collagen formation were examined and treated. The medical treatment was conducted in four stages. The first stage included full examination of patients (calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood serum and their urinary excretion, as well as determination of calcidiol and calcitriol serum levels, indicators of parathyroid hormone and osteocalcin, and a marker of bone formation P1NP and osteoresorption b-CTx. At this stage, children were obligated to undergo a genetic test to detect changes (polymorphism in alleles of receptors to vitamin D and type I collagen. Besides genetic tests, examinations at the other stages were conducted in full. Results. The study has shown the following. The genetically caused abnormality of reception to vitamin D results into substantial accumulation of vitamin D active metabolite in the blood serum. When combined with gene­tic abnormality of type I collagen formation, it significantly affected bone formation and destruction processes that causes development of osteomalacia (parathormone — vitamin D — osteocalcin system. The comprehensive study of vitamin D metabolism and biochemical vitals of bone tissue in patients having VDDR (COL1 brought us to understanding of some issues related to pathogenesis and nature of osteomalacia and, in future, osteoporotic changes on different levels, ensured us to express these changes by corresponding indices in the biochemical research and, finally, to develop appropriate schemes for the treatment of

  9. Primary amenorrhea after bone marrow transplantation and adjuvant chemotherapy misdiagnosed as disorder of sex development: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Tian, Qinjie

    2016-11-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) is a congenital condition in which the development of chromosomal, gonadal or genital sex is atypical. Majority of patients present clinical characteristics of primary amenorrhea, absent secondary sex characters, and abnormal hormone level. A female appearance patient with primary amenorrhea and 46 XY karyotype seems to be solid evidences to diagnose Y-chromosome-related DSD diseases, while it is not necessarily the accurate diagnosis. We report the case of an 18-year-old girl with primary amenorrhea and 46 XY karyotype misdiagnosed as Y-chromosome-related DSD. The patient has normal female reproductive organs and a disrupted pubertal development after the treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We consider that her gonads were probably functional and later impaired after AML. The clinical manifestations were not consistent with DSD. With doubts, we found that she received bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from her brother and adjuvant chemotherapy 6 years ago. Her karyotype changed from normal female to a karyotype of donor (her brother) origin after BMT.Adjuvant chemotherapy for AML may impair her ovarian function and finally bring about disrupted puberty or primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). We provided close follow-up. During the second visit, the patient had her menarche lasting 4 days without any medication. The present case serves as a reminder that a correct diagnosis depends on the comprehensive collection of present and past medical history, complete physical examination, and careful evaluation of related adjuvant tests. Do not presumptively judge a test and mislead reasoning. In addition, ovarian function protection should be considered for young girls having chemotherapy.

  10. Bone disease in hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Bart L

    2014-07-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is a rare disorder that may be acquired or inherited. Postsurgical hypoparathyroidism is responsible for the majority of acquired hypoparathyroidism. Bone disease occurs in hypoparathyroidism due to markedly reduced bone remodeling due to the absence or low levels of parathyroid hormone. Chronically reduced bone turnover in patients with hypoparathyroidism typically leads to higher bone mass than in age- and sex-matched controls. Whether this increased bone density reduces fracture risk is less certain, because while increased bone mineralization may be associated with increased brittleness of bone, this does not appear to be the case in hypoparathyroidism. Treatment of hypoparathyroidism with recombinant parathyroid hormone may reduce bone mineral density but simultaneously strengthen the mechanical properties of bone.

  11. The use of whole body magnetic resonance imaging in detecting bone marrow disorders - a valid alternative to imaging modalities that utilise ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    Imaging modalities for investigation of bone marrow abnormalities have traditionally involved the use of ionising radiation. Now magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers an alternative to x-rays, computer tomography (CT), nuclear medicine bone scans and bone mineral densitometry. This study attempts to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of whole body MRI in detecting bone marrow abnormalities, using Tl and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) weighted sequences. This was achieved by reviewing already acquired scan data to discover whether this method is more sensitive to marrow changes than conventional radiographic skeletal surveys and other imaging tests, involving ionising radiation. The study involved 10 adult participants all of whom suffered from heamatological malignancies, including multiple myeloma, plasma cell dyscrasia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and acute lymphocytic leukaemia. Most of the study group presented with multiple myeloma. Abnormal skeletal MRI findings were reported in nine out of the 10 participants, i.e., a positive detection rate of 90%, using whole body MRI. All participants in the study who suffered from multiple myeloma or plasma cell dyscrasia showed positive MRI findings regardless of the stage of their disease. Four already had a confirmed diagnosis prior to the MRI scan, which was either visible on x-ray or bone scintigraphy. Three participants had positive serum/urine tests, but negative radiographic findings. The study therefore established that, when investigating possible marrow disorders, MRI was more sensitive to changes in the bone-marrow producing part of the skeleton and that MRI therefore must be considered a more suitable imaging tool. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Radiography

  12. Disorders of Bone Mineral Density and Secondary Osteoporosis in Pathology of Hepatobiliary System and Gastrointestinal Tract: at the Crossing of Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Yu. Golovach

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This review article covers the issues of development of osteoporosis and disorders of bone mineral density in patients with various gastroenterological and hepatobiliary diseases. The article emphasized that the osteoporosis may be associated with many somatic diseases, especially of the digestive tract. Such situation requires participation of therapeutists and gastroenterologists in rehabilitation health care programs. According to the practical guidelines of the World Organization of Gastroenterology (OMGE, 2004 list of chronic diseases of the digestive system triggering the dangerous development of osteoporosis includes short bowel syndrome, postgastrectomy syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, cholestatic liver disease, as well as glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. The etiology and pathogenesis of lower bone mineral density in patients with chronic diseases of the digestive system include, besides population-based risk factors, processes associated with disorders of vitamin D conversion, which leads to reduction of the absorption of calcium, magnesium and phosphorus in the intestine and increase of their excretion by the kidneys. Hypocalcemia results in activation of the parathyroid glands and secondary hyperparathyroidism, and against the background of chronic inflammation increases the activity of cytokines, in particular tumor necrosis factor α and interleukins-1, -6, having bone resorptive action. The main risk factors for osteoporosis for various diseases associated with the peculiarities of the digestive tract’ disease were identified.

  13. From “Kidneys Govern Bones” to Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, and Metabolic Bone Disorder: A Crosstalk between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Modern Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and Western medicine have evolved on distinct philosophical foundations and reasoning methods, an increasing body of scientific data has begun to reveal commonalities. Emerging scientific evidence has confirmed the validity and identified the molecular mechanisms of many ancient TCM theories. One example is the concept of “Kidneys Govern Bones.” Here we discuss the molecular mechanisms supporting this theory and its potential significance in treating complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD and diabetes mellitus. Two signaling pathways essential for calcium-phosphate metabolism can mediate the effect of kidneys in bone homeostasis, one requiring renal production of bioactive vitamin D and the other involving an endocrine axis based on kidney-expressed Klotho and bone-secreted fibroblast growth factor 23. Disruption of either pathway can lead to calcium-phosphate imbalance and vascular calcification, accelerating metabolic bone disorder. Chinese herbal medicine is an adjunct therapy widely used for treating CKD and diabetes. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic effects and underlying mechanisms of a Chinese herbal formulation, Shen-An extracts, in diabetic nephropathy and renal osteodystrophy. We believe that the smart combination of Eastern and Western concepts holds great promise for inspiring new ideas and therapies for preventing and treating complications of CKD and diabetes.

  14. The association between condylar bone changes revealed in cone beam computed tomography and clinical dysfunction index in patients with or without temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khojastepour, Leila; Vojdani, Mahroo; Forghani, Maryam

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) findings pertinent to patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and patients without TMD (non-TMD), as well as to investigate the correlation between these findings and the clinical dysfunction index (Di). In this cross-sectional study, CBCT images of temporomandibular joints (TMJs) were evaluated for condylar bone changes in 84 patients with TMD. The patients were assigned a score using Helkimo's clinical Di, ranging from 1 to 25, and were thereafter subdivided into 3 groups based on the degree of Helkimo's Di. CBCT and clinical records of sex- and age-matched non-TMD patients were used as the control group. There was a significant difference in the prevalence of all types of bone changes between TMD and non-TMD groups (all P < .05), except for loose joint bodies. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the total amount of bone change and the Helkimo Di score (P < .001). Evaluation of CBCT images in the present study revealed significant differences between TMD and non-TMD condyles. There was also a significant relationship between the Helkimo clinical Di and the total amount of condylar bone change in patients with TMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diabetic impairment of C-kit bone marrow stem cells involves the disorders of inflammatory factors, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Sheng Li

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stem cells from diabetes mellitus patients exhibit functional impairment, but the relative molecular mechanisms responsible for this impairment are poorly understood. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for diabetes-related functional impairment of bone marrow stem cells by extensively screening the expression levels of inflammatory factors, cell cycle regulating molecules, extracellular matrix molecules and adhesion molecules. Bone marrow cells were collected from type 2 diabetic (db/db and healthy control (db/m+ mice, and c-kit+ stem cells were purified (purity>85% for experiments. Compared with the healthy control mice, diabetic mice had significantly fewer c-kit+ stem cells, and these cells had a lower potency of endothelial differentiation; however, the production of the angiogenic growth factor VEGF did not differ between groups. A pathway-focused array showed that the c-kit+ stem cells from diabetic mice had up-regulated expression levels of many inflammatory factors, including Tlr4, Cxcl9, Il9, Tgfb1, Il4, and Tnfsf5, but no obvious change in the expression levels of cell cycle molecules. Interestingly, diabetes-related alterations of the extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules were varied; Pecam, Mmp10, Lamc1, Itgb7, Mmp9, and Timp4 were up-regulated, but Col11a1, Fn1, Admts2, and Itgav were down-regulated. Some of these changes were also confirmed at the protein level by flow cytometry analysis. In conclusion, c-kit+ bone marrow stem cells from diabetic mice exhibited an extensive enhancement of inflammatory factors and disorders of the extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules. Further intervention studies are required to determine the precise role of each molecule in the diabetes-related functional impairment of c-kit+ bone marrow stem cells.

  16. The "phosphorus pyramid": a visual tool for dietary phosphate management in dialysis and CKD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Claudia; Piccoli, Giorgina B; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2015-01-20

    Phosphorus retention plays a pivotal role in the onset of mineral and bone disorders (MBD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Phosphorus retention commonly occurs as a result of net intestinal absorption exceeding renal excretion or dialysis removal. The dietary phosphorus load is crucial since the early stages of CKD, throughout the whole course of the disease, up to dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease.Agreement exits regarding the need for dietary phosphate control, but it is quite challenging in the real-life setting. Effective strategies to control dietary phosphorus intake include restricting phosphorus-rich foods, preferring phosphorus sourced from plant origin, boiling as the preferred cooking procedure and avoiding foods with phosphorus-containing additives. Nutritional education is crucial in this regard.Based on the existing literature, we developed the "phosphorus pyramid", namely a novel, visual, user-friendly tool for the nutritional education of patients and health-care professionals. The pyramid consists of six levels in which foods are arranged on the basis of their phosphorus content, phosphorus to protein ratio and phosphorus bioavailability. Each has a colored edge (from green to red) that corresponds to recommended intake frequency, ranging from "unrestricted" to "avoid as much as possible".The aim of the phosphorus pyramid is to support dietary counseling in order to reduce the phosphorus load, a crucial aspect of integrated CKD-MBD management.

  17. The benefits of estrogen or selective estrogen receptor modulator on kidney and its related disease—chronic kidney disease—mineral and bone disorder: Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ling Lee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An umbrella concept addressing the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD and mineral and bone disorders has been developed in recent years. Given the high prevalence of osteoporosis-related fractures in postmenopausal women with CKD, especially those undergoing chronic hemodialysis, the strategy used in the prevention and management of CKD and its associated osteoporosis in these postmenopausal women has become a topic of substantial debate. This controversy has ongoing relevance because osteoporosis results in a significant economic burden secondary to increased morbidity and mortality. The perfect goal of treatment and prevention includes both bone protection and renal protection, or at least protection of one disease without compromising the other disease. Both CKD and osteoporosis are frequently observed in the same patients, and often have parallel progression in postmenopausal women. Estrogen, the main female hormone during reproductive age, has been reported to have a protective effect on kidney fibrosis in several animal models, and is also considered one of the most effective drugs in the management of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and prevention of osteoporosis. However, due to the many adverse events associated with the use of estrogen with and without progestin, some of which have contributed to significant morbidity and mortality, drug modification, which has had fewer reported incidences of adverse events without compromising the protective effect on both the kidney and bone, may have an easier road to acceptance. Therapeutic alternatives, such as the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs, have shown the benefits of estrogen on bone, serum lipid levels, and renal protection, without any adverse effects on the breast and endometrium. The Multiple Outcomes of Raloxifene Evaluation trial (MORE and its extension—Continuing Outcomes Relevant to Evista (CORE, a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

  18. Restoration of parathyroid function after change of phosphate binder from calcium carbonate to lanthanum carbonate in hemodialysis patients with suppressed serum parathyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Masaaki; Okuno, Senji; Nagayama, Harumi; Yamada, Shinsuke; Ishimura, Eiji; Imanishi, Yasuo; Shoji, Shigeichi

    2015-03-01

    Control of phosphate is the most critical in the treatment of chronic kidney disease with mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Because calcium-containing phosphate binder to CKD patients is known to induce adynamic bone disease with ectopic calcification by increasing calcium load, we examined the effect of lanthanum carbonate (LaC), a non-calcium containing phosphate binder, to restore bone turnover in 27 hemodialysis patients with suppressed parathyroid function (serum intact parathyroid hormone [iPTH] ≦ 150 pg/mL). At the initiation of LaC administration, the dose of calcium-containing phosphate binder calcium carbonate (CaC) was withdrawn or reduced based on serum phosphate. After initiation of LaC administration, serum calcium and phosphate decreased significantly by 4 weeks, whereas whole PTH and iPTH increased. A significant and positive correlation between decreases of serum calcium, but not phosphate, with increases of whole PTH and iPTH, suggested that the decline in serum calcium with reduction of calcium load by LaC might increase parathyroid function. Serum bone resorption markers, such as serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, and N-telopeptide of type I collagen increased significantly by 4 weeks after LaC administration, which was followed by increases of serum bone formation markers including serum bone alkaline phosphatase, intact procollagen N-propeptide, and osteocalcin. Therefore, it was suggested that LaC attenuated CaC-induced suppression of parathyroid function and bone turnover by decreasing calcium load. In conclusion, replacement of CaC with LaC, either partially or totally, could increase parathyroid function and resultant bone turnover in hemodialysis patients with serum iPTH ≦ 150 pg/mL. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative evaluation of bone marrow aspirate with trephine biopsy in hematological disorders and determination of optimum trephine length in lymphoma infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Surbhi; Singh, Usha Rani; Rusia, Usha

    2014-01-02

    Bone marrow examination is an indispensable diagnostic tool to evaluate neoplastic and non neoplastic hematological diseases. To compare bone marrow aspirate with trephine biopsy in hematological disorders. To determine the optimum trephine preprocessing length in lymphoma infiltration. Diagnostic comparison was done between simultaneous bone marrow aspirates and trephine biopsies in 449 patients. Biopsies were fixed in formalin, decalcified in 5.5% EDTA and routinely processed. Concordance rates and validity parameters for aspirate were calculated. Three deeper sections of trephine biopsy, cut at 0.1-0.2 mm intervals, were assessed for lymphoma involvement. Proportion of biopsies showing marrow infiltration by lymphoma cells was plotted against trephine length and correlation was assessed. Aspirate had a high sensitivity for acute leukemia (89.4%) and multiple myeloma (88.5%), moderate for NHL (67.6%) and nonhematopoietic metastases (58.3%) and low for aplastic anemia (38.5%) and Hodgkin lymphoma (5%). Aspirate has no role in granulomatous myelitis and myelofibrosis. Lymphoma positivity increased with trephine length, with maximum positivity (68.9%) seen in 17-20 mm group and no further gain beyond 20 mm. (lymphoma positivity ≤16mm=40.3% and ≥17mm=66.1%, p=0.0011). Aspirate has a high specificity; its sensitivity depends upon the type of disease. Apart from few conditions, in which aspirate alone is sufficient, biopsy is mandatory in most. Preprocessing trephine length of 17-20 mm examined at multiple deeper levels was found optimal for assessing lymphoma positivity.

  20. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bones can also ...

  1. Should healthcare in rural Botswana focus on integration and group activities to ease the burdens associated with muscle, bone and joint disorders?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hondras, Maria; Johannessen, Helle; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Healthcare inequities and limited resources exist in Botswana for people with Muscle, Bone and Joint (MuBoJo) disorders. In response, World Spine Care established two clinics and initiated research in Botswana. This study examined the burden of living with and caring for MuBoJo condit......Objectives: Healthcare inequities and limited resources exist in Botswana for people with Muscle, Bone and Joint (MuBoJo) disorders. In response, World Spine Care established two clinics and initiated research in Botswana. This study examined the burden of living with and caring for Mu......BoJo conditions among Villagers residing in this rural setting. Methods: Ethnographic fieldwork over eight months included participant observation and 70 interviews with 48 participants (35 villagers, 13 healthcare providers). Villager interviews were typically conducted in Setswana with an interpreter. Audio...... and thatch. Villagers conveyed interest for group activities to improve MuBoJo health. Word of mouth fueled villager concerns about treatment adverse effects, but most were interested in what “the westerners offer at the caravan.” Providers encouraged integration of MuBoJo care with health and lay personnel...

  2. Bone marrow biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test is used to diagnose leukemia, infections, some types of anemia, and other blood disorders. It may also be ... the bone marrow contains the proper number and types of blood-forming (hematopoietic) cells, fat cells, and connective tissues.

  3. An Insight in to Paget's Disease of Bone | Sabharwal | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a common disorder which may affect one or many bones. Although many patients are asymptomatic, a variety of symptoms and complications may occur. PDB is a focal disorder of bone turnover characterized by excessive bone resorption coupled with bone formation. PDB begins with a ...

  4. Comparison of a restrictive versus liberal red cell transfusion policy for patients with myelodysplasia, aplastic anaemia, and other congenital bone marrow failure disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yisu; Estcourt, Lise J; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Vyas, Paresh

    2015-10-05

    Bone marrow failure disorders include a heterogenous group of disorders, of which myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), forms the largest subgroup. MDS is predominantly a disease of the elderly, with many elderly people managed conservatively with regular allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusions to treat their anaemia. However, RBC transfusions are not without risk. Despite regular transfusions playing a central role in treating such patients, the optimal RBC transfusion strategy (restrictive versus liberal) is currently unclear. To assess the efficacy and safety of a restrictive versus liberal red blood cell transfusion strategy for patients with myelodysplasia, acquired aplastic anaemia, and other inherited bone marrow failure disorders. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 4), Ovid MEDLINE (from 1946), Ovid EMBASE (from 1974), EBSCO CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980) and ongoing trial databases to 26th May 2015. RCTs including patients with long-term bone marrow failure disorders that require allogeneic blood transfusion, who are not being actively treated with a haematopoietic stem cell transplant, or intensive chemotherapy. We used standard Cochrane review methodology. One author initially screened all references, and excluded any that were clearly irrelevant or duplicates. Two authors then independently screened all abstracts of articles, identified by the review search strategy, for relevancy. Two authors independently assessed the full text of all potentially relevant articles for eligibility, completed the data extraction and assessed the studies for risk of bias using The Cochrane Collaboration's 'Risk of bias' tool. We included one trial (13 participants) and identified three ongoing trials that assess RBC transfusion strategies in people with MDS.The quality of the evidence was very low across different outcomes

  5. Study of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders in newly detected advanced renal failure patients: A Hospital-based cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar Etta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aim to evaluate the disturbances in mineral metabolism, abnormalities in bone mineral density (BMD, and extraskeletal calcification in newly detected, untreated predialysis stage 4 and 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD patients at a tertiary care hospital in North India. This is cross-sectional observational study. A total of 95 (68 males, 27 females newly detected patients underwent clinical evaluation, biochemical assessment [serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, albumin, creatinine, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH, 25- hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD], BMD measurement (at spine, hip, and forearm by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, lateral abdominal radiograph [for abdominal aortic calcification (AAC], skeletal survey (to look for any abnormality including fractures, and echocardiography [for any cardiac valvular calcification (CVC]. Symptoms related to CKD-mineral bone disorder were seen in 33.6% of the study patients. Prevalence of hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, hyperparathyroidism, and hypovitaminosis D was 64.2%, 81.1%, 49.5%, and 89.5%, respectively. CVC was seen in 22.1% of patients on echocardiography, mostly involving the mitral valve. Patients with CVC were more likely to be males and smokers. There was no significant difference in iPTH levels between patients with or without CVC. AAC was seen in 10.5% of patients on lateral abdominal X-ray. Patients with AAC had higher levels of iPTH, phosphorus, and ALP and lower levels of calcium compared to patients without AAC. BMD by DXA showed a low bone mass in 41.05% of our patients and was more prevalent in CKD stage 5. Most of the study patients had hyperparathyroidism and low 25(OHD levels. Our study shows that newly detected, naïve Indian CKD patients have a high prevalence of disturbances of mineral metabolism including hyperparathyroidism, Vitamin D deficiency, abnormal BMD, and valvular and vascular calcification, even before initiating dialysis.

  6. Relationship between renal dysfunction and bone metabolism disorder in male rats after long-term oral quantitative cadmium administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, H; Yamauchi, Y; Nakakita, M; Tanaka, H; Asami, S; Seki, Y; Yoshikawa, H

    2000-10-01

    To investigate the importance of the cadmium (Cd) exposure condition in the evaluation of toxic effect on renal function and bone metabolism, six groups of Male Wistar rats were given Cd at respective daily doses of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 mgCd/kg (as CdCl2) via a gastric tube for 6 consecutive days a week for 60 weeks. In the groups given a low Cd dose (2, 5 and 10 mgCd/kg), relatively more Cd accumulated in the kidney without liver damage than in the liver. In the high Cd dose groups (20, 30 and 60 mgCd/kg), on the other hand, more Cd accumulated in the liver than in the kidney. The daily intake of Cd dose from the intestinal tract in each experimental group was deduced to be about 0.36%-0.54% of the cumulative dose of oral Cd administration. The daily intake of Cd into the body was estimated as 7, 22, 40, 100, 120, 260 microgCd/kg/day in the experimental groups of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 mgCd/kg/day, respectively. Increase of plasma enzyme activity (GOT, GPT) and of urinary enzyme excretion (NAG, AAP, GST), reflecting hepatic damage and renal dysfunction, was found in the high Cd dose groups (30 and 60 mgCd/kg) from the 5th week. Non-CdMT concentration in the kidney was also significantly high in the high Cd dose groups. In the low Cd dose groups (2 and 5 mgCd/kg), although the renal Cd concentration was higher than that of the high Cd dose groups, prominent renal dysfunction and hepatic damage were not observed. Regeneration, vacuolization, and eosinophilic bodies in proximal tubular tissue were mainly observed in the groups subjected to 20, 30 and 60 mgCd/kg administration. Very slight regeneration was also observed in the renal proximal tubular tissue at the 30th week for the 5 mgCd/kg and 10 mgCd/kg groups, and at the 60th week for the 2 mgCd/kg group. Remarkable decrease of bone mineral density at the midpoint of the femur was found in the high Cd dose groups. Also, the decrease in bone mineral density was observed before or after the manifestation of the

  7. [Management of end-stage kidney failure: a challenge for the countries of sub-Saharan Africa example of mineral and bone disorders in Burkina Faso].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulibaly, G; Kaboré, G E; Diallo, O; Ouédraogo, D-D; Fessi, H; Ronco, P; Zabsonré, P; Lengani, A

    2013-05-01

    Meeting treatment targets for dialysis is a seemingly impossible challenge for most countries of sub-Saharan Africa. To assess this problem, we conducted this study of mineral and bone disorders in subjects undergoing hemodialysis at the Ouagadougou hemodialysis unit, the only such unit in Burkina Faso. This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in January 2010. We included patients on hemodialysis for at least three months who had some minimal predialysis laboratory results available. The KDIGO guidelines served as our reference. Dialysis sessions lasted 5 h and took place once every five days. The statistical analysis of the data was performed with PASW statistical software, version 18 for Windows. The study included 32 of the 53 patients in the unit: 19 men and 13 women with a mean age of 43.5 ± 12.7 years. Their mean serum levels were 2.2 ± 0.2 mmol/L for calcium, 1.4 ± 0.5 mmol/L for phosphorus, 934 ± 887.4 pg/mL for intact parathyroid hormone and 193.4 ± 125.7 IU/L for total alkaline phosphatases. No patient reached the target for all three of the first three indicators. Patients with parathyroid hormone ≥ 800 pg/mL (n = 14) had a serum phosphorus (1.6 ± 0.6 vs 1.2 ± 0.4; p = 0.044) and alkaline phosphatases (287.5 ± 100.5 vs 120.2 ± 90; p < 0.001), significantly higher than those whose parathyroid hormone level was < 800 pg/mL. The bone and mineral status of our hemodialysis patients is worrisome and is due to suboptimal treatment conditions. The risk of deaths is high. Subsidies sufficient to provide adequate care would reduce these problems, which have, we note, an ethical dimension.

  8. Autologous Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation for Central Nervous System Disorders – Recent Progress and Perspective for Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that the transplanted BMSC significantly promote functional recovery after CNS damage in the animal models of various kinds of CNS disorders, including cerebral infarct, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. However, there are several shortages of information when considering clinical application of BMSC transplantation for patients with CNS disorders. In this review, therefore, we discuss what we should clarify to establish cell transplantation therapy as the scientifically proven entity in clinical situation and describe our recent works for this purpose. The BMSC have the ability to alter their gene expression profile and phenotype in response to the surrounding circumstances and to protect the neurons by producing some neurotrophic factors. They also promote neurite extension and rebuild the neural circuits in the injured CNS. The BMSC can be expanded in vitro using the animal serum-free medium. Pharmacological modulation may accelerate the in vitro proliferation of the BMSC. Using in vivo optical imaging technique, the transplanted BMSC can non-invasively be tracked in the living animals for at least 8 weeks after transplantation. It is urgent issues to develop clinical imaging technique to track the transplanted cells in the CNS and evaluate the therapeutic significance of BMSC transplantation in order to establish it as a definite therapeutic strategy in clinical situation in the future.

  9. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  10. Bone metabolism in adolescent girls with eating disorders and weight loss: independent effects of weight change, insulin-like growth factor-1 and oestradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenne, Ingemar; Stridsberg, Mats

    2015-03-01

    Adolescents with eating disorders (ED) are at risk of developing osteoporosis if weight is not recovered. Previous investigations do not separate the effects of weight change per se from those of concomitant hormonal changes. In this investigation serum osteocalcin (OC), C-terminal telopeptide of collagen (CTX), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and oestradiol were measured at assessment of 498 girls with ED and during weight gain of 59 girls. At assessment, OC concentrations were associated independently with weight (change), IGF-1 and oestradiol. Low weight, a high rate of weight loss and the hormone concentrations were associated with low OC. Low weight and high rate of weight loss were associated with high CTX concentrations but there were no associations independent of weight (change) with the hormones. During weight recovery, OC and CTX were independently and positively associated with weight, weight gain, IGF-1 and oestradiol. Bone metabolism markers are related to weight change independently of IGF-1 and oestradiol during both weight loss and weight gain. During weight gain, when pubertal development and growth are resumed there is an additional independent positive association between the markers and IGF-1 and oestradiol. These relationships are strongest in premenarcheal girls.

  11. Calcium and Vitamin D Supplement Prescribing Practices among Providers Caring for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Are We Addressing Bone Health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shylaja Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD have several risk factors for low bone mineral density. The gluten-free, casein-free (GFCF diet is a complementary therapy sometimes used in ASD that raises concerns for the adequacy of calcium and vitamin D intake. This study evaluated the prescribing practices of calcium and vitamin D supplements and the practice of checking 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OHD levels by providers in 100 children with ASD, 50 of whom were on the GFCF diet. Fifty-two percent and 46% of children on the GFCF diet were on some form of vitamin D and calcium supplements, respectively, compared to 18% and 14% of those not on this diet. Twenty-four percent of children in the GFCF group had a documented 25(OHD level compared to none in the non-GFCF group. The data highlight a gap in calcium and vitamin D supplement prescribing practices among providers caring for children with ASD as well as a gap in the practice of checking 25(OHD levels.

  12. Metabolic, endocrine, and related bone diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, L.F.

    1987-01-01

    Bone is living tissue, and old bone is constantly removed and replaced with new bone. Normally this exchange is in balance, and the mineral content remains relatively constant. This balance may be disturbed as a result of certain metabolic and endocrinologic disorders. The term dystrophy, referring to a disturbance of nutrition, is applied to metabolic and endocrine bone diseases and should be distinguished from the term dysplasia, referring to a disturbance of bone growth. The two terms are easily confused but are not interchangeable. Metabolic bone disease is caused by endocrine imbalance, vitamin deficiency or excess, and other disturbances in bone metabolism leading to osteoporosis and osteomalacia

  13. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone ... to people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether ...

  14. Lrp5 functions in bone to regulate bone mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yajun; Niziolek, Paul J; MacDonald, Bryan T; Zylstra, Cassandra R; Alenina, Natalia; Robinson, Daniel R; Zhong, Zhendong; Matthes, Susann; Jacobsen, Christina M; Conlon, Ronald A; Brommage, Robert; Liu, Qingyun; Mseeh, Faika; Powell, David R; Yang, Qi M; Zambrowicz, Brian; Gerrits, Han; Gossen, Jan A; He, Xi; Bader, Michael; Williams, Bart O; Warman, Matthew L; Robling, Alexander G

    2011-06-01

    The human skeleton is affected by mutations in low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5). To understand how LRP5 influences bone properties, we generated mice with osteocyte-specific expression of inducible Lrp5 mutations that cause high and low bone mass phenotypes in humans. We found that bone properties in these mice were comparable to bone properties in mice with inherited mutations. We also induced an Lrp5 mutation in cells that form the appendicular skeleton but not in cells that form the axial skeleton; we observed that bone properties were altered in the limb but not in the spine. These data indicate that Lrp5 signaling functions locally, and they suggest that increasing LRP5 signaling in mature bone cells may be a strategy for treating human disorders associated with low bone mass, such as osteoporosis.

  15. Bone Metabolism in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical co-morbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in AN is associated with a significant risk of fractures and therefore treatments to prevent bone loss are critical. In this review, we discuss the hormonal determinants of low bone mass in AN and treatments that have been investigated in this population. PMID:24419863

  16. MRI in bone marrow lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, A.; Theissen, P.; Schauerte, G.; Schicha, H.; Diehl, V.

    1989-01-01

    MRI has the potential to demonstrate bone marrow pathology due to its good soft tissue contrast. Inflammation and necrosis can be detected very early before there is evidence of radiological changes. In bone tumors intramedullary infiltration can be visualized in addition to soft tissue changes. Metastases of bone and bone marrow, especially in spinal and pelvic regions, are well depicted, often before bone scintigraphy yields pathological findings. In haematological disorders MRI permits follow-up studies due to its good reproducibility. Infiltration by malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma and its extension in bone marrow can be visualized by MRI, too. However, the most common pathological MRI findings in bone marrow are not very specific, and final diagnosis requires further clinical or histological information. (orig.) [de

  17. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  18. Changes in Physical Fitness, Bone Mineral Density and Body Composition During Inpatient Treatment of Underweight and Normal Weight Females with Longstanding Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solfrid Bratland-Sanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine changes in aerobic fitness, muscular strength, bone mineral density (BMD and body composition during inpatient treatment of underweight and normal weight patients with longstanding eating disorders (ED. Twenty-nine underweight (BMI < 18.5, n = 7 and normal weight (BMI ≥ 18.5, n = 22 inpatients (mean (SD age: 31.0 (9.0 years, ED duration: 14.9 (8.8 years, duration of treatment: 16.6 (5.5 weeks completed this prospective naturalistic study. The treatment consisted of nutritional counseling, and 2 × 60 min weekly moderate intensive physical activity in addition to psychotherapy and milieu therapy. Underweight patients aimed to increase body weight with 0.5 kg/week until the weight gain goal was reached. Aerobic fitness, muscular strength, BMD and body composition were measured at admission and discharge. Results showed an increase in mean muscular strength, total body mass, fat mass, and body fat percentage, but not aerobic capacity, among both underweight and normal weight patients. Lumbar spine BMD increased among the underweight patients, no changes were observed in BMD among the normal weight patients. Three out of seven underweight patients were still underweight at discharge, and only three out of nine patients with excessive body fat (i.e., >33% managed to reduce body fat to normal values during treatment. These results calls for a more individualized treatment approach to achieve a more optimal body composition among both underweight and normal to overweight patients with longstanding ED.

  19. Chromosome anomalies in bone marrow as primary cause of aplastic or hypoplastic conditions and peripheral cytopenia: disorders due to secondary impairment of RUNX1 and MPL genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marletta Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome changes in the bone marrow (BM of patients with persistent cytopenia are often considered diagnostic for a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Comprehensive cytogenetic evaluations may give evidence of the real pathogenetic role of these changes in cases with cytopenia without morphological signs of MDS. Results Chromosome anomalies were found in the BM of three patients, without any morphological evidence of MDS: 1 an acquired complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a boy with severe aplastic anaemia (SAA; the rearrangement caused the loss of exons 2–8 of the RUNX1 gene with subsequent hypoexpression. 2 a constitutional complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a girl with congenital thrombocytopenia; the rearrangement led to RUNX1 disruption and hypoexpression. 3 an acquired paracentric inversion of chromosome 1, in which two regions at the breakpoints were shown to be lost, in a boy with aplastic anaemia; the MPL gene, localized in chromosome 1 short arms was not mutated neither disrupted, but its expression was severely reduced: we postulate that the aplastic anaemia was due to position effects acting both in cis and in trans, and causing Congenital Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia (CAMT. Conclusions A clonal anomaly in BM does not imply per se a diagnosis of MDS: a subgroup of BM hypoplastic disorders is directly due to chromosome structural anomalies with effects on specific genes, as was the case of RUNX1 and MPL in the patients here reported with diagnosis of SAA, thrombocytopenia, and CAMT. The anomaly may be either acquired or constitutional, and it may act by deletion/disruption of the gene, or by position effects. Full cytogenetic investigations, including a-CGH, should always be part of the diagnostic evaluation of patients with BM aplasia/hypoplasia and peripheral cytopenias.

  20. Osteoinduction of bone grafting materials for bone repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gareta, Elena; Coathup, Melanie J; Blunn, Gordon W

    2015-12-01

    Regeneration of bone defects caused by trauma, infection, tumours or inherent genetic disorders is a clinical challenge that usually necessitates bone grafting materials. Autologous bone or autograft is still considered the clinical "gold standard" and the most effective method for bone regeneration. However, limited bone supply and donor site morbidity are the most important disadvantages of autografting. Improved biomaterials are needed to match the performance of autograft as this is still superior to that of synthetic bone grafts. Osteoinductive materials would be the perfect candidates for achieving this task. The aim of this article is to review the different groups of bone substitutes in terms of their most recently reported osteoinductive properties. The different factors influencing osteoinductivity by biomaterials as well as the mechanisms behind this phenomenon are also presented, showing that it is very limited compared to osteoinductivity shown by bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Therefore, a new term to describe osteoinductivity by biomaterials is proposed. Different strategies for adding osteoinductivity (BMPs, stem cells) to bone substitutes are also discussed. The overall objective of this paper is to gather the current knowledge on osteoinductivity of bone grafting materials for the effective development of new graft substitutes that enhance bone regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bone disease of primary hyperoxaluria in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, E.; Wendler, H.; Zobel, G.; Ratschek, M.

    1989-01-01

    A patient with primary hyperoxaluria type I in infancy is reported. He had renal insufficiency, but urolithiasis was absent. Demonstration of diffuse nephrocalcinosis by renal ultrasound contributed to early diagnosis. Prolonged survival leads to extensive extrarenal oxalate deposition. Repeated skeletal surveys showed the development and the progression of severe hyperoxaluria-related bone disease. Translucent metaphyseal bands with sclerotic margins, wide areas of rarefaction at the ends of the long bones, and translucent rims around the epiphyses and the tarsal bones were signs of disordered bone growth. Bone density generally increased with time indicating progressive sclerosis due to oxalate deposition in the previously normal bone structure. (orig.)

  2. Persistent hyperparathyroidism as a risk factor for long-term graft failure: the need to discuss indication for parathyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Maria Júlia Correia Lima Nepomuceno; Ramalho, Janaina Almeida Mota; Elias, Rosilene Motta; Jorgetti, Vanda; Nahas, William; Custodio, Melani; Moysés, Rosa M A; David-Neto, Elias

    2018-01-10

    Although a successful kidney transplant (KTx) improves most of the mineral and bone disorders (MBD) produced by chronic kidney disease (CKD), hyperparathyroidism may persist (pHPT). Current guidelines recommend parathyroidectomy if serum parathormone is persistently elevated 1 year after KTx, because pHPT has been recently associated with poor graft outcomes. However, whether patients with pHPT and adequate renal function are at risk for long-term graft failure is unknown. Longitudinal follow-up of 911 adults submitted to KTx between January 2005 and December 2014, with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥ 30 mL/min 1 year after surgery. Clinical and laboratory data were collected from electronic database. Graft failure was defined as return to dialysis. Overall, 62% of the patients were classified as having pHPT 1 year after KTx. After a mean follow-up time of 47 months, there were 59 graft failures (49 in pHPT and 10 in non-pHPT group, P = .003). At last follow-up, death-censored graft survival was lower in the pHPT group (P = .009), even after adjustment for age at KTx, donor age, donor type, acute rejection, parathyroidectomy, and eGFR at 1 year after transplantation (odds ratio [OR] 1.99; 1.004-3.971; P = .049). A PTH of 150 pg/mL at 6 months was the best cutoff to predict pHPT at 1 year (specificity = 92.1%). Having pHPT after a successful KTx increases the long-term risk of death-censored graft failure. This result highlights the need for better recognition and management of CKD-MBD before and during the first year after KTx, and opens a discussion on the more appropriate timing to perform parathyroidectomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multifocal bone and bone marrow lesions in children - MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raissaki, Maria; Demetriou, Stelios; Spanakis, Konstantinos; Skiadas, Christos; Karantanas, Apostolos H. [University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Katzilakis, Nikolaos; Stiakaki, Eftichia [University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Velivassakis, Emmanouil G. [University Hospital of Heraklion, Orthopedic Clinic, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2017-03-15

    Polyostotic bone and bone marrow lesions in children may be due to various disorders. Radiographically, lytic lesions may become apparent after loss of more than 50% of the bone mineral content. Scintigraphy requires osteoblastic activity and is not specific. MRI may significantly contribute to the correct diagnosis and management. Accurate interpretation of MRI examinations requires understanding of the normal conversion pattern of bone marrow in childhood and of the appearances of red marrow rests and hyperplasia. Differential diagnosis is wide: Malignancies include metastases, multifocal primary sarcomas and hematological diseases. Benign entities include benign tumors and tumor-like lesions, histiocytosis, infectious and inflammatory diseases, multiple stress fractures/reactions and bone infarcts/ischemia. (orig.)

  4. Short Anabolic Peptides for Bone Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amso, Zaid; Cornish, Jillian; Brimble, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Loss of bone occurs in the age-related skeletal disorder, osteoporosis, leading to bone fragility and increased incidence of fractures, which are associated with enormous costs and substantial morbidity and mortality. Recent data indicate that osteoporotic fractures are more common than other diseases, which usually attract public attention (e.g., heart attack and breast cancer). The prevention and treatment of this skeletal disorder are therefore of paramount importance. Majority of osteoporosis medications restore skeletal balance by reducing osteoclastic activity, thereby reducing bone resorption. These agents, however, do not regenerate damaged bone tissue, leaving limited options for patients once bone loss has occurred. Recently, attention has turned to bone-anabolic agents. Such agents have the ability to increase bone mass and strength, potentially reversing structural damage. To date, only one bone-anabolic drug is available in the market. The discovery of more novel, cost-effective bone anabolic agents is therefore a priority to treat those suffering from this disabling condition. Short peptides offer an important alternative for the development of novel bone-anabolic agents given their high target binding specificity, which translates into potent activity with limited side effects. This review summarizes attempts in the identification of bone-anabolic peptides, and their development for promoting bone growth. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. An insight in to Paget′s disease of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Sabharwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paget′s disease of bone (PDB is a common disorder which may affect one or many bones. Although many patients are asymptomatic, a variety of symptoms and complications may occur. PDB is a focal disorder of bone turnover characterized by excessive bone resorption coupled with bone formation. PDB begins with a period of increased osteoclastic activity and bone resorption, followed by increased osteoblast production of woven bone that is poorly mineralized. In the final phase of the disease process, dense cortical and trabecular bone deposition predominates, but the bone is sclerotic and poorly organized and lacks the structural integrity and strength of normal bone. This article briefly reviews the etiopathogenesis, clinical radiographic and histological features of Paget′s disease.

  6. Mineral bone disorder and its management among hemodialysis patients in the Gulf Cooperation Council: Initial findings from the dialysis outcomes and practice patterns study (2012-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa Al Salmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prospective cohort Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS initiated data collection in national samples of hemodialysis (HD units (total of 41 study sites in all six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC countries (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates in late 2012. Here, we report initial results regarding mineral bone disorders (MBDs and its management in the GCC countries. Forty-one randomly selected HD facilities, treating >23 HD patients each, were sampled and represent care for >95% of GCC HD patients. Descriptive results for the GCC countries based on a random sample of 20-30 HD patients in each study facility. Initial results for the GCC are from 931 HD patients treated at 41 dialysis units (ranging from 1 unit in Bahrain to 21 in Saudi Arabia. Results are presented as weighted estimates, accounting for the sampling fraction in each unit. Baseline descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, median, or percentage, weighted by facility sampling fraction were calculated for the study sample. For analyses examining the percent of facility patients having (a serum phosphorus >6.0 mg/dL or (b parathyroid hormone (PTH >600 pg/mL, analyses were restricted to facilities having at least 10 HD patients with a reported serum phosphorus or PTH measurement, respectively. Logistic regression analyses of the indicated binary outcomes were based on the use of generalized estimating equations and were adjusted for GCC country, patient age category (65 years old, sex, and whether the patient was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Logistic models accounted for clustering of patients within facilities, assuming an exchangeable working correlation matrix. Mean age of HD patients in the GCC countries was 53 years vs. 61-64 years in the three other DOPPS regions. MBD markers showed slightly lower mean serum Calcium in the GCC countries, similar mean serum phosphorus, and intermediate median PTH levels compared with the three

  7. Broken bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Broken bone URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ... following steps to reduce your risk of a broken bone: Wear protective ... pads. Create a safe home for young children. Place a gate at stairways ...

  8. De Novo Mutations in SLC25A24 Cause a Disorder Characterized by Early Aging, Bone Dysplasia, Characteristic Face, and Early Demise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Writzl, Karin; Maver, Ales; Kovačič, Lidija; Martinez-Valero, Paula; Contreras, Laura; Satrustegui, Jorgina; Castori, Marco; Faivre, Laurence; Lapunzina, Pablo; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.; Radović, Slobodanka; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Peterlin, Borut; del Arco, Araceli; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2017-01-01

    A series of simplex cases have been reported under various diagnoses sharing early aging, especially evident in congenitally decreased subcutaneous fat tissue and sparse hair, bone dysplasia of the skull and fingers, a distinctive facial gestalt, and prenatal and postnatal growth retardation. For

  9. Controlled Pilot Study of High-Impact Low-Frequency Exercise on Bone Loss and Vital-Sign Stabilization in Adolescents With Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Susanne P K; Bachrach, Laura K; Golden, Neville H

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) face an increased lifetime risk of bone fragility. This randomized controlled study examined the efficacy and safety of a high-impact activity program on markers of bone turnover and stabilization of vital signs (VSS). Forty-one hospitalized adolescents with AN were randomly assigned to routine care or routine care plus 20 jumps twice daily. Bone markers were measured at baseline days 1-3 (T1), days 4-6 (T2), and days 7-9 (T3). The primary outcome was change in bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP) at T3 adjusted for BSAP and % median body mass index at T1. Secondary outcomes were serum N-telopeptide (NTX) and osteocalcin at T3. Safety was determined by comparing weight gain, time to VSS and length of stay for each group. BSAP, NTX, or osteocalcin did not differ between groups at baseline or at T3. BSAP and NTX at T3 were not associated with group of enrollment or % median body mass index. VSS was significantly reduced in the intervention group compared with the control group (11.6 ± 5.7 days vs. 17 ± 10.5 days, p = .049). There was no significant difference in weight gain or length of stay between groups. Twice-daily jumping activity failed to influence markers of bone turnover in adolescents with AN but was well tolerated, shortened time to vital-sign stabilization and did not slow weight gain. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pediatric applications of radionuclide bone imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerville, D.A.; Treves, S.T.

    1988-01-01

    Applications of skeletal scintigraphy in the pediatric population differ significantly from those in the adult population. While the majority of bone scans performed in adults are to detect osseous metastases, bone scans in the pediatric population are performed for a wider variety of conditions. These include (in addition to bony metastases) evaluation of primary bone tumors (both malignant and benign), bone and joint infections, avascular necrosis (AVN), fractures, sports-related injuries, the evaluation of growth disorders (particularly involving the mandible), and a variety of benign orthopedic conditions unique to the childhood period. Thus, the physician interpreting pediatric nuclear medicine bone scans must be acquainted with a variety of disorders not common to the adult population. In this chapter, the authors discuss those aspects of bone scintigraphy that are generally confined to the younger population. In doing so, they have attempted to avoid those aspects of skeletal scintigraphy common to both pediatric and adult populations

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  12. A Novel In Vivo Gene Transfer Technique and In Vitro Cell Based Assays for the Study of Bone Loss in Musculoskeletal Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Dennis J; Dixit, Neha; Nguyen, Thanh; Suzuki, Erika; Shin, Hyun Seock; Davis, Jack; Maverakis, Emanual; Adamopoulos, Iannis E

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation and activation of osteoclasts play a key role in the development of musculoskeletal diseases as these cells are primarily involved in bone resorption. Osteoclasts can be generated in vitro from monocyte/macrophage precursor cells in the presence of certain cytokines, which promote survival and differentiation. Here, both in vivo and in vitro techniques are demonstrated, which allow scientists to study different cytokine contributions towards osteoclast differentiation, signali...

  13. Bone Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... posts Join Mayo Clinic Connect Bone scan About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  14. Bone Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Body X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Bone Biopsy Sponsored by Please note ...

  15. Bone sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudry, P.

    2008-01-01

    Bone sarcomas are malignancies with peak incidence in adolescents and young adults. The most frequent are osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma/PNET, in an older adults are seen chondrosarcomas, other ones are rare. In general, biology of sarcomas is closely related to pediatric malignancies with fast growth, local aggressiveness, tendency to early hematogenic dissemination and chemo sensitivity. Diagnostics and treatment of bone sarcomas should be done in well experienced centres due to low incidence and broad issue of this topic. An interdisciplinary approach and staff education is essential in due care of patients with bone sarcoma. If these criteria are achieved, the cure rate is contemporary at 65 - 70 %, while some subpopulation of patients has chance for cure up to 90 %. Osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma/PNET are discussed below as types of most frequent bone sarcoma. (author)

  16. Bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Charlotte Ørsted; Hansen, Rikke Rie; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal conditions are common causes of chronic pain and there is an unmet medical need for improved treatment options. Bone pain is currently managed with disease modifying agents and/or analgesics depending on the condition. Disease modifying agents affect the underlying pathophysiology...... of the disease and reduce as a secondary effect bone pain. Antiresorptive and anabolic agents, such as bisphosphonates and intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34), respectively, have proven effective as pain relieving agents. Cathepsin K inhibitors and anti-sclerostin antibodies hold, due to their disease...... modifying effects, promise of a pain relieving effect. NSAIDs and opioids are widely employed in the treatment of bone pain. However, recent preclinical findings demonstrating a unique neuronal innervation of bone tissue and sprouting of sensory nerve fibers open for new treatment possibilities....

  17. The Role od Bone Marrow Aspirate and Trephine Samples in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other disorders diagnosed after bone marrow examination include myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), aplastic anaemia, megaloblastic anaemia and myelofibrosis. Only 8.75% of these patients had a normal bone marrow. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the complexity of using bone marrow examination in ...

  18. Medicines and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Medici a ne n s d Bone Loss Some types of medicines can cause bone loss, making your bones weak, if used for a long time. Use over a short time ... old bone and replaces it with new bone. Bone loss occurs when old bone breaks down faster than ...

  19. Personality disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... personality disorder Borderline personality disorder Dependent personality disorder Histrionic personality disorder Narcissistic personality disorder Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder Paranoid ...

  20. Bone marrow transplantation from genetically HLA-nonidentical donors in children with fatal inherited disorders excluding severe combined immunodeficiencies: use of two monoclonal antibodies to prevent graft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabado, N; Le Deist, F; Cant, A; De Graeff-Meeders, E R; Fasth, A; Morgan, G; Vellodi, A; Hale, G; Bujan, W; Thomas, C; Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Wijdenes, J; Fischer, A

    1996-09-01

    For children with life-threatening inborn errors of metabolism without a matched related bone marrow donor, transplantation from an HLA genetically nonidentical donor is the only therapeutic option. To reduce the high risk of graft rejection in this setting without increasing the conditioning regimen, a protocol based on the infusion of an antiadhesion antibody directed against the CD11a (leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 [LFA-1]) molecule was performed by the European Bone Marrow Transplantation-European Society for Immunodeficiency group with promising results. To optimize engraftment, and thereby survival, further, the additional blockade of a second important leukocyte adhesion and signalization pathway mediated by the CD2 and LFA-3 interaction was attempted in a multicenter protocol conducted by the European Bone Marrow Transplantation-European Society for Immunodeficiency group. Results of this study (ie, engraftment and survival) were compared with a historical control group that received the anti-LFA-1 antibody alone. Factors that may have affected engraftment and survival were also considered in this study. Forty-four children with inborn errors, including inherited immunodeficiencies (excluding severe combined immunodeficiencies), Chédiak-Higashi syndrome, familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, and malignant osteopetrosis, received bone marrow from HLA-nonidentical related donors or from HLA-identical unrelated donors at 13 European centers between August 1990 and June 1993. Bone marrow was depleted of T cells by use of either erythrocyte (E) rosetting or monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to prevent graft-versus-host disease. The conditioning regimen consisted of busulfan and cyclophosphamide for all patients plus etoposide for patients with osteopetrosis, familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, and Chédiak-Higashi syndrome. Infusions of MoAbs specific for the CD11a and the CD2 molecules were started 4 and 3 days, respectively, before and

  1. Physical activity and bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Međedović Bojan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The bones play an important structural role in the organism. They provide mobility, support, and protect the body, and the place where the storage essential minerals. Healthy bones have a crucial impact on the overall health of a person, and activities that promote health and preventive influence on the formation of bone disease are crucial in maintaining a strong and healthy skeletal system. Physical inactivity affects the decrease in function of bone, and the most common disease of bone osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder that results in low bone density and micro-architectural deterioration of bone tissue, that results in less bone density, and may lead to fracture. Physical activity is essential for bone health and prevention of osteoporosis. Based on available information, the best effect to maintain and stimulate the formation of bone mineral density is a combination of dynamic exercises with resistance training that engage multiple joints, large muscle groups, and have influence on the spine and hips. The results suggest that exercises with axial loading, such as running, jumping, and power exercise, promote the positive gains in bone mineral density. Therefore, training should focus on the adaptation of specific parts of the body that is most susceptible to injury, and should be sufficiently intense that exceeds the normal loads.

  2. Intractable diseases treated with intra-bone marrow-bone marrow transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming; Guo, Kuquan; Ikehara, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is used to treat hematological disorders, autoimmune diseases (ADs) and lymphoid cancers. Intra bone marrow-BMT (IBM-BMT) has been proven to be a powerful strategy for allogeneic BMT due to the rapid hematopoietic recovery and the complete restoration of T cell functions. IBM-BMT not only replaces hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) but also mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). MSCs are multi-potent stem cells that can be isolated from bone marrow (BM), umbilical co...

  3. Bone mineral content and bone metabolism in young adults with severe periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wowern von, N.; Westergaard, J.; Kollerup, G.

    2001-01-01

    Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis......Bone loss, bone markers, bone metabolism, bone mineral content, osteoporosis, severe periodontitis...

  4. Radiogrammetric analysis of upper limb long bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zlatan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiogrammetry is radiological method of bone mineral density quantification. Besides giving an insight in diagnostics and evolution of metabolic bone disorders (osteoporosis, osteomalacia, osteitis deformans- Paget's disease, it can also explain some specific biomechanical characteristics of bone structures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the significance and perspectives of radiogrammetry as a scientific model for further inquiry of skeletal system. The work demonstrates mathematical parameters (Ca-Cortical area, CI- Cortical index, GI- Garn's index, ESI- Exton Smith's index of upper limb long bones (humerus, radius, ulna. Two standard radiological projections of bones were taken: antero-posterior (AP and latero-lateral (LL. Correlation with metacarpal and lower limb bones was also performed. The value of the cortical area of humerus is significantly higher comparing with the two other examined bones (Xmean 2,2443 cm2, p < 0.01. Radial bone has the highest values of the relational mathematical parameters, which implicates its higher strength by volumetric unit concerning humerus and ulna. Despite the development of contemporary osteometric procedures (ultrasound densitometry, dual X-ray absorptiometry, digital X-ray radiogrammetry, the classical radiogrammetry sustains its important role in diagnostics of metabolic bone disorders and it can be successfully used for biomechanical inquiry of skeletal system.

  5. Facts about Broken Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Broken Bones KidsHealth / For Kids / Broken Bones What's in this ... sticking through the skin . What Happens When a Bone Breaks? It hurts to break a bone! It's ...

  6. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... the cut, then pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  7. Autologous implantation of BMP2-expressing dermal fibroblasts to improve bone mineral density and architecture in rabbit long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Weisbrode, Steve E; Bertone, Alicia L

    2015-10-01

    Cell-mediated gene therapy may treat bone fragility disorders. Dermal fibroblasts (DFb) may be an alternative cell source to stem cells for orthopedic gene therapy because of their rapid cell yield and excellent plasticity with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) gene transduction. Autologous DFb or BMP2-expressing autologous DFb were administered in twelve rabbits by two delivery routes; a transcortical intra-medullar infusion into tibiae and delayed intra-osseous injection into femoral drill defects. Both delivery methods of DFb-BMP2 resulted in a successful cell engraftment, increased bone volume, bone mineral density, improved trabecular bone microarchitecture, greater bone defect filling, external callus formation, and trabecular surface area, compared to non-transduced DFb or no cells. Cell engraftment within trabecular bone and bone marrow tissue was most efficiently achieved by intra-osseous injection of DFb-BMP2. Our results suggested that BMP2-expressing autologous DFb have enhanced efficiency of engraftment in target bones resulting in a measurable biologic response by the bone of improved bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture. These results support that autologous implantation of DFb-BMP2 warrants further study on animal models of bone fragility disorders, such as osteogenesis imperfecta and osteoporosis to potentially enhance bone quality, particularly along with other gene modification of these diseases. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Osteocyte lacunar properties in rat cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach-Gansmo, Fiona Linnea; Weaver, James C.; Jensen, Mads Hartmann

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the roles of osteocytes in bone maintenance have gained increasing attention. Osteocytes reside in lacunae that are interconnected by canaliculi resulting in a vast cellular network within the mineralized bone matrix. As the structure of the lacuno-canalicular network is highly connected......-species but also inter-site variation in lacunar properties. Here, osteocyte lacunae in rat cortical bone have been studied using synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography (SR μCT) and backscattered electron (BE) microscopy. Quantitative lacunar geometric characteristics are reported based on the synchrotron...... radiation data, differentiating between circumferential lamellar bone and a central, more disordered bone type. From these studies, no significant differences were found in lacunar volumes between lamellar and central bone, whereas significant differences in lacunar orientation, shape and density values...

  9. Segmenting Bone Parts for Bone Age Assessment using Point Distribution Model and Contour Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Singh Mann, Kulwinder, Dr.

    2018-01-01

    Bone age assessment (BAA) is a task performed on radiographs by the pediatricians in hospitals to predict the final adult height, to diagnose growth disorders by monitoring skeletal development. For building an automatic bone age assessment system the step in routine is to do image pre-processing of the bone X-rays so that features row can be constructed. In this research paper, an enhanced point distribution algorithm using contours has been implemented for segmenting bone parts as per well-established procedure of bone age assessment that would be helpful in building feature row and later on; it would be helpful in construction of automatic bone age assessment system. Implementation of the segmentation algorithm shows high degree of accuracy in terms of recall and precision in segmenting bone parts from left hand X-Rays.

  10. Osteoclasts prefer aged bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, K; Leeming, Diana Julie; Byrjalsen, I

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the age of the bones endogenously exerts control over the bone resorption ability of the osteoclasts, and found that osteoclasts preferentially develop and resorb bone on aged bone. These findings indicate that the bone matrix itself plays a role in targeted remodeling...... of aged bones....

  11. Bone marker gene expression in calvarial bones: different bone microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amer, Osama

    2017-12-01

    In calvarial mice, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into osteoprogenitor cells and then differentiate into osteoblasts that differentiate into osteocytes, which become embedded within the bone matrix. In this case, the cells participating in bone formation include MSCs, osteoprogenitor cells, osteoblasts and osteocytes. The calvariae of C57BL/KaLwRijHsD mice consist of the following five bones: two frontal bones, two parietal bones and one interparietal bone. This study aimed to analyse some bone marker genes and bone related genes to determine whether these calvarial bones have different bone microenvironments. C57BL/KaLwRijHsD calvariae were carefully excised from five male mice that were 4-6 weeks of age. Frontal, parietal, and interparietal bones were dissected to determine the bone microenvironment in calvariae. Haematoxylin and eosin staining was used to determine the morphology of different calvarial bones under microscopy. TaqMan was used to analyse the relative expression of Runx2, OC, OSX, RANK, RANKL, OPG, N-cadherin, E-cadherin, FGF2 and FGFR1 genes in different parts of the calvariae. Histological analysis demonstrated different bone marrow (BM) areas between the different parts of the calvariae. The data show that parietal bones have the smallest BM area compared to frontal and interparietal bones. TaqMan data show a significant increase in the expression level of Runx2, OC, OSX, RANKL, OPG, FGF2 and FGFR1 genes in the parietal bones compared with the frontal and interparietal bones of calvariae. This study provides evidence that different calvarial bones, frontal, parietal and interparietal, contain different bone microenvironments.

  12. Multinational observational study on clinical practices and therapeutic management of mineral and bone disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease stages 4, 5, and 5D: The OCEANOS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faissal A. M. Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to assess the current clinical practices in monitoring and treatment patterns of chronic kidney disease (CKD-mineral bone disorder and the degree to which these practices met the kidney disease improving global outcome (KDIGO guidelines. This was an international, multi-center, cross-sectional, observational study in adult patients diagnosed with CKD Stages 4, 5, and 5D. Patients were enrolled from Middle East, South Asia, Eurasia, and Africa; patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 mL/min/1.73 m 2 or with any medical/surgical conditions precluding their participation were excluded. Frequency of measurements, levels of serum calcium (Ca, phosphorus and parathormone (parathyroid hormone [PTH], and presence vascular/valvular calcification were recorded. Of the 2250 patients enrolled, data on 2247 patients were evaluated. Overall, only a small percentage of patients met all three target KDIGO ranges of serum Ca, phosphorus, and PTH (13.7% [95% confidence interval: 12.0; 15.4], with a higher proportion among CKD Stage 5D patients (14.8% than CKD Stage 4 and 5 (5.6% patients. Majority (84.3% of the patients received treatment with phosphorous binders, of whom 85.5% received Ca-based phosphate binders. Overall, 57.0% of patients received Vitamin D treatment with a similar frequency among patients with CKD Stages 4, 5, and 5D. Over half (65.7% of the patients were screened for vascular/valvular calcification; of these, 58.8% had ≥1 calcification. Diabetes status, P, PTH, and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol had significant impact on the prescription pattern of phosphorous binders. The current practices for the management of bone and mineral metabolism in CKD patients in the study region fall far short of meeting the KDIGO target range.

  13. Bone turnover markers in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Giuffrida

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Bone complications occur frequently in Gaucher disease (GD and reduce the quality of life of these patients. Skeletal involvement is an important indication for treatment to ameliorate symptoms and reduce the risk of irreversible and debilitating disease. Bone biomarkers have been used to assess disease status and the response to therapy in a number of bone disorders. Here, we examine the literature for evidence of abnormalities in bone turnover markers in patients with type 1 GD to assess whether they might be useful for the assessment of bone involvement in GD. We have found that bone biomarkers in GD show highly variable results which do not currently support their routine use for clinical assessment of bone status, as an indication for therapy initiation, or for monitoring the response to therapy. A greater understanding of bone markers and their relation to the bone manifestations of GD is required.

  14. Bone health in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hoyos, Marta; Riancho, José Antonio; Valero, Carmen

    2017-07-21

    Patients with Down syndrome have a number of risk factors that theoretically could predispose them to osteoporosis, such as early aging, development disorders, reduced physical activity, limited sun exposure, frequent comorbidities and use of drug therapies which could affect bone metabolism. In addition, the bone mass of these people may be affected by their anthropometric and body composition peculiarities. In general terms, studies in adults with Down syndrome reported that these people have lower areal bone mineral density (g/cm 2 ) than the general population. However, most of them have not taken the smaller bone size of people with Down syndrome into account. In fact, when body mineral density is adjusted by bone size and we obtain volumetric body mineral density (g/cm 3 ), the difference between both populations disappears. On the other hand, although people with Down syndrome have risk factor of hypovitaminosis D, the results of studies regarding 25(OH)D in this population are not clear. Likewise, the studies about biochemical bone markers or the prevalence of fractures are not conclusive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Pituitary Disorders and Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bolanowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various hormonal disorders can influence bone metabolism and cause secondary osteoporosis. The consequence of this is a significant increase of fracture risk. Among pituitary disorders such effects are observed in patients with Cushing’s disease, hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly, and hypopituitarism. Severe osteoporosis is the result of the coexistence of some of these disorders and hypogonadism at the same time, which is quite often.

  16. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L. Buckner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA.

  17. Bone Tissue Engineering: Recent Advances and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Ami R.; Laurencin, Cato T.; Nukavarapu, Syam P.

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has trended steeply upward and is expected to double by 2020, especially in populations where aging is coupled with increased obesity and poor physical activity. Engineered bone tissue has been viewed as a potential alternative to the conventional use of bone grafts, due to their limitless supply and no disease transmission. However, bone tissue engineering practices have not proceeded to clinical practice due to several limitations or challenges. Bone tissue engineering aims to induce new functional bone regeneration via the synergistic combination of biomaterials, cells, and factor therapy. In this review, we discuss the fundamentals of bone tissue engineering, highlighting the current state of this field. Further, we review the recent advances of biomaterial and cell-based research, as well as approaches used to enhance bone regeneration. Specifically, we discuss widely investigated biomaterial scaffolds, micro- and nano-structural properties of these scaffolds, and the incorporation of biomimetic properties and/or growth factors. In addition, we examine various cellular approaches, including the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs), adult stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and their clinical application strengths and limitations. We conclude by overviewing the challenges that face the bone tissue engineering field, such as the lack of sufficient vascularization at the defect site, and the research aimed at functional bone tissue engineering. These challenges will drive future research in the field. PMID:23339648

  18. [Frontier in bone biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Bone is an active organ in which bone mass is maintained by the balance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption, i.e., coupling of bone formation and bone resorption. Recent advances in molecular bone biology uncovered the molecular mechanism of the coupling. A fundamental role of osteocyte in the maintenance of bone mass and whole body metabolism has also been revealed recently. Moreover, neurons and neuropeptides have been shown to be intimately involved in bone homeostasis though inter-organ network, in addition to "traditional" regulators of bone metabolism such as soluble factors and cytokines

  19. Clinical significance of bone age estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, U.E.

    1986-01-01

    Skeletal development is an important maturity indicator during childhood. In clinical practice determination of skeletal age is helpful for the diagnosis of disorders of growth and development. Most hormones have specific effects on skeletal maturation. Thus, different disease states (growth disorders, disorders of pubertal development, chornic disorders of the bowels, kidneys, heart etc.) are characterized by retardation or acceleration of skeletal maturation. Therapeutic effects as well as side effects of hormones can be monitored by skeletal age determination. Typical disharmonic patterns in the appearance of bone centres of hand and wrist have been found in certain disorders of development. (orig.) [de

  20. Bone marrow stroma in idiopathic myelofibrosis and other haematological diseases. An immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisse, I; Hasselbalch, H; Junker, P

    1991-01-01

    Bone marrow stroma was investigated immunohistochemically in 31 patients with haematological diseases, mainly idiopathic myelofibrosis (n = 8) and related chronic myeloproliferative disorders (n = 14). The bone marrow from patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis and some CML patients showed marked...

  1. Are manual therapies, passive physical modalities, or acupuncture effective for the management of patients with whiplash-associated disorders or neck pain and associated disorders? An update of the Bone and Joint Decade Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders by the OPTIMa collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jessica J; Shearer, Heather M; Mior, Silvano; Jacobs, Craig; Côté, Pierre; Randhawa, Kristi; Yu, Hainan; Southerst, Danielle; Varatharajan, Sharanya; Sutton, Deborah; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Carroll, Linda J; Ameis, Arthur; Ammendolia, Carlo; Brison, Robert; Nordin, Margareta; Stupar, Maja; Taylor-Vaisey, Anne

    2016-12-01

    In 2008, the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders (Neck Pain Task Force) found limited evidence on the effectiveness of manual therapies, passive physical modalities, or acupuncture for the management of whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) or neck pain and associated disorders (NAD). This review aimed to update the findings of the Neck Pain Task Force, which examined the effectiveness of manual therapies, passive physical modalities, and acupuncture for the management of WAD or NAD. This is a systematic review and best evidence synthesis. The sample includes randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies comparing manual therapies, passive physical modalities, or acupuncture with other interventions, placebo or sham, or no intervention. The outcome measures were self-rated or functional recovery, pain intensity, health-related quality of life, psychological outcomes, or adverse events. We systematically searched five databases from 2000 to 2014. Random pairs of independent reviewers critically appraised eligible studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Studies with a low risk of bias were stratified by the intervention's stage of development (exploratory vs. evaluation) and synthesized following best evidence synthesis principles. Funding was provided by the Ministry of Finance. We screened 8,551 citations, and 38 studies were relevant and 22 had a low risk of bias. Evidence from seven exploratory studies suggests that (1) for recent but not persistent NAD grades I-II, thoracic manipulation offers short-term benefits; (2) for persistent NAD grades I-II, technical parameters of cervical mobilization (eg, direction or site of manual contact) do not impact outcomes, whereas one session of cervical manipulation is similar to Kinesio Taping; and (3) for NAD grades I-II, strain-counterstrain treatment is no better than placebo. Evidence from 15 evaluation studies

  2. Dating of cremated bones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanting, JN; Aerts-Bijma, AT; van der Plicht, J; Boaretto, E.; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    When dating unburnt bone, bone collagen, the organic fraction of the bone, is used. Collagen does not survive the heat of the cremation pyre, so dating of cremated bone has been considered impossible. Structural carbonate in the mineral fraction of the bone, however, survives the cremation process.

  3. Bone regeneration: current concepts and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGonagle Dennis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bone regeneration is a complex, well-orchestrated physiological process of bone formation, which can be seen during normal fracture healing, and is involved in continuous remodelling throughout adult life. However, there are complex clinical conditions in which bone regeneration is required in large quantity, such as for skeletal reconstruction of large bone defects created by trauma, infection, tumour resection and skeletal abnormalities, or cases in which the regenerative process is compromised, including avascular necrosis, atrophic non-unions and osteoporosis. Currently, there is a plethora of different strategies to augment the impaired or 'insufficient' bone-regeneration process, including the 'gold standard' autologous bone graft, free fibula vascularised graft, allograft implantation, and use of growth factors, osteoconductive scaffolds, osteoprogenitor cells and distraction osteogenesis. Improved 'local' strategies in terms of tissue engineering and gene therapy, or even 'systemic' enhancement of bone repair, are under intense investigation, in an effort to overcome the limitations of the current methods, to produce bone-graft substitutes with biomechanical properties that are as identical to normal bone as possible, to accelerate the overall regeneration process, or even to address systemic conditions, such as skeletal disorders and osteoporosis.

  4. Sclerostin antibody treatment increases bone formation, bone mass, and bone strength in a rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodong; Ominsky, Michael S; Warmington, Kelly S; Morony, Sean; Gong, Jianhua; Cao, Jin; Gao, Yongming; Shalhoub, Victoria; Tipton, Barbara; Haldankar, Raj; Chen, Qing; Winters, Aaron; Boone, Tom; Geng, Zhaopo; Niu, Qing-Tian; Ke, Hua Zhu; Kostenuik, Paul J; Simonet, W Scott; Lacey, David L; Paszty, Chris

    2009-04-01

    The development of bone-rebuilding anabolic agents for potential use in the treatment of bone loss conditions, such as osteoporosis, has been a long-standing goal. Genetic studies in humans and mice have shown that the secreted protein sclerostin is a key negative regulator of bone formation, although the magnitude and extent of sclerostin's role in the control of bone formation in the aging skeleton is still unclear. To study this unexplored area of sclerostin biology and to assess the pharmacologic effects of sclerostin inhibition, we used a cell culture model of bone formation to identify a sclerostin neutralizing monoclonal antibody (Scl-AbII) for testing in an aged ovariectomized rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Six-month-old female rats were ovariectomized and left untreated for 1 yr to allow for significant estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss, at which point Scl-AbII was administered for 5 wk. Scl-AbII treatment in these animals had robust anabolic effects, with marked increases in bone formation on trabecular, periosteal, endocortical, and intracortical surfaces. This not only resulted in complete reversal, at several skeletal sites, of the 1 yr of estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss, but also further increased bone mass and bone strength to levels greater than those found in non-ovariectomized control rats. Taken together, these preclinical results establish sclerostin's role as a pivotal negative regulator of bone formation in the aging skeleton and, furthermore, suggest that antibody-mediated inhibition of sclerostin represents a promising new therapeutic approach for the anabolic treatment of bone-related disorders, such as postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow in hematological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.C. vande; Lecouvet, F.E.; Maldague, B.; Malghem, J.; Michaux, L.; Ferrant, A.

    1998-01-01

    Despite its lack of specificity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the bone marrow has the potential to play a role in the management of patients with primary neoplastic disorders of the hematopoietic system, including lymphomas, leukemias and multiple myeloma. In addition to its use in the assessment of suspected spinal cord compression, bone marrow MRI could be used as a prognostic method or as a technique to assess the response to treatment. The current review addresses the common patterns of bone marrow involvement observed in primary neoplasms of the bone marrow, basic technical principles of bone marrow MRI, and several applications of MRI in selected clinical situations. (orig.) (orig.)

  6. [Bone tissue morphological structure in congenital deformations of the jaws].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkanov, A V; Panin, M G; Shipkova, T P; Chumakov, A A; Komnova, Z D

    2001-01-01

    Morphological structure of bone tissue was studied in various types of congenital deformations of the jaws. Morphological changes in the bone with deformations and the severity of these disorders depended not so much on the type on the deformation, but mainly on its severity, which can be explained by a drastic increase of functional exercise because of impaired occlusion and impossibility of proper chewing. Decelerated weak restructuring of bone tissue and imperfect osteogenesis in deformed bone, similar in various types of deformations, were demonstrated on morphological material. These changes can affect the regenerative potential of the bone in operated zones.

  7. Dating of cremated bones

    OpenAIRE

    Lanting, JN; Aerts-Bijma, AT; van der Plicht, J; Boaretto, E.; Carmi, I.

    2001-01-01

    When dating unburnt bone, bone collagen, the organic fraction of the bone, is used. Collagen does not survive the heat of the cremation pyre, so dating of cremated bone has been considered impossible. Structural carbonate in the mineral fraction of the bone, however, survives the cremation process. We developed a method of dating cremated bone by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), using this carbonate fraction. Here we present results for a variety of prehistoric sites and ages, showing a r...

  8. Force-induced bone growth and adaptation: A system theoretical approach to understanding bone mechanotransduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, Solvey; Findeisen, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    The modeling, analysis, and design of treatment therapies for bone disorders based on the paradigm of force-induced bone growth and adaptation is a challenging task. Mathematical models provide, in comparison to clinical, medical and biological approaches an structured alternative framework to understand the concurrent effects of the multiple factors involved in bone remodeling. By now, there are few mathematical models describing the appearing complex interactions. However, the resulting models are complex and difficult to analyze, due to the strong nonlinearities appearing in the equations, the wide range of variability of the states, and the uncertainties in parameters. In this work, we focus on analyzing the effects of changes in model structure and parameters/inputs variations on the overall steady state behavior using systems theoretical methods. Based on an briefly reviewed existing model that describes force-induced bone adaptation, the main objective of this work is to analyze the stationary behavior and to identify plausible treatment targets for remodeling related bone disorders. Identifying plausible targets can help in the development of optimal treatments combining both physical activity and drug-medication. Such treatments help to improve/maintain/restore bone strength, which deteriorates under bone disorder conditions, such as estrogen deficiency.

  9. Bone development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatara, M.R.; Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Sawa-Wojtanowicz, B.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the long-term effect of alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) administration during early neonatal life on skeletal development and function, with emphasis on bone exposed to regular stress and used to serve for systemic changes monitoring, the rib. Shropshire ram...... at 146 days of life and five left and right ribs (fourth to eighth) were removed for analysis. The influence of AKG on skeletal system development was evaluated in relation to both geometrical and mechanical properties, as well as quantitative computed tomography (QCT). No significant differences between...... has a long-term effect on skeletal development when given early in neonatal life, and that changes in rib properties serve to improve chest mechanics and functioning in young animals. Moreover, neonatal administration of AKG may be considered as an effective factor enhancing proper development...

  10. The challenge of controlling phosphorus in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; Martin, Kevin J

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenesis and management of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders (CKD-MBD) has experienced major changes, but the control of serum phosphorus at all stages of CKD still seems to be a key factor to improve clinical outcomes. High serum phosphorus is the most important uremia-related, non-traditional risk factor associated with vascular calcification in CKD patients and in the general population. Phosphorus may also be one of the key elements linking vascular calcification with low bone turnover. The main hormones and factors that contribute to the kidney regulation of phosphorus and calcium include parathyroid hormone, FGF-23, klotho and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D). Serum phosphorus did not start rising until CKD 3b in contrast with the earlier changes observed with fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), Klotho, calcitriol and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Despite FGF-23 and PTH having synergic effects regarding phosphorus removal, they have opposite effects on 1,25(OH)2D3. At the same stages of CKD in which phosphorus retention appears to occur, calcium retention also occurs. As phosphorus accumulation is associated with poor outcomes, an important question without a clear answer is at which level-range should serum phosphorus be maintained at different stages of CKD to improve clinical outcomes. There are four main strategies to manage phosphate homeostasis; phosphorus dietary intake, administration of phosphate binder agents, effective control of hyperparathyroidism and to ensure in the CKD 5D setting, an adequate scheme of dialysis. Despite all the available strategies, and the introduction of new phosphate binder agents in the market, controlling serum phosphorus remains challenging, and hyperphosphatemia continues to be extremely common in CKD 5 patients. Furthermore, despite phosphate binding agents having proved to be effective in reducing serum phosphorus, their ultimate effects on clinical outcomes remain controversial. Thus, we still

  11. Low Bone Mineral Mass Is Associated with Decreased Bone Formation and Diet in Females with Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Kathleen J.; Barrish, Judy O.; Neul, Jeffrey L.; Glaze, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize biomarkers of bone turnover and their relation with bone mineral mass in a cross-sectional cohort of females with Rett syndrome (RTT) and to examine the role of dietary, biochemical, hormonal, and inflammatory factors on bone mineral mass and bone biomarkers in this disorder. Methods Total body bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) were determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Dietary nutrient intakes were determined from 3-day food records. Biomarkers of bone turnover, bone metabolites, vitamin D metabolites, hormones, and inflammatory markers were measured by standard clinical laboratory methods. Results Serum osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, and C-telopeptide showed significant inverse relations with age in the RTT cohort. Mean osteocalcin concentrations were significantly lower and mean bone alkaline phosphatase concentrations were significantly higher for individual age groups in the RTT cohort than mean values for their respective age ranges in the reference population. Significant inverse associations were identified between urinary calcium losses, expressed as calcium:creatinine ratios, and total body BMC and BMD z-scores. Dietary protein, calcium, and phosphorus intakes, expressed as a proportion of Dietary Reference Intakes for age and gender, showed significant positive associations with total body BMD z-scores. Conclusion This study suggests decreased bone formation rather than increased bone resorption may explain in part the deficits in bone mineral mass in RTT and that attention to the adequacy of dietary protein, calcium and phosphorus intakes may offer an opportunity to improve bone health in RTT. PMID:25144778

  12. Functional bone marrow scintigraphy in psoriatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munz, D.; Altmeyer, P.; Chilf, G.; Schlesinger, G.; Holzmann, H.; Hoer, G.

    1982-01-01

    24 psoriatics as well as 24 normal healthy adults were studied by functional bone marrow scintigraphy using Tc-99m-labeled human serum albumin millimicrospheres (Tc-99m-HSA-MM). Functional bone marrow scintigraphy is an in vivo test system for the assessment of various functional properties of fixed macrophages. 58% of psoriatics who had no systemic drug treatment demonstrated peripheral extension of the bone marrow space indicating hyperplasia of bone marrow macrophages. This phenomenon could be observed only in one normal subject who was a high-performance sportsman. 83% (n=6) of psoriatics with cirrhosis of liver demonstrated bone marrow extension. The 'capacity' of bone marrow macrophages to engulf Tc-99m-HSA-MM ('uptake ratio') was diminished in 42% of non-treated as well as 66% of psoriatics treated with aromatic retinoid. The phagocytic and proteolytic turnover of Tc-99m-HSA-MM in bone marrow, spleen, and liver was found to be accelerated in 66% of non-treated psoriatics, normal, accelerated or delayed in psoriatics treated with aromatic retinoid as well as considerably delayed in all of the psoriatics with cirrhosis of liver. Functional bone marrow scintigraphy proved to be an appropriate in vivo test system to reveal abnormalities of fixed macrophages in psoriatics. Furthermore, theratpeutic effects as well as influences of pre-existing disorders on different macrophage populations can be assessed. (Author)

  13. [Clinical usefulness of bone turnover markers in the management of osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shozo

    2013-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a state of elevated risk for bone fracture due to depressed bone strength, which is considered to be the sum of bone mineral density and bone quality. Since a measure of bone quality has not been established, bone mineral density and bone turnover markers are the only way to evaluate bone strength. Bone turnover markers are classified into bone formation marker and resorption marker, which are correlated with the bone formation rate and resorption rate, respectively, and bone matrix-related marker. Bone is always metabolized; old tissue is resorbed by acids and proteases derived from osteoclasts, whereas new bone is produced by osteoblasts. Bone formation and resorption rates should be balanced (also called coupled). When the bone resorption rate exceeds the formation rate(uncoupled state), bone volume will be reduced. Thus, we can comprehend bone metabolism by measuring both formation and resorption markers at the same time. Increased fracture risk is recognized by elevated bone resorption markers and undercarboxylated osteocalcin, which reflects vitamin K insufficiency and bone turnover. These values and the time course give us helpful information to choose medicine suitable for the patients and to judge the responsiveness. If the value is extraordinarily high without renal failure, metabolic bone disorder or bone metastatic tumor should be considered. Bone quality may be assessed by measuring bone matrix-related markers such as homocystein and pentosidine. Since recent studies indicate that the bone is a hormone-producing organ, it is possible that glucose metabolism or an unknown mechanism could be assessed in the future.

  14. The tendon-to-bone attachment: Unification through disarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, Guy M.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2017-06-01

    High-resolution imaging, composition analysis and mechanical testing reveal a disordered transitional material within the Achilles tendon-to-bone attachment, structured as a fibrous network to enable force transfer and maximize structural integrity.

  15. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma to the bone and bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghissassi, Ibrahim; Mikou, Asmaa; Inrhaoun, Hanane; Ennouhi, Amine; Gamra, Lamiae; Errihani, Hassan

    2009-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common carcinoma in the community, but the incidence of metastatic events is exceedingly low. The few reported cases most often appear in regional nodes or the lungs, and patients usually exhibit multiple concurrent organs of spread at the time of diagnosis. We report a case of primary BCC located on the left forehead of a 48-year-old man, which metastasized exclusively to the bone and bone marrow, associated with hematologic disorders. A short review of the literature is included. Pathologic examination of the tumor located on the left forehead showed BCC. The patient underwent two surgical excisions because of local recurrence. Three years later, the patient developed a bicytopenia (anemia and thrombocytopenia). The bone marrow biopsy revealed metastasis of BCC. There were no abnormal findings in the other routine laboratory tests and radiologic investigations, except for the bone scan which showed multifocal skeletal metastases. The patient received two cycles of chemotherapy with cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) before he died as a result of hemorrhagic complications and progressive disease. Metastasis of BCC is a very rare condition that should not be overlooked. The prognosis remains very poor. We emphasize the importance of long-term follow-up of such patients.

  16. Assessment of bone mineral status in children with Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder with skeletal involvement. It is caused by mutations in fibrillin1 (FBN1) gene resulting in activation of TGF-ßeta, which developmentally regulates bone mass and matrix properties. There is no consensus regarding bone minerali...

  17. An Update into the Application of Nanotechnology in Bone Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannigan, K; Griffin, M

    2016-01-01

    Bone differs from other organs in that it can regenerate and remodel without scar formation. There are instances of trauma, congenital bone disorder, bone disease and bone cancer where this is not possible. Without bone grafts and implants, deformity and disability would result. Human bone grafts are limited in their management of large or non-union fractures. In response, synthetic bone grafts and implants are available to the Orthopaedic Surgeon. Unfortunately these also have their limitations and associated complications. Nanotechnology involves the research, design and manufacture of materials with a grain size less than 100nm. Nano-phase materials follow the laws of quantum physics, not classical mechanics, resulting in novel behavioural differences compared to conventional counterparts. Past, present and future nanotechnology in bone healing literature is reviewed and discussed. The article highlights concepts which are likely to be instrumental to the future of nanotechnology in bone healing. Nanotechnology in bone healing is an emerging field within Orthopaedic Surgery. There is a requirement for bone healing technologies which are biochemically and structurally similar to bone. Nanotechnology is a potential solution as the arrangement of bone includes nanoscopic collagen fibres and hydroxyapatite. This review centers on the novel field of nanotechnology in bone healing with discussion focusing on advances in bone grafts, implants, diagnostics and drug delivery. The concept of nanotechnology was first introduced in 1959. Current nanoproducts for bone healing include nano-HA-paste-ostim and nano-beta-tricalcium phosphate-Vitoss. Nanophase technologies are considered to be superior bone healing solutions. Limited safety data and issues regarding cost and mass scale production require further research into this exciting field.

  18. Effects of obesity on bone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Jay J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is traditionally viewed to be beneficial to bone health because of well-established positive effect of mechanical loading conferred by body weight on bone formation, despite being a risk factor for many other chronic health disorders. Although body mass has a positive effect on bone formation, whether the mass derived from an obesity condition or excessive fat accumulation is beneficial to bone remains controversial. The underline pathophysiological relationship between obesity and bone is complex and continues to be an active research area. Recent data from epidemiological and animal studies strongly support that fat accumulation is detrimental to bone mass. To our knowledge, obesity possibly affects bone metabolism through several mechanisms. Because both adipocytes and osteoblasts are derived from a common multipotential mesenchymal stem cell, obesity may increase adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation while decrease osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation. The increased circulating and tissue proinflammatory cytokines in obesity may promote osteoclast activity and bone resorption through modifying the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK/RANK ligand/osteoprotegerin pathway. Furthermore, the excessive secretion of leptin and/or decreased production of adiponectin by adipocytes in obesity may either directly affect bone formation or indirectly affect bone resorption through up-regulated proinflammatory cytokine production. Finally, high-fat intake may interfere with intestinal calcium absorption and therefore decrease calcium availability for bone formation. Unraveling the relationship between fat and bone metabolism at molecular level may help us to develop therapeutic agents to prevent or treat both obesity and osteoporosis. Obesity, defined as having a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2, is a condition in which excessive body fat accumulates to a degree that adversely

  19. Bone grafting: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Joshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafting is the process by which bone is transferred from a source (donor to site (recipient. Due to trauma from accidents by speedy vehicles, falling down from height or gunshot injury particularly in human being, acquired or developmental diseases like rickets, congenital defects like abnormal bone development, wearing out because of age and overuse; lead to bone loss and to replace the loss we need the bone grafting. Osteogenesis, osteoinduction, osteoconduction, mechanical supports are the four basic mechanisms of bone graft. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. An ideal bone graft material is biologically inert, source of osteogenic, act as a mechanical support, readily available, easily adaptable in terms of size, shape, length and replaced by the host bone. Except blood, bone is grafted with greater frequency. Bone graft indicated for variety of orthopedic abnormalities, comminuted fractures, delayed unions, non-unions, arthrodesis and osteomyelitis. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. By adopting different procedure of graft preservation its antigenicity can be minimized. The concept of bone banking for obtaining bone grafts and implants is very useful for clinical application. Absolute stability require for successful incorporation. Ideal bone graft must possess osteogenic, osteoinductive and osteocon-ductive properties. Cancellous bone graft is superior to cortical bone graft. Usually autologous cancellous bone graft are used as fresh grafts where as allografts are employed as an alloimplant. None of the available type of bone grafts possesses all these properties therefore, a single type of graft cannot be recomm-ended for all types of orthopedic abnormalities. Bone grafts and implants can be selected as per clinical problems, the equipments available and preference of

  20. Bone grafts in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation.

  1. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales G, R.; Cano P, R.; Mendoza P, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  2. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a ...

  3. ENDOCRINE DISORDERS IN THE ELDERLY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    falls, cognitive dysfunction, depression, pain, erectile dysfunction and polypharmacy. ... in the elderly, so this article covers three common problems: type 2 diabetes mellitus, thyroid disorders and metabolic bone disease. ENDOCRINE DISORDERS IN THE. ELDERLY .... than 90% of women and 60% of men have nodules.

  4. Mathematical model for bone mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V Komarova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Defective bone mineralization has serious clinical manifestations, including deformities and fractures, but the regulation of this extracellular process is not fully understood. We have developed a mathematical model consisting of ordinary differential equations that describe collagen maturation, production and degradation of inhibitors, and mineral nucleation and growth. We examined the roles of individual processes in generating normal and abnormal mineralization patterns characterized using two outcome measures: mineralization lag time and degree of mineralization. Model parameters describing the formation of hydroxyapatite mineral on the nucleating centers most potently affected the degree of mineralization, while the parameters describing inhibitor homeostasis most effectively changed the mineralization lag time. Of interest, a parameter describing the rate of matrix maturation emerged as being capable of counter-intuitively increasing both the mineralization lag time and the degree of mineralization. We validated the accuracy of model predictions using known diseases of bone mineralization such as osteogenesis imperfecta and X-linked hypophosphatemia. The model successfully describes the highly non-linear mineralization dynamics, which includes an initial lag phase when osteoid is present but no mineralization is evident, then fast primary mineralization, followed by secondary mineralization characterized by a continuous slow increase in bone mineral content. The developed model can potentially predict the function for a mutated protein based on the histology of pathologic bone samples from mineralization disorders of unknown etiology.

  5. Anorexia Nervosa and Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk., Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising addition concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors contribute to impaired bone metabolism in AN. The best strategy to improve bone density is to regain weight and menstrual function. Oral estrogen-progesterone combinations are not effective in increasing bone density in adults or adolescents with AN, and transdermal testosterone replacement is not effective in increasing bone density in adult women with AN. However, physiologic estrogen replacement as transdermal estradiol with cyclic progesterone does increase bone accrual rates in adolescents with AN to approximate that in normal-weight controls, leading to a maintenance of bone density Z-scores. A recent study has shown that risedronate increases bone density at the spine and hip in adult women with AN. However, bisphosphonates should be used with great caution in women of reproductive age given their long half-life and potential for teratogenicity, and should be considered only in patients with low bone density and clinically significant fractures when non-pharmacological therapies for weight gain are ineffective. Further studies are necessary to determine the best therapeutic strategies for low bone density in AN. PMID:24898127

  6. Association of Lactase 13910 C/T polymorphism with bone mineral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-03-24

    Mar 24, 2017 ... Introduction. Osteoporosis is a common bone disorder characterized by decrease in bone mineral density. (BMD) and skeletal microarchitecture deterioration, which leads to increased bone fragility and fracture risk. Although osteoporosis and fracture are influenced by many environmental factors such.

  7. Fat, Sugar, and Bone Health: A Complex Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available With people aging, osteoporosis is expected to increase notably. Nutritional status is a relatively easily-modified risk factor, associated with many chronic diseases, and is involved in obesity, diabetes, and coronary heart disease (CHD, along with osteoporosis. Nutrients, such as fats, sugars, and proteins, play a primary function in bone metabolism and maintaining bone health. In Western nations, diets are generally high in saturated fats, however, currently, the nutritional patterns dominating in China continue to be high in carbohydrates from starch, cereals, and sugars. Moreover, high fat or high sugar (fructose, glucose, or sucrose impart a significant impact on bone structural integrity. Due to diet being modifiable, demonstrating the effects of nutrition on bone health can provide an approach for osteoporosis prevention. Most researchers have reported that a high-fat diet consumption is associated with bone mineral density (BMD and, as bone strength diminishes, adverse microstructure changes occur in the cancellous bone compartment, which is involved with lipid metabolism modulation disorder and the alteration of the bone marrow environment, along with an increased inflammatory environment. Some studies, however, demonstrated that a high-fat diet contributes to achieving peak bone mass, along with microstructure, at a younger age. Contrary to these results, others have shown that a high-fructose diet consumption leads to stronger bones with a superior microarchitecture than those with the intake of a high-glucose diet and, at the same time, research indicated that a high-fat diet usually deteriorates cancellous bone parameters, and that the incorporation of fructose into a high-fat diet did not aggravate bone mass loss. High-fat/high-sucrose diets have shown both beneficial and detrimental influences on bone metabolism. Combined, these studies showed that nutrition exerts different effects on bone health. Thus, a better understanding of

  8. Patients with eating disorders. A high-risk group for fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Peter; Emborg, Charlotte; Støving, René K

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze fracture risk and bone mineral density in patients with eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders). DESIGN: Clinical overview. FINDINGS: Bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased in patients with anorexia nervosa....... In patients with bulimia nervosa, bone mineral is only marginally decreased and fracture risk marginally increased. In patients with other eating disorders (eating disorders not otherwise specified), bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased. CONCLUSIONS: Fracture risk is increased...... in patients with eating disorders. An eating disorder should be suspected in severely underweight young individuals (primarily girls) presenting with fractures, especially low-energy fractures....

  9. Patients with eating disorders - a high-risk group for fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, P.; Emborg, C.; Støving, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze fracture risk and bone mineral density in patients with eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders). DESIGN: Clinical overview. FINDINGS: Bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased in patients with anorexia nervosa....... In patients with bulimia nervosa, bone mineral is only marginally decreased and fracture risk marginally increased. In patients with other eating disorders (eating disorders not otherwise specified), bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased. CONCLUSIONS: Fracture risk is increased...... in patients with eating disorders. An eating disorder should be suspected in severely underweight young individuals (primarily girls) presenting with fractures, especially low-energy fractures....

  10. Regenerate augmentation with bone marrow concentrate after traumatic bone loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gessmann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis after post-traumatic segmental bone loss of the tibia is a complex and time-consuming procedure that is often complicated due to prolonged consolidation or complete insufficiency of the regenerate. The aim of this feasibility study was to investigate the potential of bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC for percutaneous regenerate augmentation to accelerate bony consolidation of the regenerate. Eight patients (age 22-64 with an average posttraumatic bone defect of 82.4 mm and concomitant risk factors (nicotine abuse, soft-tissue defects, obesity and/or circulatory disorders were treated with a modified Ilizarov external frame using an intramedullary cable transportation system. At the end of the distraction phase, each patient was treated with a percutaneously injection of autologous BMAC into the centre of the regenerate. The concentration factor was analysed using flow cytometry. The mean follow up after frame removal was 10 (4-15 months. With a mean healing index (HI of 36.9 d/cm, bony consolidation of the regenerate was achieved in all eight cases. The mean concentration factor of the bone marrow aspirate was 4.6 (SD 1.23. No further operations concerning the regenerate were needed and no adverse effects were observed with the BMAC procedure. This procedure can be used for augmentation of the regenerate in cases of segmental bone transport. Further studies with a larger number of patients and control groups are needed to evaluate a possible higher success rate and accelerating effects on regenerate healing.

  11. Regulation of Bone Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Shahi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone is formed through the processes of endochondral and intramembranous ossification. In endochondral ossification primary mesenchymal cells differentiate to chondrocytes and then are progressively substituted by bone, while in intramembranous ossification mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiate directly into osteoblasts to form bone. The steps of osteogenic proliferation, differentiation, and bone homeostasis are controlled by various markers and signaling pathways. Bone needs to be remodeled to maintain integrity with osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, which are bone-degrading cells. In this review we considered the major factors and signaling pathways in bone formation; these include fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs, wingless-type (Wnt genes, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2 and osteoblast-specific transcription factor (osterix or OSX.

  12. Bone Health in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vit Zikan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a gait disorder characterized by acute episodes of neurological defects leading to progressive disability. Patients with MS have multiple risk factors for osteoporotic fractures, such as progressive immobilization, long-term glucocorticoids (GCs treatment or vitamin D deficiency. The duration of motor disability appears to be a major contributor to the reduction of bone strength. The long term immobilization causes a marked imbalance between bone formation and resorption with depressed bone formation and a marked disruption of mechanosensory network of tightly connected osteocytes due to increase of osteocyte apoptosis. Patients with higher level of disability have also higher risk of falls that combined with a bone loss increases the frequency of bone fractures. There are currently no recommendations how to best prevent and treat osteoporosis in patients with MS. However, devastating effect of immobilization on the skeleton in patients with MS underscores the importance of adequate mechanical stimuli for maintaining the bone structure and its mechanical competence. The physical as well as pharmacological interventions which can counteract the bone remodeling imbalance, particularly osteocyte apoptosis, will be promising for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in patients with MS.

  13. Bone-Immune Cell Crosstalk: Bone Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Mori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone diseases are associated with great morbidity; thus, the understanding of the mechanisms leading to their development represents a great challenge to improve bone health. Recent reports suggest that a large number of molecules produced by immune cells affect bone cell activity. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. This review aims to shed new lights into the mechanisms of bone diseases involving immune cells. In particular, we focused our attention on the major pathogenic mechanism underlying periodontal disease, psoriatic arthritis, postmenopausal osteoporosis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, metastatic solid tumors, and multiple myeloma.

  14. Sclerostin, cardiovascular disease and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Solak, Yalcin; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Aslan, Gamze; Afsar, Baris; Yazici, Dilek; Covic, Adrian

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Several cross-sectional studies investigated the association of serum sclerostin levels with mortality and vascular calcification. We aimed to investigate the effect of sclerostin on cardiovascular events (CVE), all-cause/cardiovascular mortality and vascular calcification in patients with CKD through systematic review and meta-analysis. The primary outcome was the association between sclerostin level and development of fatal and nonfatal CVE and all-cause mortality. A literature search was performed using electronic databases Medline Ovid/Medline, PubMed/Medline, EMBASE and ISI Web of Science. Extracted hazard ratios from the included study protocols were pooled separately using the random-effects model (DerSimonian Laird). The equivalent z test was performed for each pooled HR, and if p < 0.05 it was considered statistically significant. In our final analysis, we included nine observational prospective studies involving 1788 patients (minimum 91 and maximum 673 patients). For the all-cause mortality, three studies with 503 patients showed that sclerostin levels were not significantly associated with all-cause mortality risk (HR = 1.01, 95 % CI 0.99-1.03, p = 0.16; heterogeneity χ 2  = 12.24, I 2  = 84 %, p = 0.002). For cardiovascular mortality, two studies with 412 patients showed that sclerostin levels were not significantly associated with cardiovascular mortality risk (HR = 1.03, 95 % CI 0.99-1.07, p = 0.17; heterogeneity χ 2  = 10.74, I 2  = 91 %, p = 0.001). Although the studies are mostly small in size, heterogeneous and have conflicting results, we have demonstrated that serum sclerostin levels were not associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.

  15. Macrophages and bone inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Gu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone metabolism is tightly regulated by the immune system. Accelerated bone destruction is observed in many bone diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, fracture, and particle-induced osteolysis. These pathological conditions are associated with inflammatory responses, suggesting the contribution of inflammation to bone destruction. Macrophages are heterogeneous immune cells and are polarized into the proinflammatory M1 and antiinflammatory M2 phenotypes in different microenvironments. The cytokines produced by macrophages depend on the macrophage activation and polarization. Macrophages and macrophage-derived cytokines are important to bone loss in inflammatory bone disease. Recent studies have shown that macrophages can be detected in bone tissue and interact with bone cells. The interplay between macrophages and bone cells is critical to bone formation and repair. In this article, we focus on the role of macrophages in inflammatory bone diseases, as well as discuss the latest studies about macrophages and bone formation, which will provide new insights into the therapeutic strategy for bone disease.

  16. Bone mineral content measurement in metabolic bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, B.; Fig, L.M.; Gross, M.D.

    1987-02-01

    Objective determinations of bone mineral content (BMC) are seldom required for the diagnosis of the metabolic and hormonal disorders which may result in osteoporosis. They are, however, required to document the osteoporosis itself as this is usually subclinical until late in the natural history of the disease process. Measurement of BMC in these disease processes is an important research tool in determining the effect of the disorder on the skeleton at different stages of the natural history and in investigating the effects of therapy and other interventions. Measurements of BMC may be useful in clinical practice in deciding whether to intervene in certain circumstances (e.g. asymptomatic hyperparathyroidism) or to withhold certain therapies (e.g. glucocorticoids) or to alter therapy (e.g. change from glucocorticoids to nonsteroidal immunosuppressives in autoimmune diseases). It may also play a role in monitoring the responses to therapeutic interventions.

  17. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Bulimia What Causes Eating Disorders? Sports and Eating Disorders Effects of Eating Disorders Treatment for Eating Disorders Print ... when they are biologically destined to gain it. Effects of Eating Disorders Eating disorders are serious medical illnesses. They often ...

  18. Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, ... disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play ...

  19. Gallium a unique anti-resorptive agent in bone: Preclinical studies on its mechanisms of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockman, R.; Adelman, R.; Donnelly, R.; Brody, L.; Warrell, R. (Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (USA)); Jones, K.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of gallium as a new and unique agent for the treatment of metabolic bone disorders was in part fortuitous. Gallium is an exciting new therapeutic agent for the treatment of pathologic states characterized by accelerated bone resorption. Compared to other therapeutic metal compounds containing platinum or germanium, gallium affects its antiresorptive action without any evidence of a cytotoxic effect on bone cells. Gallium is unique amongst all therapeutically available antiresorptive agents in that it favors bone formation. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMD test; Bone density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis - BMD ... need to undress. This scan is the best test to predict your risk of fractures, especially of ...

  1. Temporal bone imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    Although pluridirectional tomography had been the standard method to evaluate the temporal bone, computed tomography has replaced it for nearly all applications. Magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate nonosseous temporal bone structures as well

  2. Bone Marrow Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells or ... marrow makes too many white blood cells Other diseases, such as lymphoma, can spread into the bone ...

  3. Bone substitute biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, K

    2014-01-01

    Bone substitute biomaterials are fundamental to the biomedical sector, and have recently benefitted from extensive research and technological advances aimed at minimizing failure rates and reducing the need for further surgery. This book reviews these developments, with a particular focus on the desirable properties for bone substitute materials and their potential to encourage bone repair and regeneration. Part I covers the principles of bone substitute biomaterials for medical applications. One chapter reviews the quantification of bone mechanics at the whole-bone, micro-scale, and non-scale levels, while others discuss biomineralization, osteoductivization, materials to fill bone defects, and bioresorbable materials. Part II focuses on biomaterials as scaffolds and implants, including multi-functional scaffolds, bioceramics, and titanium-based foams. Finally, Part III reviews further materials with the potential to encourage bone repair and regeneration, including cartilage grafts, chitosan, inorganic poly...

  4. What causes bone loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paula FJA, Black DM, Rosen CJ. Osteoporosis and bone biology. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... HM. Bone development and remodeling. In: Jameson JL, De Groot ...

  5. [Artificial bone substitutes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koníček, Petr

    Bone tissue substitutes are divided into basic classification with its pros and cons described. Arteficial bone grafts are especially pointed out in article, publishing our own experience with two specific synthetic preps. Finally there is a blink in the near future of bone tissue augmentation.

  6. (unicameral) bone cysts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When encountering a radiologically benign lucent bone lesion in a child, a simple bone cyst is a reasonable diagnostic consideration. Simple or unicameral bone cysts are expansile, serous-fluid-containing defects, that are not true neoplasms. Peak age ranges between 3 and 14 years in. 80% of cases. The incidence is ...

  7. Second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen in ancient bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B; McIntosh, D; Fildes, T; Smith, L; Hargrave, F; Islam, M; Thompson, T; Layfield, R; Scott, D; Shaw, B; Burrell, C L; Gonzalez, S; Taylor, S

    2017-12-01

    Second-harmonic generation imaging (SHG) captures triple helical collagen molecules near tissue surfaces. Biomedical research routinely utilizes various imaging software packages to quantify SHG signals for collagen content and distribution estimates in modern tissue samples including bone. For the first time using SHG, samples of modern, medieval, and ice age bones were imaged to test the applicability of SHG to ancient bone from a variety of ages, settings, and taxa. Four independent techniques including Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, radiocarbon dating protocols, and mass spectrometry-based protein sequencing, confirm the presence of protein, consistent with the hypothesis that SHG imaging detects ancient bone collagen. These results suggest that future studies have the potential to use SHG imaging to provide new insights into the composition of ancient bone, to characterize ancient bone disorders, to investigate collagen preservation within and between various taxa, and to monitor collagen decay regimes in different depositional environments.

  8. Second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen in ancient bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Second-harmonic generation imaging (SHG captures triple helical collagen molecules near tissue surfaces. Biomedical research routinely utilizes various imaging software packages to quantify SHG signals for collagen content and distribution estimates in modern tissue samples including bone. For the first time using SHG, samples of modern, medieval, and ice age bones were imaged to test the applicability of SHG to ancient bone from a variety of ages, settings, and taxa. Four independent techniques including Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, radiocarbon dating protocols, and mass spectrometry-based protein sequencing, confirm the presence of protein, consistent with the hypothesis that SHG imaging detects ancient bone collagen. These results suggest that future studies have the potential to use SHG imaging to provide new insights into the composition of ancient bone, to characterize ancient bone disorders, to investigate collagen preservation within and between various taxa, and to monitor collagen decay regimes in different depositional environments.

  9. The importance of the circadian system & sleep for bone health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Christine M; Kohrt, Wendy M; Buxton, Orfeu M; Everson, Carol A; Wright, Kenneth P; Orwoll, Eric S; Shea, Steven A

    2017-12-09

    Adequate sleep timed appropriately during the circadian night is important for numerous biological processes and systems. New evidence suggests that both sleep timing and duration may be important for optimal bone health as well. This review examines the diurnal variation of bone turnover markers (BTMs) and the importance of circadian clock genes in regulating bone mass. In addition, this review explores the evidence for a link between shift work (and its associated disturbances in sleep duration/quality and circadian alignment) and alterations in bone metabolism and bone health. Finally, we review how commonly used medications and over-the-counter substances (e.g. caffeine, melatonin) complicate the relationship between sleep and circadian disorders and bone health. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. A Roadmap to the Brittle Bones of Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini P. Gore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is an autosomal recessive disorder which despite advances in medical care continues to be a life-limiting and often fatal disease. With increase in life expectancy of the CF population, bone disease has emerged as a common complication. Unlike the osteoporosis seen in postmenopausal population, bone disease in CF begins at a young age and is associated with significant morbidity due to fractures, kyphosis, increased pain, and decreased lung function. The maintenance of bone health is essential for the CF population during their lives to prevent pain and fractures but also as they approach lung transplantation since severe bone disease can lead to exclusion from lung transplantation. Early recognition, prevention, and treatment are key to maintaining optimal bone health in CF patients and often require a multidisciplinary approach. This article will review the pathophysiology, current clinical practice guidelines, and potential future therapies for treating CF-related bone disease.

  11. Glucocorticoid: A potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiancheng; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Wenbin; Xue, Yanru; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Jingbao; Shang, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Exposure of animals and humans to conditions of microgravity, including actual spaceflight and simulated microgravity, results in numerous negative alterations to bone structure and mechanical properties. Although there are abundant researches on bone loss in microgravity, the explicit mechanism is not completely understood. At present, it is widely accepted that the absence of mechanical stimulus plays a predominant role in bone homeostasis disorders in conditions of weightlessness. However, aside from mechanical unloading, nonmechanical factors such as various hormones, cytokines, dietary nutrition, etc. are important as well in microgravity induced bone loss. The stress-induced increase in endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) levels is inevitable in microgravity environments. Moreover, it is well known that GCs have a detrimental effect to bone health at excess concentrations. Therefore, GC plays a potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss. This review summarizeds several studies and their prospective solutions to this hypothesis.

  12. Cytology of Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Anne M

    2017-01-01

    Cytology of bone is a useful diagnostic tool. Aspiration of lytic or proliferative lesions can assist with the diagnosis of inflammatory or neoplastic processes. Bacterial, fungal, and protozoal organisms can result in significant osteomyelitis, and these organisms can be identified on cytology. Neoplasms of bone including primary bone tumors such as osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma, synovial cell sarcoma, and histiocytic sarcoma and tumors of bone marrow including plasma cell neoplasia and lymphoma and metastatic neoplasia can result in significant bone lysis or proliferation and can be diagnosed effectively with cytology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bone disease in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V.; Hansen, Stinus; Frost, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are generally accepted to be associated with increased bone fracture risk. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic bone disease are poorly understood, and whether the associated increased skeletal fragility is a comorbidity or a complication of diabetes...... remains under debate. Although there is some indication of a direct deleterious effect of microangiopathy on bone, the evidence is open to question, and whether diabetic osteopathy can be classified as a chronic, microvascular complication of diabetes remains uncertain. Here, we review the current...... knowledge of potential contributory factors to diabetic bone disease, particularly the association between diabetic microangiopathy and bone mineral density, bone structure, and bone turnover. Additionally, we discuss and propose a pathophysiological model of the effects of diabetic microvascular disease...

  14. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    Summary The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological principles of osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction. Several techniques combine these principles with different results, due to the condition of the bone base on which we operate changes, the surgical technique that we use, and finally for the bone metabolic conditions of the patient who can be in a state of systemic osteopenia or osteoporosis; these can also affect the result of jaw bone reconstruction. PMID:22461825

  15. Bone stress injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuru, M.J.; Pihlajamaeki, H.K.; Ahovuo, J.A. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-05-01

    Bone stress injuries are due to cyclical overuse of the bone. They are relatively common in athletes and military recruits but also among otherwise healthy people who have recently started new or intensive physical activity. Diagnosis of bone stress injuries is based on the patient's history of increased physical activity and on imaging findings. The general symptom of a bone stress injury is stress-related pain. Bone stress injuries are difficult to diagnose based only on a clinical examination because the clinical symptoms may vary depending on the phase of the pathophysiological spectrum in the bone stress injury. Imaging studies are needed to ensure an early and exact diagnosis, because if the diagnosis is not delayed most bone stress injuries heal well without complications.

  16. Bone allografting in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovoy, M. A.; Kirilova, I. A.; Podorognaya, V. T.; Matsuk, S. A.; Novoselov, V. P.; Moskalev, A. V.; Bondarenko, A. V.; Afanasev, L. M.; Gubina, E. V.

    2017-09-01

    A total of 522 patients with benign and intermediate bone tumors of various locations, aged 1 to 15 years, were operated in the period from 1996 to 2016. To diagnose skeleton tumors, we used clinical observation, X-ray, and, if indicated, tomography and tumor site biopsy. In the extensive bone resection, we performed bone reconstruction with the replacement of a defect with an allograft (bone strips, deproteinized and spongy grafts), sometimes in the combination with bone autografting. After segmental resection, the defects were filled with bone strips in the form of matchstick grafts; the allografts were received from the Laboratory for Tissue Preparation and Preservation of the Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics. According to the X-ray data, a complete reorganization of bone grafts occurred within 1.5 to 3 years. The long-term result was assessed as good.

  17. Bone scintiscanning updated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentle, B C; Russell, A S; Percy, J S; Scott, J R; Jackson, F I

    1976-03-01

    Use of modern materials and methods has given bone scintiscanning a larger role in clinical medicine, The safety and ready availability of newer agents have led to its greater use in investigating both benign and malignant disease of bone and joint. Present evidence suggests that abnormal accumulation of 99mTc-polyphosphate and its analogues results from ionic deposition at crystal surfaces in immature bone, this process being facilitated by an increase in bone vascularity. There is, also, a component of matrix localization. These factors are in keeping with the concept that abnormal scintiscan sites represent areas of increased osteoblastic activity, although this may be an oversimplification. Increasing evidence shows that the bone scintiscan is more sensitive than conventional radiography in detecting focal disease of bone, and its ability to reflect the immediate status of bone further complements radiographic findings. The main limitation of this method relates to nonspecificity of the results obtained.

  18. BONES WITH BIOCERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijianto Wijianto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discuss about ceramics in application as bone implant. Bioceramics for instance Hydroxyapatite, usually is abbreviated with HA or HAp, is a mineral that is very good physical properties as bone replacement in human body. To produce Hydroxyapatite, coating process is used which have good potential as they can exploit the biocompatible and bone bonding properties of the ceramic. There are many advantages and disadvantages of bioceramics as bone implant. Advantages of hydroxyapatite as bone implant are rapidly integrated into the human body, and is most interesting property that will bond to bone forming indistinguishable unions. On contrary, disadvantages of hydroxyapatite as bone implant are poor mechanical properties (in particular fatigue properties mean that hydroxyapatite cannot be used in bulk form for load bearing applications such as orthopaedics and poor adhesion between the calcium phosphate coating and the material implant will occur.

  19. Soy Isoflavones and Osteoporotic Bone Loss: A Review with an Emphasis on Modulation of Bone Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xi; Lee, Sun-Kyeong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoporosis is an age-related disorder that affects both women and men, although estrogen deficiency induced by menopause accelerates bone loss in older women. As the demographic shifts to a more aged population, a growing number of men and women will be afflicted with osteoporosis. Since the current drug therapies available have multiple side effects, including increased risk of developing certain types of cancer or complications, a search for potential nonpharmacologic alternative therapies for osteoporosis is of prime interest. Soy isoflavones (SI) have demonstrated potential bone-specific effects in a number of studies. This article provides a systematic review of studies on osteoporotic bone loss in relation to SI intake from diet or supplements to comprehensively explain how SI affect the modulation of bone remodeling. Evidence from epidemiologic studies supports that dietary SI attenuate menopause-induced osteoporotic bone loss by decreasing bone resorption and stimulating bone formation. Other studies have also illustrated that bone site-specific trophic and synergistic effects combined with exercise intervention might contribute to improve the bioavailability of SI or strengthen the bone-specific effects. To date, however, the effects of dietary SI on osteoporotic bone loss remain inconclusive, and study results vary from study to study. The current review will discuss the potential factors that result in the conflicting outcomes of these studies, including dosages, intervention materials, study duration, race, and genetic differences. Further well-designed studies are needed to fully understand the underlying mechanism and evaluate the effects of SI on osteoporosis in humans. PMID:26670451

  20. Role and mechanism of action of Sclerostin in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Calle, Jesus; Sato, Amy Y.; Bellido, Teresita

    2016-01-01

    After discovering that lack of Sost/sclerostin expression is the cause of the high bone mass human syndromes Van Buchem disease and sclerosteosis, extensive animal experimentation and clinical studies demonstrated that sclerostin plays a critical role in bone homeostasis and that its deficiency or pharmacological neutralization increases bone formation. Dysregulation of sclerostin expression also underlies the pathophysiology of skeletal disorders characterized by loss of bone mass as well as the damaging effects of some cancers in bone. Thus, sclerostin has quickly become a promising molecular target for the treatment of osteoporosis and other skeletal diseases, and beneficial skeletal outcomes are observed in animal studies and clinical trials using neutralizing antibodies against sclerostin. However, the anabolic effect of blocking sclerostin decreases with time, bone mass accrual is also accompanied by anti-catabolic effects, and there is bone loss over time after therapy discontinuation. Further, the cellular source of sclerostin in the bone/bone marrow microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions, the pathways that regulate sclerostin expression and the mechanisms by which sclerostin modulates the activity of osteocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts remain unclear. In this review, we highlight the current knowledge on the regulation of Sost/sclerotin expression and its mechanism(s) of action, discuss novel observations regarding its role in signaling pathways activated by hormones and mechanical stimuli in bone, and propose future research needed to understand the full potential of therapeutic interventions that modulate Sost/sclerostin expression. PMID:27742498

  1. Intractable Diseases Treated with Intra-Bone Marrow-Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming eLi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow transplantation (BMT is used to treat hematological disorders, autoimmune diseases and lymphoid cancers. Intra bone marrow-BMT (IBM-BMT has been proven to be a powerful strategy for allogeneic BMT due to the rapid hematopoietic recovery and the complete restoration of T cell functions. IBM-BMT not only replaces hematopoietic stem cells but also mesenchymal stem cells (MSMCs. MSMCs are multi-potent stem cells that can be isolated from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and adipose tissue. MSMCs play an important role in the support of hematopoiesis, and modify and influence the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSMCs also differentiate into mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineage cells to repair tissues. This review aims to summarize the functions of bone marrow-derived- MSMCs, and the treatment of intractable diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and malignant tumors with IBM-BMT.

  2. Disturbances of bone growth and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledesma-Medina, J.; Newman, B.; Oh, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    ''What is growth anyway? Can one talk about positive growth in childhood, neutral growth in maturity, and negative growth in old age? Our goal is to help promote normal positive growth in infants and children. To achieve this, we must be cognizant of the morphologic changes of both normal and abnormal bone formation as they are reflected in the radiographic image of the skeleton. The knowledge of the various causes and the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the disturbances of bone growth and development allows us to recognize the early radiographic manifestations. Endocrine and metabolic disorders affect the whole skeleton, but the early changes are best seen in the distal ends of the femurs, where growth rate is most rapid. In skeletal infections and in some vascular injuries two-or three-phase bone scintigraphy supercedes radiography early in the course of the disease. MRI has proved to be very helpful in the early detection of avascular bone necrosis, osteomyelitis, and tumor. Some benign bone tumors and many bone dysplasias have distinct and diagnostic radiographic findings that may preclude further studies. In constitutional diseases of bone, including chromosomal aberrations, skeletal surveys of the patient and all family members together with biochemical and cytogenetic studies are essential for both diagnosis and genetic counseling. Our role is to perform the least invasive and most informative diagnostic imaging modalities that corroborate the biochemical and histologic findings to establish the definitive diagnosis. Unrecognized, misdiagnosed, or improperly treated disturbance of bone growth can result in permanent deformity usually associated with disability. 116 references

  3. Bone properties by nanoindentation in mild and severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Carolyne; Jameson, John; Toth, Jeffrey M; Smith, Peter; Harris, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by bone fragility. Previous research suggests that impaired collagen network and abnormal mineralization affect bone tissue properties, however, little data is yet available to describe bone material properties in individuals with this disorder. Bone material properties have not been characterized in individuals with the most common form of osteogenesis imperfecta, type I. Bone tissue elastic modulus and hardness were measured by nanoindentation in eleven osteotomy specimens that were harvested from children with osteogenesis imperfecta during routine surgeries. These properties were compared between osteogenesis imperfecta types I (mild, n=6) and III (severe, n=5), as well as between interstitial and osteonal microstructural regions using linear mixed model analysis. Disease severity type had a small but statistically significant effect on modulus (7%, P=0.02) and hardness (8%, Posteogenesis imperfecta type I had higher modulus and hardness than did those with type III. Overall, mean modulus and hardness values were 13% greater in interstitial lamellar bone regions than in osteonal regions (Posteogenesis imperfecta, i.e., type I. Results indicate that intrinsic bone tissue properties are affected by phenotype. Knowledge of the material properties of bones in osteogenesis imperfecta will contribute to the ability to develop models to assist in predicting fracture risk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Bone homeostasis and Mechano biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Tomoki

    The weight-bearing exercises help to build bones and to maintain them strength. Bone is constantly renewed by the balanced action of osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption both of which mainly occur at the bone surface. This restructuring process called "bone remodeling" is important not only for normal bone mass and strength, but also for mineral homeostasis. Bone remodeling is stringently regulated by communication between bone component cells such as osteoclasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes. An imbalance of this process is often linked to various bone diseases. During bone remodeling, resorption by osteoclasts precedes bone formation by osteoblasts. Based on the osteocyte location within the bone matrix and the cellular morphology, it is proposed that osteocytes potentially contribute to the regulation of bone remodeling in response to mechanical and endocrine stimuli.

  5. Toxicokinetics of bone lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, M B

    1991-02-01

    This article discusses bone as a source of lead to the rest of the body and as a record of past lead exposure. Bone lead levels generally increase with age at rates dependent on the skeletal site and lead exposure. After occupational exposure, the slow decline in blood lead, a 5- to 19-year half-life, reflects the long skeletal half-life. Repeated measurements of bone lead demonstrate the slow elimination of lead from bone. Stable isotope ratios have revealed many details of skeletal uptake and subsequent release. The bulk turnover rates for compact bone are about 2% per year and 8% for spine. Turnover activity varies with age and health. Even though lead approximates calcium, radium, strontium, barium, fluorine, and other bone seekers, the rates for each are different. A simple, two-pool (bone and blood) kinetic model is presented with proposed numerical values for the changes in blood lead levels that occur with changes in turnover rates. Two approaches are offered to further quantify lead turnover. One involves a study of subjects with known past exposure. Changes in the ratio of blood lead to bone lead with time would reflect the course of bone lead availability. Also, stable isotopes and subjects who move from one geographical area to another offer opportunities. Sequential isotope measurements would indicate how much of the lead in blood is from current exposure or bone stores, distinct from changes in absorption or excretion.

  6. Hematological and vascular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, L.J.; Yochum, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    Numerous blood-related disorders will demonstrate skeletal alterations. These include various anemias, leukemias, lymphomas, and clotting-deficient diseases (hemophilia). Of all the various types of anemias only those that are chronic and severe will result in radiographically visible osseous changes. The skeletal alterations which are observed are invariably related to the direct effects on the bone marrow or are secondary to the inherent complications of the disease. The most notable osseous changes are seen in the congenital hemolytic anemias, especially thalassemia (Cooley's anemia), sickle cell anemia, and hereditary spherocytosis. Chronic iron deficiency anemia produces very minor skeletal changes, usually isolated to the skull. Leukemia demonstrates characteristic changes largely dependent on age. Hemophilia primarily alters joint function due to recurrent intraarticular hemorrhage. This chapter discusses blood-related disorders that affect the bones

  7. Changes in bone mineral density, body composition, and lipid metabolism during growth hormone (GH) treatment in children with GH deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Boot (Annemieke); M.A. Engels (Melanie); G.J.M. Boerma (Geert); E.P. Krenning (Eric); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAdults with childhood onset GH deficiency (GHD) have reduced bone mass, increased fat mass, and disorders of lipid metabolism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD), bone metabolism, body composition, and lipid metabolism in

  8. Human maxillary sinus floor elevation as a model for bone regeneration enabling the application of one-step surgical procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farre-Guasch, E.; Prins, H.J.; Overman, J.R.; ten Bruggenkate, C.M.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; Helder, M.N.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone loss in the oral and maxillofacial region caused by trauma, tumors, congenital disorders, or degenerative diseases is a health care problem worldwide. To restore (reconstruct) these bone defects, human or animal bone grafts or alloplastic (synthetic) materials have been used. However, several

  9. Human Maxillary Sinus Floor Elevation as a Model for Bone Regeneration Enabling the Application of One-Step Surgical Procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farre-Guasch, E.; Prins, H.J.; Overman, J.R.; ten Bruggenkate, C.M.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; Helder, M.N.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone loss in the oral and maxillofacial region caused by trauma, tumors, congenital disorders, or degenerative diseases is a health care problem worldwide. To restore (reconstruct) these bone defects, human or animal bone grafts or alloplastic (synthetic) materials have been used. However, several

  10. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikavitsas, V. I.; Temenoff, J. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  11. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more-serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss [Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap, http://research.hq.nasa.gov/code_u/bcpr/index.cfm]. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It shows that an extrapolation of the microgravity induced bone loss rates to longer time scales, such as a 2.5 year round-trip to Mars (6 months out at 0 g, 1.5 year stay on Mars at 0.38 g, 6 months back at 0 g), could severely compromise the skeletal system of such a person.

  12. Skeletal scintigraphy and quantitative tracer studies in metabolic bone disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelman, Ignac

    Bone scan imaging with the current bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals, the technetium-99m labelled diphosphonates, has dramatically improved our ability to evaluate skeletal pathology. In this thesis, chapter 1 presents a review of the history of bone scanning, summarises present concepts as to the mechanism of uptake of bone seeking agents and briefly illustrates the role of bone scanning in clinical practice. In chapter 2 the applications of bone scan imaging and quantitative tracer techniques derived from the bone scan in the detection of metabolic bone disease are discussed. Since skeletal uptake of Tc-99m diphosphonate depends upon skeletal metabolism one might expect that the bone scan would be of considerable value in the assessment of metabolic bone disease. However in these disorders the whole skeleton is often diffusely involved by the metabolic process and simple visual inspection of the scan image may not reveal the uniformly increased uptake of tracer. Certain patterns of bone scan abnormality have, however, been reported in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and renal osteo-dystrophy; the present studies extend these observations and introduce the concept of "metabolic features" which are often recognisable in conditions with generalised increased bone turnover. As an aid to systematic recognition of these features on a given bone scan image a semi-quantitative scoring system, the metabolic index, was introduced. The metabolic index allowed differentiation between various groups of patients with metabolic disorders and a control population. In addition, in a bone scan study of patients with acromegaly, it was found that the metabolic index correlated well with disease activity as measured by serum growth hormone levels. The metabolic index was, however, found to be a relatively insensitive means of identifying disease in individual patients. Patients with increased bone turnover will have an absolute increase in skeletal uptake of tracer. As a

  13. Central and peripheral distribution of bone marrow on bone marrow scintigraphy with antigranulocytic antibody in hematologic malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Do Young; Lee, Jae Tae; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Lee, Kyu Bo

    2002-01-01

    Bone marrow scintigraphy has been used to evaluate the status of bone marrow in various hematologic disorders. We have analyzed the peripheral distribution pattern and central uptake ratio of bone marrow using anti-NCA-95 monoclonal antibody and the their correlation in patients with various hematologic malignancy. Bone marrow immunoscintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m anti-granulocyte monoclonal mouse antibody BW 250/183. Fifty patients were classified into four groups; 11 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 12 with acute lymphocytic leukemia, 15 with lymphoma and 12 with myelodysplastic syndrome. Th extension of peripheral bone marrow was categorized into four grades: I, II, III and IV. The activity of central bone marrow was expressed as sacroiliac uptake ratio. The patient's number was 4 in grade I, 27 in grade II, 15 in grade III and 4 in grade IV according to extension of peripheral bone marrow. The extension of peripheral bone marrow was marked (58% in grade III and IV) in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute lymphocytic leukemia and mild (93% in grade I and II) in lymphoma. Sacroiliac uptake ratio was highest (8.5±4.0) in myelodysplastic syndrome and lowest (5.9±3.6) in acute myelogenous leukemia, but not significantly different among four grades (p=0.003), but there was not correlated between grade of peripheral bone marrow and sacroiliac uptake ratio (r=0.05). Sacroiliac uptake ratio of whole patients was significantly different among four grades (p=0.003), but there was not correlated between grade of peripheral bone marrow and sacroiliac uptake ratio (r=0.05). The pattern of peripheral bone marrow extension and activity of central hemopoietic marrow were not specific to the disease entities. Response of hemopoietic bone marrow may be evaluated on both peripheral and central bone marrow in patients with hematologic malignancy

  14. Current options for the treatment of Paget’s disease of the bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Merlotti

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Merlotti, Luigi Gennari, Giuseppe Martini, Ranuccio NutiDepartment of Internal Medicine, Endocrine-Metabolic Sciences and Biochemistry, University of Siena, Siena, ItalyAbstract: Paget’s disease of bone (PDB is a chronic bone remodeling disorder characterized by increased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, with subsequent compensatory increases in new bone formation, resulting in a disorganized mosaic of woven and lamellar bone at affected skeletal sites. This disease is most often asymptomatic but can be associated with bone pain or deformity, fractures, secondary arthritis, neurological complications, deafness, contributing to substantial morbidity and reduced quality of life. Neoplastic degeneration of pagetic bone is a relatively rare event, occurring with an incidence of less than 1%, but has a grave prognosis. Specific therapy for PDB is aimed at decreasing the abnormal bone turnover and bisphosphonates are currently considered the treatment of choice. These treatments are associated with a reduction in plasma alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and an improvement in radiological and scintigraphic appearance and with a reduction in bone pain and bone deformity, Recently, the availability of newer, more potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates has improved treatment outcomes, allowing a more effective and convenient management of this debilitating disorder.Keywords: Paget’s disease of bone, bisphosphonates, aminobisphosphonates, bone remodeling

  15. The petrous bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørkov, Marie Louise Schjellerup; Heinemeier, Jan; Lynnerup, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Intraskeletal variation in the composition of carbon (delta(13)C) and nitrogen (delta(15)N) stable isotopes measured in collagen is tested from various human bones and dentine. Samples were taken from the femur, rib, and petrous part of the temporal bone from well-preserved skeletons of both adul...... of this study it is believed the petrous bone may be a new useful bone element and a supplement or a proxy for teeth in the analysis of early dietary patterns as it may reflect diet in fetal stages and early years of life....

  16. Toxicokinetics of bone lead.

    OpenAIRE

    Rabinowitz, M B

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses bone as a source of lead to the rest of the body and as a record of past lead exposure. Bone lead levels generally increase with age at rates dependent on the skeletal site and lead exposure. After occupational exposure, the slow decline in blood lead, a 5- to 19-year half-life, reflects the long skeletal half-life. Repeated measurements of bone lead demonstrate the slow elimination of lead from bone. Stable isotope ratios have revealed many details of skeletal uptake a...

  17. Hypercalciuric Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favus, Murray J.

    2008-09-01

    Hypercalciuria plays an important causal role in many patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones. The source of the hypercalciuria includes increased intestinal Ca absorption and decreased renal tubule Ca reabsorption. In CaOx stone formers with idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH), Ca metabolic balance studies have revealed negative Ca balance and persistent hypercalciuria in the fasting state and during low dietary Ca intake. Bone resorption may also contribute to the high urine Ca excretion and increase the risk of bone loss. Indeed, low bone mass by DEXA scanning has been discovered in many IH patients. Thiazide diuretic agents reduce urine Ca excretion and may increase bone mineral density (BMD), thereby reducing fracture risk. Dietary Ca restriction that has been used unsuccessfully in the treatment of CaOx nephrolithiasis in the past may enhance negative Ca balance and accelerate bone loss. DEXA scans may demonstrate low BMD at the spine, hip, or forearm, with no predictable pattern. The unique pattern of bone histologic changes in IH differs from other causes of low DEXA bone density including postmenopausal osteoporosis, male hypogonadal osteoporosis, and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Hypercalciuria appears to play an important pathologic role in the development of low bone mass, and therefore correction of urine Ca losses should be a primary target for treatment of the bone disease accompanying IH.

  18. Traumatic bone cyst, idiopathic origin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic bone cyst (TBC) is an uncommon non-epithelial lined cavity of the jaws. Traumatic bone cysts have been reported in the literature under a variety of names: solitary bone cyst, haemorrhagic bone cyst, extravasation cyst and simple bone cyst. The multitude of names applied to this lesion implies ...

  19. Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in pediatric orthopedics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing the musculoskeletal disorders of childhood. Conditions such as neonatal osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, diskitis of childhood, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, the osteochondroses, the toddler's fracture, sports injuries, spondylolysis, myositis ossificians, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are readily defined. High-quality state-of-the-art scintigraphy is essential in infants and young children. 64 references

  20. Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in pediatric orthopedics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, J.J.

    1986-12-01

    Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing the musculoskeletal disorders of childhood. Conditions such as neonatal osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, diskitis of childhood, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, the osteochondroses, the toddler's fracture, sports injuries, spondylolysis, myositis ossificians, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are readily defined. High-quality state-of-the-art scintigraphy is essential in infants and young children. 64 references.

  1. Severe osteopenia in adolescence: poor bone health for life

    OpenAIRE

    Baldan, Alessandro; et al.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by low bone mass that leads to increased bone fragility and susceptibility to fracture. Lactose intolerance is characterized by abdominal pain and/or diarrhea following the ingestion of lactose in people with lactase deficiency. The most common therapeutic approach to lactose intolerance is to exclude dairy products from the diet, which are the main source of calcium. We studied a group of patients with symptoms attributab...

  2. Correlating the nanoscale mechanical and chemical properties of knockout mice bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavukcuoglu, Nadire Beril

    Bone is a mineral-organic composite where the organic matrix is mainly type I collagen plus small amounts of non-collagenous proteins including osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OC) and fibrillin 2 (Fbn2). Mature bone undergoes remodeling continually so new bone is formed and old bone resorbed. Uncoupling between the bone resorption and bone formation causes an overall loss of bone mass and leads to diseases like osteoporosis and osteopenia. These are characterized by structural deterioration of the bone tissue and an increased risk of fracture. The non-collagenous bone proteins are known to have a role in regulating bone turnover and to affect the structural integrity of bone. OPN and OC play a key role in bone resorption and formation, while absence of Fbn-2 causes a connective tissue disorder (congenital contractural arachnodactyly) and has been associated with decreased bone mass. In this thesis nanoindentation and Raman-microspectroscopy techniques were used to investigate and correlate the mechanical and chemical properties of cortical femoral bones from OPN deficient (OPN-/-), OC deficient (OC-/-) and Fbn-2 deficient (Fbn2-/-) mice and their age, sex and background matched wild-type controls (OPN+/+, OC+/+ and Fbn2+/+). For OPN the hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) of under 12 week OPN-/- bones were significantly lower than for OPN+/+ bones, but Raman showed no significant difference. Mechanical properties of bones from mice older than 12 weeks were not significantly different with genotype. However, mineralization and crystallinity from >50 week OPN-/- bones were significantly higher than for OPN+/+ bones. Mechanical properties of OPN-/- bones showed no variation with age, but mineralization, crystallinity and type-B carbonate substitution increased for both genotypes. For OC-/- intra-bone analyses showed that the hardness and crystallinity of the bones were significantly higher, especially in the mid-cortical sections, compared to OC+/+ bones. Fbn2

  3. Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make treatment less successful. Examples include: Anxiety disorders Eating disorders Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Alcohol or drug problems Physical health problems, such as heart disease, thyroid ...

  4. Schizoaffective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder Images Schizoaffective disorder References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  5. Extraskeletal and intraskeletal new bone formation induced by demineralized bone matrix combined with bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, T.S.; Nilsson, O.S.; Lindholm, T.C.

    1982-01-01

    Dilutions of fresh autogenous bone marrow cells in combination with allogeneic demineralized cortical bone matrix were tested extraskeletally in rats using roentgenographic, histologic, and 45 Ca techniques. Suspensions of bone marrow cells (especially diluted 1:2 with culture media) combined with demineralized cortical bone seemed to induce significantly more new bone than did demineralized bone, bone marrow, or composite grafts with whole bone marrow, respectively. In a short-term spinal fusion experiment, demineralized cortical bone combined with fresh bone marrow produced new bone and bridged the interspace between the spinous processes faster than other transplantation procedures. The induction of undifferentiated host cells by demineralized bone matrix is further complemented by addition of autogenous, especially slightly diluted, bone marrow cells

  6. PREDICTION OF THE DURATION OF DISTRACTION REGENERATED BONE MATURATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Tushina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study the characteristics of changes of serum biochemical parameters in dogs with delayed maturation of the distraction regenerate after surgical lengthening the leg bones by Ilizarov. The comparative analysis of biochemical changes in blood serum of animals with delayed regenerated bone osteogenesis after surgical leg bone lengthening according to Ilizarov has been made in the work. The development of persistent and marked hypocalcemia, significant accumulation of blood serum nonoxidized degradation products during limb bone surgical lengthening according to Ilizarov have been revealed to be adverse signs evidencing of the high probability of the disorder of further formation of the regenerated bone and its subsequent maturation at the stage of fixation.

  7. Current Concepts in Scaffolding for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Toktam; Shahroodi, Azadeh; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Mousavian, Alireza; Movaffagh, Jebraeel; Moradi, Ali

    2018-03-01

    Bone disorders are of significant worry due to their increased prevalence in the median age. Scaffold-based bone tissue engineering holds great promise for the future of osseous defects therapies. Porous composite materials and functional coatings for metallic implants have been introduced in next generation of orthopedic medicine for tissue engineering. While osteoconductive materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate ceramics as well as some biodegradable polymers are suggested, much interest has recently focused on the use of osteoinductive materials like demineralized bone matrix or bone derivatives. However, physiochemical modifications in terms of porosity, mechanical strength, cell adhesion, biocompatibility, cell proliferation, mineralization and osteogenic differentiation are required. This paper reviews studies on bone tissue engineering from the biomaterial point of view in scaffolding. Level of evidence: I.

  8. Controlled release pharmaceutical composition useful for the treatment of diseases and conditions affecting metabolism and/or structural integrity of cartilage and/or bone in male comprises strontium salt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    ); such as osteoporosis (also including secondary osteoporosis induced by e.g. endocrine diseases, metabolic causes, nutritional conditions, drug substances and/or disorders of the collagen metabolism), osteoarthritis, osteopectoris, osteopenia, Paget's disease, hypercalcemia of malignancy, periodontal disease......, hyperparathyroidism, periarticular erosions in rheumatoid arthritis, osteodystrophy, myositis ossificans, Bechterew's disease, osteolytic lesions produced by bone metastasis, bone pain due to bone metastasis, bone loss due to sex steroid hormone deficiency, bone abnormalities due to steroid hormone treatment, bone...

  9. The role of bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis and follow-up of disorders of the knee; La scintigraphie osseuse dans le diagnostic et la surveillance des pathologies du genou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Jeune, J.J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 49 - Angers (France)

    1994-12-31

    Bone scintigraphy of the knee is non invasive and can be easily performed in any nuclear medicine ward, before CT scan or MRI, when physical and X ray examinations are negative. This technique is able to orientate the diagnosis or to give evidence for algodystrophy, osteonecrosis, osteochondritis, occult fracture. In association with radiolabelled-WBC scintigraphy, it gives relevant arguments to diagnose osteomyelitis or prosthesis infection. (author). 10 figs., refs.

  10. A probable new type of osteopenic bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widhe, Torulf L. [Department of Orthopaedics, Huddinge University Hospital (Sweden)

    2002-06-01

    A probable new type of osteopenic bone disease in two sisters and one female cousin is described. In infancy, the radiological findings were osteopenia, coxa vara, periosteal cloaking, bowing of the long bones, and flaring of the metaphyses. During growth, spinal pathology developed with compression of the vertebral bodies and scoliosis in one girl and kyphosis in another. All three children had genu valgum and two developed severe S-shaped bowing of the tibiae. Growth was stunted. Inheritance of this disorder is probably recessive. Type I and III collagen biosynthesis was normal. This condition is probably a hitherto undescribed form of osteogenesis imperfecta type III or a new bone disease. (orig.)

  11. A probable new type of osteopenic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widhe, Torulf L.

    2002-01-01

    A probable new type of osteopenic bone disease in two sisters and one female cousin is described. In infancy, the radiological findings were osteopenia, coxa vara, periosteal cloaking, bowing of the long bones, and flaring of the metaphyses. During growth, spinal pathology developed with compression of the vertebral bodies and scoliosis in one girl and kyphosis in another. All three children had genu valgum and two developed severe S-shaped bowing of the tibiae. Growth was stunted. Inheritance of this disorder is probably recessive. Type I and III collagen biosynthesis was normal. This condition is probably a hitherto undescribed form of osteogenesis imperfecta type III or a new bone disease. (orig.)

  12. Bone turnover markers: Emerging tool in the management of osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahana Shetty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes constant remodeling throughout the life span. Bone turnover is balanced with coupling of bone formation and resorption at various rates leading to continuous remodeling of bone. A study of bone turnover markers (BTMs provides an insight of the dynamics of bone turnover in many metabolic bone disorders. An increase in bone turnover seen with aging and pathological states such as osteoporosis leads to deterioration of bone microarchitecture and thus contributes to an increase in the risk of fracture independent of low bone mineral density (BMD. These microarchitectural alterations affecting the bone quality can be assessed by BTMs and thus may serve as a complementary tool to BMD in the assessment of fracture risk. A systematic search of literature regarding BTMs was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Various reliable, rapid, and cost-effective automated assays of BTMs with good sensitivity are available for the management of osteoporosis. However, BTMs are subjected to various preanalytical and analytical variations necessitating strict sample collection and assays methods along with utilizing ethnicity-based reference standards for different populations. Estimation of fracture risk and monitoring the adherence and response to therapy, which is a challenge in a chronic, asymptomatic disease such as osteoporosis, are the most important applications of measuring BTMs. This review describes the physiology of bone remodeling, various conventional and novel BTMs, and BTM assays and their role in the assessment of fracture risk and monitoring response to treatment with antiresorptive or anabolic agents.

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone ... bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special preparation. You ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little to no special ...

  15. Bone-building exercise (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exercise plays an important role in the retention of bone density in the aging person. Studies show that exercises requiring muscles to pull on bones cause the bones to retain and possibly gain density.

  16. Pregnancy, Breastfeeding, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... go on to optimize their bone mass. Teen pregnancy and bone health. Teenage mothers may be at especially high risk for bone loss during pregnancy and for osteoporosis later in life. Unlike older ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of bone cancer . locate foreign objects in soft tissues around or in bones. top of page How ... bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more ...

  18. Stem cells applications in bone and tooth repair and regeneration: New insights, tools, and hopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Meguid, Eiman; Ke, Yuehai; Ji, Junfeng; El-Hashash, Ahmed H K

    2018-03-01

    The exploration of stem and progenitor cells holds promise for advancing our understanding of the biology of tissue repair and regeneration mechanisms after injury. This will also help in the future use of stem cell therapy for the development of regenerative medicine approaches for the treatment of different tissue-species defects or disorders such as bone, cartilages, and tooth defects or disorders. Bone is a specialized connective tissue, with mineralized extracellular components that provide bones with both strength and rigidity, and thus enable bones to function in body mechanical supports and necessary locomotion process. New insights have been added to the use of different types of stem cells in bone and tooth defects over the last few years. In this concise review, we briefly describe bone structure as well as summarize recent research progress and accumulated information regarding the osteogenic differentiation of stem cells, as well as stem cell contributions to bone repair/regeneration, bone defects or disorders, and both restoration and regeneration of bones and cartilages. We also discuss advances in the osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration of dental and periodontal stem cells as well as in stem cell contributions to dentine regeneration and tooth engineering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Epigenetic Regulation of Bone Remodeling and Its Impacts in Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chafik Ghayor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics describes mechanisms which control gene expression and cellular processes without changing the DNA sequence. The main mechanisms in epigenetics are DNA methylation in CpG-rich promoters, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. DNA methylation modifies the function of the DNA and correlates with gene silencing. Histone modifications including acetylation/deacetylation and phosphorylation act in diverse biological processes such as transcriptional activation/inactivation and DNA repair. Non-coding RNAs play a large part in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in addition to their roles at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Osteoporosis is the most common skeletal disorder, characterized by compromised bone strength and bone micro-architectural deterioration that predisposes the bones to an increased risk of fracture. It is most often caused by an increase in bone resorption that is not sufficiently compensated by a corresponding increase in bone formation. Nowadays it is well accepted that osteoporosis is a multifactorial disorder and there are genetic risk factors for osteoporosis and bone fractures. Here we review emerging evidence that epigenetics contributes to the machinery that can alter DNA structure, gene expression, and cellular differentiation during physiological and pathological bone remodeling.

  20. Role of Galectin-3 in Bone Cell Differentiation, Bone Pathophysiology and Vascular Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Iacobini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 is expressed in various tissues, including the bone, where it is considered a marker of chondrogenic and osteogenic cell lineages. Galectin-3 protein was found to be increased in the differentiated chondrocytes of the metaphyseal plate cartilage, where it favors chondrocyte survival and cartilage matrix mineralization. It was also shown to be highly expressed in differentiating osteoblasts and osteoclasts, in concomitance with expression of osteogenic markers and Runt-related transcription factor 2 and with the appearance of a mature phenotype. Galectin-3 is expressed also by osteocytes, though its function in these cells has not been fully elucidated. The effects of galectin-3 on bone cells were also investigated in galectin-3 null mice, further supporting its role in all stages of bone biology, from development to remodeling. Galectin-3 was also shown to act as a receptor for advanced glycation endproducts, which have been implicated in age-dependent and diabetes-associated bone fragility. Moreover, its regulatory role in inflammatory bone and joint disorders entitles galectin-3 as a possible therapeutic target. Finally, galectin-3 capacity to commit mesenchymal stem cells to the osteoblastic lineage and to favor transdifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells into an osteoblast-like phenotype open a new area of interest in bone and vascular pathologies.

  1. Biologicals and bone loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieckaert, C.L.M.; Lems, W.F.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory joint diseases are associated with extra-articular side effects including bone involvement.There is an increased risk of osteoporotic fractures. The pathogeneses of local and generalized bone loss share a common pathway. Early and active rheumatoid arthritis is associated with

  2. Menopause and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calcium supplement if necessary. • Vitamin D. Your body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium and move it into ... bone density test? • Should I take calcium and vitamin D supplements? How much do I need? • Do I need medication for my bone loss? • ...

  3. Pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Won-Jong; Mirra, Joseph M.

    2004-01-01

    To discuss the concept of pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone, which pathologically show hyperchromatism and marked pleomorphism with quite enlarged, pleomorphic nuclei, but with no to extremely rare, typical mitoses, and to propose guidelines for their diagnosis. From a database of 4,262 bone tumors covering from 1971 to 2001, 15 cases of pseudoanaplastic bone tumors (0.35% of total) were retrieved for clinical, radiographic and pathologic review. Postoperative follow-up after surgical treatment was at least 3 years and a maximum of 7 years. There were eight male and seven female patients. Their ages ranged from 10 to 64 years with average of 29.7 years. Pathologic diagnoses of pseudoanaplastic variants of benign bone tumors included: osteoblastoma (4 cases), giant cell tumor (4 cases), chondromyxoid fibroma (3 cases), fibrous dysplasia (2 cases), fibrous cortical defect (1 case) and aneurysmal bone cyst (1 case). Radiography of all cases showed features of a benign bone lesion. Six cases, one case each of osteoblastoma, fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, chondromyxoid fibroma, giant cell tumor and osteoblastoma, were initially misdiagnosed as osteosarcoma. The remaining cases were referred for a second opinion to rule out sarcoma. Despite the presence of significant cytologic aberrations, none of our cases showed malignant behavior following simple curettage or removal of bony lesions. Our observation justifies the concept of pseudoanaplasia in some benign bone tumors as in benign soft tissue tumors, especially in their late evolutionary stage when bizarre cytologic alterations strongly mimic a sarcoma. (orig.)

  4. Pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Won-Jong [Uijongbu St. Mary Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyunggido, 480-821 (Korea); Mirra, Joseph M. [Orthopaedic Hospital, Orthopedic Oncology, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2004-11-01

    To discuss the concept of pseudoanaplastic tumors of bone, which pathologically show hyperchromatism and marked pleomorphism with quite enlarged, pleomorphic nuclei, but with no to extremely rare, typical mitoses, and to propose guidelines for their diagnosis. From a database of 4,262 bone tumors covering from 1971 to 2001, 15 cases of pseudoanaplastic bone tumors (0.35% of total) were retrieved for clinical, radiographic and pathologic review. Postoperative follow-up after surgical treatment was at least 3 years and a maximum of 7 years. There were eight male and seven female patients. Their ages ranged from 10 to 64 years with average of 29.7 years. Pathologic diagnoses of pseudoanaplastic variants of benign bone tumors included: osteoblastoma (4 cases), giant cell tumor (4 cases), chondromyxoid fibroma (3 cases), fibrous dysplasia (2 cases), fibrous cortical defect (1 case) and aneurysmal bone cyst (1 case). Radiography of all cases showed features of a benign bone lesion. Six cases, one case each of osteoblastoma, fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, chondromyxoid fibroma, giant cell tumor and osteoblastoma, were initially misdiagnosed as osteosarcoma. The remaining cases were referred for a second opinion to rule out sarcoma. Despite the presence of significant cytologic aberrations, none of our cases showed malignant behavior following simple curettage or removal of bony lesions. Our observation justifies the concept of pseudoanaplasia in some benign bone tumors as in benign soft tissue tumors, especially in their late evolutionary stage when bizarre cytologic alterations strongly mimic a sarcoma. (orig.)

  5. Flexoelectricity in Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Sancho, Fabian; Abdollahi, Amir; Damjanovic, Dragan; Catalan, Gustau

    2018-03-01

    Bones generate electricity under pressure, and this electromechanical behavior is thought to be essential for bone's self-repair and remodeling properties. The origin of this response is attributed to the piezoelectricity of collagen, which is the main structural protein of bones. In theory, however, any material can also generate voltages in response to strain gradients, thanks to the property known as flexoelectricity. In this work, the flexoelectricity of bone and pure bone mineral (hydroxyapatite) are measured and found to be of the same order of magnitude; the quantitative similarity suggests that hydroxyapatite flexoelectricity is the main source of bending-induced polarization in cortical bone. In addition, the measured flexoelectric coefficients are used to calculate the (flexo)electric fields generated by cracks in bone mineral. The results indicate that crack-generated flexoelectricity is theoretically large enough to induce osteocyte apoptosis and thus initiate the crack-healing process, suggesting a central role of flexoelectricity in bone repair and remodeling. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Benign bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilday, D.L.; Ash, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    There is little information in the literature concerning the role of bone scanning in benign bone neoplasms except for sporadic reports. Since the advent of /sup 99m/Tc-polyphosphate, bone imaging has proven feasible and useful in locating the cause of bone pain, such as in osteoid osteomas, which are not always radiologically apparent, and in evaluating whether or not a radiologic lesion is indeed benign and solitary. Blood-pool images are particularly important in neoplastic disease, since the absence of hyperemia in the immediate postinjection period favors the diagnosis of a benign neoplasm, as does low-grade uptake on the delayed study. The scan, including pinhole magnification images, is especially valuable in diagnosing lesions in the spine and pelvis, which are poorly seen radiologically. We have studied various types of benign bone tumors, including simple and aneurysmal bone cysts, fibrous cortical defects, and nonossifying fibromas, all of which had minimal or no increased uptake of the radiopharmaceutical, unless traumatized. Although osteochondromas and enchondromas showed varied accumulation of activity, the scan was useful in differentiating these from sarcomatous lesions. All osteoid osteomas demonstrated marked activity, and could be accurately located preoperatively, as could the extent of fibrous dysplasia. The bone scan in the reticuloses also showed abnormal accumulation of activity, and aided in arriving at the prognosis and treatment of histiocytic bone lesions

  7. Caisson disease of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, P J; Walder, D N

    1986-09-01

    Caisson disease of bone, which may affect compressed air workers and divers, is characterized by regions of bone and marrow necrosis that may lead to secondary osteoarthrosis of the hip and shoulder joints. A review of the pathologic, radiologic, and clinical aspects demonstrated uncertainties in the exact etiology. Early diagnosis is often not possible because of the delayed appearance of radiologic abnormalities. Research into these two aspects of this condition was carried out by the Medical Research Council Decompression Sickness Research Team in Newcastle upon Tyne over a ten-year period (1972 to 1982). Because no suitable animal model exists for the study of this condition, bone and marrow necrosis was produced by embolism of bone blood vessels with glass microspheres. With this model, it was shown that the presence of bone and marrow necrosis could be detected by bone scintigraphy using 99mTc-MDP and by measuring changes in serum ferritin concentration at a much earlier stage than was possible by radiography. However, only the former method has proved useful in clinical practice. Investigations into the etiology of caisson disease of bone have shown evidence for an increase in marrow fat cell size resulting from hyperoxia. This phenomenon may play a role in the production and localization of gas bubble emboli, which are thought to be the cause of the bone and marrow necrosis.

  8. Children's bone health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M. van der Sluis (Inge)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe thesis can be divided in two main parts. In the first part (Chapter 2 to 5) bone mineral density, bone metabolism and body composition in healthy children and young adults have been evaluated, while in the second part (Chapter 6 to 10) these issues were studied in children

  9. A Matrine Derivative M54 Suppresses Osteoclastogenesis and Prevents Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss by Targeting Ribosomal Protein S5

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Zhi; Jin, Cui; Chao, Liu; Zheng, Zhang; Liehu, Cao; Panpan, Pan; Weizong, Weng; Xiao, Zhai; Qingjie, Zhao; Honggang, Hu; Longjuan, Qin; Xiao, Chen; Jiacan, Su

    2018-01-01

    Post-menopausal osteoporosis (PMOP) is a metabolic bone disorder characterized by low bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration of bone tissue. The over-activated osteoclastogenesis, which plays an important role in osteoporosis, has become an important therapeutic target. M54 was a bioactive derivative of the Chinese traditional herb matrine. We found that M54 could suppress RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow mononuclear cells and RAW264.7 cells through suppressing NF-κB, ...

  10. Cyclothymic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Cyclothymic disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing, 2013:139-141. Fava M, Ostergaard SD, Cassano P. Mood disorders: depressive disorders (major ...

  11. Skeletal complications of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Abigail A; Gordon, Catherine M

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness with profound medical consequences. Among the many adverse physical sequelae of AN, bone health is impacted by starvation and can be permanently impaired over the course of the illness. In this review of skeletal complications associated with eating disorders, we discuss the epidemiology, neuroendocrine changes, adolescent vs. adult skeletal considerations, orthopedic concerns, assessment of bone health, and treatment options for individuals with AN. The focus of the review is the skeletal sequelae associated with anorexia nervosa, but we also briefly consider other eating disorders that may afflict adolescents and young adults. The review presents updates to the field of bone health in AN, and also suggests knowledge gaps and areas for future investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy findings representing osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Dae Gun; Moon, Tae Geon; Kim, Ji Hong; Son, Seok Man; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Yong Ki [College of Medicine, Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    Bone scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled phosphates is one of the most common procedures in evaluation of various skeletal disorders. Metabolic bone diseases show involvement of the whole skeleton and are associated with increased bone turnover and increased uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled phosphates. In this study, we investigated apparently normal women who were examined with routine bone scintigraphy applied bone densitometry to correlate it with skeletal uptake in bone scan. This study includes 79 women who were performed both of bone mineral density(BMD) and bone scintigraphy. We investigated the relation of bone scan findings and BMD of lumbar, femur, radius. Regional BMD were negatively correlated with increased age. Among the bone scintigraphy findings representing metabolic bone disease, uptakes by the long bones, skull and mandible increased with age in women, while that in the costochondral junction decreased. Increased skull and mandible uptakes is associated with decreased BMD, and it has statistically significance. Our results show that increased radionuclide uptake in bone scintigraphy, especially skull and mandible uptake was associated with decreased lumbar, femur BMD in women. So that, increased skull and mandible uptake in women would be a scintigraphic sign of osteopenia or osteoporosis.

  13. SILICON AND BONE HEALTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    JUGDAOHSINGH, R.

    2009-01-01

    Low bone mass (osteoporosis) is a silent epidemic of the 21st century, which presently in the UK results in over 200,000 fractures annually at a cost of over one billion pounds. Figures are set to increase worldwide. Understanding the factors which affect bone metabolism is thus of primary importance in order to establish preventative measures or treatments for this condition. Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health, but the effects of the individual nutrients and minerals, other than calcium, is little understood. Accumulating evidence over the last 30 years strongly suggest that dietary silicon is beneficial to bone and connective tissue health and we recently reported strong positive associations between dietary Si intake and bone mineral density in US and UK cohorts. The exact biological role(s) of silicon in bone health is still not clear, although a number of possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the synthesis of collagen and/or its stabilization, and matrix mineralization. This review gives an overview of this naturally occurring dietary element, its metabolism and the evidence of its potential role in bone health. PMID:17435952

  14. Vitamins and bone health: beyond calcium and vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadieh, Hala; Arabi, Asma

    2011-10-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health disorder associated with an increased risk of fracture. Nutrition is among the modifiable factors that influence the risk of osteoporosis and fracture. Calcium and vitamin D play important roles in improving bone mineral density and reducing the risk of fracture. Other vitamins appear to play a role in bone health as well. In this review, the findings of studies that related the intake and/or the status of vitamins other than vitamin D to bone health in animals and humans are summarized. Studies of vitamin A showed inconsistent results. Excessive, as well as insufficient, levels of retinol intake may be associated with compromised bone health. Deficiencies in vitamin B, along with the consequent elevated homocysteine level, are associated with bone loss, decreased bone strength, and increased risk of fracture. Deficiencies in vitamins C, E, and K are also associated with compromised bone health; this effect may be modified by smoking, estrogen use or hormonal therapy after menopause, calcium intake, and vitamin D. These findings highlight the importance of adequate nutrition in preserving bone mass and reducing the risk of osteoporosis and fractures. © 2011 International Life Sciences Institute.

  15. Lrp5 and bone formation : A serotonin-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijay K; Ducy, Patricia

    2010-03-01

    Lrp5, the mutated gene in osteoporosis pseudoglioma (OPPG) and the high bone-mass syndrome (HBM), regulates bone formation, while beta-catenin, the molecular node of Wnt signaling, regulates bone resorption, suggesting that Lrp5 could act in a Wnt-independent manner. Using microarray and conditional gene deletion in mice, we showed that Lrp5 actually enhances bone formation by inhibiting the expression, in duodenum, of tryptophan hydroxylase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme in the serotonin biosynthetic pathway. Accordingly, serotonin circulating levels are high in Lrp5(-/-) mice and OPPG patients but low in HBM patients, and normalizing serum serotonin levels rescues the bone phenotype of the Lrp5(-/-) mice. We also showed that serotonin acts on osteoblasts through the Htr1b receptor and the transcription factor cAMP responsive element binding to inhibit their proliferation. This study shows that Lrp5 acts in gut cells, not in osteoblasts, to control bone formation via a Wnt-independent pathway and identifies a new hormone, serotonin, and a novel endocrine axis regulating bone mass. These findings may have important therapeutic implications for the treatment of low bone-mass disorders.

  16. The Impact of Type 2 Diabetes on Bone Fracture Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Marin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a chronic metabolic disease known by the presence of elevated blood glucose levels. Nowadays, it is perceived as a worldwide epidemic, with a very high socioeconomic impact on public health. Many are the complications caused by this chronic disorder, including a negative impact on the cardiovascular system, kidneys, eyes, muscle, blood vessels, and nervous system. Recently, there has been increasing evidence suggesting that T2DM also adversely affects the skeletal system, causing detrimental bone effects such as bone quality deterioration, loss of bone strength, increased fracture risk, and impaired bone healing. Nevertheless, the precise mechanisms by which T2DM causes detrimental effects on bone tissue are still elusive and remain poorly studied. The aim of this review was to synthesize current knowledge on the different factors influencing the impairment of bone fracture healing under T2DM conditions. Here, we discuss new approaches used in recent studies to unveil the mechanisms and fill the existing gaps in the scientific understanding of the relationship between T2DM, bone tissue, and bone fracture healing.

  17. Pros and cons of fatty acids in bone biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauquier, Fabien; Léotoing, Laurent; Philippe, Claire; Spilmont, Mélanie; Coxam, Véronique; Wittrant, Yohann

    2015-04-01

    Despite the growing interest in deciphering the causes and consequences of obesity-related disorders, the mechanisms linking fat intake to bone behaviour remain unclear. Since bone fractures are widely associated with increased morbidity and mortality, most notably in elderly and obese people, bone health has become a major social and economic issue. Consistently, public health system guidelines have encouraged low-fat diets in order to reduce associated complications. However, from a bone point of view, mechanisms linking fat intake to bone alteration remain quite controversial. Thus, after more than a decade of dedicated studies, this timely review offers a comprehensive overview of the relationships between bone and fatty acids. Using clinical evidences as a starting-point to more complex molecular elucidation, this work highlights the complexity of the system and reveals that bone alteration that cannot be solved simply by taking ω-3 pills. Fatty acid effects on bone metabolism can be both direct and indirect and require integrated investigations. Furthermore, even at the level of a single cell, one fatty acid is able to trigger several different independent pathways (receptors, metabolites…) which may all have a say in the final cellular metabolic response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Aneurysmal bone cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangachari P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Back ground: Aneurysmal bone cysts have raised intra-cystic pressures which are dynamic and diagnostic in nature. Aneurysmal bone cysts could be diagnosed from other benign cystic lesions of bone by recording their intra-cystic pressures with a spinal manometer. Raised intra-cystic pressures in aneurysmal bone cysts are maintained as long as the periosteum over the cyst is intact even in those with pathological fractures. Even though its pathology is definite its aetio-pathology is not clear Method: Fourteen out of 16 radiologically benign cystic lesions of bone were subjected to intra-cystic pressure recordings with spinal manometer. Other two cysts had displaced unimpacted pathological fractures and so their intra-cystic pressures could not be recorded. All 16 cysts were subjected to histo-pathological examination to confirm their diagnosis and to find out for any pre-existing benign pathology. All the cysts were surgically treated. Results: Fourteen benign cystic lesions of bone were diagnosed as aneurysmal bone cysts preoperatively by recording raised intra-cystic pressures and confirmed by histo-pathology. In addition, histo-pathology revealed pre-existing benign pathology. All cysts were successfully treated surgically. Conclusions: Since, there is appreciable rise in intra-cystic dynamic pressures, the aneurysmal bone cyst is considered to be due to either sudden venous obstruction or arterio-venous shunt. Pre-operative intra-cystic pressure recordings help not only to diagnose aneurysmal bone cysts but also to assess the quantum of blood loss and its replacement during surgery.

  19. Bone repair in osteoporotic bone: postmenopausal and cortisone-induced osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortet, B

    2011-06-01

    Although osteoporosis has been the subject of a considerable number of publications in recent years, very few studies have investigated the effects of osteoporosis on the process of tissue repair. Most of the studies are based on animal data, using the ovariectomized rat model, and in most cases, fractures were obtained by femoral osteotomy. This model is imperfect in several aspects to fit with postmenopausal osteoporosis which is a complex, multifactorial disorder. Furthermore, a surgically induced fracture is not exactly the same as a fracture which occurs as a result of bone fragility. However, and despite contradictory results in some of the studies, in ovariectomized rats a delay in bone consolidation has been reported in the model, associated locally with a decrease in bone mineral density and mechanical resistance. Very few human data are available, which confirm the existence of a delay in consolidation subsequent to femoral fractures in aged patients compared to young patients.

  20. Elite athletes' characteristics in esthetic sports related to body composition, physiology, bone mineral density and nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    PEHLİVAN, Çisem; RUDARLI NALÇAKAN, Gülbin; AKTUĞ ERGAN, Semra

    2018-01-01

    Aim: Nutritional deficiencies occur in elite athletes in aesthetic branches who suffer from intensive training programs and strict weight control. Increased disability, the weakening of the immune system, menstrual disorders and increased risk of bone fracture due to abnormal bone mineralization impair the quality of life and threaten the health of athletes. The purpose of this study was to determine body composition, nutrition and hydration status, bone mineral density levels and some physio...

  1. Autogenous tooth bone graft: Ingenious bone regeneration material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadalavada Sarala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth-derived bone graft material, which is proved to be rich in bone growth factors and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs, have been becoming a practical substitute to bone grafting. It can also be used as a carrier for growth factors and stem cells as reported in many recent studies. Autogenous-tooth bone grafting technique is significant as this biomaterial has excellent bone regeneration capacity and also relatively non-existent chances of antigenicity, genetic diseases and disease transmission. In this article, a broad overview of the published findings with regard to the properties and uses of tooth-derived regenerative bone grafting is discussed.

  2. Bone changes in endometrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, P.S.; Orphanoudakis, S.C.; Hutchinson-Williams, K.; Lewis, A.B.; Lovett, L.; Polan, M.L.; DeCherney, A.H.; Comite, F.

    1989-01-01

    In this study, quantitative CT is used to measure bone in the distal radius in normal women, women with endometriosis who had not been treated, and women with endometriosis who had been treated with danazol--an anabolic (androgen) steroid. Measurements of cortex and trabeculae indicate that untreated women have decreased bone mass (1125 HU and 160 HU, respectively), compared with bone mass in normal women (1269 HU and 257 HU; P < .05) and treated women (1238 HU and 255 HU). This finding is important because the most effective way to reduce the complications of osteoporosis is identification of risk factors, prevention, and early treatment

  3. Bone scintigraphy for horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahn, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Scintigraphy (bone scan) is being used approximately since 1980 in the horse under general anaesthesia. With the construction of custom-made overhead gantries for gamma-cameras scintigraphy found widespread entry in big equine referral hospitals for bone-scanning of the standing horse. Indications for the use of a bone scan in the horse are inflammatory alterations in the locomotor apparatus. It is primarily used for diagnosis of lameness of unknown origin, suspect of stress fracture or hairline fracture and for horses with bad riding comfort with suspected painful lesions in the spine. (orig.)

  4. Periodontal bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, L.W.J. van der.

    1985-01-01

    In the course of life the periodontum is subject to changes which may be physiological or pathological. Intraoral radiographs give insight into the hard structures of the dentomaxillar region and provides information on lesions in the bone of the periodontum in that they show radiopacities and radiolucencies caused by such lesions. In this thesis the relation is investigated between the true shape and dimensions of periodontal bone lesions and their radiographic images. A method is developed and tested of making standardized and reproducible radiographs suitable for longitudinal studies of periodontal lesions. Also the possibility is demonstrated of an objective and reproducible interpretation of radiographic characteristics of periodontal bone lesions. (Auth.)

  5. Altered interaction and distribution of glycosaminoglycans and growth factors in mucopolysaccharidosis type I bone disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, S.D.; Wagemans, T.; Ijlst, L.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Everts, V.; Wijburg, F.A.; Vlies, N. van

    2016-01-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) comprise a group of lysosomal storage disorders characterized by deficient degradation and subsequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Progressive bone and joint disease are a major cause of morbidity, and current therapeutic strategies have limited effect

  6. Combined Scanning Confocal Ultrasound Diagnostic and Treatment System for Bone Quality Assessment and Fracture Healing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of this study are to develop a combined diagnostic and treatment ultrasound technology for early prediction of bone disorder and guided acceleration...

  7. Children with chronic kidney disease: a 3-year prospective study of growth, bone mass and bone turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swolin-Eide, Diana; Hansson, Sverker; Magnusson, Per

    2009-02-01

    Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at risk of developing skeletal problems. This 3-year prospective study investigated the development of bone mass and bone turnover in children with CKD. Fifteen patients, 4-15 years, were included with a median glomerular filtration rate of 48 (range 8-94) mL/min/1.73 m(2). Bone mineral density (BMD) and markers of bone and mineral metabolism were investigated over a 3-year period. Growth was satisfactory but a delayed bone age was observed. Total body bone mineral density (TBBMD) Z-scores were below zero in five patients at start and after 3 years, but none had a Z-score below -2.5. Lumbar spine BMD Z-scores were below zero in three patients at start and in five patients after 3 years. The median TBBMD and lumbar spine Z-scores did not change during the study period. Eleven CKD patients had increased PTH levels at baseline and 13 patients after 3 years. Most children had normal levels of leptin and vitamin D. Almost 50% of the patients had increased osteoprotegerin levels after 3 years. A normal BMD does not exclude mineral bone disorder in patients with CKD, yet the BMD Z-scores were well preserved and most markers of bone turnover were within the reference intervals.

  8. LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) affects bone accrual and eye development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gong, Y.; Slee, R.B.; Fukai, N.; Rawadi, G.; Roman-Roman, S.; Reginato, A.M.; Wang, H.; Cundy, T.; Glorieux, F.H.; Lev, D.; Zacharin, M.; Oexle, K.; Marcelino, J.; Suwairi, W.; Heeger, S.; Sabatakos, G.; Apte, S.; Adkins, W.; Allgrove, J.; Arslan-Kirchner, M.; Batch, J.A.; Beighton, P.; Black, G.C.M.; Boles, R.G.; Boon, L.; Borrone, C.; Brunner, H.G.; Carle, G.F.; Dallapicola, B.; Paepe, A. de; Floege, B.; Halfhide, M.L.; Hall, B.D.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Hirose, T.; Jans, A.; Juppner, H.; Kim, C.; Keppler-Noreuil, K.; Kohlschuetter, A.; Lacombe, D.; Lambert, M.; Lemyre, E.; Letteboer, T.; Peltonen, L.; Ramesar, R.S.; Romanengo, M.; Somer, H.; Steichen-Gersdorf, E.; Steinmann, B.; Sullivan, B.; Superti-Furga, A.; Swoboda, W.; Boogaard, M.J. van den; Hul, W. van; Vikkula, M.; Votruba, M.; Zabel, B.; Garcia, T.; Baron, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Warman, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    In humans, low peak bone mass is a significant risk factor for osteoporosis. We report that LRP5, encoding the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5, affects bone mass accrual during growth. Mutations in LRP5 cause the autosomal recessive disorder osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome

  9. LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) affects bone accrual and eye development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gong, Y.; Slee, R. B.; Fukai, N.; Rawadi, G.; Roman-Roman, S.; Reginato, A. M.; Wang, H.; Cundy, T.; Glorieux, F. H.; Lev, D.; Zacharin, M.; Oexle, K.; Marcelino, J.; Suwairi, W.; Heeger, S.; Sabatakos, G.; Apte, S.; Adkins, W. N.; Allgrove, J.; Arslan-Kirchner, M.; Batch, J. A.; Beighton, P.; Black, G. C.; Boles, R. G.; Boon, L. M.; Borrone, C.; Brunner, H. G.; Carle, G. F.; Dallapiccola, B.; de Paepe, A.; Floege, B.; Halfhide, M. L.; Hall, B.; Hennekam, R. C.; Hirose, T.; Jans, A.; Jüppner, H.; Kim, C. A.; Keppler-Noreuil, K.; Kohlschuetter, A.; Lacombe, D.; Lambert, M.; Lemyre, E.; Letteboer, T.; Peltonen, L.; Ramesar, R. S.; Romanengo, M.; Somer, H.; Steichen-Gersdorf, E.; Steinmann, B.; Sullivan, B.; Superti-Furga, A.; Swoboda, W.; van den Boogaard, M. J.; van Hul, W.; Vikkula, M.; Votruba, M.; Zabel, B.; Garcia, T.; Baron, R.; Olsen, B. R.; Warman, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    In humans, low peak bone mass is a significant risk factor for osteoporosis. We report that LRP5, encoding the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5, affects bone mass accrual during growth. Mutations in LRP5 cause the autosomal recessive disorder osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome

  10. Lutein Enhances Bone Mass by Stimulating Bone Formation and Suppressing Bone Resorption in Growing Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Tominari, Tsukasa; Hirata, Michiko; Watanabe, Kenta; Matsumoto, Chiho; Grundler, Florian M W; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2017-01-01

    Lutein is a member of the xanthophyll family of carotenoids, which are known to prevent hypoxia-induced cell damage in the eye by removing free radicals. However, its role in other tissues is controversial, and the effects of lutein on bone tissues are unknown. To identify a possible role of lutein in bone tissues, we examined the effects of lutein on bone formation and bone resorption and on femoral bone mass in mice. Lutein enhanced the formation of mineralized bone nodules in cultures of osteoblasts. On the other hand, lutein clearly suppressed 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 -induced bone resorption as measured by pit formation in organ culture of mouse calvaria. In co-cultures of bone marrow cells and osteoblasts, lutein suppressed 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 -induced osteoclast formation. In cultures of bone marrow macrophages, lutein suppressed soluble RANKL, the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) ligand, induced osteoclast formation. When five-week-old male mice were orally administered lutein for 4 weeks, the femoral bone mass was clearly enhanced in cortical bone, as measured by bone mineral density in dual X-ray absorptiometry and micro computed tomography (µCT) analyses. The present study indicates that lutein enhances bone mass in growing mice by suppressing bone resorption and stimulating bone formation. Lutein may be a natural agent that promotes bone turnover and may be beneficial for bone health in humans.

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  15. Effect of Glycosphingolipids on Osteoclastogenesis and Osteolytic Bone Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel eErsek

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in glycosphingolipid production results in lysosomal storage disorders associated with neurodegenerative changes. In Gauchers disease, the patients also develop osteoporosis that is ameliorated upon treatment for the underlying defect in glycosphingolipid metabolism. The role of glycosphingolipids in osteoclast and osteoblast formation is discussed here as well as the potential therapeutic uses of already approved drugs that limit glycosphingolipid production in bone loss disorders such as multiple myeloma and periodontal disease.

  16. [Effects of autologous periosteum wrapping allogenic tendon graft on tendon-bone healing inside a bone tunnel in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xianbin; Chen, Zhiwei; Cao, Shengjun

    2008-10-01

    tendon graft and the bone tunnel, which was similar to normal tendon-bone interface. The proliferation of fibroblast was active in the periosteum, and there were many fibrous joints between the periosteum and the tendon graft. Partial bone formation was seen between the tendon graft and the bone tunnel in the control group, with disorderly arrangement, and there were many collagen fibrous joints between the tendon graft and the bone tunnel. Four and 8 weeks after operation, the pullout or pull and break loads of the experimental group were (35.03 +/- 1.21) N/cm and (42.36 +/- 1.31) N/cm, respectively, and those of the control group were (26.14 +/- 6.13) N/cm and (31.63 +/- 6.87) N/cm, respectively. There was significant difference between the two groups (P autologous periosteum graft wrapping around allogenic tendon graft may shorten the time of osteochondral ossification between the tendon graft and the bone tunnel, improve healing strength and promote tendon-bone healing in the bone tunnel in rabbits.

  17. Bone Graft Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spinal deformity, or who have some types of disc herniations. In certain types of spinal fusion, bone grafts ... Specialist SEARCH Download Brochure ENGLISH Related Treatments Cervical Disc Herniation Fusion Lumbar Disc Herniation {1} ##LOC[OK]## {1} ## ...

  18. BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION. AUTOLOGOUS TRANSPLANTS: Oct 1986 - Dec 2007. Multiple Myeloma 90. NHL 39. Hodgkins lymphoma 19. AML 36. APML 9. ALL 2. Amyloidosis 2. Granulocytic Sarcoma 1.

  19. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Acute myeloid leukemia - adult Aplastic anemia Bone marrow transplant Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) Graft-versus-host disease Hodgkin lymphoma Multiple myeloma Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Patient ...

  20. Nanocomposites for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Pan, Yong Zheng; Li, Lin; He, Chao Bin

    2013-04-01

    Natural bone tissue possesses a nanocomposite structure that provides appropriate physical and biological properties. For bone tissue regeneration, it is crucial for the biomaterial to mimic living bone tissue. Since no single type of material is able to mimic the composition, structure and properties of native bone, nanocomposites are the best choice for bone tissue regeneration as they can provide the appropriate matrix environment, integrate desirable biological properties, and provide controlled, sequential delivery of multiple growth factors for the different stages of bone tissue regeneration. This article reviews the composition, structure and properties of advanced nanocomposites for bone tissue regeneration. It covers aspects of interest such as the biomimetic synthesis of bone-like nanocomposites, guided bone regeneration from inert biomaterials and bioactive nanocomposites, and nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration. The design, fabrication, and in vitro and in vivo characterization of such nanocomposites are reviewed.

  1. Uranium in fossil bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koul, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt has been made to determine the uranium content and thus the age of certain fossil bones Haritalyangarh (Himachal Pradesh), India. The results indicate that bones rich in apatite are also rich in uranium, and that the radioactivity is due to radionuclides in the uranium series. The larger animals apparently have a higher concentration of uranium than the small. The dating of a fossil jaw (elephant) places it in the Pleistocene. (Auth.)

  2. Engineered vascularized bone grafts

    OpenAIRE

    Tsigkou, Olga; Pomerantseva, Irina; Spencer, Joel A.; Redondo, Patricia A.; Hart, Alison R.; O’Doherty, Elisabeth; Lin, Yunfeng; Friedrich, Claudia C.; Daheron, Laurence; Lin, Charles P.; Sundback, Cathryn A.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Neville, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Clinical protocols utilize bone marrow to seed synthetic and decellularized allogeneic bone grafts for enhancement of scaffold remodeling and fusion. Marrow-derived cytokines induce host neovascularization at the graft surface, but hypoxic conditions cause cell death at the core. Addition of cellular components that generate an extensive primitive plexus-like vascular network that would perfuse the entire scaffold upon anastomosis could potentially yield significantly higher-quality grafts. W...

  3. Bone changes in phenylketonuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Hae Kyung; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Lee, Dong Hwan

    1998-01-01

    While treating 14 phenylketonurial (PKU) patients, we evaluated bone density, changes in bone age, and bony changes such as spiculation or metaphyseal widening. A total of 14 PKU patients aged between 1 month and 14 years (mean, 6.4 years) were under dietary treatment. Eight and eleven patients underwent radiography of the left hand and wrist and bone densitometry (BMD) of the lumbar spine, respectively. The results were reviewed with regard to abnormal bony changes, delayed bone age, and osteopenia. Patients were assigned to either the early or late treatment group, depending on whether or not dietary therapy was started before 3 months of age. Those in whom a blood phenylalanine level of under 10 mg/dl was maintained were assigned to the good control group; others were classified as variable control. The findings of radiographs of the left hand and lumbar BMD were evaluated in relation to the time of dietary therapy, and adequacy of treatment. None of the 14 PKU patients who underwent dietary therapy had bony abnormalities such as spiculation or metaphyseal widening. In four of the 11, bone age was at least one year less than chronological age, and on lumbar BMD, osteoporosis was seen. For the evaluation of bone change in PKU patients, plain radiography and BMD are thus complementary. (author). 18 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  4. Bone changes in phenylketonuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Hae Kyung; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Lee, Dong Hwan [Soonchunhyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Hospital

    1998-02-01

    While treating 14 phenylketonurial (PKU) patients, we evaluated bone density, changes in bone age, and bony changes such as spiculation or metaphyseal widening. A total of 14 PKU patients aged between 1 month and 14 years (mean, 6.4 years) were under dietary treatment. Eight and eleven patients underwent radiography of the left hand and wrist and bone densitometry (BMD) of the lumbar spine, respectively. The results were reviewed with regard to abnormal bony changes, delayed bone age, and osteopenia. Patients were assigned to either the early or late treatment group, depending on whether or not dietary therapy was started before 3 months of age. Those in whom a blood phenylalanine level of under 10 mg/dl was maintained were assigned to the good control group; others were classified as variable control. The findings of radiographs of the left hand and lumbar BMD were evaluated in relation to the time of dietary therapy, and adequacy of treatment. None of the 14 PKU patients who underwent dietary therapy had bony abnormalities such as spiculation or metaphyseal widening. In four of the 11, bone age was at least one year less than chronological age, and on lumbar BMD, osteoporosis was seen. For the evaluation of bone change in PKU patients, plain radiography and BMD are thus complementary. (author). 18 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  5. Bone nutrients for vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangels, Ann Reed

    2014-07-01

    The process of bone mineralization and resorption is complex and is affected by numerous factors, including dietary constituents. Although some dietary factors involved in bone health, such as calcium and vitamin D, are typically associated with dairy products, plant-based sources of these nutrients also supply other key nutrients involved in bone maintenance. Some research suggests that vegetarian diets, especially vegan diets, are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this does not appear to be clinically significant. Vegan diets are not associated with an increased fracture risk if calcium intake is adequate. Dietary factors in plant-based diets that support the development and maintenance of bone mass include calcium, vitamin D, protein, potassium, and soy isoflavones. Other factors present in plant-based diets such as oxalic acid and phytic acid can potentially interfere with absorption and retention of calcium and thereby have a negative effect on BMD. Impaired vitamin B-12 status also negatively affects BMD. The role of protein in calcium balance is multifaceted. Overall, calcium and protein intakes in accord with Dietary Reference Intakes are recommended for vegetarians, including vegans. Fortified foods are often helpful in meeting recommendations for calcium and vitamin D. Plant-based diets can provide adequate amounts of key nutrients for bone health. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. [Abnormalities of bone metabolism in bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Esquide, Virginia; Peris, Pilar; Gifre, Laia; Guañabens, Nuria

    2011-02-26

    Obesity is an ever-increasing disease in our environment, and a major risk factor for the development of other chronic diseases that increase morbidity and mortality. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for obesity, since it not only allows a significant and sustained loss of weight, but also an important reduction of its co-morbidities. However, this treatment is not free of complications, since along with weight loss, frequent nutritional and metabolic deficiencies have been described. These complications are particularly frequent when mixed surgical procedures with a restrictive and malabsortive component such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and biliopancreatic diversion are performed. The nutritional deficiencies observed include, to a greater or lesser extent, malabsorption of fat and liposoluble vitamins, as well as other micronutrients such as calcium. As a result, disorders of bone mineral metabolism with skeletal manifestations that include bone mass reduction, increased bone turnover and defective bone mineralization may develop. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Bone metastasis in patients with para neoplastic myasthenic syndrome - Possible indication for bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirion, Cristina; Stanescu, D.A.; Draganescu, Sandina; Ion, Virginia

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by a decrease in the number of acetylcholine receptors at neuromuscular junctions and consequently characterized by weakness and fatigue. Paraneoplastic myasthenic syndrome (PMS) is a neurological disorder often difficult to diagnose in clinical practice, due to the lack, in most cases, of any sign of malignancy at the time when neurological impairment occurs. The connection between MG and pathological alterations of the thymus as well as between the presynaptic membrane alteration (Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome) and the small-cell lung cancer is often demonstrated. Most researchers agree that myasthenic syndrome noticed in aged persons should be investigated as a possible paraneoplastic disorder. The aim of our study was to find if suspected PMS could be an indication to perform a bone scan, in presence of parameters suggesting malignancy (such as elevated serum levels of alkaline phosphatase, elevated tumor markers, unexplained bone pain etc.). Another question is whether bone metastases occur more frequently in malignancies associated with PMS than in the same diseases without neurological involvement, taking into account that neurological disorders are not produced by metastatic or direct invasion of the nervous system by the cancer. Our observations included 28 patients (13 men and 15 women), aged 42-80 years with myasthenic syndrome, who were referred by the neurology department for suspicion of bone metastasis. All patients had elevated serum levels of alkaline phosphatase, 18 patients had therapy-resistant bone and joints pain. Conventional imaging procedures (abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray and computer tomography) were performed in all patients. Only in 6 patients the primary malignancy was diagnosed prior to bone scan (5 cases with thymoma and 1 case of digestive neoplasm). Bone scan was performed on a Diacam Siemens gamma camera and consisted of whole-body examination after

  8. Bone mineral density and elemental composition of bone tissues in "red-boned" Guishan goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chenchen; Wang, Jianguo; Li, Peng; Liu, Guowen; Li, Xiaobing; Ma, Huarong; Wang, Weizhong; Wang, Zhe; Ge, Changrong; Gao, Shizheng

    2012-12-01

    Red-colored bones were first found in Guishan goats in the 1980s, and they were subsequently designated red-boned Guishan goats. However, the difference remains unclear between the bone mineral density (BMD) or elemental composition in bones between red-boned Guishan goats and common Guishan goats. Analysis of femoral bone samples by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry revealed an increase in bone mineral density in the femoral diaphysis and distal femur of red-boned Guishan goats at 18 and 36 months of age. The data revealed that BMD increased in both the red-boned and common Guishan goats from 18 to 36 months of age. The data also indicated that the ratio of the BMD values of red-boned to common Guishan goats was higher at 36 months of age than they were at 18 months of age. Furthermore, the levels of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, barium, zinc, manganese, and aluminum were significantly higher in red-boned Guishan goats than common Guishan goats at 18 and 36 months of age. The results indicate that the red-boned Guishan goats were linked to the elevated levels of mineral salts observed in the bones and that this in turn may be linked to the elevated BMD levels encountered in red-boned Guishan goats. These reasons may be responsible for the red coloration in the bones of red-boned Guishan goats.

  9. Guided bone regeneration : the influence of barrier membranes on bone grafts and bone defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielkens, Pepijn Frans Marie

    2008-01-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) can be described as the use of a barrier membrane to provide a space available for new bone formation in a bony defect. The barrier membrane protects the defect from in-growth of soft tissue cells and allows bone progenitor cells to develop bone within a blood clot

  10. Bone degradation machinery of osteoclasts: An HIV-1 target that contributes to bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud-Messina, Brigitte; Bracq, Lucie; Dupont, Maeva; Souriant, Shanti; Usmani, Shariq M; Proag, Amsha; Pingris, Karine; Soldan, Vanessa; Thibault, Christophe; Capilla, Florence; Al Saati, Talal; Gennero, Isabelle; Jurdic, Pierre; Jolicoeur, Paul; Davignon, Jean-Luc; Mempel, Thorsten R; Benichou, Serge; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Vérollet, Christel

    2018-03-13

    Bone deficits are frequent in HIV-1-infected patients. We report here that osteoclasts, the cells specialized in bone resorption, are infected by HIV-1 in vivo in humanized mice and ex vivo in human joint biopsies. In vitro, infection of human osteoclasts occurs at different stages of osteoclastogenesis via cell-free viruses and, more efficiently, by transfer from infected T cells. HIV-1 infection markedly enhances adhesion and osteolytic activity of human osteoclasts by modifying the structure and function of the sealing zone, the osteoclast-specific bone degradation machinery. Indeed, the sealing zone is broader due to F-actin enrichment of its basal units (i.e., the podosomes). The viral protein Nef is involved in all HIV-1-induced effects partly through the activation of Src, a regulator of podosomes and of their assembly as a sealing zone. Supporting these results, Nef-transgenic mice exhibit an increased osteoclast density and bone defects, and osteoclasts derived from these animals display high osteolytic activity. Altogether, our study evidences osteoclasts as host cells for HIV-1 and their pathological contribution to bone disorders induced by this virus, in part via Nef.

  11. Role of Regulators of G Protein Signaling Proteins in Bone Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Joel; Yang, Shuying; Chen, Wei; Li, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins enhance the intrinsic GTPase activity of α subunits of the heterotrimeric G protein complex of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and thereby inactivate signal transduction initiated by GPCRs. The RGS family consists of nearly 37 members with a conserved RGS homology domain which is critical for their GTPase accelerating activity. RGS proteins are expressed in most tissues, including heart, lung, brain, kidney, and bone and play essential roles in many physiological and pathological processes. In skeletal development and bone homeostasis as well as in many bone disorders, RGS proteins control the functions of various GPCRs, including the parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 and calcium-sensing receptor and also regulate various critical signaling pathways, such as Wnt and calcium oscillations. This chapter will discuss the current findings on the roles of RGS proteins in regulating signaling of key GPCRs in skeletal development and bone homeostasis. We also will examine the current updates of RGS proteins' regulation of calcium oscillations in bone physiology and highlight the roles of RGS proteins in selected bone pathological disorders. Despite the recent advances in bone and mineral research, RGS proteins remain understudied in the skeletal system. Further understanding of the roles of RGS proteins in bone should not only provide great insights into the molecular basis of various bone diseases but also generate great therapeutic drug targets for many bone diseases. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The impact of bone development on final carcass weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatara, M.R.; Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Sawa-Wojtanowicz, B.

    2006-01-01

    Proper development and function of the skeleton is crucial for the optimal growth of an organism, with rapid growth rates often resulting in skeletal disorders in farm animals. Yet, despite clear benefits for breed selection and animal welfare (HARRISON et al., 2004), the impact of bone development...

  13. Craniofacial and temporal bone CT findings in cleidocranial dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Guido E.; Caruso, Paul A.; Curtin, Hugh D.; Small, Juan E.; Jyung, Robert W.; Troulis, Maria J.

    2008-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a multistructural polyostotic genetic disorder that results from mutation of the CBFA1 gene. Hearing loss is a frequent finding in CCD. We describe the CT craniofacial findings in CCD and provide a comprehensive discussion of the CT temporal bone findings in these patients. (orig.)

  14. Craniofacial and temporal bone CT findings in cleidocranial dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Guido E. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Departamento de Imagenes, Santiago (Chile); Caruso, Paul A.; Curtin, Hugh D. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Small, Juan E. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Jyung, Robert W. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Otology, Boston, MA (United States); Troulis, Maria J. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a multistructural polyostotic genetic disorder that results from mutation of the CBFA1 gene. Hearing loss is a frequent finding in CCD. We describe the CT craniofacial findings in CCD and provide a comprehensive discussion of the CT temporal bone findings in these patients. (orig.)

  15. Temporal bone imaging in osteogenesis imperfecta patients with hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinnen, F.K.R.; Casselman, J.W.; Leenheer, E.M. De; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Dhooge, I.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an autosomal-dominant connective-tissue disorder, predominantly characterized by bone fragility. Conductive hearing loss develops in half of the OI patients and often progresses to mixed loss. Findings of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic

  16. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the frontal bone in a teenager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadom, Nadja; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Yaun, Amanda; Santi, Mariarita

    2009-01-01

    We report a skull chondromyxoid fibroma with symptomatic intracranial extension causing initial misdiagnosis as a psychiatric disorder in a 14-year-old child. CT performed for work-up of the patient's ''stuffy nose'' revealed a large calcified frontal bone mass with extensive intracranial growth. We present this child with the diagnosis of intracranial chondromyxoid fibroma with detailed neuroimaging and neuropathology correlations. (orig.)

  17. Porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for enhanced bone bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang He

    Full Text Available Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth.The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant-bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests.The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony defect.Our findings suggested a new bioactive

  18. Horizontal bone augmentation by means of guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benic, Goran I; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2014-10-01

    The development of bone augmentation procedures has allowed placement of dental implants into jaw bone areas lacking an amount of bone sufficient for standard implant placement. Thus, the indications for implants have broadened to include jaw regions with bone defects and those with a bone anatomy that is unfavorable for implant anchorage. Of the different techniques, the best documented and the most widely used method to augment bone in localized alveolar defects is guided bone regeneration. A large body of evidence has demonstrated the successful use of guided bone regeneration to regenerate missing bone at implant sites with insufficient bone volume and the long-term success of implants placed simultaneously with, or after, guided bone regeneration. However, the influence of guided bone regeneration on implant survival and success rates, and the long-term stability of the augmented bone, remain unknown. Many of the materials and techniques currently available for bone regeneration of alveolar ridge defects were developed many years ago. Recently, various new materials and techniques have been introduced. Many of them have, however, not been sufficiently documented in clinical studies. The aim of this review was to present the scientific basis of guided bone regeneration and the accepted clinical procedures. A classification of bone defects has been presented, aiming at simplifying the decision-making process regarding the choice of strategy for bone augmentation. Finally, an outlook into actual research and the possible future options related to bone augmentation has been provided. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Age-related elemental change in bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.; Eisa, M.H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Jin, W. [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shen, H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)], E-mail: haoshen@fudan.edu.cn; Mi, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Gao, J.; Zhou, Y. [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Yao, H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhao, Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2008-04-15

    To investigate age dependence of the bone element contents and structure, lumbar and femur from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were chosen for their more susceptibility to fracture. These rats were divided into to 5 age groups: 1, 4, 7, 11 and 25 month-age, corresponding human beings from the young to the old. The elements contents were detected by external Proton Induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) method was also applied to obtain information about calcium (Ca) and phosphor (P) structure. It was found that Ca content, Ca/P ratio, valance state of Ca and P and their coordinate structure remains unaltered with age variance, whereas the content of strontium (Sr) was significantly decreasing. Sr concentration may provide a new parameter for diagnosis of bone disorder.

  20. Dissociative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... actions and identity. People with dissociative disorders escape reality in ways that are involuntary and unhealthy and ... conditions. Complications People with dissociative disorders are at increased risk of complications and associated disorders, such as: ...

  1. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  2. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Therapist Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Helping Kids Cope With Stress Helping Kids Handle Worry Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias Childhood Stress Anxiety Disorders Special Needs Factsheet Social Phobia Special Needs Factsheet Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) ...

  3. Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder. It causes panic attacks, which are sudden feelings of terror ... their lives and they cannot leave their homes. Panic disorder is more common in women than men. It ...

  4. Bone Metabolism and Osteoporosis in Oncological Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.V. Dumanskyi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A review of the current literature and our own researches data are presented. They are demonstrated the existence of close connection between malignant tumors and bone metabolism disorders. It manifests by an increase in the synthesis of osteopontin and osteocalcin, the activation of alkaline phosphatase, imbalance of osteoassociated macro- (calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and microelements (cobalt, manganese, copper, strontium, chromium, zinc, etc, which involved in the pathogenetic constructions of cancer and osteoporosis. The latter can be complicated with bone fractures in these patients. Changes in bone metabolism are aggravated by ongoing chemo- and radiation therapy of cancer, and existing information about oncoinduced action of bisphosphonates, which are widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis, is now called into question. These data necessitate the development of anticancer therapy medical technology, which has protective effect toward bone metabolism, as well as the creation of antiosteoporotic treatment, simultaneously directed to the tumor process.

  5. Gene Expression in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrogio, A.

    Skeletal system has two main functions, to provide mechanical integrity for both locomotion and protection and to play an important role in mineral homeostasis. There is extensive evidence showing loss of bone mass during long-term Space-Flights. The loss is due to a break in the equilibrium between the activity of osteoblasts (the cells that forms bone) and the activity of osteoclasts (the cells that resorbs bone). Surprisingly, there is scanty information about the possible altered gene expression occurring in cells that form bone in microgravity.(Just 69 articles result from a "gene expression in microgravity" MedLine query.) Gene-chip or microarray technology allows to screen thousands of genes at the same time: the use of this technology on samples coming from cells exposed to microgravity could provide us with many important informations. For example, the identification of the molecules or structures which are the first sensors of the mechanical stress derived from lack of gravity, could help in understanding which is the first event leading to bone loss due to long-term exposure to microgravity. Consequently, this structure could become a target for a custom-designed drug. It is evident that bone mass loss, observed during long-time stay in Space, represents an accelerated model of what happens in aging osteoporosis. Therefore, the discovery and design of drugs able to interfere with the bone-loss process, could help also in preventing negative physiological processes normally observed on Earth. Considering the aims stated above, my research is designed to:

  6. Temporal bone meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrionis, F D; Robertson, J H; Gardner, G; Heilman, C B

    1999-01-01

    Meningiomas involving the temporal bone may originate from arachnoid cell nests present within the temporal bone (intratemporal), but more frequently originate from arachnoid cell nests of the posterior or middle cranial fossa with secondary invasion of the TB (extratemporal). In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 13 patients with meningiomas involving the temporal bone who underwent surgery. Tumors of the posterior fossa with only temporal bone hyperostosis, but without invasion, were excluded. Patients presented primarily with otologic symptoms and signs. The tumors originated in the temporal bone (5/13), jugular foramen (4/13), petroclival region (2/13), the asterion (1/13) or the internal auditory meatus (1/13). All of the intratemporal meningiomas had the radiological appearance of en-plaque menigiomas. The tumor extended into the middle ear (11/13), eustachian tube (5/13), and/or the labyrinth (3/13). A gross total resection was achieved in 11 patients and a subtotal resection in 2 patients. The lower cranial nerves were infiltrated by tumor in 4 patients, and were sacrificed. At a mean follow-up of approximately 6 years, 12 patients are currently alive and doing well and 1 died from tumor progression. Six patients showed tumor recurrence and were reoperated on (5/6) or followed conservatively (1/6). Surgical treatment of temporal bone meningiomas is associated with high recurrence rate due to indiscreet tumor margins. Combined surgical approaches (temporal craniotomy and mastoidectomy) by neurosurgical and otological teams are recommended for meningiomas originating in the temporal bone.

  7. Karyotype of cryopreserved bone marrow cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.L.F. Chauffaille

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of chromosomal abnormalities is important for the study of hematological neoplastic disorders since it facilitates classification of the disease. The ability to perform chromosome analysis of cryopreserved malignant marrow or peripheral blast cells is important for retrospective studies. In the present study, we compared the karyotype of fresh bone marrow cells (20 metaphases to that of cells stored with a simplified cryopreservation method, evaluated the effect of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF as an in vitro mitotic index stimulator, and compared the cell viability and chromosome morphology of fresh and cryopreserved cells whenever possible (sufficient metaphases for analysis. Twenty-five bone marrow samples from 24 patients with hematological disorders such as acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, megaloblastic anemia and lymphoma (8, 3, 3, 8, 1, and 1 patients, respectively were selected at diagnosis, at relapse or during routine follow-up and one sample was obtained from a bone marrow donor after informed consent. Average cell viability before and after freezing was 98.8 and 78.5%, respectively (P < 0.05. Cytogenetic analysis was successful in 76% of fresh cell cultures, as opposed to 52% of cryopreserved samples (P < 0.05. GM-CSF had no proliferative effect before or after freezing. The morphological aspects of the chromosomes in fresh and cryopreserved cells were subjectively the same. The present study shows that cytogenetic analysis of cryopreserved bone marrow cells can be a reliable alternative when fresh cell analysis cannot be done, notwithstanding the reduced viability and lower percent of successful analysis that are associated with freezing.

  8. Bone biology in the elderly: clinical importance for fracture treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolvien Tim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Age-related bone impairment often leads to fragility fractures in the elderly. Although excellent surgical care is widely provided, diagnosis and treatment of the underlying bone disorder are often not kept in mind. The interplay of the three major bone cells – osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes – is normally well regulated via the secretion of messengers to control bone remodeling. Possible imbalances that might occur in the elderly are partly due to age, genetic risk factors, and adverse lifestyle factors but importantly also due to imbalances in calcium homeostasis (mostly due to vitamin D deficiency or hypochlorhydria, which have to be eliminated. Therefore, the cooperation between the trauma surgeon and the osteologist is of major importance to diagnose and treat the respective patients at risk. We propose that any patient suffering from fragility fractures is rigorously screened for osteoporosis and metabolic bone diseases. This includes bone density measurement by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, laboratory tests for calcium, phosphate, vitamin D, and bone turnover markers, as well as additional diagnostic modalities if needed. Thereby, most risk factors, including vitamin D deficiency, can be identified and treated while patients who meet the criteria for a specific therapy (i.e. antiresorptive and osteoanabolic receive such. If local health systems succeed to manage this process of secondary fracture prevention, morbidity and mortality of fragility fractures will decline to a minimum level.

  9. Bone marrow scintigraphy with 111In-chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Masayasu; Miyamae, Tatsuya

    1977-01-01

    111 In-chloride as a useful bone marrow-scanning agent has been used for various hematological diseases. We also have studied the distribution of indium-111 by scintigraphy in 28 patients with systemic hematopoietic disorders and other: 4 with aplastic anemia, 8 with leucemia, 3 with iron-deficiency anemia, one with pernicious anemia, 2 with myelofibrosis, 3 with multiple myeloma, one with malignant lymphoma, 3 with liver cirrhosis or Banti-syndrome and 3 with seminoma received post operative irradiation. The results of scintigraphy (the image of bone marrow, liver, spleen, kidney and intestine) were compared with bone marrow biopsies, ferrokinetic data and Se.I./TIBC. The bone marrow image was interpreted on a three-point scale: normal distribution of activity (+), abnormal distribution (+-), body back ground level (-). In the cases of iron-deficiency anemia and pernicious anemia with hyperplastic erythroid marrow, regardless of its severe anemia, the scintigrams showed clearly delineated bone marrow images and normal organ distribution of indium. On the other hand, the scan images revealed severe suppressions of bone marrow activity and markedly increased renal activity in some cases of aplastic anemia, acute leucemia and malignant lymphoma with hypoplastic and/or tumour-cell infiltrative marrows. Thus, it may be said that the bone marrow uptake of indium-111 correlates well with the degree of erythroid elements, no correlation with nucleated cell counts, and there is a strong tendency to increased renal activity in the cases of markedly decreased erythropoietic cell counts. (auth.)

  10. Primary Hyperparathyroidism: The Influence of Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue on Bone Loss and of Osteocalcin on Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira L. Mendonça

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Bone marrow adipose tissue has been associated with low bone mineral density. However, no data exist regarding marrow adipose tissue in primary hyperparathyroidism, a disorder associated with bone loss in conditions of high bone turnover. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between marrow adipose tissue, bone mass and parathyroid hormone. The influence of osteocalcin on the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was also evaluated. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a university hospital, involving 18 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT and 21 controls (CG. Bone mass was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and marrow adipose tissue was assessed by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biochemical evaluation included the determination of parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin, glucose and insulin levels. RESULTS: A negative association was found between the bone mass at the 1/3 radius and parathyroid hormone levels (r = -0.69; p<0.01. Marrow adipose tissue was not significantly increased in patients (CG = 32.8±11.2% vs PHPT = 38.6±12%. The serum levels of osteocalcin were higher in patients (CG = 8.6±3.6 ng/mL vs PHPT = 36.5±38.4 ng/mL; p<0.005, but no associations were observed between osteocalcin and insulin or between insulin and both marrow adipose tissue and bone mass. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the increment of adipogenesis in the bone marrow microenvironment under conditions of high bone turnover due to primary hyperparathyroidism is limited. Despite the increased serum levels of osteocalcin due to primary hyperparathyroidism, these patients tend to have impaired insulin sensitivity.

  11. Roentgenofunctional investigation of the ankle joint in a long-term period after crural bone fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignat'ev, Yu.T.; Novikov, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of the results of clinicoroentgenological and tensographic investigations of 119 patients after traumas of the crural bones and ankle joint (2-36 yrs. ago) the authors showed the importance of roentgenofunctional investigation of the ankle joint. A specially designed footing was proposed. Of 77 patients after intra-articular fractures of the ankle bones various disorders in articular proportions, undetectable on routine roengenography, were diagnosed in 29 by functional roentgenography. Articular changes on roentgenofunctional investigation were revealed in one patient only out of 42 patients with extra-articular fractures of the crural bones. Tensography showed disorders of foot biomechanics in all patients with subluxations in the ankle

  12. Bone density and young athletic women. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, David L; Sanborn, Charlotte F; Essery, Eve V

    2007-01-01

    High-school girls and collegiate women have tremendous opportunities to participate in athletic teams. Young girls are also playing in club and select teams at an early age and often, year-round. There are many benefits for participating in sport and physical activity on both the physical and mental health of girls and women. Decreased risk for heart disease and diabetes mellitus, along with improved self-esteem and body-image, were among the first reported benefits of regular physical activity. In addition, sport participation and physical activity is also associated with bone health. Athletes have a greater bone mineral density compared with non-active and physically active females. The increase in bone mass should reduce the risk of fragility fractures in later life. There appears to be a window of opportunity during the development of peak bone mass in which the bone is especially responsive to weight-bearing physical activity. Impact loading sports such as gymnastics, rugby or volleyball tend to produce a better overall osteogenic response than sports without impact loading such as cycling, rowing and swimming. Relatively little is known about the impact of retiring from athletics on bone density. It appears that former athletes continue to have a higher bone density than non-athletes; however, the rate of bone loss appears to be similar in the femoral neck. The positive impact of sports participation on bone mass can be tempered by nutritional and hormonal status. It is not known whether female athletes need additional calcium compared with the general female population. Due to the increased energy expenditure of exercise and/or the pressure to obtain an optimal training bodyweight, some female athletes may develop low energy availability or an eating disorder and subsequently amenorrhoea and a loss of bone mineral density. The three inter-related clinical disorders are referred to as the 'female athlete triad'. This article presents a review of the

  13. Bone anabolic versus bone anticatabolic treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyritis, George P; Georgoulas, Thomas; Zafeiris, Christos P

    2010-09-01

    Increased bone fragility after menopause is commonly associated with accelerated bone loss and aggressive osteoclastic function. This is attributed to increased RANKL production and impaired osteoprotegerin synthesis. Fast bone loss leads to trabecular perforations, dramatic diminution of bone strength, and unexpected fractures. To avoid osteoporotic fractures, elimination of fast bone loss is recommended. Antiosteoclastic drugs, apart from estrogens, are the selective estrogen receptor modulators, calcitonins, and amino-bisphosphonates. These drugs increase bone mass by 1-5%, but reduce the relative risk of a vertebral fracture by 30-70%. Long-term exposure to bisphosphonates may be related to low bone turnover. In elderly and severe osteoporosis, antiosteoclastic regimens hardly correct the depressed osteoblastic function. Intermittent teriperatide stimulates osteoblastic function, improves bone geometry, and has an additional analgesic effect. While both anticatabolic and anabolic agents increase bone mass and decrease the risk of spinal fractures and occasionally of the fracture of the femoral neck, there are differences in the mode of their action. These pathophysiological differences are tentative therapeutic tools for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures. A fast bone loss, associated with increased biochemical markers, is the main indicator for anticatabolic agents, while impaired bone geometry, normal or low bone markers, and established bone architectural changes are in favor of the anabolic agents. Strontium ranelate combines the anticatabolic effect with an additional anabolic action. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Microarchitecture of irradiated bone: comparison with healthy bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bléry, Pauline; Amouriq, Yves; Guédon, Jeanpierre; Pilet, Paul; Normand, Nicolas; Durand, Nicolas; Espitalier, Florent; Arlicot, Aurore; Malard, Olivier; Weiss, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    The squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aero-digestive tract represent about ten percent of cancers. External radiation therapy leads to esthetic and functional consequences, and to a decrease of the bone mechanical abilities. For these patients, the oral prosthetic rehabilitation, including possibilities of dental implant placement, is difficult. The effects of radiotherapy on bone microarchitecture parameters are not well known. Thus, the purpose of this study is to assess the effects of external radiation on bone micro architecture in an experimental model of 25 rats using micro CT. 15 rats were irradiated on the hind limbs by a single dose of 20 Grays, and 10 rats were non irradiated. Images of irradiated and healthy bone were compared. Bone microarchitecture parameters (including trabecular thickness, trabecular number, trabecular separation, connectivity density and tissue and bone volume) between irradiated and non-irradiated bones were calculated and compared using a Mann and Whitney test. After 7 and 12 weeks, images of irradiated and healthy bone are different. Differences on the irradiated and the healthy bone populations exhibit a statistical significance. Trabecular number, connectivity density and closed porosity are less important on irradiated bone. Trabecular thickness and separation increase for irradiated bone. These parameters indicate a decrease of irradiated bone properties. Finally, the external irradiation induces changes on the bone micro architecture. This knowledge is of prime importance for better oral prosthetic rehabilitation, including implant placement.

  15. Calcar bone graft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargar, W.L.; Paul, H.A.; Merritt, K.; Sharkey, N.

    1986-01-01

    A canine model was developed to investigate the use of an autogeneic iliac bone graft to treat the calcar deficiency commonly found at the time of revision surgery for femoral component loosening. Five large male mixed-breed dogs had bilateral total hip arthroplasty staged at three-month intervals, and were sacrificed at six months. Prior to cementing the femoral component, an experimental calcar defect was made, and a bicortical iliac bone graft was fashioned to fill the defect. Serial roentgenograms showed the grafts had united with no resorption. Technetium-99 bone scans showed more uptake at three months than at six months in the graft region. Disulfine blue injection indicated all grafts were perfused at both three and six months. Thin section histology, fluorochromes, and microradiographs confirmed graft viability in all dogs. Semiquantitative grading of the fluorochromes indicated new bone deposition in 20%-50% of each graft at three months and 50%-80% at six months. Although the calcar bone graft was uniformly successful in this canine study, the clinical application of this technique should be evaluated by long-term results in humans.

  16. Fibrosarcoma of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taconis, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    A general clinical-radiological description of fibrosarcoma of bone, including tumours with features of malignant fibrous histiocytoma is presented. 104 patients with fibrosarcoma of the long bones are analysed in terms of age and sex distribution, symptoms, duration of symptoms and tumour localization. The radiological findings obtained in patients with fibrosarcoma of the long bones are discussed. The treatment and course of fibrosarcoma of the long bones are discussed. Data on the type of therapy given were available on 103 patients: 67 were treated by ablative surgery either immediately or within three months of preceding local surgery and/or radiotherapy. In the remaining 36 cases treatment consisted of local surgery, radiotherapy or a combination of these, or non-curative (palliative) treatment. In a few cases ablative surgery was performed at a later stage. 13 patients with fibrosarcoma of the axial skeleton and 14 with fibrosarcoma of the jaws are considered. A causistic discussion of patients with a secondary fibrosarcoma is presented. Secondary fibrosarcoma was found in a total of 19 patients (14%); 4 after irradiation. The features of significance for the course of the disease are discussed: general features such as age and sex, tumour localization in the long bones, presence or absence of a pathological fracture, and the radiological and histological characteristics of the tumour. The type of therapy and the occurrence of lung metastases in relation to the course of the disease is also discussed. (Auth.)

  17. [Bone Cell Biology Assessed by Microscopic Approach. Bone histomorphometry of remodeling, modeling and minimodeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Noriaki; Shimakura, Taketoshi; Takahashi, Hideaki

    2015-10-01

    Bone histomorphometry is defined as a quantitative evaluation of bone remodeling. In bone remodeling, bone resorption and bone formation are coupled with scalloped cement lines. Another mechanism of bone formation is minimodeling which bone formation and resorption are independent. The finding of minimodeling appeared in special condition with metabolic bone disease or anabolic agents. We need further study for minimodeling feature and mechanism.

  18. Case report 437: Solitary (unicameral, simple) bone cyst of the scapula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggieri, P.; Biagnini, M.; Picci, P.

    1987-08-01

    A case has been presented of an expanding, aggressive bone cyst in the scapula of an 11-year-old girl. The lesion had the appearance of a highly aggressive, cyst-like disorder that appeared to be benign. Biopsy and histological preparation confirmed the presence of a solitary bone cyst. The clinical, radiological, and pathological criteria associated with a solitary bone cyst, particularly in the scapula, were discussed and the literature was reviewed. The differential diagnosis was stressed and a number of examples of scapular lesions was presented radiologically, particularly lesions that might be confused with solitary bone cyst. (orig./SHA).

  19. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Bone Biology and Osteoporosis: Can They Drive Therapeutic Choices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Francesca; Cianferotti, Luisella; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2016-08-12

    Osteoporosis is a complex multifactorial disorder of the skeleton. Genetic factors are important in determining peak bone mass and structure, as well as the predisposition to bone deterioration and fragility fractures. Nonetheless, genetic factors alone are not sufficient to explain osteoporosis development and fragility fracture occurrence. Indeed, epigenetic factors, representing a link between individual genetic aspects and environmental influences, are also strongly suspected to be involved in bone biology and osteoporosis. Recently, alterations in epigenetic mechanisms and their activity have been associated with aging. Also, bone metabolism has been demonstrated to be under the control of epigenetic mechanisms. Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), the master transcription factor of osteoblast differentiation, has been shown to be regulated by histone deacetylases and microRNAs (miRNAs). Some miRNAs were also proven to have key roles in the regulation of Wnt signalling in osteoblastogenesis, and to be important for the positive or negative regulation of both osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation. Exogenous and environmental stimuli, influencing the functionality of epigenetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of bone metabolism, may contribute to the development of osteoporosis and other bone disorders, in synergy with genetic determinants. The progressive understanding of roles of epigenetic mechanisms in normal bone metabolism and in multifactorial bone disorders will be very helpful for a better comprehension of disease pathogenesis and translation of this information into clinical practice. A deep understanding of these mechanisms could help in the future tailoring of proper individual treatments, according to precision medicine's principles.

  20. Is More Cortical Bone Decortication Effective on Guided Bone Augmentation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Ahmet Hüseyin; Alan, Hilal; Özgür, Cem; Vardi, Nigar; Asutay, Fatih; Güler, Çiğdem

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the possible effect of more cortical bone decortication (CBD) on guided bone augmentation. A total of 16 New Zealand rabbits and 32 titanium domes were used. No cortical bone decortication was applied to the control group and in the study groups, the cortical bones were decorticated with a round burr (Group A: 1 hole with bleeding, Group B: 5 holes with bleeding, Group C: a thin layer of compact bone was completely removed with no bleeding). Then 2 titanium domes were placed on the calvarium of each rabbit with hydroxyapatite/beta-tricalcium phosphate. After 3 months, the animals were sacrificed and specimens were sent for histological and histomorphometric analysis. Histological and histomorphometric analysis showed that bone decortication with burr significantly increased new bone regeneration in all the experimental groups compared with the control group (P guided bone augmentation. However, a greater amount of CBD does not have a greater effect.

  1. Bone geometry, density and microarchitecture in the distal radius and tibia in adults with osteogenesis imperfecta type-1 assessed by HR-pQCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkestad, Lars; Hald, Jannie Dahl; Hansen, Stinus

    2012-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary disorder characterized by decreased biosynthesis or impaired morphology of collagen type-1 that leads to decreased bone mass and increased bone fragility. We hypothesized that patients with OI have altered bone microstructure and bone geometry. In this......Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary disorder characterized by decreased biosynthesis or impaired morphology of collagen type-1 that leads to decreased bone mass and increased bone fragility. We hypothesized that patients with OI have altered bone microstructure and bone geometry...... treated with bisphosphonates. HR-pQCT at the distal radius and distal tibia and dual-energy X-ray absorptiomentry of total hip, femoral neck, trochanteric region and the lumbar spine (L1-L4) were performed. The patients were shorter than the controls (159¿±¿10¿cm vs. 170¿±¿9¿cm, p¿...

  2. Percutaneous bone tumor management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangi, Afshin; Buy, Xavier

    2010-06-01

    Interventional radiology plays a major role in the management of bone tumors. Many different percutaneous techniques are available. Some aim to treat pain and consolidate a pathological bone (cementoplasty); others aim to ablate tumor or reduce its volume (sclerotherapy, thermal ablation). In this article, image-guided techniques of primary and secondary bone tumors with vertebroplasty, ethanol injection, radiofrequency ablation, laser photocoagulation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ionization (coblation) will be reviewed. For each modality, the principles, the indications, and the results will be presented. The technical choice depends on the therapeutic intent-curative or palliative-and the need for consolidation, but also on the general status of the patient and the other therapeutic options. For the most complex cases, combined treatments can be required. However, the less disabling technique should always be considered first.

  3. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  4. Myostatin deficiency partially rescues the bone phenotype of osteogenesis imperfecta model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestreich, A K; Carleton, S M; Yao, X; Gentry, B A; Raw, C E; Brown, M; Pfeiffer, F M; Wang, Y; Phillips, C L

    2016-01-01

    Mice with osteogenesis imperfecta (+/oim), a disorder of bone fragility, were bred to mice with muscle over growth to test whether increasing muscle mass genetically would improve bone quality and strength. The results demonstrate that femora from mice carrying both mutations have greater mechanical integrity than their +/oim littermates. Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable connective tissue disorder due primarily to mutations in the type I collagen genes resulting in skeletal deformity and fragility. Currently, there is no cure, and therapeutic strategies encompass the use of antiresorptive pharmaceuticals and surgical bracing, with limited success and significant potential for adverse effects. Bone, a mechanosensing organ, can respond to high mechanical loads by increasing new bone formation and altering bone geometry to withstand increased forces. Skeletal muscle is a major source of physiological loading on bone, and bone strength is proportional to muscle mass. To test the hypothesis that congenic increases in muscle mass in the osteogenesis imperfecta murine model mouse (oim) will improve their compromised bone quality and strength, heterozygous (+/oim) mice were bred to mice deficient in myostatin (+/mstn), a negative regulator of muscle growth. The resulting adult offspring were evaluated for hindlimb muscle mass, and bone microarchitecture, physiochemistry, and biomechanical integrity. +/oim mice deficient in myostatin (+/mstn +/oim) were generated and demonstrated that myostatin deficiency increased body weight, muscle mass, and biomechanical strength in +/mstn +/oim mice as compared to +/oim mice. Additionally, myostatin deficiency altered the physiochemical properties of the +/oim bone but did not alter bone remodeling. Myostatin deficiency partially improved the reduced femoral bone biomechanical strength of adult +/oim mice by increasing muscle mass with concomitant improvements in bone microarchitecture and physiochemical properties.

  5. Bone metabolic activity in hyperostosis cranialis interna measured with {sup 18}F-fluoride PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterval, Jerome J.; Dongen, Thijs M.A. van; Stokroos, Robert J.; Manni, Johannes J. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Teule, Jaap G.J.; Kemerink, Gerrit J.; Brans, Boudewijn [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Nieman, Fred H.M. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Technology Assessment, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2011-05-15

    {sup 18}F-Fluoride PET/CT is a relatively undervalued diagnostic test to measure bone metabolism in bone diseases. Hyperostosis cranialis interna (HCI) is a (hereditary) bone disease characterised by endosteal hyperostosis and osteosclerosis of the skull and the skull base. Bone overgrowth causes entrapment and dysfunction of several cranial nerves. The aim of this study is to compare standardised uptake values (SUVs) at different sites in order to quantify bone metabolism in the affected anatomical regions in HCI patients. Nine affected family members, seven non-affected family members and nine non-HCI non-family members underwent {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT scans. SUVs were systematically measured in the different regions of interest: frontal bone, sphenoid bone, petrous bone and clivus. Moreover, the average {sup 18}F-fluoride uptake in the entire skull was measured by assessing the uptake in axial slides. Visual assessment of the PET scans of affected individuals was performed to discover the process of disturbed bone metabolism in HCI. {sup 18}F-Fluoride uptake is statistically significantly higher in the sphenoid bone and clivus regions of affected family members. Visual assessment of the scans of HCI patients is relevant in detecting disease severity and the pattern of disturbed bone metabolism throughout life. {sup 18}F-Fluoride PET/CT is useful in quantifying the metabolic activity in HCI and provides information about the process of disturbed bone metabolism in this specific disorder. Limitations are a narrow window between normal and pathological activity and the influence of age. This study emphasises that {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT may also be a promising diagnostic tool for other metabolic bone disorders, even those with an indolent course. (orig.)

  6. Growth Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem or disease. The pituitary gland makes growth hormone, which stimulates the growth of bone and other tissues. Children who have too little ... gland tumor, which is not cancer. Too much growth hormone can cause gigantism in children, where their bones and their body grow too much. In adults, ...

  7. ADAM10 is essential for cranial neural crest-derived maxillofacial bone development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Yu, E-mail: tanyu2048@163.com; Fu, Runqing, E-mail: furunqing@sjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Jiaqiang, E-mail: liujqmj@163.com; Wu, Yong, E-mail: wyonger@gmail.com; Wang, Bo, E-mail: wb228@126.com; Jiang, Ning, E-mail: 179639060@qq.com; Nie, Ping, E-mail: nieping1011@sina.com; Cao, Haifeng, E-mail: 0412chf@163.com; Yang, Zhi, E-mail: wcums1981@163.com; Fang, Bing, E-mail: fangbing@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-07-08

    Growth disorders of the craniofacial bones may lead to craniofacial deformities. The majority of maxillofacial bones are derived from cranial neural crest cells via intramembranous bone formation. Any interruption of the craniofacial skeleton development process might lead to craniofacial malformation. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 plays an essential role in organ development and tissue integrity in different organs. However, little is known about its function in craniofacial bone formation. Therefore, we investigated the role of ADAM10 in the developing craniofacial skeleton, particularly during typical mandibular bone development. First, we showed that ADAM10 was expressed in a specific area of the craniofacial bone and that the expression pattern dynamically changed during normal mouse craniofacial development. Then, we crossed wnt1-cre transgenic mice with adam10-flox mice to generate ADAM10 conditional knockout mice. The stereomicroscopic, radiographic, and von Kossa staining results showed that conditional knockout of ADAM10 in cranial neural crest cells led to embryonic death, craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that impaired mineralization could be triggered by decreased osteoblast differentiation, increased cell death. Overall, these findings show that ADAM10 plays an essential role in craniofacial bone development. -- Highlights: •We firstly reported that ADAM10 was essentially involved in maxillofacial bone development. •ADAM10 cKO mice present craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. •Impaired osteoblast differentiation,proliferation and apoptosis underlie the bone deformity.

  8. Biochemical markers of bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Deog Yoon

    1999-01-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover has received increasing attention over the past few years, because of the need for sensitivity and specific tool in the clinical investigation of osteoporosis. Bone markers should be unique to bone, reflect changes of bone less, and should be correlated with radiocalcium kinetics, histomorphometry, or changes in bone mass. The markers also should be useful in monitoring treatment efficacy. Although no bone marker has been established to meet all these criteria, currently osteocalcin and pyridinium crosslinks are the most efficient markers to assess the level of bone turnover in the menopausal and senile osteoporosis. Recently, N-terminal telopeptide (NTX), C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone specific alkaline phosphatase are considered as new valid markers of bone turnover. Recent data suggest that CTX and free deoxypyridinoline could predict the subsequent risk of hip fracture of elderly women. Treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen, calcitonin and bisphosphonates demonstrated rapid decrease of the levels of bone markers that correlated with the long-term increase of bone mass. Factors such as circadian rhythms, diet, age, sex, bone mass and renal function affect the results of biochemical markers and should be appropriately adjusted whenever possible. Each biochemical markers of bone turnover may have its own specific advantages and limitations. Recent advances in research will provide more sensitive and specific assays

  9. Biochemical markers of bone turnover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Deog Yoon [College of Medicine, Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover has received increasing attention over the past few years, because of the need for sensitivity and specific tool in the clinical investigation of osteoporosis. Bone markers should be unique to bone, reflect changes of bone less, and should be correlated with radiocalcium kinetics, histomorphometry, or changes in bone mass. The markers also should be useful in monitoring treatment efficacy. Although no bone marker has been established to meet all these criteria, currently osteocalcin and pyridinium crosslinks are the most efficient markers to assess the level of bone turnover in the menopausal and senile osteoporosis. Recently, N-terminal telopeptide (NTX), C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone specific alkaline phosphatase are considered as new valid markers of bone turnover. Recent data suggest that CTX and free deoxypyridinoline could predict the subsequent risk of hip fracture of elderly women. Treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen, calcitonin and bisphosphonates demonstrated rapid decrease of the levels of bone markers that correlated with the long-term increase of bone mass. Factors such as circadian rhythms, diet, age, sex, bone mass and renal function affect the results of biochemical markers and should be appropriately adjusted whenever possible. Each biochemical markers of bone turnover may have its own specific advantages and limitations. Recent advances in research will provide more sensitive and specific assays.

  10. Tiludronate: bone pharmacology and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjour, J P; Ammann, P; Barbier, A; Caverzasio, J; Rizzoli, R

    1995-11-01

    The pharmacological properties of tiludronate (4-chlorophenyl)thiomethylene bisphosphonate), a sulfured bisphosphonate, have been characterized in a series of preclinical in vivo and in vitro studies. In vivo, tiludronate exerts a dose-dependent inhibitory activity on bone resorption. This property was demonstrated in several animal models, including rats, ewes, and dogs, when bone resorption was induced by administration of retinoid acid or parathyroid hormone, or by immobilization, ovariectomy or orchidectomy. By uncoupling bone resorption from bone formation, tiludronate can induce a positive calcium and phosphate balance. When administered either continuously or intermittently to ovariectomized osteoporotic rats, tiludronate promotes a significant increase in bone mass. This positive effect is associated with an increase in mechanical resistance. Bone tolerance studies indicate that tiludronate is a safe compound with an appreciable therapeutic margin since it can effectively inhibit bone resorption without reducing bone mineralization and strength. In vitro, tiludronate added to bone tissue culture inhibits calcium release, lysosomal enzyme secretion and collagen matrix degradation when induced by various stimulators of bone resorption. At the cellular level, tiludronate does not appear to exert its inhibitory effect on bone resorption by impairing either the recruitment, the migration or the fusion of osteoclast precursors. Tiludronate could act on mature osteoclasts by reducing their capacity to secrete proton into the resorption space and also by favoring their detachment from the bone matrix. The available preclinical data indicate that tiludronate should be an efficacious bisphosphonate in the management of clinical conditions characterized by excessive bone resorption.

  11. Three-dimensional CT imaging with a helical scan on temporal bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Honghan; Hiraishi, Kumiko; Uesugi, Yasuo; Sakakura, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Shuji; Shimizu, Takaya; Sueyoshi, Kozo; Narabayashi, Isamu [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)

    1996-06-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) CT on the lesions of temporal bone, we studied 19 patients with disorders on the region of temporal bone by high speed helical CT. The results showed that 8 patients with congenital hearing disorder had deficiency of the auditory ossicles, 2 patients with chronic otitis media had deformity and shortness of the auditory ossicles, 4 patients with trauma had fracture of the temporal bone (1 patient was complicated by doubtful fracture of the incus), 5 patients (4 patients with acquired hearing disorder and 1 patient with otorrhea) had space-occupying lesions. 3-D helical CT could detect abnormal findings on all the patients and it was an important examination for the temporal bone. (author)

  12. Enzymatic maceration of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhre, Marie-Louise; Eriksen, Anne Marie; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær

    2015-01-01

    This proof of concept study investigates the removal of soft tissue from human ribs with the use of two common methods: boiling with a laundry detergent and using enzymes. Six individuals were autopsied, and one rib from each individual was removed for testing. Each rib was cut into pieces...... and afterwards macerated by one of the two methods. DNA extraction was performed to see the effect of the macerations on DNA preservation. Furthermore, the bone pieces were examined in a stereomicroscope to assess for any bone damage. The results demonstrated that both methods removed all flesh/soft tissue from...

  13. Porcine bone marrow: extraction procedure and characterization by bone type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, C M; Schnell, T D; Mandigo, R W

    1998-12-01

    Data on porcine and bovine bone marrow composition indicate high calcium content, which may be erroneously elevated owing to the marrow recovery process. A method of bone marrow recovery was developed that involved passing marrow extracted from bone through a filter-press mechanism to remove very fine bone particles and dust, allowing a more accurate analysis of marrow. Calcium values were reduced approximately 90% and ash values reduced more than 50% compared to other reported data. The new recovery method did not require sawing away the hard bone and it removed particulate that may have interfered with analyses. Bone marrow was characterized by bone type. Rib bone marrow had higher protein, iron, non-heme iron and total pigment than scapula, aitch/hip bone or vertebrae marrow. Fat ranged from 17·81 to 26·76% and calcium ranged from 27·25 to 44·33mg 100g(-1) among bone types. The pH of bone marrow ranged from 7·14 to 7·53. Bone marrow appears to contribute to some of the properties of meat obtained from advanced meat recovery systems.

  14. A novel bio-inorganic bone implant containing deglued bone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deglued bone (DGB) which is a by-product of bone glue industries and has the close crystallographic similarities of hydroxyapatite was used as main component in the preparation of bone implant. Chitosan was prepared from the exoskeleton of prawn (Pinaeus indicus, family Crustaceae) which is a by-product of seafood ...

  15. Analysis of bone mineral density of human bones for strength ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    indirect indicator of osteoporosis and fracture risk. This medical bone density is not the true physical “density” of the bone, which would be computed as mass per volume. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, previously DEXA), a means of measuring BMD, is the most widely used and most thoroughly studied bone ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x- ... x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken to the patient in a hospital ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... little information about muscles, tendons or joints. An MRI may be more useful in identifying bone and ... bones and the spinal cord can be evaluated). MRI can also detect subtle or occult fractures or ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to produce pictures of any bone in the body. It is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones ... x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to ...

  19. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menopause Map Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July 2010 Download PDFs English ... G. Komen Foundation What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray ( ... leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little to ... fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes ...

  2. Fractures (Broken Bones): First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Fractures (broken bones) Fractures (broken bones): First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A fracture is a ... 10, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-fractures/basics/ART-20056641 . Mayo Clinic ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissues around or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require ... is placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a ...

  4. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Health Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Download PDFs English Espanol ... also helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  5. Bone Mineral Status in Children and Adolescents with Klinefelter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Stagi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Klinefelter syndrome (KS has long-term consequences on bone health. However, studies regarding bone status and metabolism during childhood and adolescence are very rare. Patients. This cross-sectional study involved 40 (mean age: 13.7±3.8 years KS children and adolescents and 80 age-matched healthy subjects. For both patient and control groups, we evaluated serum levels of ionised and total calcium, phosphate, total testosterone, luteinising hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, parathyroid hormone (PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, and urinary deoxypyridinoline concentrations. We also calculated the z-scores of the phalangeal amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS and the bone transmission time (BTT. Results. KS children and adolescents showed significantly reduced AD-SoS (p<0.005 and BTT (p<0.0005 z-scores compared to the controls. However, KS patients presented significantly higher PTH (p<0.0001 and significantly lower 25(OHD (p<0.0001, osteocalcin (p<0.05, and bone alkaline phosphatase levels (p<0.005. Interestingly, these metabolic bone disorders were already present in the prepubertal subjects. Conclusions. KS children and adolescents exhibited impaired bone mineral status and metabolism with higher PTH levels and a significant reduction of 25-OH-D and bone formation markers. Interestingly, this impairment was already evident in prepubertal KS patients. Follow-ups should be scheduled with KS patients to investigate and ameliorate bone mineral status and metabolism until the prepubertal ages.

  6. The effects of low environmental cadmium exposure on bone density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzcinka-Ochocka, M., E-mail: ochocka@imp.lodz.pl [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Jakubowski, M. [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Szymczak, W. [Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Insitute of Psychology, University of Lodz (Poland); Janasik, B.; Brodzka, R. [Department of Chemical Hazards, Laboratory of Biomonitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)

    2010-04-15

    Recent epidemiological data indicate that low environmental exposure to cadmium, as shown by cadmium body burden (Cd-U), is associated with renal dysfunction as well as an increased risk of cadmium-induced bone disorders. The present study was designed to assess the effects of low environmental cadmium exposure, at the level sufficient to induce kidney damage, on bone metabolism and mineral density (BMD). The project was conducted in the area contaminated with cadmium, nearby a zinc smelter located in the region of Poland where heavy industry prevails. The study population comprised 170 women (mean age=39.7; 18-70 years) and 100 men (mean age=31.9; 18-76 years). Urinary and blood cadmium and the markers of renal tubular dysfunction ({beta}{sub 2}M-U RBP, NAG), glomerular dysfunction (Alb-U and {beta}{sub 2}M-S) and bone metabolism markers (BAP-S, CTX-S) as well as forearm BMD, were measured. The results of this study based on simple dose-effect analysis showed the relationship between increasing cadmium concentrations and an increased excretion of renal dysfunction markers and decreasing bone density. However, the results of the multivariate analysis did not indicate the association between exposure to cadmium and decrease in bone density. They showed that the most important factors that have impact on bone density are body weight and age in the female subjects and body weight and calcium excretion in males. Our investigation revealed that the excretion of low molecular weight proteins occurred at a lower level of cadmium exposure than the possible loss of bone mass. It seems that renal tubular markers are the most sensitive and significant indicators of early health effects of cadmium intoxication in the general population. The correlation of urinary cadmium concentration with markers of kidney dysfunction was observed in the absence of significant correlations with bone effects. Our findings did not indicate any effects of environmental cadmium exposure on bone

  7. Red-yellow marrow conversion: Its effect on the location of some solitary bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kricun, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The location of red marrow related bone lesions is dependent upon the distribution of red marrow. It is altered by the normal conversion of red marrow to yellow (fat) marrow and by the reconversion of yellow marrow to red marrow caused by marrow infiltrating disorders or marrow stress disorders. (orig.)

  8. Bone quality: the determinants of bone strength and fragility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Hélder; Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Coriolano, Hans-Joachim Appell; Duarte, José Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Bone fragility is a major health concern, as the increased risk of bone fractures has devastating outcomes in terms of mortality, decreased autonomy, and healthcare costs. Efforts made to address this problem have considerably increased our knowledge about the mechanisms that regulate bone formation and resorption. In particular, we now have a much better understanding of the cellular events that are triggered when bones are mechanically stimulated and how these events can lead to improvements in bone mass. Despite these findings at the molecular level, most exercise intervention studies reveal either no effects or only minor benefits of exercise programs in improving bone mineral density (BMD) in osteoporotic patients. Nevertheless, and despite that BMD is the gold standard for diagnosing osteoporosis, this measure is only able to provide insights regarding the quantity of bone tissue. In this article, we review the complex structure of bone tissue and highlight the concept that its mechanical strength stems from the interaction of several different features. We revisited the available data showing that bone mineralization degree, hydroxyapatite crystal size and heterogeneity, collagen properties, osteocyte density, trabecular and cortical microarchitecture, as well as whole bone geometry, are determinants of bone strength and that each one of these properties may independently contribute to the increased or decreased risk of fracture, even without meaningful changes in aBMD. Based on these findings, we emphasize that while osteoporosis (almost) always causes bone fragility, bone fragility is not always caused just by osteoporosis, as other important variables also play a major role in this etiology. Furthermore, the results of several studies showing compelling data that physical exercise has the potential to improve bone quality and to decrease fracture risk by influencing each one of these determinants are also reviewed. These findings have meaningful clinical

  9. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Bone Remodeling*

    OpenAIRE

    Raggatt, Liza J.; Partridge, Nicola C.

    2010-01-01

    Physiological bone remodeling is a highly coordinated process responsible for bone resorption and formation and is necessary to repair damaged bone and to maintain mineral homeostasis. In addition to the traditional bone cells (osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes) that are necessary for bone remodeling, several immune cells have also been implicated in bone disease. This minireview discusses physiological bone remodeling, outlining the traditional bone biology dogma in light of emerging ...

  10. Chondroblastoma of temporal bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanohta, K.; Noda, M.; Katoh, H.; Okazaki, A.; Sugiyama, S.; Maehara, T.; Onishi, S.; Tanida, T.

    1986-07-01

    The case of a 55-year-old female with chondroblastoma arising from the left temporal bone is presented. Although 10 cases of temporal chondroblastoma have been reported, this is the first in which plain radiography, pluridirectional tomography, computed tomography (CT) and angiography were performed. We discuss the clinical and radiological aspects of this rare tumor.

  11. Bone scintigraphy in chondroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphry, A.; Gilday, D.L.; Brown, R.G.

    1980-11-01

    Scintigraphy in 3 patients with chondroblastoma showed that the tumors were hyperemic and avidly accumulated the radionuclide. These changes were also present in adjacent normal bone, but to a lesser degree. This suggests that radionuclide uptake in chondroblastoma is a function of the blood supply to the tumor rather than primary matrix extraction.

  12. Bone scintiscanning in metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayla, J.; Basset, J.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The three fold interest of bone scintiscanning is discussed in relation to 182 cases of bone metastases of various origins. Firstly, this technic facilitates early diagnosis of invasion of the bone by the detection of metastatic lesions which, in 7.7% of cases are still infraradiologic, or even of reflex algodystrophy of the legs, which can be detected only from a scintiscan, long before X-ray plates can show the lumbar metastasis which is responsible. Secondly, the method is able to pick up more metastasic sites in 54.4% of cases than can be detected by X-ray; this is confirmed by investigation of the S/R ratio (ratio of the number of strongly binding sites to the number of sites showing radiologic damage) which is greater than unity for a considerable period. Thirdly, repeated scintiscanography provides a prognosis, because the survival time appears to be fairly closely correlated with the regression, stability or extension of strongly binding sites, although a ''flare phenomenon'' may give the erroneous impression that the metastatic process has deteriorated. Repeated scintiscanography also provides a good way of evaluating the efficacy of medical treatment, particularly in the case of bone metastases of mammary or prostatic origin. Sometimes, the decision for or against prophylactic or palliative orthopedic surgery may be based to a considerable extent on data provided by scintiscan [fr

  13. Bone island and leprosy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpintero, P.; Garcia-Frasquet, A. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Cordoba University, Medical School, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Tarradas, E. [Department of Imaging, Cordoba University, Medical School, Cordoba (Spain); Logrono, C. [Department of Dermatology, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Carrascal, A. [Department of Radiology, Infanta Elena Hospital, Huelva (Spain); Carreto, A. [Department of Radiology, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain)

    1998-06-01

    Objective. To determine the incidence of bone islands in leprosy patients. Design. X-rays of feet and hands of patients with Hansen`s disease (leprosy) were reviewed retrospectively. A second group of related age- and sex-matched patients who did not have Hansen`s disease was used for control purposes. Controls had undergone hand or foot X-rays during diagnosis of other pathologies. The patients with Hansen`s disease were compared with the control group, and were also analyzed as subgroups with different types of leprosy. The results were subjected to statistical analysis. Patients. Ninety patients with Hansen`s disease were randomly selected for this study. Patients who had had ulcers on hands or feet were excluded from the study. Results and conclusions. Bone islands were demonstrated in 20 patients with Hansen`s disease; no bone islands were observed in the controls. This was statistically significant (P<0.01). Bone islands were only seen in patients with lepromatous leprosy and borderline types but were not demonstrated in patients with tuberculoid leprosy. There was also a statistically significant relationship for a disease duration of 15 years or more. The cause of this raised incidence of enostosis in leprosy patients is not clear, but there may be a genetic predisposition in patients with leprosy, or it may be a side effect of leprosy, especially the lepromatous form. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 9 refs.

  14. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, B

    2001-01-01

    Bone marrow aspiration biopsies are carried out principally to permit cytological assessment but also for immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, molecular genetic, and other specialised investigations. Often, a trephine biopsy is carried out as part of the same procedure. Bone marrow aspirations should be carried out by trained individuals who are aware of the indications, contraindications, and hazards of the procedure. They should follow a standard operating procedure. The operator should have made an adequate assessment of clinical and haematological features to ensure both that appropriate indications exist and that all relevant tests are performed. For the patient's comfort and safety, the posterior iliac crest is generally the preferred site of aspiration. Films of aspirated marrow and, when appropriate, films of crushed particles should be made and labelled. Once thoroughly dry, films should be fixed and stained. As a minimum, a Romanowsky stain and a Perls' stain are required. A cover slip should be applied. The bone marrow films should be assessed and reported in a systematic manner so that nothing of importance is overlooked, using a low power, then intermediate, then high power objective. A differential count should be performed. An interpretation of the findings, in the light of the clinical and haematological features, should be given. The report should be signed or computer authorised, using a secure password, and issued in a timely manner. Key Words: bone marrow aspirate • haematological diagnosis PMID:11533068

  15. Sodium and bone health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teucher, B.; Dainty, J. R.; Spinks, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    High salt intake is a well-recognized risk factor for osteoporosis because it induces calciuria, but the effects of salt on calcium metabolism and the potential impact on bone health in postmenopausal women have not been fully characterized. This study investigated adaptive mechanisms in response...

  16. Making silent bones speak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanovaite, Livija; Jensen, Mathias Paul Bjørnevad; Philippsen, Bente

    2017-01-01

    Orphaned osseous tools very often perceived as having high aesthetical value but carrying minimal information. The article illustrates the research potential of these artefacts with a case study of Mesolithic stray finds from Lithuania. Four bone points from the Šventoji river, Vaikantonys, Obšrū...

  17. Temporal bone imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmerling, Marc [Algemeen Ziekenhuis Sint-Lucas, Gent (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Foer, Bert de (ed.) [Sint-Augustinus Ziekenhuis, Wilrijk (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Complete overview of imaging of normal and diseased temporal bone. Straightforward structure to facilitate learning. Detailed consideration of newer imaging techniques, including the hot topic of diffusion-weighted imaging. Includes a chapter on anatomy that will be of great help to the novice interpreter of imaging findings. Excellent illustrations throughout. This book provides a complete overview of imaging of normal and diseased temporal bone. After description of indications for imaging and the cross-sectional imaging anatomy of the area, subsequent chapters address the various diseases and conditions that affect the temporal bone and are likely to be encountered regularly in clinical practice. The classic imaging methods are described and discussed in detail, and individual chapters are included on newer techniques such as functional imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging. There is also a strong focus on postoperative imaging. Throughout, imaging findings are documented with the aid of numerous informative, high-quality illustrations. Temporal Bone Imaging, with its straightforward structure based essentially on topography, will prove of immense value in daily practice.

  18. Bones of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The film "Bones of the Earth" (Riglin, Cunninham & Correa, 2014) is an experience in collective inquiry and visual creation based on arts-based research. Starting from the meeting of different subjectivities and through dialogue, planning, shooting and editing, an audiovisual text that reconstructs a reflexive process of collective…

  19. Are Bones Alive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravita, Silvia; Falchetti, Elisabetta

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the classification of living things. Our study deals with a different problem: the attribution of life to one component of a living organism, specifically the bones. The task involves not only specifying what we mean by "alive", but also requires "informed thinking" leading to an understanding of…

  20. Bone Marrow Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Mark; Maklad, Rania; Heaney, Emma

    2014-01-01

    As a final-year student teacher specialising in primary science, Emma Heaney faced the challenge of having to plan, organise, and conduct a small-scale, classroom-based research project. She had to teach about bones in the final block practice session and thought it would be a good idea to bring in some biological specimens obtained from the local…

  1. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat in their diet. Vitamin D is the hormone that helps the gut absorb more calcium. Many older adults have common risks that make bone health worse. Calcium intake in the diet (milk, cheese, yogurt) is low. Vitamin D levels are ...

  2. Bone scintigraphy in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, K.; Thiers, G.; Eissner, D.; Holzmann, H.; Frankfurt Univ.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1973 bone scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-phosphate-complexes was carried out in 382 patients with psoriasis. For comparison with the results of nuclear medicine, roentgenologic and clinical findings a group af 121 patients with psoriasis aged between 11 and 74 years was compared to a group of 42 patients aged between 20 and 49 years without roentgenologic and clinical signs of psoriasis arthritis. We found by means of isotope investigation that an essentially greater part of the bones adjacent to the joints was involved than was expected according to X-ray and clinical findings. In addition, in 205 patients with psoriasis whole-body scintigraphy, using sup(99m)Tc-MDP, was carried out since 1977/78. In 17 patients we found an increased accumulation of activity in the region of extraarticular structures of the skull as well as of the skeletal thorax. According to these results we conclude that in addition to the clinically and roentgenologically defined psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis an osteopathy may exist, which can only be demonstrated by skeletal scintigraphy and which is localized in bones adjacent to the joints but can also be demonstrated in the region of extraarticular bones. (orig.) [de

  3. Bone scintiscanning in metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cayla, J.; Basset, J.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The three fold interest of bone scintiscanning is discussed in relation to 182 cases of bone metastases of various origins. Firstly, this technic facilitates early diagnosis of invasion of the bone by the detection of metastatic lesions which, in 7.7% of cases are still infraradiologic, or even of reflex algodystrophy of the legs, which can be detected only from a scintiscan, long before X-ray plates can show the lumbar metastasis which is responsible. Secondly, the method is able to pick up more metastasic sites in 54.4% of cases than can be detected by X-ray; this is confirmed by investigation of the S/R ratio (ratio of the number of strongly binding sites to the number of sites showing radiologic damage) which is greater than unity for a considerable period. Thirdly, repeated scintiscanography provides a prognosis, because the survival time appears to be fairly closely correlated with the regression, stability or extension of strongly binding sites, although a ''flare phenomenon'' may give the erroneous impression that the metastatic process has deteriorated. Repeated scintiscanography also provides a good way of evaluating the efficacy of medical treatment, particularly in the case of bone metastases of mammary or prostatic origin. Sometimes, the decision for or against prophylactic or palliative orthopedic surgery may be based to a considerable extent on data provided by scintiscan.

  4. Food and Your Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Experts Home › Patients › Treatment for Osteoporosis › Nutrition Nutrition Food For Thought Quiz How do you get your ... above View Answers Loading ... Nutritional Guide View Now Food and Your Bones — Osteoporosis Nutrition Guidelines The food ...

  5. Electron Microscopy of Bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, V.; Hoeben, K. A.

    2012-01-01

    Mineralized tissues like bone, dentin and mineralized cartilage are difficult to prepare for ultrastructural analysis. In general, the higher the level of mineralization is, the more difficult it is to obtain ultrathin sections of these tissue. Tissues with a low level of mineral, e.g. from young

  6. Percutaneous autologous bone marrow transplantation for the treatment of delayed union of limb bone in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu J

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Jun Wu,* Hongxi Guo,* Xing Liu, Ming Li, Yujiang Cao, Xiangyang Qu, Hai Zhou, Liuqi Weng Department of Orthopaedics, Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing Engineering Research Center of Stem Cell Therapy, China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and purpose: Percutaneous autologous bone marrow transplantation (PABMT is a minimally invasive therapeutic strategy for the treatment of delayed bone union in adults, which has been confirmed by many studies. However, there is no report on PABMT application in pediatric orthopedic surgery. The aim of this article was to analyze the therapeutic effect of PABMT in children with delayed union of limb bone and its influence in relation to delayed bone union therapy, transplantation period, patients’ sex, fracture location, and fracture fixation.Methods: In this study, 53 patients (aged 3–16 years, with an average age of 6.7 years with delayed union of long bone (20 femurs, 12 tibiae, 10 humeri, 5 radiuses, 5 ulnas, and 1 fibula were treated using PABMT. Clinical examination and X-ray were integrated to evaluate the therapeutic effect.Results: All 53 patients were followed up for 2–6 years (average time, 3.5 years. Of the 53 patients, 47 (88.7% were healed, whereas the other 6 (11.3% were not, and were subsequently treated by autologous bone grafting. In 30 patients who received their first PABMT treatment 6–8 months after fixation, the clinical cure rate, operation times, and healing time were 83.3%, 5.8±0.5 months, and 2.5±0.6, respectively. In the other 23 patients, whose first PABMT treatments were started within 4 to 6 months after fixation, the clinical cure rate, operation times, and healing time were 95.7% (P=0.167, 3.2±0

  7. Eosinophilic Granuloma in Jaw Bone

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    alveolar bone. Involvement of other bones is ruled out by nucleotide imaging study. CONCLUSION: EG should be considered as a differential diagnosis whenever there is ... KEYWORDS: Eosinophilic granuloma, langerhans cell histiocytosis, oral manifestations, alveolar bone .... enough to initiate healing and spontaneous.

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  9. Bone grafting options in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Randal R; Lavelle, William F; Samdani, Amer F

    2010-08-01

    Retrospective review of the literature. To review the current literature as well as recent trends in bone grafting techniques available for children. The currently accepted gold standard in bone grafting for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is autogenous iliac crest. Due to questions concerning complications such as donor site pain, other options have been explored, including various allograft sources, demineralized bone matrix, and bone morphogenetic protein. A review of the current medical literature was completed and additional case examples are presented. A review of the literature reveals that up to 31% of patients have persistent pain at 2 years post surgery when autogenous iliac crest bone graft is harvested. Allograft supplementation of local autograft has been demonstrated in the literature to be as effective as autogenous iliac crest bone grafting in contributing to a successful posterior spinal fusion in patients with AIS. Modern demineralized bone matrix formulations have been found in both animal models as well as in a recent retrospective clinical review to contribute to a successful posterior spinal fusion in AIS. Bone morphogenetic protein has been shown to contribute to a successful posterior spinal fusion in complex pediatric spinal deformity patients. At 2 years follow-up, patients who underwent a posterior instrumented spinal fusion that was not augmented with any bone graft appear to have successful spinal fusions. Although autogenous iliac bone graft remains the benchmark to which bone grafting materials are compared, other options including the placement of no bone graft at all provides similar fusion rates in patients with AIS.

  10. [Imaging diagnostics of bone sarcomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, J A; Gübitz, R; Beck, L; Heindel, W; Vieth, V

    2014-06-01

    Bone tumors and especially bone sarcomas are rare lesions of the skeletal system in comparison to the much more frequently occurring bone metastases. Despite the relative rarity they are important differential diagnoses of bone lesions. The aim of this article is to give the reader an insight into the fundamentals of the primary imaging of bone sarcomas and to illustrate this with the help of two examples (e.g. osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma). The foundation of the imaging of bone sarcomas is the radiograph in two planes. This method delivers important information on bone tumors. This information should be analyzed with the help of the Lodwick classification, the configuration of periosteal reactions and a possible reaction of the cortex. A possible tumor matrix and the localization within the skeleton or within long bones also provide important information for differential diagnostic delimitation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with specific adapted bone tumor sequences allows an exact local staging of a bone sarcoma. In addition to local imaging a compartmental MRI which illustrates the entire extent of tumor-bearing bone and the adjacent joints should be performed to rule out possible skip lesions. The most common distant metastases of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma occur in the lungs; therefore, a computed tomography (CT) of the chest is part of staging. Other imaging methods, such as CT of the tumor, positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT), bone scan and whole body MRI supplement the imaging depending on tumor type.

  11. Bone regeneration during distraction osteogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amir, L.R.; Everts, V.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Bone has the capacity to regenerate in response to injury. During distraction osteogenesis, the renewal of bone is enhanced by gradual stretching of the soft connec- tive tissues in the gap area between two separated bone segments. This procedure has received much clinical atten- tion as a way to

  12. Oral Health and Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that the loss of alveolar bone mineral density leaves bone more susceptible to periodontal bacteria, increasing the ... bone density will have a favorable impact on dental health. Bisphosphonates, a group of medications available for the treatment of osteoporosis, have been linked to the development ...

  13. Multiple long bone cysts revealed by MRI in trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II predisposing to pathological fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konala, Praveen; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Kiely, Nigel [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Noakes, Charlotte [Oxford University Hospital, The Oxford Genetics Laboratories, Oxford (United Kingdom); Blair, Edward [Oxford University Hospital, Department of Clinical Genetics, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-15

    Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II is a rare genetic disorder with the few published case reports mainly reporting the radiographic skeletal manifestations. There are no published imaging reports of long bone cysts involving multiple bones in this condition. We report a unique case of bone cysts involving multiple long bones detected with MRI in a patient with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II complicated by a subsequent pathological fracture. It is possible that the bone cysts are a previously undescribed feature of this syndrome; however, the evidence is insufficient to establish a definite association. Chromosomal abnormality identified in this patient is consistent with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II with no unusual features. Although the nature of these bone cysts is unclear, they are one of the causes of the known increased fracture risk observed in this syndrome. (orig.)

  14. Production of new 3D scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration by rapid prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradique, R; Correia, T R; Miguel, S P; de Sá, K D; Figueira, D R; Mendonça, A G; Correia, I J

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of bone disorders, whether due to trauma or pathology, has been trending upward with the aging of the worldwide population. The currently available treatments for bone injuries are rather limited, involving mainly bone grafts and implants. A particularly promising approach for bone regeneration uses rapid prototyping (RP) technologies to produce 3D scaffolds with highly controlled structure and orientation, based on computer-aided design models or medical data. Herein, tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/alginate scaffolds were produced using RP and subsequently their physicochemical, mechanical and biological properties were characterized. The results showed that 60/40 of TCP and alginate formulation was able to match the compression and present a similar Young modulus to that of trabecular bone while presenting an adequate biocompatibility. Moreover, the biomineralization ability, roughness and macro and microporosity of scaffolds allowed cell anchoring and proliferation at their surface, as well as cell migration to its interior, processes that are fundamental for osteointegration and bone regeneration.

  15. Expanding the Description of Spaceflight Effects beyond Bone Mineral Density [BMD]: Trabecular Bone Score [TBS] in ISS Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, J. D.; Spector, E. R.; King, L. J.; Evans, H. J.; Smith, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    mission, DXA BMD and TBS are detecting different effects of ARED exercise and of ARED + Bisphosphonate on the lumbar spine of astronauts. There is emerging evidence associating reduced TBS with terrestrial metabolic bone disorders where a TBS 1.350 is associated with "normal." However, it is not possible to conclude how the spaceflight-induced changes in TBS increase risk for vertebral fractures in the astronaut or if changes in body composition of the trunk region could be an indirect method of assessing exercise effect on bone microarchitecture. More importantly, this pilot analysis demonstrates a new, minimal risk approach for monitoring changes to vertebral bone microarchitecture. This method could help assess the combined skeletal effects of spaceflight with the effects of aging in the astronaut after return to Earth.

  16. Bone formation using human demineralised bone matrix (Grafton) for the treatment of bone cysts in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, H-J; Krause, H; Kroker, S; Wagemann, W; Meyer, F

    2007-02-01

    Bone cysts, in particular solitary bone cysts, are the most frequent cause of pathological fractures in children. However, there is still a great variety of regimens used to treat these lesions. Since demineralised bone matrix (DBM) is commercially available, we aimed to use this material for the consolidation of bones diagnosed as fragile because of cyst formation. Each of the 7 bone cysts as well as one enchondroma filled with DBM showed a continuous decrease in bone transparency over a period of two years (mean 8 months). A significant decrease in bone transparency and simultaneous cortical remodelling was radiographically detected in these cases as the specific hallmark of an initiated graft incorporation after 3 to 4 months. It was demonstrated that it is possible to heal children within an acceptable period of time using DBM to fill the cystic lesion. DBM appears to be a reasonable and beneficial alternative for the treatment of bone cysts offering both osteoinduction and osteoconductive features.

  17. Bones of Contention: Bone Mineral Density Recovery in Celiac Disease—A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Grace-Farfaglia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic bone disease is a frequent co-morbidity in newly diagnosed adults with celiac disease (CD, an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of dietary gluten. This systematic review of studies looked at the efficacy of the gluten-free diet, physical activity, nutrient supplementation, and bisphosphonates for low bone density treatment. Case control and cohort designs were identified from PubMed and other academic databases (from 1996 to 2015 that observed newly diagnosed adults with CD for at least one year after diet treatment using the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA scan. Only 20 out of 207 studies met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the Strengthening of the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE statement checklist. Gluten-free diet adherence resulted in partial recovery of bone density by one year in all studies, and full recovery by the fifth year. No treatment differences were observed between the gluten-free diet alone and diet plus bisphosphonates in one study. For malnourished patients, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium resulted in significant improvement. Evidence for the impact of physical activity on bone density was limited. Therapeutic strategies aimed at modifying lifestyle factors throughout the lifespan should be studied.

  18. Bones of contention: bone mineral density recovery in celiac disease--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace-Farfaglia, Patricia

    2015-05-07

    Metabolic bone disease is a frequent co-morbidity in newly diagnosed adults with celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of dietary gluten. This systematic review of studies looked at the efficacy of the gluten-free diet, physical activity, nutrient supplementation, and bisphosphonates for low bone density treatment. Case control and cohort designs were identified from PubMed and other academic databases (from 1996 to 2015) that observed newly diagnosed adults with CD for at least one year after diet treatment using the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Only 20 out of 207 studies met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the Strengthening of the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement checklist. Gluten-free diet adherence resulted in partial recovery of bone density by one year in all studies, and full recovery by the fifth year. No treatment differences were observed between the gluten-free diet alone and diet plus bisphosphonates in one study. For malnourished patients, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium resulted in significant improvement. Evidence for the impact of physical activity on bone density was limited. Therapeutic strategies aimed at modifying lifestyle factors throughout the lifespan should be studied.

  19. Bone marrow oedema associated with benign and malignant bone tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, S.L.J. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, B31 2AP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steven.james@roh.nhs.uk; Panicek, D.M. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Davies, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, B31 2AP (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-15

    Bone marrow oedema is associated with a wide variety of pathological processes including both benign and malignant bone tumours. This imaging finding in relation to intraosseous tumours can aid in providing a more focused differential diagnosis. In this review, we will discuss the MR imaging of bone marrow oedema surrounding intraosseous neoplasms. The different pulse sequences used in differentiating underlying tumour from surrounding oedema are discussed along with the role of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI. Benign lesions commonly associated with bone marrow oedema include osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, chondroblastoma and Langerhan's cell histiocytosis. Metastases and malignant primary bone tumours such as osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma and chondrosarcoma may also be surrounded by bone marrow oedema. The imaging findings of these conditions are reviewed and illustrated. Finally, the importance of bone marrow oedema in assessment of post chemotherapeutic response is addressed.

  20. Bone microarchitecture and bone mineral density in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, A; Oturai, A B; Søndergaard, H B

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are at increased risk of reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures. The aetiology of bone loss in MS is unclear. Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a novel analytical tool that provides a measurement of the bone microarchitecture. Decreased TBS...... included. TBS was calculated using TBS iNsight software (MediMaps® ). Multivariable regression analyses were performed with information on smoking, alcohol, glucocorticoid (GC) treatment, sun exposure, physical activity, vitamin D and BMI. RESULTS: Trabecular bone score was not significantly different from...... patients, suggesting that BMD alone, and not the bone microarchitecture, is affected in MS. However, larger studies are needed to verify these findings and to establish the role of TBS in MS. As in the background population, physical activity and non-smoking habits are associated with better bone health...

  1. Bone scintigraphy in detection of bone invasion by oral carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Kotaro; Wakao, Hiromi; Ikuta, Hiroyuki; Kashima, Isamu; Everhart, F.R. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Detecting osseous involvement is clinically important in the management of oral carcinoma. Thirty-one patients with osseous involvement due to oral carcinoma who underwent panoramic radiography and bone scintigraphy were evaluated retrospectively. Bone scintigraphy confirmed osseous involvement in all 31 (100%) of these patients. In 27 (87%) of 31 patients with osseous involvement, both the panoramic radiogram and bone scintigram were positive. In the remaining four patients (13%), bone scintigram was positive for mandibular or maxillary invasion, while panoramic radiogram was negative. There were no instances of an abnormal radiogram with a normal bone scintigram. These findings strongly suggest that bone scintigraphy is more sensitive than panoramic radiography in detecting osseous involvement of the mandible and maxilla due to oral carcinoma. Furthermore, bone scintigraphy was a critical pre-surgical tool in determining the extent of the osseous involvement. (author)

  2. Bone marrow oedema associated with benign and malignant bone tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, S.L.J.; Panicek, D.M.; Davies, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow oedema is associated with a wide variety of pathological processes including both benign and malignant bone tumours. This imaging finding in relation to intraosseous tumours can aid in providing a more focused differential diagnosis. In this review, we will discuss the MR imaging of bone marrow oedema surrounding intraosseous neoplasms. The different pulse sequences used in differentiating underlying tumour from surrounding oedema are discussed along with the role of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI. Benign lesions commonly associated with bone marrow oedema include osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, chondroblastoma and Langerhan's cell histiocytosis. Metastases and malignant primary bone tumours such as osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma and chondrosarcoma may also be surrounded by bone marrow oedema. The imaging findings of these conditions are reviewed and illustrated. Finally, the importance of bone marrow oedema in assessment of post chemotherapeutic response is addressed

  3. Evolutionary patterns of bone histology and bone compactness in xenarthran mammal long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straehl, Fiona R; Scheyer, Torsten M; Forasiepi, Analía M; MacPhee, Ross D; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    Bone microstructure reflects physiological characteristics and has been shown to contain phylogenetic and ecological signals. Although mammalian long bone histology is receiving increasing attention, systematic examination of the main clades has not yet been performed. Here we describe the long bone microstructure of Xenarthra based on thin sections representing twenty-two species. Additionally, patterns in bone compactness of humeri and femora are investigated. The primary bone tissue of xenarthran long bones is composed of a mixture of woven, parallel-fibered and lamellar bone. The vascular canals have a longitudinal, reticular or radial orientation and are mostly arranged in an irregular manner. Concentric rows of vascular canals and laminar organization of the tissue are only found in anteater bones. The long bones of adult specimens are marked by dense Haversian bone, a feature that has been noted for most groups of mammals. In the long bones of armadillos, secondary osteons have an oblique orientation within the three-dimensional bone tissue, thus resulting in their irregular shape when the bones are sectioned transversely. Secondary remodeling is generally more extensive in large taxa than in small taxa, and this could be caused by increased loading. Lines of arrested growth are assumed to be present in all specimens, but they are restricted to the outermost layer in bones of armadillos and are often masked by secondary remodeling in large taxa. Parameters of bone compactness show a pattern in the femur that separates Cingulata and Pilosa (Folivora and Vermilingua), with cingulates having a lower compactness than pilosans. In addition, cingulates show an allometric relationship between humeral and femoral bone compactness.

  4. Autologous bone graft versus demineralized bone matrix in internal fixation of ununited long bones

    OpenAIRE

    Rubenbauer Bianka; Löffler Thomas; Zaspel Johannes; Wittmann Alexandra; Pieske Oliver; Trentzsch Heiko; Piltz Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Non-unions are severe complications in orthopaedic trauma care and occur in 10% of all fractures. The golden standard for the treatment of ununited fractures includes open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) as well as augmentation with autologous-bone-grafting. However, there is morbidity associated with the bone-graft donor site and some patients offer limited quantity or quality of autologous-bone graft material. Since allogene bone-grafts are introduced on the marke...

  5. [Osteoporosis and quality of bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štěpán, Jan

    2018-01-01

    The risk of osteoporotic fracture is determined collectively by bone mineral density, bone mass, architecture and properties of the mineral and organic matrix composite. Changes in these distinct aspects of quality of bone with age, estrogen deficiency, diseases leading to increased risk of fracture and differential mode of action of antiresorptive and bone anabolic treatments have to be considered in clinical therapeutic strategies. In patients at high risk of low impact fracture, sequential therapy switching to antiresorptives after patients have an adequate response to 2 years teriparatide may be the optimal strategy of long term therapy.Key words: aging - bone quality - osteoporosis - prevention - therapy.

  6. Metastases to bone in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieco, P.T.; Azouz, E.M.; Hoeffel, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is a relatively common intracranial neoplasm in childhood. Its extraneural spread was, until recently, thought to be a rare occurrence. Metastases are most commonly to bone. Five patients with medulloblastoma metastatic to bone are presented, and findings are compared to those of previous reports. Two of the five cases showed patchy extensive osteosclerosis of the pelvis and/or proximal femora. One case had concurrent lymph node involvement. In patients with past or present medulloblastoma and bone pain, metastases to bone should be excluded. Medulloblastoma metastatic to bone is a rare cause of extensive osteosclerosis. (orig.)

  7. Bone Anchored Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in improving the hearing of people with conduction or mixed hearing loss. The Technology The (BAHA) is a bone conduction hearing device that includes a titanium fixture permanently implanted into the mastoid bone of the skull and an external percutaneous sound processor. The sound processor is attached to the fixture by means of a skin penetrating abutment. Because the device bypasses the middle ear and directly stimulates the cochlea, it has been recommended for individuals with conduction hearing loss or discharging middle ear infection. The titanium implant is expected to last a lifetime while the external sound processor is expected to last 5 years. The total initial device cost is approximately $5,300 and the external sound processor costs approximately $3,500. Review of BAHA by the Medical Advisory Secretariat The Medical Advisory Secretariat’s review is a descriptive synthesis of findings from 36 research articles published between January 1990 and May 2002. Summary of Findings No randomized controlled studies were found. The evidence was derived from level 4 case series with relative small sample sizes (ranging from 30-188). The majority of the studies have follow-up periods of eight years or longer. All except one study were based on monaural BAHA implant on the side with the best bone conduction threshold. Safety Level 4 evidence showed that BAHA has been be implanted safely in adults and children with success rates of 90% or higher in most studies. No mortality or life threatening morbidity has been reported. Revision rates for tissue reduction or resiting were generally under 10% for adults but have been reported to be as high as 25% in pediatric studies. Adverse skin reaction around the skin penetration site was the most common complication reported. Most of these

  8. Elevated Levels of Peripheral Kynurenine Decrease Bone Strength in Rats with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartlomiej Kalaska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis and treatment of bone disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD represent a clinical challenge. CKD leads to mineral and bone complications starting early in the course of renal failure. Recently, we have observed the positive relationship between intensified central kynurenine turnover and bone strength in rats with subtotal 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6 Nx-induced CKD. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between peripheral kynurenine pathway metabolites and bone strength in rats with 5/6 Nx-induced CKD. The animals were sacrificed 1 and 3 months after 5/6 Nx or sham operation. Nephrectomized rats presented higher concentrations of serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, and parathyroid hormone both 1 and 3 months after nephrectomy. These animals revealed higher concentrations of kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine in the serum and higher gene expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR as a physiological receptor for kynurenine and AhR-dependent cytochrome in the bone tissue. Furthermore, nephrectomy significantly increased the number of osteoclasts in the bone without affecting their resorptive activity measured in serum. These changes were particularly evident in rats 1 month after 5/6 Nx. The main bone biomechanical parameters of the tibia were unchanged between nephrectomized and sham-operated rats but were significantly increased in older compared to younger animals. A similar trend was observed for geometrical parameters measured with calipers, bone mineral density based on Archimedes' method and image of bone microarchitecture obtained from micro-computed tomography analyses of tibial cortical bone. In nephrectomized animals, peripheral kynurenine levels correlated negatively with the main parameters of bone biomechanics, bone geometry, and bone mineral density values. In conclusion, our data suggest that CKD-induced elevated levels of peripheral kynurenine cause pathological changes in bone

  9. Bone scintigraphy for the investigation of lameness in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolln, G.; Franke, C.

    2010-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy has been used as a helpful method in diagnosing lameness in small animals. It is a sensitive, non-invasive method to evaluate bone lesions and orthopaedic disorders. It provides a functional image of the skeleton and thereby aiding in the localisation and diagnosing of obscure lameness. Compared to human medicine one important difference is the inability of an animal to characterize its pain to the examiner. Another difference is the lacking cooperation of an animal during bone scintigraphy. Before this background are shown on the basis of 5 examples the advantages, the method and the different indication of bone scintigraphy. The technique of this method arrives from a human medicine protocol of a 2-phase-bone-scintigraphy and has to be done under light anaesthesia, to avoid artefacts of movement during acquisitions. The authors are convinced that bone scintigraphy is a very useful and diagnostic method for evaluation of obscure lameness because it can give a quick diagnosis and aimed therapy. Therefore secondary changes and additional costs can be avoided for the animal and its owner. (orig.)

  10. Minor histocompatibility antigens on transfused leukoreduced units of red blood cells induce bone marrow transplant rejection in a mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Desmarets, Maxime; Cadwell, Chantel M.; Peterson, Kenneth R.; Neades, Renee; Zimring, James C.

    2009-01-01

    When successful, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)–matched bone marrow transplantation with reduced-intensity conditioning is a cure for several nonmalignant hematologic disorders that require chronic transfusion, such as sickle cell disease and aplastic anemia. However, there are unusually high bone marrow transplant (BMT) rejection rates in these patients. Rejection correlates with the number of transfusions before bone marrow transplantation, and it has been hypothesized that preimmunization t...

  11. Rosai-Dorfman Disease with Epidural and Spinal Bone Marrow Involvement: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oner, A.Y.; Akpek, S.; Tali, T.

    2007-01-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), or Rosai-Dorfman disease, is a rare histiocytic disorder that typically presents with chronic, self-limiting cervical lymphadenopathy. Although this disease mainly affects histiocytes, there are a few reports of bone marrow infiltration. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a promising technology in differentiating between various bone marrow pathologies. We here present conventional magnetic resonance imaging and DWI features of a patient with SHML and bone marrow involvement

  12. Rosai-Dorfman Disease with Epidural and Spinal Bone Marrow Involvement: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oner, A.Y.; Akpek, S.; Tali, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Gazi Univ. School of Medicine. Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), or Rosai-Dorfman disease, is a rare histiocytic disorder that typically presents with chronic, self-limiting cervical lymphadenopathy. Although this disease mainly affects histiocytes, there are a few reports of bone marrow infiltration. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a promising technology in differentiating between various bone marrow pathologies. We here present conventional magnetic resonance imaging and DWI features of a patient with SHML and bone marrow involvement.

  13. Natural variations in calcium isotope composition as a monitor of bone mineral balance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulan, J.; Anbar, A.; Thomas, B.; Smith, S.

    2004-12-01

    The skeleton is the largest reservoir of calcium in the human body and is responsible for the short term control of blood levels of this element. Accurate measurement of changes in bone calcium balance is critical to understanding how calcium metabolism responds to physiological and environmental changes and, more specifically, to diagnosing and evaluating the effectiveness of treatments for osteoporosis and other serious calcium-related disorders. It is very difficult to measure bone calcium balance using current techniques, however, because these techniques rely either on separate estimates of bone resorption and formation that are not quantitatively comparable, or on complex and expensive studies of calcium kinetics using administered isotopic tracers. This difficulty is even more apparent and more severe for measurements of short-term changes in bone calcium balance that do not produce detectable changes in bone mineral density. Calcium isotopes may provide a novel means of addressing this problem. The foundation of this isotope application is the ca. 1.3 per mil fractionation of calcium during bone formation, favoring light calcium in the bone. This fractionation results in a steady-state isotopic offset between calcium in bone and calcium in soft tissues, blood and urine. Perturbations to this steady state due to changes in the net formation or resorption of bone should be reflected in changes in the isotopic composition of soft tissues and fluids. Here we present evidence that easily detectable shifts in the natural calcium isotope composition of human urine rapidly reflect changes in bone calcium balance. Urine from subjects in a 17-week bed rest study was analyzed for calcium isotopic composition. Bed rest promotes net resorption of bone, shifting calcium from bone to soft tissues, blood and urine. The calcium isotope composition of patients in this study shifted toward lighter values during bed rest, consistent with net resorption of isotopically

  14. Effects of cadmium intake on bone metabolism of mothers during pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Hisayoshi; Ichikawa, Masayo; Seki, Yukio

    2002-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy metal that exists ubiquitously in the environment, and it interacts with essential elements such as zinc, copper, iron, and calcium (Ca). Particularly, Cd interferes with Ca and vitamin D metabolism in bone kidney and intestine. The interaction between Cd and Ca in bone, intestine, and kidney may result in the disorder of bone metabolism. On the other hand, pregnancy and lactation are also important physiological factors affecting bone metabolism in the mother. Ca absorption is decreased by competition with Cd in the intestine, and more Ca is released from maternal bone and transferred to neonate by lactation. In the intestine, Cd uptake competes with Ca uptake. Cd causes a marked decrease in bone density compared to the normal decrease in bone mineral density during lactation. Lactation is an important factor contributing to the decrease in bone mineral density and Cd has an additive effect of decreasing bone metabolism of mother animal, although the Cd intake level is relatively low (approximately 3-14 microgCd/kg/day). The relationship among maternal Cd intake, renal function and bone metabolism and the interaction between Cd and Ca during lactation are reviewed herein, together with additional data obtained recently in our laboratory.

  15. Hepatic Osteodystrophy: The Mechanism of Bone Loss in Hepatocellular Disease and the Effects of Pamidronate Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirlandeli, Adriano L; Dick-de-Paula, Ingrid; Zamarioli, Ariane; Jorgetti, Vanda; Ramalho, Leandra N Z; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H; Volpon, Jose B; Jordão, Alceu A; Cunha, Fernando Q; Fukada, Sandra Y; de Paula, Francisco J A

    2017-04-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the bone phenotypes and mechanisms involved in bone disorders associated with hepatic osteodystrophy. Hepatocellular disease was induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). In addition, the effects of disodium pamidronate on bone tissue were evaluated. The study included 4 groups of 15 mice: a) C = mice subjected to vehicle injections; b) C+P = mice subjected to vehicle and pamidronate injections; c) CCl4+V = mice subjected to CCl4 and vehicle injections; and d) CCl4+P = mice subjected to CCl4 and pamidronate injections. CCl4 or vehicle was administered for 8 weeks, while pamidronate or vehicle was injected at the end of the fourth week. Bone histomorphometry and biomechanical analysis were performed in tibiae, while femora were used for micro-computed tomography and gene expression. CCl4 mice exhibited decreased bone volume/trabecular volume and trabecular numbers, as well as increased trabecular separation, as determined by bone histomorphometry and micro-computed tomography, but these changes were not detected in the group treated with pamidronate. CCl4 mice showed increased numbers of osteoclasts and resorption surface. High serum levels of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and the increased expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase in the bones of CCl4 mice supported the enhancement of bone resorption in these mice. Taken together, these results suggest that bone resorption is the main mechanism of bone loss in chronic hepatocellular disease in mice.

  16. Bone three-dimensional microstructural features of the common osteoporotic fracture sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huayue; Kubo, Kin-ya

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common metabolic skeletal disorder characterized by decreased bone mass and deteriorated bone structure, leading to increased susceptibility to fractures. With aging population, osteoporotic fractures are of global health and socioeconomic importance. The three-dimensional microstructural information of the common osteoporosis-related fracture sites, including vertebra, femoral neck and distal radius, is a key for fully understanding osteoporosis pathogenesis and predicting the fracture risk. Low vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) is correlated with increased fracture of the spine. Vertebral BMD decreases from cervical to lumbar spine, with the lowest BMD at the third lumbar vertebra. Trabecular bone mass of the vertebrae is much lower than that of the peripheral bone. Cancellous bone of the vertebral body has a complex heterogeneous three-dimensional microstructure, with lower bone volume in the central and anterior superior regions. Trabecular bone quality is a key element to maintain the vertebral strength. The increased fragility of osteoporotic femoral neck is attributed to low cancellous bone volume and high compact porosity. Compared with age-matched controls, increased cortical porosity is observed at the femoral neck in osteoporotic fracture patients. Distal radius demonstrates spatial inhomogeneous characteristic in cortical microstructure. The medial region of the distal radius displays the highest cortical porosity compared with the lateral, anterior and posterior regions. Bone strength of the distal radius is mainly determined by cortical porosity, which deteriorates with advancing age. PMID:25232524

  17. [Computed tomography of the temporal bone in diagnosis of chronic exudative otitis media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelikovich, E I

    2005-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone was made in 37 patients aged 2 to 55 years with chronic exudative otitis media (CEOM). In 21 of them the pathology was bilateral. The analysis of 58 CT images has identified CT signs of chronic exudative otitis media. They include partial (17 temporary bones) or complete (38 temporal bones) block of the bone opening of the auditory tube, pneumatic defects of the tympanic cavity (58 temporal bones), pneumatic defects of the mastoid process and antrum (47 temporal bones), pathologic retraction of the tympanic membrane. The examination of the temporal bone detected both CT-signs of CEOM and other causes of hearing disorders in 14 patients (26 temporal bones) with CEOM symptoms and inadequately high hypoacusis. Among these causes were malformation of the auditory ossicula (n=5), malformation of the labynthine window (n=2), malformation of the middle and internal ear (n=4), a wide aqueduct of the vestibule, labyrinthine anomaly of Mondini's type (n=1), cochlear hypoplasia (n=4), stenosis of the internal acoustic meatuses (n=2). Sclerotic fibrous dysplasia was suggested in 2 temporal bones (by CT data). CT was repeated after surgical treatment of 10 patients (14 temporal bones) and visual assessment of tympanostomy results was made.

  18. Aberrant bone density in aging mice lacking the adenosine transporter ENT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Hinton

    Full Text Available Adenosine is known to regulate bone production and resorption in humans and mice. Type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT1 is responsible for the majority of adenosine transport across the plasma membrane and is ubiquitously expressed in both humans and mice. However, the contribution of ENT1-mediated adenosine levels has not been studied in bone remodeling. With the recent identification of the importance of adenosine signaling in bone homeostasis, it is essential to understand the role of ENT1 to develop novel therapeutic compounds for bone disorders. Here we examined the effect of ENT1 deletion on bone density using X-ray, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-computerized tomography analysis. Our results show that bone density and bone mineral density is reduced in the lower thoracic and lumbar spine as well as the femur of old ENT1 null mice (>7 months compared to wild-type littermates. Furthermore, we found increased mRNA expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, an osteoclast marker, in isolated long bones from 10 month old ENT1 null mice compared to wild-type mice. In addition, aged ENT1 null mice displayed severe deficit in motor coordination and locomotor activity, which might be attributed to dysregulated bone density. Overall, our study suggests that ENT1-regulated adenosine signaling plays an essential role in lumbar spine and femur bone density.

  19. Forearm bone mineralization in recently diagnosed female adolescents with a premenarchal onset of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggen, Inge; Vanbesien, Jesse; Gies, Inge; Van den Eede, Ursula; Lampo, Annik; Louis, Olivia; De Schepper, Jean

    2016-08-01

    Data available on bone mineralization by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) in adolescents with an early onset anorexia nervosa (AN) is limited. We investigated whether a disturbed bone mineralization can be observed at the distal radius in recently diagnosed female adolescents with AN and a premenarchal onset of this disease. Twenty-four premenarchal patients with AN and 22 healthy females which were age and height matched, were selected from our reference database; both groups underwent a pQCT bone assessment at the distal radius of the nondominant arm. The patients age ranged between 13.3 and 18.4 years. Their percent weight loss ranged between 5 and 36% (median 23%) and occurred within the preceding 3 to 44 months. Trabecular volumetric bone mineral density of the patient group was significantly lower than the comparison group (185.6 ± 30.2 vs.209.3 ± 34.0 mm(2) ; p = 0.02). Bone cross-sectional area, bone mineral content, total volumetric bone mineral density and periosteal circumference were also lower, albeit not significantly. The bone parameters were unrelated to the under nutrition severity and duration. In premenarchal patients with AN the trabecular bone mineralization of the forearm is significantly reduced, this might be an early indicator of altered bone mineral accrual. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:809-812). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Study on the relationship between bone metabolism indexes and osteoporosis in aged males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Nanping; Yang Daoli; Zhao Yutang; Peng Liyi; Liu Guixiang

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics and significance of the changes of bone metabolism indexes related to the occurrence of osteoporosis in aged males. Methods: Serum interleukin 1β(IL-1β), insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), parathyroid hormone (PTH-M) and 25-OH-D were measured by radio-immunoassay in 58 aged males with osteoporosis and 37 cases with bone mass loss. Bone density was measured in these subjects and all the indexes were compared with those in young and middle-aged and aged healthy controls. Results: IL-1β and PTH-M levels in aged males with osteoporosis or bone mass loss were higher than those in healthy controls (P < 0.01), while IGF-II and 25-OH-D were lower than in normal controls, especially in osteoporosis group (P < 0.01). With the age increasing and the deterioration of the disorder, bone density in the two groups of patients were significantly lower than those in young and middle-aged controls (P < 0.01). Aged males with osteoporosis had a significantly lower bone density than patients with bone mass loss. Conclusion: Cytokines and disturbance of bone metabolism indexes are the main factors that lead to osteoporosis characterized by more bone absorption and less bone formation in aged males

  1. Synostosis Between Pubic Bones due to Neurogenic, Heterotopic Ossification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic, heterotopic ossification is characterised by the formation of new, extraosseous (ectopic bone in soft tissue in patients with neurological disorders. A 33-year-old female, who was born with spina bifida, paraplegia, and diastasis of symphysis pubis, had indwelling urethral catheter drainage and was using oxybutynin bladder instillations. She was prescribed diuretic for swelling of feet, which aggravated bypassing of catheter. Hence, suprapubic cystostomy was performed. Despite anticholinergic therapy, there was chronic urine leak around the suprapubic catheter and per urethra. Therefore, the urethra was mobilised and closed. After closure of the urethra, there was no urine leak from the urethra, but urine leak persisted around the suprapubic catheter. Cystogram confirmed the presence of a Foley balloon inside the bladder; there was no urinary fistula. The Foley balloon ruptured frequently, leading to extrusion of the Foley catheter. X-ray of abdomen showed heterotopic bone formation bridging the gap across diastasis of symphysis pubis. CT of pelvis revealed heterotopic bone lying in close proximity to the balloon of the Foley catheter; the sharp edge of heterotopic bone probably acted like a saw and led to frequent rupture of the balloon of the Foley catheter. Unique features of this case are: (1 temporal relationship of heterotopic bone formation to suprapubic cystostomy and chronic urine leak; (2 occurrence of heterotopic ossification in pubic region; (3 complications of heterotopic bone formation viz. frequent rupture of the balloon of the Foley catheter by the irregular margin of heterotopic bone and difficulty in insertion of suprapubic catheter because the heterotopic bone encroached on the suprapubic track; (4 synostosis between pubic bones as a result of heterotopic ossification..Common aetiological factors for neurogenic, heterotopic ossification, such as forceful manipulation, trauma, or spasticity, were absent in this

  2. Mechanical properties of femoral trabecular bone in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolte Ingo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studying mechanical properties of canine trabecular bone is important for a better understanding of fracture mechanics or bone disorders and is also needed for numerical simulation of canine femora. No detailed data about elastic moduli and degrees of anisotropy of canine femoral trabecular bone has been published so far, hence the purpose of this study was to measure the elastic modulus of trabecular bone in canine femoral heads by ultrasound testing and to assess whether assuming isotropy of the cancellous bone in femoral heads in dogs is a valid simplification. Methods From 8 euthanized dogs, both femora were obtained and cubic specimens were cut from the centre of the femoral head which were oriented along the main pressure and tension trajectories. The specimens were tested using a 100 MHz ultrasound transducer in all three orthogonal directions. The directional elastic moduli of trabecular bone tissue and degrees of anisotropy were calculated. Results The elastic modulus along principal bone trajectories was found to be 11.2 GPa ± 0.4, 10.5 ± 2.1 GPa and 10.5 ± 1.8 GPa, respectively. The mean density of the specimens was 1.40 ± 0.09 g/cm3. The degrees of anisotropy revealed a significant inverse relationship with specimen densities. No significant differences were found between the elastic moduli in x, y and z directions, suggesting an effective isotropy of trabecular bone tissue in canine femoral heads. Discussion This study presents detailed data about elastic moduli of trabecular bone tissue obtained from canine femoral heads. Limitations of the study are the relatively small number of animals investigated and the measurement of whole specimen densities instead of trabecular bone densities which might lead to an underestimation of Young's moduli. Publications on elastic moduli of trabecular bone tissue present results that are similar to our data. Conclusion This study provides data about directional elastic

  3. Effects of Resveratrol Supplementation on Bone Growth in Young Rats and Microarchitecture and Remodeling in Ageing Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M. C. Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a highly prevalent skeletal disorder in the elderly that causes serious bone fractures. Peak bone mass achieved at adolescence has been shown to predict bone mass and osteoporosis related risk fracture later in life. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol compound, may have the potential to promote bone formation and reduce bone resorption. However, it is unclear whether it can aid bone growth and bone mass accumulation during rapid growth and modulate bone metabolism during ageing. Using rat models, the current study investigated the potential effects of resveratrol supplementation during the rapid postnatal growth period and in late adulthood (early ageing on bone microarchitecture and metabolism. In the growth trial, 4-week-old male hooded Wistar rats on a normal chow diet were given resveratrol (2.5 mg/kg/day or vehicle control for 5 weeks. In the ageing trial, 6-month-old male hooded Wistar rats were treated with resveratrol (20 mg/kg/day or vehicle for 3 months. Treatment effects in the tibia were examined by μ-computer tomography (μ-CT analysis, bone histomorphometric measurements and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR gene expression analysis. Resveratrol treatment did not affect trabecular bone volume and bone remodeling indices in the youth animal model. Resveratrol supplementation in the early ageing rats tended to decrease trabecular bone volume, Sirt1 gene expression and increased expression of adipogenesis-related genes in bone, all of which were statistically insignificant. However, it decreased osteocalcin expression (p = 0.03. Furthermore, serum levels of bone resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides type I collagen (CTX-1 were significantly elevated in the resveratrol supplementation group (p = 0.02 with no changes observed in serum levels of bone formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP. These results in rat models suggest that resveratrol supplementation does not significantly affect bone

  4. Electromechanical Properties of Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regimbal, Raymond L.

    Discrepancies between calculated and empirical properties of bone are thought to be due to a general lack of consideration for the extent and manner(s) with which bone components interact at the molecular level. For a bone component in physiological fluid or whenever two phases are in contact, there is a region between the bulk phases called the electrical double layer which is marked by a separation of electric charges. For the purpose of studying electrical double layer interactions, the method of particle microelectrophoresis was used to characterize bone and its major constituents on the basis of the net charge they bear when suspended in ionic media of physiological relevance. With the data presented as pH versus zeta (zeta ) potential, the figures reveal an isoelectric point (IEP) for bone mineral near pH 8.6, whereas intact and EDTA demineralized bone tissue both exhibit IEPs near pH 5.1. While these data demonstrate the potential for a significant degree of coulombic interaction between the bone mineral and organic constituent double layers, it was also observed that use of inorganic phosphate buffers, as a specific marker for bone mineral, resulted in (1) an immediate reversal, from positive to negative, of the bone mineral zeta potential (2) rendered the zeta potential of intact bone more negative in a manner linearly dependent on both time and temperature and (3) had no affect on demineralized bone (P load for a 3 day period. While it is thus demonstrated that the major inorganic and organic phases of bone are electromechanically coupled, a thermodynamic consideration of the data suggests that the nature of the bond is to preserve mineral and organic phase electroneutralities by participating in electrical double layer interactions. The results are discussed in terms of bone mechanical modeling, electrokinetic properties, aging, tissue-implant compatibility and the etiologies of bone pathologic conditions.

  5. Bone- and bone marrow scintigraphy in Gaucher disease type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikosch, P. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, State Hospital Klagenfurt (Austria); Dept. of Internal Medicine II, State Hospital Klagenfurt (Austria); Zitter, F. [Dept. of Internal Medicine II, State Hospital Klagenfurt (Austria); Gallowitsch, H.J.; Lind, P. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, State Hospital Klagenfurt (Austria); Wuertz, F. [Dept. of Pathology, State Hospital Klagenfurt (Austria); Mehta, A.B.; Hughes, D.A. [Lysosomal Storage Disorder Unit, Dept. of Academic Haematology, Royal Free and Univ. Coll. Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    Scintigraphy is a method for imaging metabolism and should be viewed as complimentary to morphological imaging. Bone and bone marrow scintigraphy can particularly contribute to the detection of focal disease in Gaucher disease. In bone crises it can discriminate within three days after pain onset between local infection and aseptic necrosis. A further advantage of bone- and bone marrow scintigraphy is the visualization of the whole skeleton within one setting. Whole body imaging for focal lesions might thus be an objective in GD, in particular in patients complaining of several painful sites. Direct imaging of bone marrow deposits in GD by MIBI scintigraphy might be of special interest in children in whom bone marrow undergoes a developmental conversion from red to yellow marrow in the ap-pendicular skeleton. MRI interpretation in young GD patients is thus difficult in order to estimate the exact amount and extent of bone marrow infiltration by Gaucher cells. 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy with its direct visualization of lipid storage could thus add interesting additional information not shown with other methods including MRI. Although MRI is the most accepted imaging modality in assessing the skeletal status in GD, a selective use of scintigraphy for imaging bone and bone marrow may add information in the evaluation of patients with Gaucher disease.

  6. Bone marrow macrophages support prostate cancer growth in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soki, Fabiana N; Cho, Sun Wook; Kim, Yeo Won; Jones, Jacqueline D; Park, Serk In; Koh, Amy J; Entezami, Payam; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Pienta, Kenneth J; Roca, Hernan; McCauley, Laurie K

    2015-11-03

    Resident macrophages in bone play important roles in bone remodeling, repair, and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, yet their role in skeletal metastasis remains under investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of macrophages in prostate cancer skeletal metastasis, using two in vivo mouse models of conditional macrophage depletion. RM-1 syngeneic tumor growth was analyzed in an inducible macrophage (CSF-1 receptor positive cells) ablation model (MAFIA mice). There was a significant reduction in tumor growth in the tibiae of macrophage-ablated mice, compared with control non-ablated mice. Similar results were observed when macrophage ablation was performed using liposome-encapsulated clodronate and human PC-3 prostate cancer cells where tumor-bearing long bones had increased numbers of tumor associated-macrophages. Although tumors were consistently smaller in macrophage-depleted mice, paradoxical results of macrophage depletion on bone were observed. Histomorphometric and micro-CT analyses demonstrated that clodronate-treated mice had increased bone volume, while MAFIA mice had reduced bone volume. These results suggest that the effect of macrophage depletion on tumor growth was independent of its effect on bone responses and that macrophages in bone may be more important to tumor growth than the bone itself. In conclusion, resident macrophages play a pivotal role in prostate cancer growth in bone.

  7. Bone- and bone marrow scintigraphy in Gaucher disease type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikosch, P.; Zitter, F.; Gallowitsch, H.J.; Lind, P.; Wuertz, F.; Mehta, A.B.; Hughes, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Scintigraphy is a method for imaging metabolism and should be viewed as complimentary to morphological imaging. Bone and bone marrow scintigraphy can particularly contribute to the detection of focal disease in Gaucher disease. In bone crises it can discriminate within three days after pain onset between local infection and aseptic necrosis. A further advantage of bone- and bone marrow scintigraphy is the visualization of the whole skeleton within one setting. Whole body imaging for focal lesions might thus be an objective in GD, in particular in patients complaining of several painful sites. Direct imaging of bone marrow deposits in GD by MIBI scintigraphy might be of special interest in children in whom bone marrow undergoes a developmental conversion from red to yellow marrow in the ap-pendicular skeleton. MRI interpretation in young GD patients is thus difficult in order to estimate the exact amount and extent of bone marrow infiltration by Gaucher cells. 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy with its direct visualization of lipid storage could thus add interesting additional information not shown with other methods including MRI. Although MRI is the most accepted imaging modality in assessing the skeletal status in GD, a selective use of scintigraphy for imaging bone and bone marrow may add information in the evaluation of patients with Gaucher disease

  8. Aging and bone. X-ray bone densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Rikushi

    1994-01-01

    Bone mass at all ages of the individuals is the integration of genetic factors, nutrition, physical exercise, hormonal environments, and other factors influencing the bone. It is also a measurable risk factor for osteoporosis which may subsequently cause bone fractures. Thus measuring bone mass is required to predict the probability of developing bone fractures subsequent to osteoporosis, and to diagnose osteoporosis, and to manage the osteoporosis patient. This paper discusses bone mineral measurements according to their characteristics and clinical application. Methodology for measuring bone mass has rapidly progressed during the past 15 years, which covers photodensitometry, photon absorptiometry (single energy X-ray absorptiometry and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), quantitative CT, and ultrasound. These techniques have allowed noninvasive measurement of bone mineral density in any site of the skeleton with high accuracy and precision, although a single use of the technique cannot satisfy the complete clinical requirements. Thus the most appropriate method for measuring bone mineral density is important to monitor bone mass change and according to the specific site. (N.K.)

  9. Bone graft viability evaluated by three phase bone scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljiljana Jaukovic Rajko Spaic; Marijan Novakovic; Srbislav Stosic

    2004-01-01

    Bone defects resulting war injury can be replaced by microvascular bone grafts from fibula. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the value of three phase (3P) bone scintigraphy in the early detection of the bone graft complications. Method: 3P bone scans were performed in four patients (two after mandible reconstruction with micro vascular fibular bone grafts, one after fibular transplantation for ulnar and one with humeral reconstruction). First dynamic phase scan was performed immediately after iv injection of 740 MBq Tc- 99m DPD, acquiring 15 two seconds duration frames. Second, early static scan was performed during next 300 seconds, and third, delayed scan three hours later. All scans were obtained under the bone graft region. The scans were evaluated using ROI under graft region and the corresponding contra lateral area. Blood flow in graft region was determined using first phase scan, and tracer uptake in the same region was determined using second and third phase scans. Results: in all patients blood flow in graft region was particularly normal. Tracer uptake in one of two patients with mandible reconstruction was diffusely increased in graft, strongly suggesting infection; In the other patient delayed scan showed no tracer uptake in graft center .Both patients with ulnar and humeral reconstruction showed only slightly decreased tracer uptake in bone grafts. 3 phase bone scintigraphy may play a role in the evaluation of bone graft viability by predicting the infection and necrosis. (authors)

  10. Reduced diaphyseal strength associated with high intracortical vascular porosity within long bones of children with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Carolyne; Jameson, John; Smith, Peter; Harris, Gerald

    2014-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disorder resulting in bone fragility. The mechanisms behind this fragility are not well understood. In addition to characteristic bone mass deficiencies, research suggests that bone material properties are compromised in individuals with this disorder. However, little data exists regarding bone properties beyond the microstructural scale in individuals with this disorder. Specimens were obtained from long bone diaphyses of nine children with osteogenesis imperfecta during routine osteotomy procedures. Small rectangular beams, oriented longitudinally and transversely to the diaphyseal axis, were machined from these specimens and elastic modulus, yield strength, and maximum strength were measured in three-point bending. Intracortical vascular porosity, bone volume fraction, osteocyte lacuna density, and volumetric tissue mineral density were determined by synchrotron micro-computed tomography, and relationships among these mechanical properties and structural parameters were explored. Modulus and strength were on average 64-68% lower in the transverse vs. longitudinal beams (Posteogenesis imperfecta. Results confirm that these properties are anisotropic. Elevated vascular porosity was observed in most specimens, and this parameter was associated with reduced bone material strength. These results offer insight toward understanding bone fragility and the role of intracortical porosity on the strength of bone tissue in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of bone marrow macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simranpreet; Raggatt, Liza Jane; Batoon, Lena; Hume, David Arthur; Levesque, Jean-Pierre; Pettit, Allison Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages, named for their phagocytic ability, participate in homeostasis, tissue regeneration and inflammatory responses. Bone and adjacent marrow contain multiple functionally unique resident tissue macrophage subsets which maintain and regulate anatomically distinct niche environments within these interconnected tissues. Three subsets of bone-bone marrow resident tissue macrophages have been characterised; erythroblastic island macrophages, haematopoietic stem cell niche macrophages and osteal macrophages. The role of these macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches is reviewed in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Heritability of bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, S; Benmalek, A; Guaydier-Souquières, G; Sabatier, J P; Marcelli, C

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate the influence of genetic background as a determinant of peak bone mass. We compared lumbar spine bone mineral density in 175 girls with a bone age of 16 years or older and in their premenopausal mothers. We also investigated the influence of a family history of osteoporosis on lumbar spine bone mineral density in 275 women and their 559 daughters. In the 175 mother-daughter pairs, heritability (h2) was significantly different from 0 (P < 0.0001) for lumbar spine bone mineral density (h2 = 53%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 28.5-77.6%), bone mineral content (h2 = 62.3%; 95% CI = 37.7-86.8%), bone mineral density adjusted for body mass index (h2 = 56%; CI = 31.5-80.5%), and bone mineral content adjusted for body mass index (h2 = 68.2%; CI = 43.6-92.7%). However, the heritability estimations lacked accuracy, as shown by the wide 95% CIs. Osteopenia and osteoporosis were found in 16.4% and 1% of the mothers, respectively. In the subgroup defined by osteopenia or osteoporosis in the mother, lumbar spine bone mineral density was significantly higher in the daughters than in the mothers (0.994 +/- 0.095 g/cm2 versus 0.895 +/- 0.098 g/cm2; P < 0.0001), whereas the opposite was true in the subgroup defined by normal bone mass in the mothers (1.068 +/- 0.110 g/cm2 versus 1.109 +/- 0.098 g/cm2; P = 0.0003). Nevertheless, lumbar spine bone mineral density was significantly lower in the daughters of low-bone-mass women than in those of normal-bone-mass women (0.994 +/- 0.009 g/cm2 versus 1.069 +/- 0.012 g/cm2; P = 0.0006). These findings suggest a role of genetic factors inherited from the father and also indicate that bone mass gains during adulthood contribute to achievement of the optimal peak bone mass. In the family history study, bone mass was lower in the subjects with a family history of osteoporosis (123 of the 559 daughters, Z-scores normalized for height, weight, and pubertal status: bone mineral density Z-score, -0.054 +/- 1.104; bone mineral

  13. Bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Colin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD presents in different phases over time and is oftencomplicated by comorbid conditions such as substance-use disordersand anxiety disorders. Treatment usually involves pharmacotherapywith combinations of different classes of medications and frequentmedication revisions.

  14. Conduct disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000919.htm Conduct disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Conduct disorder is a set of ongoing emotional and behavioral ...

  15. Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personality disorders are a group of mental illnesses. They involve long-term patterns of thoughts and behaviors that ... serious problems with relationships and work. People with personality disorders have trouble dealing with everyday stresses and problems. ...

  16. Menstrual Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Menstrual Disorders in Teens Page Content Article Body Within ... test Measurement of gonadotropins, prolactin and androgens How Menstrual Disorders are treated with Drug Therapy: After exclusion ...

  17. Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mental disorder(s) (84.5%). 1 Table 1 Download PNG image Download PDF file Past Year Co-morbidity ... in the past 12 months. Table 2 Download PNG image Download PDF file Past Year Treatment of ...

  18. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000816.htm Autoimmune disorders To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An autoimmune disorder occurs when the body's immune system attacks and ...

  19. TMJ disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and dislocations. Alternative Names TMD; Temporomandibular joint disorders; Temporomandibular muscle disorders References Garza I, Schwedt TJ, Robertson CE, Smith JH. Headache and other craniofacial pain. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic ...

  20. Conversion disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000954.htm Conversion disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Conversion disorder is a mental condition in which a person ...

  1. Neuromuscular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can ... function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Multiple sclerosis Myasthenia ...

  2. Mathematics disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001534.htm Mathematics disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mathematics disorder is a condition in which a child's ...

  3. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eating disorders are serious behavior problems. They can include severe overeating or not consuming enough food to stay ... concern about your shape or weight. Types of eating disorders include Anorexia nervosa, in which you become too ...

  4. Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They go ... The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in families. ...

  5. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More Publications About Eating Disorders Research Results PubMed: Journal Articles about Eating Disorders Contact Us The National Institute of Mental Health Information Resource Center Hours: 8:30 a.m. ...

  6. Panic Disorder and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health illnesses Alcoholism, substance abuse, and addictive behavior Anxiety disorders Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Bipolar disorder (manic depressive illness) Borderline personality disorder Depression Eating disorders Post-traumatic ...

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    risk ?,” Equine Veterinary J., vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 174– 180, Mar. 2010. [127] J. J. Sciote and T. J. Morris, “Skeletal muscle function and fibre...shear properties of fibrils, fibers, and lamellar layers. A layered composite model assessed cortical and trabecular bone while a simple finite element...to be assessed . It was found that the distribution of hydroxyapatite within the tropocollagen matrix at the fibril level influences the macroscale

  8. Non-linear pattern formation in bone growth and architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Phil

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatiotemporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here - chaotic non-linear pattern formation (NPF) - which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence, and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of "group intelligence" exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called "particle swarm optimization" (PSO). This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes, seeing them operating "socially" in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical), resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in silico computer simulation of bone modeling. What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder juvenile Pagets disease or idiopathic hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here, coupling or "feedback" between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element. This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the emergent

  9. The spectrum of bone disease in Jordanian hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, Nidal A.; Al-Mansour, M.; Sroujieh, Ahmad S.; Wahbeh, A.; Ailabouni, W.; Hamzah, Y.; Mahafzah, W.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the spectrum of mineral abnormalities and bone disease (BD) in hemodialysis patients at Jordan University Hospital (JUH), Amman, Jordan. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 63 patients (38 males and 25 females), mean age 44.19 years (range 17-76 years), with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on regular hemodialysis at JUH between November 2004 and April 2005. All patients have undergone complete blood count, chemistry profile, alkaline phosphatase, serum albumin, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and plain x-rays. Bone disorders were identified in 45 patients on x-rays (70%). Osteopenia was found in 43 patients (68.3%), subperiosteal resorption in 24 patients (38.3%) and metastatic calcification in 22 patients (35%). Hypocalcemia was found in 28.6% and hypercalcemia in 7.9%. All patients were taking calcium carbonate, and 55.5% of patients were on vitamin D supplements. The calcium levels in 63.5% and the phosphorus levels in 50.8% of patients were within the recommended guidelines of the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI). Serum i-PTH level was above 300 pg/ml high turnover bone disease in 24.6% of patients, 21.3% had iPTH of 150-300 pg/ml target, and 44.3% had i-PTH levels below 100 pg/mL suggesting a dynamic bone disease. Patients with severe bone disease had a statistically significant higher iPTH levels (p<0.005). Bone disease and mineral abnormalities are common in hemodialysis patients at JUH. Earlier detection of bone disease and better overall management strategy may reduce the frequency and severity of bone disease in CKD patients in Jordan. (author)

  10. Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Gucciardi, Enza; Celasun, Nalan; Ahmad, Farah; Stewart, Donna E

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Health Issue Eating disorders are an increasing public health problem among young women. Anorexia and bulimia may give rise to serious physical conditions such as hypothermia, hypotension, electrolyte imbalance, endocrine disorders, and kidney failure. Key Issues Eating disorders are primarily a problem among women. In Ontario in 1995, over 90% of reported hospitalized cases of anorexia and bulimia were women. In addition to eating disorders, preoccupation with weight, body image and...

  11. Mineral metabolism and bone abnormalities in children with chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Cheryl P

    2008-06-01

    Abnormalities in mineral metabolism and changes in skeletal histology may contribute to growth impairment in children with chronic renal failure. Hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia, metabolic acidosis, alterations in vitamin D and IGF synthesis and parathyroid gland dysfunction play significant roles in the development of secondary hyperparathyroidism and subsequently, bone disease in renal failure. The recent KDIGO conference has made recommendations to consider this as a systemic disorder (chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder) and to standardize bone histomorphometry to include bone turnover, mineralization and volume (TMV). The use of DXA to assess bone mass is controversial in children with chronic renal failure. Questions arise regarding the accuracy of bone measurements and difficulty in data interpretation especially in children with renal failure who are not only growth retarded but often have pubertal delay and osteosclerosis. The validity and feasibility of new modalities of skeletal imaging which can detect changes in both trabecular and cortical bone are currently being investigated in children. The management of mineral abnormalities and bone disease in chronic renal failure is multifactorial. To manage hyperphosphatemia, dietary phosphate restriction accompanied by intake of calcium-free and metal-free phosphate binding agents are widely utilized. Vitamin D analogs remain the primary therapy for secondary hyperparathyroidism, although the use of the less hypercalcemic agents is preferred due to concerns of calciphylaxis and vascular calcification. Future clinical studies are needed to evaluate the long-term effects of calcimimetic agents and bisphosphonate therapy in children with chronic renal failure.

  12. Battling Brittle Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The accuDEXA(R) Bone Mineral Density Assessment System, manufactured by Schick Technologies, Inc., utilizes "camera on a chip" sensor technology invented and developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Schick's accuDEXA system offers several advantages over traditional osteoporosis tests, which assess bone density loss in the hip and spine, and require specialized personnel to conduct. With accuDEXA, physicians can test the entire body's bone density at a peripheral site, such as the finger, without applying gels or having patients remove garments. Results are achieved in 30 seconds and printed out in less than a minute, compared to the estimated exam time of 15 minutes for hip and spine density analyses. Schick has also applied the CMOS APS technology to a new software product that performs dental radiography using up to 90 percent less radiation exposure than conventional X-rays. Called Computed Dental Radiography(R), the new digital imaging product utilizes an electronic sensor in place of X-ray film to generate sharp and clear images that appear on a computer screen within 3 seconds, and can be enlarged and enhanced to identify problems.

  13. HIV and bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Benjamin; Dockrell, David; Bowman, Christine; McCloskey, Eugene

    2010-11-01

    Advances in management have resulted in a dramatic decline in mortality for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This decrease in mortality, initially the result of improved prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections but later mediated by the use of highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to the need to consider long-term complications of the disease itself, or its treatment. Bone disease is increasingly recognised as a concern. The prevalence of reduced BMD and possibly also fracture incidence are increased in HIV-positive individuals compared with HIV-negative controls. There are many potential explanations for this - an increased prevalence of established osteoporosis risk factors in the HIV-positive population, a likely direct effect of HIV infection itself and a possible contributory role of ARV therapy. At present, the assessment of bone disease and fracture risk remains patchy, with little or no guidance on identifying those at increased risk of reduced BMD or fragility fracture. Preventative and therapeutic strategies with bone specific treatments need to be developed. Limited data suggest bisphosphonates may be beneficial in conjunction with vitamin D and calcium supplementation in the treatment of reduced BMD in HIV-infected patients but larger studies of longer duration are needed. The safety and cost-effectiveness of these and other treatments needs to be evaluated. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... They may say they're in a bad mood. A mood disorder is different. It affects a person's everyday emotional state. Nearly one in ten people aged 18 and older have mood disorders. These include depression and bipolar disorder (also ...

  15. Anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... women of other races and ethnicities. 7 What causes anxiety disorders? Researchers think anxiety disorders are caused by a ... Asnaani, A… .Hofmann, S.G. (2011). Gender Differences in Anxiety Disorders: Prevalence, Course of Illness, Comorbidity and Burden of Illness . Journal of Psychiatric ...

  16. Panic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Samarasinghe, D S

    1983-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a prevalent anxiety disorder with lifetimeprevalence rates ranging from 1.1% to 3.7% in the general populationand 3.0% to 8.3% in clinic settings.[1]The presence of agoraphobia inpatients with PD is associated with substantial severity, comorbidity(e.g. major depression, other anxiety disorders, alcohol abuse) andfunctional impairment.[1

  17. Bone Metabolism on ISS Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Heer, M. A.; Shackelford, L. C.; Zwart, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced bone loss is associated with increased bone resorption (1, 2), and either unchanged or decreased rates of bone formation. Resistive exercise had been proposed as a countermeasure, and data from bed rest supported this concept (3). An interim resistive exercise device (iRED) was flown for early ISS crews. Unfortunately, the iRED provided no greater bone protection than on missions where only aerobic and muscular endurance exercises were available (4, 5). In 2008, the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), a more robust device with much greater resistance capability, (6, 7) was launched to the ISS. Astronauts who had access to ARED, coupled with adequate energy intake and vitamin D status, returned from ISS missions with bone mineral densities virtually unchanged from preflight (7). Bone biochemical markers showed that while the resistive exercise and adequate energy consumption did not mitigate the increased bone resorption, bone formation was increased (7, 8). The typical drop in circulating parathyroid hormone did not occur in ARED crewmembers. In 2014, an updated look at the densitometry data was published. This study confirmed the initial findings with a much larger set of data. In 42 astronauts (33 male, 9 female), the bone mineral density response to flight was the same for men and women (9), and those with access to the ARED did not have the typical decrease in bone mineral density that was observed in early ISS crewmembers with access to the iRED (Figure 1) (7). Biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption responded similarly in men and women. These data are encouraging, and represent the first in-flight evidence in the history of human space flight that diet and exercise can maintain bone mineral density on long-duration missions. However, the maintenance of bone mineral density through bone remodeling, that is, increases in both resorption and formation, may yield a bone with strength characteristics different from those

  18. Denosumab for bone diseases: translating bone biology into targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsourdi, Elena; Rachner, Tilman D; Rauner, Martina; Hamann, Christine; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2011-12-01

    Signalling of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL) through RANK is a critical pathway to regulate the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts and, hence, a master regulator of bone resorption. Increased RANKL activity has been demonstrated in diseases characterised by excessive bone loss such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteolytic bone metastases. The development and approval of denosumab, a fully MAB against RANKL, has heralded a new era in the treatment of bone diseases by providing a potent, targeted and reversible inhibitor of bone resorption. This article summarises the molecular and cellular biology of the RANKL/RANK system and critically reviews preclinical and clinical studies that have established denosumab as a promising novel therapy for metabolic and malignant bone diseases. We will discuss the potential indications for denosumab along with a critical review of safety and analyse its potential within the concert of established therapies.

  19. Bone disease in primary hyperparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Francisco; Cusano, Natalie E.; Silva, Barbara C.; Cassibba, Sara; Almeida, Clarissa Beatriz; Machado, Vanessa Caroline Costa; Bilezikian, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Bone disease in severe primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is described classically as osteitis fibrosa cystica (OFC). Bone pain, skeletal deformities and pathological fractures are features of OFC. Bone mineral density is usually extremely low in OFC, but it is reversible after surgical cure. The signs and symptoms of severe bone disease include bone pain, pathologic fractures, proximal muscle weakness with hyperreflexia. Bone involvement is typically characterized as salt-and-pepper appearance in the skull, bone erosions and bone resorption of the phalanges, brown tumors and cysts. In the radiography, diffuse demineralization is observed, along with pathological fractures, particularly in the long bones of the extremities. In severe, symptomatic PHPT, marked elevation of the serum calcium and PTH concentrations are seen and renal involvement is manifested by nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. A new technology, recently approved for clinical use in the United States and Europe, is likely to become more widely available because it is an adaptation of the lumbar spine DXA image. Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a gray-level textural analysis that provides an indirect index of trabecular microarchitecture. Newer technologies, such as high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), have provided further understanding of the microstructural skeletal features in PHPT. PMID:25166047

  20. Bone tumors of the spine and sacral bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyschmidt, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    Bone tumors and tumorlike lesions of the spine are rare entities and may harbour diagnostic problems. In this article we discuss the epidemiology, topographic aspects, clinical and radiologic features as well as the diagnostic management of vertebral bone tumors. Entities that should be more familiar to the radiologist (i.e. osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, hemangioma, giant cell tumor, chordoma, aneurysmal bone cyst) are considered in more detail. (orig.)