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Sample records for bone disorder ckd-mbd

  1. [Treatment of CKD-MBD targeting the parathyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isozaki, Yudai; Komaba, Hirotaka

    2016-06-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a major component of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder(CKD-MBD)and has a considerable impact on morbidity and mortality through the development of high-turnover bone disease and vascular calcification. Thus, management of secondary hyperparathyroidism is important for improving the outcomes of CKD patients. Because there is a fundamental difference in the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism between predialysis and dialysis patients, different therapeutic approach should be considered for each condition. In this article, we summarize the treatment of CKD-MBD for managing secondary hyperparathyroidism, with a particular focus on the difference between predialysis and dialysis stages of CKD. PMID:27230846

  2. [The expanding concept of CKD-MBD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaba, Hirotaka

    2016-09-01

    Almost seven years have passed since the publication of the KDIGO clinical practice guideline on chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder(CKD-MBD). During this period, several new medications for osteoporosis that may be applicable to patients with CKD have become available. Clinical studies have also shown the utility of bone mineral density to assess fracture risk in CKD. These new data charges us with the task of reconciling the concept of renal osteodystrophy(ROD)and osteoporosis in CKD. This review summarize the recent advances in the management of bone disease in CKD and the key points raised during the discussion for the KDIGO guideline revision, and address the problems to be solved in future. PMID:27561339

  3. Cardiovascular Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), the CKD- Mineral Bone Disorder (CKD- MBD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hruska, Keith A; Choi, Eric T.; Memon, Imran; Davis, T. Keefe; Mathew, Suresh

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the excess mortality of chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to cardiovascular complications demonstrate through observational studies that vascular calcification and hyperphosphatemia are major cardiovascular risk factors. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that these two risk factors are related, and that hyperphosphatemia directly stimulates vascular calcification. The role of hyperphosphatemia in stimulating vascular calcification in CKD is associated with...

  4. Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder in the Elderly Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James Goya

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to review the literature concerning the treatment of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) in the elderly peritoneal dialysis (PD) patient. ♦ RESULTS: Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder is a major problem in the elderly PD patient......, with its associated increased fracture risk, vascular calcification, and accelerated mortality fracture risk. Peritoneal dialysis, however, bears a lower risk than hemodialysis (HD). The approach to CKD-MBD prophylaxis and treatment in the elderly PD patient is similar to other CKD patients, with some...... to other dialysis patient groups, physicians should be aware of the special problems of the elderly group....

  5. CKD-MBD after kidney transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Wesseling-Perry, Katherine; Bacchetta, Justine

    2011-01-01

    Successful kidney transplantation corrects many of the metabolic abnormalities associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, skeletal and cardiovascular morbidity remain prevalent in pediatric kidney transplant recipients and current recommendations from the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) working group suggest that bone disease—including turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth, and strength—as well as cardiovascular disease be evaluated in all patients with ...

  6. Calcimimetics in the chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Jordi; Aguilar, Armando; Baas, Juan; Reyes, Joselyne; Lloret, Maria-J; Farré, Neus; Olaya, Mayte; Canal, Cristina; Marco, Helena; Andrés, Enric; Trinidad, Pedro; Ballarin, José

    2009-02-01

    Mineral and bone disorders (MBD) are both an early and very common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is now accepted that they represent a significant risk factor, explaining the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in CKD patients. During the last decade, we have been witnessing many advances in the nomenclature, classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CKD and some of its complications, such as CKD-MBD. The identification of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) involvement in the pathogenesis of primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) and the availability of a new class of drugs called calcimimetics are two outstanding examples. Cinacalcet, the only available calcimimetic, has been shown to be a very effective therapeutic tool in CKD-MBD. Many clinical trials with cinacalcet in hemodialysis patients with SHPT have shown a reduction in parathyroid hormone, calcium (Ca), phosphate (P) and Ca x P product levels, allowing far greater success in reaching therapeutic goals as recommended by international guidelines. Additionally, some studies have shown that the use of cinacalcet may improve other aspects of CKD-MBD, reducing the risk of vascular calcification and parathyroidectomy, among others. Prospective studies on dialysis patients, with hard endpoint data, are currently underway. This review summarizes the most significant aspects of calcimimimetics based on both experimental and clinical results, underlining their possibilities not only for the treatment of isolated SHPT but also for other CKD-MBD related conditions. PMID:19363783

  7. Diagnostic Workup for Disorders of Bone and Mineral Metabolism in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in the Era of KDIGO Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Francesco Morrone; Domenico Russo; Biagio Di Iorio

    2011-01-01

    KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) is an international nonprofit organization devoted to “improve the care and outcomes of kidney disease patients worldwide through promoting coordination, collaboration, and integration of initiatives to develop and implement clinical practice guidelines.” The mineral and bone disorder (MBD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been the first area of interest of KDIGO international initiative. KDIGO guidelines on CKD-MBD were publi...

  8. A potential kidney-bone axis involved in the rapid minute-to-minute regulation of plasma Ca2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm, Anders; Mace, Maria L; Gravesen, Eva; Olgaard, Klaus; Lewin, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Understanding the regulation of mineral homeostasis and function of the skeleton as buffer for Calcium and Phosphate has regained new interest with introduction of the syndrome "Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder"(CKD-MBD). The very rapid minute-to-minute regulation of p...

  9. Osteoporosis and adynamic bone in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cannata, J.B. (Jorge); Rodríguez, Minerva; Gómez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Among the chronic kidney disease–mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD) disorders, osteoporosis and adynamic bone are highly prevalent, and they have been consistently associated with low bone mass, bone fractures, vascular calcifications and greater mortality in general and CKD populations. Despite the fact that osteoporosis and adynamic bone have similar clinical outcomes, they have different pathogeneses and clinical management. In osteoporosis, there is a lack of balance between bone format...

  10. Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder and energy metabolism%慢性肾脏病-矿物质和骨代谢异常与能量代谢

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛澄; 戴兵; 梅长林

    2013-01-01

    慢性肾脏病-矿物质和骨代谢异常(CKD-MBD)的危害近年来日益受到重视,除传统致病因素外,能量代谢因子瘦素、胰岛素、脂联素等也参与了CKD-MBD的发生与发展.高瘦素血症可以通过直接和间接途径影响骨重塑;CKD患者伴有糖尿病会损伤成骨细胞功能,易发生低甲状旁腺素(PTH)动力不良性骨病;CKD患者脂联素水平升高的意义也与生理状态不同,可作为骨病严重程度的标记物.CKD-MBD与能量代谢的相互影响仍需要更多的基础和临床研究阐明,针对其分子机制的干预可能会给CKD-MBD带来新的治疗手段.本文将就CKD-MBD与能量代谢的相互影响作一综述.%The damage of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) has drawn increasing attention in recent years.In addition to traditional pathogenic factors,energy regulatory factors such as leptin,insulin,and adiponectin also participate in the development and progression of CKD-MBD.Hyperleptinaemia can directly or indirectly affect bone formation.CKD patients with diabetes have injured osteoblast function and are liable to have low dynamic osteopathy with low parathyroid hormone (PTH).Adiponectin is increased in CKD patients,which can be used as a marker for severity of osteopathy.More basic and clinical researches are needed to elucidate the mutual influence between CKD-MBD and energy metabolism.The interventions targeting molecular mechanisms may bring new treatments to CKD-MBD.This paper reviewed the mutual influence of CKD-MBD and energy metabolism.

  11. Progress in diagnosis and treatment of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone metabolism abnormalities%慢性肾脏病-矿物质和骨代谢异常的诊断及治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏正坤; 杨晓

    2015-01-01

    慢性肾脏病-矿物质和骨代谢异常(CKD-MBD)是指慢性肾脏病(CKD)患者出现的与CKD相关的矿物质和钙磷代谢紊乱所致的一系列临床症状和知生化及影像学指标异常.自2006年CKD-MBD的概念首次被提出至今,其越来越引起临床医师的重视.现介绍CKD-MBD的流行病学特点、临床表现、检查方法、诊断标准、治疗及预防的研究进展.%Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) refers to a series of clinical symptoms and biochemical and imaging abnormalities caused by minerals and calcium phosphorus metabolic disorder,which is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD).Since 2006 ,the concept of CKD-MBD was put forward for the first time,doctors are increasingly paying more attention to it.This review introduces the epidemiological characteristics, clinical manifestation, examination methods, diagnostic criteria and the research progress of treatment and prevention of CKD-MBD.

  12. Calcium Regulation and Bone Mineral Metabolism in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickram Tejwani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD. CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD.

  13. [The efficacy and safety of activated vitamin D for CKD-MBD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Nobuki; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic bone disorders that are represented by secondary hyperparathyroidism occur with the progression of chronic kidney disease(CKD). The administration of activated vitamin D is expected to improve high-turnover bone disorders and is widely used for the management of bone mineral diseases in patients with CKD and end-stage renal disease. CKD is an underlying disease of secondary osteoporosis and coexists with primary osteoporosis at a high rate. With regard to osteoporosis patients with renal insufficiency, the administration of activated vitamin D is also thought to reduce the fracture incidence by both increasing bone mass and reducing falls. PMID:27561349

  14. The Biomechanical Testing for the Assessment of Bone Quality in an Experimental Model of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksztulska-Kolanek, Ewa; Znorko, Beata; Michałowska, Małgorzata; Pawlak, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Mineral metabolism disturbances are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and have been classified as a new clinical entity, also known as CKD-mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD). A decrease in the bone strength, whose clinical manifestation is a tendency for fracture, has been recognized as an important component of CKD-MBD. Because of ethical issues, measurements of the bone strength in the human body are usually limited to noninvasive techniques, such as radiography, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and the assays of bone turnover biomarkers. However, it has been postulated recently that the evidence concerning bone strength based solely on the determination of the bone quantity may be insufficient and that bone quality should also be examined. In this regard, an animal model of CKD can represent an experimental tool to test the effectiveness of new therapeutic strategies. Despite the many available methods that are used to diagnose metabolic bone disorders and predict fracture risk especially in small rodents with CKD, it turns out that the most appropriate are biomechanical tests, which can provide information about the structural and material properties of bone. The present review summarizes and discusses the principles for carrying out selected biomechanical tests (3-point bending test and compression test) and their application in clinical practice. PMID:26680019

  15. Prevalence and severity of disordered mineral metabolism in patients with chronic kidney disease: A study from a tertiary care hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Vikrant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disordered mineral metabolism is common complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, there are limited data on the pattern of these disturbances in Indian CKD population. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD over a period of 3 years. The biochemical markers of CKD-MBD, namely, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH, and 25-hydoxyvitamin Vitamin D3 (25OHD, were measured in newly diagnosed CKD Stage 3–5 and prevalent CKD Stage 5D adult patients. Results: A total of 462 patients of CKD Stage 3–5D were studied. The frequency of various biochemical abnormalities was hypocalcemia (23.8%, hypercalcemia (5.4%, hypophosphatemia (2.8%, hyperphosphatemia (55.4%, raised alkaline phosphatase (56.9%, secondary hyperparathyroidism (82.7%, and hypoparathyroidism (1.5%. 25OHD was done in 335 (72.5% patients and 90.4% were found to have Vitamin D deficiency. About 70.6% of the patients had iPTH levels were above kidney disease outcomes quality initiative (KDOQI target range. Nondiabetic CKD as compared to diabetic CKD had a higher alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.016, a higher iPTH (P = 0.001 a higher proportion of patients with iPTH above KDOQI target range (P = 0.09, and an elevated alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.004. The 25OHD levels were suggestive of severe Vitamin D deficiency in 33.7%, Vitamin D deficiency in 45.4%, and Vitamin D insufficiency in 11.3% patients. There was a significant positive correlation between iPTH with alkaline phosphatase (r = 0.572, P = 0.001, creatinine (r = 0.424, P = 0.001, and phosphorus (r = 0.241, P = 0.001 and a significant negative correlation with hemoglobin (r = −0.325, 0.001, age (r = −0.169, P = 0.002, and 25OHD (r = −0.126, P = 0.021. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, an elevated alkaline phosphatase was a significant predictor of hyperparathyroidism (odds ratio 9.7, 95

  16. Prevalence and severity of disordered mineral metabolism in patients with chronic kidney disease: A study from a tertiary care hospital in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikrant, Sanjay; Parashar, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Disordered mineral metabolism is common complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, there are limited data on the pattern of these disturbances in Indian CKD population. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) over a period of 3 years. The biochemical markers of CKD-MBD, namely, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and 25-hydoxyvitamin Vitamin D3 (25OHD), were measured in newly diagnosed CKD Stage 3–5 and prevalent CKD Stage 5D adult patients. Results: A total of 462 patients of CKD Stage 3–5D were studied. The frequency of various biochemical abnormalities was hypocalcemia (23.8%), hypercalcemia (5.4%), hypophosphatemia (2.8%), hyperphosphatemia (55.4%), raised alkaline phosphatase (56.9%), secondary hyperparathyroidism (82.7%), and hypoparathyroidism (1.5%). 25OHD was done in 335 (72.5%) patients and 90.4% were found to have Vitamin D deficiency. About 70.6% of the patients had iPTH levels were above kidney disease outcomes quality initiative (KDOQI) target range. Nondiabetic CKD as compared to diabetic CKD had a higher alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.016), a higher iPTH (P = 0.001) a higher proportion of patients with iPTH above KDOQI target range (P = 0.09), and an elevated alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.004). The 25OHD levels were suggestive of severe Vitamin D deficiency in 33.7%, Vitamin D deficiency in 45.4%, and Vitamin D insufficiency in 11.3% patients. There was a significant positive correlation between iPTH with alkaline phosphatase (r = 0.572, P = 0.001), creatinine (r = 0.424, P = 0.001), and phosphorus (r = 0.241, P = 0.001) and a significant negative correlation with hemoglobin (r = −0.325, 0.001), age (r = −0.169, P = 0.002), and 25OHD (r = −0.126, P = 0.021). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, an elevated alkaline phosphatase was a significant predictor of hyperparathyroidism (odds ratio 9.7, 95

  17. Eating disorders and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Dale; Morgan, Sarah L

    2013-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is a frequent and often-overlooked consequence of eating disorders, in particular anorexia nervosa and eating disorders associated with the female athlete triad. The causes of low BMD are multifactorial and include low peak bone mass accrual, accelerated bone resorption, and changes in bone microarchitecture. Early diagnosis and interventions focused on nutritional rehabilitation and weight gain reduce the risk of further BMD deficits and fractures. PMID:24094471

  18. Osteoporosis and adynamic bone in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; Rodriguez García, Minerva; Gómez Alonso, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Among the chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD) disorders, osteoporosis and adynamic bone are highly prevalent, and they have been consistently associated with low bone mass, bone fractures, vascular calcifications and greater mortality in general and CKD populations. Despite the fact that osteoporosis and adynamic bone have similar clinical outcomes, they have different pathogeneses and clinical management. In osteoporosis, there is a lack of balance between bone formation and bone resorption, and less new bone is formed to replace bone losses. Osteoporosis is defined by the World Health Organization as "a disease characterized by low bone mineral density and micro architectural deterioration leading to low bone strength and increased risk of fractures." In the general population, there is a good correlation between dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements and bone fractures, but this is not the case with CKD patients. Despite the fact that we have a great number of active antiosteoporotic drugs, the experience in CKD patients is limited. Adynamic bone is suspected based on biochemical parameters, mainly parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone alkaline phosphatase, but it needs to be proven using a bone biopsy, where a low or zero bone formation rate and a reduction or absence of osteoblasts and osteoclasts should be found. The clinical management of adynamic bone has important limitations and currently does not allow taking many active measures. Treatment is mainly based on the prevention of risk factors known to induce PTH oversuppression, such as aluminium and calcium load and very high doses of vitamin D receptor activators. Due to the limitations in the treatment of both conditions, prevention plays a key role in the management of these disorders. PMID:23023723

  19. Bone health in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman-Levin, N; Hochberg, Z; Latzer, Y

    2014-03-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) put adolescents and young adults at risk for impaired bone health. Low bone mineral density (BMD) with ED is caused by failure to accrue peak bone mass in adolescence and bone loss in young adulthood. Although ED patients diagnosed with bone loss may be asymptomatic, some suffer bone pains and have increased incidence of fractures. Adolescents with ED are prone to increased prevalence of stress fractures, kyphoscoliosis and height loss. The clinical picture of the various EDs involves endocrinopathies that contribute to impaired bone health. Anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by low bone turnover, with relatively higher osteoclastic (bone resorptive) than osteoblastic (bone formation) activity. Bone loss in AN occurs in both the trabecular and cortical bones, although the former is more vulnerable. Bone loss in AN has been shown to be influenced by malnutrition and low weight, reduced fat mass, oestrogen and androgen deficiency, glucocorticoid excess, impaired growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis, and more. Bone loss in AN may not be completely reversible despite recovery from the illness. Treatment modalities involving hormonal therapies have limited effectiveness, whereas increased caloric intake, weight gain and resumption of menses are essential to improved BMD. PMID:24165231

  20. Bone disease in haemoglobin disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersi Voskaridou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone disease represents a prominent cause of morbidity in patients with thalassaemia and other haemoglobin disorders. The delay in sexual maturation, the presence of diabetes and hypothyroidism, the parathyroid gland dysfunction, the haemolytic anaemia, the progressive marrow expansion, the iron toxicity on osteoblasts, the iron chelators, and the deficiency of growth hormone or insulin growth factors have been identified as major causes of osteoporosis in thalassaemia. Adequate hormonal replacement, effective iron chelation, improvement of hemoglobin levels, calcium and vitamin D administration, physical activity, and smoking cessation are the main to-date measures for the management of the disease. During the last decade, novel pathogenetic data suggest that the reduced osteoblastic activity, which is believed to be the basic mechanism of bone loss in thalassemia, is accompanied by a comparable or even greater increase in bone resorption. Therefore, potent inhibitors of osteoclast activation, such as the aminobisphosphonates, arise as key drugs for the management of osteoporosis in thalassaemia patients and other haemoglobin disorders.

  1. Turning over renal osteodystrophy dogma: direct actions of FGF23 on osteoblast β-catenin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavi, Susan C; Moysés, Rosa M A

    2016-07-01

    Although recognized as a major complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the pathophysiology of the CKD-related mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is not completely understood. Recently, the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin pathway in osteocytes by sclerostin has been shown to play a role in CKD-MBD. The study by Carrilo-Lopez et al. confirms this inhibition in an experimental model of CKD. Moreover, they describe direct actions of FGF23-Klotho on osteoblasts, increasing the expression of DKK1, another Wnt/β-catenin pathway inhibitor. PMID:27312441

  2. [Phosphate binders in renal patients: a point estimate from rationale, through evidences to the real world setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galassi, Andrea; Giovenzana, Maria Enrica; Galbiati, Eleonora; Auricchio, Sara; Colzani, Sara; Scanziani, Renzo

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate binders represent a common intervention in renal patients affected by chronic kidney disease and mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Although counteracting P overload through binders adoption is argued by a physiology-driven approach, the efficacy of this intervention on hard endpoints remains poorly evident. The inconsistencies between rationale and methodological weakness, concerning the clinical relevance of P binding in chronic kidney disease, will be herein discussed with special focus on the need of a multi-factorial treatment against CKD-MBD, which is currently more achievable due to the variety of P binders and the rapid evolution of nutritional therapy, dialysis techniques and nursing science. PMID:27545626

  3. Quality of care and monitoring in paediatric end stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Huis

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis quality of care and monitoring of chronic kidney disease - mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is assessed. Practices and policies with regards to transplantation, growth hormone and hypertension are inventories and compared with current guidelines and lit

  4. MR imaging of bone marrow disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author performed MR imaging in 89 patients with bone marrow disorders (29 with aplastic anemia, 20 with leukemia, 9 with postirradiation changes, 8 with hemosiderosis, 6 with primary bone tumors and metastases, and 17 with bone marrow disorders of other etiologies). They selected the thoracic and lumbar vertebral marrow as a target and used both T1-weighted spin-echo images and calculated T1 images. T1 was prolonged in bone marrow hyperplasia but shortened in hypoplasia. Bone marrow T1 values proved to depend on the number of fat cells (pathologic correlation). In aplastic anemia scattered islands of low signal intensity were seen within a background of high signal intensity in some typical cases. MR imaging patterns were used for staging aplastic anemia. T1 was prolonged in leukemia cells

  5. Psychiatric disorders in bone marrow transplant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the psychiatric illnesses in patients with hematological/oncological disorders encountered during blood and bone marrow transplantation. All consecutive patients, aged 15 years and above, who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria and underwent blood and bone marrow transplantation, were enrolled in this study. Psychiatric assessment comprised of a semi-structured interview based on Present Status Examination (PSE). The psychiatric diagnosis was made on the basis of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) system of classification devised by W.H.O. Eighty patients, who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, were inducted in this study. Thirty (37.5%) cases were found to have psychiatric disorders. Out of the total, 60 (75%) were males and 20 (25%) females. Adjustment disorder was the most frequent diagnosis (n=12), followed by major depression (n=7). Rest of the diagnoses made were generalized anxiety disorder, acute psychotic disorder, delirium and depressive psychosis. High psychiatric morbidity associated with blood and bone marrow transplantation was observed. It indicates the importance of psychiatric intervention during the isolation period of BMT as well as pre-transplant psychiatric assessment and counseling regarding procedure. (author)

  6. Bone Metabolism and Arterial Stiffness After Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Cseprekál

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To assess the relationship between bone and vascular disease and its changes over time after renal transplantation. Metabolic bone disease (MBD is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD and is associated with cardiovascular (CV disease. Following transplantation (Tx, improvement in CV disease has been reported; however, data regarding changes in bone disease remain controversial. Methods: Bone turnover and arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity (PWV were assessed in 47 Tx patients (38 (3-191 months after Tx. Results: Bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP, osteocalcin (OC and beta-crosslaps were significantly higher in Tx patients, and decreased significantly after one year. There was a negative correlation between BALP, OC and steroid administered (r=-0.35;r=-0.36 respectively. PWV increased in the Tx group (1.15 SD. In patients with a follow up of Conclusions: Increased bone turnover and arterial stiffness are present following kidney transplantation. While bone turnover decreases with time, arterial stiffness correlates initially with bone turnover, after which the influence of cholesterol becomes significant. Non-invasive estimation of bone metabolism and arterial stiffness may help to assess CKD-MBD following renal transplantation.

  7. Therapeutic actions of curcumin in bone disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohanizadeh, Ramin; Deng, Yi; Verron, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is the active component of turmeric extract derived from the Curcuma longa plant. In the last decade, curcumin has raised a considerable interest in medicine owing to its negligible toxicity and multiple therapeutic actions including anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activities. Among the various molecular targets of curcumin, some are involved in bone remodeling, which strongly suggests that curcumin can affect the skeletal system. The review sheds light on the current and potential applications of curcumin to treat bone disorders characterized by an excessive resorption activity. Within the scope of this review, the novel formulations of curcumin to overcome its physico-chemical and pharmacokinetic constraints are also discussed. PMID:26962450

  8. A New Data Analysis System to Quantify Associations between Biochemical Parameters of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Rodriguez

    Full Text Available In hemodialysis patients, deviations from KDIGO recommended values of individual parameters, phosphate, calcium or parathyroid hormone (PTH, are associated with increased mortality. However, it is widely accepted that these parameters are not regulated independently of each other and that therapy aimed to correct one parameter often modifies the others. The aim of the present study is to quantify the degree of association between parameters of chronic kidney disease and mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD.Data was extracted from a cohort of 1758 adult HD patients between January 2000 and June 2013 obtaining a total of 46.141 records (10 year follow-up. We used an advanced data analysis system called Random Forest (RF which is based on self-learning procedure with similar axioms to those utilized for the development of artificial intelligence. This new approach is particularly useful when the variables analyzed are closely dependent to each other.The analysis revealed a strong association between PTH and phosphate that was superior to that of PTH and Calcium. The classical linear regression analysis between PTH and phosphate shows a correlation coefficient is 0.27, p<0.001, the possibility to predict PTH changes from phosphate modification is marginal. Alternatively, RF assumes that changes in phosphate will cause modifications in other associated variables (calcium and others that may also affect PTH values. Using RF the correlation coefficient between changes in serum PTH and phosphate is 0.77, p<0.001; thus, the power of prediction is markedly increased. The effect of therapy on biochemical variables was also analyzed using this RF.Our results suggest that the analysis of the complex interactions between mineral metabolism parameters in CKD-MBD may demand a more advanced data analysis system such as RF.

  9. Association of Increased Serum Leptin with Ameliorated Anemia and Malnutrition in Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease Patients after Parathyroidectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Yao Jiang; Jingjing Zhang; Yanggang Yuan; Xiaoming Zha; Changying Xing; Chong Shen; Zhixiang Shen; Chao Qin; Ming Zeng; Guang Yang; Huijuan Mao; Bo Zhang; Xiangbao Yu; Bin Sun; Chun Ouyang

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that regulates various metabolism, but its association with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), a clinical manifestation of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), remains obscure. Parathyroidectomy (PTX) is recommended for severe SHPT patients. Here, the associations between circulating leptin and clinical characteristics in CKD patients were investigated. Effects of PTX on leptin production were analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Controls and CKD pat...

  10. Quality of care and monitoring in paediatric end stage renal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Huis, van, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis quality of care and monitoring of chronic kidney disease – mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is assessed. Practices and policies with regards to transplantation, growth hormone and hypertension are inventories and compared with current guidelines and literature. Since end stage renal disease (ESRD) in childhood is rare, large scale studies are scarce. Differences in policies might be caused by a lack of evidence based guidelines, possibly affectin...

  11. Tooth dentin defects reflect genetic disorders affecting bone mineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Vital, S. Opsahl; Gaucher, C.; Bardet, C; Rowe, P.S.; George, A.; Linglart, A.; Chaussain, C.

    2012-01-01

    Several genetic disorders affecting bone mineralization may manifest during dentin mineralization. Dentin and bone are similar in several aspects, especially pertaining to the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which is secreted by well-differentiated odontoblasts and osteoblasts, respectively. However, unlike bone, dentin is not remodelled and is not involved in the regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism. In contrast to bone, teeth are accessible tissues with the shedding ...

  12. Scanning of Bone Marrow in Haematopoietic Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning can help evaluate size and distribution of the haematopoietic marrow, a difficult task by aspiration or biopsy. With the 61-hole focusing gold-tungsten Oak Ridge National Laboratory Scanner, the marrow organ has been clearly delineated by means of intravenous colloidal Au198, it being known that reticulo-endothelial function in the marrow correlates with areas of haematopoiesis. Patients with normal haematopoiesis and with a variety of blood disorders such as focal marrow lesions, acute and chronic leukaemia, polycythaemiavera, myelofibrosis, multiple myeloma, and lymphoma have been scanned. Because of the reticulo-endothelial activity in liver and spleen, the marrow pattern is obscured in the mid-trunk. Vertebral bodies, intervertebral discs, pelvis and long bones are outlined, and, in the thorax, the sternum and thoracic vertebrae. Focal lesions have also been found. Because of respiratory motion, individual ribs are not seen. In expanded marrow, the knee region can be shown, including the joint space. It has been possible to correlate these scans with aspiration biopsy and with linear scans. Because relatively large doses of Au198 are required, other isotopes are being investigated. An improved whole- body scanner is being tested for more practical scans. (author)

  13. Single-center open-label randomized study of anemia management improvement in ESRD patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellasi Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Whether anemia and mineral bone abnormalities (chronic kidney disease–mineral bone disorder [CKD-MBD] are associated still remains to be elucidated. Both anemia and CKD-MBD have been associated with adverse cardiovascular outcome and poor quality of life. However, recent evidence suggests that use of large doses of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs to correct hemoglobin (Hb may be detrimental in CKD. The Optimal Anemia Treatment in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD (Optimal ESRD Treatment study will assess whether lowering of parathyroid hormone (PTH is associated with a reduction in ESA consumption. The Optimal ESRD Treatment study is a pilot single-center open-label study with blinded end point (a prospective randomized open blinded end-point [PROBE] design enrolling 50 patients on maintenance dialysis. Eligible patients with intact PTH (iPTH 300-540 pg/mL and Hb 10-11.5 g/dL will be randomized 1:1 to strict PTH control (150-300 pg/mL versus standard care (PTH range 300-540 pg/mL. Available drugs for CKD-MBD and anemia treatment will be managed by the attending physician to maintain the desired levels of PTH (according to study arm allocation and Hb (10-11.5 g/dL. Echocardiographic data for cardiac structure and function as well as arterial stiffness will be assessed at study inception and completion. The Optimal ESRD Treatment study should shed light on the complicated interplay of anemia and CKD-MBD and on the feasibility of clinical trials in this domain. The study results are expected in the spring of 2017.

  14. Calcium and bone disorders in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shriraam Mahadevan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant transplacental calcium transfer occurs during pregnancy, especially during the last trimester, to meet the demands of the rapidly mineralizing fetal skeleton. Similarly, there is an obligate loss of calcium in the breast milk during lactation. Both these result in considerable stress on the bone mineral homeostasis in the mother. The maternal adaptive mechanisms to conserve calcium are different in pregnancy and lactation. During pregnancy, increased intestinal absorption of calcium from the gut mainly due to higher generation of calcitriol (1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D helps in maintaining maternal calcium levels. On the other hand, during lactation, the main compensatory mechanism is skeletal resorption due to increased generation of parathormone related peptide (PTHrP from the breast. Previous studies suggest that in spite of considerable changes in bone mineral metabolism during pregnancy, parity and lactation are not significantly associated with future risk for osteoporosis. However, in India, the situation may not be the same as a significant proportion of pregnancies occur in the early twenties when peak bone mass is not yet achieved. Further, malnutrition, anemia and vitamin D deficiency are commonly encountered in this age group. This may have an impact on future bone health of the mother. It may also probably provide an opportunity for health care providers for prevention. Other metabolic bone diseases like hypoparathyroidism, hyperparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism are rarely encountered in pregnancy. Their clinical implications and management are also discussed.

  15. Mineral and bone disorder after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweesedt, Pahnwat T; Disthabanchong, Sinee

    2015-12-24

    After successful kidney transplantation, accumulated waste products and electrolytes are excreted and regulatory hormones return to normal levels. Despite the improvement in mineral metabolites and mineral regulating hormones after kidney transplantation, abnormal bone and mineral metabolism continues to present in most patients. During the first 3 mo, fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and parathyroid hormone levels decrease rapidly in association with an increase in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D production. Renal phosphate excretion resumes and serum calcium, if elevated before, returns toward normal levels. FGF-23 excess during the first 3-12 mo results in exaggerated renal phosphate loss and hypophosphatemia occurs in some patients. After 1 year, FGF-23 and serum phosphate return to normal levels but persistent hyperparathyroidism remains in some patients. The progression of vascular calcification also attenuates. High dose corticosteroid and persistent hyperparathyroidism are the most important factors influencing abnormal bone and mineral metabolism in long-term kidney transplant (KT) recipients. Bone loss occurs at a highest rate during the first 6-12 mo after transplantation. Measurement of bone mineral density is recommended in patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate > 30 mL/min. The use of active vitamin D with or without bisphosphonate is effective in preventing early post-transplant bone loss. Steroid withdrawal regimen is also beneficial in preservation of bone mass in long-term. Calcimimetic is an alternative therapy to parathyroidectomy in KT recipients with persistent hyperparathyroidism. If parathyroidectomy is required, subtotal to near total parathyroidectomy is recommended. Performing parathyroidectomy during the waiting period prior to transplantation is also preferred in patients with severe hyperparathyroidism associated with hypercalcemia. PMID:26722650

  16. Autoinflammatory bone disorders with special focus on chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO)

    OpenAIRE

    Hedrich, Christian M.; Hofmann, Sigrun R.; Pablik, Jessica; Morbach, Henner; Girschick, Hermann J.

    2016-01-01

    Sterile bone inflammation is the hallmark of autoinflammatory bone disorders, including chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) with its most severe form chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO). Autoinflammatory osteopathies are the result of a dysregulated innate immune system, resulting in immune cell infiltration of the bone and subsequent osteoclast differentiation and activation. Interestingly, autoinflammatory bone disorders are associated with inflammation of the skin and/or...

  17. Histone Deacetylases in Bone Development and Skeletal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Elizabeth W; Carpio, Lomeli R; van Wijnen, Andre J; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2015-10-01

    Histone deacetylases (Hdacs) are conserved enzymes that remove acetyl groups from lysine side chains in histones and other proteins. Eleven of the 18 Hdacs encoded by the human and mouse genomes depend on Zn(2+) for enzymatic activity, while the other 7, the sirtuins (Sirts), require NAD2(+). Collectively, Hdacs and Sirts regulate numerous cellular and mitochondrial processes including gene transcription, DNA repair, protein stability, cytoskeletal dynamics, and signaling pathways to affect both development and aging. Of clinical relevance, Hdacs inhibitors are United States Food and Drug Administration-approved cancer therapeutics and are candidate therapies for other common diseases including arthritis, diabetes, epilepsy, heart disease, HIV infection, neurodegeneration, and numerous aging-related disorders. Hdacs and Sirts influence skeletal development, maintenance of mineral density and bone strength by affecting intramembranous and endochondral ossification, as well as bone resorption. With few exceptions, inhibition of Hdac or Sirt activity though either loss-of-function mutations or prolonged chemical inhibition has negative and/or toxic effects on skeletal development and bone mineral density. Specifically, Hdac/Sirt suppression causes abnormalities in physiological development such as craniofacial dimorphisms, short stature, and bone fragility that are associated with several human syndromes or diseases. In contrast, activation of Sirts may protect the skeleton from aging and immobilization-related bone loss. This knowledge may prolong healthspan and prevent adverse events caused by epigenetic therapies that are entering the clinical realm at an unprecedented rate. In this review, we summarize the general properties of Hdacs/Sirts and the research that has revealed their essential functions in bone forming cells (e.g., osteoblasts and chondrocytes) and bone resorbing osteoclasts. Finally, we offer predictions on future research in this area and the

  18. Bone Density in Peripubertal Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeyer, Ann M.; Gates, Amy; Ferrone, Christine; Lee, Hang; Misra, Madhusmita

    2013-01-01

    We determined whether bone mineral density (BMD) is lower in boys with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) than controls, and also assessed variables that may affect BMD in ASD. BMD was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 18 boys with ASD and 19 controls 8-14 years old. Boys with ASD had lower BMD Z-scores at the spine, hip and…

  19. Lipid metabolism disorders and bone dysfunction-interrelated and mutually regulated (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Li; Yu, Xijie

    2015-01-01

    The association between lipid and bone metabolism has become an increasing focus of interest in recent years, and accumulating evidence has shown that atherosclerosis (AS) and osteoporosis (OP), a disorder of bone metabolism, frequently co-exist. Fat and bone are known to share a common progenitor cell: Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in the bone marrow (BM), which are able to differentiate into various cell phenotypes, including osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Laboratory-b...

  20. Study on temporomandibular joint disorders by bone scintigraphy and bone metabolic markers (ICTP, PICP) in synovial fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate bone metabolic condition in imaging findings of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) using bone scintigraphy, which has a high sensitivity to bone metabolism, and two bone metabolic markers: pyridinoline cross-linked carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) which influence both the formation and absorption of bone. The subjects were 92 patients (18 male, 74 female, mean age 40.3±18.2 years of age, 112 temporomandibular joints (TMJs)) with TMD who underwent bone scintigraphy using 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate sodium (MDP) and/or had their concentration of bone metabolic markers (ICTP and PICP) measured in synovial lavage fluid by a radioimmunoassay kit using competitive inhibition. Synovial lavage fluid was a mixture of synovial fluid and physiological saline, obtained by irrigation of the superior joint compartment of TMD patients. Sixteen female controls (mean age 42.7±15.7 years of age) with no symptoms of TMD, but who had other diseases and who underwent bone scintigraphy, were selected. The position and configuration of the articular disk of patients with TMD were diagnosed by MRI and/or double contrastarthrography. All patients were examined for morphological bone change of the TMJ by tomography and were evaluated using both a positive ratio and an accumulation ratio (radioactivity counts of TMJ region/radioactivity counts of neck soft tissue region) by bone scintigraphy. We obtained the following results and conclusions. All the temporomandibular joints with morphological bone change showed an increase in accumulation by bone scintigraphy. Some of the temporomandibular joints without morphological bone change also showed an increase in accumulation. There were no statistically significant differences between disk position, disk configuration and accumulation ratio. Most of the temporomandibular joints, which had an increase in accumulation

  1. [Pathogenesis and treatment of vascular calcification in CKD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio, D; Gallieni, M; Pasho, S; Fallabrino, G; Olivi, L; Volpi, E; Ciceri, P; Missaglia, E; Ronga, C; Brambilla, C; Butti, A; Rocca-Rey, L; Chiarelli, G; Cozzolino, M

    2009-01-01

    Increased vascular calcification is a major cause of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is the result of an active ossification process counteracted by ''bone'' proteins such as osteopontin, alkaline phosphatase, osteoprotegerin, and osteocalcin. Chronic kidney disease - mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a systemic disorder of mineral and bone metabolism that occurs in CKD. In addition to abnormalities in the serum calcium and phosphate profile, CKD-MBD is characterized by abnormalities of bone turnover, mineralization, volume and growth as well as vascular calcification. Considering that the presence and extent of vascular calcification in CKD portend a poor prognosis, many efforts have been made to shed light on this complicated phenomenon to prevent vascular calcium deposition and its progression. Indeed, careful control of calcium load, serum phosphate and parathyroid hormone along with the use of calcium-free phosphate binders and vitamin D receptor activators represent a new therapeutic armamentarium to improve quality of life and reduce mortality in CKD. PMID:19382090

  2. Drugs Used in Paediatric Bone and Calcium Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Moira S

    2015-01-01

    Calcium and bone disorders in children and adolescents are treated with a wide variety of drugs. Several of these drugs have been used for many years on the basis of accepted practice, without being subjected to rigorous trials. Bisphosphonates are the mainstay treatment for children with osteoporosis, but newer, more potent compounds such as zoledronate and risedronate have begun to replace the older-generation bisphosphonates. Hypocalcaemia is managed with calcium and vitamin D and its metabolites. In difficult cases that are secondary to hypoparathyroidism, subcutaneous injections or infusions of parathyroid hormone have been used. Multiple daily phosphate supplements and calcitriol are the standard treatment for hypophosphataemic rickets, but trials of an anti-fibroblast growth factor 23 antibody appear promising, and the results are eagerly awaited. Many new medications are undergoing clinical trials and are starting to emerge as viable treatment options for children. Some of these drugs target specific diseases, such as recombinant alkaline phosphatase for hypophosphatasia and a C-type natriuretic peptide analogue for achondroplasia. Other drugs, such as denosumab and odanacatib, have been used successfully in the adult population, and the appropriate use of these drugs in children is now being evaluated. PMID:26138848

  3. Adult Bone Marrow: Which Stem Cells for Cellular Therapy Protocols in Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien; Emerence Laudet; Virginie Neirinckx; Bernard Rogister

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In th...

  4. A clinical study of temporomandibular disorder. The value of bone scintigraphy as an aid to diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is still not defined with respect to the point of an entity, terminological problems, and clinical classification and gradings. Moreover, diagnostic problems of internal deranegement and osteodeformity at the temporomandibular joint such as type IV and mechanism of bone remodeling at condylar head are also still not clear. In this investigation, we tried to classify the severity and progressive grading according to the symptoms and objective laboratory data taken from soft tissues such as muscles related to mastication, discs and ligaments, and hard tissues such as condylar head and temporal bone changes around the temporomandibular joint. Preliminary diagnostic clinical tool of the assessment of temporomandibular joint by maens of bone scintigraphy was attributed to the additional diagnostic procedure and research for the bone remodeling for the temporomandibular disorder because this can be defined between subjective and objective symptoms in this disorder. Bone scintigraphy will solve many problems concerning undefined degenerative bone changes in TMD, enable more accurate diagnosis, and the selection of treatment and prognosis in future investigation. Also, it is believed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) nuclear bone imaging is a highly accurate diagnostic method for craniomandibular disorders. (author)

  5. A clinical study of temporomandibular disorder. The value of bone scintigraphy as an aid to diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiura, Masashi [Nippon Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata

    2000-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is still not defined with respect to the point of an entity, terminological problems, and clinical classification and gradings. Moreover, diagnostic problems of internal deranegement and osteodeformity at the temporomandibular joint such as type IV and mechanism of bone remodeling at condylar head are also still not clear. In this investigation, we tried to classify the severity and progressive grading according to the symptoms and objective laboratory data taken from soft tissues such as muscles related to mastication, discs and ligaments, and hard tissues such as condylar head and temporal bone changes around the temporomandibular joint. Preliminary diagnostic clinical tool of the assessment of temporomandibular joint by maens of bone scintigraphy was attributed to the additional diagnostic procedure and research for the bone remodeling for the temporomandibular disorder because this can be defined between subjective and objective symptoms in this disorder. Bone scintigraphy will solve many problems concerning undefined degenerative bone changes in TMD, enable more accurate diagnosis, and the selection of treatment and prognosis in future investigation. Also, it is believed single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) nuclear bone imaging is a highly accurate diagnostic method for craniomandibular disorders. (author)

  6. Bone marrow scan evaluation of arthropathy in sickle cell disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve patients with sickle cell hemoglobinopathies and arthropathy were studied, using technetium Tc 99m sulfur colloid bone marrow scans. Eight of 12 had decreased marrow radionuclide activity adjacent to painful joints, suggesting obliteration of vessels supplying bone marrow. Four patients without marrow defects on scanning had causes other than infarction for their joint symptoms, viz, small fractures, postinfectious synovitis, degenerative arthritis, and osteochondromas. Roentgenograms never showed bony abnormalities in five patients with marrow infarctions, and, in three others, showed defects several months later than did the marrow scans. Bone marrow scans offer a sensitive and early diagnostic aid in sickle cell hemoglobinopathies with arthropathy

  7. Autoinflammatory bone disorders: update on immunologic abnormalities and clues about possible triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manisha; Ferguson, Polly J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review To provide an update on the genetics and immunologic basis of autoinflammatory bone disorders including chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis including the monogenic forms of the disease. Recent findings Ongoing research in murine, canine and human models of sterile bone inflammation has solidified the hypothesis that sterile bone inflammation can be genetically driven. Mutations in Pstpip2, LPIN2 and IL1RN have been identified in monogenic autoinflammatory bone disorders that have allowed more detailed dissection of the immunologic defects that can produce sterile osteomyelitis. Recent studies in murine chronic multifocal osteomyelitis, deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), Majeed syndrome and SAPHO syndrome reveal abnormalities in innate immune system function. IL-1 pathway dysregulation is present in several of these disorders and blocking IL-1 therapeutically has resulted in control of disease in DIRA, Majeed syndrome and in some cases of SAPHO and CRMO. Basic research demonstrates the importance of the innate immune system in disease pathogenesis and offer clues about potential disease triggers. Summary Research and clinical data produced over the last several years support the important role of innate immunity in sterile osteomyelitis. Based on what has been learned in the monogenic autoinflammatory bone disorders, IL-1 is emerging as an important pathway in the development of sterile bone inflammation. PMID:23917160

  8. Bone and bone marrow - nuclear medicine in the diagnosis of disorders of the hematopoetic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant progress has been achieved during the last years regarding therapy of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases of the hematopoietic system by introduction of new therapeutic modalities like highdose chemotherapy, bone marrow and stem cell transplantation, interferon-therapy and others. Diagnosis is still based on biopsy and histopathology of bone marrow. Imaging methods, however, provided by radiology and nuclear medicine, are now increasingly employed to give an additional macroscopic view over morphological and functional changes of the entire bone marrow. Bone marrow scintigraphy either using radiocolloids or immunoscintigraphy against granulocyte-antigenes may be performed as an alternative or an addition to nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Bone scintigraphy has been successful in the detection of additional bony lesions for more than two decades. Positron emission tomography using 18-fluorine-deoxyglucose has recently been employed as a new and promising tool also for assessment of bone marrow infiltration in malignant lymphomas. (orig.)

  9. Restoring Bone Density in Women with Ovarian Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an estradiol patch, progestin pills, and an inactive placebo patch. The researchers used bone density scans of the hip and lower spine to measure the effects of the regimens. For comparison, the scientists also ...

  10. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant for Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Mucopolysaccharidosis; Hurler Syndrome; Hunter Syndrome; Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome; Sly Syndrome; Alpha Mannosidosis; Fucosidosis; Aspartylglucosaminuria; Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD); Krabbe Disease; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD); Sphingolipidoses; Peroxisomal Disorders

  11. Adult Bone Marrow: Which Stem Cells for Cellular Therapy Protocols in Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy.

  12. Adult bone marrow: which stem cells for cellular therapy protocols in neurodegenerative disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Laudet, Emerence; Neirinckx, Virginie; Rogister, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy. PMID:22319243

  13. Molecular, Phenotypic Aspects and Therapeutic Horizons of Rare Genetic Bone Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Faruqi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare disease afflicts less than 200,000 individuals, according to the National Organization for Rare Diseases (NORD of the United States. Over 6,000 rare disorders affect approximately 1 in 10 Americans. Rare genetic bone disorders remain the major causes of disability in US patients. These rare bone disorders also represent a therapeutic challenge for clinicians, due to lack of understanding of underlying mechanisms. This systematic review explored current literature on therapeutic directions for the following rare genetic bone disorders: fibrous dysplasia, Gorham-Stout syndrome, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, melorheostosis, multiple hereditary exostosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, craniometaphyseal dysplasia, achondroplasia, and hypophosphatasia. The disease mechanisms of Gorham-Stout disease, melorheostosis, and multiple hereditary exostosis are not fully elucidated. Inhibitors of the ACVR1/ALK2 pathway may serve as possible therapeutic intervention for FOP. The use of bisphosphonates and IL-6 inhibitors has been explored to be useful in the treatment of fibrous dysplasia, but more research is warranted. Cell therapy, bisphosphonate polytherapy, and human growth hormone may avert the pathology in osteogenesis imperfecta, but further studies are needed. There are still no current effective treatments for these bone disorders; however, significant promising advances in therapeutic modalities were developed that will limit patient suffering and treat their skeletal disabilities.

  14. 18F-FLT PET in hematologic disorders : A novel technique to analyze the bone marrow compartment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agool, Ali; Schot, Bart W.; Jager, Pieter L.; Vellenga, Edo

    2006-01-01

    Few diagnostic procedures are available to determine the degree of bone marrow cellularity and the numbers of cycling cells in patients with bone marrow disorders. Noninvasive imaging of the bone marrow compartment may be helpful. The PET tracer 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxy-L-thymidine (F-18-FLT) has been dev

  15. Diagnostic importance of bone marrow examination in haematological malignant and non-malignant disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Bone marrow examination is regarded as one of the most important diagnostic procedure to assess various haematological disorders. The uses and advantages of bone marrow aspiration are numerous. This study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the frequency of involvement of bone marrow with malignant and non-malignant haematological and other clinical disorders and to observe the significance of bone marrow in establishing primary diagnosis of the same condition. Method: This was descriptive carried out at the Department of Pathology, Women Medical College, Abbottabad. A total of 570 successful bone marrow examinations were performed. Patients of all age groups and genders were included in the study. After history, clinical examination and blood complete counts, bone marrow was aspirated from posterior superior iliac spine, sternum or tibia. Smears were made, stained and examined under microscope. Results: Total numbers of cases were 570. Ages ranged from 6 months to 70 years. Male to female ratio was 2:1. The common clinical presentation for bone marrow examination were progressive pallor, fever of unknown origin and bleeding. Total numbers of non-malignant haematological conditions were 417 (73.2 percentage) while the numbers of malignant conditions were 153 (27.8 percentage). Conclusion: Bone marrow examination remains a simple, reliable and effective technique in the diagnosis of many important clinical conditions. It is a reliable accessible tool for diagnosing various haematological malignant and non-haematological conditions. The importance of bone marrow examination is further highlighted in cases where routine investigations fail to reach a conclusive diagnosis. Treatable conditions like visceral leishmaniasis and malaria are diagnosed and the result is decreased mortality from these diseases. (author)

  16. Diabetes and disordered bone metabolism (diabetic osteodystrophy): time for recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, S; Defeudis, G; Manfrini, S; Napoli, N; Pozzilli, P

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes and osteoporosis are rapidly growing diseases. The link between the high fracture incidence in diabetes as compared with the non-diabetic state has recently been recognized. While this review cannot cover every aspect of diabetic osteodystrophy, it attempts to incorporate current information from the First International Symposium on Diabetes and Bone presentations in Rome in 2014. Diabetes and osteoporosis are fast-growing diseases in the western world and are becoming a major problem in the emerging economic nations. Aging of populations worldwide will be responsible for an increased risk in the incidence of osteoporosis and diabetes. Furthermore, the economic burden due to complications of these diseases is enormous and will continue to increase unless public awareness of these diseases, the curbing of obesity, and cost-effective measures are instituted. The link between diabetes and fractures being more common in diabetics than non-diabetics has been widely recognized. At the same time, many questions remain regarding the underlying mechanisms for greater bone fragility in diabetic patients and the best approach to risk assessment and treatment to prevent fractures. Although it cannot cover every aspect of diabetic osteodystrophy, this review will attempt to incorporate current information particularly from the First International Symposium on Diabetes and Bone presentations in Rome in November 2014. PMID:26980458

  17. Clinical Utility of bone Scan in the Diagnosis of Temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scan is a very sensitive diagnostic imaging test for detecting bone and joint disorders. So it might be useful in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders of the joint origin. Thus, the effectiveness of bone scan for detecting temporomandibular joint(TMJ) diseases and differentiating the TMJ disc displacement from the TMJ arthritis was evaluated. Bone scan was done in 21 patients with TMJ disc displacement (I3 unilaterally affected, 8 bilaterally affected), 26 patients with TMJ arthritis (23 unilateral, 3 bilateral), and 39 volunteers with no signs, symptoms, or history of TMJ disease TMJ simple uptake rate(SUR) and difference of both TMJ SUR were calculated from the 100,000 count lateral image of head and neck region in 99mTc MDP bone scan. Transcranial and panorama X-ray examination was also done in all patients. TMJ SUR(%) were 1.67 ±0.606 in TMJs affected with arthritis, 1.350±0.351 in TMJs affected with disc displacement, and 1.084±0.172 in TMJs of controls Significant differences were demonstrated among them(pmean+2SD of controls) in unilateral TMJ arthritis patients were significantly higher than those in patients with unilateral TMJ disc displacement(69.6% and 87% vs 23.1% and 23%). Conclusively, bone scan may help to detect TMJ disease and differentiate TMJ disc displacement from TMJ arthritis.

  18. Use of nuclear medicine and imaging techniques in disorders of the bone system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is the medical specialty that deals with clinical diagnosis, treatment and research through the use of isotopes as open sources. Bone diseases such as osteoporosis, primary bone cancer, bone metastases, arthrosis and arthritis are common among the population. The objective of this review was to present international and national statistics, and evaluate the incidence of these disorders. Additionally, a review was conducted of various clinical studies to identify the radiopharmaceuticals most frequently used to diagnose and treat bone disease, and their combination with the most common imaging techniques. A presentation was made of the usefulness of bone gammagraphy and the confirmation of the disorders studied. Reference was also made to the use of new techniques such as single photon emission tomography or positron emission tomography. It was found that the radioisotope most commonly used to diagnose diseases of the bone system was 99mTc, due to its physical and chemical characteristics, whereas 186Re, 188Re, 153Sm, 177Lu, 32P, 89Sr, 85Sr, 117mSn are used for therapeutic purposes, depending on the type, location and magnitude of the lesions and the availability of the radioisotope. At present, radiopharmaceutical development centers on combining these radioisotopes with various biomolecules to improve their properties and broaden their field of application

  19. Effects of rabeprazole on bone metabolic disorders in a gastrectomized rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAMASAKI, YUKI; FUJIMURA, TAKASHI; OYAMA, KATSUNOBU; HIGASHI, YUKI; HIROSE, ATSUSHI; TSUKADA, TOMOYA; OKAMOTO, KOICHI; KINOSHITA, JUN; NAKAMURA, KEISHI; MIYASHITA, TOMOHARU; TAJIMA, HIDEHIRO; TAKAMURA, HIROYUKI; NINOMIYA, ITASU; FUSHIDA, SACHIO; OHTA, TETSUO

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are frequently prescribed to patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease; however, the number of bone fractures reportedly increased in these patients. Although PPIs have been shown to inhibit the bone resorption by osteoclasts, the effect of PPIs on skeletal metabolism remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of the PPI rabeprazole on skeletal metabolism using gastrectomized rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: i) Sham-surgery (n=15); ii) total gastrectomy (TG) control (n=20); iii) TG plus rabeprazole (n=20); and iv) TG plus the bisphosphonate minodronic acid (n=20). Twenty-two weeks after TG, the rats were sacrificed, and bone mineral density (BMD), bone strength and markers for bone metabolism were measured. Compared with the control group (50.0±8.1%), the TG-induced decrease in BMD was significantly ameliorated in the rabeprazole group (56.5±7.5%) and the minodronic acid group (59.0±6.0%). However, rabeprazole did not improve bone strength. In conclusion, rabeprazole does not appear to exacerbate bone metabolic disorders in gastrectomized rats, but rather ameliorates the TG-induced BMD decrease. PMID:27330752

  20. Studies on 99Tcm-sulfur colloid bone marrow scintigraphy in myeloproliferative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the imaging features and changing patterns of bone marrow scintigraphy in myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) as well as its clinical significance. Methods: Bone marrow scintigraphy using 99Tcm-sulfur colloid 370-550 MBq was performed on 85 MPD patients, including 40 cases of idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF), 15 of polycythemia vera (PV), 5 of essential thrombocythaemia (ET), 30 of chronic granulocytic leukemia. Also, 40 cases of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) were observed in this study. Results: Abnormal bone marrow imaging was found in 88.2% of the 85 patients. The suppression rate of central bone marrow (CBM) and expansion rate of peripheral bone marrow (PBM) in these MPD patients were 61.2% and 56.5%, respectively. The imaging patterns was classified into three types according to the distribution and activity of bone marrow. 1) reduced imaging (31.8%); 2) increased and expanded imaging (27.1%); 3) depressed and expanded imaging (29.4%). Splenomegaly with minimal residual marrow activity was typical for late stages of MPD. Expansion of PBM was the further feature, but of no major importance for improving hematopoiesis of MPD, and it tended to retract during clinical recovery in chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL). With expanding PBM, unmatched peripheral blood decreasing was found in MDS. The expansion pattern of PBM in different MPD was of relatively definite features. Conclusions: The imaging pattern of bone marrow was correlated with blood work-up data and clinical course or stages of MPD. Bone marrow scintigraphy may be proven useful in differential diagnosis and evaluation of clinical staging and prognosis of MPD

  1. Radiological diagnosis of the constitutional disorders of bone. As easy as A, B, C?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although many constitutional disorders of bone are individually rare, collectively they make up a large group of disorders. They are broadly classified into osteochondrodysplasias and dysostoses. Because of the rarity of some of these conditions, they can be difficult to diagnose. Members of the International Dysplasia Group meet regularly to update and clarify the nomenclature. The last meeting was in Oxford in 2001. This article attempts to highlight the differences between the osteochondrodysplasias and the dysostoses, and provides a systematic approach to their radiological diagnosis. (orig.)

  2. Occlusal Disorders among Patients with Total Clefts of Lip, Alveolar Bone, and Palate

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Paradowska-Stolarz; Beata Kawala

    2014-01-01

    Clefts are common birth defects. They are accompanied by various malformations, including disturbances in facial look as well as skeletal disorders that include malocclusions, most frequently crossbites and class III anomalies. The aim of the study was to present the commonest malocclusions in patients with total cleft of the lip, alveolar bone and palate (n = 154) and compare the results to the healthy on-cleft patients (n = 151). Normal occlusion, characteristic for I angle class, was obser...

  3. Diagnostic values of bone scintigram for painful disorders of the hand and the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From April 1993 to April 1997, 43 patients underwent bone scintigraphic examination for various painful conditions in the hand and the wrist joint. Three hours after an intravenous injection of 740 MBq of TC-99m HMDP, wrist scintigram was obtained. Of 18 patients with ulnar wrist pain, 12 patients had positive scan. The accumulation pattern in the five cases of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome showed different patterns. Slight difference of the accumulation between the ulnar head and the ulnar styloid process was well differentiated. Each carpal bone could be well identified, but when two bones were overlapping as in the triquetrum and the pisiform, additional physical findings were helpful. Six patients showed negative scan. The two patients with positive triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) tear but with negative bone scan showed no bony involvement, whereas those with TFC tear and positive scan were the ones having some bony disorders such as ulnocarpal abutment syndrome. Of 25 patients with wrist pain other than ulnar pain, 14 patients had positive scan. The remaining 11 patients who had negative scan included three patients with occult ganglion, two with wrist sprain and six with various disorders. (K.H.)

  4. Radiophosphorus (/sup 32/P) treatment of bone marrow disorders in dogs: 11 cases (1970-1987)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.; Turrel, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Between March 1970 and February 1987, radiophosphorus (/sup 32/P) was used to treat bone marrow disorders in 6 dogs; 4 had polycythemia vera and 2 had essential thrombocythemia. Activities of /sup 32/P given initially ranged from 2.4 to 3.3 mCi/m2. Four dogs responded well to /sup 32/P treatment, with gradual resolution of high RBC or platelet counts. Two of these dogs died of intercurrent disease unrelated to their bone marrow disorder, before blood counts could be stabilized. Two dogs did not respond to the initial /sup 32/P treatment nor to additional treatments with /sup 32/P, and had clinical signs and blood counts stabilized by use of phlebotomy or chemotherapeutic agents. We reviewed and analyzed 5 other cases of bone marrow disorders in dogs treated with /sup 32/P and included the findings from their records with the records of our 6 dogs in this retrospective analysis. Of the 8 dogs with polycythemia vera treated with /sup 32/P, 5 were given a single treatment that controlled clinical signs and blood counts for the remainder of the follow-up period. Of the 3 dogs treated for thrombocytosis with /sup 32/P, 2 had blood counts that responded to a single treatment.

  5. Busulfan and total body irradiation as antihematopoietic stem cell agents in the preparation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorders for allogenic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capacity of busulfan and total body irradiation to ablate hematopoietic stem cells as preparation for the allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorders was studied. Fourteen patients received 18 transplants; busulfan was used in the preparatory regimen of eight transplants and total body irradiation in the regimens of six transplants. Sustained hematopoietic ablation was achieved in six of eight patients prepared with busulfan and in all six patients prepared with total body irradiation. Three patients prepared with total body irradiation died with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, whereas no patients receiving busulfan developed interstitial pneumonitis. The optimal antihematopoietic stem cell agent to be used for the preparation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorder for bone marrow transplantation is not certain

  6. Next-generation sequencing for disorders of low and high bone mineral density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sule, Gautam; Campeau, Philippe M.; Zhang, Victor Wei; Nagamani, Sandesh C.S.; Dawson, Brian C.; Grover, Monica; Bacino, Carlos A.; Sutton, V. Reid; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lu, James T.; Lemire, Edmond; Gibbs, Richard A.; Cohn, Dan H.; Cui, Hong; Wong, Lee-Jun C.; Lee, Brendan H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), and osteopetrosis (OPT)are collectively common inherited skeletal diseases. Evaluation of subjects with these conditions often includes molecular testing which has important counseling, therapeutic and sometimes legal implications. Since several different genes have been implicated in these conditions, Sanger sequencing of each gene can be a prohibitively expensive and time consuming way to reach a molecular diagnosis. Methods In order to circumvent these problems, we have designed and tested a NGS platform that would allow simultaneous sequencing on a single diagnostic platform of different genes implicated in OI, OPT, EDS, and other inherited conditions leading to low or high bone mineral density. We used a liquid-phase probe library that captures 602 exons (~100 kb) of 34 selected genes and have applied it to test clinical samples from patients with bone disorders. Results NGS of the captured exons by Illumina HiSeq2000 resulted in an average coverage of over 900X. The platform was successfully validated by identifying mutations in 6 patients with known mutations. Moreover, in 4 patients with OI or OPT without a prior molecular diagnosis, the assay was able to detect the causative mutations. Conclusions In conclusion, our NGS panel provides a fast and accurate method to arrive at a molecular diagnosis in most patients with inherited high or low bone mineral density disorders. PMID:23443412

  7. Use of Bone Marrow derived Stem Cells in patients with Cardiovascular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end stage heart failure have very few treatment options. The long waiting times for transplant and the complications associated with immunosuppression has led to the search for alternatives. Subsequent to the isolation and characterization of stem cells, tremendous advances have been made and the safety and feasibility of autologous bone marrow derived stem cells has been proven in preclinical studies. Clinical studies have also shown mobilized cells repair the infracted heart, improving function and survival. We have started a clinical study to evaluate the efficacy of bone marrow derived stem cells. Bone-marrow was aspirated from the right iliac crest and the stem cells were isolated by density gradient method and suspended according to the mode of delivery.From Jan 2007 till date 10 patients (8 adults, 2 children, age with end stage cardiovascular disorder of varied etiology (Ischemic left ventricular dysfunction - 6 patients, Primary pulmonary hypertension - 2 patients, Dilated cardiomyopathy -1 patient, Biventricular non-compaction -1 patient underwent stem cell therapy. All patients were evaluated and cardiac function was measured by using echocardiography and thallium scintigraphy. There were no procedure related complications. These patients are being regularly followed-up and one patient who has completed 6-month follow-up has shown improvement in perfusion as well as increase in ejection fraction of 10%. Stem cell therapy in patients with end-stage cardiovascular disorder might be a promising tool by means of angiogenesis and other paracrine mechanisms.

  8. Clinical Utility of bone Scan in the Diagnosis of Temporomandibular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Joo; Kang, Yang Ho; Son, Seok Man; Lee, Kyoung Seog; Lee, Jae Bok; Kim, Yong Ki; Seo, Bong Jik; Park, June Sang; Park, June Sang; Ko, Myung Yun [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Son, Seong Pyo [Saint Benedict Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    Bone scan is a very sensitive diagnostic imaging test for detecting bone and joint disorders. So it might be useful in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders of the joint origin. Thus, the effectiveness of bone scan for detecting temporomandibular joint(TMJ) diseases and differentiating the TMJ disc displacement from the TMJ arthritis was evaluated. Bone scan was done in 21 patients with TMJ disc displacement (I3 unilaterally affected, 8 bilaterally affected), 26 patients with TMJ arthritis (23 unilateral, 3 bilateral), and 39 volunteers with no signs, symptoms, or history of TMJ disease TMJ simple uptake rate(SUR) and difference of both TMJ SUR were calculated from the 100,000 count lateral image of head and neck region in {sup 99m}Tc MDP bone scan. Transcranial and panorama X-ray examination was also done in all patients. TMJ SUR(%) were 1.67 +-0.606 in TMJs affected with arthritis, 1.350+-0.351 in TMJs affected with disc displacement, and 1.084+-0.172 in TMJs of controls Significant differences were demonstrated among them(p<001). Difference of both TMJ SUR was highest in patients with unilateral TMJ arthritis(0.608+-0.533, p<001), and there is no significant difference between that of controls and that of unilateral TMJ disc displacement patients(0.062+-0.063 vs 0.122+-0.100). TMJ SUR of joint with bone change on X-ray finding was not significantly different from that of joint with normal X-ray finding. Those in patients with unilateral TMJ disc displacement(69.6% and 87% vs 23.1% and 23%). The proportions of patients with increased TMJ SUR and difference of both TMJ SUR(>mean+2SD of controls) in unilateral TMJ arthritis patients were significantly higher than those in patients with unilateral TMJ disc displacement(69.6% and 87% vs 23.1% and 23%). Conclusively, bone scan may help to detect TMJ disease and differentiate TMJ disc displacement from TMJ arthritis.

  9. Utility of bone scintigraphy in the study of hereditary disorders of the connective tissues (HDCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Collagen fiber genetic alterations predispose to pain and instability of joints, with a tendency to osteoarthritis, and may also cause fragility of other tissues. Objective: To demonstrate that Bone Scintigraphy is useful in the diagnosis of Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissues (HDCT). Material and methods: We studied the scintigraphic changes of wrists, carpal bones and hands of 22 adult patients with HDCT who were diagnosed clinically using both the Brighton Criteria(1), as well as own criteria**. We compared them to 22 controls with similar age and sex, who had a bone scintigram done for other purposes. Results: Statistically significant scintigraphic positivity was found in the areas studied in the patients as compared to controls (p ≤ 0.05), with a sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 73%. There was no correlation of the degree of positivity with age, sex or type of HDCT studied. A scintigraphic positivity was seen both in patients with lax joints, as well as in those with a lesser degree of joint mobility. Conclusions: We concluded that bone scintigraphic studies are useful in the diagnosis of adult HDCT patients (including Benign Joint Hyper mobility Syndrome (BJHS) and other forms of Ehlers-Danlos). We suggest that not only hypermobility of joints, but also cartilage fragility are important pathogenic factors in the genesis of these alterations. We formulate a new hypothesis of the importance of low folic acid intake during pregnancy, as a cause for mutations that would give rise to HDCT (Au)

  10. Borderline personality disorder and bone marrow transplantation: ethical considerations and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzner, M A; Lehninger, F; Sullivan, D; Fields, K K

    1999-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is rapidly becoming a part of conventional cancer treatment. However, it remains a 'last-ditch' treatment option for patients who have exhausted other treatment modalities. Patients experience a significant amount of emotional distress during all stages of the BMT process. Patients with personality disorders experience even more emotional distress than average and their behavior is often detrimental to effective patient-staff interactions. A case of a borderline patient is presented with a discussion of the ethical issues involved in the evaluation of these patients and the determination of their appropriateness for transplant. PMID:10202782

  11. Prediction of Splint Therapy Efficacy Using Bone Scan in Patients with Unilateral Temporomandibular Disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Mi; Lee, Won Woo; Yun, Pil Young; Kim, Young Kyun; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    It is not known whether bone scan is useful for the prediction of the prognosis of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of the present study was to identify useful prognostic markers on bone scan for the pre-therapeutic assessment of patients with unilateral TMD. Between January 2005 and July 2007, 55 patients (M:F=9:46; mean age, 34.7{+-}14.1 y) with unilateral TMD that underwent a pre-therapeutic bone scan were enrolled. Uptake of Tc-99m HDP in each temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was quantitated using a 13X13 pixel-square region-of-interest over TMJ and parietal skull area as background. TMJ uptake ratios and asymmetric indices were calculated. TMD patients were classified as improved or not improved and the bone scan findings associated with each group were investigated. Forty-six patients were improved, whereas 9 patients were not improved. There was no significant difference between the two groups of patients regarding the TMJ uptake ratio of the involved joint, the TMJ uptake ratio of the non-involved joint, and the asymmetric index (p>0.05). However, in a subgroup analysis, the patients with an increased uptake of Tc-99m HDP at the disease-involved TMJ, by visual assessment, could be easily identified by the asymmetric index; the patients that improved had a higher asymmetric index than the patients that did not improve (1.32{+-}0.35 vs. 1.08{+-}0.04, p=0.023), The Tc-99m HDP bone scan may help predict the prognosis of patients with unilateral TMD after splint therapy when the TMD-involved joint reveals increased uptake by visual assessment.

  12. Prediction of Splint Therapy Efficacy Using Bone Scan in Patients with Unilateral Temporomandibular Disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is not known whether bone scan is useful for the prediction of the prognosis of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of the present study was to identify useful prognostic markers on bone scan for the pre-therapeutic assessment of patients with unilateral TMD. Between January 2005 and July 2007, 55 patients (M:F=9:46; mean age, 34.7±14.1 y) with unilateral TMD that underwent a pre-therapeutic bone scan were enrolled. Uptake of Tc-99m HDP in each temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was quantitated using a 13X13 pixel-square region-of-interest over TMJ and parietal skull area as background. TMJ uptake ratios and asymmetric indices were calculated. TMD patients were classified as improved or not improved and the bone scan findings associated with each group were investigated. Forty-six patients were improved, whereas 9 patients were not improved. There was no significant difference between the two groups of patients regarding the TMJ uptake ratio of the involved joint, the TMJ uptake ratio of the non-involved joint, and the asymmetric index (p>0.05). However, in a subgroup analysis, the patients with an increased uptake of Tc-99m HDP at the disease-involved TMJ, by visual assessment, could be easily identified by the asymmetric index; the patients that improved had a higher asymmetric index than the patients that did not improve (1.32±0.35 vs. 1.08±0.04, p=0.023), The Tc-99m HDP bone scan may help predict the prognosis of patients with unilateral TMD after splint therapy when the TMD-involved joint reveals increased uptake by visual assessment

  13. Bone mineralization disorders as a complication of anorexia nervosa - etiology, prevalence, course and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielska, Gabriela Wiesława; Przedlacki, Jerzy; Bartoszewicz, Zbigniew; Racicka, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) most often has its onset in adolescence, which is a crucial period to achieve peak bone mass. The hormonal abnormalities (hypoestrogenism, hypercortisolism, decreased secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor) and malnutrition are associated with profound bone mineralization disorders. Densitomertic bone mineral density (BMD) values for osteopenia and osteoporosis were found respectively in 35-98% and 13-50% of women with AN. Prospective studies indicate a further decline in BMD at the beginning of treatment and a crucial importance of weight gain and return of spontaneous menses for its growth. Due to frequent chronic and relapsing course of AN densitometric assessment of BMD is recommended in all patients with AN and amenorrhea lasting around twelve months. In order to establish standards for the treatment of osteoporosis in AN, studies on pharmacological treatment are conducted. There are promising results indicating the improvement in BMD after treatment with physiologic oestrogen replacement treatment and sequential administration of medroxyprogesterone in teenage girls and bisphosphonates in adult women. Supplementation of vitamin D and adequate consumption of calcium from diet are recommended. Further studies on the effectiveness of long-term treatment of osteoporosis with regard to the possibility of increase in BMD and reducing the risk of osteoporotic fractures are needed. PMID:27556110

  14. Bone mineralization disorders as a complication of anorexia nervosa - etiology, prevalence, course and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Wiesława Jagielska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN most often has its onset in adolescence, which is a crucial period to achieve peak bone mass. The hormonal abnormalities (hypoestrogenism, hypercortisolism, decreased secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor and malnutrition are associated with profound bone mineralization disorders. Densitomertic bone mineral density (BMD values for osteopenia and osteoporosis were found respectively in 35–98% and 13–50% of women with AN. Prospective studies indicate a further decline in BMD at the beginning of treatment and a crucial importance of weight gain and return of spontaneous menses for its growth. Due to frequent chronic and relapsing course of AN densitometric assessment of BMD is recommended in all patients with AN and amenorrhea lasting around twelve months. In order to establish standards for the treatment of osteoporosis in AN, studies on pharmacological treatment are conducted. There are promising results indicating the improvement in BMD after treatment with physiologic oestrogen replacement treatment and sequential administration of medroxyprogesterone in teenage girls and bisphosphonates in adult women. Supplementation of vitamin D and adequate consumption of calcium from diet are recommended. Further studies on the effectiveness of long-term treatment of osteoporosis with regard to the possibility of increase in BMD and reducing the risk of osteoporotic fractures are needed.

  15. Cohort Study on Respiratory and Neurological Disorders among Workers in a Bone Glue Factory in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AS Al-Badry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glues are strong, liquid adhesive derived from animal tissues. It has been shown that glue sniffing is associated with demyelinating polyneuropathy. The low molecular weight agents which cause occupational lung disease have generally included the isocyanates exposure to which could result in asthma among workers. Toluene is also used widely in glue and adhesive industry and households where toluene exposure and abuse can occur. Objectives: To study some respiratory and neurological disorders that may arise in workers in a bone glue factory in Queisna industrial zone, Menoufyia governorate, Egypt.Methods: In a historical cohort study, the exposed participants (n=50 were recruited from workers in a bone glue factory in Queisna industrial zone, Menoufyia governorate. The unexposed group was selected from workers' relatives who had never worked in glue industry. All participants completed a pre-designed questionnaire on personal and occupational histories. Pulmonary function tests as well as electromyography (EMG were performed for all participants. Urinary hippuric acid was also measure in all participants. Results: The prevalence of cough, asthmatic attacks and paresthesia were significantly higher among exposed than unexposed participants. Abnormal spirometric measurements (particularly towards obstruction, abnormal EMG and positive urinary hippuric acid were significantly more prevalent among exposed than unexposed group. Conclusion: Spirometry and EMG should be included in the periodic medical examination for exposed workers for early detection of respiratory and neurological disorders. Urinary hippuric acid could be a useful indicator of the nerve conduction abnormalities and should be measured periodically for these workers.

  16. Bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scanning provides information on the extent of primary bone tumors, on possible metastatic disease, on the presence of osteomyelitis prior to observation of roentgenographic changes so that earlier therapy is possible, on the presence of collagen diseases, on the presence of fractures not disclosed by x-ray films, and on the evaluation of aseptic necrosis. However, the total effect and contribution of bone scanning to the diagnosis, treatment, and ultimate prognosis of pediatric skeletal diseases is, as yet, unknown. (auth)

  17. A Study Of Psyshological Disorder Through The Leading Character In Alice Sebold’s Novel The Lovely Bones

    OpenAIRE

    Hutahaean, Novi Yanti

    2010-01-01

    Skripsi ini berjudul A Study of Psychological Disorder Through the Leading Character in Alice Sebold’s Novel The Lovely Bones yang merupakan suatu pembahasan mengenai Psikologi Abnormal yang dimiliki Mr. Harvey yaitu Pedopilia. Tujuan dari pembahasan ini adalah untuk mengetahui psikologi abnormal, pedopilia dan faktor apa yang mempengaruhi perkembangan Mr. Harvey. Setelah melakukan pembahasan dengan menggunakan buku-buku psikologi dan juga novel The Lovely Bones sebagai bahan pedoman pembahas...

  18. Bone changes in the condylar head and mandibular fossa in patients with temporomandibular disorders. Helical CT observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, we investigated whether bone changes are present in sites impossible to observe by panoramic X-ray and Schuller's X-ray examination, namely the medial of the condylar head and mandibular fossa, in patients with type IV temporomandibular joint disorders. We observed the articular fossa using computed tomography, which is able to obtain detailed 3-dimensional information, in patients with type IV temporomandibular disorders. We examined 120 joints of 60 patiens who visited the Department of Oral Surgery, Osaka Medical College Hospital. Each condylar head was clearly visualized in panoramic X-ray and Schuller's X-ray examination findings, and shown to have possible changes unilaterally. Each joint was diagnosed as type IV, according to the diagnostic guidelines set by Japanese Society for Temporomandibular Joint, and further examined using helical CT. Changes in condylar head; We concluded that bone changes were present with considerable probability in the medial of condylar head in a manner similar to those found in the lateral and center of joints with type IV temporomandibular disorders. Changes in mandibular fossa; The bone changes occurred in various locations of the mandibular fossa, while they appeared significantly more frequently in the condylar head. We think that our finding will contribute to development of treatment strategies for temporomandibular disorders, as they clarify bone changes in sites previously unreported. (author)

  19. Bone Mineral Density Changes after Physical Training and Calcium Intake in Students with Attention Deficit and Hyper Activity Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab ameri, Elahe; Dehkhoda, Mohammad Reza; Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate the effects of weight bearing exercise and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with attention deficit and hyper activity (ADHD) disorder. For this reason 54 male students with ADHD (age 8-12 years old) were assigned to four groups with no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake, and physical…

  20. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between eating disorders and bone density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, L; Aldridge, V; Clark, E M; Misra, M; Micali, N

    2016-06-01

    This meta-analysis investigates the effect of an eating disorder on bone mineral density in two eating disorder subtypes. Following conflicting findings in previous literature, this study finds that not only anorexia nervosa, but also bulimia nervosa has a detrimental effect on BMD. Key predictors of this relationship are discussed. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigates bone mineral density (BMD) in individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). AN has been associated with low BMD and a risk of fractures and mixed results have been obtained for the relationship between BN and BMD. Deciphering the effect these two ED subtypes on BMD will determine the effect of low body weight (a characteristic of AN) versus the effects of periods of restrictive eating and malnutrition which are common to both AN and BN. We conducted a systematic search through the electronic databases MedLine, EMBASE and PsychInfo and the Cochrane Library to investigate and quantify this relationship. We screened 544 articles and included 27 studies in a random-effect meta-analysis and calculated the standardised mean difference (SMD) in BMD between women with a current diagnosis of AN (n = 785) vs HCs (n = 979) and a current diagnosis of BN (n = 187) vs HCs (n = 350). The outcome measures investigated were spinal, hip, femoral neck and whole body BMD measured by DXA or DPA scanning. A meta-regression investigated the effect of factors including age, duration since diagnosis, duration of amenorrhea and BMI on BMD. The mean BMI of participants was 16.65 kg/m(2) (AN), 21.16 kg/m(2) (BN) and 22.06 kg/m(2) (HC). Spine BMD was lowest in AN subjects (SMD, -3.681; 95 % CI, -4.738, -2.625; p < 0.0001), but also lower in BN subjects compared with HCs (SMD, -0.472; 95 % CI, -0.688, -0.255; p < 0.0001). Hip, whole body and femoral neck BMD were reduced to a statistically significant level in AN but not BN

  1. Living with the unknown: Posttraumatic stress disorder in pediatric bone marrow transplantation survivors and their mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskıran, Gülseren; Sürer Adanır, Aslı; Özatalay, Esin

    2016-04-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is used to treat children with various hematologic, oncologic, and metabolic diseases. Although the treatment can be lifesaving, it is also physically and psychologically demanding for both the child and caregivers. In previous studies, BMT is found to be related with anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and psychosocial problems both in children and parents. The aim of this study was to investigate PTSD in pediatric BMT survivors and their mothers compared with the healthy controls. Twenty-seven BMT survivors and their mothers and 28 healthy peers and their mothers were recruited as the study group and as the comparison group, respectively. All children were interviewed using Child Posttraumatic Stress Disorder-Reaction Index (CPTSD-RI) for assessing posttraumatic stress responses. As for mothers, Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) was used. In healthy children and mothers, instead of BMT, the most important traumatic event reported by them was included. All data were analyzed by a neutral statistician from the Department of Biostatistics of the university. The BMT group, both children and mothers, obtained significantly higher PTSD rates than the control group (66.5% and 17.8%, respectively, in children; 57.6% and 7%, respectively, in mothers). However, there was a weak correlation between survivors' and mothers' posttraumatic stress responses. These findings suggest that BMT is a significant stressor for both children and mothers. Clinicians should be aware of psychiatric symptoms of children who underwent such a life-threatening condition. Combination of medical treatment with psychosocial support is imperative. PMID:26949991

  2. The effect of rat bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells transplantation for restoration of olfactory disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hyogyeong; Jung, Minyoung; Seo, Dong Jin; Park, Dong Joon

    2015-11-13

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation on olfactory epithelium (OE) of morphologic and functional restoration following neural Sensorineural Disorder in rats. Except the Normal group, twenty-one rats underwent Triton X-100 (TX-100) irrigation to induce degeneration of OE, and then BMSCs and PBS were treated from the both medial canthus to the rear part of the both nasal cavity into the experimental group and then were observed for restoration according to time point. At two and four weeks after transplantation with BMSCs, restoration of OE was observed with olfactory marker protein (OMP) and behavioral test. And we observed the expression of OMP, nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). After TX-100 irrigation, the OE almost disappeared in 3 days. At four weeks after transplantation with BMSCs, the thickness and cellular composition of OE was considerably restored to normal group and expression of OMP was markedly increased when compared with PBS group and reduced the searching time in the behavioral test. Furthermore at two weeks after treatment with BMSCs, expression of NGF and BDNF was greatly increased when compared with PBS group. However at four weeks after treatment with BMSCs, expression of NGF and BDNF was slightly decreased. Our results suggest the BMSCs transplantation affect restoration of OE and olfaction, most likely via regulation of the neurotrophic factor expression, especially the expression of NGF and BDNF and has a possibility of a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of olfactory disorder caused by the degeneration of OE. PMID:26427869

  3. A comparison of flow cytometry, bone marrow biopsy, and bone marrow aspirates in the detection of lymphoid infiltration in B cell disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, S P; Matutes, E; Wotherspoon, A C; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the diagnostic value of bone marrow aspirates, trephine biopsies (BMB), and flow cytometry (FC) in the assessment of bone marrow infiltration in chronic lymphoid disorders. Methods: Investigations were carried out in 110 diagnostic and follow up specimens from B cell disorders, namely: chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL; 65), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL; 39), and hairy cell leukaemia (HCL; 6). A selected panel of monoclonal antibodies was used both for FC and immunohistochemistry. Results: In CLL there was agreement between the three investigations in 71% of samples and in 88% when only FC and BMB were compared. In nine of 65 samples, FC and BMB were positive, although the aspirate was reported as negative. Four BMB negative samples had minimal residual disease (MRD) detected by FC, whereas two samples were positive both on BMB and aspirate but showed no evidence of disease on FC. In NHL, there was agreement between the three investigations in 22 of 39 cases, and in 27 of 39 cases there was agreement between FC and BMB. In eight of 39 NHL cases, FC was negative but the BMB was either positive (five) or uncertain (three), whereas in three of 39, FC was positive but BMB was either negative (one) or uncertain (two). In three of five uncertain BMB, no clonal population was detected by the polymerase chain reaction, whereas in the remaining two cases the nodular aggregates disappeared on further sectioning. Conclusions: Both BMB and FC are better than bone marrow aspirates for the detection of infiltration in B cell disorders. FC might be slightly more sensitive than BMB to detect MRD in CLL, whereas BMB may be slightly better than FC in NHL. PMID:12560392

  4. CKD-Mineral Bone Disorder in Stage 4 and 5 CKD: What We Know Today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Michal L; Buttar, Rupinder Singh; Coco, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Patients with CKD stages 4 and 5 experience biochemical derangements associated with CKD-mineral bone disorder. Some of the key abnormalities are hyperparathyroidism, hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia, and metabolic acidosis. We review the available treatments for these conditions and the evidence behind the treatments. We conclude that there is greater evidence for treating hyperphosphatemia than hyperparathyroidism. Treatment of metabolic acidosis in small clinical trials appears to be safe. We caution the reader about side effects associated with some of these treatments that differ in patients with CKD Stages 4 and 5 compared with patients on dialysis. The use of cinacalcet has been associated with hyperphosphatemia in patients with functioning kidneys. Activated vitamin D therapy has been associated with elevated creatinine levels, which may or may not be a reflection of true decrement in kidney function. Finally, the use of non-calcium-containing phosphate binders may be associated with improved clinical outcomes in patients; however, many more clinical trials are needed in this important area of medicine. PMID:27324680

  5. Digging for known genetic mutations underlying inherited bone and cartilage characteristics and disorders in the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Bianca; Mazrier, Hamutal; Wade, Claire M

    2016-07-19

    Gene mapping projects for many traits in both dogs and cats have yielded new knowledge. Both researchers and the public alike have been fascinated by the inheritance of breed characteristic phenotypes and sporadic disorders. It has been proposed that selective breeding practices have on occasion generated alterations in structure that might be harmful. In this review, simply inherited disorders and characteristics affecting bone and cartilage for which a putative mutation is known are collected. A better understanding of the known inherited basis of skeletal conditions and disorders will assist veterinarians to improve their diagnoses and increase their effectiveness on advising clients on the prevention, management, prognosis and possible treatment of the conditions. PMID:27189647

  6. Comparative Effectiveness of Phosphate Binders in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigar Sekercioglu

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD has been linked to poor health outcomes, including diminished quality and length of life. This condition is characterized by high phosphate levels and requires phosphate-lowering agents-phosphate binders. The objective of this systematic review is to compare the effects of available phosphate binders on patient-important outcomes in patients with CKD-MBD.Data sources included MEDLINE and EMBASE Trials from 1996 to February 2016. We also searched the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials up to April 2016. Teams of two reviewers, independently and in duplicate, screened titles and abstracts and potentially eligible full text reports to determine eligibility, and subsequently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias in eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Eligible trials enrolled patients with CKD-MBD, randomized them to receive calcium (delivered as calcium acetate, calcium citrate or calcium carbonate, non-calcium-based phosphate binders (NCBPB (sevelamer hydrochloride, sevelamer carbonate, lanthanum carbonate, sucroferric oxyhydroxide and ferric citrate, phosphorus restricted diet, placebo or no treatment, and reported effects on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality or hospitalization at ≥4 weeks follow-up. We performed network meta-analyses (NMA for all cause-mortality for individual agents (seven-node analysis and conventional meta-analysis of calcium vs. NCBPBs for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and hospitalization. In the NMAs, we calculated the effect estimates for direct, indirect and network meta-analysis estimates; for both NMA and conventional meta-analysis, we pooled treatment effects as risk ratios (RR and calculated 95% confidence intervals (CIs using random effect models. We used the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach to rate the quality of evidence for each paired comparison.Our search

  7. The Use of Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs to Identify Osteoclast Defects in Rare Genetic Bone Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ping Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available More than 500 rare genetic bone disorders have been described, but for many of them only limited treatment options are available. Challenges for studying these bone diseases come from a lack of suitable animal models and unavailability of skeletal tissues for studies. Effectors for skeletal abnormalities of bone disorders may be abnormal bone formation directed by osteoblasts or anomalous bone resorption by osteoclasts, or both. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs can be generated from somatic cells of various tissue sources and in theory can be differentiated into any desired cell type. However, successful differentiation of hiPSCs into functional bone cells is still a challenge. Our group focuses on the use of human iPSCs (hiPSCs to identify osteoclast defects in craniometaphyseal dysplasia. In this review, we describe the impact of stem cell technology on research for better treatment of such disorders, the generation of hiPSCs from patients with rare genetic bone disorders and current protocols for differentiating hiPSCs into osteoclasts.

  8. The acrophysis: a unifying concept for enchondral bone growth and its disorders. I. Normal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to discuss and illustrate the common effects on normal and abnormal enchondral bone at the physes and at all other growth plates of the developing child, the term ''acrophysis'' is proposed. Acrophyses include the growth plates of secondary growth centers including carpals and tarsals and apophyses, and the growth plates at the non-physeal ends of small tubular bones. The last layer of development of both physes and acrophysis is the cartilaginous zone of provisional calcification (ZPC). The enchondral bone abutting the ZPC shares similar properties at physes and acrophyses, including the relatively lucent metaphyseal bands of many normal infants at several weeks of age. The bone-in-bone pattern of the normal vertebral bodies and bands of demineralization of the tarsal bones just under the ZPC are the equivalent of those bands. The growth arrest/recovery lines of metaphyses similarly have equivalent lines in growth centers and other acrophyseal sites. Nearly the same effects can also be anticipated from the relatively similar growth plate at the cartilaginous cap of benign exostoses (''paraphysis''). The companion article will explore abnormalities at acrophyseal sites, including metabolic bone disease and dysplasias. (orig.)

  9. Detection of bone marrow involvement in newly diagnosed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography versus bone marrow biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheysens, Olivier; Thielemans, Sanne; Morscio, Julie; Boeckx, Nancy; Goffin, Karolien E; Deroose, Christophe M; Sagaert, Xavier; Wlodarska, Iwona; Verhoef, Gregor; Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Detecting bone marrow involvement (BMI) in lymphoma is important as it adversely affects stage. Bone marrow biopsy (BMB) remains the standard to detect BMI but is prone to sampling error. We retrospectively investigated whether (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) could identify BMI in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) with sufficient accuracy in comparison with staging BMB. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with PTLD who underwent (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and BMB within one month were evaluated. Based on our criteria, six patients (24%) were considered positive for BMI on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to one by BMB. Although we cannot completely exclude false positive results on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT, our data indicate a significantly higher sensitivity of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to BMB (100% vs 17%) but similar specificity. These data confirm the high diagnostic performance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT for detecting BMI, but prospective studies are needed to determine whether (18)F-FDG-PET/CT could indeed replace staging BMB in PTLD. PMID:26854937

  10. Modern aspects of application of tree-phase bone scan in diagnosis of locomotor system disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of 3-phase bone scan is featured; the investigations to its applications to its application are described. The peculiarities of scintigraphy data and their interpreting at some benign pathological processes of the locomotor system

  11. Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder occurring after bone marrow transplantation for aplastic anemia in Down’s syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Furuya, Aya; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Hodohara, Keiko; Yoshii, Miyuki; Okuno, Hiroko; Horinouchi, Akiko; Nakanishi, Ryota(Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8526, Japan); Harada, Ayumi; IWAI, MUNEO; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Yoshida, Takashi; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that Down’s syndrome exhibits a predisposition to development of leukemia, however, association between aplastic anemia and Down’s syndrome is exceptional. Herein, we describe a case of aplastic anemia occurring in Down’s syndrome following post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). A 27-year-old Japanese male with Down’s syndrome presented with a headache. Laboratory tests revealed severe pancytopenia, and bone marrow b...

  12. Bone marrow transplantation for treatment of some radiation induced biochemical disorders in albino rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation has been conducted aiming to study the role played by transplantation of bone marrow cells as a biological treatment for radiation injury to carbohydrate metabolism as shown by changes in: serum glucose level and liver glycogen content as well as protein metabolism as presented by: serum total protein and protein and protein fractions. gamma irradiation caused detectable hyperglycemia parallel by depletion in liver glycogen content. On the other hand, radiation caused decrease in serum albumin, increase in serum protein content, increase in total globulin and consequently a decrease in the albumin/globulin ratio. Transplantation of bone marrow cells to irradiated rats caused restoration of glucose level in serum and glycogen content in liver after one week from transplantation; only partial restoration could be detected for total protein, total globulin, content as well as A/G ratio. 6 fig

  13. Bone mineral density and disorders of mineral metabolism in chronic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Joe; Ganesh, Hosahithlu K; Acharya, Shrikrishna; Bandgar, Tushar R; Shivane, Vyankatesh; Karvat, Anjana; Bhatia, Shobna J; Shah, Samir; Menon, Padmavathy S; Shah, Nalini

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence and identify the risk factors for metabolic bone disease in patients with cirrhosis. METHODS: The study was performed on 72 Indian patients with cirrhosis (63 male, nine female; aged < 50 years). Etiology of cirrhosis was alcoholism (n = 37), hepatitis B (n = 25) and hepatitis C (n = 10). Twenty-three patients belonged to Child class A, while 39 were in class B and 10 in class C. Secondary causes for metabolic bone disease and osteoporosis were ruled out. Sunlight exposure, physical activity and dietary constituents were calculated. Complete metabolic profiles were derived, and bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual energy X ray absorptiometry. Low BMD was defined as a Z score below -2. RESULTS: Low BMD was found in 68% of patients. Lumbar spine was the most frequently and severely affected site. Risk factors for low BMD included low physical activity, decreased sunlight exposure, and low lean body mass. Calcium intake was adequate, with unfavorable calcium: protein ratio and calcium: phosphorus ratio. Vitamin D deficiency was highly prevalent (92%). There was a high incidence of hypogonadism (41%). Serum estradiol level was elevated significantly in patients with normal BMD. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 and IGF binding protein 3 levels were below the age-related normal range in both groups. IGF-1 was significantly lower in patients with low BMD. Serum osteocalcin level was low (68%) and urinary deoxypyridinoline to creatinine ratio was high (79%), which demonstrated low bone formation with high resorption. CONCLUSION: Patients with cirrhosis have low BMD. Contributory factors are reduced physical activity, low lean body mass, vitamin D deficiency and hypogonadism and low IGF-1 level. PMID:19630107

  14. Use of Bone Marrow derived Stem Cells in patients with Cardiovascular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham S; Naveen AT; Kirtivasan V; Prasad GN; Karthik Vaidyanathan; Rajesh V.; Madhusankar N; Cherian KM

    2007-01-01

    Patients with end stage heart failure have very few treatment options. The long waiting times for transplant and the complications associated with immunosuppression has led to the search for alternatives. Subsequent to the isolation and characterization of stem cells, tremendous advances have been made and the safety and feasibility of autologous bone marrow derived stem cells has been proven in preclinical studies. Clinical studies have also shown mobilized cells repair the infracted heart, ...

  15. Molecular symphony of tooth - bone morphogenesis and related disorders, Part 2: Remodelling and defects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, P.; Matalová, Eva; Fleischmannová, Jana; Míšek, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 5 (2009), 14-21. ISSN 1210-4272 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC524/08/J032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : odontogenesis * osteogenesis * dental disorders Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry

  16. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC for CNS disorders – Strategy and tactics for clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kuroda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background – There is increasing evidence that the transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC significantly promote functional recovery after central nervous system (CNS damage in the animal models of various kinds of CNS disorders, including cerebral infarct, brain contusion and spinal cord injury. However, there are several shortages of information when considering clinical application of BMSC transplantation for patients with neurological disorders. In this paper, therefore, we discuss what we should clarify to establish cell transplantation therapy in clinical situation and describe our recent works for this purpose.Methods and Results – The BMSC have the ability to alter their gene expression profile and phenotype in response to the surrounding circumstances and to protect the neurons by producing some neurotrophic factors. They also promote neurite extension and rebuild the neural circuits in the injured CNS. Using optical imaging and MRI techniques, the transplanted BMSC can non-invasively be tracked in the living animals for at least 8 weeks after transplantation. Functional imaging such as PET scan may have the potential to assess the beneficial effects of BMSC transplantation. The BMSC can be expanded using the animal protein-free culture medium, which would maintain their potential of proliferation, migration, and neural differentiation.Conclusion – It is urgent issues to develop clinical imaging technique to track the transplanted cells in the CNS and evaluate the therapeutic significance of BMSC transplantation in order to establish it as a definite therapeutic strategy in clinical situation in the future

  17. The Impact of Chronic Kidney Disease - Mineral and Bone Disorder on the Locomotor System and Quality of Life in Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed FOUAD

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic kidney disease - mineral and bone disorder (CKD -BMD is a worldwide challenge in hemodialysis patients (HD. Widespread use and improved methods of HD may have changed the spectrum of locomotor system disorders in this population. Locomotor system disorders have an impact on health-related quality of life (QOL. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of CKD-BMD on the locomotor system (bone, joint, muscle, tendon and bursa and document the prevalence of locomotor system disorders in HD populations and its impact in QOL. MATERIAL and METHODS: 550 HD patients were enrolled in this study. Each HD patient received complete locomotor system examination and specific diagnostic investigation. iPTH level classified study population into three groups. Group 1. (149 patients iPTH level 300 pg/ mL, high turnover bone disease. Patients were offered a self-administered QOL questionnaire, which assessed various QOL variables. RESULTS: 75% of hemodialysis patients suffered from one or more locomotor system disorders and the commonest was bone pain 60%, followed by muscle cramps 36%, proximal muscle weakness 30%, osteoarthritis 25%, osteoporosis 16%, rotator cuff syndrome15%, gout pre-HD 12.5%, carpal tunnel syndrome 12%, bone fracture 7%, fibromyalgia 7%, tenosynovitis 6%, periarticular calcification 5%, Dupuytren’s contracture 2%, septic arthritis 0.9% and osteomyelitis 0.9%. The three studied groups were represented by 27%, 23% and 50% respectively. The prevalence of osteoarthritis, muscle cramps, bone pain, spontaneous bone fracture and osteoporosis were higher in the third group. 30% of our HD patients completed the QOL questionnaire without assistance and their mean functional status, psychological status, pain scale, fatigue scale, global assessment and joint count were 3.24±2.24, 3.13 ±1.67, 4.07 ±1.7, 4.95 ±1. 8, 3.97 ±1.55 and 9.65±9.95 respectively. QOL variables pronouncedly worsen in HD patients, however the

  18. The acrophysis: a unifying concept for understanding enchondral bone growth and its disorders. II. Abnormal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to discuss and illustrate the effects common to normal and abnormal enchondral bone at the physes and at all other growth plates of the developing child, the term ''acrophysis'' was proposed. Acrophyses include the growth plates of secondary growth centers including carpals and tarsals and apophyses, and the growth plates at the nonphyseal ends of small tubular bones. Abnormalities at acrophyseal sites are analogous to those at the physeal growth plates and their metaphyses. For example, changes relating to the zone of provisional calcification (ZPC) are often important to the demonstration of such similarities. Lead lines were an early example of the concept of analogy from abnormality due to physeal and to acrophyseal disturbance. The ZPC is a key factor in understanding patterns of rickets and its healing. Examples (including hypothyroidism, scurvy and other osteoporosis, Ollier disease, achondroplasia, and osteopetrosis, as well as the family of frostbite, Kashin-Beck disease, and rat bite fever) illustrate the acrophysis principle and in turn their manifestations are explained by that principle. (orig.)

  19. The acrophysis: a unifying concept for understanding enchondral bone growth and its disorders. II. Abnormal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestreich, Alan E. [Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, OH 45229-3039, Cincinnati (United States)

    2004-03-01

    In order to discuss and illustrate the effects common to normal and abnormal enchondral bone at the physes and at all other growth plates of the developing child, the term ''acrophysis'' was proposed. Acrophyses include the growth plates of secondary growth centers including carpals and tarsals and apophyses, and the growth plates at the nonphyseal ends of small tubular bones. Abnormalities at acrophyseal sites are analogous to those at the physeal growth plates and their metaphyses. For example, changes relating to the zone of provisional calcification (ZPC) are often important to the demonstration of such similarities. Lead lines were an early example of the concept of analogy from abnormality due to physeal and to acrophyseal disturbance. The ZPC is a key factor in understanding patterns of rickets and its healing. Examples (including hypothyroidism, scurvy and other osteoporosis, Ollier disease, achondroplasia, and osteopetrosis, as well as the family of frostbite, Kashin-Beck disease, and rat bite fever) illustrate the acrophysis principle and in turn their manifestations are explained by that principle. (orig.)

  20. Stimulant medication effects on growth and bone age in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Alison S; Bui, Quoc; Melzer, Elaine; Evans, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Stimulant medication is known to cause transient weight loss and slowing down of growth, but whether it delays physical maturation is unclear. We studied growth and bone age over the first 3 years of treatment in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (patients) compared with healthy siblings (controls). Bone age was estimated blindly by two independent radiologists using Tanner and Whitehouse version 3. Dexamphetamine or methylphenidate was titrated and continued when clinically indicated. Forty out of 73 patients, together with 22 controls, completed the study. There were no significant growth differences between the two groups at baseline. Despite slower growth on treatment [5.1 cm/year, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.7-5.5, vs. 6.3 cm/year, 95% CI: 5.7-6.8, P=0.002; and 2.7 kg/year, 95% CI: 2.1-3.3, vs. 4.4 kg/year, 95% CI: 3.5-5.3, P=0.005], the patients showed no significant maturational delay (RUS score: 49 U/year, 95% CI: 44-55, vs. 55 U/year, 95% CI: 47-63, P=0.27). A subgroup of patients underwent serial biochemistry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, recording a significant reduction in fat (5.61±3.56-4.22±3.09 kg, P<0.001) and leptin (3.88±2.87-2.57±1.94 ng/ml, P=0.017). The pattern of change in height z-score over time was modified by the dose of medication (P for interaction=0.024). We found no medication effect on the rate of maturation, which was instead predicted by baseline leptin (P=0.035 controlling for age and sex). PMID:26544899

  1. Infiltration patterns in monoclonal plasma cell disorders: correlation of magnetic resonance imaging with matched bone marrow histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To investigate how plasma cell infiltration patterns detected by MRI match the plasma cell distribution in bone marrow biopsy. Methods: We assessed 50 patients with monoclonal plasma cell disorders of all clinical stages. MRI infiltration pattern was compared with matched BM histology from the same anatomic region. Results: MRI revealed a minimal (n = 11, 22%), focal (n = 5, 10%), diffuse (n = 14, 28%) and mixed (n = 20, 40%) infiltration pattern. Diffuse MRI pattern was predominant in smoldering myeloma patients whereas the MRI patterns with “focal component” (i.e. focal and mixed) were most common in symptomatic myeloma (p < 0.01). In histology an interstitial (n = 13, 26%), nodular (n = 23, 46%) and packed marrow (n = 14, 28%) was found respectively. All three histological types of infiltration were observed in patients with diffuse and mixed MRI patterns. Minimal MRI pattern was found in all MGUS patients and was associated with an interstitial BM infiltration. In two patients with minimal MRI pattern an extensive micro-nodular BM infiltration was found in histology. Conclusions: Infiltration patterns in MRI represent different histological growth patterns of plasma cells, but the MRI resolution is not sufficient to visualize micro-nodular aggregates of plasma cells

  2. Infiltration patterns in monoclonal plasma cell disorders: correlation of magnetic resonance imaging with matched bone marrow histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrulis, Mindaugas [Institute of Pathology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Bäuerle, Tobias [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Goldschmidt, Hartmut [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Landgren, Ola [Multiple Myeloma Section, Metabolism Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda (United States); Schirmacher, Peter [Institute of Pathology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Hillengass, Jens, E-mail: jens.hillengass@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Objectives: To investigate how plasma cell infiltration patterns detected by MRI match the plasma cell distribution in bone marrow biopsy. Methods: We assessed 50 patients with monoclonal plasma cell disorders of all clinical stages. MRI infiltration pattern was compared with matched BM histology from the same anatomic region. Results: MRI revealed a minimal (n = 11, 22%), focal (n = 5, 10%), diffuse (n = 14, 28%) and mixed (n = 20, 40%) infiltration pattern. Diffuse MRI pattern was predominant in smoldering myeloma patients whereas the MRI patterns with “focal component” (i.e. focal and mixed) were most common in symptomatic myeloma (p < 0.01). In histology an interstitial (n = 13, 26%), nodular (n = 23, 46%) and packed marrow (n = 14, 28%) was found respectively. All three histological types of infiltration were observed in patients with diffuse and mixed MRI patterns. Minimal MRI pattern was found in all MGUS patients and was associated with an interstitial BM infiltration. In two patients with minimal MRI pattern an extensive micro-nodular BM infiltration was found in histology. Conclusions: Infiltration patterns in MRI represent different histological growth patterns of plasma cells, but the MRI resolution is not sufficient to visualize micro-nodular aggregates of plasma cells.

  3. Analysis by computed tomography of bone changes in the mandibular head and mandibular fossa in relation to clinical findings in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamamoto, Yoshioki; Nakajima, Tamio; Hayashi, Takafumi [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1994-12-01

    Bone changes in the mandibular head and mandibular fossa in 33 patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders were studied with axial computed tomography in relation to clinical findings to clarify possible factors leading to bone changes in this phenomenon. Bone changes of the mandibular head were observed in 45 (68%) of the 66 TMJs. The mandibular head was juxtaposed to the mandibular fossa in 13 (29%) of the 45 joints in centric occlusion and in 29 joints (64%) in the anterior position on CT, whereas the mandibular head with no pathological bone change was juxtaposed to the mandibular fossa in none of the 21 joints in centric occlusion and in only 1 joint (5%) in the anterior position. In the two groups of patients with and without juxtaposition of the mandibular head and mandibular fossa with bone changes, the incidence of the initial symptoms such as pain, crepitus, and difficulty in opening the mouth was increased compared with the symptoms at presentation. However, the former group had severer symptoms than the latter group. These findings suggest that bony degeneration of the TMJ is accelerated by juxtaposition of the head and fossa. (author).

  4. Analysis by computed tomography of bone changes in the mandibular head and mandibular fossa in relation to clinical findings in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone changes in the mandibular head and mandibular fossa in 33 patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders were studied with axial computed tomography in relation to clinical findings to clarify possible factors leading to bone changes in this phenomenon. Bone changes of the mandibular head were observed in 45 (68%) of the 66 TMJs. The mandibular head was juxtaposed to the mandibular fossa in 13 (29%) of the 45 joints in centric occlusion and in 29 joints (64%) in the anterior position on CT, whereas the mandibular head with no pathological bone change was juxtaposed to the mandibular fossa in none of the 21 joints in centric occlusion and in only 1 joint (5%) in the anterior position. In the two groups of patients with and without juxtaposition of the mandibular head and mandibular fossa with bone changes, the incidence of the initial symptoms such as pain, crepitus, and difficulty in opening the mouth was increased compared with the symptoms at presentation. However, the former group had severer symptoms than the latter group. These findings suggest that bony degeneration of the TMJ is accelerated by juxtaposition of the head and fossa. (author)

  5. Association of Increased Serum Leptin with Ameliorated Anemia and Malnutrition in Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease Patients after Parathyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yao; Zhang, Jingjing; Yuan, Yanggang; Zha, Xiaoming; Xing, Changying; Shen, Chong; Shen, Zhixiang; Qin, Chao; Zeng, Ming; Yang, Guang; Mao, Huijuan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Xiangbao; Sun, Bin; Ouyang, Chun; Xu, Xueqiang; Ge, Yifei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lina; Cheng, Chen; Yin, Caixia; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Huimin; Ma, Haoyang; Wang, Ningning

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that regulates various metabolism, but its association with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), a clinical manifestation of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), remains obscure. Parathyroidectomy (PTX) is recommended for severe SHPT patients. Here, the associations between circulating leptin and clinical characteristics in CKD patients were investigated. Effects of PTX on leptin production were analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Controls and CKD patients had approximate serum leptin levels in that a larger proportion of CKD patients with body mass index (BMI) leptin was related to anemia, albumin, and bone metabolism disorders in CKD patients. Lower intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) was related with higher leptin in PTX patients group. Severe SHPT inhibited uremia-enhanced leptin production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which was attenuated after PTX. High levels of PTH were found to reduce Akt phosphorylation and leptin production in vitro but high levels of calcium and phosphorus were not. Successful PTX was found to improve anemia and malnutrition in severe SHPT patients, and this was correlated with increased circulating leptin levels via up-regulated Akt signaling in adipocytes. These findings indicated the therapeutic potential of leptin and related target pathway for improving survival and quality of life in CKD. PMID:27307101

  6. Association of Increased Serum Leptin with Ameliorated Anemia and Malnutrition in Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease Patients after Parathyroidectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yao; Zhang, Jingjing; Yuan, Yanggang; Zha, Xiaoming; Xing, Changying; Shen, Chong; Shen, Zhixiang; Qin, Chao; Zeng, Ming; Yang, Guang; Mao, Huijuan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Xiangbao; Sun, Bin; Ouyang, Chun; Xu, Xueqiang; Ge, Yifei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lina; Cheng, Chen; Yin, Caixia; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Huimin; Ma, Haoyang; Wang, Ningning

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that regulates various metabolism, but its association with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), a clinical manifestation of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), remains obscure. Parathyroidectomy (PTX) is recommended for severe SHPT patients. Here, the associations between circulating leptin and clinical characteristics in CKD patients were investigated. Effects of PTX on leptin production were analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Controls and CKD patients had approximate serum leptin levels in that a larger proportion of CKD patients with body mass index (BMI) leptin was related to anemia, albumin, and bone metabolism disorders in CKD patients. Lower intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) was related with higher leptin in PTX patients group. Severe SHPT inhibited uremia-enhanced leptin production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which was attenuated after PTX. High levels of PTH were found to reduce Akt phosphorylation and leptin production in vitro but high levels of calcium and phosphorus were not. Successful PTX was found to improve anemia and malnutrition in severe SHPT patients, and this was correlated with increased circulating leptin levels via up-regulated Akt signaling in adipocytes. These findings indicated the therapeutic potential of leptin and related target pathway for improving survival and quality of life in CKD. PMID:27307101

  7. Bone and bone marrow - nuclear medicine in the diagnosis of disorders of the hematopoetic system; Skelett und Knochenmark - nuklearmedizinische Diagnostik bei onkologischen und haematologischen Systemerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremerius, U. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1997-10-01

    Significant progress has been achieved during the last years regarding therapy of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases of the hematopoietic system by introduction of new therapeutic modalities like highdose chemotherapy, bone marrow and stem cell transplantation, interferon-therapy and others. Diagnosis is still based on biopsy and histopathology of bone marrow. Imaging methods, however, provided by radiology and nuclear medicine, are now increasingly employed to give an additional macroscopic view over morphological and functional changes of the entire bone marrow. Bone marrow scintigraphy either using radiocolloids or immunoscintigraphy against granulocyte-antigenes may be performed as an alternative or an addition to nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Bone scintigraphy has been successful in the detection of additional bony lesions for more than two decades. Positron emission tomography using 18-fluorine-deoxyglucose has recently been employed as a new and promising tool also for assessment of bone marrow infiltration in malignant lymphomas. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Therapie onkologischer und haematologischer Systemerkrankungen wie der malignen Lymphome, des Plasmozytoms und der Osteomyelofibrose hat in den letzten Jahren grosse Fortschritte durch die Anwendung neuer Therapiemodalitaeten (Hochdosischemotherapie, Knochenmark- und Stammzelltransplantation, Einsatz von Interferon u.a.) erfahren. Grundlage der Diagnostik ist nach wie vor die histologische Beurteilung des Knochenmarks nach Biopsie. Ergaenzend spielen bildgebende radiologische und nuklearmedizinische Verfahren zur makroskopischen Beurteilung morphologischer und funktioneller Veraenderungen des gesamten Knochenmarkraumes eine zunehmende Rolle. Die Knochenmarkszintigraphie mit Radiokolloiden bzw. die Knochenmarkimmunszintigraphie stellen hierbei wichtige Methoden alternativ oder ergaenzend zur Kernspintomographie dar. Die Skelettszintigraphie als bewaehrte Methode vermag zusaetzlich ossaere

  8. The use of whole body magnetic resonance imaging in detecting bone marrow disorders - a valid alternative to imaging modalities that utilise ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging modalities for investigation of bone marrow abnormalities have traditionally involved the use of ionising radiation. Now magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers an alternative to x-rays, computer tomography (CT), nuclear medicine bone scans and bone mineral densitometry. This study attempts to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of whole body MRI in detecting bone marrow abnormalities, using Tl and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) weighted sequences. This was achieved by reviewing already acquired scan data to discover whether this method is more sensitive to marrow changes than conventional radiographic skeletal surveys and other imaging tests, involving ionising radiation. The study involved 10 adult participants all of whom suffered from heamatological malignancies, including multiple myeloma, plasma cell dyscrasia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and acute lymphocytic leukaemia. Most of the study group presented with multiple myeloma. Abnormal skeletal MRI findings were reported in nine out of the 10 participants, i.e., a positive detection rate of 90%, using whole body MRI. All participants in the study who suffered from multiple myeloma or plasma cell dyscrasia showed positive MRI findings regardless of the stage of their disease. Four already had a confirmed diagnosis prior to the MRI scan, which was either visible on x-ray or bone scintigraphy. Three participants had positive serum/urine tests, but negative radiographic findings. The study therefore established that, when investigating possible marrow disorders, MRI was more sensitive to changes in the bone-marrow producing part of the skeleton and that MRI therefore must be considered a more suitable imaging tool. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Radiography

  9. Studies of bone marrow scintigrams with sup(99m)technetium sulfur colloid on various hematological disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred and eighty-five bone marrow scintigraphy on the whole body was performed on eight healthy adults and 151 patients with various hematologic diseases including 64 leukemia, 41 anemia, 23 other malignancy, etc. The positions of the investigated bone marrow were divided into the central marrow (five positions on the trunk bones) and the peripheral marrow (11 positions on the upper and 11 positions on the lower extremities) on the scintigram. The bone marrow scintigram was estimated by following three criteria. The first, ''Yuu-ryoiki'' (positive area), was the existence of sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid accumulation on bone marrow (two grades; presence or absence). The second, ''Bunpu-kei'' (distribution form), was the extent of the sup(99m)Tc accumulation area of the investigated bone marrow and was divided into five grades. The last, ''Kido'' (intensity of radioactivity), was the density of the sup(99m)Tc accumulation on the area and was divided into five grades. Using this estimation, in the diseases with bone marrow hyperplasia such as Primary Thrombocythemia and Hemolytic Anemia, ''Yuu-ryoiki'' was enlarged, ''Bunpu-kei'' was extended, and ''Kido'' was increased comparing with those in healty adult. In contrast, in the diseases with bone marrow hypoplasia such as Myelofibrosis and Aplastic Anemia, ''Yuu-ryoiki'' was reduced, ''Bunpu-kei'' was contracted, and ''Kido'' was decreased. However, the enlargement of ''Yuu-ryoiki'' did not always mean bone marrow hyperplasia. The author could evaluate not only the range and distribution of hemopoiesis as a whole in malignant or benign diseases but also the residual effective hemopoiesis to know the suitable time of the initiation of the therapy or to predict the prognosis of these cases. In this study it was shown that the bone marrow scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid was an useful method to estimate the hemopoietic activity of the bone marrow. (J.P.N.)

  10. High Fatality Rate of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disorder Occurring after Bone Marrow Transplantation with Rabbit Antithymocyte Globulin Conditioning Regimens

    OpenAIRE

    Peres, E; Savasan, S.; Klein, J; Abidi, M.; Dansey, R; Abella, E.

    2005-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV-LPD) following bone marrow transplantation can be fatal. The major risk factors for the development of EBV-LPD are ex vivo T-cell depletion or in vivo T-cell depletion with either antithymocyte globulin (ATG) or monoclonal anti-T-cell antibodies. Between March 1999 and January 2001, a total of 23 transplants with ATG of equine source (20 transplants) and ATG of rabbit source (3 transplants) used as part of the preparatory r...

  11. Radiocalcium Measurement of Bone Turnover in Disorders of Calcium Metabolism Using a Model Based on an Expanding Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine bone mineralization rate the patient eats a constant daily diet for the duration of the study. 10 μCi of 47CaCl2 are injected intravenously on day one of the investigation. Blood samples are taken at 5, 10, 20, 40 and 90 minutes, 3, 5, 9 and 22 hours and 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 days. 47Ca radioactivity is measured in all the plasma and daily faecal and urine samples. Bone mineralization is determined using a model based on the concept that the exchangeable calcium pool is continuously expanding according to a power function and that activity is lost from the pool into faeces, urine and bone (by mineralization) in direct proportion to the specific activity of the plasma (S*). The power function can be determined graphically from a log/log plot of the S* data over the first 15 hours. Extrapolation of this line to day 7 permits calculation of the pool size at that time (reciprocal of the calculated Sp*7) and the product of the calculated pool and actual S7* yields the amount of activity in the pool at day 7. This is deducted from the activity retained at day 7 to give the activity attributable to bone mineralization which is then divided by the integrated S* over the 7 days to yield the bone mineralization rate. Usually the whole calculation is performed by curve fitting the data points with the aid of a computer. In contrast to previously published methods for the determination of the bone mineralization rates the results presented are independent of the portion of the S* curve that is analysed and thus bone mineralization can be determined in 7 days, previous methods requiring 14 days or more. The normal mineralization rate is 4-6 mg Ca/kg per day. High values of bone mineralization are found in groups of patients with Paget' s disease, osteomalacia, hyperthyroidism, hyperparathyroidism and renal osteodystrophy. Low values for bone mineralization have been found in some patients with crush fracture osteoporosis and in hypoparathyroidism. Changes in bone

  12. Is Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder a Risk for Kohler’s Disease? Osteonecrosis of Navicular Bone of Foot

    OpenAIRE

    Basal, Ozgur; Burc, Halil; Atay, Tolga

    2015-01-01

    AbstractWe present a pediatric case report of foot pain due to Kohler's disease. We discussed the etiology and treatment of Kohler’s Disease of a 5-year-old boy who had Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in this case report. Our goal is elucidate the etiology of these cases and their relationship with behavioral disorders. Key Words: Osteonecrosis of Navicula; Kohler Disease; Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Trauma

  13. Imaging of Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sopo; Ouyang, Tao; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow is the essential for function of hematopoiesis, which is vital for the normal functioning of the body. Bone marrow disorders or dysfunctions may be evaluated by blood workup, peripheral smears, marrow biopsy, plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT), MRI and nuclear medicine scan. It is important to distinguish normal spinal marrow from pathology to avoid missing a pathology or misinterpreting normal changes, either of which may result in further testing and increased health care costs. This article focuses on the diffuse bone marrow pathologies, because the majority of the bone marrow pathologies related to hematologic disorders are diffuse. PMID:27444005

  14. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  15. Bone Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, spine, and sometimes other bones and joints. Grafts can also repair bone loss caused by some ...

  16. Bone Metabolism in Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical co-morbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in ...

  17. Bone Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Biopsy Bone biopsy uses a needle and imaging guidance ... limitations of Bone Biopsy? What is a Bone Biopsy? A bone biopsy is an image-guided procedure ...

  18. Symptoms of Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo Are 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety? ALL NEWS > Resources First ... Blood Disorders Bone Marrow Examination Blood disorders can cause various symptoms in almost any area of the ...

  19. [Inflammation and bone : Osteoimmunological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, K W; Neumann, E; Lange, U

    2016-06-01

    Microscopic fractures (so-called microcracks) or traumatic macrofractures require bone, as the basic scaffold of the human body, to have a high regenerative capability. In order to be able to provide this regenerative capability, bone is in a constant process of remodeling. This finely tuned homeostasis of bone formation and degradation can become disrupted, which leads to osteoporosis or other bone disorders. It has been shown that the immune system is substantially involved in the regulation of bone homeostasis and that chronic inflammation in particular can disturb this balance; therefore, this article reviews the osteoimmunological aspects contributing to osteoporosis and other diseases associated with bone degradation. PMID:27250491

  20. Autologous Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation for Central Nervous System Disorders – Recent Progress and Perspective for Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that the transplanted BMSC significantly promote functional recovery after CNS damage in the animal models of various kinds of CNS disorders, including cerebral infarct, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. However, there are several shortages of information when considering clinical application of BMSC transplantation for patients with CNS disorders. In this review, therefore, we discuss what we should clarify to establish cell transplantation therapy as the scientifically proven entity in clinical situation and describe our recent works for this purpose. The BMSC have the ability to alter their gene expression profile and phenotype in response to the surrounding circumstances and to protect the neurons by producing some neurotrophic factors. They also promote neurite extension and rebuild the neural circuits in the injured CNS. The BMSC can be expanded in vitro using the animal serum-free medium. Pharmacological modulation may accelerate the in vitro proliferation of the BMSC. Using in vivo optical imaging technique, the transplanted BMSC can non-invasively be tracked in the living animals for at least 8 weeks after transplantation. It is urgent issues to develop clinical imaging technique to track the transplanted cells in the CNS and evaluate the therapeutic significance of BMSC transplantation in order to establish it as a definite therapeutic strategy in clinical situation in the future.

  1. Comparison of planar scintigraphy and bone SPECT with clinical findings and other imaging modalities in temporomandibular disorder patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to evaluate the diagnostic value of both planar and SPECT imagings by comparing the results with the clinical and other imaging modalities findings. A total of 578 joints with TMJ complaints were examined using planar scintigraphy and SPECT. The planar scintigraphy and SPECT findings were analyzed and compared to the clinical findings of pain, clicking, crepitus and limitation of mouth opening. Moreover we compared the accuracy of the planar scintigraphy and SPECT methods with the one of the panoramic, transcranial, tomographic and MR imaging methods. The planar scintigraphy and SPECT methods showed a high sensitivity of 0.76-0.84 and low specificity of 0.25-0.45 toward the clinical findings : pain, clicking, crepitus and mouth opening restriction. Simple radionuclide uptake ratio was high in each group of patients with pain, crepitus, limitation of mouth opening (p<0.05) complaints, in each group with positive bone changes on panoramic, transcranial or tomographic images, and in disc displaced group. Although both planar and SPECT imagings have limited specificity, these techniques are sensitive for detection of internal derangement of the TMJ.

  2. Bone Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, spine, and sometimes other bones and joints. Grafts can also repair bone loss caused by some types of fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone ...

  3. Technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate uptake in the brachialis muscle hematoma in a patient with prostate cancer and coagulation disorder mimicking bone metastasis evaluated by single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of 79-year-old male with prostate cancer and coagulation disorder presented with left shoulder pain. He underwent bone scintigraphy to rule out metastasis, which showed intense foci of tracer activity in the left axilla. Hybrid single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT/CT) of the shoulder region localized tracer uptake to the left brachialis muscle hematoma. (author)

  4. Anorexia nervosa and bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by self-induced starvation with a lifetime prevalence of 2.2% in women. The most common medical co-morbidity in women with AN is bone loss, with over 85% of women having bone mineral density values more than one standard deviation below an age comparable mean. The low bone mass in AN is due to multiple hormonal adaptations to under nutrition, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and growth hormone resistance. Importantly, this low bone mass is also associated with a seven-fold increased risk of fracture. Therefore, strategies to effectively prevent bone loss and increase bone mass are critical. We will review hormonal adaptations that contribute to bone loss in this population as well as promising new therapies that may increase bone mass and reduce fracture risk in AN. PMID:24882734

  5. Anorexia nervosa and bone metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by self-induced starvation with a lifetime prevalence of 2.2% in women. The most common medical co-morbidity in women with AN is bone loss, with over 85% of women having bone mineral density values more than one standard deviation below an age comparable mean. The low bone mass in AN is due to multiple hormonal adaptations to under nutrition, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and growth hormone resistance. Importantly, this low bone mass is also associated with a seven-fold increased risk of fracture. Therefore, strategies to effectively prevent bone loss and increase low bone mass are critical. We will review hormonal adaptations that contribute to bone loss in this population as well as promising new therapies that may increase bone mass and reduce fracture risk in AN. PMID:24882734

  6. Changes in Physical Fitness, Bone Mineral Density and Body Composition During Inpatient Treatment of Underweight and Normal Weight Females with Longstanding Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solfrid Bratland-Sanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine changes in aerobic fitness, muscular strength, bone mineral density (BMD and body composition during inpatient treatment of underweight and normal weight patients with longstanding eating disorders (ED. Twenty-nine underweight (BMI < 18.5, n = 7 and normal weight (BMI ≥ 18.5, n = 22 inpatients (mean (SD age: 31.0 (9.0 years, ED duration: 14.9 (8.8 years, duration of treatment: 16.6 (5.5 weeks completed this prospective naturalistic study. The treatment consisted of nutritional counseling, and 2 × 60 min weekly moderate intensive physical activity in addition to psychotherapy and milieu therapy. Underweight patients aimed to increase body weight with 0.5 kg/week until the weight gain goal was reached. Aerobic fitness, muscular strength, BMD and body composition were measured at admission and discharge. Results showed an increase in mean muscular strength, total body mass, fat mass, and body fat percentage, but not aerobic capacity, among both underweight and normal weight patients. Lumbar spine BMD increased among the underweight patients, no changes were observed in BMD among the normal weight patients. Three out of seven underweight patients were still underweight at discharge, and only three out of nine patients with excessive body fat (i.e., >33% managed to reduce body fat to normal values during treatment. These results calls for a more individualized treatment approach to achieve a more optimal body composition among both underweight and normal to overweight patients with longstanding ED.

  7. Chromosome anomalies in bone marrow as primary cause of aplastic or hypoplastic conditions and peripheral cytopenia: disorders due to secondary impairment of RUNX1 and MPL genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marletta Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome changes in the bone marrow (BM of patients with persistent cytopenia are often considered diagnostic for a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Comprehensive cytogenetic evaluations may give evidence of the real pathogenetic role of these changes in cases with cytopenia without morphological signs of MDS. Results Chromosome anomalies were found in the BM of three patients, without any morphological evidence of MDS: 1 an acquired complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a boy with severe aplastic anaemia (SAA; the rearrangement caused the loss of exons 2–8 of the RUNX1 gene with subsequent hypoexpression. 2 a constitutional complex rearrangement of chromosome 21 in a girl with congenital thrombocytopenia; the rearrangement led to RUNX1 disruption and hypoexpression. 3 an acquired paracentric inversion of chromosome 1, in which two regions at the breakpoints were shown to be lost, in a boy with aplastic anaemia; the MPL gene, localized in chromosome 1 short arms was not mutated neither disrupted, but its expression was severely reduced: we postulate that the aplastic anaemia was due to position effects acting both in cis and in trans, and causing Congenital Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia (CAMT. Conclusions A clonal anomaly in BM does not imply per se a diagnosis of MDS: a subgroup of BM hypoplastic disorders is directly due to chromosome structural anomalies with effects on specific genes, as was the case of RUNX1 and MPL in the patients here reported with diagnosis of SAA, thrombocytopenia, and CAMT. The anomaly may be either acquired or constitutional, and it may act by deletion/disruption of the gene, or by position effects. Full cytogenetic investigations, including a-CGH, should always be part of the diagnostic evaluation of patients with BM aplasia/hypoplasia and peripheral cytopenias.

  8. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  9. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another part of the body is more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 ...

  10. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly ... childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about ...

  11. Bone Density in Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Houlihan, Christine Murray; Stevenson, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength predisposing a person to an increased risk of fracture.1 Osteoporosis remains a major health problem worldwide, costing an estimated $13.8 billion in health care each year in the United States. Despite advances in treating osteoporosis in the elderly, no cure exists. Osteoporosis has its roots in childhood. Accrual of bone mass occurs throughout childhood and early adulthood, and peak bone mass is a key determinant...

  12. Anorexia nervosa and bone metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by self-induced starvation with a lifetime prevalence of 2.2% in women. The most common medical co-morbidity in women with AN is bone loss, with over 85% of women having bone mineral density values more than one standard deviation below an age comparable mean. The low bone mass in AN is due to multiple hormonal adaptations to under nutrition, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and growth hormone resistance. Importa...

  13. 膳食钙、骨密度与儿童肥胖相关代谢异常的关系%Effects of dietary calcium intake on bone mineral density and obesity-related metabolic disorders in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮慧娟; 汤庆娅

    2009-01-01

    越来越多研究支持增加钙摄入可减少代谢综合征的发生率,儿童时期的牛奶摄入水平及保持饮用牛奶的习惯与成年后骨密度呈正相关,有助于获得更高的骨峰值.本文总结了膳食钙摄入量对骨密度和儿童肥胖相关代谢异常之间的关系.%More studies have shown that dietary calcium intake can decrease the incidence of metabolic syndrome. Milk consumption in childhood and the habit of milk drinking are positively correlated with bone mineral density in adult-hood. This article summarizes the relationship between dietary calcium and bone mineral density and obesity-related metabolic disorder in children.

  14. Bone defect animal models for testing efficacy of bone substitute biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Ye Li; Shu-Kui Chen; Long Li; Ling Qin; Xin-Luan Wang; Yu-Xiao Lai

    2015-01-01

    Large bone defects are serious complications that are most commonly caused by extensive trauma, tumour, infection, or congenital musculoskeletal disorders. If nonunion occurs, implantation for repairing bone defects with biomaterials developed as a defect filler, which can promote bone regeneration, is essential. In order to evaluate biomaterials to be developed as bone substitutes for bone defect repair, it is essential to establish clinically relevant in vitro and in vivo testing models for...

  15. Bone metabolism in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed, chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical comorbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in AN is associated with a significant risk of fractures and therefore treatments to prevent bone loss are critical. In this review, we discuss the hormonal determinants of low bone mass in AN and treatments that have been investigated in this population. PMID:24419863

  16. Bone Metabolism in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical co-morbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in AN is associated with a significant risk of fractures and therefore treatments to prevent bone loss are critical. In this review, we discuss the hormonal determinants of low bone mass in AN and treatments that have been investigated in this population. PMID:24419863

  17. Bone scanning in osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on bone scanning in osteoporosis a diagnosis of osteoporosis most often follows fracture, and clearly this should be confirmed by x-ray. The bone scan therefore does not have an important role to play in the initial diagnosis of osteoporosis. While the exact mechanism by which the 99mTc-labeled diphosphonates localize in the skeleton is not fully understood, it is believed that they adsorb onto bone surfaces most probably via the calcium of hydroxyapatite crystals. Because the major factors that affect adsorption are osteoblastic activity and to a lesser extent skeletal vascularity, it is apparent that a bone scan image presents a functional display of skeletal metabolic activity. However, osteoporosis is a disorder in which gradual change in bone mass may occur over many years and, in keeping with this minor imbalance in skeletal metabolism, the bone scan appearances are usually normal. However, the scan images may appear of poor quality because of relatively low bone uptake of tracer with, on occasion, a washed-out pattern of activity in the axial and appendicular bone. It has been suggested that such a pattern occurs in severe or end-stage osteoporosis caused by markedly reduced osteoblastic activity. If kyphosis is observed on the bone scan or if there appears to be loss of spinal height with proximity of ribs to each other or increased closeness of rib cage to pelvis, then appearances suggest vertebral collapse and would be in keeping with a diagnosis of osteoporosis. Such evidence is, however, indirect and in practice a bone scan is an extremely unreliable means of diagnosing osteoporosis

  18. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of DXA Bone Densitometry? What is a Bone Density Scan (DXA)? Bone density scanning, also called dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry ( ... is today's established standard for measuring bone mineral density (BMD). An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  19. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  20. [Endocrine disorders and osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yuka

    2015-10-01

    Secondary osteoporosis is a bone disease characterized by decreased bone mass that predisposes fractures due to underlying disorders or medication. Disorders of the endocrine system, such as primary hyperparathyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency, Cushing's syndrome, and anorexia nervosa frequently cause secondary osteoporosis. In those diseases, hormone excess or deficiency affects functions of osteoblasts, osteocyte, and osteoclasts, leading to aberrant bone remodeling. Bisphosphonates are the first-choice pharmacological agents for fracture prevention in most patients with secondary osteoporosis along with treatment of the underlying disease. PMID:26529938

  1. ADHD Meds Tied to Lower Bone Density in Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157591.html ADHD Meds Tied to Lower Bone Density in Kids ... 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children on medications for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have lower bone density than their ...

  2. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... physical exam. Tests that may be done include: Alkaline phosphatase blood level Bone biopsy Bone scan Chest x- ... also affect the results of the following tests: Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme Blood calcium level Parathyroid hormone Blood phosphorus ...

  3. Well-Designed Bone-Seeking Radiolabeled Compounds for Diagnosis and Therapy of Bone Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals are frequently used as diagnostic agents in nuclear medicine, because they can detect bone disorders before anatomical changes occur. Furthermore, their effectiveness in the palliation of metastatic bone cancer pain has been demonstrated in the clinical setting. With the aim of developing superior bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals, many compounds have been designed, prepared, and evaluated. Here, several well-designed bone-seeking compounds used for diagnostic and therapeutic use, having the concept of radiometal complexes conjugated to carrier molecules to bone, are reviewed. PMID:26075256

  4. Short Anabolic Peptides for Bone Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amso, Zaid; Cornish, Jillian; Brimble, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Loss of bone occurs in the age-related skeletal disorder, osteoporosis, leading to bone fragility and increased incidence of fractures, which are associated with enormous costs and substantial morbidity and mortality. Recent data indicate that osteoporotic fractures are more common than other diseases, which usually attract public attention (e.g., heart attack and breast cancer). The prevention and treatment of this skeletal disorder are therefore of paramount importance. Majority of osteoporosis medications restore skeletal balance by reducing osteoclastic activity, thereby reducing bone resorption. These agents, however, do not regenerate damaged bone tissue, leaving limited options for patients once bone loss has occurred. Recently, attention has turned to bone-anabolic agents. Such agents have the ability to increase bone mass and strength, potentially reversing structural damage. To date, only one bone-anabolic drug is available in the market. The discovery of more novel, cost-effective bone anabolic agents is therefore a priority to treat those suffering from this disabling condition. Short peptides offer an important alternative for the development of novel bone-anabolic agents given their high target binding specificity, which translates into potent activity with limited side effects. This review summarizes attempts in the identification of bone-anabolic peptides, and their development for promoting bone growth. PMID:27297498

  5. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP): A human genetic disorder of extra-skeletal bone formation, or - How does one tissue become another?

    OpenAIRE

    Shore, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a rare human genetic disease in which de novo osteogenesis – a developmental process occurring during embryonic skeletal formation – is induced aberrantly and progressively beginning during early childhood in soft connective tissues. Episodic initiation of spontaneous bone forming lesions occurs over time, affecting a generally predictable sequence of body locations following a pattern similar to that of the developing embryonic skeleton. The het...

  6. Virtual Temporal Bone Anatomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Background The Visible Human Project(VHP) initiated by the U.S. National Library of Medicine has drawn much attention and interests from around the world. The Visible Chinese Human (VCH) project has started in China. The current study aims at acquiring a feasible virtual methodology for reconstructing the temporal bone of the Chinese population, which may provide an accurate 3-D model of important temporal bone structures that can be used in teaching and patient care for medical scientists and clinicians. Methods A series of sectional images of the temporal bone were generated from section slices of a female cadaver head. On each sectional image, SOIs (structures of interest) were segmented by carefully defining their contours and filling their areas with certain gray scale values. The processed volume data were then inducted into the 3D Slicer software(developed by the Surgical Planning Lab at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the MIT AI Lab) for resegmentation and generation of a set of tagged images of the SOIs. 3D surface models of SOIs were then reconstructed from these images. Results The temporal bone and structures in the temporal bone, including the tympanic cavity, mastoid cells, sigmoid sinus and internal carotid artery, were successfully reconstructed. The orientation of and spatial relationship among these structures were easily visualized in the reconstructed surface models. Conclusion The 3D Slicer software can be used for 3-dimensional visualization of anatomic structures in the temporal bone, which will greatly facilitate the advance of knowledge and techniques critical for studying and treating disorders involving the temporal bone.

  7. Infections of bone and the neurotrophic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteomyelitis, or an infection of bone, is a very debilitating disease that can occur anywhere in the body, but especially in the lower extremity. The bone infection may be due to bacteria, viral infections, or mycotic infections, but usually is due to bacteria. The usual clinical picture reveals infectious edema, soft tissue changes, subperiosteal alterations, active bone destruction, areas of dead bone, and areas of new bone production. Osteomyelitis must be distinguished from inflammatory disorders, arthritis, Paget's disease, neurofibromatosis, multiple myeloma, malignant disease, endocrine disorders, and metabolic disorders. All of these conditions may cause changes that can be confused with osteomyelitis. The author discusses the two basic types of osteomyelitis: hematogenous and direct extension

  8. [Bone diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:26946704

  9. Ulnar variance in children - standard measurements for evaluation of ulnar shortening in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, hereditary multiple exostosis and other bone or joint disorders in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements for radioulnar variance in adults cannot be used in children because the epiphyses are not fully ossified. We describe a method of determining ulnar variance in children by using the distance from the distal metaphysis of the radius to the distal metaphysis of the ulna. Standards for this measurement are presented for ages 1.5 to 15.5 years in boys and girls. These measurements change little with age and may be helpful in establishing shortening of the ulna which may be seen in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, hereditary multiple exostosis, or other bone and joint diseases with childhood onset. (orig.)

  10. Talking Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jaclyn; Kassing, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation with the Saint Louis Zoo to provide opportunities for elementary school students to learn about bones, how animals move, what they eat, and how much they grow. Uses biofacts which include bones, skulls, and other parts to make the laboratory a hands-on experience for students. (YDS)

  11. Bone Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker for bone resorption. It is ... resorption include: N-telopeptide (N-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTx)) – a peptide fragment from the amino terminal ...

  12. Bone densitometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Alexandersen, P; Møllgaard, A

    1999-01-01

    The bisphosphonates have been introduced as alternatives to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for the treatment and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The expected increasing application in at clinical practice demands cost-effective and easily handled methods to monitor the effect on bone....... The weak response at the distal forearm during antiresorptive treatment has restricted the use of bone densitometry at this region. We describe a new model for bone densitometry at the distal forearm, by which the response obtained is comparable to the response in other regions where bone densitometry...... is much more expensive and technically complicated. By computerized iteration of single X-ray absorptiometry forearm scans we defined a region with 65% trabecular bone. The region was analyzed in randomized, double-masked, placebo- controlled trials: a 2-year trial with alendronate (n = 69), a 1-year...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  15. The Association between Trunk Body Composition and Spinal Bone Mineral Density in Korean Males versus Females: a Farmers' Cohort for Agricultural Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (FARM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun Kyoung; Park, Hee Won; Baek, Sora; Lim, Jae Young

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was proposed to identify the association of trunk body composition with spinal bone mineral density (BMD) in Korean male and female farmers. A total of 523 Korean farmers (259 males, 44 premenopausal females, and 220 postmenopausal females) were recruited. Computed tomography scans were acquired at the mid-L4 vertebral level, and total trunk muscle mass (TMM, cm³), back muscle mass (BMM), and abdominal wall muscle mass (AMM), total trunk fat mass (TFM), visceral fat mass (VFM), and subcutaneous fat mass (SFM) were assessed. Spinal BMD (g/cm²) was estimated from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at the L4 level. In terms of muscle mass, spinal BMD was significantly correlated with all the components of the trunk muscle mass (r = 0.171-0.360; P http://cris.nih.go.kr), number KCT0000829. PMID:27550488

  16. Multinational observational study on clinical practices and therapeutic management of mineral and bone disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease stages 4, 5, and 5D: The OCEANOS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faissal A. M. Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to assess the current clinical practices in monitoring and treatment patterns of chronic kidney disease (CKD-mineral bone disorder and the degree to which these practices met the kidney disease improving global outcome (KDIGO guidelines. This was an international, multi-center, cross-sectional, observational study in adult patients diagnosed with CKD Stages 4, 5, and 5D. Patients were enrolled from Middle East, South Asia, Eurasia, and Africa; patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 mL/min/1.73 m 2 or with any medical/surgical conditions precluding their participation were excluded. Frequency of measurements, levels of serum calcium (Ca, phosphorus and parathormone (parathyroid hormone [PTH], and presence vascular/valvular calcification were recorded. Of the 2250 patients enrolled, data on 2247 patients were evaluated. Overall, only a small percentage of patients met all three target KDIGO ranges of serum Ca, phosphorus, and PTH (13.7% [95% confidence interval: 12.0; 15.4], with a higher proportion among CKD Stage 5D patients (14.8% than CKD Stage 4 and 5 (5.6% patients. Majority (84.3% of the patients received treatment with phosphorous binders, of whom 85.5% received Ca-based phosphate binders. Overall, 57.0% of patients received Vitamin D treatment with a similar frequency among patients with CKD Stages 4, 5, and 5D. Over half (65.7% of the patients were screened for vascular/valvular calcification; of these, 58.8% had ≥1 calcification. Diabetes status, P, PTH, and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol had significant impact on the prescription pattern of phosphorous binders. The current practices for the management of bone and mineral metabolism in CKD patients in the study region fall far short of meeting the KDIGO target range.

  17. [Metabolic bone disease osteomalacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuss-Borst, M A

    2014-05-01

    Osteomalacia is a rare disorder of bone metabolism leading to reduced bone mineralization. Underlying vitamin D deficiency and a disturbed phosphate metabolism (so-called hypophosphatemic osteomalacia) can cause the disease. Leading symptoms are dull localized or generalized bone pain, muscle weakness and cramps as well as increased incidence of falls. Rheumatic diseases, such as polymyalgia rheumatica, rheumatoid arthritis, myositis and fibromyalgia must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is typically elevated in osteomalacia while serum phosphate and/or 25-OH vitamin D3 levels are reduced. The diagnosis of osteomalacia can be confirmed by an iliac crest bone biopsy. Histological correlate is reduced or deficient mineralization of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix. Treatment strategies comprise supplementation of vitamin D and calcium and for patients with intestinal malabsorption syndromes vitamin D and calcium are also given parenterally. In renal phosphate wasting syndromes substitution of phosphate is the treatment of choice, except for tumor-induced osteomalacia when removal of the tumor leads to a cure in most cases. PMID:24811356

  18. Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and phobias Bipolar disorder Depression Mood disorders Personality disorders Psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history ...

  19. Genetic control of bone mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudin, Eveline; Fijalkowski, Igor; Hendrickx, Gretl; Van Hul, Wim

    2016-09-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a quantitative traits used as a surrogate phenotype for the diagnosis of osteoporosis, a common metabolic disorder characterized by increased fracture risk as a result of a decreased bone mass and deterioration of the microarchitecture of the bone. Normal variation in BMD is determined by both environmental and genetic factors. According to heritability studies, 50-85% of the variance in BMD is controlled by genetic factors which are mostly polygenic. In contrast to the complex etiology of osteoporosis, there are disorders with deviating BMD values caused by one mutation with a large impact. These mutations can result in monogenic bone disorders with either an extreme high (sclerosteosis, Van Buchem disease, osteopetrosis, high bone mass phenotype) or low BMD (osteogenesis imperfecta, juvenile osteoporosis, primary osteoporosis). Identification of the disease causing genes, increased the knowledge on the regulation of BMD and highlighted important signaling pathways and novel therapeutic targets such as sclerostin, RANKL and cathepsin K. Genetic variation in genes involved in these pathways are often also involved in the regulation of normal variation in BMD and osteoporosis susceptibility. In the last decades, identification of genetic factors regulating BMD has proven to be a challenge. Several approaches have been tested such as linkage studies and candidate and genome wide association studies. Although, throughout the years, technological developments made it possible to study increasing numbers of genetic variants in populations with increasing sample sizes at the same time, only a small fraction of the genetic impact can yet be explained. In order to elucidate the missing heritability, the focus shifted to studying the role of rare variants, copy number variations and epigenetic influences. This review summarizes the genetic cause of different monogenic bone disorders with deviating BMD and the knowledge on genetic factors

  20. Bone disease in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Anastasia D; Lyritis, George P; Tournis, Symeon

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychiatric disorder accompanied by high morbidity and mortality. It is characterized by emaciation due to self-starvation and displays a unique hormonal profile. Alterations in gonadal axis, growth hormone resistance with low insulin-like growth factor I levels, hypercortisolemia and low triiodothyronine levels are almost universally present and constitute an adaptive response to malnutrition. Bone metabolism is likewise affected resulting in low bone mineral density, reduced bone accrual and increased fracture risk. Skeletal deficits often persist even after recovery from the disease with serious implications for future skeletal health. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying bone disease are quite complicated and treatment is a particularly challenging task. PMID:24722126

  1. Bone Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the knee in either the femur (thigh) or tibia (shinbone). Other common locations include the hip and ... bone that is weakened by a tumor to fracture, or break. This may be severely painful. Occasionally, ...

  2. Your Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a fall! If you play sports like football, soccer, lacrosse, or ice hockey, always wear all the ... to strengthen your bones is through exercise like running, jumping, dancing, and playing sports. Take these steps ...

  3. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and bone mineralisation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Chen Guo; Quan Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a hormone that is mainly secreted by osteocytes and osteoblasts in bone. The critical role of FGF23 in mineral ion homeostasis was first identified in human genetic and acquired rachitic diseases and has been further characterised in animal models. Recent studies have revealed that the levels of FGF23 increase significantly at the very early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and may play a critical role in mineral ion disorders and bone metabolism in these patients. Our recent publications have also shown that FGF23 and its cofactor, Klotho, may play an independent role in directly regulating bone mineralisation instead of producing a systematic effect. In this review, we will discuss the new role of FGF23 in bone mineralisation and the pathophysiology of CKD-related bone disorders.

  4. The Effect of Estrogen on the Restoration of Bone Mass and Bone Quality in Ovariectomized Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of estrogen on its ability to restore the bone mass and bone quality in ovariectomized rats by examining the changes of bone morphology and histomorphometry, 3month-old rats were divided randomly into 4 groups: normal control, ovariectomized (OVX), shamoperated (Sham-O) and OVX plus estrogen (OVX+E2). Treatment initiated from the day 8 weeks after operation and continued for 12 weeks. Bone morphology and histomorphometry were examined afterwards. Results showed that comparing to control group, the trabecular bone in OVX appeared thinner and reduced in the amount. The connectivity between trabecula was decreased and the structure disordered. The free-end of trabecula was increased. The cavity of bone marrow enlarged. After treatment with estrogen, above changes improved remarkably by different degree, although did not reach the normal face. The bone histomorphometry results damonstrated that estrogen treatment increased bone mass and the amount of trabecula by 129% and 132% respectively (P<0. 05). The activity of bone resorption decreased significantly and the rate of bone formation increased to 203 %. These results suggest that treatment of ovariectomized rats with estrogen can not only increase bone mass, also improve the bone structure and enhance the property of bone mechanics.

  5. Calcium and magnesium disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Jesse P

    2014-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a clinical disorder that can be life threatening to the cow (milk fever) and predisposes the animal to various other metabolic and infectious disorders. Calcium homeostasis is mediated primarily by parathyroid hormone, which stimulates bone calcium resorption and renal calcium reabsorption. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to enhance diet calcium absorption. High dietary cation-anion difference interferes with tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone. Hypomagnesemia reduces tissue response to parathyroid hormone. PMID:24980727

  6. Radiogrammetric analysis of upper limb long bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zlatan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiogrammetry is radiological method of bone mineral density quantification. Besides giving an insight in diagnostics and evolution of metabolic bone disorders (osteoporosis, osteomalacia, osteitis deformans- Paget's disease, it can also explain some specific biomechanical characteristics of bone structures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the significance and perspectives of radiogrammetry as a scientific model for further inquiry of skeletal system. The work demonstrates mathematical parameters (Ca-Cortical area, CI- Cortical index, GI- Garn's index, ESI- Exton Smith's index of upper limb long bones (humerus, radius, ulna. Two standard radiological projections of bones were taken: antero-posterior (AP and latero-lateral (LL. Correlation with metacarpal and lower limb bones was also performed. The value of the cortical area of humerus is significantly higher comparing with the two other examined bones (Xmean 2,2443 cm2, p < 0.01. Radial bone has the highest values of the relational mathematical parameters, which implicates its higher strength by volumetric unit concerning humerus and ulna. Despite the development of contemporary osteometric procedures (ultrasound densitometry, dual X-ray absorptiometry, digital X-ray radiogrammetry, the classical radiogrammetry sustains its important role in diagnostics of metabolic bone disorders and it can be successfully used for biomechanical inquiry of skeletal system.

  7. Bone densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an x-ray bone densitometer, special calibration techniques are employed to accommodate variations. In one aspect, a bone-like calibration material is interposed and the system determines the calibration data from rays passing only through flesh. In another aspect, a rotating device carries the calibration material through the beam. The specific densitometer shown uses an x-ray tube operated at two different voltages to generate a pencil beam, the energy levels of the x-ray photons being a function of the voltage applied. An integrating detector is timed to integrate the detected signal of the patient-attenuated beam over each pulse, the signals are converted to digital values and a digital computer converts the set of values produced by the raster scan into a representation of the bone density of the patient. Multiple reference detectors with differing absorbers are used by the system to continuously correct for variation in voltage and current of the x-ray tube. Calibration is accomplished by the digital computer on the basis of passing the pencil beam through known bone-representing substance as the densitometer scans portions of the patient having bone and adjacent portions having only flesh. A set of detected signals affected by the calibration substance in regions having only flesh is compared by the computer with a set of detected signals unaffected by the calibration material

  8. Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post- ... disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play a ...

  9. Biofabrication of bone tissue: approaches, challenges and translation for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Daniel; Tare, Rahul S; Yang, Liang-Yo; Williams, David F; Ou, Keng-Liang; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2016-03-01

    The rising incidence of bone disorders has resulted in the need for more effective therapies to meet this demand, exacerbated by an increasing ageing population. Bone tissue engineering is seen as a means of developing alternatives to conventional bone grafts for repairing or reconstructing bone defects by combining biomaterials, cells and signalling factors. However, skeletal tissue engineering has not yet achieved full translation into clinical practice as a consequence of several challenges. The use of additive manufacturing techniques for bone biofabrication is seen as a potential solution, with its inherent capability for reproducibility, accuracy and customisation of scaffolds as well as cell and signalling factor delivery. This review highlights the current research in bone biofabrication, the necessary factors for successful bone biofabrication, in addition to the current limitations affecting biofabrication, some of which are a consequence of the limitations of the additive manufacturing technology itself. PMID:26803405

  10. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... needle is gently pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  11. What Is Bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by your browser. Home Bone Basics What Is Bone? Publication available in: PDF (57 KB) Related Resources ... Men, and Osteoporosis Osteoporosis Prevention For Your Information Bone Remodeling Throughout life, bone is constantly renewed through ...

  12. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  13. Facts about Broken Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... White House Lunch Recipes The Facts About Broken Bones KidsHealth > For Kids > The Facts About Broken Bones ... through the skin . continue What Happens When a Bone Breaks? It hurts to break a bone! It's ...

  14. Bone biopsy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  15. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia to ... remove the bone can be done if the biopsy exam shows that there is an abnormal growth ...

  16. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L. Buckner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA.

  17. Osteoclasts prefer aged bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, K; Leeming, Diana Julie; Byrjalsen, I;

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the age of the bones endogenously exerts control over the bone resorption ability of the osteoclasts, and found that osteoclasts preferentially develop and resorb bone on aged bone. These findings indicate that the bone matrix itself plays a role in targeted remodeling of...... aged bones....

  18. Bone imaging in infants and children: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technetium-99m phosphate compounds have enabled bone imaging to become a practical diagnostic tool for pediatric patients. The efficacy of tracers in differentiating inflammatory conditions, identifying vascular disorders, and managing neoplastic disease in the growing skeleton has been clearly established. This noninvasive technique, which provides both a functional and an anatomic evaluation of bone, has proven more sensitive than conventional radiography. Future applications of gamma imaging in systemic and metabolic bone disorders of childhood seem certain. The development of new bone-imaging agents will undoubtedly revolutionize the state of the art as we know it

  19. Pathogenesis of Bone Alterations in Gaucher Disease: The Role of Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Marcos Mucci; Paula Rozenfeld

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher, the most prevalent lysosomal disorder, is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder due to a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase. Glucocerebrosidase deficiency leads to the accumulation of glucosylceramide primarily in cells of mononuclear-macrophage lineage. Clinical alterations are visceral, hematological, and skeletal. Bone disorder in Gaucher disease produces defects on bone metabolism and structure and patients suffer from bone pain and crisis. Skeletal problems include osteopenia,...

  20. Patients with eating disorders. A high-risk group for fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Peter; Emborg, Charlotte; Støving, René K;

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze fracture risk and bone mineral density in patients with eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders). DESIGN: Clinical overview. FINDINGS: Bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased in patients with anorexia nervosa....... In patients with bulimia nervosa, bone mineral is only marginally decreased and fracture risk marginally increased. In patients with other eating disorders (eating disorders not otherwise specified), bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased. CONCLUSIONS: Fracture risk is increased...... in patients with eating disorders. An eating disorder should be suspected in severely underweight young individuals (primarily girls) presenting with fractures, especially low-energy fractures....

  1. Bone defect animal models for testing efficacy of bone substitute biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Large bone defects are serious complications that are most commonly caused by extensive trauma, tumour, infection, or congenital musculoskeletal disorders. If nonunion occurs, implantation for repairing bone defects with biomaterials developed as a defect filler, which can promote bone regeneration, is essential. In order to evaluate biomaterials to be developed as bone substitutes for bone defect repair, it is essential to establish clinically relevant in vitro and in vivo testing models for investigating their biocompatibility, mechanical properties, degradation, and interactional with culture medium or host tissues. The results of the in vitro experiment contribute significantly to the evaluation of direct cell response to the substitute biomaterial, and the in vivo tests constitute a step midway between in vitro tests and human clinical trials. Therefore, it is essential to develop or adopt a suitable in vivo bone defect animal model for testing bone substitutes for defect repair. This review aimed at introducing and discussing the most available and commonly used bone defect animal models for testing specific substitute biomaterials. Additionally, we reviewed surgical protocols for establishing relevant preclinical bone defect models with various animal species and the evaluation methodologies of the bone regeneration process after the implantation of bone substitute biomaterials. This review provides an important reference for preclinical studies in translational orthopaedics.

  2. Bone Marrow Transplantation for Feline Mucopolysaccharidosis I

    OpenAIRE

    Ellinwood, N. Matthew; Colle, Marie-Anne; Weil, Margaret A.; Casal, Margret L.; Charles H Vite; Wiemelt, Staci; Hasson, Christopher W.; O’Malley, Thomas M.; He, Xingxuan; Prociuk, Ulana; Verot, Lucie; Melniczek, John R.; Lannon, Anne; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Knox, Van W.

    2007-01-01

    Severe mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a fatal neuropathic lysosomal storage disorder with significant skeletal involvement. Treatment involves bone marrow transplantation (BMT), and although effective, is suboptimal, due to treatment sequelae and residual disease. Improved approaches will need to be tested in animal models and compared to BMT. Herein we report on bone marrow transplantation to treat feline mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I). Five MPS I stably engrafted kittens, transpla...

  3. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Buckner, Jason L.; Bowden, Sasigarn A.; Mahan, John D

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serio...

  4. Bone Health in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vit Zikan

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a gait disorder characterized by acute episodes of neurological defects leading to progressive disability. Patients with MS have multiple risk factors for osteoporotic fractures, such as progressive immobilization, long-term glucocorticoids (GCs) treatment or vitamin D deficiency. The duration of motor disability appears to be a major contributor to the reduction of bone strength. The long term immobilization causes a marked imbalance between bone formation and reso...

  5. Bone Morphogenic Proteins: Applications in Spinal Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Gerard K.; Sandhu, Harvinder S.; Farmer, James

    2005-01-01

    The prospect of predictable and reliable oseteogenesis without the need for secondary bone grafting to treat a wide spectrum of spinal disorders is tremendously appealing. Recombinant human bone morphogenic proteins (rhBMP) have been the subject of extensive basic science, animal, and clinical research as a potential therapeutic modality to promote bony fusion. Animal studies and prospective, randomized clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of rhBMPs as an adjunct or substitute to au...

  6. Bone marrow stroma in idiopathic myelofibrosis and other haematological diseases. An immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisse, I; Hasselbalch, H; Junker, P

    1991-01-01

    Bone marrow stroma was investigated immunohistochemically in 31 patients with haematological diseases, mainly idiopathic myelofibrosis (n = 8) and related chronic myeloproliferative disorders (n = 14). The bone marrow from patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis and some CML patients showed marked....... As in normal bone marrow, argyrophilic fibres and type III collagen displayed a close co-distribution, which was also demonstrated for type IV collagen and laminin. While normal bone marrow sinusoids had discontinuous basement membranes, fibrosing bone marrow was characterized by endothelial cell...

  7. Hypercalcemia and altered biochemical bone markers in post-bone marrow transplantation osteopetrosis: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulpiya, Alisa; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Pakakasama, Samart; Hongeng, Suradej; Poomthavorn, Preamrudee

    2012-08-01

    Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis is a rare disorder of bone resorption defect that results in generalized sclerotic bones and bone marrow failure. Allogeneic BMT is the only treatment for cure. One of the complications following a successful BMT is hypercalcemia that is a unique complication in this group of patients. We report a three-yr-old boy with osteopetrosis who developed hypercalcemia following the successful BMT. His maximal calcium level was 13.3 mg/dL. Markedly increased both bone formation and resorption markers were demonstrated along with hypercalcemia. These findings indicated an active donor-derived osteoclastic function and thus bone resorption following the successful donor engraftment in the patient. Treatment with hyperhydration, furosemide and bone resorption inhibitors, calcitonin, and bisphosphonate led to normalization of the serum calcium level. Bone resorption but not bone formation marker was persistently elevated despite having normocalcemia during a 16.5-month follow-up period. PMID:21323826

  8. Force-induced bone growth and adaptation: A system theoretical approach to understanding bone mechanotransduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modeling, analysis, and design of treatment therapies for bone disorders based on the paradigm of force-induced bone growth and adaptation is a challenging task. Mathematical models provide, in comparison to clinical, medical and biological approaches an structured alternative framework to understand the concurrent effects of the multiple factors involved in bone remodeling. By now, there are few mathematical models describing the appearing complex interactions. However, the resulting models are complex and difficult to analyze, due to the strong nonlinearities appearing in the equations, the wide range of variability of the states, and the uncertainties in parameters. In this work, we focus on analyzing the effects of changes in model structure and parameters/inputs variations on the overall steady state behavior using systems theoretical methods. Based on an briefly reviewed existing model that describes force-induced bone adaptation, the main objective of this work is to analyze the stationary behavior and to identify plausible treatment targets for remodeling related bone disorders. Identifying plausible targets can help in the development of optimal treatments combining both physical activity and drug-medication. Such treatments help to improve/maintain/restore bone strength, which deteriorates under bone disorder conditions, such as estrogen deficiency.

  9. Effect of chronic metabolic acidosis on bone density and bone architecture in vivo in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Jürg A; Hulter, Henry N; Imboden, Peter; Krapf, Reto

    2014-03-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) might result in a decrease in vivo in bone mass based on its reported in vitro inhibition of bone mineralization, bone formation, or stimulation of bone resorption, but such data, in the absence of other disorders, have not been reported. CMA also results in negative nitrogen balance, which might decrease skeletal muscle mass. This study analyzed the net in vivo effects of CMA's cellular and physicochemical processes on bone turnover, trabecular and cortical bone density, and bone microarchitecture using both peripheral quantitative computed tomography and μCT. CMA induced by NH4Cl administration (15 mEq/kg body wt/day) in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) rats resulted in stable CMA (mean Δ[HCO3(-)]p = 10 mmol/l). CMA decreased plasma osteocalcin and increased TRAP5b in intact and OVX animals. CMA decreased total volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) after 6 and 10 wk (week 10: intact normal +2.1 ± 0.9% vs. intact acidosis -3.6 ± 1.2%, P effect attributable to a decrease in cortical thickness and, thus, cortical bone mass (no significant effect on cancellous vBMD, week 10) attributed to an increase in endosteal bone resorption (nominally increased endosteal circumference). Trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) decreased significantly in both CMA groups at 6 and 10 wk, associated with a decrease in trabecular number. CMA significantly decreased muscle cross-sectional area in the proximal hindlimb at 6 and 10 wk. In conclusion, chronic metabolic acidosis induces a large decrease in cortical bone mass (a prime determinant of bone fragility) in intact and OVX rats and impairs bone microarchitecture characterized by a decrease in trabecular number. PMID:24352505

  10. TMJ disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    TMD; Temporomandibular joint disorders; Temporomandibular muscle disorders ... vessels, and nerves Teeth For many people with temporomandibular joint disorders, the cause is unknown. Some causes given for ...

  11. Phonological disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Articulation disorder; Developmental articulation disorder; Speech distortion; Sound distortion ... Children should be examined for disorders such as: Cognitive problems (such as intellectual disability ) Hearing impairment Neurological ...

  12. Bone marrow biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may be taken from the pelvic or breast bone. Sometimes, other areas are used. Marrow is removed ...

  13. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003658.htm Bone marrow aspiration To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside bones that helps ...

  14. Changes in the Ultrastructural Features of Estrogen Deficient Ovine Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Mauer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is “a skeletal disorder characterised by compromised bone strength predis- posing to an increased risk of fracture” (NIH, 2001). Every second woman and every fifth man will suffer an osteoporotic fracture (Kanis et al., 2000). Of all people that suffer an age-related fracture, the current gold standard of osteoporosis diagnosis, DEXA scanning, misclassifies 80% of them to be non-osteoporotic (Sanders et al., 2006). Bone quantity is easily measured, however, bone strength is an in...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Child All About Food Allergies X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Bone Age Study Print A A A Text ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Precocious Puberty X-Ray Exam: Wrist What Is a Growth Disorder? Turner Syndrome ...

  16. Assessment of bone mineral status in children with Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder with skeletal involvement. It is caused by mutations in fibrillin1 (FBN1) gene resulting in activation of TGF-ßeta, which developmentally regulates bone mass and matrix properties. There is no consensus regarding bone minerali...

  17. Bone Metabolism in Adolescent Boys with Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Madhusmita; Katzman, Debra K.; Cord, Jennalee; Manning, Stephanie J; Mendes, Nara; Herzog, David B.; Miller, Karen K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Background: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe undernutrition associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) in adolescent females with this disorder. Although primarily a disease in females, AN is increasingly being recognized in males. However, there are few or no data regarding BMD, bone turnover markers or their predictors in adolescent AN boys.

  18. Anorexia Nervosa and Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk., Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising addition concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors...

  19. Hematological and vascular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous blood-related disorders will demonstrate skeletal alterations. These include various anemias, leukemias, lymphomas, and clotting-deficient diseases (hemophilia). Of all the various types of anemias only those that are chronic and severe will result in radiographically visible osseous changes. The skeletal alterations which are observed are invariably related to the direct effects on the bone marrow or are secondary to the inherent complications of the disease. The most notable osseous changes are seen in the congenital hemolytic anemias, especially thalassemia (Cooley's anemia), sickle cell anemia, and hereditary spherocytosis. Chronic iron deficiency anemia produces very minor skeletal changes, usually isolated to the skull. Leukemia demonstrates characteristic changes largely dependent on age. Hemophilia primarily alters joint function due to recurrent intraarticular hemorrhage. This chapter discusses blood-related disorders that affect the bones

  20. [Clinical usefulness of bone turnover markers in the management of osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shozo

    2013-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a state of elevated risk for bone fracture due to depressed bone strength, which is considered to be the sum of bone mineral density and bone quality. Since a measure of bone quality has not been established, bone mineral density and bone turnover markers are the only way to evaluate bone strength. Bone turnover markers are classified into bone formation marker and resorption marker, which are correlated with the bone formation rate and resorption rate, respectively, and bone matrix-related marker. Bone is always metabolized; old tissue is resorbed by acids and proteases derived from osteoclasts, whereas new bone is produced by osteoblasts. Bone formation and resorption rates should be balanced (also called coupled). When the bone resorption rate exceeds the formation rate(uncoupled state), bone volume will be reduced. Thus, we can comprehend bone metabolism by measuring both formation and resorption markers at the same time. Increased fracture risk is recognized by elevated bone resorption markers and undercarboxylated osteocalcin, which reflects vitamin K insufficiency and bone turnover. These values and the time course give us helpful information to choose medicine suitable for the patients and to judge the responsiveness. If the value is extraordinarily high without renal failure, metabolic bone disorder or bone metastatic tumor should be considered. Bone quality may be assessed by measuring bone matrix-related markers such as homocystein and pentosidine. Since recent studies indicate that the bone is a hormone-producing organ, it is possible that glucose metabolism or an unknown mechanism could be assessed in the future. PMID:24369600

  1. Functional bone marrow scintigraphy in psoriatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    24 psoriatics as well as 24 normal healthy adults were studied by functional bone marrow scintigraphy using Tc-99m-labeled human serum albumin millimicrospheres (Tc-99m-HSA-MM). Functional bone marrow scintigraphy is an in vivo test system for the assessment of various functional properties of fixed macrophages. 58% of psoriatics who had no systemic drug treatment demonstrated peripheral extension of the bone marrow space indicating hyperplasia of bone marrow macrophages. This phenomenon could be observed only in one normal subject who was a high-performance sportsman. 83% (n=6) of psoriatics with cirrhosis of liver demonstrated bone marrow extension. The 'capacity' of bone marrow macrophages to engulf Tc-99m-HSA-MM ('uptake ratio') was diminished in 42% of non-treated as well as 66% of psoriatics treated with aromatic retinoid. The phagocytic and proteolytic turnover of Tc-99m-HSA-MM in bone marrow, spleen, and liver was found to be accelerated in 66% of non-treated psoriatics, normal, accelerated or delayed in psoriatics treated with aromatic retinoid as well as considerably delayed in all of the psoriatics with cirrhosis of liver. Functional bone marrow scintigraphy proved to be an appropriate in vivo test system to reveal abnormalities of fixed macrophages in psoriatics. Furthermore, theratpeutic effects as well as influences of pre-existing disorders on different macrophage populations can be assessed. (Author)

  2. Imaging of trabecular bone structure in osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disorder that is characterized by reduced bone mass and a deterioration of bone structure which results in an increased fracture risk. Since the disease is preventable, diagnostic techniques are of major importance. Standard techniques determine bone mineral density, whereas some of the newer techniques focus on trabecular structure. This article reviews structure analysis techniques in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Imaging techniques applied to the assessment of trabecular bone structure include conventional radiography, magnification radiography, high-resolution CT (HRCT) and high-resolution MR imaging (HRMRI). The best results were obtained using high-resolution tomographic techniques. The highest spatial resolutions in vivo were achieved using HRMRI. The most common texture analysis techniques that have been used are morphological parameters (analogous to bone histomorphometry). Fractal dimension, co-occurrence matrices, mathematical filter techniques and autocorrelation functions are more complex techniques. Most of the studies evaluating structure analysis show that texture parameters and bone mineral density both predict bone strength and osteoporotic fractures, and that combining both techniques yields the best results in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. (orig.)

  3. The bone-cartilage unit in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lories, Rik J; Luyten, Frank P

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) refers to a group of mechanically-induced joint disorders to which both genetic and acquired factors contribute. Current pathophysiological concepts focus on OA as a disease of the whole joint. Within these models, the functional unit formed by the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone seems to be of particular interest. Cartilage and bone receive and dissipate the stress associated with movement and loading, and are therefore continuously challenged biomechanically. Recent data support the view that cartilage and bone can communicate over the calcified tissue barrier; vessels reach out from bone into the cartilage zone, patches of uncalcified cartilage are in contact with bone, and microcracks and fissures further facilitate transfer of molecules. Several molecular signaling pathways such as bone morphogenetic proteins and Wnts are hypothesized to have a role in OA and can activate cellular and molecular processes in both cartilage and bone cells. In addition, intracellular activation of different kinase cascades seems to be involved in the molecular crosstalk between cartilage and bone cells. Further research is required to integrate these different elements into a comprehensive approach that will increase our understanding of the disease processes in OA, and that could lead to the development of specific therapeutics or treatment strategies. PMID:21135881

  4. Bone strength: more than just bone density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    The following bone density measurements have limited utility in determining bone strength because they do not include bone quality: microarchitecture, mineralization, ability to repair damage, collagen structure, crystal size, or marrow composition. Patients with kidney disease have poor bone quality. Newman et al. now describe beneficial effects with raloxifene in an animal model of progressive kidney disease. These biomechanical measurements will be important in the development of medications to decrease fractures in patients. PMID:26759040

  5. Disordered eating and eating disorders in aquatic sports

    OpenAIRE

    Melin, Anna; Torstveit, Monica Klungland; Burke, Louise M.; Marks, Saul; Sundgot, Jorunn

    2014-01-01

    Disordered eating behavior (DE) and eating disorders (EDs) are of great concern because of their associa- tions with physical and mental health risks and, in the case of athletes, impaired performance. The syndrome originally known as the Female Athlete Triad, which focused on the interaction of energy availability, reproductive function, and bone health in female athletes, has recently been expanded to recognize that Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) has a broader range of negative...

  6. Mutations in FAM20C Are Associated with Lethal Osteosclerotic Bone Dysplasia (Raine Syndrome), Highlighting a Crucial Molecule in Bone Development

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, M. A. ; Hsu, R. ; Keir, L. S. ; Hao, J. ; Sivapalan, G. ; Ernst, L. M. ; Zackai, E. H. ; Al-Gazali, L. I. ; Hulskamp, G. ; Kingston, H. M. ; Prescott, T. E. ; Ion, A. ; Patton, M. A. ; Murday, V. ; George, A. 

    2007-01-01

    The generation and homeostasis of bone tissue throughout development and maturity is controlled by the carefully balanced processes of bone formation and resorption. Disruption of this balance can give rise to a broad range of skeletal pathologies. Lethal osteosclerotic bone dysplasia (or, Raine syndrome) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by generalized osteosclerosis with periosteal bone formation and a distinctive facial phenotype. Affected individuals survive only days or we...

  7. Bone development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatara, M.R.; Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Sawa-Wojtanowicz, B.;

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the long-term effect of alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) administration during early neonatal life on skeletal development and function, with emphasis on bone exposed to regular stress and used to serve for systemic changes monitoring, the rib. Shropshire ram...... at 146 days of life and five left and right ribs (fourth to eighth) were removed for analysis. The influence of AKG on skeletal system development was evaluated in relation to both geometrical and mechanical properties, as well as quantitative computed tomography (QCT). No significant differences between...... has a long-term effect on skeletal development when given early in neonatal life, and that changes in rib properties serve to improve chest mechanics and functioning in young animals. Moreover, neonatal administration of AKG may be considered as an effective factor enhancing proper development...

  8. Effects of obesity on bone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Jay J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is traditionally viewed to be beneficial to bone health because of well-established positive effect of mechanical loading conferred by body weight on bone formation, despite being a risk factor for many other chronic health disorders. Although body mass has a positive effect on bone formation, whether the mass derived from an obesity condition or excessive fat accumulation is beneficial to bone remains controversial. The underline pathophysiological relationship between obesity and bone is complex and continues to be an active research area. Recent data from epidemiological and animal studies strongly support that fat accumulation is detrimental to bone mass. To our knowledge, obesity possibly affects bone metabolism through several mechanisms. Because both adipocytes and osteoblasts are derived from a common multipotential mesenchymal stem cell, obesity may increase adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation while decrease osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation. The increased circulating and tissue proinflammatory cytokines in obesity may promote osteoclast activity and bone resorption through modifying the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK/RANK ligand/osteoprotegerin pathway. Furthermore, the excessive secretion of leptin and/or decreased production of adiponectin by adipocytes in obesity may either directly affect bone formation or indirectly affect bone resorption through up-regulated proinflammatory cytokine production. Finally, high-fat intake may interfere with intestinal calcium absorption and therefore decrease calcium availability for bone formation. Unraveling the relationship between fat and bone metabolism at molecular level may help us to develop therapeutic agents to prevent or treat both obesity and osteoporosis. Obesity, defined as having a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2, is a condition in which excessive body fat accumulates to a degree that adversely

  9. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis - exercise; Low bone density - exercise ... Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become brittle and more likely to fracture (break). With osteoporosis, the bones lose density. Bone density is the amount of bone ...

  10. Pathophysiology of bone loss in the female athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Papadimitriou, Dimitra

    2010-09-01

    Low bone mass is frequent among female athletes. The "female athlete triad" is a term that describes the interaction among energy availability, menstrual function, and bone metabolism that may lead to amenorrhea and osteopenia or osteoporosis. The main pathophysiologic mechanisms that lead to low bone mass in female athletes are low energy availability and functional hypothalamic amenorrhea. Increased energy expenditure and/or decreased energy intake, as well as the presence of eating disorders, are associated with low bone mass. In addition, menstrual dysfunction is quite common, especially among athletes competing in sports favoring leanness, and also associates with low bone mass. Screening for bone loss in female athletes should take place in the presence of amenorrhea or body mass index <18 kg/m(2) . Management of low bone mass aims to restore normal energy availability and nutritional habits. Hormone replacement therapy has no effect in abnormally underweight patients unless normal eating behaviors are restored. PMID:20840252

  11. Bone Mass and Turnover in Women with Epilepsy on Antiepileptic Drug Monotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pack, Alison M.; Morrell, Martha J.; Marcus, Robert; Holloway, Leah; Flaster, Edith; Doñe, Silvia; Randall, Alison; Seale, Cairn; Shane, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs, particularly cytochrome P450 enzyme inducers, are associated with disorders of bone metabolism. We studied premenopausal women with epilepsy receiving antiepileptic drug monotherapy (phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, and lamotrigine). Subjects completed exercise and nutrition questionnaires and bone mineral density studies. Serum was analyzed for indices of bone metabolism including calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, insulin growth factor I, insulin bin...

  12. Bone grafting: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Joshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafting is the process by which bone is transferred from a source (donor to site (recipient. Due to trauma from accidents by speedy vehicles, falling down from height or gunshot injury particularly in human being, acquired or developmental diseases like rickets, congenital defects like abnormal bone development, wearing out because of age and overuse; lead to bone loss and to replace the loss we need the bone grafting. Osteogenesis, osteoinduction, osteoconduction, mechanical supports are the four basic mechanisms of bone graft. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. An ideal bone graft material is biologically inert, source of osteogenic, act as a mechanical support, readily available, easily adaptable in terms of size, shape, length and replaced by the host bone. Except blood, bone is grafted with greater frequency. Bone graft indicated for variety of orthopedic abnormalities, comminuted fractures, delayed unions, non-unions, arthrodesis and osteomyelitis. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. By adopting different procedure of graft preservation its antigenicity can be minimized. The concept of bone banking for obtaining bone grafts and implants is very useful for clinical application. Absolute stability require for successful incorporation. Ideal bone graft must possess osteogenic, osteoinductive and osteocon-ductive properties. Cancellous bone graft is superior to cortical bone graft. Usually autologous cancellous bone graft are used as fresh grafts where as allografts are employed as an alloimplant. None of the available type of bone grafts possesses all these properties therefore, a single type of graft cannot be recomm-ended for all types of orthopedic abnormalities. Bone grafts and implants can be selected as per clinical problems, the equipments available and preference of

  13. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  14. Bone Marrow Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains stem cells. The stem cells can ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem ...

  15. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a ...

  16. Bone grafts in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Prasanna Kumar; Belliappa Vinitha; Ghousia Fathima

    2013-01-01

    Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation.

  17. Bone grafts in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation.

  18. Bone mineral density and markers of bone turnover in patients with renal transplantation and regular hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir M. Ibrahim,. Khalid H Abdel-Mageed, Magdi M El-Sharkawy

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decreased bone mineral density (BMD is a known complication for the uremic state antedating dialysis / renal transplantation (RTx. The issue of stabilized versus continued decrease of BMD especially on long-term basis, continues to be unresolved. Patients and Methods: !"#"hemodialysis (HD-#" $% " &'( &'(-group had been evaluated for metabolic bone changes by calcium homeostasis parameters (serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase "ALP" and vitamin D "calcitriol", markers of bone formation (bone alkaline phosphatase "BAP", osteocalcin "OC", N-terminal propeptide of collagen type I "PINP", bone resorption markers (pyridoline "PYL" and deoxypyridoline "DPYL", and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH. Also, BMD had been assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA twice, at inclusion time and * ! "" Results: comparing both groups regarding calcium homeostasis, markers of bone turnover and iPTH showed non significant difference. However, there was a significant drop of BMD (as evidenced by T-score at follow up in the HD group, compared to stabilization of T-score for the RTx-group. Furthermore, annual T-score change was significantly more in HD-group, compared to RTx-group. Results also showed that, the best marker correlating with T-score annual changes and iPTH to be PINP. Irrespective of normal calcium homeostasis parameters, low BMD is a prevalent disorder among patients on regular HD and renal transplants.Conclusion: Follow up for * ! " %+ ,- ." % """"!to continued bone loss in patients on regular HD. This could raise recommendation for calcium and calcitriol supplementation, especially in the predialysis period, early post transplantation period, and continued guided replacement for those on maintenance HD. Serum PINP showed best correlations with BMD changes and iPTH and could be considered a reliable marker reflecting bone formation in those patients. Keywords: hemodialysis, renal transplantation, markers of bone

  19. BONE IN OSTEOPETROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteopetrosis, a generalized developmental bone disease due to genetic disturbances, characterized by failure of bone re sorption and continuous bone formation making the bone hard, dense and brittle. Bones of intramembranous ossification and enchondrial ossification are affected genetically and symmetrically. During the process of disease the excess bone formation obliterates the cranial foramina and presses the optic, auditory and facial nerves resulting in defective vision, impaired hearing and facial paralysis. The bone formation in osteopetrosis affects bone marrow function leading to severe anemia and deficient of blood cells. The bone devoid of blood supply due to compression of blood vessels by excess formation of bone are prone to osteomyelitic changes with suppuration and pathological fracture if exposed to infection. Though the condition is chronic progressive, it produces changes leading to fatal condition, it should be studied thoroughly by everyone and hence this article presents a classical case of osteopetrosis with detailed description and discussion for the benefit of readers

  20. [The new bone formation and bone metabolism in Forestier disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrych, Daniel; Bohatyrewicz, Andrzej; Woźniak, Wojciech; Zietek, Paweł; Kołodziej, Łukasz; Karaczun, Maciej; Grzegorczyk, Wojciech; Antoniak, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    The study was performed on 36 male patients between 65 and 83 years who were either hospitalised or treated in the out-patients clinic due to Forestier's disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the advance of ectopic bone formation process in cervical spine and bony metabolic changes in treated patients. The study showed reverse corelation between the degree of advance of cervical hyperostosis and the prevalence of osteoporosis and metabolic disorders in the tested group. The authors have emphasized the need of precise evaluation and differentiation of Forestier's disease and degenerative spine disease. PMID:18847002

  1. Bone scanning in the child and young adult. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of the radionuclide bone scan in identifying osteoblastic reaction in bone and in detecting local alterations in blood flow is valuable in many benign diseases involving bone, particularly those which are more common in children and young adults, and in which early detection may be critical to future health. Bone scanning offers a simple yet reliable means for establishing an early diagnosis, evaluating the extent of the disease, and assessing the therapeutic response in disorders resulting from infection, trauma, or vascular insult. Useful information may also be obtained in disturbances of growth and development, and in congenital lesions. (orig.)

  2. Bone scanning in the child and young adult. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of the radionuclide bone scan in identifying osteoblastic reaction in bone and in detecting local alterations in blood flow is valuable in many benign diseases involving bone, particularly those which are more common in children and young adults, and in which early detection may be critical to future health. Bone scanning offers a simple, yet reliable means for establishing an early diagnosis, evaluating the extent of the disease, and assessing the therapeutic response in disorders resulting from infection, trauma or vascular insult. Useful information may also be obtained in disturbances of growth and development, and in congenital lesions. (orig.)

  3. Bone Health in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vit Zikan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a gait disorder characterized by acute episodes of neurological defects leading to progressive disability. Patients with MS have multiple risk factors for osteoporotic fractures, such as progressive immobilization, long-term glucocorticoids (GCs treatment or vitamin D deficiency. The duration of motor disability appears to be a major contributor to the reduction of bone strength. The long term immobilization causes a marked imbalance between bone formation and resorption with depressed bone formation and a marked disruption of mechanosensory network of tightly connected osteocytes due to increase of osteocyte apoptosis. Patients with higher level of disability have also higher risk of falls that combined with a bone loss increases the frequency of bone fractures. There are currently no recommendations how to best prevent and treat osteoporosis in patients with MS. However, devastating effect of immobilization on the skeleton in patients with MS underscores the importance of adequate mechanical stimuli for maintaining the bone structure and its mechanical competence. The physical as well as pharmacological interventions which can counteract the bone remodeling imbalance, particularly osteocyte apoptosis, will be promising for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in patients with MS.

  4. Fibrous dysplasia of bone: a clinicopathologic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Harsh Mohan1, Preeti Mittal1, Irneet Mundi1, Sudhir Kumar21Department of Pathology, 2Department of Orthopedics, Government Medical College, Sector 32, Chandigarh, IndiaAbstract: Fibrous dysplasia of the bones is an uncommon congenital skeletal disorder that is found equally in both genders and is not inherited. Its etiology has been linked to an activating mutation of Gsα and the downstream effects of the resultant increase in cAMP. Fibrous dysplasia is categorized as either monostotic or polyostotic, and may occur as a component of McCune-Albright syndrome or the rare Mazabraud syndrome. Long bones, skull bones, and ribs are the most commonly affected bones. The radiological picture is somewhat variable, including a ground-glass appearance, expansion of the bone, and sclerosis surrounding the lesion. Histologically, fibrous dysplasia shows irregularly-shaped trabeculae of immature, woven bone in a background of variably cellular, loosely arranged fibrous stroma. It may be complicated by pathologic fracture, and rarely by malignant transformation. This review examines interesting issues surrounding the etiology of fibrous dysplasia, its clinical and laboratory manifestations, radiological picture, utility of bone biopsy, gross and microscopic pathology, complications, and its differential diagnostic considerations.Keywords: fibrous dysplasia, McCune-Albright syndrome, monostotic form, polyostotic form

  5. Regenerate augmentation with bone marrow concentrate after traumatic bone loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gessmann

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis after post-traumatic segmental bone loss of the tibia is a complex and time-consuming procedure that is often complicated due to prolonged consolidation or complete insufficiency of the regenerate. The aim of this feasibility study was to investigate the potential of bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC for percutaneous regenerate augmentation to accelerate bony consolidation of the regenerate. Eight patients (age 22-64 with an average posttraumatic bone defect of 82.4 mm and concomitant risk factors (nicotine abuse, soft-tissue defects, obesity and/or circulatory disorders were treated with a modified Ilizarov external frame using an intramedullary cable transportation system. At the end of the distraction phase, each patient was treated with a percutaneously injection of autologous BMAC into the centre of the regenerate. The concentration factor was analysed using flow cytometry. The mean follow up after frame removal was 10 (4-15 months. With a mean healing index (HI of 36.9 d/cm, bony consolidation of the regenerate was achieved in all eight cases. The mean concentration factor of the bone marrow aspirate was 4.6 (SD 1.23. No further operations concerning the regenerate were needed and no adverse effects were observed with the BMAC procedure. This procedure can be used for augmentation of the regenerate in cases of segmental bone transport. Further studies with a larger number of patients and control groups are needed to evaluate a possible higher success rate and accelerating effects on regenerate healing.

  6. Anorexia nervosa and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure, and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk. Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising additional concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, and hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors contribute to impaired bone metabolism in AN. The best strategy to improve bone density is to regain weight and menstrual function. Oral estrogen-progesterone combinations are not effective in increasing bone density in adults or adolescents with AN, and transdermal testosterone replacement is not effective in increasing bone density in adult women with AN. However, physiological estrogen replacement as transdermal estradiol with cyclic progesterone does increase bone accrual rates in adolescents with AN to approximate that in normal-weight controls, leading to a maintenance of bone density Z-scores. A recent study has shown that risedronate increases bone density at the spine and hip in adult women with AN. However, bisphosphonates should be used with great caution in women of reproductive age, given their long half-life and potential for teratogenicity, and should be considered only in patients with low bone density and clinically significant fractures when non-pharmacological therapies for weight gain are ineffective. Further studies are necessary to determine the best therapeutic strategies for low bone density in AN. PMID:24898127

  7. Anorexia Nervosa and Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk., Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising addition concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors contribute to impaired bone metabolism in AN. The best strategy to improve bone density is to regain weight and menstrual function. Oral estrogen-progesterone combinations are not effective in increasing bone density in adults or adolescents with AN, and transdermal testosterone replacement is not effective in increasing bone density in adult women with AN. However, physiologic estrogen replacement as transdermal estradiol with cyclic progesterone does increase bone accrual rates in adolescents with AN to approximate that in normal-weight controls, leading to a maintenance of bone density Z-scores. A recent study has shown that risedronate increases bone density at the spine and hip in adult women with AN. However, bisphosphonates should be used with great caution in women of reproductive age given their long half-life and potential for teratogenicity, and should be considered only in patients with low bone density and clinically significant fractures when non-pharmacological therapies for weight gain are ineffective. Further studies are necessary to determine the best therapeutic strategies for low bone density in AN. PMID:24898127

  8. Skeletal complications of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Abigail A; Gordon, Catherine M

    2015-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness with profound medical consequences. Among the many adverse physical sequelae of AN, bone health is impacted by starvation and can be permanently impaired over the course of the illness. In this review of skeletal complications associated with eating disorders, we discuss the epidemiology, neuroendocrine changes, adolescent vs. adult skeletal considerations, orthopedic concerns, assessment of bone health, and treatment options for individuals with AN. The focus of the review is the skeletal sequelae associated with anorexia nervosa, but we also briefly consider other eating disorders that may afflict adolescents and young adults. The review presents updates to the field of bone health in AN, and also suggests knowledge gaps and areas for future investigation. PMID:26166318

  9. Matrix Extracellular Phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) Is a New Bone Renal Hormone and Vascularization Modulator

    OpenAIRE

    David, Valentin; Martin, Aline; Hedge, Anne-Marie; Rowe, Peter S N

    2009-01-01

    Increased matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) expression occurs in several phosphate and bone-mineral metabolic disorders. To resolve whether MEPE plays a role, we created a murine model overexpressing MEPE protein (MEPE tgn) in bone. MEPE tgn mice displayed a growth and mineralization defect with altered bone-renal vascularization that persisted to adulthood. The growth mineralization defect was due to a decrease in bone remodeling, and MEPE tgn mice were resistant to diet-induce...

  10. Physiology and molecular characterization of metabolism related mouse models for bone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Shen

    2015-01-01

    Bone disorders are commonly associated with various metabolic diseases. Two ENU- induced mutant mouse lines were analyzed to explore the relationship between bone and metabolic phenotypes. SATB2 was proven to regulate bone development. In addition, a previously unknown role of the gene in energy metabolism was uncovered. Only a minor influence on bone homeostasis and energy metabolism could be attributed to the T720A mutation of DLL1.

  11. Bone scintigraphy in non-neoplastic diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the introduction of 99mTc labeled polyphosphates bone scintigraphy has become a widely accepted method for the evaluation of non-neoplastic bone diseases in children. High quality images require the child's immobilisation and a correct positioning as well as an optimized technical equipment. Two or three phase scintigraphy is the routinely procedure but additional techniques like pinhole images or SPECT can be very helpful for special indications and localizations. Due to the age and sex dependent differences of bone metabolism in the developing skeleton the interpretation of the bone scan in children is more difficult than in adults and requires more experience. Infections, trauma and aseptic necrosis are the most important non-neoplastic diseases requiring bone scintigraphy. Bone scan has a high sensitivity in the early detection of pathological bone metabolism indicating bone disease; other investigations, which are describing morphological changes like X-ray are less sensitive especially at the beginning of the disease. Negative bone scan rools out significant bone disorders with a high certainty. Follow-up studies can give additional information about the response to therapeutical regimes and about the prognosis. To improve the specificity of a bone scan a combined interpretation of scintigraphy and X-ray is recommended

  12. TMJ Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... referred Sally and her parents to a local dentist who specialized in jaw disorders. After examining Sally ... having symptoms of a TMJ disorder, let your dentist know. The earlier a TMJ disorder is diagnosed ...

  13. Mathematics disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathematics disorder is a condition in which a child's math ability is far below normal for their ... Children who have mathematics disorder have trouble with simple ... disorder may appear with: Developmental coordination ...

  14. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  15. [Microdestruction of the bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iankovskiĭ, V É

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was the detection of microcracks in the compact bone tissue surrounding the fracture and in deformed bone undergoing subcritical loading. The portions of deformed bone tissue and terminal fragments of broken bones were obtained in the form of blocks longitudinally sawcut from the regions of primary and secondary bone rupture. A total of 300 such blocks were available for the examination. All portions of the deformed bone tissue and terminal fragments of broken bones showed up microcracks commensurate with the bone structures. They were actually hardened traces of deformation that preceded the fracture and reflected the volume of the destroyed bone tissue; moreover, in certain cases they allowed to identify the kind of the object that exerted the external action (either a blow or slow bending). PMID:25269164

  16. Panic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anxiety disorder - panic attacks References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  17. Phonological disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Articulation disorder; Developmental articulation disorder; Speech distortion; Sound distortion ... unknown. Close relatives may have had speech and language problems. ... sounds. These changes may include cleft palate and problems ...

  18. A Roadmap to the Brittle Bones of Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini P. Gore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is an autosomal recessive disorder which despite advances in medical care continues to be a life-limiting and often fatal disease. With increase in life expectancy of the CF population, bone disease has emerged as a common complication. Unlike the osteoporosis seen in postmenopausal population, bone disease in CF begins at a young age and is associated with significant morbidity due to fractures, kyphosis, increased pain, and decreased lung function. The maintenance of bone health is essential for the CF population during their lives to prevent pain and fractures but also as they approach lung transplantation since severe bone disease can lead to exclusion from lung transplantation. Early recognition, prevention, and treatment are key to maintaining optimal bone health in CF patients and often require a multidisciplinary approach. This article will review the pathophysiology, current clinical practice guidelines, and potential future therapies for treating CF-related bone disease.

  19. Panic Disorder and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder. Other types of anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder , obsessive compulsive disorder , social phobia , and post-traumatic stress disorders . Panic disorder affects women twice as often ...

  20. How Is Bone Cancer Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with bone cancer. Accurate diagnosis of a bone tumor often depends on combining information about its location (what bone is affected and even which part of the bone is involved), appearance on x-rays, and appearance under a microscope. ...

  1. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lymphoma , and myeloma can be treated with a bone marrow transplant . This is now often called a stem cell ... are two types of bone marrow donation: Autologous bone marrow transplant is when people donate their own bone marrow. " ...

  2. Bone Graft Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cadavers. The types of allograft bone used for spine surgery include fresh frozen and lyophilized (freeze dried). The ... the most common uses of bone grafts in spine surgery is during spinal fusion. The use of autogenous ...

  3. Bone Loss in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DENSITY? Although bone seems as hard as a rock, it’s actually living tissue. Throughout your life, old ... available Bone Loss (.pdf) File: 290 KB 733 Third Avenue, Suite 510, New York, NY 10017 | 800- ...

  4. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paula FJA, Black DM, Rosen CJ. Osteoporosis and bone biology.In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology . 13th ed. Philadelphia, ... Bone-density testing interval and transition to osteoporosis in ...

  5. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMD test; Bone density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis-BMD ... need to undress. This scan is the best test to predict your risk of fractures. Peripheral DEXA ( ...

  6. Smoking and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It has been called a childhood disease with old age consequences because building healthy bones in youth helps ... stronger. Weight-bearing exercise that forces you to work against gravity is the best exercise for bone. ...

  7. Bone Metabolism in Adolescent Boys with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Katzman, Debra K.; Cord, Jennalee; Manning, Stephanie J.; Mendes, Nara; Herzog, David B.; Miller, Karen K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Background: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe undernutrition associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) in adolescent females with this disorder. Although primarily a disease in females, AN is increasingly being recognized in males. However, there are few or no data regarding BMD, bone turnover markers or their predictors in adolescent AN boys. Hypotheses: We hypothesized that BMD would be low in adolescent boys with AN compared with controls associated with a decrease in bone turnover markers, and that the gonadal steroids, testosterone and estradiol, and levels of IGF-I and the appetite regulatory hormones leptin, ghrelin, and peptide YY would predict BMD and bone turnover markers. Methods: We assessed BMD using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and measured fasting testosterone, estradiol, IGF-I, leptin, ghrelin, and peptide YY and a bone formation (aminoterminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen) and bone resorption (N-telopeptide of type 1 collagen) marker in 17 AN boys and 17 controls 12–19 yr old. Results: Boys with AN had lower BMD and corresponding Z-scores at the spine, hip, femoral neck, trochanter, intertrochanteric region, and whole body, compared with controls. Height-adjusted measures (lumbar bone mineral apparent density and whole body bone mineral content/height) were also lower. Bone formation and resorption markers were reduced in AN, indicating decreased bone turnover. Testosterone and lean mass predicted BMD. IGF-I was an important predictor of bone turnover markers. Conclusion: AN boys have low BMD at multiple sites associated with decreased bone turnover markers at a time when bone mass accrual is critical for attainment of peak bone mass. PMID:18544623

  8. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological p...

  9. Bone densitometry and osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this book is to provide a perspective on the current status of bone densitometry and its relevance to osteoporosis diagnosis and management. Therefore, this book will give the reader an introduction to the nature of osteoporosis, its pathophysiology and epidemiology, and the clinical consequences of performing bone densitometry. Aside from standard bone densitometry, newer technologies such as quantitative ultrasound techniques, magnetic resonance imaging and bone structure analysis are discussed in the context of diagnosing osteoporosis. (orig.)

  10. BONE MECHANOTRANSDUCTION: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Joana; Capela e Silva, Fernando; Queiroga, Cristina; Lucena, Sónia; Potes, José

    2011-01-01

    This review focus on the bone physiology and mechanotransduction elements and mechanisms. Bone biology and architecture is deeply related to the mechanical environment. Orthopaedic implants cause profound changes in the biomechanics and electrophysiology of the skeleton. In the context of biomedical engineering, a deep reflexion on bone physiology and electromechanics is needed. Strategic development of new biomaterials and devices that respect and promote continuity with bone str...

  11. Normal Bone Turnover in Transient Hyperphosphatasemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutilek, Stepan; Cervickova, Barbora; Bebova, Pavla; Kmonickova, Marie; Nemec, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Transient hyperphosphatasemia of infancy and early childhood (THI) is characterized by a temporary isolated elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), predominantly its bone or liver isoform, in either sick or healthy children under 5 years of age. Return to normal ALP levels usually occurs within four months. Spontaneous rise of ALP might concern the physician, especially when treating seriously ill children. However, THI is considered a benign biochemical disorder with no clinical consequences. Some existing reports support the hypothesis that THI is a result of increased bone turnover. We present evidence of normal bone turnover in two children with THI. In a one-year-old girl and a boy of the same age, high ALP levels (31 and 109 μkat/L, respectively) were accidentally detected. The children had no signs of metabolic bone disease or of liver disease. The high ALP levels returned to normal in two months, thus fulfilling the diagnosis of THI. In both patients, serum parathyroid hormone and bone turnover markers, serum CrossLaps, and serum osteocalcin were neither elevated, nor did these markers follow the ALP dynamics, thus reflecting normal bone turnover in THI. Children with THI should be spared from extensive investigations and unnecessary vitamin D treatment. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22664360

  12. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy. PMID:25579825

  13. Intractable Diseases Treated with Intra-Bone Marrow-Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming eLi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow transplantation (BMT is used to treat hematological disorders, autoimmune diseases and lymphoid cancers. Intra bone marrow-BMT (IBM-BMT has been proven to be a powerful strategy for allogeneic BMT due to the rapid hematopoietic recovery and the complete restoration of T cell functions. IBM-BMT not only replaces hematopoietic stem cells but also mesenchymal stem cells (MSMCs. MSMCs are multi-potent stem cells that can be isolated from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and adipose tissue. MSMCs play an important role in the support of hematopoiesis, and modify and influence the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSMCs also differentiate into mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineage cells to repair tissues. This review aims to summarize the functions of bone marrow-derived- MSMCs, and the treatment of intractable diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and malignant tumors with IBM-BMT.

  14. Menopause and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet & Menopause Bone Loss How are bone loss and menopause related? Throughout life your body keeps a balance between the loss ... The sooner you take steps to prevent bone loss, the lower your risk of osteoporosis later in life. If you are skipping menstrual periods, have had ...

  15. What's a Funny Bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes What's a Funny Bone? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's a Funny Bone? Print A A A Text Size Have you ... prickly kind of dull pain? That's your funny bone! It doesn't really hurt as much as ...

  16. Soy Isoflavones and Osteoporotic Bone Loss: A Review with an Emphasis on Modulation of Bone Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xi; Lee, Sun-Kyeong; Chun, Ock K

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an age-related disorder that affects both women and men, although estrogen deficiency induced by menopause accelerates bone loss in older women. As the demographic shifts to a more aged population, a growing number of men and women will be afflicted with osteoporosis. Since the current drug therapies available have multiple side effects, including increased risk of developing certain types of cancer or complications, a search for potential nonpharmacologic alternative therapies for osteoporosis is of prime interest. Soy isoflavones (SI) have demonstrated potential bone-specific effects in a number of studies. This article provides a systematic review of studies on osteoporotic bone loss in relation to SI intake from diet or supplements to comprehensively explain how SI affect the modulation of bone remodeling. Evidence from epidemiologic studies supports that dietary SI attenuate menopause-induced osteoporotic bone loss by decreasing bone resorption and stimulating bone formation. Other studies have also illustrated that bone site-specific trophic and synergistic effects combined with exercise intervention might contribute to improve the bioavailability of SI or strengthen the bone-specific effects. To date, however, the effects of dietary SI on osteoporotic bone loss remain inconclusive, and study results vary from study to study. The current review will discuss the potential factors that result in the conflicting outcomes of these studies, including dosages, intervention materials, study duration, race, and genetic differences. Further well-designed studies are needed to fully understand the underlying mechanism and evaluate the effects of SI on osteoporosis in humans. PMID:26670451

  17. BONE AGE –AN IMPORTANT ANATOMICAL TOOL IN THE HANDS OF THE ENDOCRINOLOGIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameet

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The skeletal maturity of any individual is known a s bone age and it can be reliably estimated by a roentgenologic study of osseous development since the appearance and union of the centers of ossification o ccur in a fairly definite pattern and time sequence from birth to maturity. This is particular ly helpful in the clinical workup of children with endocrinological disorders where skeletal and pubertal growth is affected. Therefore the bone age can be advanced, delayed or appropriate for c hronological age in various endocrinological disorders. We present cases which a ffect skeletal maturation in a way that a simple investigation like the bone age estimation c an lead to their diagnosis or can help therapeutic interventions. The present study aims to reiterate the importance of bone age in the diagnosis and management of endocrinological disord ers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: X rays of both hands of cases and for bone age estimation we used the Greulich – Pyle atlas to accord a bone age to each bone of the hand and obtain an ave rage reading. RESULT: The endocrinological disorders were classified as advan ced, delayed and bone age appropriate for chronological age. Cases with advanced bone age we re a child with hypothalamic hamartoma and a child with congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Thos e with delayed bone age were hypothyroidism and growth hormone deficiency. The ca se with bone age appropriate for chronological age was that of a Turner girl. In eac h of these cases the bone age helped in the diagnosis and also in the therapeutic decisions. CONCLUSIONS: Assessing bone age through radiographs of both hands graded according to Greuli ch Pyle method provided the endocrinologists an inexpensive tool to obtain an ob jective measure of the child’s developmental status and also an effective tool for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of various endocrinological disorders. It also guides the endocrinologist of the timing

  18. Panic Disorder among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...

  19. Antisocial Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...

  20. Bipolar Disorder Among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...

  1. Any Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...

  2. Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...

  3. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. PMID:27469183

  4. Disturbances of bone growth and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ''What is growth anyway? Can one talk about positive growth in childhood, neutral growth in maturity, and negative growth in old age? Our goal is to help promote normal positive growth in infants and children. To achieve this, we must be cognizant of the morphologic changes of both normal and abnormal bone formation as they are reflected in the radiographic image of the skeleton. The knowledge of the various causes and the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the disturbances of bone growth and development allows us to recognize the early radiographic manifestations. Endocrine and metabolic disorders affect the whole skeleton, but the early changes are best seen in the distal ends of the femurs, where growth rate is most rapid. In skeletal infections and in some vascular injuries two-or three-phase bone scintigraphy supercedes radiography early in the course of the disease. MRI has proved to be very helpful in the early detection of avascular bone necrosis, osteomyelitis, and tumor. Some benign bone tumors and many bone dysplasias have distinct and diagnostic radiographic findings that may preclude further studies. In constitutional diseases of bone, including chromosomal aberrations, skeletal surveys of the patient and all family members together with biochemical and cytogenetic studies are essential for both diagnosis and genetic counseling. Our role is to perform the least invasive and most informative diagnostic imaging modalities that corroborate the biochemical and histologic findings to establish the definitive diagnosis. Unrecognized, misdiagnosed, or improperly treated disturbance of bone growth can result in permanent deformity usually associated with disability. 116 references

  5. Enzymatic maceration of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhre, Marie-Louise; Eriksen, Anne Marie; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær;

    2015-01-01

    afterwards macerated by one of the two methods. DNA extraction was performed to see the effect of the macerations on DNA preservation. Furthermore, the bone pieces were examined in a stereomicroscope to assess for any bone damage. The results demonstrated that both methods removed all flesh/soft tissue from...... the bones. The DNA analysis showed that DNA was preserved on all the pieces of bones which were examined. Finally, the investigation suggests that enzyme maceration could be gentler on the bones, as the edges appeared less frayed. The enzyme maceration was also a quicker method; it took three hours...

  6. Tin in Human Bones

    OpenAIRE

    Jambor, Jaroslav; Smreka, Vâclav

    1993-01-01

    TIN IN HUMAN BONES. The tin content in the bones of 149 skeletons from the 1st - 5th centuries A.D., and of 11 individuals of the recent population was determined. The bone samples were carbonized and analyzed through emission spectroscopy with a.c. excitation. The tin content in bones of recent populations not exposed to extra tin supply is about one order of magnitude higher than is the case with the bones od some populations that lived at the beginning of our era. The distribut...

  7. MANAGEMENT OF JOINT DISORDERS BY KSHEERAVASTI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingade Vijay P.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Now a days joint disorders are the most commonly occuring in the world. Sandhigata Vata, Vata rakta, Amavata are the common joint disorders. In dhatukshayajanya sandhigata vata and vata rakta, ksheera vasti is helpful. Common symptoms of joint disorders are: Asthishoola, Sandhishoola, Sandhisodha, restriction of movements, pain on movement. Though there are several joint disorders, majority of joint disorders are due to vitiation of vata dosha. Hence, vasti is considered as the main treatment for vata dosha. Specially in dhatukshayajanya conditions, vasti with medicated milk is very useful. Cow milk is the best among all milks. It has same properties like ojas, thus increases ojas. Ksheera is considered as the best in nourishing the asthi dhatu because of its tulyaguna, thus controls the vata dosha. Milk has Snigdha, guru, bahala properties which are similar to that of asthidhatu (tulyaguna. Thus, it counters the rukshatwa and sclerosing effects of bone and increases the unctousness of joint. It also nourishes the asthidhatu and prevents the bone from osteoporosis. Most joint disorders are due to deficiency of calcium content of bone tissue. Milk contains calcium. So, by giving Ksheera vasti calcium content of bone can be increased. Milk contains almost all minerals needed by the body, Such as Ca, P, Na, K, Mg, Cu, I, Cobalt etc, but particularly it is rich in Ca.

  8. Bone stress injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone stress injuries are due to cyclical overuse of the bone. They are relatively common in athletes and military recruits but also among otherwise healthy people who have recently started new or intensive physical activity. Diagnosis of bone stress injuries is based on the patient's history of increased physical activity and on imaging findings. The general symptom of a bone stress injury is stress-related pain. Bone stress injuries are difficult to diagnose based only on a clinical examination because the clinical symptoms may vary depending on the phase of the pathophysiological spectrum in the bone stress injury. Imaging studies are needed to ensure an early and exact diagnosis, because if the diagnosis is not delayed most bone stress injuries heal well without complications

  9. Bone scintigraphy in polyostotic fibrous dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadhwa, S.S.; Mansberg, R.; Fernandes, V.B. [Illawarra Regional Hospital, Wollongong, NSW, (Australia)

    1998-03-01

    Fibrous dysplasia is a benign skeletal disorder of unknown aetiology. Fibrous dysplasia characteristically involves the fibrous replacement of portions of the medullary cavities of a single bone (monostotic) or multiple bones (polyostotic). Bones typically involved include the femurs, tibiae, ribs and maxillae. The polyostotic form may be accompanied by skin pigmentation and endocrine abnormalities (McCune Allbright Syndrome). Radiological findings in fibrous dysplasia are variable, ranging from completely radiolucent to radio-opaque lesions, depending on the amount of fibrous or osseous tissue deposited in the medulla. The most common radiographic finding is that of a ground glass-like semi-opaque lesion. Case reports on scintigraphic manifestation of fibrous dysplasia are scanty. We present radiological and scintigraphic findings of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia in a young male. (authors). 3 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Starvation marrow - gelatinous transformation of bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osgood, Eric; Muddassir, Salman; Jaju, Minal; Moser, Robert; Farid, Farwa; Mewada, Nishith

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT), also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management. PMID:25317270

  11. Impact of bone marrow on respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Sara M

    2008-06-01

    The bone marrow is not only a site of haematopoiesis but also serves as an important reservoir for mature granulocytes and stem cells, including haematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and fibrocytes. In respiratory diseases, such as asthma and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis these cells are mobilised from the bone marrow in response to blood-borne mediators and subsequently recruited to the lungs. Although the granulocytes contribute to the inflammatory reaction, stem cells may promote tissue repair or remodelling. Understanding the factors and molecular mechanisms that regulate the mobilisation of granulocytes and stem cells from the bone marrow may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of a wide range of respiratory disorders. PMID:18372214

  12. High Dose Cyclophosphamide Treatment for Autoimmune Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Brodsky, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    High-dose cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg) was initially developed as a conditioning regimen for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Recently, high-dose cyclophosphamide without bone marrow transplantation has been employed as a method to induce durable treatment-free remissions in severe aplastic anemia and a variety of other severe autoimmune disorders. The premise underlying this approach is that high-dose cyclophosphamide is maximally immunosuppressive, but not myeloablative. Early hemato...

  13. Current options for the treatment of Paget’s disease of the bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Merlotti

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Merlotti, Luigi Gennari, Giuseppe Martini, Ranuccio NutiDepartment of Internal Medicine, Endocrine-Metabolic Sciences and Biochemistry, University of Siena, Siena, ItalyAbstract: Paget’s disease of bone (PDB is a chronic bone remodeling disorder characterized by increased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, with subsequent compensatory increases in new bone formation, resulting in a disorganized mosaic of woven and lamellar bone at affected skeletal sites. This disease is most often asymptomatic but can be associated with bone pain or deformity, fractures, secondary arthritis, neurological complications, deafness, contributing to substantial morbidity and reduced quality of life. Neoplastic degeneration of pagetic bone is a relatively rare event, occurring with an incidence of less than 1%, but has a grave prognosis. Specific therapy for PDB is aimed at decreasing the abnormal bone turnover and bisphosphonates are currently considered the treatment of choice. These treatments are associated with a reduction in plasma alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and an improvement in radiological and scintigraphic appearance and with a reduction in bone pain and bone deformity, Recently, the availability of newer, more potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates has improved treatment outcomes, allowing a more effective and convenient management of this debilitating disorder.Keywords: Paget’s disease of bone, bisphosphonates, aminobisphosphonates, bone remodeling

  14. Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in pediatric orthopedics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing the musculoskeletal disorders of childhood. Conditions such as neonatal osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, diskitis of childhood, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, the osteochondroses, the toddler's fracture, sports injuries, spondylolysis, myositis ossificians, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are readily defined. High-quality state-of-the-art scintigraphy is essential in infants and young children. 64 references

  15. Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in pediatric orthopedics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, J.J.

    1986-12-01

    Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing the musculoskeletal disorders of childhood. Conditions such as neonatal osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, diskitis of childhood, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, the osteochondroses, the toddler's fracture, sports injuries, spondylolysis, myositis ossificians, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are readily defined. High-quality state-of-the-art scintigraphy is essential in infants and young children. 64 references.

  16. Molecular Aspects of Bone Resorption in β-Thalassemia Major

    OpenAIRE

    Najmaldin Saki; Saeid Abroun; Fatemeh Salari; Fakher Rahim; Mohammad Shahjahani; Javad Mohammadi-Asl

    2016-01-01

    β-thalassemia is the most common single gene disorder worldwide, in which hemoglobin β-chain production is decreased. Today, the life expectancy of thalassemic patients is increased because of a variety of treatment methods; however treatment related complications have also increased. The most common side effect is osteoporosis, which usually occurs in early adulthood as a consequence of increased bone resorption. Increased bone resorption mainly results from factors such as delayed puberty, ...

  17. LRP4 in neuromuscular junction and bone development and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chengyong; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2015-11-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family. Recent studies have revealed multiple functions and complex signaling mechanisms of LRP4 in different organs and tissues. LPR4 mutation or malfunction has been implicated in neurological disorders including congenital myasthenic syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and diseases of bone or kidney. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Muscle Bone Interactions". PMID:26071838

  18. Severe osteopenia in adolescence: poor bone health for life

    OpenAIRE

    Baldan, Alessandro; et al.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by low bone mass that leads to increased bone fragility and susceptibility to fracture. Lactose intolerance is characterized by abdominal pain and/or diarrhea following the ingestion of lactose in people with lactase deficiency. The most common therapeutic approach to lactose intolerance is to exclude dairy products from the diet, which are the main source of calcium. We studied a group of patients with symptoms attributab...

  19. Contemporary Approaches for Identifying Rare Bone Disease Causing Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Farber, Charles R; Clemens, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the speed and accuracy of DNA sequencing, together with increasingly sophisticated mathematical approaches for annotating gene networks, have revolutionized the field of human genetics and made these once time consuming approaches assessable to most investigators. In the field of bone research, a particularly active area of gene discovery has occurred in patients with rare bone disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are caused by mutations in single genes. ...

  20. Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personality disorders are a group of mental illnesses. They involve long-term patterns of thoughts and behaviors ... serious problems with relationships and work. People with personality disorders have trouble dealing with everyday stresses and ...

  1. Mathematics disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001534.htm Mathematics disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mathematics disorder is a condition in which a child's ...

  2. Rumination disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001539.htm Rumination disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rumination disorder is a condition in which a person ...

  3. Panic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Hofmann SG, Smits JA. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for adult anxiety disorders: ...

  4. Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body ... that produce the energy. You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or ...

  5. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eating disorders are serious behavior problems. They can include severe overeating or not consuming enough food to stay ... concern about your shape or weight. Types of eating disorders include Anorexia nervosa, in which you become too ...

  6. Adjustment disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Powell AD. Grief, bereavement, and adjustment disorders. In: Stern TA, Fava ...

  7. Cyclothymic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing, 2013. Peris RH. Bipolar disorder. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum JF, Fava M, ...

  8. Adjustment disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, Va: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Powell AD. Grief, bereavement, and adjustment disorders. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum ...

  9. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... press the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) Anxiety Disorders in Older Adults Click for more information Studies estimate that anxiety ... anxiety symptoms or make them worse. In older adults, anxiety disorders often occur at the same time as depression, ...

  10. Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They go ... The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in families. ...

  11. Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Building a Healthy Self-Image and Improving Self-Esteem 8 Things You Should Know About Body Dysmorphic ... personality disorder. Personality disorders are usually recognizable by adolescence or earlier, continue throughout adulthood, and become less ...

  12. Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include depression and bipolar disorder (also called manic depression). Mood disorders can increase a person's risk for heart disease, diabetes, and other diseases. Treatments include medication, psychotherapy, or a combination of both. With treatment, most ...

  13. Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as clotting factors. If you have a bleeding disorder, you either do not have enough platelets or ... don't work the way they should. Bleeding disorders can be the result of other diseases, such ...

  14. Voice Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the vocal cords. Other causes of voice disorders include infections, upward movement of stomach acids into ... become an effort to talk Treatment for voice disorders varies depending on the cause. Most voice problems ...

  15. Platelet Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... higher risk of blood clots. With other platelet disorders, the platelets do not work as they should. ... This can cause excessive bleeding. Treatment of platelet disorders depends on the cause. NIH: National Heart, Lung, ...

  16. Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They ... The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in ...

  17. Paget's disease diagnosed on bone scintigraphy: Case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paget's disease of bone is a chronic bone remodeling disorder. Although most patients are asymptomatic, a variety of symptoms and complications may develop directly from bone involvement or secondarily due to compression by the expanded bone. It is usually diagnosed from radiological and biochemical abnormalities or in advanced cases it becomes clinically evident due to the expanded bone. We report a case of Paget's disease which was detected incidentally during evaluation of nephrolithiasis and polyarthritis but had normal radiographs and normal biochemical markers

  18. Panic disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Snaith, R P

    1983-01-01

    Panic disorder is characterised by recurrent, unpredictable panic attacks, making people worry about or change their behaviour to avert subsequent panic attacks or their consequences. Panic disorder occurs in up to 3% of the adult population at some time, and is associated with other psychiatric and personality disorders, and with drug and alcohol abuse.The risk of suicide and attempted suicide has been found to be higher in people with panic disorder than in people with other psychiatric ...

  19. Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Farah; Celasun Nalan; Gucciardi Enza; Stewart Donna E

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Health Issue Eating disorders are an increasing public health problem among young women. Anorexia and bulimia may give rise to serious physical conditions such as hypothermia, hypotension, electrolyte imbalance, endocrine disorders, and kidney failure. Key Issues Eating disorders are primarily a problem among women. In Ontario in 1995, over 90% of reported hospitalized cases of anorexia and bulimia were women. In addition to eating disorders, preoccupation with weight, body image and...

  20. Asymptomatic Paget's disease of bone presenting with complete atrioventricular block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Rauoof Malik; Nazir A.Lone; Hilal A.Rather; Vicar M Jan; Javid A.Malik; Khursheed A.Khan; S.Jalal

    2008-01-01

    @@ Paget's disease of bone is a deforming bone disease (osteitis deformans) characterized by increased bone remodeling,bone hypertrophy,and abnormal bone structure,leading to bone expansion,deformities,easy fractures,and occasionally,neoplastic transformation.It is the second most common bone disorder after osteoporosis.1 The disease is relatively rare in Asia but is common in Europe and North America,affecting approximately 2% of the population over 50 years,although lately,a decline in the prevalence has been reported.2 Paget's disease commonly affects people in or past their middle age and is slightly more common in men than in women.1 The exact cause of Paget's disease is not known.Environmental agents,particularly paramyxoviral infections (measles and canine distemper viruses) have been postulated as potential etiological factors.3 Recently,a strong genetic component has been described,with candidate loci suggested at 18q,5q35-QTER,and particularly,the squestosome 1/p62.2,3 The pathological process in Paget's disease consists of one or more areas of aggressive and relentless osteoclastic activity,coupled with deposition of structurally abnormal excessive bone and matrix tissues.1,4 Most of the cases involve only one (monostotic) or few bones,particularly skull,vertebrae,pelvis,femur,and tibia.

  1. Effects of renal failure and metabolic diseases upon bone scanning in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic disorders of bone most commonly affect the entire skeleton but also lead to focal abnormalities. Bone scintigraphy provides useful data on the presence, severity and response to therapy of the underlying systemic bone disease by visually grading of easily recognizable metabolic features and even more by quantitative assessment of bone turnover. This can be done by measurement of the 24-hr whole-body retention of Tc-99m diphosphonate or, more accurately in patients with renal failure, by evaluation of bone clearance of Tc-99m MDP. As far as combined with quantitative measurements bone scintigraphy is more sensitive but less specific in the detection of metabolic bone disease than conventional radiography. However, assessment of metabolic activity is more complicated in children than in adults, because of an inhomogeneous and age dependent tracer uptake in bone

  2. Determination of radial bone mineral content in low birth weight infants by photon absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies at the University of Wisconsin have demonstrated that photon absorptiometry is a precise, accurate, and reproducible technique for measuring bone mineral content in premature infants and can be used to establish an intrauterine curve of bone mineralization in the fetus. Photon absorptiometry can also be used to measure bone width, thereby documenting appositional bone growth. The bone mineral content/bone width ratio may be helpful in identifying disorders of bone mineral metabolism in premature infants. The technique has been used to demonstrate that relatively poor bone mineralization (compared with the intrauterine curve) occurs in very low birth weight infants after birth, regardless of the type of feeding or the presence or absence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. 31 references

  3. Genetic disorders producing compressive radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Joseph M

    2006-11-01

    Back pain is a frequent complaint seen in neurological practice. In evaluating back pain, neurologists are asked to evaluate patients for radiculopathy, determine whether they may benefit from surgery, and help guide management. Although disc herniation is the most common etiology of compressive radiculopathy, there are many other causes, including genetic disorders. This article is a discussion of genetic disorders that cause or contribute to radiculopathies. These genetic disorders include neurofibromatosis, Paget's disease of bone, and ankylosing spondylitis. Numerous genetic disorders can also lead to deformities of the spine, including spinal muscular atrophy, Friedreich's ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, familial dysautonomia, idiopathic torsional dystonia, Marfan's syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, the extent of radiculopathy caused by spine deformities is essentially absent from the literature. Finally, recent investigation into the heritability of disc degeneration and lumbar disc herniation suggests a significant genetic component in the etiology of lumbar disc disease. PMID:17048153

  4. Auditory Processing Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auditory Processing Disorders Auditory processing disorders (APDs) are referred to by many names: central auditory processing disorders , auditory perceptual disorders , and central auditory disorders . APDs ...

  5. Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearing, Melissa

    Bipolar disorder, a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person's mood, affects approximately one percent of the population. It commonly occurs in late adolescence and is often unrecognized. The diagnosis of bipolar disorder is made on the basis of symptoms, course of illness, and when possible, family history. Thoughts of suicide are…

  6. Anabolic Vitamin D Analogs as Countermeasures to Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Duncan, Randall L.; Karin, Norman J.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    1997-01-01

    We demonstrated for the first time that vitamin D3 influences the effect of PTH on bone cell calcium ion levels. This is a rapid effect, taking place within seconds/minutes. This may prove to be a critical contribution to our understanding of bone physiology in that these two hormones are among the most potent regulators of bone calcium content and of systemic calcium homeostasis. Together with the data gathered from the study of astronauts exposed to microgravity for extended periods, these observations suggest the interaction of vitamin D3 and PTH as a possible therapeutic target in the treatment of bone loss disorders such as osteoporosis and disuse atrophy. Chronic exposure of cultured osteoblasts to vitamin D, altered the number of voltage-sensitive Ca(+2) channels expressed. Estrogen treatment yielded a similar result, suggesting that there is overlap in the mechanism by which these hormones elicit long-term effects on bone cell calcium homeostasis.

  7. Bone tumors: Nursing care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone tumors represent approximately 5% of childhood malignancies. osteosarcoma is the primary malignant bone tumor, accounting for 60% of cancer with peak incidence in the 2nd decade of life. Ewing's sarcoma is the second most common bone cancer with peak at a slightly younger age. This presentation discusses similarities and differences in the diagnosis and treatment of these two malignancies. Diagnostic procedures include plain radiographs, CT and MRI of the primary site, plain x-ray and CT of the chest, bone scan, and biopsy of the primary tumor. For patients diagnosed with Ewing's sarcoma, a bone marrow aspirate and biopsy will also be required. Our current approach to the treatment of bone tumors includes preoperative combination chemotherapy and en bloc surgical removal of the tumor followed by postoperative chemotherapy. In the case of Ewing's sarcoma, radiation therapy may be employed in addition to surgery, if margins are questionable of instead of surgery, if the tumor is not resectable

  8. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more-serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss [Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap, http://research.hq.nasa.gov/code_u/bcpr/index.cfm]. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It shows that an extrapolation of the microgravity induced bone loss rates to longer time scales, such as a 2.5 year round-trip to Mars (6 months out at 0 g, 1.5 year stay on Mars at 0.38 g, 6 months back at 0 g), could severely compromise the skeletal system of such a person.

  9. Epigenetic Regulation of Bone Remodeling and Its Impacts in Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayor, Chafik; Weber, Franz E

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics describes mechanisms which control gene expression and cellular processes without changing the DNA sequence. The main mechanisms in epigenetics are DNA methylation in CpG-rich promoters, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). DNA methylation modifies the function of the DNA and correlates with gene silencing. Histone modifications including acetylation/deacetylation and phosphorylation act in diverse biological processes such as transcriptional activation/inactivation and DNA repair. Non-coding RNAs play a large part in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in addition to their roles at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Osteoporosis is the most common skeletal disorder, characterized by compromised bone strength and bone micro-architectural deterioration that predisposes the bones to an increased risk of fracture. It is most often caused by an increase in bone resorption that is not sufficiently compensated by a corresponding increase in bone formation. Nowadays it is well accepted that osteoporosis is a multifactorial disorder and there are genetic risk factors for osteoporosis and bone fractures. Here we review emerging evidence that epigenetics contributes to the machinery that can alter DNA structure, gene expression, and cellular differentiation during physiological and pathological bone remodeling. PMID:27598138

  10. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  11. Bone fractures after menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Barlow, David H.; Bouchard, Philippe; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Evers, J.L.H.; Glasier, A.; Negri, Eva; Papapoulos, Socrates E; Ralston, Stuart H; Rizzoli, Rene; Baird, D T; Collins, J.; G. Benagiano; P.G. Crosignani; La Vecchia, C.; Volpe, A

    2010-01-01

    Every year 30% of individuals above age 65 fall, and falls are the principal cause of bone fractures. To reduce fracture incidence requires both prevention of falls and maintenance of bone strength.PubMed searches were performed, for studies of the epidemiology of fractures, bone physiology, endocrine effects, osteoporosis measurement, genetics, prevention and effectiveness. Topic summaries were presented to the Workshop Group and omissions or disagreements were resolved by discussion.Ageing ...

  12. Bone Regeneration in Odontostomatology

    OpenAIRE

    Tonelli, P; Duvina, M.; Brancato, L.; Delle Rose, G.; Biondi, E.; Civitelli, V.

    2010-01-01

    Maxillary edentulism, together with periodontal disease, is the condition that most frequently induces disruption of alveolar bone tissue. Indeed, the stimulus of the periodontal ligament is lost and the local bone tissue becomes subject to resorption processes that, in the six months following the loss of the tooth, result in alveolar defects or more extensive maxillary atrophy. In both cases, loss of vestibular cortical bone is followed by reduction in the vertical dimension of the alveolar...

  13. Percutaneous Bone Tumor Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gangi, Afshin; Buy, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Interventional radiology plays a major role in the management of bone tumors. Many different percutaneous techniques are available. Some aim to treat pain and consolidate a pathological bone (cementoplasty); others aim to ablate tumor or reduce its volume (sclerotherapy, thermal ablation). In this article, image-guided techniques of primary and secondary bone tumors with vertebroplasty, ethanol injection, radiofrequency ablation, laser photocoagulation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ioniza...

  14. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It is well known that bone remodeling responds to mechanical forces. We are developing two-photon microscopy techniques to study bone tissue and bone cell cultures to better understand the fundamental response mechanism in bone remodeling. Osteoblast and osteoclast cell cultures are being studied, and the goal is to use molecular biology techniques in conjunction with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to study the physiology of in-vitro cell cultures in response to various stimuli, such as fluid flow induced shear stress and mechanical stress. We have constructed a two-photon fluorescence microscope for these studies, and are currently incorporating FLIM detection. Current progress will be reviewed. This work is supported by the NASA John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium.

  15. Bone marrow fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardouin, Pierre; Pansini, Vittorio; Cortet, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    Bone marrow fat (BMF) results from an accumulation of fat cells within the bone marrow. Fat is not a simple filling tissue but is now considered as an actor within bone microenvironment. BMF is not comparable to other fat depots, as in subcutaneous or visceral tissues. Recent studies on bone marrow adipocytes have shown that they do not appear only as storage cells, but also as cells secreting adipokines, like leptin and adiponectin. Moreover bone marrow adipocytes share the same precursor with osteoblasts, the mesenchymal stem cell. It is now well established that high BMF is associated with weak bone mass in osteoporosis, especially during aging and anorexia nervosa. But numerous questions remain discussed: what is the precise phenotype of bone marrow adipocytes? What is the real function of BMF, and how does bone marrow adipocyte act on its environment? Is the increase of BMF during osteoporosis responsible for bone loss? Is BMF involved in other diseases? How to measure BMF in humans? A better understanding of BMF could allow to obtain new diagnostic tools for osteoporosis management, and could open major therapeutic perspectives. PMID:24703396

  16. Bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Iria; Berk, Michael; Birmaher, Boris; Vieta, Eduard

    2016-04-01

    Bipolar disorder is a recurrent chronic disorder characterised by fluctuations in mood state and energy. It affects more than 1% of the world's population irrespective of nationality, ethnic origin, or socioeconomic status. Bipolar disorder is one of the main causes of disability among young people, leading to cognitive and functional impairment and raised mortality, particularly death by suicide. A high prevalence of psychiatric and medical comorbidities is typical in affected individuals. Accurate diagnosis of bipolar disorder is difficult in clinical practice because onset is most commonly a depressive episode and looks similar to unipolar depression. Moreover, there are currently no valid biomarkers for the disorder. Therefore, the role of clinical assessment remains key. Detection of hypomanic periods and longitudinal assessment are crucial to differentiate bipolar disorder from other conditions. Current knowledge of the evolving pharmacological and psychological strategies in bipolar disorder is of utmost importance. PMID:26388529

  17. Blood disorders typically associated with renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation has become one of the most common surgical procedures performed to replace a diseased kidney with a healthy kidney from a donor. It can help patients with kidney failure live decades longer. However, renal transplantation also faces a risk of developing various blood disorders. The blood disorders typically associated with renal transplantation can be divided into two main categories: (1) Common disorders including post-transplant anemia (PTA), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), post-transplant erythrocytosis (PTE), and post-transplant cytopenias (PTC, leukopenia/neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and pancytopenia); and (2) Uncommon but serious disorders including hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), therapy-related myelodysplasia (t-MDS), and therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). Although many etiological factors involve the development of post-transplant blood disorders, immunosuppressive agents, and viral infections could be the two major contributors to most blood disorders and cause hematological abnormalities and immunodeficiency by suppressing hematopoietic function of bone marrow. Hematological abnormalities and immunodeficiency will result in severe clinical outcomes in renal transplant recipients. Understanding how blood disorders develop will help cure these life-threatening complications. A potential therapeutic strategy against post-transplant blood disorders should focus on tapering immunosuppression or replacing myelotoxic immunosuppressive drugs with lower toxic alternatives, recognizing and treating promptly the etiological virus, bacteria, or protozoan, restoring both hematopoietic function of bone marrow and normal blood counts, and improving kidney graft survival. PMID:25853131

  18. Bone, fat, and body composition: evolving concepts in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Clifford J; Klibanski, Anne

    2009-05-01

    Disorders of body composition, including obesity and osteoporosis, have reached record proportions. Coincidentally, our understanding of the mechanisms controlling body mass also has greatly improved. Shared regulation at the hypothalamus and the bone marrow highlight major bone-fat interactions. The hypothalamus modulates fat and bone via the sympathetic nervous system by regulating appetite, insulin sensitivity, energy use, and skeletal remodeling. In the bone marrow, fat and bone cells arise from the same stem cells. Insights from disorders such as anorexia nervosa provide a new rationale for examining the mechanisms that link bone to fat. This article explores these relationships in the context of a new paradigm with implications for obesity and osteoporosis. PMID:19375545

  19. Extraskeletal and intraskeletal new bone formation induced by demineralized bone matrix combined with bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilutions of fresh autogenous bone marrow cells in combination with allogeneic demineralized cortical bone matrix were tested extraskeletally in rats using roentgenographic, histologic, and 45Ca techniques. Suspensions of bone marrow cells (especially diluted 1:2 with culture media) combined with demineralized cortical bone seemed to induce significantly more new bone than did demineralized bone, bone marrow, or composite grafts with whole bone marrow, respectively. In a short-term spinal fusion experiment, demineralized cortical bone combined with fresh bone marrow produced new bone and bridged the interspace between the spinous processes faster than other transplantation procedures. The induction of undifferentiated host cells by demineralized bone matrix is further complemented by addition of autogenous, especially slightly diluted, bone marrow cells

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnosis of bone cancer . locate foreign objects in soft tissues around or in bones. top of page How ... Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little to no special ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of bone cancer . locate foreign objects in soft tissues around or in bones. top of page How ... bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special ... to 10 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? A bone ...

  4. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000839.htm Bone marrow (stem cell) donation To use the sharing ... stem cells from a donor's blood. Types of Bone Marrow Donation There are two types of bone ...

  5. Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Sites Search Help? Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Examination Formal name: Bone Marrow Aspiration; Bone Marrow Biopsy Related tests: Complete Blood Count ; WBC Differential ; Reticulocyte ...

  6. Exercise for Your Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Lifestyle Exercise for Your Bone Health Publication available in: PDF ( ... A Complete Osteoporosis Program For Your Information Why Exercise? Like muscle, bone is living tissue that responds ...

  7. Predictors of bone disease in Egyptian prepubertal children with β-thalassaemia major

    OpenAIRE

    Tantawy, Azza A.G.; El-Bostany, Eman A.; Matter, Randa M; El-Ghoroury, Eman A.; Ragab, Shadia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Thalassaemic osteopathy is a multifactorial disorder and limited information exists about bone accrual and bone mineral density (BMD) in prepubertal thalassaemic children. The study aimed to investigate some potential genetic and biochemical bone markers as possible early predictors of BMD variations in children with β-thalassaemia major (TM) before puberty. Material and methods Thirt-one prepubertal children with β-TM, and 43 matched controls were subjected to BMD assessment by ...

  8. An Association between BK Virus Replication in Bone Marrow and Cytopenia in Kidney-Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Emilie Pambrun; Catherine Mengelle; Geneviève Fillola; Patrick Laharrague; Laure Esposito; Isabelle Cardeau-Desangles; Arnaud Del Bello; Jacques Izopet; Lionel Rostaing; Nassim Kamar

    2014-01-01

    The human polyomavirus BK (BKV) is associated with severe complications, such as ureteric stenosis and polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN), which often occur in kidney-transplant patients. However, it is unknown if BKV can replicate within bone marrow. The aim of this study was to search for BKV replication within the bone marrow of kidney-transplant patients presenting with a hematological disorder. Seventy-two kidney-transplant patients underwent bone-marrow aspiration for cytopenia....

  9. Characteristic focal hot spots of bone marrow scintigraphic finding in aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bone marrow scintigraphy with 99mTc sulfur colloid has been performed in 168 patients with Aplastic anemia(AA) and 100 patients with others hematological disorders. Bone marrow imaging is a useful method to demonstrate the existence of active hematopoietic foci in living body. The features and clinical significance of these focal hot spots have been discussed. The bone marrow scintigraphy is proved to be helpful in diagnosis, therapy and assessing prognosis of A.A

  10. Expression Level of IL-6 Secreted by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Mice with Aplastic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Feng Chen; Zhong Min Wu; Cong Xie; Shi Bai; Li Dong Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Parasecretion of the hematopoietic cytokines is considered as one of the mechanisms account for bone marrow hematopoiesis disorder. In this study, the level of IL-6 secreted by bone marrow stromal cells from a mouse model of aplastic anemia was analyzed. The aplastic anemia mouse model was established with cyclophosphamide in combination with chloramphenicol and 60Co γ radiation. The impairment of bone marrow hematopoiesis induced by irradiation and chemotherapeutic drugs was subsequently cha...

  11. Free Software Development. 4. Client-Server Implementation of Bone Age Assessment Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Sorana Daniela BOLBOACĂ; Carmencita DENEŞ; Andrei ACHIMAŞ CADARIU BELA

    2003-01-01

    In pediatrics, bone age also called skeletal maturity, an expression of biological maturity of a child, is an important quantitative measure for the clinical diagnosis of endocrinological problems and growth disorders. The present paper discusses a Java script implementation of Tanner-Whitehouse Method on computer, with complete graphical interface that include pictures and explanations for every bone. The program allows to select a stage (from a set of 7 or 8 stages) for every bone (from a ...

  12. MR imaging of the foot and ankle: patterns of bone marrow signal abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis of marrow disorders of the foot and ankle is among the more challenging aspects of MR interpretation. Evaluation of normal and abnormal bone marrow with regard to pattern, distribution, and signal characteristics on different sequences often allows a specific diagnosis. This pictorial review illustrates MR imaging findings of normal variants of bone marrow of the foot and ankle, and the varied responses of bone marrow to trauma, stress, or disease. (orig.)

  13. Skeletal scintigraphy manifestations of hematologic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeletal manifestations are common in hematologic disorders. Benign entities such as Sickle cell disease develop microvascular embolization causing skeletal crisis. Leukemia, acute myeloblastic or lymphoblastic may develop bone marrow infarcts. Compromised immunity makes them susceptible to secondary infection leading to osteomyelitis or septic arthritis. Exposure to steroids may lead to osteonecrosis in these cases. Presented here is an atlas of various scintigraphic skeletal manifestations encountered over the past 10 years, in hematologic disorders

  14. Effect of age and disease on bone mass in Japanese patients with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Sugawara Norio; Yasui-Furukori Norio; Umeda Takashi; Tsuchimine Shoko; Fujii Akira; Sato Yasushi; Saito Manabu; Furukori Hanako; Danjo Kazuma; Matsuzaka Masashi; Takahashi Ippei; Kaneko Sunao

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There have been a limited number of studies comparing bone mass between patients with schizophrenia and the general population. The aim of this study was to compare the bone mass of schizophrenia patients with that of healthy subjects in Japan. Methods We recruited patients (n = 362), aged 48.8 ± 15.4 (mean ± SD) years who were diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV...

  15. Wnt Signaling in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takuo; Michigami, Toshimi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2010-01-01

    Wnt signaling is involved not only in embryonic development but also in maintenance of homeostasis in postnatal tissues. Multiple lines of evidence have increased understanding of the roles of Wnt signaling in bone since mutations in the LRP5 gene were identified in human bone diseases. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes mesenchymal progenitor cells to differentiate into osteoblasts. The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway possibly through Lrp6, a co-receptor for Wnts as well as Lrp5, in osteoblasts regulates bone resorption by increasing the OPG/RANKL ratio. However, endogenous inhibitors of Wnt signaling including sclerostin block bone formation. Regulation of sclerostin appears to be one of the mechanisms of PTH anabolic actions on bone. Since sclerostin is almost exclusively expressed in osteocytes, inhibition of sclerostin is the most promising design. Surprisingly, Lrp5 controls bone formation by inhibiting serotonin synthesis in the duodenum, but not by directly promoting bone formation. Pharmacological intervention may be considered in many components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, although adverse effects and tumorigenicity to other tissues are important. More studies will be needed to fully understand how the Wnt signaling pathway actually influences bone metabolism and to assure the safety of new interventions. PMID:23926379

  16. Bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculiarities of clinico-hematologic pattern in patients with acute leukosis when ionizing radiation is used as prepration regime for hystocompatible bone marrow transplantation are listed. Chemico-radiopreparation of patients with acute leukosis is described, different techniques of bone marrow transplantation are presented, secondary signs of the disease are shown

  17. [Eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yoshie; Okamoto, Yuri; Jinnin, Ran; Shishida, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Yasumasa

    2015-02-01

    Eating disorders are characterized by aberrant patterns of eating behavior, including such symptoms as extreme restriction of food intake or binge eating, and severe disturbances in the perception of body shape and weight, as well as a drive for thinness and obsessive fears of becoming fat. Eating disorder is an important cause for physical and psychosocial morbidity in young women. Patients with eating disorders have a deficit in the cognitive process and functional abnormalities in the brain system. Recently, brain-imaging techniques have been used to identify specific brain areas that function abnormally in patients with eating disorders. We have discussed the clinical and cognitive aspects of eating disorders and summarized neuroimaging studies of eating disorders. PMID:25681363

  18. The risk of lead contamination in bone broth diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monro, J A; Leon, R; Puri, B K

    2013-04-01

    The preparation and consumption of bone broth is being increasingly recommended to patients, for example as part of the gut and psychology syndrome (GAPS) diet for autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, dyspraxia, depression and schizophrenia, and as part of the paleolithic diet. However, bones are known to sequester the heavy metal lead, contamination with which is widespread throughout the modern environment. Such sequestered lead can then be mobilised from the bones. We therefore hypothesised that bone broth might carry a risk of being contaminated with lead. A small, blinded, controlled study of lead concentrations in three different types of organic chicken broth showed that such broths do indeed contain several times the lead concentration of the water with which the broth is made. In particular, broth made from skin and cartilage taken off the bone once the chicken had been cooked with the bones in situ, and chicken-bone broth, were both found to have markedly high lead concentrations, of 9.5 and 7.01 μg L(-1), respectively (compared with a control value for tap water treated in the same way of 0.89 μg L(-1)). In view of the dangers of lead consumption to the human body, we recommend that doctors and nutritionists take the risk of lead contamination into consideration when advising patients about bone broth diets. PMID:23375414

  19. Use of Gamma Correction Pinhole Bone Scans in Trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Youg Whee [Sung Ae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Youg An; Park, Jung Mee [Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    {sup 99}mTc hydroxydiphosphonate (HDP) bone scanning is a classic metabolic nuclear imaging method and the most frequently performed examination. Clinically, it has long been cherished as an indispensable diagnostic screening tool and for monitoring of patients with bone, joint, and soft tissue diseases. The HDP bone scan, the pinhole scan in particular, is known for its ability to detect increased, decreased, or defective tracer uptake along with magnified anatomy. Unfortunately, however, the findings of such uptake changes are not specific in many traumatic bone disorders, especially when lesions are minute and complex. This study discusses the recently introduced gamma correction pinhole bone scan (GCPBS), emphasizing its usefulness in the diagnosis of traumatic bone diseases including occult fractures; and fish vertebra. Indeed, GCPBS can remarkably enhance the diagnostic feasibility of HDP pinhole bone scans by refining the topography, pathologic anatomy, and altered chemical profile of the traumatic diseases in question. The fine and precise depiction of anatomic and metabolic changes in these diseases has been shown to be unique to GCPBS, and they are not appreciated on conventional radiographs, multiple detector CT, or ultrasonographs. It is true that MR imaging can portray proton change, but understandably, it is a manifestation that is common to any bone disease.

  20. The normal bone scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses applications of the bone scan. It is the most frequently performed nuclear medicine investigation, the commonest indication being the detection of occult metastases, for which purpose the entire skeleton should be imaged. For other purposes it is often adequate to examine only part of the skeleton. The amount of isotope taken up at any site depends primarily on the local rate of bone turnover rather than on bone mass. The scintigraphic appearance therefore does not necessarily correlate with the radiographic one; however, as there is a relationship between the rate at which bone is replaced and the quantity of bone which is present at any point, the two appearances are not entirely unrelated. Recognition of abnormality is based on a detailed knowledge of normal scintigraphic appearances

  1. Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    LUKEŠOVÁ, Petra

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor thesis is to create an eating disorder prevention program. The thesis particularly focuses on the eating disorder problems during adolescence and early adulthood along with the explanation and specification of basic terms, history and cause of the disorder. A strong emphasis is placed on the possibilities of the prevention. A qualitative research was carried out within the scope of this thesis and it brought useful data about the students and their knowledge of the ea...

  2. Bone markers and osteoporosis therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Bandeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Several factors are involved in determining bone quality including bone density, bone turnover, the extent of trabecular bone connectivity, cortical porosity and geometry. Metabolically active and in a continuous process of remodeling, approximately 20% of bone tissue is renewed annually. Bone turn over markers (BTM are frequently used in clinical trials and to provide valid information about the effectiveness of osteoporosis treatment, reflecting the state of bone metabolism and its response to treatment, although they are not useful alone to estimate bone loss. In this review the behavior of BTM from different clinical trials or different osteoporotic drugs will be addressed.

  3. Bone changes in tuberous sclerosis mimicking metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Kong Hwai Loong; Choo Hui Fen [National University Hospital (Singapore). Depts. of Diagnostic Radiology and Oncology

    1996-02-01

    Sclerotic and lytic bone changes of tuberous sclerosis (TS) can mimic bone metastases. A case is reported of a patient with concomitant sclerotic bone metastases from bronchogenic carcinoma and TS bone changes, diagnosed by bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging. The increased bone uptake and abnormal magnetic resonance signal allowed distinction of TS bone lesions from bone metastases. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Bone changes in tuberous sclerosis mimicking metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sclerotic and lytic bone changes of tuberous sclerosis (TS) can mimic bone metastases. A case is reported of a patient with concomitant sclerotic bone metastases from bronchogenic carcinoma and TS bone changes, diagnosed by bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging. The increased bone uptake and abnormal magnetic resonance signal allowed distinction of TS bone lesions from bone metastases. 6 refs., 4 figs

  5. Decreased bone formation and increased osteoclastogenesis cause bone loss in mucolipidosis II

    OpenAIRE

    Kollmann, Katrin; Pestka, Jan Malte; Kühn, Sonja Christin; Schöne, Elisabeth; Schweizer, Michaela; Karkmann, Kathrin; Otomo, Takanobu; Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Failla, Antonio Virgilio; Marshall, Robert Percy; Krause, Matthias; Santer, Rene; Amling, Michael; Braulke, Thomas; Schinke, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Mucolipidosis type II (MLII) is a severe multi-systemic genetic disorder caused by missorting of lysosomal proteins and the subsequent lysosomal storage of undegraded macromolecules. Although affected children develop disabling skeletal abnormalities, their pathogenesis is not understood. Here we report that MLII knock-in mice, recapitulating the human storage disease, are runted with accompanying growth plate widening, low trabecular bone mass and cortical porosity. Intralysosomal deficiency...

  6. Inherited mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Though inherited mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are most well known for their syndromic forms, for which widely known acronyms (MELAS, MERRF, NARP, LHON etc.) have been coined, the vast majority of inherited MIDs presents in a non-syndromic form. Since MIDs are most frequently multisystem disorders already at onset or during the disease course, a MID should be suspected if there is a combination of neurological and non-neurological abnormalities. Neurological abnormalities occurring as a part of a MID include stroke-like episodes, epilepsy, migraine-like headache, movement disorders, cerebellar ataxia, visual impairment, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment, dementia, psychosis, hypopituitarism, aneurysms, or peripheral nervous system disease, such as myopathy, neuropathy, or neuronopathy. Non-neurological manifestations concern the ears, the endocrine organs, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract, the kidneys, the bone marrow, and the skin. Whenever there is an unexplained combination of neurological and non-neurological disease in a patient or kindred, a MID should be suspected and appropriate diagnostic measures initiated. Genetic testing should be guided by the phenotype, the biopsy findings, and the biochemical results. PMID:22399423

  7. What Is a Bone Marrow Transplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page Print this page What is a bone marrow transplant? A bone marrow or cord blood transplant is ... with healthy bone marrow. Tweet What is a bone marrow transplant How a bone marrow transplant works Transplant process ...

  8. Personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M.C. van den Bosch; R. Verheul

    2012-01-01

    Subject of this chapter is the often found combination of personality disorders and ­substance abuse disorders. The serious nature of this comorbidity is shown through the discussion of prevalence and epidemiological data. Literature shows that the comorbidity, hampering the diagnostic process, is s

  9. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Rachel G.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their high prevalence and their negative long-term consequences, child anxiety disorders have become an important focus of interest. Whether pathological anxiety and normal fear are similar processes continues to be controversial. Comparative studies of child anxiety disorders are scarce, but there is some support for the current…

  10. Conduct disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitelaar, J.K.; Smeets, K.C.; Herpers, P.; Scheepers, F.; Glennon, J.; Rommelse, N.N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic

  11. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eventually damage a person’s physical and emotional health, self-esteem and sense of control. Factors that may be involved in developing an eating disorder include: Genetics. People with first degree relatives, siblings or parents, with an eating disorder appear to be more ...

  12. EATING DISORDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are complex disorders that are often perplexing to therapists and difficult to manage. The purpose of this chapter is to review the history, nature, etiology, and treatment of these disorders, as well as to provide a brief introduction to the proposed d...

  13. Short Fourth Metacarpal Bone in Sickle Cell Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Bagherzadeh; Mahmoud Parham

    2015-01-01

    A 19-year-old man referred to the emergency department with generalized extremity pain. He had past medical history of sickle cell anemia. On physical examination, body temperature was normal and short right fourth-metacarpal bone was observed, but there was no sign of genetic disorders like turner syndrome, McCune-Albright, and hypothyroidism.

  14. Aneurysmal bone cyst: revision of different techniques in imaging diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study simple radiology, conventional tomography, computed tomography and angiography in 8 cases of aneurysmal bone cyst for the purpose of assessing the utility of these diagnostic techniques. Our results, in agreement with those in the literature, indicate that the presence of a generally well-defined lytic, insufflated lesion containing septi should suggest this disorder. (Author)

  15. Craniofacial and temporal bone CT findings in cleidocranial dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a multistructural polyostotic genetic disorder that results from mutation of the CBFA1 gene. Hearing loss is a frequent finding in CCD. We describe the CT craniofacial findings in CCD and provide a comprehensive discussion of the CT temporal bone findings in these patients. (orig.)

  16. Pathogenetic differentiation of the bone superscan using bone marrow scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a 54-year old patient suffering from a prostatic carcinoma is presented. At the time of diagnosis multiple bone metastases were detected by bone scintigraphy. An initial improvement was observed following antiandrogenic therapy. After three years the patient presented with increasing bone pain, which was most prominent in the knee joints. A 'superscan' was found in bone scintigraphy with an unusually high uptake in the peripheral skeleton. Bone marrow scintigraphy showed a nearly complete metastatic displacement of central bone marrow and a peripheral marrow extension as explanation for the bone scan findings. (orig.)

  17. Personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrer, Peter; Mulder, Roger; Crawford, Mike;

    2010-01-01

    Personality disorder is now being accepted as an important condition in mainstream psychiatry across the world. Although it often remains unrecognized in ordinary practice, research studies have shown it is common, creates considerable morbidity, is associated with high costs to services...... increasing evidence that some treatments, mainly psychological, are of value in this group of disorders. What is now needed is a new classification that is of greater value to clinicians, and the WPA Section on Personality Disorders is currently undertaking this task....... and to society, and interferes, usually negatively, with progress in the treatment of other mental disorders. We now have evidence that personality disorder, as currently classified, affects around 6% of the world population, and the differences between countries show no consistent variation. We are also getting...

  18. Bone metastasis in patients with para neoplastic myasthenic syndrome - Possible indication for bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by a decrease in the number of acetylcholine receptors at neuromuscular junctions and consequently characterized by weakness and fatigue. Paraneoplastic myasthenic syndrome (PMS) is a neurological disorder often difficult to diagnose in clinical practice, due to the lack, in most cases, of any sign of malignancy at the time when neurological impairment occurs. The connection between MG and pathological alterations of the thymus as well as between the presynaptic membrane alteration (Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome) and the small-cell lung cancer is often demonstrated. Most researchers agree that myasthenic syndrome noticed in aged persons should be investigated as a possible paraneoplastic disorder. The aim of our study was to find if suspected PMS could be an indication to perform a bone scan, in presence of parameters suggesting malignancy (such as elevated serum levels of alkaline phosphatase, elevated tumor markers, unexplained bone pain etc.). Another question is whether bone metastases occur more frequently in malignancies associated with PMS than in the same diseases without neurological involvement, taking into account that neurological disorders are not produced by metastatic or direct invasion of the nervous system by the cancer. Our observations included 28 patients (13 men and 15 women), aged 42-80 years with myasthenic syndrome, who were referred by the neurology department for suspicion of bone metastasis. All patients had elevated serum levels of alkaline phosphatase, 18 patients had therapy-resistant bone and joints pain. Conventional imaging procedures (abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray and computer tomography) were performed in all patients. Only in 6 patients the primary malignancy was diagnosed prior to bone scan (5 cases with thymoma and 1 case of digestive neoplasm). Bone scan was performed on a Diacam Siemens gamma camera and consisted of whole-body examination after

  19. Bone cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the considerable disparity in published values of the risk for bone cancers from ionising radiation, the article 'An analysis of bone and head sinus cancers in radium dial painters using a two-mutation carcinogenesis model' by Leenhouts and Brugmans in the June 2000 issue of this Journal deserves further comment and consideration. The letter concludes that radiological protection and risk estimation has acquired an extra dimension, and it is clear that the risk of bone cancer from exposure to ionising radiation needs further review. Letter-to-the-editor

  20. Periodontal bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of life the periodontum is subject to changes which may be physiological or pathological. Intraoral radiographs give insight into the hard structures of the dentomaxillar region and provides information on lesions in the bone of the periodontum in that they show radiopacities and radiolucencies caused by such lesions. In this thesis the relation is investigated between the true shape and dimensions of periodontal bone lesions and their radiographic images. A method is developed and tested of making standardized and reproducible radiographs suitable for longitudinal studies of periodontal lesions. Also the possibility is demonstrated of an objective and reproducible interpretation of radiographic characteristics of periodontal bone lesions. (Auth.)

  1. Enzymatic maceration of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhre, Marie-Louise; Eriksen, Anne Marie; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær;

    2015-01-01

    This proof of concept study investigates the removal of soft tissue from human ribs with the use of two common methods: boiling with a laundry detergent and using enzymes. Six individuals were autopsied, and one rib from each individual was removed for testing. Each rib was cut into pieces and...... the bones. The DNA analysis showed that DNA was preserved on all the pieces of bones which were examined. Finally, the investigation suggests that enzyme maceration could be gentler on the bones, as the edges appeared less frayed. The enzyme maceration was also a quicker method; it took three hours...

  2. Why date old bones?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods for pretreatment and purification of bone have not been accorded the same standard protocols that are applied to other sample materials. Many users lack confidence in bone dates, with some justification, and it is not clear how to proceed. With the advent of AMS dating, it is becoming easy to date very small amounts of highly purified samples such as single amino acids from bone collagen. This note serves a warning that there are dangers in the uncritical application of powerful separation and measurement techniques to uncharacterized material. (orig.)

  3. Bone scintigraphy for horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintigraphy (bone scan) is being used approximately since 1980 in the horse under general anaesthesia. With the construction of custom-made overhead gantries for gamma-cameras scintigraphy found widespread entry in big equine referral hospitals for bone-scanning of the standing horse. Indications for the use of a bone scan in the horse are inflammatory alterations in the locomotor apparatus. It is primarily used for diagnosis of lameness of unknown origin, suspect of stress fracture or hairline fracture and for horses with bad riding comfort with suspected painful lesions in the spine. (orig.)

  4. Bones and oil reservoirs : bioengineers use oilpatch technology to study fluid flow in bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsters, S.

    2003-06-01

    The fact that porosity and the presence of channels are qualities that are common to oil reservoirs and bones, led to the use of reservoir modelling technology in investigating bone disorders and to the discovery of dramatic changes in the structure and blood supply of osteoarthritic bones that lie under degenerating cartilage. CMG (Computer Modelling Group) Ltd., developers of reservoir simulation software claim that their software packages can help with the modelling of cellular responses to strains and deformations that occur as fluid flows through bone after a traumatic event such as a tear in the anterior cruciate ligament, a common sports-related injury. Researchers at the University of Calgary expect that by looking at the changes in blood and fluid flow within the bone, they can attain a better understanding of the chain of events that leads to osteoarthritis. Better understanding of the progression of the disease could eventually lead to more precise administration of drugs to deal with osteoarthritic pain, and even to the prevention of painful arthritic joints.

  5. Acidic microenvironment and bone pain in cancer-colonized bone

    OpenAIRE

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher A.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers and hematologic cancers frequently colonize bone and induce skeletal-related complications. Bone pain is one of the most common complications associated with cancer colonization in bone and a major cause of increased morbidity and diminished quality of life, leading to poor survival in cancer patients. Although the mechanisms responsible for cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) are poorly understood, it is likely that complex interactions among cancer cells, bone cells and periphe...

  6. Roentgenofunctional investigation of the ankle joint in a long-term period after crural bone fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the results of clinicoroentgenological and tensographic investigations of 119 patients after traumas of the crural bones and ankle joint (2-36 yrs. ago) the authors showed the importance of roentgenofunctional investigation of the ankle joint. A specially designed footing was proposed. Of 77 patients after intra-articular fractures of the ankle bones various disorders in articular proportions, undetectable on routine roengenography, were diagnosed in 29 by functional roentgenography. Articular changes on roentgenofunctional investigation were revealed in one patient only out of 42 patients with extra-articular fractures of the crural bones. Tensography showed disorders of foot biomechanics in all patients with subluxations in the ankle

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  8. Interparietal bones in Nigerian skulls.

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, S. K.; Chowdhary, D S; Jain, S P

    1986-01-01

    The study was conducted on 40 adult Nigerian skulls which were examined for the presence of interparietal and pre-interparietal bones. Only one interparietal bone was found (2.5% of the present series) while a single pre-interparietal bone was found in four skulls (10%) and multiple pre-interparietal bones in one skull (2.5%).

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  11. Disorders of the upper extremity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azouz, E M; Oudjhane, K

    1998-08-01

    This article presents a brief overview of the indications of MR imaging in a variety of disorders of the upper extremity of the pediatric patient. This covers congenital anomalies: Sprengel shoulder, Poland sequence, arthrogryposis; posttraumatic lesions of cartilage, bone, tendon, muscle and nerve including the brachial plexus injury; inflammatory arthritis and synovitis; bone and joint infection; osteochondritis dissecans, bone necrosis and infarcts in sickle cell anemia and juvenile Gaucher disease, as well as tumors. In this last category, the authors briefly describe the appearances of cysts and tumors of bones and soft tissues of the upper extremity. Indications for the intravenous administration of Gadolinium are given throughout the article with emphasis on the synovial enhancement seen in active arthritis and synovitis. PMID:9654591

  12. Joint Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  13. Nonsyndromic Isolated Temporal Bone Styloid Process Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, Hamed; Dehghani, Nima; Aghdashi, Farzad; Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Fracture of the styloid process (SP) of the temporal bone is a rare traumatic injury in normal individuals who are not suffering from Eagle’s syndrome. Diagnosis and management of this problem requires comprehensive knowledge about its signs and symptoms. This study aimed to present an isolated styloid process fracture in a nonsyndromic patient. Case Presentation: A 50-year-old male patient was referred to our department with a complaint of sore throat. However, presentation of the problem resembled the symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). Fracture of the SP of the temporal bone was detected on the radiographs. Conservative treatment was undertaken for the patient. The symptoms diminished after about four months. Conclusions: Physicians should be aware of the signs and symptoms of different pain sources to prevent misdiagnosis and maltreatment.

  14. Immunoregulation of bone remodelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajai; Mehdi, Abbass A; Srivastava, Rajeshwer N; Verma, Nar Singh

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling, a continuous physiological process maintains the strength of the bones, which maintains a delicate balance between bone formation and resorption process. This review gives an insight to the complex interaction and correlation between the bone remodeling and the corresponding changes in host immunological environment and also summarises the most recent developments occuring in the understanding of this complex field. T cells, both directly and indirectly increase the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand (RANKL); a vital step in the activation of osteoclasts, thus positively regulates the osteoclastogenesis. Though various cytokines, chemikines, transcription factors and co-stimulatory molecules are shared by both skeletal and immune systems, but researches are being conducted to establish and analyse their role and / or control on this complex but vital process. The understanding of this part of research may open new horizons in the management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, resulting into bone loss and that of osteoporosis also. PMID:22837895

  15. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complications Potential problems after a PTBG include infection, fracture of the proximal tibia and pain related to the procedure. Frequently Asked Questions If proximal tibial bone graft is taken from my knee, will this prevent me from being able to ...

  16. Osteomyelitis of frontal bone

    OpenAIRE

    Chaturvedil, V. N.; Raizada, R. M.; Singh, A. K. Kennedy; Puttewar, M. P.; Bali, S.

    2004-01-01

    A case of Osteomyelitis of the frontal bone with a subperiosteal absces s, an extrudural abscess and a frontal sinus fistula is presented here for its rarity. A brief review of literature and management of the condition is also discussed.

  17. Skull base bone hyperpneumatization

    OpenAIRE

    Houet, E J; Kouokam, L.M.; Nchimi, A L

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old male with a long standing history of compulsive Valsalva maneuvers, complaining of episodes of vertigo underwent head computed tomography. Axial CT slices at the level of the skull base (Fig. A) and the first cervical vertebrae (Fig. B) shows an extensive unusual pneumatization of both the body and lateral processes of the first cervical vertebrae (arrows), with air pouches dissecting planes between bone cortex and the periosteum around the occipital bone and the lateral process...

  18. Inca bones at asterion

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant E Natekar; Suhit E Natekar; Fatima M De Souza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Surgical approach towards asterion has to be done with caution as many surgeons are unfamiliar with the anatomical variations. The asterion corresponds to the site of the posterolateral (mastoid) fontanelle of the neonatal skull which closes at the end of the first year. Inca bones provide information as markers for various diseases, and can mislead in the diagnosis of fractures. Observation and Results: 150 dry skull bones from the Department of Anatomy at Goa Medical College, In...

  19. Uranium in fossil bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt has been made to determine the uranium content and thus the age of certain fossil bones Haritalyangarh (Himachal Pradesh), India. The results indicate that bones rich in apatite are also rich in uranium, and that the radioactivity is due to radionuclides in the uranium series. The larger animals apparently have a higher concentration of uranium than the small. The dating of a fossil jaw (elephant) places it in the Pleistocene. (Auth.)

  20. Bone healing: little secrets

    OpenAIRE

    Einhorn, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The development of new strategies to enhance the healing of fractures continues to evolve with the introduction of both locally and systemically delivered compounds. The recent refinement in the use of autologous bone marrow as a bone graft material has brought the field of stem cell biology into orthopaedic practice. New recombinant peptides such as platelet- derived growth factor and teriparatide show promise as local and systemic enhancers respectively. Finally, recent evidence that mutati...

  1. Detecting microdamage in bone.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, T Clive; Mohsin, Sahar; Taylor, David; Parkesh, Raman; Gunnlaugsson, TThorfinnur; O'Brien, Fergal J.; Giehl, Michael; Gowin, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue-induced microdamage in bone contributes to stress and fragility fractures and acts as a stimulus for bone remodelling. Detecting such microdamage is difficult as pre-existing microdamage sustained in vivo must be differentiated from artefactual damage incurred during specimen preparation. This was addressed by bulk staining specimens in alcohol-soluble basic fuchsin dye, but cutting and grinding them in an aqueous medium. Nonetheless, some artefactual cracks are partially stained and ...

  2. Fracture Nasal Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan; Venkatesan, Ulaganathan

    2013-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the face, hence it is likely to be the most common structure to be injured in the face. Although fractures involving the nasal bones are very common, it is often ignored by the patient. Patients with fractures of nasal bone will have deformity, tenderness, haemorrhage, edema, ecchymosis, instability, and crepitation. These features may be present in varying combinations. This article discusses the pathophysiology of these fractures, role of radiography and u...

  3. FRACTURE NASAL BONES

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian Thaigarajan; Venkatesan Ulaganathan

    2013-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the face, hence it is likely to be the most common structure to be injured in the face. Although fractures involving the nasal bones are very common, it is often ignored by the patient. Patients with fractures of nasal bone will have deformity, tenderness, haemorrhage, edema, ecchymosis, instability, and crepitation. These features may be present in varying combinations. This article discusses the pathophysiology of these fractures, role of radiography a...

  4. Small Animal Bone Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Vashishth, Deepak

    2008-01-01

    Animal models, in particular mice, offer the possibility of naturally achieving or genetically engineering a skeletal phenotype associated with disease and conducting destructive fracture tests on bone to determine the resulting change in bone’s mechanical properties. Several recent developments, including nano- and micro- indentation testing, microtensile and microcompressive testing, and bending tests on notched whole bone specimens, offer the possibility to mechanically probe small animal ...

  5. Multiscale imaging of bone microdamage

    OpenAIRE

    Poundarik, Atharva A.; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a structural and hierarchical composite that exhibits remarkable ability to sustain complex mechanical loading and resist fracture. Bone quality encompasses various attributes of bone matrix from the quality of its material components (type-I collagen, mineral and non-collagenous matrix proteins) and cancellous microarchitecture, to the nature and extent of bone microdamage. Microdamage, produced during loading, manifests in multiple forms across the scales of hierarchy in bone and fu...

  6. Bone nutrients for vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangels, Ann Reed

    2014-07-01

    The process of bone mineralization and resorption is complex and is affected by numerous factors, including dietary constituents. Although some dietary factors involved in bone health, such as calcium and vitamin D, are typically associated with dairy products, plant-based sources of these nutrients also supply other key nutrients involved in bone maintenance. Some research suggests that vegetarian diets, especially vegan diets, are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this does not appear to be clinically significant. Vegan diets are not associated with an increased fracture risk if calcium intake is adequate. Dietary factors in plant-based diets that support the development and maintenance of bone mass include calcium, vitamin D, protein, potassium, and soy isoflavones. Other factors present in plant-based diets such as oxalic acid and phytic acid can potentially interfere with absorption and retention of calcium and thereby have a negative effect on BMD. Impaired vitamin B-12 status also negatively affects BMD. The role of protein in calcium balance is multifaceted. Overall, calcium and protein intakes in accord with Dietary Reference Intakes are recommended for vegetarians, including vegans. Fortified foods are often helpful in meeting recommendations for calcium and vitamin D. Plant-based diets can provide adequate amounts of key nutrients for bone health. PMID:24898231

  7. Three-dimensional CT imaging with a helical scan on temporal bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) CT on the lesions of temporal bone, we studied 19 patients with disorders on the region of temporal bone by high speed helical CT. The results showed that 8 patients with congenital hearing disorder had deficiency of the auditory ossicles, 2 patients with chronic otitis media had deformity and shortness of the auditory ossicles, 4 patients with trauma had fracture of the temporal bone (1 patient was complicated by doubtful fracture of the incus), 5 patients (4 patients with acquired hearing disorder and 1 patient with otorrhea) had space-occupying lesions. 3-D helical CT could detect abnormal findings on all the patients and it was an important examination for the temporal bone. (author)

  8. Bone marrow scintigraphy with 111In-chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    111In-chloride as a useful bone marrow-scanning agent has been used for various hematological diseases. We also have studied the distribution of indium-111 by scintigraphy in 28 patients with systemic hematopoietic disorders and other: 4 with aplastic anemia, 8 with leucemia, 3 with iron-deficiency anemia, one with pernicious anemia, 2 with myelofibrosis, 3 with multiple myeloma, one with malignant lymphoma, 3 with liver cirrhosis or Banti-syndrome and 3 with seminoma received post operative irradiation. The results of scintigraphy (the image of bone marrow, liver, spleen, kidney and intestine) were compared with bone marrow biopsies, ferrokinetic data and Se.I./TIBC. The bone marrow image was interpreted on a three-point scale: normal distribution of activity (+), abnormal distribution (+-), body back ground level (-). In the cases of iron-deficiency anemia and pernicious anemia with hyperplastic erythroid marrow, regardless of its severe anemia, the scintigrams showed clearly delineated bone marrow images and normal organ distribution of indium. On the other hand, the scan images revealed severe suppressions of bone marrow activity and markedly increased renal activity in some cases of aplastic anemia, acute leucemia and malignant lymphoma with hypoplastic and/or tumour-cell infiltrative marrows. Thus, it may be said that the bone marrow uptake of indium-111 correlates well with the degree of erythroid elements, no correlation with nucleated cell counts, and there is a strong tendency to increased renal activity in the cases of markedly decreased erythropoietic cell counts. (auth.)

  9. Prevalence of bone marrow necrosis in Egyptian cancer patients referring to the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone marrow necrosis; Egyptian cancer patients Abstract Background: Bone marrow necrosis is a relatively rare entity which has been associated with a poor prognosis. It is most commonly found in patients with neoplastic disorders and severe infections. Methods: study comprised examination of 5043 bone marrow biopsy specimens performed at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, over 7 years period (March 2004-March 2011). It included 5 years retrospective (2867 archived samples) and 2 years prospective (2176 samples). Results: Bone marrow necrosis was diagnosed in fifteen out of 5043 examined specimens with a percentage of 0.3% and ranged from mild to massive according to semiquantitative estimation. Prognosis of all patients was poor with survival not exceeding 6 months from the date of marrow necrosis diagnosis. Conclusion: In Egyptian patients, bone marrow necrosis in association with malignancy is a rare disorder which is accompanied by a poor outcome

  10. Bone density and young athletic women. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, David L; Sanborn, Charlotte F; Essery, Eve V

    2007-01-01

    High-school girls and collegiate women have tremendous opportunities to participate in athletic teams. Young girls are also playing in club and select teams at an early age and often, year-round. There are many benefits for participating in sport and physical activity on both the physical and mental health of girls and women. Decreased risk for heart disease and diabetes mellitus, along with improved self-esteem and body-image, were among the first reported benefits of regular physical activity. In addition, sport participation and physical activity is also associated with bone health. Athletes have a greater bone mineral density compared with non-active and physically active females. The increase in bone mass should reduce the risk of fragility fractures in later life. There appears to be a window of opportunity during the development of peak bone mass in which the bone is especially responsive to weight-bearing physical activity. Impact loading sports such as gymnastics, rugby or volleyball tend to produce a better overall osteogenic response than sports without impact loading such as cycling, rowing and swimming. Relatively little is known about the impact of retiring from athletics on bone density. It appears that former athletes continue to have a higher bone density than non-athletes; however, the rate of bone loss appears to be similar in the femoral neck. The positive impact of sports participation on bone mass can be tempered by nutritional and hormonal status. It is not known whether female athletes need additional calcium compared with the general female population. Due to the increased energy expenditure of exercise and/or the pressure to obtain an optimal training bodyweight, some female athletes may develop low energy availability or an eating disorder and subsequently amenorrhoea and a loss of bone mineral density. The three inter-related clinical disorders are referred to as the 'female athlete triad'. This article presents a review of the

  11. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein induces bone formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have purified and characterized active recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2A. Implantation of the recombinant protein in rats showed that a single BMP can induce bone formation in vivo. A dose-response and time-course study using the rat ectopic bone formation assay revealed that implantation of 0.5-115 μg of partially purified recombinant human BMP-2A resulted in cartilage by day 7 and bone formation by day 14. The time at which bone formation occurred was dependent on the amount of BMP-2A implanted; at high doses bone formation could be observed at 5 days. The cartilage- and bone-inductive activity of the recombinant BMP-2A is histologically indistinguishable from that of bone extracts. Thus, recombinant BMP-2A has therapeutic potential to promote de novo bone formation in humans

  12. Crosstalk between cancer cells and bone microenvironment in bone metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone, as well as lung and liver, is one of the most preferential metastatic target sites for cancers including breast, prostate, and lung cancers. Although the precise molecular mechanisms underlying this preference need to be elucidated, it appears that bone microenvironments possess unique biological features that enable circulating cancer cells to home, survive and proliferate, and destroy bone. In conjunction, cancers that develop bone metastases likely have the capacity to utilize these unique bone environments for colonization and bone destruction. This crosstalk between metastatic cancer cells and bone is critical to the development and progression of bone metastases. Disruption of this interaction will allow us to design mechanism-based effective and specific therapeutic interventions for bone metastases

  13. [Morphological analysis of bone dynamics and metabolic bone disease. Histomorphometric concepts of bone remodeling and modeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideaki E

    2011-04-01

    In tissue level turnover of bone cells, bone remodeling shows a sequential events of activation, resorption, reversal and formation. This may be observed as secondary osteons in the cortical bone and trabecular packets in the cancellous bone. Microcracks are repaired by targeted remodeling, and calcium is released by non-targeted remodeling. In macromodeling, a macroscopic size of a bone increases with growth, without changing its basic figure. In micromodelimg, a shift of trabecula, a minishift, is biomechnically controlled. New lamellar bone is added parallel to compressive and tensile force, and bone resorption occurs at the opposite surface of formation. In minimodeling new lamellar bone is formed with a sequence of activation, then directly formation, without scalloping at the cement line between newly formed bone and its basic bone. PMID:21447918

  14. Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the day, even if you have had enough sleep? You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Insomnia - a hard time falling or staying asleep Sleep apnea - breathing interruptions during sleep Restless legs syndrome - ...

  15. Conversion disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Blais MA, Smallwood P, Groves JE, Rivas-Vazquez RA. Personality and ...

  16. Conduct disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Walter HJ, Rashid A, Moseley LR, DeMaso DR. Disruptive, impulse-control, ...

  17. Schizoaffective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, Va: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Freudenreich O, Weiss AP, Goff DC. Psychosis and schizophrenia. In: Stern ...

  18. Personality disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Blais MA, Smallwood P, Groves JE, Rivas-Vazquez RA. Personality and ...

  19. Peritoneal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your peritoneum is the tissue that lines your abdominal wall and covers most of the organs in your abdomen. ... the surface of this tissue. Disorders of the peritoneum are not common. They include Peritonitis - an inflammation ...

  20. Smell Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... like cilia shed light on disorders of the senses Perelman School of Medicine / University of Pennsylvania ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health USA.gov—Government ...

  1. Anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which may include: Hormonal changes during the menstrual cycle Genetics. Anxiety disorders may run in families. Traumatic events. Experiencing abuse, an attack, or sexual assault can lead to serious health problems, including ...

  2. Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lows). These aren't the normal periods of happiness and sadness that everyone experiences from time to ... with long-lasting medical conditions (such as asthma , diabetes , or epilepsy ), teens with bipolar disorder need to ...

  3. Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... times I'd miss work and skip the gym because I felt so lousy. So I decided ... cell called platelets. Your body also needs blood proteins called clotting factors. In people with bleeding disorders, ...

  4. Muscle Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  5. Cephalic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be caused by a disturbance in the proliferation of nerve cells. Micrencephaly may also be associated with maternal problems ... as cephalic disorders. Understanding how genes control brain cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and death, and how radiation, drugs, toxins, ...

  6. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21 (Down syndrome) . Other trisomies include trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) . Monosomy is ... which there is an extra chromosome. Trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome): A genetic disorder that causes serious heart ...

  7. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapies Join a Study Learn More Anxiety Disorders Definition Occasional anxiety is a normal part of life. ... and sharing their problems and achievements with others. Internet chat rooms might also be useful, but any ...

  8. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... situation, and affects a person's daily life and happiness. Symptoms of an anxiety disorder can come on ... letting go of worry allows space for more happiness and fun. Reviewed by: D'Arcy Lyness, PhD ...

  9. Eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kontić Olga; Vasiljević Nadja; Trišović Marija; Jorga Jagoda; Lakić Aneta; Jašović-Gašić Miroslava

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are considered chronic diseases of civilization. The most studied and well known are anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Anorexia is considered one of the most common psychiatric problems of girls in puberty and adolescence. Due to high mortality and morbidity as well as the increasing expansion of these diseases, it is clear why the amount of research on these diseases is growing worldwide. Eating disorders lead to numerous medical complications, mostly due to late diagnosis...

  10. Bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Frederick K; Ghaemi, S Nassir

    1999-01-01

    Bipolar disorder's unique combination of three characteristics - clear genetic diathesis, distinctive clinical features, early availability of an effective treatment (lithium) - explains its special place in the history of psychiatry and its contribution to the current explosive growth of neuroscience. This article looks at the state of the art in bipolar disorder from the vantage point of: (i) genetics (possible linkages on chromosomes 18 and 21q, polygenic hypothesis, research into genetic ...

  11. Enhancing the mechanical integrity of the implant-bone interface with BoneWelding technology: determination of quasi-static interfacial strength and fatigue resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Stephen J; Weber, Urs; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Mayer, Joerg

    2006-04-01

    The BoneWelding technology is an innovative bonding method, which offers new alternatives in the treatment of fractures and other degenerative disorders of the musculoskeletal system. The BoneWelding process employs ultrasonic energy to liquefy a polymeric interface between orthopaedic implants and the host bone. Polymer penetrates the pores of the surrounding bone and, following a rapid solidification, forms a strong and uniform bond between implant and bone. Biomechanical testing was performed to determine the quasi-static push-out strength and fatigue performance of 3.5-mm-diameter polymeric dowels bonded to a bone surrogate material (Sawbones solid and cellular polyurethane foam) using the BoneWelding process. Fatigue tests were conducted over 100,000 cycles of 20-100 N loading. Mechanical test results were compared with those obtained with a comparably-sized, commercial metallic fracture fixation screw. Tests in surrogate bone material of varying density demonstrated significantly superior mechanical performance of the bonded dowels in comparison to conventional bone screws (p Ultrasonically inserted implants migrated, on average, less than 20 microm over, and interfacial stiffness remained constant the full duration of fatigue testing. With further refinement, the BoneWelding technology may offer a quicker, simpler, and more effective method for achieving strong fixation and primary stability for fracture fixation or other orthopaedic and dental implant applications. PMID:16211571

  12. Porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for enhanced bone bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant-bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests. RESULTS: The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony

  13. Bone metabolic activity in hyperostosis cranialis interna measured with {sup 18}F-fluoride PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterval, Jerome J.; Dongen, Thijs M.A. van; Stokroos, Robert J.; Manni, Johannes J. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Teule, Jaap G.J.; Kemerink, Gerrit J.; Brans, Boudewijn [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Nieman, Fred H.M. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Technology Assessment, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2011-05-15

    {sup 18}F-Fluoride PET/CT is a relatively undervalued diagnostic test to measure bone metabolism in bone diseases. Hyperostosis cranialis interna (HCI) is a (hereditary) bone disease characterised by endosteal hyperostosis and osteosclerosis of the skull and the skull base. Bone overgrowth causes entrapment and dysfunction of several cranial nerves. The aim of this study is to compare standardised uptake values (SUVs) at different sites in order to quantify bone metabolism in the affected anatomical regions in HCI patients. Nine affected family members, seven non-affected family members and nine non-HCI non-family members underwent {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT scans. SUVs were systematically measured in the different regions of interest: frontal bone, sphenoid bone, petrous bone and clivus. Moreover, the average {sup 18}F-fluoride uptake in the entire skull was measured by assessing the uptake in axial slides. Visual assessment of the PET scans of affected individuals was performed to discover the process of disturbed bone metabolism in HCI. {sup 18}F-Fluoride uptake is statistically significantly higher in the sphenoid bone and clivus regions of affected family members. Visual assessment of the scans of HCI patients is relevant in detecting disease severity and the pattern of disturbed bone metabolism throughout life. {sup 18}F-Fluoride PET/CT is useful in quantifying the metabolic activity in HCI and provides information about the process of disturbed bone metabolism in this specific disorder. Limitations are a narrow window between normal and pathological activity and the influence of age. This study emphasises that {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT may also be a promising diagnostic tool for other metabolic bone disorders, even those with an indolent course. (orig.)

  14. Bone metabolic activity in hyperostosis cranialis interna measured with 18F-fluoride PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18F-Fluoride PET/CT is a relatively undervalued diagnostic test to measure bone metabolism in bone diseases. Hyperostosis cranialis interna (HCI) is a (hereditary) bone disease characterised by endosteal hyperostosis and osteosclerosis of the skull and the skull base. Bone overgrowth causes entrapment and dysfunction of several cranial nerves. The aim of this study is to compare standardised uptake values (SUVs) at different sites in order to quantify bone metabolism in the affected anatomical regions in HCI patients. Nine affected family members, seven non-affected family members and nine non-HCI non-family members underwent 18F-fluoride PET/CT scans. SUVs were systematically measured in the different regions of interest: frontal bone, sphenoid bone, petrous bone and clivus. Moreover, the average 18F-fluoride uptake in the entire skull was measured by assessing the uptake in axial slides. Visual assessment of the PET scans of affected individuals was performed to discover the process of disturbed bone metabolism in HCI. 18F-Fluoride uptake is statistically significantly higher in the sphenoid bone and clivus regions of affected family members. Visual assessment of the scans of HCI patients is relevant in detecting disease severity and the pattern of disturbed bone metabolism throughout life. 18F-Fluoride PET/CT is useful in quantifying the metabolic activity in HCI and provides information about the process of disturbed bone metabolism in this specific disorder. Limitations are a narrow window between normal and pathological activity and the influence of age. This study emphasises that 18F-fluoride PET/CT may also be a promising diagnostic tool for other metabolic bone disorders, even those with an indolent course. (orig.)

  15. Mimicking the nanostructure of bone matrix to regenerate bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert; Ma1, Peter X

    2013-11-01

    Key features of bone tissue structure and composition are capable of directing cellular behavior towards the generation of new bone tissue. Bone tissue, as well as materials derived from bone, have a long and successful history of use as bone grafting materials. Recent developments in design and processing of synthetic scaffolding systems has allowed the replication of the bone's desirable biological activity in easy to fabricate polymeric materials with nano-scale features exposed on the surface. The biological response to these new tissue-engineering scaffold materials oftentimes exceeds that seen on scaffolds produced using biological materials. PMID:24688283

  16. Bone scan in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1984, a survey carried out in 21 countries in Europe showed that bone scintigraphy comprised 16% of all paediatric radioisotope scans. Although the value of bone scans in paediatrics is potentially great, their quality varies greatly, and poor-quality images are giving this valuable technique a bad reputation. The handling of children requires a sensitive staff and the provision of a few simple inexpensive items of distraction. Attempting simply to scan a child between two adult patients in a busy general department is a recipe for an unhappy, uncooperative child with the probable result of poor images. The intravenous injection of isotope should be given adjacent to the gamma camera room, unless dynamic scans are required, so that the child does not associate the camera with the injection. This injection is best carried out by someone competent in paediatric venipunture; the entire procedure should be explained to the child and parent, who should remain with child throughout. It is naive to think that silence makes for a cooperative child. The sensitivity of bone-seeking radioisotope tracers and the marked improvement in gamma camera resolution has allowed the bone scanning to become an integrated technique in the assessment of children suspected of suffering from pathological bone conditions. The tracer most commonly used for routine bone scanning is 99mTc diphosphonate (MDP); other isotopes used include 99mTc colloid for bone marrow scans and 67Ga citrate and 111In white blood cells (111In WBC) for investigation of inflammatory/infective lesions

  17. Bone scintigraphy of decompression sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Value of bone scintigraphy in decompression sickness of 42 patients was retrospectively evaluated. Bone scintigraphy was positive in 30 of 42 patients (83 lesions), while radiography and symptoms were positive in 23 patients (48 lesions), and in 29 patients (44 lesions) respectively. Bone scintigraphy was positive in many lesions with negative radiography or symptoms. However, approximately half of the lesions in which either radiography or symptoms was positive could not be detected by bone scintigraphy. These cases mostly showed radiographic abnormalities such as irregular calcified areas and ''bone island'' in the cervical regions of the humerus, femur and tibia. Both bone scintigraphy and radiography were positive in most of the patients with symptoms of the bends and there seems to be a close relationship between the bends symptoms and bone lesion. We concluded that bone scintigraphy is useful for the evaluation of decompression sickness, but it must be complemented by bone radiography to avoid a significant number of false negative cases. (author)

  18. Autism and Related Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    McPartland, James; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2012-01-01

    The Pervasive Developmental Disorders are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders that include Autistic Disorder, Asperger’s Disorder, Pervasive Developmental Disorder - Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD), and Rett’s Disorder. All feature childhood onset with a constellation of symptoms spanning social interaction and communication and including atypical behavior patterns. The first three disorders (Autistic Disorder, Asperger’s Disorder, and PDD-NOS) a...

  19. Bone Marrow Imaging: Part I and Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Rafiee

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of bone marrow are commonly encountered"nin clinical practice. For an accurate interpretation, it"nis essential to have a thorough understanding of the"nnormal marrow appearance, marrow conversion (red to"nyellow from birth to adulthood, marrow reconversion"n(yellow to red, and benign and malignant marrow"nproliferative, replacement, depletion, and vascular"ndisorders."nThe purpose of this teaching presentation is to:"n1. Describe normal bone marrow anatomy and"nfunction."n2. Review methods of imaging bone marrow."n3. Review MR appearance of normal bone marrow in"ndifferent age groups"n4. Review marrow proliferative diseases - benign (e.g.,"nreconversion, malignant (e.g., leukemia."n5. Review marrow replacement processes - benign"n(e.g. osteomyelitis, malignant (e.g., metastasis."n6. Review marrow depletion disorders - benign,"nmalignant (e.g., aplastic anemia, radiation."n7. Review vascular marrow disorders (e.g. osteonecrosis"nand miscellaneous marrow abnormalities.

  20. Inca bones at asterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant E Natekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical approach towards asterion has to be done with caution as many surgeons are unfamiliar with the anatomical variations. The asterion corresponds to the site of the posterolateral (mastoid fontanelle of the neonatal skull which closes at the end of the first year. Inca bones provide information as markers for various diseases, and can mislead in the diagnosis of fractures. Observation and Results: 150 dry skull bones from the Department of Anatomy at Goa Medical College, India and other neighboring medical colleges by examining the asterion, and its sutural articulations with parietal, temporal and occipital bones and also anatomical variations if any in adults. Discussion: The anatomical landmarks selected must be reliable and above all easy to identify. Bony structures are more suitable than soft tissue or cartilaginous landmarks because of their rigid and reliable location. Presence of these bones provides false impressions of fractures or the fractures may be interpreted for inca bones especially in the region of asterion either radiologically or clinically which may lead to complications during burr hole surgeries.

  1. Periostin action in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Garnero, Patrick; Ferrari, Serge

    2016-09-01

    Periostin is a highly conserved matricellular protein that shares close homology with the insect cell adhesion molecule fasciclin 1. Periostin is expressed in a broad range of tissues including the skeleton, where it serves both as a structural molecule of the bone matrix and a signaling molecule through integrin receptors and Wnt-beta-catenin pathways whereby it stimulates osteoblast functions and bone formation. The development of periostin null mice has allowed to elucidate the crucial role of periostin on dentinogenesis and osteogenesis, as well as on the skeletal response to mechanical loading and parathyroid hormone. The use of circulating periostin as a potential clinical biomarker has been explored in different non skeletal conditions. These include cancers and more specifically in the metastasis process, respiratory diseases such as asthma, kidney failure, renal injury and cardiac infarction. In postmenopausal osteoporosis, serum levels have been shown to predict the risk of fracture-more specifically non-vertebral- independently of bone mineral density. Because of its preferential localization in cortical bone and periosteal tissue, it can be speculated that serum periostin may be a marker of cortical bone metabolism, although additional studies are clearly needed. PMID:26721738

  2. Fibrosarcoma of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general clinical-radiological description of fibrosarcoma of bone, including tumours with features of malignant fibrous histiocytoma is presented. 104 patients with fibrosarcoma of the long bones are analysed in terms of age and sex distribution, symptoms, duration of symptoms and tumour localization. The radiological findings obtained in patients with fibrosarcoma of the long bones are discussed. The treatment and course of fibrosarcoma of the long bones are discussed. Data on the type of therapy given were available on 103 patients: 67 were treated by ablative surgery either immediately or within three months of preceding local surgery and/or radiotherapy. In the remaining 36 cases treatment consisted of local surgery, radiotherapy or a combination of these, or non-curative (palliative) treatment. In a few cases ablative surgery was performed at a later stage. 13 patients with fibrosarcoma of the axial skeleton and 14 with fibrosarcoma of the jaws are considered. A causistic discussion of patients with a secondary fibrosarcoma is presented. Secondary fibrosarcoma was found in a total of 19 patients (14%); 4 after irradiation. The features of significance for the course of the disease are discussed: general features such as age and sex, tumour localization in the long bones, presence or absence of a pathological fracture, and the radiological and histological characteristics of the tumour. The type of therapy and the occurrence of lung metastases in relation to the course of the disease is also discussed. (Auth.)

  3. Bone metabolism during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Jean Pierre

    2016-06-01

    During pregnancy, mineral concentrations, of calcium and phosphorus in particular, are maintained at a high level in fetal blood so that the developing skeleton may accrete adequate mineral content. The placenta actively transports minerals for this purpose. Maternal intestinal absorption increases in order to meet the fetal demand for calcium, which is only partly dependent on calcitriol. Mineral regulation is essentially dependent on parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP). The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulates PTH and PTHrP production. If calcium intake is insufficient, the maternal skeleton will undergo resorption due to PTHrP. After birth, a switch from fetal to neonatal homeostasis occurs through increase in PTH and calcitriol, and developmental adaptation of the kidneys and intestines with bone turnover contributing additional mineral to the circulation. Calcium absorption becomes progressively active and dependent on calcitriol. The postnatal skeleton can transiently present with osteoposis but adequate mineral diet usually allows full restoration. Cases of primary osteoporosis must be identified. Loss of trabecular mineral content occurs during lactation in order to provide calcium to the newborn. This programmed bone loss is dependent on a "brain-breast-bone" circuit. The physiological bone resorption during reproduction does not normally cause fractures or persistent osteoporosis. Women who experience fracture are likely to have other causes of bone loss. PMID:27157104

  4. The use of bone age in clinical practice - part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David D; Wit, Jan M; Hochberg, Ze'ev; van Rijn, Rick R; Fricke, Oliver; Werther, George; Cameron, Noël; Hertel, Thomas; Wudy, Stefan A; Butler, Gary; Thodberg, Hans Henrik; Binder, Gerhard; Ranke, Michael B

    2011-01-01

    If height-limiting treatment is being considered for a child with tall stature, skeletal maturity is invaluable in the selection of appropriate patients for treatment, determining appropriate age of treatment commencement, monitoring progress of treatment, and determining the expected treatment effect on adult height. In precocious puberty, bone maturation can be usefully assessed at initial diagnosis and start of treatment and at regular intervals thereafter during treatment monitoring. Together with height, bone maturation is an essential parameter for long-term treatment monitoring in congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Bone age (BA) determination in children with skeletal dysplasia is only feasible in a few disorders and estimations should be treated with caution. Radiographs of the left hand and wrist are, however, essential in the diagnosis of many skeletal disorders. Bone mineralization and measures of bone lengths, width, thickness and cortical thickness should always be evaluated in relation to a child's height and BA, especially around puberty. The use of skeletal maturity, assessed on a radiograph alone to estimate chronological age for immigration authorities or criminal courts is not recommended. PMID:21691055

  5. Nutritional and Pubertal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Calvo, M Teresa; Argente, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Caloric-protein malnutrition can slow growth and cause pubertal delay. This chapter focuses on endocrine abnormalities and pubertal alterations in patients with eating disorders, childhood obesity, the female athlete triad and children cancer survivors. Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) exhibit multiple endocrine abnormalities, including isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The delay in pubertal development and reduction in growth seen in AN patients may be a direct result of malnutrition. Appropriate psychiatric, nutritional and hormonal therapy is necessary. It is suggested that obesity during childhood can accelerate pubertal onset and these children usually exhibit accelerated linear growth during puberty. In girls the relationship between childhood obesity and early pubertal onset could be related to their insulin resistance and/or hyperinsulinemia. The female athlete triad is often observed in physically active girls and women in whom low energy availability with or without disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction and low bone mineral density can be present. In prepubertal girls excess exercise can cause delayed menarche with no effects on adult height, while in postpubertal females it results in menstrual cycle irregularities. The consequences of childhood cancer depend on the type of cancer, its location, the age at which the disease was diagnosed, the dose of radiotherapy, and the type and dose of chemotherapy. PMID:26680577

  6. The effects of low environmental cadmium exposure on bone density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent epidemiological data indicate that low environmental exposure to cadmium, as shown by cadmium body burden (Cd-U), is associated with renal dysfunction as well as an increased risk of cadmium-induced bone disorders. The present study was designed to assess the effects of low environmental cadmium exposure, at the level sufficient to induce kidney damage, on bone metabolism and mineral density (BMD). The project was conducted in the area contaminated with cadmium, nearby a zinc smelter located in the region of Poland where heavy industry prevails. The study population comprised 170 women (mean age=39.7; 18-70 years) and 100 men (mean age=31.9; 18-76 years). Urinary and blood cadmium and the markers of renal tubular dysfunction (β2M-U RBP, NAG), glomerular dysfunction (Alb-U and β2M-S) and bone metabolism markers (BAP-S, CTX-S) as well as forearm BMD, were measured. The results of this study based on simple dose-effect analysis showed the relationship between increasing cadmium concentrations and an increased excretion of renal dysfunction markers and decreasing bone density. However, the results of the multivariate analysis did not indicate the association between exposure to cadmium and decrease in bone density. They showed that the most important factors that have impact on bone density are body weight and age in the female subjects and body weight and calcium excretion in males. Our investigation revealed that the excretion of low molecular weight proteins occurred at a lower level of cadmium exposure than the possible loss of bone mass. It seems that renal tubular markers are the most sensitive and significant indicators of early health effects of cadmium intoxication in the general population. The correlation of urinary cadmium concentration with markers of kidney dysfunction was observed in the absence of significant correlations with bone effects. Our findings did not indicate any effects of environmental cadmium exposure on bone density.

  7. Bone Mineral Status in Children and Adolescents with Klinefelter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Stagi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Klinefelter syndrome (KS has long-term consequences on bone health. However, studies regarding bone status and metabolism during childhood and adolescence are very rare. Patients. This cross-sectional study involved 40 (mean age: 13.7±3.8 years KS children and adolescents and 80 age-matched healthy subjects. For both patient and control groups, we evaluated serum levels of ionised and total calcium, phosphate, total testosterone, luteinising hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, parathyroid hormone (PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, and urinary deoxypyridinoline concentrations. We also calculated the z-scores of the phalangeal amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS and the bone transmission time (BTT. Results. KS children and adolescents showed significantly reduced AD-SoS (p<0.005 and BTT (p<0.0005 z-scores compared to the controls. However, KS patients presented significantly higher PTH (p<0.0001 and significantly lower 25(OHD (p<0.0001, osteocalcin (p<0.05, and bone alkaline phosphatase levels (p<0.005. Interestingly, these metabolic bone disorders were already present in the prepubertal subjects. Conclusions. KS children and adolescents exhibited impaired bone mineral status and metabolism with higher PTH levels and a significant reduction of 25-OH-D and bone formation markers. Interestingly, this impairment was already evident in prepubertal KS patients. Follow-ups should be scheduled with KS patients to investigate and ameliorate bone mineral status and metabolism until the prepubertal ages.

  8. Bone Regeneration Using Bone Morphogenetic Proteins and Various Biomaterial Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma and disease frequently result in fractures or critical sized bone defects and their management at times necessitates bone grafting. The process of bone healing or regeneration involves intricate network of molecules including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs. BMPs belong to a larger superfamily of proteins and are very promising and intensively studied for in the enhancement of bone healing. More than 20 types of BMPs have been identified but only a subset of BMPs can induce de novo bone formation. Many research groups have shown that BMPs can induce differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and stem cells into osteogenic cells which are capable of producing bone. This review introduces BMPs and discusses current advances in preclinical and clinical application of utilizing various biomaterial carriers for local delivery of BMPs to enhance bone regeneration.

  9. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...

  10. Radiotherapy for bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between December 1986 and January 1978, 68 patients with bone metastases were analyzed to evaluate the effect of radiation for the relief of pain. The 68 patients, who had a total of 97 lesions, complained of pain caused by their bone metastasis. The good, fair, and poor responses were found to be 18%, 60%, and 22%, respectively. With reference to the primary neoplasms, the effective response rate was 73% in lung cancer, 100% in breast cancer, 75% in gastric cancer, 100% in hepatic cancer, 100% in bladder cancer, 25% in epipharyngeal cancer, and 70% in the other neoplasms. Depending on the cell types of the lung cancer, the effective response rate was 80% for small cell carcinomas, 72% for adenocarcinomas and 40% for squamous cell carcinomas. Our results suggest that radiotherapy for bone metastases is to be recommended, since the effective response rate was 78% for the relief of pain. (author)

  11. Biochemical markers of bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover has received increasing attention over the past few years, because of the need for sensitivity and specific tool in the clinical investigation of osteoporosis. Bone markers should be unique to bone, reflect changes of bone less, and should be correlated with radiocalcium kinetics, histomorphometry, or changes in bone mass. The markers also should be useful in monitoring treatment efficacy. Although no bone marker has been established to meet all these criteria, currently osteocalcin and pyridinium crosslinks are the most efficient markers to assess the level of bone turnover in the menopausal and senile osteoporosis. Recently, N-terminal telopeptide (NTX), C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone specific alkaline phosphatase are considered as new valid markers of bone turnover. Recent data suggest that CTX and free deoxypyridinoline could predict the subsequent risk of hip fracture of elderly women. Treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen, calcitonin and bisphosphonates demonstrated rapid decrease of the levels of bone markers that correlated with the long-term increase of bone mass. Factors such as circadian rhythms, diet, age, sex, bone mass and renal function affect the results of biochemical markers and should be appropriately adjusted whenever possible. Each biochemical markers of bone turnover may have its own specific advantages and limitations. Recent advances in research will provide more sensitive and specific assays

  12. Multiscale imaging of bone microdamage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poundarik, Atharva A; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-04-01

    Bone is a structural and hierarchical composite that exhibits remarkable ability to sustain complex mechanical loading and resist fracture. Bone quality encompasses various attributes of bone matrix from the quality of its material components (type-I collagen, mineral and non-collagenous matrix proteins) and cancellous microarchitecture, to the nature and extent of bone microdamage. Microdamage, produced during loading, manifests in multiple forms across the scales of hierarchy in bone and functions to dissipate energy and avert fracture. Microdamage formation is a key determinant of bone quality, and through a range of biological and physical mechanisms, accumulates with age and disease. Accumulated microdamage in bone decreases bone strength and increases bone's propensity to fracture. Thus, a thorough assessment of microdamage, across the hierarchical levels of bone, is crucial to better understand bone quality and bone fracture. This review article details multiple imaging modalities that have been used to study and characterize microdamage; from bulk staining techniques originally developed by Harold Frost to assess linear microcracks, to atomic force microscopy, a modality that revealed mechanistic insights into the formation diffuse damage at the ultrastructural level in bone. New automated techniques using imaging modalities, such as microcomputed tomography are also presented for a comprehensive overview. PMID:25664772

  13. Bone Targeted Therapies for Bone Metastasis in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wajeeha Razaq

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis to the bone develops commonly in patients with various malignancies, and is a major cause of morbidity and diminished quality of life in many affected patients. Emerging treatments for metastatic bone disease have arisen from advances in our understanding of the unique cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the bone metastasis. The tendency of cancer cells to metastasize to bone is probably the end result of many factors including vascular pathways, the highly ...

  14. Bone formation following implantation of bone biomaterials into extraction sites

    OpenAIRE

    Molly, Liene; Vandromme, Heleen; Quirynen, Marc; Schepers, Evert; Adams, Jessica L; van Steenberghe, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background: Adequate bone volume is imperative for the osseointegration of endosseous implants, but post-extraction resorption and remodeling may challenge implant placement. The use of bone biomaterials has been advocated to fill extraction sites and to enhance primary implant stability during osseointegration. The objective of the case series was to evaluate bone formation histologically and biomechanically in extraction sites following implantation of three commercially available bone biom...

  15. Bone Marrow Transplantation in Hindlimb Muscles of Motoneuron Degenerative Mice Reduces Neuronal Death and Improves Motor Function

    OpenAIRE

    Pastor, Diego; Viso-León, Mari Carmen; Botella-López, Arancha; Jaramillo-Merchan, Jesus; Moraleda, Jose M.; Jones, Jonathan; Martínez, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow has proved to be an adequate source of stem cells for the treatment of numerous disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Bone marrow can be easily and relatively painlessly extracted from a patient or allogenic donor and then transplanted into the degenerative area. Here, the grafted cells will activate a number of mechanisms in order to protect, repair, and/or regenerate the damaged tissue. These properties make the bone marrow a feasible source for cell therapy. In this ...

  16. Rosai-Dorfman Disease with Epidural and Spinal Bone Marrow Involvement: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oner, A.Y.; Akpek, S.; Tali, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Gazi Univ. School of Medicine. Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), or Rosai-Dorfman disease, is a rare histiocytic disorder that typically presents with chronic, self-limiting cervical lymphadenopathy. Although this disease mainly affects histiocytes, there are a few reports of bone marrow infiltration. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a promising technology in differentiating between various bone marrow pathologies. We here present conventional magnetic resonance imaging and DWI features of a patient with SHML and bone marrow involvement.

  17. Sleep Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian sleep has evolved under the influence of the day-night cycle and in response to reproductive needs, food seeking, and predator avoidance, resulting in circadian (predictive) and homeostatic (reactive) regulation. A molecular clock characterized by transcription/translation feedback loops...... mediates circadian regulation of sleep. Misalignment with the rhythm of the sun results in circadian disorders and jet lag. The molecular basis of homeostatic sleep regulation is mostly unknown. A network of mutually inhibitory brain nuclei regulates sleep states and sleep-wake transitions. Abnormalities...... in these networks create sleep disorders, including rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, sleep walking, and narcolepsy. Physiological changes associated with sleep can be imbalanced, resulting in excess movements such as periodic leg movements during sleep or abnormal breathing in obstructive...

  18. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  19. The bone scan in tarsal coalition: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lima, R.T. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA (United States); Mishkin, F.S. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tarsal coalition is abnormal fusion of two or more tarsal bones. The union may be fibrous, cartilaginous, or osseous and can be congenital or acquired in response to infection, articular disorders, trauma, or surgery. We report a case of fibrous talocalcaneal coalition in a 15-year-old boy in whom bone scintigraphy employing pinhole lateral views confirmed the clinical diagnosis when plain radiographs showed minimal changes and computed tomography was equivocal. The diagnosis of symptomatic tarsal coalition is important in that it is a common remediable cause of peroneal spastic flat foot, a frequently encountered condition. Scintigraphy provides important information about the presence and localization of this condition. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  20. The bone scan in tarsal coalition: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarsal coalition is abnormal fusion of two or more tarsal bones. The union may be fibrous, cartilaginous, or osseous and can be congenital or acquired in response to infection, articular disorders, trauma, or surgery. We report a case of fibrous talocalcaneal coalition in a 15-year-old boy in whom bone scintigraphy employing pinhole lateral views confirmed the clinical diagnosis when plain radiographs showed minimal changes and computed tomography was equivocal. The diagnosis of symptomatic tarsal coalition is important in that it is a common remediable cause of peroneal spastic flat foot, a frequently encountered condition. Scintigraphy provides important information about the presence and localization of this condition. (orig.). With 3 figs

  1. Archival bone marrow samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Najmi, Laeya A; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata;

    2015-01-01

    AB Archival samples represent a significant potential for genetic studies, particularly in severe diseases with risk of lethal outcome, such as in cancer. In this pilot study, we aimed to evaluate the usability of archival bone marrow smears and biopsies for DNA extraction and purification, whole...... with samples stored for 4 to 10 years. Acceptable call rates for SNPs were detected for 7 of 42 archival samples. In conclusion, archival bone marrow samples are suitable for DNA extraction and multiple marker analysis, but WGA was less successful, especially when longer fragments were analyzed. Multiple SNP...

  2. FRACTURE NASAL BONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thaigarajan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nose is the most prominent part of the face, hence it is likely to be the most common structure to be injured in the face. Although fractures involving the nasal bones are very common, it is often ignored by the patient. Patients with fractures of nasal bone will have deformity, tenderness, haemorrhage, edema, ecchymosis, instability, and crepitation. These features may be present in varying combinations. This article discusses the pathophysiology of these fractures, role of radiography and ultrasound in their diagnosis and their management.

  3. [Cytogenetics of bone sarcomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagner-Capodano, A M; Poitout, D

    There has been much progress in the cytogenesis, and molecular biology of bone tumours such as Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcomas, greatly improving diagnostic possibilities and prognosis. Ewing's sarcoma is an indifferentiated sarcoma with round cells which usually occurs in children or adolescents. Ewing's sarcoma corresponds to 6% of all bone tumours. Histologically Ewing's sarcoma belongs to a group of small round cell tumours including neuroblastoma, embryon and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Differential diagnosis is difficult. Cytogenetic examinations can now differentiate Ewing's sarcoma from other small round cell tumours. There is a specific 11:12 translocation (q24; q12) which can be used as a marker. PMID:8785922

  4. Evaluation of cell binding peptide (p15) with silk fibre enhanced hydroxyappatite bone substitute for posterolateral spinal fusion in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.; Jespersen, Stig; Overgaard, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal fusion is indicated in the surgical management of various spinal disorders. To ensure stabile fusion, bone graft materials are essential. Traditionally allo- or autograft has been used, but both are associated with limitations. Synthetic bone graft materials that reassemble tod...

  5. Computerized geometric features of carpal bone for bone age estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-Wen Hsieh; Tai-Lang Jong; Yi-Hong Chou; Chui-Mei Tiu

    2007-01-01

    Background Bone age development is one of the significant indicators depicting the growth status of children.However, bone age assessment is an heuristic and tedious work for pediatricians. We developed a computerized bone age estimation system based on the analysis of geometric features of carpal bones.Methods The geometric features of carpals were extracted and analyzed to judge the bone age of children by computerized shape and area description. Four classifiers, linear, nearest neighbor, back-propagation neural network,and radial basis function neural network, were adopted to categorize bone age. Principal component and discriminate analyses were employed to improve assorting accuracy.Results The hand X-ray films of 465 boys and 444 girls served as our database. The features were extracted from carpal bone images, including shape, area, and sequence. The proposed normalization area ratio method was effective in bone age classification by simulation. Besides, features statistics showed similar results between the standard of the Greulich and Pyle atlas and our database.Conclusions The bone area has a higher discriminating power to judge bone age. The ossification sequence of trapezium and trapezoid bones between Taiwanese and the atlas of the GP method is quite different. These results also indicate that carpal bone assessment with classification of neural networks can be correct and practical.

  6. Bone lesions in early syphilis detected by bone scintigraphy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, K.; Hvid-Jacobsen, K; Lindewald, H; Sørensen, P S; Weismann, K

    1984-01-01

    We report a case of early syphilis with multiple bone lesions which all resolved after treatment with penicillin. We discuss why bone lesions may be more prevalent than generally believed and why 99m-Tc-MDP-bone scintigraphy is more sensitive than radiography in detecting syphilitic periostitis.

  7. Murine Hind Limb Long Bone Dissection and Bone Marrow Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Sarah R; Valkenburg, Kenneth C; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the bone and the bone marrow is critical in many research fields including basic bone biology, immunology, hematology, cancer metastasis, biomechanics, and stem cell biology. Despite the importance of the bone in healthy and pathologic states, however, it is a largely under-researched organ due to lack of specialized knowledge of bone dissection and bone marrow isolation. Mice are a common model organism to study effects on bone and bone marrow, necessitating a standardized and efficient method for long bone dissection and bone marrow isolation for processing of large experimental cohorts. We describe a straightforward dissection procedure for the removal of the femur and tibia that is suitable for downstream applications, including but not limited to histomorphologic analysis and strength testing. In addition, we outline a rapid procedure for isolation of bone marrow from the long bones via centrifugation with limited handling time, ideal for cell sorting, primary cell culture, or DNA, RNA, and protein extraction. The protocol is streamlined for rapid processing of samples to limit experimental error, and is standardized to minimize user-to-user variability. PMID:27168390

  8. Expanding the Description of Spaceflight Effects beyond Bone Mineral Density [BMD]: Trabecular Bone Score [TBS] in ISS Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, J. D.; Spector, E. R.; King, L. J.; Evans, H. J.; Smith, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    mission, DXA BMD and TBS are detecting different effects of ARED exercise and of ARED + Bisphosphonate on the lumbar spine of astronauts. There is emerging evidence associating reduced TBS with terrestrial metabolic bone disorders where a TBS 1.350 is associated with "normal." However, it is not possible to conclude how the spaceflight-induced changes in TBS increase risk for vertebral fractures in the astronaut or if changes in body composition of the trunk region could be an indirect method of assessing exercise effect on bone microarchitecture. More importantly, this pilot analysis demonstrates a new, minimal risk approach for monitoring changes to vertebral bone microarchitecture. This method could help assess the combined skeletal effects of spaceflight with the effects of aging in the astronaut after return to Earth.

  9. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download PDFs ... helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  10. Bones of Contention: Bone Mineral Density Recovery in Celiac Disease—A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Grace-Farfaglia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic bone disease is a frequent co-morbidity in newly diagnosed adults with celiac disease (CD, an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of dietary gluten. This systematic review of studies looked at the efficacy of the gluten-free diet, physical activity, nutrient supplementation, and bisphosphonates for low bone density treatment. Case control and cohort designs were identified from PubMed and other academic databases (from 1996 to 2015 that observed newly diagnosed adults with CD for at least one year after diet treatment using the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA scan. Only 20 out of 207 studies met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was assessed using the Strengthening of the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE statement checklist. Gluten-free diet adherence resulted in partial recovery of bone density by one year in all studies, and full recovery by the fifth year. No treatment differences were observed between the gluten-free diet alone and diet plus bisphosphonates in one study. For malnourished patients, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium resulted in significant improvement. Evidence for the impact of physical activity on bone density was limited. Therapeutic strategies aimed at modifying lifestyle factors throughout the lifespan should be studied.

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... around or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no ... might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist ...

  12. Uranium concentrations in human bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural uranium content in the bone of one person has been determined by a new method. The results were obtained by quantitative analysis of fission track autoradiographs of bone from a person injected witn 239Pu

  13. Limb Salvage After Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blog Donate Now Select Page Limb Salvage After Bone Cancer Home > Understanding Children’s Cancer > Late Effects of Treatment > Limb Salvage After Bone Cancer Limb salvage is a surgical procedure that replaces ...

  14. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transmitted very efficiently through the head using bone conduction. The Baha device uses sound vibrations, and those ... changed from a normal soundwave into a bone conduction vibration, and that is what is passed then ...

  15. Vitamin A and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Nutrition Vitamin A and Bone Health Publication available in: PDF ( ... Find More Information? For Your Information What Is Vitamin A? Vitamin A is a family of compounds ...

  16. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Baha system consists of a bone-anchored titanium fixture that is implanted in the mastoid bone, ... the -- great. I'm going to grab the titanium implant. And what I want you to notice ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little to ... fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... little information about muscles, tendons or joints. An MRI may be more useful in identifying bone and ... bones and the spinal cord can be evaluated). MRI can also detect subtle or occult fractures or ...

  19. Bone-marrow transplant - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100112.htm Bone-marrow transplant - series To use the sharing features on ... slide 4 out of 4 Normal anatomy Overview Bone-marrow is a soft, fatty tissue found inside of ...

  20. Bone metabolism in anorexia nervosa: molecular pathways and current treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howgate, D J; Graham, S M; Leonidou, A; Korres, N; Tsiridis, E; Tsapakis, E

    2013-02-01

    Eating disorders are associated with a multitude of metabolic abnormalities which are known to adversely affect bone metabolism and structure. We aimed to comprehensively review the literature on the effects of eating disorders, particularly anorexia nervosa (AN), on bone metabolism, bone mineral density (BMD), and fracture incidence. Furthermore, we aimed to highlight the risk factors and potential management strategies for patients with eating disorders and low BMD. We searched the MEDLINE/OVID (1950-July 2011) and EMBASE (1980-July 2011) databases, focussing on in vitro and in vivo studies of the effects of eating disorders on bone metabolism, bone mineral density, and fracture incidence. Low levels of estrogen, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and leptin, and high levels of cortisol, ghrelin, and peptide YY (PYY) are thought to contribute to the 'uncoupling' of bone turnover in patients with active AN, leading to increased bone resorption in comparison to bone formation. Over time, this results in a high prevalence and profound degree of site-specific BMD loss in women with AN, thereby increasing fracture risk. Weight recovery and increasing BMI positively correlate with levels of IGF-1 and leptin, normalisation in the levels of cortisol, as well as markers of bone formation and resorption in both adolescent and adult patients with AN. The only treatments which have shown promise in reversing the BMD loss associated with AN include: physiologic dose transdermal and oral estrogen, recombinant human IGF-1 alone or in combination with the oral contraceptive pill, and bisphosphonate therapy. PMID:22875459

  1. Cancellous structure of tarsal bones.

    OpenAIRE

    D N Sinha

    1985-01-01

    The internal structure of the tarsal bones has been studied to investigate their cancellous architecture. It is revealed that these bones have fine and coarse meshworks and even a tendency for obliteration of the trabecular pattern in the bones lying distal to this midtarsal joint. Internal structure of the talus does not show an arched pattern of bony lamellae. An increased density of bony lamellae in the internal structure of the navicular bone could result from excessive stress, enforced b...

  2. Bone microdamage and cell apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Noble B.

    2003-01-01

    Accumulation of microdamage in bone leads to the reduced strength of our skeleton. In health, bone adapts to the prevailing mechanical needs of the organism and is also capable of self-repair, sensing, removing and replacing damaged or mechanically insufficient volumes of bone. In disease and old age these characteristics are reduced. In order to undertake both of the processes of functional adaptation and repair the bone resorbing and forming cells must be very accurately targeted to areas o...

  3. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Bone Remodeling*

    OpenAIRE

    Raggatt, Liza J; Partridge, Nicola C

    2010-01-01

    Physiological bone remodeling is a highly coordinated process responsible for bone resorption and formation and is necessary to repair damaged bone and to maintain mineral homeostasis. In addition to the traditional bone cells (osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes) that are necessary for bone remodeling, several immune cells have also been implicated in bone disease. This minireview discusses physiological bone remodeling, outlining the traditional bone biology dogma in light of emerging ...

  4. An improved method for isolation of RNA from bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Lauren E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone physiology is increasingly appreciated as an important contributor to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. However, progress in understanding the role of bone in determining metabolic health is hampered by the well-described difficulty of obtaining high quality RNA from bone for gene expression analysis using the currently available approaches. Results We developed a simple approach to isolate bone RNA that combines pulverizing the bone and the phenol-guanidinium based RNA extraction in a single step while maintaining near-freezing temperatures. This single step method increases the yield of high quality RNA by eight-fold, with RNA integrity numbers ranging from 6.7 to 9.2. Conclusions Our streamlined approach substantially increases the yield of high-quality RNA from bone tissue while facilitating safe and efficient processing of multiple samples using readily available platforms. The RNA obtained from this method is suitable for use in gene expression analysis in real-time quantitative PCR, microarray, and next generation sequencing applications.

  5. Dehydroepiandrosterone treatment effects on weight, bone density, bone metabolism and mood in women suffering from anorexia nervosa-a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Miki; Ish-Shalom, Sophia; Greenman, Yona; Klein, Ehud; Latzer, Yael

    2012-12-30

    We investigated the effects of the administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on weight, bone metabolism, bone density and clinical mood symptoms in outpatient Anorexia Nervosa (AN) patients. AN patients (n=26) were double-blindly randomized to receive DHEA (100mg) or placebo for 6 months. Outcome measures were bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and metabolism indexes, steroid hormones, and mood and eating disorder symptoms measured at baseline and at the 3 and 6 months follow-up visits. Mood and eating disorder symptoms were assessed monthly by the Beck Depression Inventory, Eating Disorder Inventory and Clinical Global Improvement Scales. No treatment or treatment by time interaction was observed for any bone density measures. Deoxypiridinolyne (DPD) was positively correlated with weight (P=0.02). An increase in body mass index (BMI) in the DHEA group was significantly higher at 4 months compared to the control group (P=0.05). Improvement of mood was significantly correlated with weight only in the DHEA group. Despite a significant decrease in DPD, no improvement in bone mineral density was detected. However, patients treated with DHEA benefited from a significant increase in BMI, which was positively correlated with improvement in mood. PMID:22858403

  6. Penis Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Problems with the penis can cause pain and affect a man's sexual function and fertility. Penis disorders include Erectile dysfunction - inability to get or ... not go away Peyronie's disease - bending of the penis during an erection due to a hard lump ...

  7. Amnestic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Savage, G.

    2015-01-01

    Amnestic disorders may involve deficits in the encoding or storage of information in memory, or in retrieval of information from memory. Etiologies vary and include traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative disease, and psychiatric illness. Different forms of amnesia can be distinguished: anterograd

  8. Tailbone Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumors. You rarely break your tailbone. Instead, most injuries cause bruises or pulled ligaments. A backward fall onto a hard surface, such as slipping on ice, is the most common cause of such injuries. Symptoms of various tailbone disorders include pain in ...

  9. Eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontić Olga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders are considered chronic diseases of civilization. The most studied and well known are anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Anorexia is considered one of the most common psychiatric problems of girls in puberty and adolescence. Due to high mortality and morbidity as well as the increasing expansion of these diseases, it is clear why the amount of research on these diseases is growing worldwide. Eating disorders lead to numerous medical complications, mostly due to late diagnosis. The main characteristic of these diseases is changed behavior in the nutrition, either as an intentional restriction of food, i.e. extreme dieting, or overeating, i.e. binge eating. Extreme dieting, skipping meals, self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, and misuse of laxatives and diuretics for the purpose of maintaining or reducing body weight are characteristic forms of compensatory behavior of patients with eating disorder. The most appropriate course of treatment is determined by evaluating the patient’s health condition, associated with behavior and eating habits, the experience of one’s own body, character traits of personality, and consequently the development and functioning of the individual. The final treatment plan is individual. Eating disorders are a growing medical problem even in this part of the world. Prevention should be planned in cooperation with different sectors so as to stop the epidemic of these diseases.

  10. Movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the measurement of brain-tissue functions in patients with movement disorders using positron emission tomography (PET). This scanning technique is a method for direct in vivo quantitation of the regional tissue content of positron emitting radionuclides in brain (or other organs) in an essentially non-invasive way. Ch. 2 outlines some general features of PET and describes the scanner which has been used for the studies in this thesis. Also the tracer methodology, as applied to data investigations of movement disorders, are discussed. Ch. 3 contains the results of the PET investigations which were performed in the study of movement disorders. The results are presented in the form of 12 papers. The main goals of these studies were the understanding of the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, Huntington's chorea, Steele-Richardson-Olzewski syndrome and special case reports. Ch. 4 summarizes the results of these publications and Ch. 5 concludes the main part of this thesis with a general discussion of movement disorders in relation to PET investigations. 697 refs.; 60 figs.; 31 tabs

  11. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... concern about your shape or weight. Types of eating disorders include Anorexia nervosa, in which you become too thin, but you don't eat enough because you think you are fat Bulimia nervosa, which involves periods of overeating followed by ...

  12. Eating disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of eating disorders is increasing, and health care professionals are faced with the difficult task of treating these refractory conditions. The first clinical description of anorexia nervosa (AN) was reported in 1694 and included symptoms such as decreased appetite, amenorrhea, food av...

  13. Somatoform Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or a headache may mean a brain tumor. Body dysmorphic disorder occurs when a person becomes obsessed with a flaw in his or her physical appearance that is either a minor flaw or a flaw ... be any part of the body. Wrinkles, hair loss, weight gain, and size and ...

  14. Eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontić, Olga; Vasiljević, Nadja; Trisović, Marija; Jorga, Jagoda; Lakić, Aneta; Gasić, Miroslava Jasović

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are considered chronic diseases of civilization. The most studied and well known are anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Anorexia is considered one of the most common psychiatric problems of girls in puberty and adolescence. Due to high mortality and morbidity as well as the increasing expansion of these diseases, it is clear why the amount of research on these diseases is growing worldwide. Eating disorders lead to numerous medical complications, mostly due to late diagnosis. The main characteristic of these diseases is changed behavior in the nutrition, either as an intentional restriction of food, i.e. extreme dieting, or overeating, i.e. binge eating. Extreme dieting, skipping meals, self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, and misuse of laxatives and diuretics for the purpose of maintaining or reducing body weight are characteristic forms of compensatory behavior of patients with eating disorder. The most appropriate course of treatment is determined by evaluating the patient's health condition, associated with behavior and eating habits, the experience of one's own body, character traits of personality, and consequently the development and functioning of the individual. The final treatment plan is individual. Eating disorders are a growing medical problem even in this part of the world. Prevention should be planned in cooperation with different sectors so as to stop the epidemic of these diseases. PMID:23289290

  15. Study on the relationship between bone metabolism indexes and osteoporosis in aged males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics and significance of the changes of bone metabolism indexes related to the occurrence of osteoporosis in aged males. Methods: Serum interleukin 1β(IL-1β), insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), parathyroid hormone (PTH-M) and 25-OH-D were measured by radio-immunoassay in 58 aged males with osteoporosis and 37 cases with bone mass loss. Bone density was measured in these subjects and all the indexes were compared with those in young and middle-aged and aged healthy controls. Results: IL-1β and PTH-M levels in aged males with osteoporosis or bone mass loss were higher than those in healthy controls (P < 0.01), while IGF-II and 25-OH-D were lower than in normal controls, especially in osteoporosis group (P < 0.01). With the age increasing and the deterioration of the disorder, bone density in the two groups of patients were significantly lower than those in young and middle-aged controls (P < 0.01). Aged males with osteoporosis had a significantly lower bone density than patients with bone mass loss. Conclusion: Cytokines and disturbance of bone metabolism indexes are the main factors that lead to osteoporosis characterized by more bone absorption and less bone formation in aged males

  16. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  18. Playing with bone and fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Zvonic, Sanjin; Floyd, Z. Elisabeth;

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between bone and fat formation within the bone marrow microenvironment is complex and remains an area of active investigation. Classical in vitro and in vivo studies strongly support an inverse relationship between the commitment of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or...

  19. Chondrosarcoma of the hyoid bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demeyere, A.; Somer, F. de; Perdieus, D.; Lemmens, L.; Schillebeeckx, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Imeldaziekenhuis Bonheiden (Belgium); Hauwe, L. van den [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Antwerp (Belgium)

    2000-02-01

    The CT and MRI findings in a case of chondrosarcoma of the hyoid bone are reported. Although chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary malignant bone tumor, only 10 % of chondrosarcomas occur in the head and neck region. The hyoid bone is a rare site of involvement with only seven cases reported previously. (orig.)

  20. Bone metastases: When and how lung cancer interacts with bone

    OpenAIRE

    Roato, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a common and debilitating consequence of lung cancer: 30%-40% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer develop bone metastases during the course of their disease. Lung cancer cells find a favorable soil in the bone microenvironment due to factors released by the bone matrix, the immune system cells, and the same cancer cells. Many aspects of the cross-talk among lung tumor cells, the immune system, and bone cells are not clear, but this review aims to summarize the recen...

  1. [Musculoskeletal rehabilitation and bone. Abnormal bone metabolism in female elite athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enatsu, Akiko

    2010-04-01

    Recently, female athletes are particularly well, the other hand, many athletes suffer from amenorrhea due to excessive training. Especially, in sports with weight restrictions, they suffer from "Female athlete triad" , eating disorders, amenorrhea and osteoporosis. Amenorrhea is nothing else than a lack of estrogen, action on bone resorption and promote bone formation, by neglect this, it lead to osteoporosis and a stress fracture, and they would often give up their career as elite athletes. So we should consider it as serious sports injury. The problems of amenorrhea is should be recognized as a deficiency of estrogen. A Case of amenorrhea in female athletes, it is necessary to consider the hormone replacement therapy based on the appropriate diagnosis. However, it is important to start the management of body fat and body weight and strength of exercises since adolescent for the prevention the amenorrhea. PMID:20354328

  2. Craniocervical bone pneumatisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of extensive craniocervical bone pneumatisation presenting after minor trauma. The patient had neurological signs and initial radiographs showed multiple lucencies in the skull base and the atlas vertebra. CT established the true nature of this rare condition. (orig.). With 3 figs

  3. Sodium and bone health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teucher, B.; Dainty, J. R.; Spinks, C. A.;

    2008-01-01

    High salt intake is a well-recognized risk factor for osteoporosis because it induces calciuria, but the effects of salt on calcium metabolism and the potential impact on bone health in postmenopausal women have not been fully characterized. This study investigated adaptive mechanisms in response...

  4. Metastatic Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... concern for patients with MBD is the general loss in quality of life. How much of an effect MBD has on ... to be most effective in maintaining quality of life. A technetium bone scan ... blood count, because loss of red blood cells (anemia) is a frequent ...

  5. Healthy Bones Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... think that this is something that only older people need to worry about. BUT—you can take action right now to help make sure that as you get older your bones are as healthy as they can be. Eating a balanced diet ...

  6. Bone Marrow Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Mark; Maklad, Rania; Heaney, Emma

    2014-01-01

    As a final-year student teacher specialising in primary science, Emma Heaney faced the challenge of having to plan, organise, and conduct a small-scale, classroom-based research project. She had to teach about bones in the final block practice session and thought it would be a good idea to bring in some biological specimens obtained from the local…

  7. Are Bones Alive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravita, Silvia; Falchetti, Elisabetta

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the classification of living things. Our study deals with a different problem: the attribution of life to one component of a living organism, specifically the bones. The task involves not only specifying what we mean by "alive", but also requires "informed thinking" leading to an understanding of the concept of life…

  8. Food and Your Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Store Shopping Cart Home › Patients › Treatment › Nutrition Nutrition Food For Thought Quiz True or false: Prunes contain ... health. True False View Answers Loading ... Sponsored by: Food and Your Bones – Osteoporosis Nutrition Guidelines The food ...

  9. Bone island and leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To determine the incidence of bone islands in leprosy patients. Design. X-rays of feet and hands of patients with Hansen's disease (leprosy) were reviewed retrospectively. A second group of related age- and sex-matched patients who did not have Hansen's disease was used for control purposes. Controls had undergone hand or foot X-rays during diagnosis of other pathologies. The patients with Hansen's disease were compared with the control group, and were also analyzed as subgroups with different types of leprosy. The results were subjected to statistical analysis. Patients. Ninety patients with Hansen's disease were randomly selected for this study. Patients who had had ulcers on hands or feet were excluded from the study. Results and conclusions. Bone islands were demonstrated in 20 patients with Hansen's disease; no bone islands were observed in the controls. This was statistically significant (P<0.01). Bone islands were only seen in patients with lepromatous leprosy and borderline types but were not demonstrated in patients with tuberculoid leprosy. There was also a statistically significant relationship for a disease duration of 15 years or more. The cause of this raised incidence of enostosis in leprosy patients is not clear, but there may be a genetic predisposition in patients with leprosy, or it may be a side effect of leprosy, especially the lepromatous form. (orig.)

  10. Bone scintigraphy in psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, K.; Thiers, G.; Eissner, D.; Holzmann, H.

    1980-08-01

    Since 1973 bone scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-phosphate-complexes was carried out in 382 patients with psoriasis. For comparison with the results of nuclear medicine, roentgenologic and clinical findings a group af 121 patients with psoriasis aged between 11 and 74 years was compared to a group of 42 patients aged between 20 and 49 years without roentgenologic and clinical signs of psoriasis arthritis. We found by means of isotope investigation that an essentially greater part of the bones adjacent to the joints was involved than was expected according to X-ray and clinical findings. In addition, in 205 patients with psoriasis whole-body scintigraphy, using sup(99m)Tc-MDP, was carried out since 1977/78. In 17 patients we found an increased accumulation of activity in the region of extraarticular structures of the skull as well as of the skeletal thorax. According to these results we conclude that in addition to the clinically and roentgenologically defined psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis an osteopathy may exist, which can only be demonstrated by skeletal scintigraphy and which is localized in bones adjacent to the joints but can also be demonstrated in the region of extraarticular bones.

  11. Bone scintigraphy in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1973 bone scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-phosphate-complexes was carried out in 382 patients with psoriasis. For comparison with the results of nuclear medicine, roentgenologic and clinical findings a group af 121 patients with psoriasis aged between 11 and 74 years was compared to a group of 42 patients aged between 20 and 49 years without roentgenologic and clinical signs of psoriasis arthritis. We found by means of isotope investigation that an essentially greater part of the bones adjacent to the joints was involved than was expected according to X-ray and clinical findings. In addition, in 205 patients with psoriasis whole-body scintigraphy, using sup(99m)Tc-MDP, was carried out since 1977/78. In 17 patients we found an increased accumulation of activity in the region of extraarticular structures of the skull as well as of the skeletal thorax. According to these results we conclude that in addition to the clinically and roentgenologically defined psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis an osteopathy may exist, which can only be demonstrated by skeletal scintigraphy and which is localized in bones adjacent to the joints but can also be demonstrated in the region of extraarticular bones. (orig.)

  12. Objective assessment of phalangeal bone atrophy using nuclear medicine computer system in case of vibration disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the changes of phalangeal bone of those, suffering from peripheral circulatory disorder due to use of vibrating machines for a long time. And we examined the cause of changes, keeping the influence of vibrating machines, tools and circulatory disorder of fingers in mind. They were 45 in number, and all males. We measured the density of proximal part of middle phalangeal bones from both hands X-ray image using video image input function of nuclear medicine computer system (SCINTIPAC-2400, Shimazu). After we changed the counts of area unit and standardized through the agency of Alminium step wedge scale, we examined the state of atrophy of phalangeal bones among vibrating machines users. The density of middle phalangeal bones is, in general, lower on the right hand, and becomes lower, middle finger, ring finger, index finger, and little finger in order. And it becomes lower with age. The density in vibration disease group is generally lower than that in control group, but statistically, it is not significant. Moreover, the frequency of low bone density strikingly rise in case of recovery delay of skin temperature at all seasons, and frequent onset of Raynaud's phenomenon. The difference of bone density of each finger is attributable to the influence of load in human life. But major causes of the decrease of phalangeal bone density seem to be the excessive load on fingers by operating vibrating machines or by being engaged in heavy work for a long time, and seem to be poor nutrition of bones following spasmodic circulatory disorder. Moreover, it is considerably embarrassing to examine the state of phalangeal bone density by means of MCI method or MD method. So, it is useful to measure small, distorted and localized bone density using nuclear medicine computer system. And it will be more worthy to use for diagnosing diseases and for judging the effect of treatment. (author)

  13. Effects of Resveratrol Supplementation on Bone Growth in Young Rats and Microarchitecture and Remodeling in Ageing Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M. C. Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a highly prevalent skeletal disorder in the elderly that causes serious bone fractures. Peak bone mass achieved at adolescence has been shown to predict bone mass and osteoporosis related risk fracture later in life. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol compound, may have the potential to promote bone formation and reduce bone resorption. However, it is unclear whether it can aid bone growth and bone mass accumulation during rapid growth and modulate bone metabolism during ageing. Using rat models, the current study investigated the potential effects of resveratrol supplementation during the rapid postnatal growth period and in late adulthood (early ageing on bone microarchitecture and metabolism. In the growth trial, 4-week-old male hooded Wistar rats on a normal chow diet were given resveratrol (2.5 mg/kg/day or vehicle control for 5 weeks. In the ageing trial, 6-month-old male hooded Wistar rats were treated with resveratrol (20 mg/kg/day or vehicle for 3 months. Treatment effects in the tibia were examined by μ-computer tomography (μ-CT analysis, bone histomorphometric measurements and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR gene expression analysis. Resveratrol treatment did not affect trabecular bone volume and bone remodeling indices in the youth animal model. Resveratrol supplementation in the early ageing rats tended to decrease trabecular bone volume, Sirt1 gene expression and increased expression of adipogenesis-related genes in bone, all of which were statistically insignificant. However, it decreased osteocalcin expression (p = 0.03. Furthermore, serum levels of bone resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides type I collagen (CTX-1 were significantly elevated in the resveratrol supplementation group (p = 0.02 with no changes observed in serum levels of bone formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP. These results in rat models suggest that resveratrol supplementation does not significantly affect bone

  14. Autism and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, James; Volkmar, Fred R

    2012-01-01

    The pervasive developmental disorders are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders that include autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder, pervasive developmental disorder - not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD), and Rett's disorder. All feature childhood onset with a constellation of symptoms spanning social interaction and communication and including atypical behavior patterns. The first three disorders (autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder, and PDD-NOS) are currently referred to as autism spectrum disorders, reflecting divergent phenotypic and etiological characteristics compared to Rett's disorder and CDD. This chapter reviews research and clinical information to appropriate medical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22608634

  15. Super bone scans on bone scintigraphy in patients with metastatic bone tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight patients with malignant tumor (3 with gastric cancer, 4 with prostatic cancer, 1 with transitional cell carcinoma), which showed diffusely increased uptake of 99mTc labelled phosphorous compound in axial skeleton (''Super Bone Scan'') on bone scintigraphy were clinically studied. No relationship with its histological type of the tumor was recognized. All cases revealed extremely high serum ALP concentration, which might reflect increased osteoblastic activity. Furthermore, on bone roentgenograms all cases showed predominantly osteosclerotic change in the metastatic bones, while some did locally osteolytic change. In three cases with gastric cancer, although they had diffuse skeletal metastases, two had no evidence of liver metastases. Thus, it seemed that clinical study of patients with ''Super Bone Scan'' was interesting to evaluate the mechanism of accumulation of 99mTc labelled phosphorous compound to bone and bone metabolism, and the pathophysiology in the pathway of bone metastases. (author)

  16. Synostosis Between Pubic Bones due to Neurogenic, Heterotopic Ossification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic, heterotopic ossification is characterised by the formation of new, extraosseous (ectopic bone in soft tissue in patients with neurological disorders. A 33-year-old female, who was born with spina bifida, paraplegia, and diastasis of symphysis pubis, had indwelling urethral catheter drainage and was using oxybutynin bladder instillations. She was prescribed diuretic for swelling of feet, which aggravated bypassing of catheter. Hence, suprapubic cystostomy was performed. Despite anticholinergic therapy, there was chronic urine leak around the suprapubic catheter and per urethra. Therefore, the urethra was mobilised and closed. After closure of the urethra, there was no urine leak from the urethra, but urine leak persisted around the suprapubic catheter. Cystogram confirmed the presence of a Foley balloon inside the bladder; there was no urinary fistula. The Foley balloon ruptured frequently, leading to extrusion of the Foley catheter. X-ray of abdomen showed heterotopic bone formation bridging the gap across diastasis of symphysis pubis. CT of pelvis revealed heterotopic bone lying in close proximity to the balloon of the Foley catheter; the sharp edge of heterotopic bone probably acted like a saw and led to frequent rupture of the balloon of the Foley catheter. Unique features of this case are: (1 temporal relationship of heterotopic bone formation to suprapubic cystostomy and chronic urine leak; (2 occurrence of heterotopic ossification in pubic region; (3 complications of heterotopic bone formation viz. frequent rupture of the balloon of the Foley catheter by the irregular margin of heterotopic bone and difficulty in insertion of suprapubic catheter because the heterotopic bone encroached on the suprapubic track; (4 synostosis between pubic bones as a result of heterotopic ossification..Common aetiological factors for neurogenic, heterotopic ossification, such as forceful manipulation, trauma, or spasticity, were absent in this

  17. Mechanical properties of femoral trabecular bone in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolte Ingo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studying mechanical properties of canine trabecular bone is important for a better understanding of fracture mechanics or bone disorders and is also needed for numerical simulation of canine femora. No detailed data about elastic moduli and degrees of anisotropy of canine femoral trabecular bone has been published so far, hence the purpose of this study was to measure the elastic modulus of trabecular bone in canine femoral heads by ultrasound testing and to assess whether assuming isotropy of the cancellous bone in femoral heads in dogs is a valid simplification. Methods From 8 euthanized dogs, both femora were obtained and cubic specimens were cut from the centre of the femoral head which were oriented along the main pressure and tension trajectories. The specimens were tested using a 100 MHz ultrasound transducer in all three orthogonal directions. The directional elastic moduli of trabecular bone tissue and degrees of anisotropy were calculated. Results The elastic modulus along principal bone trajectories was found to be 11.2 GPa ± 0.4, 10.5 ± 2.1 GPa and 10.5 ± 1.8 GPa, respectively. The mean density of the specimens was 1.40 ± 0.09 g/cm3. The degrees of anisotropy revealed a significant inverse relationship with specimen densities. No significant differences were found between the elastic moduli in x, y and z directions, suggesting an effective isotropy of trabecular bone tissue in canine femoral heads. Discussion This study presents detailed data about elastic moduli of trabecular bone tissue obtained from canine femoral heads. Limitations of the study are the relatively small number of animals investigated and the measurement of whole specimen densities instead of trabecular bone densities which might lead to an underestimation of Young's moduli. Publications on elastic moduli of trabecular bone tissue present results that are similar to our data. Conclusion This study provides data about directional elastic

  18. Combined bone grafting: an alternative method for bone healing stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most provocative problem in bone grafting is the effectiveness of healing of the graft. When you use the heterogenous bone graft, it may take one or more than two years for consolidation and union depends on the graft quality and the situation of surrounding blood supply. In our preliminary report seven cases of freeze-dried heterogenous bone graft from the Bangkok Biomaterial Center were mixed with autogenous iliac bone graft from the patient in the ratio of 3:1. After that the healing was checked by clinical examination and X-ray in the periodic follow up. The causes of bone lost are post evacuation of benign bone tumor and post infection of bone after trauma. The result of bony union could be tested by clinical examination and showed in the X-ray films as early as 3 months post grafting

  19. Bone Positron Emission Tomography with or without CT Is More Accurate than Bone Scan for Detection of Bone Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Soo Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2013-01-01

    Objective Na18F bone positron emission tomography (bone PET) is a new imaging modality which is useful for the evaluation of bone diseases. Here, we compared the diagnostic accuracies between bone PET and bone scan for the detection of bone metastasis (BM). Materials and Methods Sixteen cancer patients (M:F = 10:6, mean age = 60 ± 12 years) who underwent both bone PET and bone scan were analyzed. Bone PET was conducted 30 minutes after the injection of 370 MBq Na18F, and a bone scan was perfo...

  20. Nonlinear pattern formation in bone growth and architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil eSalmon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3D morphology of bone arises through adaptation to its required engineering performance. Genetically and adaptively bone travels along a complex spatio-temporal trajectory to acquire optimal architecture. On a cellular, micro-anatomical scale, what mechanisms coordinate the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts to produce complex and efficient bone architectures? One mechanism is examined here – chaotic nonlinear pattern formation (NPF – which underlies in a unifying way natural structures as disparate as trabecular bone, swarms of birds flying, island formation, fluid turbulence and others. At the heart of NPF is the fact that simple rules operating between interacting elements, and Turing-like interaction between global and local signals, lead to complex and structured patterns. The study of group intelligence exhibited by swarming birds or shoaling fish has led to an embodiment of NPF called particle swarm optimization (PSO. This theoretical model could be applicable to the behavior of osteoblasts osteoclasts and osteocytes, seeing them operating socially in response simultaneously to both global and local signals (endocrine, cytokine, mechanical resulting in their clustered activity at formation and resorption sites. This represents problem-solving by social intelligence, and could potentially add further realism to in-silico simulation of bone modeling.What insights has NPF provided to bone biology? One example concerns the genetic disorder Juvenile Pagets Disease (JPD or Idiopathic Hyperphosphatasia, where the anomalous parallel trabecular architecture characteristic of this pathology is consistent with an NPF paradigm by analogy with known experimental NPF systems. Here coupling or feedback between osteoblasts and osteoclasts is the critical element.This NPF paradigm implies a profound link between bone regulation and its architecture: in bone the architecture is the regulation. The former is the emergent consequence of the