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Sample records for bone conduction implant

  1. New developments in bone-conduction hearing implants: a review

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    Reinfeldt, Sabine; Håkansson, Bo; Taghavi, Hamidreza; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    The different kinds of bone-conduction devices (BCDs) available for hearing rehabilitation are growing. In this paper, all BCDs currently available or in clinical trials will be described in categories according to their principles. BCDs that vibrate the bone via the skin are referred to as skin-drive devices, and are divided into conventional devices, which are attached with softbands, for example, and passive transcutaneous devices, which have implanted magnets. BCDs that directly stimulate the bone are referred to as direct-drive devices, and are further divided into percutaneous and active transcutaneous devices; the latter have implanted transducers directly stimulating the bone under intact skin. The percutaneous direct-drive device is known as a bone-anchored hearing aid, which is the BCD that has the largest part of the market today. Because of some issues associated with the percutaneous implant, and to some extent because of esthetics, more transcutaneous solutions with intact skin are being developed today, both in the skin-drive and in the direct-drive category. Challenges in developing transcutaneous BCDs are mostly to do with power, attachment, invasiveness, and magnetic resonance imaging compatibility. In the future, the authors assume that the existing percutaneous direct-drive BCD will be retained as an important rehabilitation alternative, while the transcutaneous solutions will increase their part of the market, especially for patients with bone-conduction thresholds better than 35 dB HL (hearing level). Furthermore, the active transcutaneous direct-drive BCDs appear to be the most promising systems, but to establish more detailed inclusion criteria, and potential benefits and drawbacks, more extensive clinical studies are needed. PMID:25653565

  2. New developments in bone-conduction hearing implants: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinfeldt S

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sabine Reinfeldt,1 Bo Håkansson,1 Hamidreza Taghavi,1 Måns Eeg-Olofsson21Department of Signals and Systems, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: The different kinds of bone-conduction devices (BCDs available for hearing rehabilitation are growing. In this paper, all BCDs currently available or in clinical trials will be described in categories according to their principles. BCDs that vibrate the bone via the skin are referred to as skin-drive devices, and are divided into conventional devices, which are attached with softbands, for example, and passive transcutaneous devices, which have implanted magnets. BCDs that directly stimulate the bone are referred to as direct-drive devices, and are further divided into percutaneous and active transcutaneous devices; the latter have implanted transducers directly stimulating the bone under intact skin. The percutaneous direct-drive device is known as a bone-anchored hearing aid, which is the BCD that has the largest part of the market today. Because of some issues associated with the percutaneous implant, and to some extent because of esthetics, more transcutaneous solutions with intact skin are being developed today, both in the skin-drive and in the direct-drive category. Challenges in developing transcutaneous BCDs are mostly to do with power, attachment, invasiveness, and magnetic resonance imaging compatibility. In the future, the authors assume that the existing percutaneous direct-drive BCD will be retained as an important rehabilitation alternative, while the transcutaneous solutions will increase their part of the market, especially for patients with bone-conduction thresholds better than 35 dB HL (hearing level. Furthermore, the active transcutaneous direct-drive BCDs appear to be the most promising systems

  3. Sound Localization in Patients With Congenital Unilateral Conductive Hearing Loss With a Transcutaneous Bone Conduction Implant.

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    Vyskocil, Erich; Liepins, Rudolfs; Kaider, Alexandra; Blineder, Michaela; Hamzavi, Sasan

    2017-03-01

    There is no consensus regarding the benefit of implantable hearing aids in congenital unilateral conductive hearing loss (UCHL). This study aimed to measure sound source localization performance in patients with congenital UCHL and contralateral normal hearing who received a new bone conduction implant. Evaluation of within-subject performance differences for sound source localization in a horizontal plane. Tertiary referral center. Five patients with atresia of the external auditory canal and contralateral normal hearing implanted with transcutaneous bone conduction implant at the Medical University of Vienna were tested. Activated/deactivated implant. Sound source localization test; localization performance quantified using the root mean square (RMS) error. Sound source localization ability was highly variable among individual subjects, with RMS errors ranging from 21 to 40 degrees. Horizontal plane localization performance in aided conditions showed statistically significant improvement compared with the unaided conditions, with RMS errors ranging from 17 to 27 degrees. The mean RMS error decreased by a factor of 0.71 (p conduction implant. Some patients with congenital UCHL might be capable of developing improved horizontal plane localization abilities with the binaural cues provided by this device.

  4. Preoperative headband assessment for semi-implantable bone conduction hearing devices in conductive hearing loss: is it useful or misleading?

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    Rainsbury, James W; Williams, Blair A; Gulliver, Mark; Morris, David P

    2015-02-01

    To establish whether preoperative assessment using a conventional, percutaneous bone conducting implant (pBCI) processor on a headband accurately represents postoperative performance of a semi-implantable BCI (siBCI). Retrospective case series. Tertiary otology unit. Five patients with chronic otitis media (implanted unilaterally) and one with bilateral congenital ossicular fixation (implanted bilaterally). Semi-implantable bone conduction hearing implant. Functional hearing gain; preoperative (headband) versus postoperative (aided) speech discrimination; unaided bone conduction (BC) versus postoperative (aided) soundfield threshold. Significant functional gain was seen at all frequencies (one-tailed t test p G 0.01; n = 7). There was a 50 dB improvement in median speech reception threshold (SRT) from 70 dB unaided to 20 dB aided. Compared to the preoperative BC, aided siBCI thresholds were worse at 0.5 kHz, but at frequencies from 1 to 6 kHz, the siBCI closely matched the bone curve ( p G 0.01). The siBCI performed better than both pBCI processors on a headband at 3 to 4 kHz, except 1 kHz ( p G 0.01). BC thresholds may be a better indicator of implant performance than headband assessment. Candidacy assessment for siBCI implantation that relies on headband testing with pBCI processors should be interpreted with caution because the headband may under-represent the implanted device. This seems to be especially true at 3 kHz and above and may make it difficult for surgeons to conduct accurate informed consent discussions with patients about the realistic anticipated outcomes and benefits of the procedure.

  5. First clinical experiences with an implantable bone conduction hearing aid at the University of Amsterdam

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    van der Hulst, R. J.; Dreschler, W. A.; Tange, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    A transcutaneous bone-conduction hearing aid was implanted in 11 patients who were not suitable for transcranial sound amplification. Audiological and surgical selection criteria were followed strictly. One device had to be explanted and minor revision surgery was needed in two cases for skin

  6. CT pre-operative planning of a new semi-implantable bone conduction hearing device

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    Law, Eric K.C.; Bhatia, Kunwar S.S. [Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Tsang, Willis S.S.; Tong, Michael C.F. [Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Shi, Lin [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Hong Kong, SAR (China); The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Chow Yuk Ho Technology Center for Innovative Medicine, Hong Kong, SAR (China)

    2016-06-15

    Accommodating a novel semi-implantable bone conduction hearing device within the temporal bone presents challenges for surgical planning. This study describes the utility of CT in pre-operative assessment of such an implant. Retrospective review of pre-operative CT, clinical and surgical records of 16 adults considered for device implantation. Radiological suitability was assessed on CT using 3D simulation software. Antero-posterior (AP) dimensions of the mastoid bone and minimum skull thickness were measured. CT planning results were correlated with operative records. Eight and five candidates were suitable for device placement in the transmastoid and retrosigmoid positions, respectively, and three were radiologically unsuitable. The mean AP diameter of the mastoid cavity was 14.6 mm for the transmastoid group and 4.6 mm for the retrosigmoid group (p < 0.05). Contracted mastoid and/or prior surgery were predisposing factors for unsuitability. Four transmastoid and five retrosigmoid positions required sigmoid sinus/dural depression and/or use of lifts due to insufficient bone capacity. A high proportion of patients being considered have contracted or operated mastoids, which reduces the feasibility of the transmastoid approach. This finding combined with the complex temporal bone geometry illustrates the importance of careful CT evaluation using 3D software for precise device simulation. (orig.)

  7. Postoperative pain in patients undergoing a transcutaneous active bone conduction implant (Bonebridge).

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    Lassaletta, Luis; Calvino, Miryam; Zernotti, Mario; Gavilán, Javier

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate postoperative pain following a transcutaneous active conductive hearing implant. 27 patients undergoing Bonebridge (BB) bone conduction implantation were evaluated with two pain-related questionnaires. The Headache Impact Test (HIT-6) was used to measure the degree of disability including none or little impact (≤49), mild (50-55), moderate (56-59), and severe (≥60). The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) was used to assess pain severity score and function interference (0 = no pain to 10 = worst pain); meaningful pain was considered to be ≥3. The impact of surgical factors on postoperative pain was analyzed. Postoperative BB pain results were compared with 11 Vibrant Soundbridge™ (VSB) and 103 cochlear implant (CI) users. The mean pre- and postoperative HIT-6 scores for BB implantation were 42.6 and 41.8, respectively and the mean preoperative BPI pain severity score changed from 0.6 to 0.9 postoperatively, whereas the preoperative interference score changed from 0.1 to 0.3. None of the mean postoperative values revealed significant pain. The retrosigmoid approach, the need for dural or sinus compression, and the use of bone conduction implant lifts had no significant impact on pain scores. The mean postoperative HIT-6 pain scores for patients with BB, VSB, and CI were 41.8, 46.4, and 42.8, respectively, with the differences not being significant. BB implantation causes no significant postoperative pain irrespective of sinus or dura compression. Pain scores were similar to those experienced by patients with other transcutaneous auditory implants such as middle ear or CIs.

  8. The bone conduction implant: Clinical results of the first six patients

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    Reinfeldt, Sabine; Håkansson, Bo; Taghavi, Hamidreza; Fredén Jansson, Karl-Johan; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate audiological and quality of life outcomes for a new active transcutaneous device, called the bone conduction implant (BCI), where the transducer is implanted under intact skin. Design: A clinical study with sound field audiometry and questionnaires at six-month follow-up was conducted with a bone-anchored hearing aid on a softband as reference device. Study sample: Six patients (age 18–67 years) with mild-to-moderate conductive or mixed hearing loss. Results: The surgical procedure was found uneventful with no adverse events. The first hypothesis that BCI had a statistically significant improvement over the unaided condition was proven by a pure-tone-average improvement of 31.0 dB, a speech recognition threshold improvement in quiet (27.0 dB), and a speech recognition score improvement in noise (51.2 %). At speech levels, the signal-to-noise ratio threshold for BCI was − 5.5 dB. All BCI results were better than, or similar to the reference device results, and the APHAB and GBI questionnaires scores showed statistically significant improvements versus the unaided situation, supporting the second and third hypotheses. Conclusions: The BCI provides significant hearing rehabilitation for patients with mild-to-moderate conductive or mixed hearing impairments, and can be easily and safely implanted under intact skin. PMID:25705995

  9. Preliminary functional results and quality of life after implantation of a new bone conduction hearing device in patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss.

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    Ihler, Friedrich; Volbers, Laura; Blum, Jenny; Matthias, Christoph; Canis, Martin

    2014-02-01

    To review functional results and quality of life of the first patients implanted with a newly introduced bone conduction implant system. Retrospective chart analysis of 6 patients (6 ears) implanted for conductive hearing loss (CHL) and mixed hearing loss (MHL) in 1 tertiary referral center between July 2012 and February 2013. Implantation of a new bone conduction hearing device. Pure tone audiometry (air conduction and bone conduction thresholds, pure tone average, air-bone gap, and functional gain), speech audiometry (Freiburg Monosyllabic Test), intraoperative and postoperative complication rate, and patient satisfaction (Glasgow benefit inventory [GBI]) were assessed. Air-conduction pure tone average (PTA) was 58.8 ± 8.2 dB HL. Unaided average air-bone gap (ABG) was 33.3 ± 6.2 dB. Aided air-conduction PTA in sound field was 25.2 ± 5.1 dB HL. Aided average ABG was -0.3 ± 7.3 dB. Average functional gain was 33.6 ± 7.2 dB. Mean improvement of GBI was +36.1. No intraoperative complications occurred. During a follow-up period of 8.5 ± 2.2 months, no device failure and no need for revision surgery occurred. Audiometric results of the new bone conduction hearing system are satisfying and comparable to the results of devices that have been applied previously for CHL and MHL. Intraoperatively and postoperatively, no complications were noted.

  10. An experimental objective method to determine maximum output and dynamic range of an active bone conduction implant: the Bonebridge

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    Mertens, G.; Desmet, J.; Snik, A.F.M.; Heyning, P. van de

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recently, a new active bone conduction implant, the Bonebridge, was introduced. This transcutaneous device is proposed as an alternative to previous percutaneous systems. The current study aims to determine the maximum output (MO) of the Bonebridge by making use of Bonebridge-generated

  11. Evaluation of Bone Conduction Implant Stability and Soft Tissue Status in Children in Relation to Age, Bone Thickness, and Sound Processor Loading Time.

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    Mierzwiński, Józef; Konopka, Wiesław; Drela, Maria; Łaz, Piotr; Śmiechura, Malgorzata; Strużycka, Malgorzata; Kuśmierczyk, Joanna

    2015-08-01

    To measure the stability, as determined by implant stability quotient (ISQ) values, of bone conduction implants placed using FAST (one-stage) surgery in children to look for the differences between various ages and indications. To monitor the status of the peri-implant soft tissue using the classification proposed by Holgers et al. It was a prospective, open, multicenter study performed in two investigation centers. Twenty-two subjects under 18 years of age implanted with the Cochlear BIA300 and BIA400 types of devices at the ENT Departments of Children's Hospitals in Bydgoszcz and Lodz in Poland. Implantation and use of the bone conduction implant system. The implants were placed unilaterally or bilaterally according to a one-stage surgical procedure as per normal practice at the hospitals. Loading time was adjusted to individual patient, and it was based on the assessment of implant stability and status of the soft tissue. The attention was given to the differences in the ISQ values obtained during the subsequent visits in the various age and indication groups. Resonance frequency analysis was performed as per the routine follow-up schedule at the hospital. Age at the time of implantation on average was 9.8 years (min. 5.2 yr; max. 16 yr). On average, ISQ value on each of the study observations in this group equaled to 59.17 (median, 58.79). Seventh to tenth day post-surgery seemed to be a sensitive period as the lowest ISQ values (on average: 56.38 ISQ) were recorded for these dates. On average, implant was loaded 7.5 weeks after surgery in the study group (min. 2 wk, max. 14 wk). In none of the subjects the significant decrease of the implant stability values after sound processor loading was observed. Statistically significant correlation rate (p processor fitting. There was no correlation observed between the time of the sound processor fitting and the skin reactions status.

  12. Clinical performance of a new magnetic bone conduction hearing implant system: results from a prospective, multicenter, clinical investigation.

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    Briggs, Robert; Van Hasselt, Andrew; Luntz, Michal; Goycoolea, Marcos; Wigren, Stina; Weber, Peter; Smeds, Henrik; Flynn, Mark; Cowan, Robert

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the investigation was to prospectively evaluate, in a multicenter setting, the clinical performance of a new magnetic bone conduction hearing implant system. The test device was the Cochlear Baha Attract System (Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions AB, Mölnlycke, Sweden). Instead of the skin-penetrating abutment of traditional bone conduction hearing implants, the test device uses an implantable and an external magnet to transmit sound from the sound processor (SP) through intact skin to the skull bone. Twenty-seven adult patients with a conductive or mild mixed hearing loss or single-sided sensorineural deafness were included in the clinical investigation across four investigational sites. The patients were followed for 9 months after implantation. The study evaluated efficacy in terms of hearing performance compared with unaided hearing and with hearing with the SP on a softband. Patient benefit, soft tissue status, device retention, and safety parameters were monitored continuously throughout the investigation. Surgery and healing was uneventful. Statistically significant improvements in audibility and speech understanding in noise and quiet were recorded for the test device compared with preoperative unaided hearing. Speech recognition was similar or better than tests performed with the same SP on a softband. Good soft tissue outcomes were reported, without major pressure-related complications. At the end of the investigation, all patients continued to use and benefit from the device. The test device provides good hearing performance in patients with a conductive hearing loss or single-sided sensorineural deafness, with good wearing comfort and minimal soft tissue complications.

  13. Evaluation of long-term patient satisfaction and experience with the Baha(®) bone conduction implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jacob; Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate long-term patient satisfaction with bone-anchored hearing aids (the Baha(R), now referred to by Cochlear as a 'bone conduction implant') in our hospital clinic spanning the eighteen-year period from the inception of our Baha program. The researchers further wished to analyse...... noise disturbance, ease of communication, cosmetic appearance, and satisfaction with the Baha amongst patient relatives, an aspect not previously investigated. Design: The study design was retrospective and executed as a postal questionnaire. The questionnaire was developed by the authors of this paper...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant – a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla

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    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. Methods and materials One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. Results It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. Conclusion This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant. PMID:26604836

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant - a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla.

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    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant – a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredén Jansson KJ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Karl-Johan Fredén Jansson,1 Bo Håkansson,1 Sabine Reinfeldt,1 Cristina Rigato,1 Måns Eeg-Olofsson2 1Department of Signals and Systems, Chalmers University of Technology, 2Deptartment of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Purpose: The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO, total harmonic distortion (THD, and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated.Methods and materials: One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI.Results: It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant.Conclusion: This pilot study indicates that the present BCI

  17. Evaluation of long-term patient satisfaction and experience with the Baha(®) bone conduction implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jacob; Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate long-term patient satisfaction with bone-anchored hearing aids (the Baha(R), now referred to by Cochlear as a 'bone conduction implant') in our hospital clinic spanning the eighteen-year period from the inception of our Baha program. The researchers further wished to analyse...... the various factors leading to patient satisfaction/dissatisfaction with their Baha. We developed a new questionnaire to obtain a comprehensive impression of individual patient practices, general satisfaction, and experiences with their Baha in respect to time spent using Baha, sound quality, annoyance from....... A primary factor leading to dissatisfaction, experienced by 70% of responding patients, was annoyance from wind noise. Conclusions: Baha was found to yield good overall patient satisfaction over the long-term, and it was possible to identify specific factors attributing to satisfaction/dissatisfaction....

  18. Long-term subjective benefit with a bone conduction implant sound processor in 44 patients with single-sided deafness.

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    Desmet, Jolien; Wouters, Kristien; De Bodt, Marc; Van de Heyning, Paul

    2014-07-01

    Studies that investigate the subjective benefit from a bone conduction implant (BCI) sound processor in patients with single-sided sensorineural deafness (SSD) have been limited to examining short- and mid-term benefit. In the current study, we performed a survey among 44 SSD BCI users with a median follow-up time of 50 months. Forty-four experienced SSD BCI users participated in the survey, which consisted of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit, the Single-Sided Deafness Questionnaire, the Short Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults, and a self-made user questionnaire. For patients with tinnitus, the Tinnitus Questionnaire was also completed. The results of the survey were correlated with contralateral hearing loss, age at implantation, duration of the hearing loss at the time of implantation, duration of BCI use, and the presence and burden of tinnitus. In total, 86% of the patients still used their sound processor. The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit and the Short Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults show a statistically significant overall improvement with the BCI. The Single-Sided Deafness Questionnaire and the user questionnaire showed that almost 40% of the patients reported daily use of the sound processor. However, the survey of daily use reveals benefit only in certain circumstances. Speech understanding in noisy situations is rated rather low, and 58% of all patients reported that their BCI benefit was less than expected. The majority of the patients reported an overall improvement from using their BCI. However, the number of users decreases during a longer follow-up time and patients get less enthusiastic about the device after an extended period of use, especially in noisy situations. However, diminished satisfaction because of time-related reductions in processor function could not be ruled out.

  19. Evaluation of long-term patient satisfaction and experience with the Baha® bone conduction implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jacob; Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme

    2012-03-01

    Evaluate long-term patient satisfaction with bone-anchored hearing aids (the Baha®, now referred to by Cochlear as a 'bone conduction implant') in our hospital clinic spanning the eighteen-year period from the inception of our Baha program. The researchers further wished to analyse the various factors leading to patient satisfaction/dissatisfaction with their Baha. We developed a new questionnaire to obtain a comprehensive impression of individual patient practices, general satisfaction, and experiences with their Baha in respect to time spent using Baha, sound quality, annoyance from noise disturbance, ease of communication, cosmetic appearance, and satisfaction with the Baha amongst patient relatives, an aspect not previously investigated. The study design was retrospective and executed as a postal questionnaire. The questionnaire was developed by the authors of this paper. Patients operated on for a Baha at our hospital from 1989 to 2007. The response rate was 92.4%. Eighty-six percent were satisfied or very satisfied with their Baha. Ninety-one percent of respondents could communicate using their Baha in a one-on-one conversational setting. A primary factor leading to dissatisfaction, experienced by 70% of responding patients, was annoyance from wind noise. Baha was found to yield good overall patient satisfaction over the long-term, and it was possible to identify specific factors attributing to satisfaction/dissatisfaction.

  20. Active Bone Conduction Prosthesis: BonebridgeTM

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    Zernotti, Mario E.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Bone conduction implants are indicated for patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss, as well as for patients with single-sided deafness (SSD. The transcutaneous technology avoids several complications of the percutaneous bone conduction implants including skin reaction, skin growth over the abutment, and wound infection. The Bonebridge (MED-EL, Austria prosthesis is a semi-implantable hearing system: the BCI (Bone Conduction Implant is the implantable part that contains the Bone Conduction-Floating Mass Transducer (BC-FMT, which applies the vibrations directly to the bone; the external component is the audio processor Amadé BB (MED-EL, Austria, which digitally processes the sound and sends the information through the coil to the internal part. Bonebridge may be implanted through three different approaches: the transmastoid, the retrosigmoid, or the middle fossa approach. Objective This systematic review aims to describe the world́s first active bone conduction implant system, Bonebridge, as well as describe the surgical techniques in the three possible approaches, showing results from implant centers in the world in terms of functional gain, speech reception thresholds and word recognition scores. Data Synthesis The authors searched the MEDLINE database using the key term Bonebridge. They selected only five publications to include in this systematic review. The review analyzes 20 patients that received Bonebridge implants with different approaches and pathologies. Conclusion Bonebridge is a solution for patients with conductive/mixed hearing loss and SSD with different surgical approaches, depending on their anatomy. The system imparts fewer complications than percutaneous bone conduction implants and shows proven benefits in speech discrimination and functional gain.

  1. Positioning a Novel Transcutaneous Bone Conduction Hearing Implant: a Systematic Anatomical and Radiological Study to Standardize the Retrosigmoid Approach, Correlating Navigation-guided, and Landmark-based Surgery.

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    Arnold, Heinz; Schulze, Maximilian; Wolpert, Stephan; Hirt, Bernhard; Tropitzsch, Anke; Zimmermann, Rainer; Radeloff, Andreas; Löwenheim, Hubert; Reimann, Katrin

    2018-04-01

    Anatomical and radiological evaluation improves safety and accuracy of the retrosigmoid approach for positioning a transcutaneous bone conduction implant and provides anatomical reference data for standardized, landmark-based implantation at this alternative site. The primary implantation site for the floating mass transducer of a novel bone conduction hearing implant is the mastoid. However, anatomical limitations or previous mastoid surgery may prevent mastoid implantation. Therefore, the retrosigmoid approach has been introduced as an alternative. Mastoid and retrosigmoid implantation sites were radiologically identified and evaluated in preoperative computed tomography scans of anatomical head specimens. Navigation-guided implantation was then performed in the retrosigmoid site (n = 20). The optimal retrosigmoid position was determined in relation to both the asterion and the mastoid notch as surgical landmarks in an anatomical coordinate system. Preoperative radiological analysis revealed spatial limitations in the mastoid in 45% of the specimens. Navigation-guided retrosigmoid implantation was possible without affecting the sigmoid sinus in all the specimens. The optimal implantation site was located 1.9 ± 0.1 cm posterior/1.7 ± 0.1 cm inferior to the asterion and 3.3 ± 0.2 cm posterior/2.1 ± 0.1 cm superior to the mastoid notch.Retrosigmoid skull thickness was 6.6 ± 0.4 mm, measured anatomically, 7.0 ± 0.4 mm, measured radiologically and 6.7 ± 0.5 mm, measured with the navigation software. The navigation-guided retrosigmoid approach seemed to be a reliable procedure in all the specimens. Measurements of bone thickness revealed the need for spacers in 95% of the specimens. Reference coordinates of the optimal implantation site are provided and can confirm image-guided surgery or facilitate orientation if a navigation system is not available.

  2. Analysis and design of RF power and data link using amplitude modulation of Class-E for a novel bone conduction implant.

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    Taghavi, Hamidreza; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents analysis and design of a radio frequency power and data link for a novel Bone Conduction Implant (BCI) system. Patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss and single-sided deafness can be rehabilitated by bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHA). Whereas the conventional hearing aids transmit sound to the tympanic membrane via air conduction, the BAHA transmits sound via vibrations through the skull directly to the cochlea. It uses a titanium screw that penetrates the skin and needs life-long daily care; it may cause skin infection and redness. The BCI is developed as an alternative to the percutaneous BAHA since it leaves the skin intact. The BCI comprises an external audio processor with a transmitter coil and an implanted unit called the bridging bone conductor with a receiver coil. Using amplitude modulation of the Class-E power amplifier that drives the inductive link, the sound signal is transmitted to the implant through the intact skin. It was found that the BCI can generate enough output force level for candidate patients. Maximum power output of the BCI was designed to occur at 5-mm skin thickness and the variability was within 1.5 dB for 1-8-mm skin thickness variations.

  3. Basis of bone metabolism around dental implants during osseointegration and peri-implant bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insua, Angel; Monje, Alberto; Wang, Hom-Lay; Miron, Richard J

    2017-07-01

    Despite the growing number of publications in the field of implant dentistry, there are limited studies to date investigating the biology and metabolism of bone healing around dental implants and their implications in peri-implant marginal bone loss. The aim of this review article is to provide a thorough understanding of the biological events taking place during osseointegration and the subsequent early and late phases of bone remodeling around dental implants. An update on the coupling mechanism occurring during bone resorption-bone remodeling is provided, focused on the relevance of the osteocytes, bone lining cells and immune cells during bone maintenance. An electronic and manual literature search was conducted by three independent reviewers in several databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register databases for articles up to September 2016 with no language restriction. Local bone metabolism is subject to signals from systemic calcium-phosphate homeostasis and bone remodeling. Three areas of interest were reviewed due to recent reported compromises in bone healing including the putative effects of (1) cholesterol, (2) hyperlipidemia, and (3) low vitamin D intake. Moreover, the prominent influence of osteocytes and immune cells is discussed as being key regulators during dental implant osseointegration and maintenance. These cells are of crucial importance in the presence of biofilm accumulation and their associated byproducts that leads to hard and soft tissue breakdown; the so called peri-implantitis. Factors that could negatively impact osteoclastogenesis or osteal macrophage activation should be monitored in future research including implant placement/torque protocols, bone characteristics, as well as meticulous maintenance programs to favor osseointegration and future long-term stability and success of dental implants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res

  4. Effect of intraoperative bone quality testing on bone healing and osseointegration of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias; Palarie, Victor; Nacu, Viorel; Krafft, Tim

    2013-01-01

    A novel diagnostic device (BoneProbe) for evaluating alveolar bone quality during dental implant surgery has recently been developed. The underlying measurement principle is based on a compressive test of bone, which may subsequently affect bone healing and osseointegration of dental implants. Six implant sites each were created in the rear left tibia of four sheep and used for bone quality testing with the BoneProbe, while empty osteotomies and implants placed without testing served as controls. Maximum insertion torque and primary implant stability (Osstell) were determined additionally. After 5 and 20 weeks, the animals were sacrificed followed by histomorphometric and microradiographic analysis quantifying bone implant contact (BIC) and bone mineral density (BMD) as parameters. Statistical analysis was conducted applying one-sample t tests, two-sample t tests and Pearson correlation coefficients (α = .05). Implants placed following application of the BoneProbe differed from the control treatments only in one case, where BIC was greater (P = .02) at the control implant after 20 weeks of healing. With the exception of the combinations of Osstell/BoneProbe measurement in trabecular bone (0.29) and Osstell/insertion torque (0.34), good correlations of all clinically conducted measurements were found. Based on the results obtained, it appears that intraoperative testing of bone quality applying the BoneProbe does not jeopardize bone healing and osseointegration of dental implants.

  5. Safety and effectiveness of the Bonebridge transcutaneous active direct-drive bone-conduction hearing implant at 1-year device use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerber, Sébastien; Deguine, O; Marx, M; Van de Heyning, P; Sterkers, O; Mosnier, I; Garin, P; Godey, B; Vincent, C; Venail, F; Mondain, M; Deveze, A; Lavieille, J P; Karkas, A

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a new transcutaneous bone-conduction implant (BCI BB) in patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss or with single-sided deafness (SSD), 1 year after surgical implantation. The study design is multicentric prospective, intra-subject measurements. Each subject is his/her own control. The setting is nine university hospitals: 7 French and 2 Belgian. Sixteen subjects with conductive or mixed hearing loss with bone-conduction hearing thresholds under the upper limit of 45 dB HL for each frequency from 500 to 4000 Hz, and 12 subjects with SSD (contralateral hearing within normal range) were enrolled in the study. All subjects were older than 18 years. The intervention is rehabilitative. The main outcome measure is the evaluation of skin safety, audiological measurements, benefit, and satisfaction questionnaires with a 1-year follow up. Skin safety was rated as good or very good. For the mixed or conductive hearing loss groups, the average functional gain (at 500 Hz, 1, 2, 4 kHz) was 26.1 dB HL (SD 13.7), and mean percentage of speech recognition in quiet at 65 dB was 95 % (vs 74 % unaided). In 5/6 SSD subjects, values of SRT in noise were lower with BB. Questionnaires revealed patient benefit and satisfaction. The transcutaneous BCI is very well tolerated at 1-year follow up, improves audiometric thresholds and intelligibility for speech in quiet and noise, and gives satisfaction to both patients with mixed and conductive hearing loss and patients with SSD.

  6. Stress Analysis on the Bone Around Five Different Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    STRESS ANALYSIS ON THE BONE AROUND FIVE DIFFERENT DENTAL IMPLANTS S. M. Rajaai, S. Khorrami-mehr School of mechanical Engineering Iran... implant , which is an effective criterion in osseointegration . In this paper, stress analysis has been conducted on the bone by applying finite element...method. A comparison has been performed among different models of dental implant fixtures. Keywords- Dental Implant , Root Form, Cylinder Form, Step

  7. Dynamics of bone graft healing around implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Venkataraman

    2015-01-01

    A few questions arise pertaining to the use of bone grafts along with implants are whether these are successful in approximation with implant. Do they accelerate bone regeneration? Are all defects ultimately regenerated with new viable bone? Is the bone graft completely resorbed or integrated in new bone? Does the implant surface characteristic positively affect osseointegration when used with a bone graft? What type of graft and implant surface can be used that will have a positive effect on the healing type and time? Finally, what are the dynamics of bone graft healing around an implant? This review discusses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone graft healing in general and in vicinity of another foreign, avascular body, namely the implant surface, and further, the role of bone grafts in osseointegration and/or clinical success of the implants.

  8. Objective and Subjective Outcome of a New Transcutaneous Bone Conduction Hearing Device: Half-year Follow-up of the First 12 Nordic Implantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Kristine Elisabeth; Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Miyazaki, Hidemi; Bille, Michael; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2016-03-01

    To examine the objective and subjective outcome of a new transcutaneous bone conduction hearing device. Prospective, consecutive case series. Twelve patients were implanted. Eight patients had a conductive/mixed (con/mix) hearing loss. Four had single sided deafness. At half-year follow-up, aided and unaided sound field hearing was evaluated by 1) warble tone thresholds, 2) pure-tone average (PTA4), 3) speech discrimination score (SDS) in quiet, and 4) speech reception threshold 50% at 70 dB SPL noise level (SRT50%). Subjective outcome was evaluated by three questionnaires: 1) International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids, 2) Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale 12, and 3) a questionnaire on frequency and duration of use. No major complications occurred. The mean aided PTA4 was lowered by 23dB. SDS was increased by 40% at 50dB, by 34% at 65dB, and by 12% at 80 dB SPL. SRT50% in noise improved 5.2 dB. 58% of the patients used the device daily and 83% at least 5 days a week. 50% used the device ≥ 8 hours and 75% ≥ 4  hours a day. Mean International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids score was 3.7, corresponding to beneficial outcome. In Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale 12, "quality of hearing" scored especially high. The con/mix hearing loss group showed larger benefit especially in SDS, SRT50% in noise and the subjective evaluations, whereas frequency and duration of use were similar. This study on the first 12 Nordic patients implanted with a new transcutaneous bone conduction hearing device demonstrates significant objective, as well as subjective hearing benefit. Patient satisfaction was high, as was the frequency of use.

  9. Experimental study on bone tissue reaction around HA implants radiated after implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Masato; Matsui, Yoshiro; Tamura, Sayaka; Chen, Xuan; Uchida, Haruo; Mori, Kimie; Ohno, Kohsuke; Michi, Ken-ichi

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate histologically and histomorphometrically the tissue reaction around hydroxylapatite (HA) implants that underwent irradiation in 3 different periods in the course of bone healing after implantation. The cylindrical high-density HA implants were implanted in 48 Japanese white rabbit mandibles. A single 15 Gy dose was applied to the mandible 5, 14, or 28 days after implantation. The rabbits were sacrificed 7, 14, 28, and 90 days after irradiation. Nonirradiated rabbits were used as controls. CMR, labeling with tetracycline and calcein, and non-decalcified specimens stained with toluidine blue were used for histological analyses and histomorphometric measurements. The results were as follows: In the rabbits irradiated 5 days after implantation, the HA-bone contact was observed later than that in the controls and the bone-implant contact surface ratio was lower than that in the controls at examination because necrosis of the newly-formed bone occurred just after irradiation. HA-bone contact of the rabbits irradiated 14 and 28 days after implantation was similar to that of the controls. And, bone remodeling was suppressed in rabbits of each group sacrificed at 90 days after irradiation. The results suggested that a short interval between implantation and irradiation causes direct contact between HA implant and bone and a long lapse of time before irradiation hardly affects the bone-implant contact, but delays bone remodeling. Therefore, it is necessary to prevent overloading the HA implants irradiated after implantation and pay utmost attention to conditions around the bone-implant contact. (author)

  10. Experimental study on bone tissue reaction around HA implants radiated after implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Masato; Matsui, Yoshiro; Tamura, Sayaka; Chen, Xuan; Uchida, Haruo; Mori, Kimie; Ohno, Kohsuke; Michi, Ken-ichi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1998-07-01

    This study was conducted to investigate histologically and histomorphometrically the tissue reaction around hydroxylapatite (HA) implants that underwent irradiation in 3 different periods in the course of bone healing after implantation. The cylindrical high-density HA implants were implanted in 48 Japanese white rabbit mandibles. A single 15 Gy dose was applied to the mandible 5, 14, or 28 days after implantation. The rabbits were sacrificed 7, 14, 28, and 90 days after irradiation. Nonirradiated rabbits were used as controls. CMR, labeling with tetracycline and calcein, and non-decalcified specimens stained with toluidine blue were used for histological analyses and histomorphometric measurements. The results were as follows: In the rabbits irradiated 5 days after implantation, the HA-bone contact was observed later than that in the controls and the bone-implant contact surface ratio was lower than that in the controls at examination because necrosis of the newly-formed bone occurred just after irradiation. HA-bone contact of the rabbits irradiated 14 and 28 days after implantation was similar to that of the controls. And, bone remodeling was suppressed in rabbits of each group sacrificed at 90 days after irradiation. The results suggested that a short interval between implantation and irradiation causes direct contact between HA implant and bone and a long lapse of time before irradiation hardly affects the bone-implant contact, but delays bone remodeling. Therefore, it is necessary to prevent overloading the HA implants irradiated after implantation and pay utmost attention to conditions around the bone-implant contact. (author)

  11. Bone Substitutes for Peri-Implant Defects of Postextraction Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pâmela Letícia Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Placement of implants in fresh sockets is an alternative to try to reduce physiological resorption of alveolar ridge after tooth extraction. This surgery can be used to preserve the bone architecture and also accelerate the restorative procedure. However, the diastasis observed between bone and implant may influence osseointegration. So, autogenous bone graft and/or biomaterials have been used to fill this gap. Considering the importance of bone repair for treatment with implants placed immediately after tooth extraction, this study aimed to present a literature review about biomaterials surrounding immediate dental implants. The search included 56 articles published from 1969 to 2012. The results were based on data analysis and discussion. It was observed that implant fixation immediately after extraction is a reliable alternative to reduce the treatment length of prosthetic restoration. In general, the biomaterial should be used to increase bone/implant contact and enhance osseointegration.

  12. Suboccipital neuropathy after bone conduction device placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, H T; de Ru, J A

    2013-01-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics of a 70-year-old female with occipital neuropathy following bone conduction device surgery. A 65-year-old woman underwent bone conduction device placement surgery on the left temporal bone. Postoperatively she progressively developed chronic pain at the implantation site. The pain led to minimal neck movement, which resulted in complaints of the shoulder and arm on the left side. She was treated by an orthopaedic surgeon for a frozen shoulder. Pain medication and occipital nerve blocking had no sustained effect on the pain. Occipital neuropathy is a syndrome with continuous aching involving the occipital and parietal scalp caused by trauma or peripheral compression of the occipital nerves. The most common causes of occipital neuropathy are probably direct trauma to the nerve and hypertrophic fibrosis of subcutaneous tissue surrounding the nerve. Scar formation after surgery may therefore cause entrapment of the nerve. We describe a case of occipital neuropathy as a complication of BAHA surgery.

  13. Osseointegration of subperiosteal implants using bovine bone substitute and various membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, Merete; Schou, S.; Hjørting-Hansen, E.

    2000-01-01

    Osseointegration, subperiosteal implant, bone substitute, bovine bone, guided bone, regeneration, histology, rabbits......Osseointegration, subperiosteal implant, bone substitute, bovine bone, guided bone, regeneration, histology, rabbits...

  14. Correlating implant stability to bone structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozé, Julie; Babu, Stéphanie; Saffarzadeh, Afchine; Gayet-Delacroix, Marie; Hoornaert, Alain; Layrolle, Pierre

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate a possible correlation between bone microarchitecture and primary implant stability. Twenty-two implants (Ankylos((R)) and Straumann((R))) were inserted into the maxillae and mandibles of human cadavers. Bone structure was determined by computed tomography in three specimens (male, age 53; female, 67; female, 80). A strict clinical protocol was used for implantation. Primary implant stability was measured by resonance frequency analysis (Osstell Mentor). The bone structure was analyzed by micro-computed tomography (CT). Bone histomorphometrical parameters were calculated and correlated to primary implant stability. Implant stability quotients (ISQ) ranged from 50 to 70% depending on the specimens and sites. Histomorphometry indicated differences in the bone microstructures of the specimens. However, ISQ values were not related to trabecular bone histomorphometrical parameters. The sole correlation was found between ISQ values and cortical bone thickness. This study confirms the relevance for primary stability of cortical thickness around implants. The thickness of cortical bone can be assessed using a standard clinical CT.

  15. A novel bio-inorganic bone implant containing deglued bone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deglued bone (DGB) which is a by-product of bone glue industries and has the close crystallographic similarities of hydroxyapatite was used as main component in the preparation of bone implant. Chitosan was prepared from the exoskeleton of prawn (Pinaeus indicus, family Crustaceae) which is a by-product of seafood ...

  16. Marginal bone loss around tilted implants in comparison to straight implants: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Alberto; Chan, Hsun-Liang; Suarez, Fernando; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of this systematic review was to compare the amount of marginal bone loss around tilted and straight implants. As the secondary aim, the incidence of biomechanic complications was compared. An electronic literature search from five databases, for the years 2000 to 2011, and a hand search in implant-related journals were conducted. Clinical human studies in the English language that had reported marginal bone loss in tilted and straight implants at 12-months follow-up or longer were included. Mean marginal bone loss and the number of implants that were available for analysis were extracted from original articles for meta-analyses. Eight (six prospective and two retrospective) studies were included. One-year data were available in seven articles, which included 1,015 (451 tilted) implants. Three articles provided 3- to 5-year data from 302 (164 tilted) implants. No significant difference in weighted mean marginal bone loss was found between the tilted and straight implants in the short and medium terms. Three articles reported the incidence of biomechanic complications. There was not enough information to make a comparison. This meta-analysis failed to support the hypothesis that tilted implants that were splinted for the support of fixed prostheses had more marginal bone loss. Additionally, there was not enough evidence to claim a higher incidence of biomechanic complications in tilted implants. However, due to the nature of the study design of the included articles, caution should be exercised when interpreting the results of this review.

  17. Crestal bone loss of standard implant versus platform switch implant design using minimal invasive technique

    OpenAIRE

    Karim M. Ahmed; Salah Abd Elfatah; Mohamed Abd El-Mageed Katamish

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the type of abutment/implant connection on the marginal bone loss around dental implant. The present study was conducted on eleven patients, six males and five females with age range from 26 to 45 years. Twenty consecutive dental implants were inserted for implant – supported restoration in the maxillary premolar area. The diameter and length of dental implants of all subjects were the same in groups, 3.7 mm diameter and 11.5 mm leng...

  18. Bone Conduction: Anatomy, Physiology, and Communication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry, Paula; Letowski, Tomasz R

    2007-01-01

    ... conduction transmission, and the use of the bone conduction pathway for communication. Bone conduction for the transmission of communication is effective and feasible for Soldiers because it provides a means of providing radio communication in combination with hearing protection devices.

  19. Design Improvement of Dental Implant-Based on Bone Remodelling

    OpenAIRE

    Solehuddin Shuib; Koay Boon Aik; Zainul Ahmad Rajion

    2016-01-01

    There are many types of mechanical failure on the dental implant. In this project, the failure that needs to take into consideration is the bone resorption on the dental implant. Human bone has its ability to remodel after the implantation. As the dental implant is installed into the bone, the bone will detect and change the bone structure to achieve new biomechanical environment. This phenomenon is known as bone remodeling. The objective of the project is to improve the ...

  20. Impact of crestal and subcrestal implant placement in peri-implant bone: A prospective comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer-Chover, Hilario; Peñarrocha-Diago, María; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Gomar-Vercher, Sonia; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the influence of the crestal or subcrestal placement of implants upon peri-implant bone loss over 12 months of follow-up. Material and Methods Twenty-six patients with a single hopeless tooth were recruited in the Oral Surgery Unit (Valencia University, Valencia, Spain). The patients were randomized into two treatment groups: group A (implants placed at crestal level) or group B (implants placed at subcrestal level). Control visits were conducted by a trained clinician at the time of implant placement and 12 months after loading. A previously established standard protocol was used to compile general data on all patients (sex and age, implant length and diameter, and brushing frequency). Implant success rate, peri-implant bone loss and the treatment of the exposed implant surface were studied. The level of statistical significance was defined as 5% (α=0.05). Results Twenty-three patients (8 males and 15 females, mean age 49.8±11.6 years, range 28-75 years) were included in the final data analyses, while three were excluded. All the included subjects were nonsmokers with a brushing frequency of up to twice a day in 85.7% of the cases. The 23 implants comprised 10 crestal implants and 13 subcrestal implants. After implant placement, the mean bone position with respect to the implant platform in group A was 0.0 mm versus 2.16±0.88 mm in group B. After 12 months of follow-up, the mean bone positions were -0.06±1.11 mm and 0.95±1.50 mm, respectively - this representing a bone loss of 0.06±1.11 mm in the case of the crestal implants and of 1.22±1.06 mm in the case of the subcrestal implants (p=0.014). Four crestal implants and 5 subcrestal implants presented peri-implant bone levels below the platform, leaving a mean exposed treated surface of 1.13 mm and 0.57 mm, respectively. The implant osseointegration success rate at 12 months was 100% in both groups. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, bone loss was found to be greater in

  1. Conductivity in insulators due to implantation of conducting species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prawer, S.; Kalish, R.

    1993-01-01

    Control of the surface conductivity of insulators can be accomplished by high dose ion implantation of conductive species. The use of C + as the implant species is particularly interesting because C can either form electrically insulating sp 3 bonds or electrically conducting sp 2 bonds. In the present work, fused quartz plates have been irradiated with 100 keV C + ions to doses up to 1 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 at room temperature and at 200 deg C. The ion beam induced conductivity was monitored in-situ and was found to increase by up to 8 orders to magnitude for the ion dose range studied. Xe implantations over a similar range did not induce any changes in the conductivity showing that the increase in conductivity is caused by the presence of the C in the fused quartz matrix and not by damage. The dependence of the conductivity on implantation temperature and on post implantation annealing sheds light on the clustering of the C implants. The temperature dependence of the conductivity for the highest doses employed (1 x 10 17 C + /cm 2 ) can be described very well by lnσ α T. This is considered to be a peculiar dependence which does not comply with any of the standard models for conduction. 9 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  2. Does platform switching really prevent crestal bone loss around implants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Hagiwara

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To maintain long-term implant stability, it is important to minimize bone loss around the implant. Several clinical studies have shown a mean marginal bone loss around dental implants of 1.5–2 mm in the first year after prosthetic restoration. Currently, concepts to prevent bone loss around dental implants have been reported as the platform switching (PLS. This technique use of prosthetic abutments with reduced width in relation to the implant platform diameter seems to have the greatest potential to limit the crestal resorption. However, there are only a few reports on the mechanism of action or the extent of bone loss prevention, and as such, it is difficult to say that the effect of PLS has been thoroughly examined. Excluding case reports, articles on PLS can be broadly categorized into: (1 radiographic evaluation of crestal bone level in humans, (2 histological and histomorphometrical analysis in animals, or (3 finite element analysis. This review revealed a shortage of published data for above three categories related PLS. Researchers have attempted to explain the mechanism of action of PLS; however, it is necessary to conduct further studies, including histological studies using animals, to clarify the mechanism fully.

  3. Bone tissue response to experimental zirconia implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihatovic, Ilja; Golubovic, Vladimir; Becker, Jürgen; Schwarz, Frank

    2017-03-01

    This study seeks to assess the bone tissue response at experimental zirconia implants in comparison with titanium implants by means of descriptive histology and histomorphometry in a dog model. Experimental zirconia implants with three different surface roughnesses (Z1  Z2 30.1 % > Z3 28.9 % > Z1 25.1 %, p > 0.05, unpaired t test, respectively). A provisional matrix was evident at all implant surfaces. At 14 days, percentages of BIC increased in all groups (tBIC: Ti 62.1 % > Z3 69.2 %  Z1 42.3 %; nBIC: Z3 58.9 % > Ti 52.2 % > Z2 35.1 % > Z1 32.5 %). Two implants, one of group Z1 and one of group Z2, were lost. At 10 weeks, 13 of 18 zirconia implants were lost, equally distributed between all three surface modifications. The remaining implants revealed increased BIC values (tBIC: Z3 69.5 % > Ti 58.5 % > Z1 49.7 % > Z2 37.1 %; nBIC: Z3 57.2 % > Ti 46.5 % > Z1 32.3 % > Z2 29.3 %). Histomorphometrical analysis showed comparable mean BIC values in all groups at all healing periods without showing statistical differences (p > 0.05, unpaired t test, respectively). The bone tissue response throughout the healing periods was characterized by a constant bone remodeling accompanied by resorption of old bone in favor of new bone formation at both titanium and zirconia implants. Surface roughness had a positive effect on BIC, although not showing statistical significance. Due to the poor survival rate, the experimental zirconia implants investigated may not be suitable for clinical use. Zirconia has been introduced as an alternative biomaterial for dental implants. A profound knowledge about the bone tissue response at zirconia implant surfaces is necessary as it plays an important role for proper osseointegration and long-term stability.

  4. [Experimental implantation of hydrogel into bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelár, P; Vacík, J; Dylevský, I; Sulc, J; Hulvert, J

    1989-02-01

    In spite of the rapid development of various natural and artifical implants of bone tissue, bones or whole joints, no material was found as yet which would maximally resemble the structure of the bone tissue and would also be maximally compatible. The present study deals with the application possibilities of unsoluble hydrophilic gels (hydrogels) as substitutes of bone tissue in experiment. The study concerns above all their biocompatibility with regard to the porous qualities of the implant and to its chemical structure, and evaluates their behaviour in the spongious and compact bone. It was used polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate (polyHEMA) which is crossling with small amount of glycoldimethacrylate when by changing of ratio monomer: water is possible obtain from homogeneous to macroporous structure of polymers. The macroporous structure was increased and the surface of the macroporous structure of polymers. The macroporous structure was increased and the surface of the macroporous, sinterted HEMA modified and implanted. The so-called double porosity was thus obtained. The implants were prepared in the form of cylinders (3.5 mm in diameter) in 8 different modifications and surgically implanted into the subtrochanteric and supracondylic part of the rabbit femurs. 42 animals were operated on. The obtained preparations were then evaluated macroscopically, and histologically processed in half-thin cuts (3-4 micrones). 124 samples were thus obtained. Some samples were radiographically contrasting. The rabbits were killed at intervals from 1-6 months, i.e. 32-193 days. It was found that the hydrogels modifications used in the experiment are biocompatible, their compatibility increasing in dependence on the increasing porosity. The non-porous and microporous hydrogels are not compatible and are damarked. The sintered macroporous gel is surrounded by a thin fibrine membrane signifying a high degree of compatibility with the bone tissue. By adding metacrylate acid to the

  5. Current bone substitutes for implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahiro; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2017-09-15

    Alveolar ridge augmentation is essential for success in implant therapy and depends on the biological performance of bone graft materials. This literature review aims to comprehensively explain the clinically relevant capabilities and limitations of currently available bone substitutes for bone augmentation in light of biomaterial science. The biological performance of calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes was categorized according to space-making capability, biocompatibility, bioabsorption, and volume maintenance over time. Each category was reviewed based on clinical studies, preclinical animal studies, and in vitro studies. Currently available bone substitutes provide only osteoconduction as a scaffold but not osteoinduction. Particle size, sensitivity to enzymatic or chemical dissolution, and mechanical properties affect the space-making capability of bone substitutes. The nature of collagen fibers, particulate size, and release of calcium ions influence the biocompatibility of bone substitutes. Bioabsorption of bone substitutes is determined by water solubility (chemical composition) and acid resistance (integrity of apatite structure). Bioabsorption of remnant bone substitute material and volume maintenance of the augmented bone are inversely related. It is necessary to improve the biocompatibility of currently available bone substitutes and to strike an appropriate balance between bioabsorption and volume maintenance to achieve ideal bone remodeling. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Suboccipital neuropathy after bone conduction device placement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, H.T.; Ru, J.A. de

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics of a 70-year-old female with occipital neuropathy following bone conduction device surgery. DESCRIPTION: A 65-year-old woman underwent bone conduction device placement surgery on the left temporal bone. Postoperatively she progressively developed

  7. Bone Conduction: Anatomy, Physiology, and Communication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry, Paula; Letowski, Tomasz R

    2007-01-01

    .... This report combines results of an extensive literature review of the anatomy and physiology of human hearing, theories behind the mechanisms of bone conduction transmission, devices for use in bone...

  8. Bone Conduction Communication: Research Progress and Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-16

    localization, equal loudness, speech intelligibility, gender differences 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU...Correlational Research 33 2.9 Summary 34 3. Bone Conduction Loudness 34 3.1 Sound Cancellation Studies 35 3.2 Equal -Loudness Studies 37 3.3 Summary 45...Separation Studies 56 5.5 Summary 58 6. Bone Conduction Gender Differences 58 6.1 Air Conduction Studies 59 6.2 Bone Conduction Transmission (Vibrator

  9. Conductive component after cochlear implantation in patients with residual hearing conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chole, Richard A; Hullar, Timothy E; Potts, Lisa G

    2014-12-01

    Changes in auditory thresholds following cochlear implantation are generally assumed to be due to damage to neural elements. Theoretical studies have suggested that placement of a cochlear implant can cause a conductive hearing loss. Identification of a conductive component following cochlear implantation could guide improvements in surgical techniques or device designs. The purpose of this study is to characterize new-onset conductive hearing losses after cochlear implantation. In a prospective study, air- and bone-conduction audiometric testing were completed on cochlear implant recipients. An air-bone gap equal to or greater than 15 dB HL at 2 frequencies determined the presence of a conductive component. Of the 32 patients with preoperative bone-conduction hearing, 4 patients had a new-onset conductive component resulting in a mixed hearing loss, with air-conduction thresholds ranging from moderate to profound and an average air-bone gap of 30 dB HL. One had been implanted through the round window, 2 had an extended round window, and 1 had a separate cochleostomy. Loss of residual hearing following cochlear implantation may be due in part to a conductive component. Identifying the mechanism for this conductive component may help minimize hearing loss. Postoperative hearing evaluation should measure both air- and bone-conduction thresholds.

  10. Osteoporotic rat models for evaluation of osseointegration of bone implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alghamdi, H.S.A.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Jansen, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Osseointegration of dental and orthopedic bone implants is the important process that leads to mechanical fixation of implants and warrants implant functionality. In view of increasing numbers of osteoporotic patients, bone implant surface optimization strategies with instructive and drug-loading

  11. Nanoscale characterization of bone-implant interface and biomechanical modulation of bone ingrowth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Paul A. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States)]. E-mail: pclark4@gmail.com; Clark, Andrew M. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Rodriguez, Anthony [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Hussain, Mohammad A. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States); Mao, Jeremy J. [Tissue Engineering Laboratory MC 841, Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Bioengineering, and Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street, Illinois 60612 (United States)]. E-mail: jmao2@uic.edu

    2007-04-15

    Bone-implant interface is characterized by an array of cells and macromolecules. This study investigated the nanomechancial properties of bone-implant interface using atomic force microscopy in vitro, and the mechanical modulation of implant bone ingrowth in vivo using bone histomorphometry. Upon harvest of screw-type titanium implants placed in vivo in the rabbit maxilla and proximal femur for 4 weeks, nanoindentation was performed in the bone-implant interface at 60-{mu}m intervals radially from the implant surface. The average Young's Moduli (E) of the maxillary bone-implant interface was 1.13 {+-} 0.27 MPa, lacking significant differences at all intervals. In contrast, an increasing gradient of E was observed radially from the femur bone-implant interface: 0.87 {+-} 0.25 MPa to 2.24 {+-} 0.69 MPa, representing significant differences among several 60-{mu}m intervals. In a separate experiment, bone healing was allowed for 6 weeks for proximal femur implants. The right femoral implant received axial cyclic loading at 200 mN and 1 Hz for 10 min/d over 12 days, whereas the left femoral implant served as control. Cyclic loading induced significantly higher bone volume, osteoblast numbers per endocortical bone surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate than controls. These data demonstrate nanoscale and microscale characterizations of bone-implant interface, and mechanical modulation of bone ingrowth surrounding titanium implants.

  12. Nanoscale characterization of bone-implant interface and biomechanical modulation of bone ingrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Paul A.; Clark, Andrew M.; Rodriguez, Anthony; Hussain, Mohammad A.; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2007-01-01

    Bone-implant interface is characterized by an array of cells and macromolecules. This study investigated the nanomechancial properties of bone-implant interface using atomic force microscopy in vitro, and the mechanical modulation of implant bone ingrowth in vivo using bone histomorphometry. Upon harvest of screw-type titanium implants placed in vivo in the rabbit maxilla and proximal femur for 4 weeks, nanoindentation was performed in the bone-implant interface at 60-μm intervals radially from the implant surface. The average Young's Moduli (E) of the maxillary bone-implant interface was 1.13 ± 0.27 MPa, lacking significant differences at all intervals. In contrast, an increasing gradient of E was observed radially from the femur bone-implant interface: 0.87 ± 0.25 MPa to 2.24 ± 0.69 MPa, representing significant differences among several 60-μm intervals. In a separate experiment, bone healing was allowed for 6 weeks for proximal femur implants. The right femoral implant received axial cyclic loading at 200 mN and 1 Hz for 10 min/d over 12 days, whereas the left femoral implant served as control. Cyclic loading induced significantly higher bone volume, osteoblast numbers per endocortical bone surface, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate than controls. These data demonstrate nanoscale and microscale characterizations of bone-implant interface, and mechanical modulation of bone ingrowth surrounding titanium implants

  13. Implant bone integration importance in forensic identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Danilo; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    Odontological identification consists of the comparison of antemortem dental information regarding a missing person with postmortem data from an unidentified corpse or human remains. Usually, the comparison concerns morphologic features that the operator chooses among all the visible characteristics because of inter-individual uniqueness; for this reason, implants can be of enormous assistance. A case concerning the recovery of a burnt oral implant, connected to a bone fragment, among 2780 charred bone fragments, suspected to have belonged to a victim of homicide, is presented to demonstrate that dental implants and their site of bone integration represent a very precious element for personal forensic identification. Because of their morphological invariability in time and because of their morphologic uniqueness, they were used as evidence to associate unidentified human charred remains to a missing person where DNA analysis failed to do so. The case illustrates the fundamental contribution, not yet described in literature, given by the clinical aspects of tooth replacement with dental implants to a forensic discipline. Clinical practitioners should therefore be aware of the great importance of their work and of dental records in a forensic identification scenario. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Osseointegration of dental implants placed into canine mandibular bone regenerated by bone transport distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogiorgos, Elias; Elsalanty, Mohammed E; Zakhary, Ibrahim; Nagy, William W; Dechow, Paul C; Opperman, Lynne A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the osseointegration of dental implants placed in canine mandibular bone and in regenerated bone produced by bone transport distraction osteogenesis. Ten adult foxhounds were divided into two groups of five animals each. In all animals, a 40-mm defect was created on one side of the mandible. A bone transport reconstruction plate was used to stabilize the mandible and regenerate bone. Six weeks after the distraction period was finished, dental implants were placed in regenerated and native mandibular bone. The animals were sacrificed after another 6 and 12 weeks of healing, respectively. Microcomputed tomographic evaluation showed that bone volume fraction (BV/TV) was greater at the coronal regions of the implants and decreased toward the apical regions. There was an increase in BV/TV around implants placed in regenerated bone from 6 to 12 weeks of healing. The regenerated group showed lower BV/TV at 6 weeks versus implants placed in native bone but had reached the same levels as the native bone at 12 weeks. Histology showed that direct bone-to-implant contact was greater for implants placed in native bone than for those placed in regenerated bone for both time periods. The removal torque of the implants placed in native bone was higher at 6 weeks than that of implants placed in regenerated bone. At 12 weeks, there were no statistically significant differences in removal torque between the groups. Bone was successfully regenerated in all animals. The implants placed entirely in regenerated bone were osseointegrated. The regenerated bone around the implants became denser over time. This finding suggests that implants placed entirely in regenerated bone will be as well integrated as implants in native mandibular bone by 12 weeks after placement.

  15. Development of osteoconductive coatings for non-metallic bone implants

    OpenAIRE

    Turco, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    2008/2009 The design of osseous implants, either load bearing or not, with desired mechanical and surface features that promote integration with bone and avoid risks of bone resorption and implant failure due to shear stresses, is still a challenging endeavour. The mechanical stresses which the skeleton undergoes affect bone formation and resorption processes. Bone remodelling is often promoted by adequate stress/strain conditions which are able to prevent bone mass loss. The largely used ...

  16. Survival of Dental Implants Placed in Grafted and Nongrafted Bone: A Retrospective Study in a University Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Duong T; Gay, Isabel C; Diaz-Rodriguez, Janice; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Weltman, Robin; Friedman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    To compare dental implant survival rates when placed in native bone and grafted sites. Additionally, risk factors associated with dental implant loss were identified. This study was based on the hypothesis that bone grafting has no effect on implant survival rates. A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients receiving dental implants at the University of Texas, School of Dentistry from 1985 to 2012. Exclusion criteria included patients with genetic diseases, radiation and chemotherapy, or an age less than 18 years. To avoid misclassification bias, implants were excluded if bone grafts were only done at the same time of placement. Data on age, sex, tobacco use, diabetes, osteoporosis, anatomical location of the implant, implant length and width, bone graft, and professional maintenance were collected for analysis. A total of 1,222 patients with 2,729 implants were included. The cumulative survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 92% and 87% for implants placed in native bone and 90% and 79% for implants placed in grafted bone, respectively. The results from multivariate analysis (Cox regression) indicated no significant difference in survival between the two groups; having maintenance therapy after implant placement reduced the failure rate by 80% (P dental implant survival rate when implants were placed in native bone or bone-grafted sites. Smoking and lack of professional maintenance were significantly related to increased implant loss.

  17. Finite element analysis of bone loss around failing implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, J.E.H.; Narra, N.; Antalainen, A.K.; Valasek, J.; Kaiser, J.; Sandor, G.K.; Marcian, P.

    2014-01-01

    Dental implants induce diverse forces on their surrounding bone. However, when excessive unphysiological forces are applied, resorption of the neighbouring bone may occur. The aim of this study was to assess possible causes of bone loss around failing dental implants using finite element analysis. A

  18. Prosthetic abutment influences bone biomechanical behavior of immediately loaded implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana de Villa CAMARGOS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the type of prosthetic abutment associated to different implant connection on bone biomechanical behavior of immediately and delayed loaded implants. Computed tomography-based finite element models comprising a mandible with a single molar implant were created with different types of prosthetic abutment (UCLA or conical, implant connection (external hexagon, EH or internal hexagon, IH, and occlusal loading (axial or oblique, for both immediately and delayed loaded implants. Analysis of variance at 95%CI was used to evaluate the peak maximum principal stress and strain in bone after applying a 100 N occlusal load. The results showed that the type of prosthetic abutment influences bone stress/strain in only immediately loaded implants. Attachment of conical abutments to IH implants exhibited the best biomechanical behavior, with optimal distribution and dissipation of the load in peri-implant bone.

  19. Treatment concepts for the posterior maxilla and mandible: short implants versus long implants in augmented bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Daniel Stefan; Cha, Jae-Kook; Jung, Ui-Won

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this narrative review is to describe treatment options for the posterior regions of the mandible and the maxilla, comparing short implants vs. longer implants in an augmented bone. The dental literature was screened for treatment options enabling the placement of dental implants in posterior sites with a reduced vertical bone height in the maxilla and the mandible. Short dental implants have been increasingly used recently, providing a number of advantages including reduced patient morbidity, shorter treatment time, and lower costs. In the posterior maxilla, sinus elevation procedures were for long considered to be the gold standard using various bone substitute materials and rendering high implant survival rates. More recently, implants were even placed without any further use of bone substitute materials, but the long-term outcomes have yet to be documented. Vertical bone augmentation procedures in the mandible require a relatively high level of surgical skill and allow the placement of standard-length dental implants by the use of autogenous bone blocks. Both treatment options, short dental implants, and standard-length implants in combination with vertical bone augmentation procedures, appear to result in predictable outcomes in terms of implant survival rates. According to recent clinical studies comparing the therapeutic options of short implants vs. long implants in augmented bone, the use of short dental implants leads to a number of advantages for the patients and the clinician.

  20. Short implants versus bone grafting and standard-length implants placement: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Juan A V; Garcia, Jaime Jiménez; Caramês, João M M; Quirynen, Marc; da Silva Marques, Duarte Nuno

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review to compare the survival rates between short implants (length implants (≥ 10 mm) inserted in grafted bone. As secondary outcomes, marginal bone loss and survival rates of the implant supported prostheses were also analysed. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) that compared both techniques were searched on three electronic databases till June 2016, a manual search was performed on the bibliography of the collected articles, and the authors were contacted for additional references. The estimates of the interventions were expressed in relative risk (RR), mean implant survival rates and mean differences in marginal bone. Eight RCTs were included in this study. From a total of 458 short implants, 15 failed (mean survival rates = 96.7%), While from 488 regular implants, 13 failed (mean survival rates = 97.3%). The technique did not significantly affect: the implant failure rate (P > 0.05), with RR of 1.34 (95% CI 0.67-2.87), the mean differences of marginal bone loss (P = 0.18; MD - 0.04 mm [- 0.10; 0.02] 95% CI), at loading or prosthesis failures rates (RR:0.98; 95% CI 0.40-2.41). The mean differences of marginal bone at 1 year follow-up (post loading) presented significant marginal changes in the short implant group (P = 0.002; MD - 0.10 mm [- 0.16; - 0.03] 95% CI) although a significant high heterogeneity was found between groups. This systematic review suggests no difference between both techniques in the treatment of atrophic arches. However, more long-term RCTs are needed to evaluate the predictability at the long run. The use of short implants might be considered an alternative treatment, since it usually requires fewer surgical phases and tends to be a more affordable option.

  1. The effect of peri-implant bone exposure on soft tissue healing and bone loss in two adjacent implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung-Yun; Kye, Seung-Boem; Hong, Jongrak; Paeng, Jun-Young

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the soft tissue and bone change around two adjacent implants in one-stage implant surgery. Methods Eleven subjects (7 males, 4 females) who were needed placement of 2 adjacent implants in the molar area were included. The two implants were placed with the platform at the level of the alveolar crest. The interproximal bone between the 2 implants was not covered with gingiva. After surgery, an alginate impression was taken to record the gingival shape and radiographs were taken to evaluate implant placement. Using a master cast, the gingival height was measured at baseline, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks. In the radiograph, the alveolar bone level was measured at the mesial and distal side of both implants at baseline and 12 weeks. Results The exposed bone was covered with gingiva at both 4 and 12 weeks. Loss of alveolar bone around implants was found in all areas. The alveolar bone level in the exposed bone area did not differ from that in the non-exposed area. Conclusions This study showed that the alveolar bone level and gingival height around 2 adjacent implants in the exposed bone area did not differ from that in unexposed bone area. PMID:22413070

  2. Effects of Implant-Associated Osteomyelitis on Cefuroxime Bone Pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttrup, Mikkel; Bue, Mats; Koch, Janne

    2016-01-01

    penetration into bone.  Methods: Implant-associated osteomyelitis using a Staphylococcus aureus strain was induced in the right tibia in ten pigs. After five days and following administration of 1500 mg of cefuroxime, measurements of cefuroxime were obtained using microdialysis for eight hours in the implant......-related bone cavity, in the adjacent infected cancellous bone and infected subcutaneous tissue, and in healthy cancellous bone and subcutaneous tissue in the contralateral leg. Measurements of the corresponding free plasma concentrations were also obtained. The extent of the infection was assessed...... by postmortem computed tomography (CT) scans and cultures of blood, swabs, and bone specimens.  Results: Bone destruction was found in the implant cavities. No structural bone changes in the adjacent infected cancellous bone were visible on CT scans. S. aureus was grown on culture of specimens from all implant...

  3. Appositional bone formation in marginal defects at implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botticelli, Daniele; Berglundh, Tord; Buser, Daniel; Lindhe, Jan

    2003-02-01

    In a previous experiment, it was demonstrated that a wide marginal defect around an implant can heal with a high degree of osseointegration. The present experiment was performed to evaluate the degree and quality of de novo bone formation and osseointegration in marginal defects adjacent to submerged titanium implants. All mandibular premolars and 1st molars were extracted in four Labrador dogs. Four experimental sites were identified in the right side of the mandible. In two sites, custom-made implants with a sandblasted, large grit, acid-etched (SLA) surface were installed without further ostectomy (control sites). In the two remaining sites (test sites), a specially designed step drill was used to widen the marginal 5 mm of the canal. A barrier membrane was used to cover the implants in the defect sites. All implants were submerged. One month later, an identical procedure, including site preparation and implant installation, was performed in the left side of the mandible. Two months following the first implant installation procedure, biopsies were collected and prepared for sectioning. Ostectomy and implant installation in the control location resulted in a series of bone tissue alterations which eventually allowed newly formed bone to establish contact with the SLA surface. The marginal defect lateral to the implant in the test locations gradually became filled with newly formed bone. De novo bone formation started within the walls of the surgically prepared defect. Bone-to-implant contact was first established in the apical portion of the gap. This new bone tissue was in the coronal direction continuous with a dense, non-mineralized 'implant attached' soft tissue which, over time, also became mineralized to increase the height of the zone of bone-to-implant contact. The results suggest that healing of a wide marginal defect around an implant is characterized by appositional bone growth from the lateral and apical bone walls of the defect.

  4. Artificial composite bone as a model of human trabecular bone: the implant-bone interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J A; Bishop, N E; Götzen, N; Sprecher, C; Honl, M; Morlock, M M

    2007-01-01

    The use of artificial bones in implant testing has become popular due to their low variability and ready availability. However, friction coefficients, which are critical to load transfer in uncemented implants, have rarely been compared between human and artificial bone, particularly for wet and dry conditions. In this study, the static and dynamic friction coefficients for four commercially used titanium surfaces (polished, Al(2)O(3) blasted, plasma sprayed, beaded) acting on the trabecular component of artificial bones (Sawbones) were compared to those for human trabecular bone. Artificial bones were tested in dry and wet conditions and normal interface stress was varied (0.25, 0.5, 1.0MPa). Friction coefficients were mostly lower for artificial bones than real bone. In particular, static friction coefficients for the dry polished surface were 20% of those for real bone and 42-61% for the dry beaded surface, with statistical significance (alphaartificial bone models for pre-clinical implant testing that rely on interface load transfer with trabecular bone for mechanical integrity can be particularly sensitive to surface finish and lubrication conditions.

  5. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex E Pozhitkov

    Full Text Available Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient's mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4-5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients.

  6. Biocompatibility of orthopaedic implants on bone forming cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kapanen, A. (Anita)

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Reindeer antler was studied for its possible use as a bone implant material. A molecular biological study showed that antler contains a growth factor promoting bone formation. Ectopic bone formation assay showed that antler is not an equally effective inducer as allogenic material. Ectopic bone formation assay was optimised for biocompatibility studies of orthopaedic NiTi implants. Ti-6Al-4V and stainless steel were used as reference materials. The assay...

  7. Impact of platform switching on peri-implant bone remodeling around short implants in the posterior region, 1-year results from a split-mouth clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telleman, Gerdien; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J A

    2014-02-01

    To assess the effect of platform switching on peri-implant bone remodeling around short implants (8.5 mm) placed in the resorbed posterior mandibular and maxillary region of partially edentulous patients. Seventeen patients with one or more missing teeth at both sides in the posterior region were, according to a split-mouth design, randomly assigned to be treated with a platform-matched (control) implant on the one side and a platform-switched implant (test) on the other side. A total of 62 short implants (8.5 mm) with a dual-acid etched surface with nanometer-sized calcium phosphate particles was placed. Follow-up visits were conducted one month and one year after placing the implant crown. Outcome measures were interproximal bone level changes, implant survival and clinical parameters. One year after loading, peri-implant bone remodeling around test implants (0.53 ± 0.54 mm) was significant less than around control implants (0.85 ± 0.65 mm; p = .003). With regard to implant survival and clinical parameters no significant differences were observed between test and control implants. This study suggested that peri-implant bone remodeling is affected by platform switching. One year after loading, interproximal bone levels were better maintained at implants restored according to the platform switching concept. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Bonebridge Implantation for Conductive Hearing Loss in a Patient with Oval Window Atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minbum

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of oval window atresia is a rare anomaly with conductive hearing loss. Traditional atresia surgeries involve challenging surgical techniques with risks of irreversible inner ear damage. Recent reports on Bonebridge (Medel, Innsbruck, Austria), a novel implantable bone conduction hearing aid system, assert that the device is safe and effective for conductive hearing loss. We present a case of Bonebridge implantation in an eight-year-old girl with bilateral oval window atresia.

  9. Treatment concepts for the posterior maxilla and mandible: short implants versus long implants in augmented bone

    OpenAIRE

    Thoma, Daniel Stefan; Cha, Jae-Kook; Jung, Ui-Won

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this narrative review is to describe treatment options for the posterior regions of the mandible and the maxilla, comparing short implants vs. longer implants in an augmented bone. The dental literature was screened for treatment options enabling the placement of dental implants in posterior sites with a reduced vertical bone height in the maxilla and the mandible. Short dental implants have been increasingly used recently, providing a number of advantages including reduced patient...

  10. Implant failure in osteosynthesis of fractures of long bones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients who had open operative treatment of fractures of long bones were reviewed retrospectively to identify the incidence of and risk factors for implant failure. One hundred and five patients had open reduction and internal fixation of 117 fractures of long bones, out of which four patients suffered implant failure.

  11. Bone grafting simultaneous to implant placement. Presentation of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Gómez-Adrián, Maria Dolores; García-Mira, Berta; Ivorra-Sais, Mariola

    2005-01-01

    Bone defects at mandibular alveolar crest level complicate the placement of dental implants in the ideal location. Surgical reconstruction using autologous bone grafts allows implant fixation in an esthetic and functional manner. We describe a patient with large mandibular bone loss secondary to periodontal inflammatory processes. Reconstruction of the mandibular alveolar process was carried out using onlay block bone grafts harvested from the mandible. The grafts were stabilized by positioning the dental implants through them--a procedure that moreover afforded good primary implant fixation. After two years of follow-up the clinical and radiological outcome is good. In the lower jaw, where bone regeneration is complicated, we were able to achieve good results in this patient--minimizing the corresponding waiting time by grafting and placing the implants in the same surgical step.

  12. Scapular Free Vascularised Bone Flaps for Mandibular Reconstruction: Are Dental Implants Possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lanzer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Free fibula flap remains the flap of choice for reconstruction of mandibular defects. If free fibula flap is not possible, the subscapular system of flaps is a valid option. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of dental implant placement in patients receiving a scapular free flap for oromandibular reconstruction. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients undergoing mandible reconstruction with a subscapular system free-tissue (lateral border of the scapula transfer at the University Hospital Zürich between January 1, 2010 and January 1, 2013. Bone density in cortical and cancellous bone was measured in Hounsfield units (HU. Changes of bone density, height and width were analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics 22. Comparisons of bone dimensions as well as bone density were performed using a chi-square test. Results: Ten patients were included. Implantation was conducted in 50%. However, all patients could have received dental implants considering bone stock. Loss of bone height and width were significant (P < 0.001. There was a statistical significant increase in bone density in cortical (P < 0.001 and cancellous (P = 0.004 bone. Conclusions: Dental implants are possible after scapular free flap reconstruction of oromandibular defects. Bone height and width were reduced, while bone density increased with time.

  13. Review of recent publications on bone implant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseke, C.

    2001-01-01

    Review of recent development in bone implant manufacturing and properties have been reported. The desirable implant mechanical, chemical, biological and surface properties have been discussed. Implant materials as well as their surface treatment and coating for achievement of best therapeutic results have been also presented

  14. Osteogenesis and Morphology of the Peri-Implant Bone Facing Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Franchi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of different implant surfaces on peri-implant osteogenesis and implant face morphology of peri-implant tissues during the early (2 weeks and complete healing period (3 months. Thirty endosseous titanium implants (conic screws with differently treated surfaces (smooth titanium = SS, titanium plasma sprayed = TPS, sand-blasted zirconium oxide = Zr-SLA were implanted in femur and tibiae diaphyses of two mongrel sheep. Histological sections of the implants and surrounding tissues obtained by sawing and grinding techniques were observed under light microscopy (LM. The peri-implant tissues of other samples were mechanically detached from the corresponding implants to be processed for SEM observation. Two weeks after implantation, we observed osteogenesis (new bone trabeculae around all implant surfaces only where a gap was present at the host bone-metal interface. No evident bone deposition was detectable where threads of the screws were in direct contact with the compact host bone. Distance osteogenesis predominated in SS implants, while around rough surfaces (TPS and Zr-SLA, both distance and contact osteogenesis were present. At SEM analysis 2 weeks after implantation, the implant face of SS peri-implant tissue showed few, thin, newly formed, bone trabeculae immersed in large, loose, marrow tissue with blood vessels. Around the TPS screws, the implant face of the peri-implant tissue was rather irregular because of the rougher metal surface. Zr-SLA screws showed more numerous, newly formed bone trabeculae crossing marrow spaces and also needle-like crystals in bone nodules indicating an active mineralising process. After 3 months, all the screws appeared osseointegrated, being almost completely covered by a compact, mature, newly formed bone. However, some marrow spaces rich in blood vessels and undifferentiated cells were in contact with the metal surface. By SEM analysis, the implant face of the peri-implant

  15. Influences of implant neck design and implant-abutment joint type on peri-implant bone stress and abutment micromovement: three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanishi, Yasufumi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Imazato, Satoshi; Nakano, Tamaki; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2012-11-01

    Occlusal overloading is one of the causes of peri-implant bone resorption, and many studies on stress distribution in the peri-implant bone by three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA) have been performed. However, the FEA models previously reported were simplified and far from representing what occurs in clinical situations. In this study, 3D FEA was conducted with simulation of the complex structure of dental implants, and the influences of neck design and connections with an abutment on peri-implant bone stress and abutment micromovement were investigated. Three types of two-piece implant CAD models were designed: external joint with a conical tapered neck (EJ), internal joint with a straight neck (IJ), and conical joint with a reverse conical neck (CJ). 3D FEA was performed with the setting of a "contact" condition at the component interface, and stress distribution in the peri-implant bone and abutment micromovement were analyzed. The shear stress was concentrated on the mesiodistal side of the cortical bone for EJ. EJ had the largest amount of abutment micromovement. While the von Mises and shear stresses around the implant neck were concentrated on the labial bone for IJ, they were distributed on the mesiodistal side of the cortical bone for CJ. CJ had the least amount of abutment micromovement. Implants with a conical joint with an abutment and reverse conical neck design may effectively control occlusal overloading on the labial bone and abutment micromovement. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bone Conduction Thresholds without Bone Vibrator Application Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geal-Dor, Miriam; Chordekar, Shai; Adelman, Cahtia; Sohmer, Haim

    2015-01-01

    Osseous bone conduction (BC) stimulation involves applying the clinical bone vibrator with an application force of about 5 Newton (N) to the skin over the cranial vault of skull bone (e.g., mastoid, forehead). In nonosseous BC (also called soft tissue conduction), the bone vibrator elicits hearing when it is applied to skin sites not over the cranial vault of skull bone, such as the neck. To gain insight into the mechanisms of osseous and nonosseous BC. In general, thresholds were determined with the bone vibrator applied with about 5 N force directly to osseous sites (mastoid, forehead) on the head of the participants, as classically conducted in the clinic, and again without direct physical contact (i.e., 0 N force) achieved by coupling the bone vibrator to gel as in ultrasound diagnostic imaging, on the same or nearby skin sites (nonosseous BC). The participants were equipped with earplugs to minimize air-conducted stimulation. In the first experiment, 10 normal-hearing participants were tested with stimulation (5 and 0 N) at the forehead; in the second experiment, 10 additional normal-hearing participants were tested with stimulation at the mastoid (about 5 N) and at the nearby tragus and cavum concha of the external ear (0 N). The mean thresholds with 0 N were much better than might be expected from classical theories in response to stimulation by a bone vibrator, in the absence of any application force. The differences between the mean thresholds with the 0 N and the 5 N forces depended on condition, site, and stimulus frequency of the comparisons. The difference was 1.5 dB at 1.0 kHz on the forehead; ranged between 10 and 12.5 dB at 1.0 kHz on the cavum and tragus (versus on the mastoid) and at 2.0 and 4.0 kHz on the forehead; 17 and 19 dB at 2.0 kHz on the cavum and tragus (versus on the mastoid); reaching 32 dB only in a single condition (forehead at 0.5 kHz). As it is unlikely that threshold intensity stimulation delivered with 0 N application force could

  17. Effect of Surface Nanotopography on Bone Response to Titanium Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Gileade P; Lopes, Helena B; Martins-Neto, Evandro C; de Oliveira, Paulo T; Beloti, Marcio M; Rosa, Adalberto L

    2016-06-01

    Clinical success of implant therapy is directly related to titanium (Ti) surface properties and the quality of bone tissue. The treatment of Ti implants with H2SO4/H2O2 is a feasible, reproducible, and low-cost technique to create surface nanotopography (Ti-Nano). As this nanotopography induces osteoblast differentiation, we hypothesized that it may affect bone response to Ti. Thus, this study was designed to evaluate the bone response to a machined Ti implant treated with H2SO4/H2O2 to generate Ti-Nano and to compare it with a commercially available microtopographic Ti implant (Ti-Porous). Implants were placed in rabbit tibias and evaluated after 2 and 6 weeks, and the bone tissue formed around them was assessed by microtomography to record bone volume, bone surface, specific bone surface, trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and trabecular separation. Undecalcified histological sections were used to determine the percentages of bone-to-implant contact, bone area formed between threads, and bone area formed in the mirror area. At the end of 6 weeks, the removal torque was evaluated using a digital torque gauge. The results showed bone formation in close contact with both Ti-Nano and Ti-Porous implants without relevant morphological and morphometric differences, in addition to a similar removal torque irrespective of surface topography. In conclusion, our results have shown that a simple and low-cost method using H2SO4/H2O2 is highly efficient for creating nanotopography on Ti surfaces, which elicits a similar bone response compared with microtopography presented in a commercially available Ti implant.

  18. The effect of peri-implant bone exposure on soft tissue healing and bone loss in two adjacent implants

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Seung-Yun; Kye, Seung-Boem; Hong, Jongrak; Paeng, Jun-Young; Yang, Seung-Min

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the soft tissue and bone change around two adjacent implants in one-stage implant surgery. Methods Eleven subjects (7 males, 4 females) who were needed placement of 2 adjacent implants in the molar area were included. The two implants were placed with the platform at the level of the alveolar crest. The interproximal bone between the 2 implants was not covered with gingiva. After surgery, an alginate impression was taken to record the gingival...

  19. A Bone-Implant Interaction Mouse Model for Evaluating Molecular Mechanism of Biomaterials/Bone Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenlong; Dan, Xiuli; Wang, Ting; Lu, William W; Pan, Haobo

    2016-11-01

    The development of an optimal animal model that could provide fast assessments of the interaction between bone and orthopedic implants is essential for both preclinical and theoretical researches in the design of novel biomaterials. Compared with other animal models, mice have superiority in accessing the well-developed transgenic modification techniques (e.g., cell tracing, knockoff, knockin, and so on), which serve as powerful tools in studying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we introduced the establishment of a mouse model, which was specifically tailored for the assessment of bone-implant interaction in a load-bearing bone marrow microenvironment and could potentially allow the molecular mechanism study of biomaterials by using transgenic technologies. The detailed microsurgery procedures for developing a bone defect (Φ = 0.8 mm) at the metaphysis region of the mouse femur were recorded. According to our results, the osteoconductive and osseointegrative properties of a well-studied 45S5 bioactive glass were confirmed by utilizing our mouse model, verifying the reliability of this model. The feasibility and reliability of the present model were further checked by using other materials as objects of study. Furthermore, our results indicated that this animal model provided a more homogeneous tissue-implant interacting surface than the rat at the early stage of implantation and this is quite meaningful for conducting quantitative analysis. The availability of transgenic techniques to mechanism study of biomaterials was further testified by establishing our model on Nestin-GFP transgenic mice. Intriguingly, the distribution of Nestin + cells was demonstrated to be recruited to the surface of 45S5 glass as early as 3 days postsurgery, indicating that Nestin + lineage stem cells may participate in the subsequent regeneration process. In summary, the bone-implant interaction mouse model could serve as a potential candidate to evaluate the early stage tissue

  20. Stress Distribution on Short Implants at Maxillary Posterior Alveolar Bone Model With Different Bone-to-Implant Contact Ratio: Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazicioglu, Duygu; Bayram, Burak; Oguz, Yener; Cinar, Duygu; Uckan, Sina

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution of the short dental implants and bone-to-implant contact ratios in the posterior maxilla using 3-dimensional (3D) finite element models. Two different 3D maxillary posterior bone segments were modeled. Group 1 was composed of a bone segment consisting of cortical bone and type IV cancellous bone with 100% bone-to-implant contact. Group 2 was composed of a bone segment consisting of cortical bone and type IV cancellous bone including spherical bone design and homogenous tubular hollow spaced structures with 30% spherical porosities and 70% bone-to-implant contact ratio. Four-millimeter-diameter and 5-mm-height dental implants were assumed to be osseointegrated and placed at the center of the segments. Lateral occlusal bite force (300 N) was applied at a 25° inclination to the implants long axis. The maximum von Mises stresses in cortical and cancellous bones and implant-abutment complex were calculated. The von Mises stress values on the implants and the cancellous bone around the implants of the 70% bone-to-implant contact group were almost 3 times higher compared with the values of the 100% bone-to-implant contact group. For clinical reality, use of the 70% model for finite element analysis simulation of the posterior maxilla region better represents real alveolar bone and the increased stress and strain distributions evaluated on the cortical and cancellous bone around the dental implants.

  1. Bioreactor activated graft material for early implant fixation in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek Henriksen, Susan; Ding, Ming; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The combined incubation of a composite scaffold with bone marrow stromal cells in a perfusion bioreactor could make up a novel hybrid graft material with optimal properties for early fixation of implant to bone. The aim of this study was to create a bioreactor activated graft (BAG...... in each sheep. The concentric gap (2 mm) surrounding the implant was filled with 1) BAG (autogenous), 2) granules, 3) granules+bone marrow aspirate (BMA, autologous) or 4) allograft. The sheep were euthanized after 6 weeks. Distal femurs were removed and implant-bone samples were divided in two parts...... calculated to assess implant fixation. Results were assessed by One-way ANOVA. P-values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Results One sheep in group 1 had to be euthanized after 4 weeks (excluded). One implant in each group was loosened and could not undergo push-out test (excluded). Group 1...

  2. Evaluation of bone tissue reaction in laser beamed implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegrini, Sergio, E-mail: sergiojr@usp.br [Graduate Program in Biodentistry, Ibirapuera University (UNIB), São Paulo, SP, 04661 100 (Brazil); Yoshimoto, Marcelo [Graduate Program in Biodentistry, Ibirapuera University (UNIB), São Paulo, SP, 04661 100 (Brazil); Salles, Marcos Barbosa [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), São Paulo, SP, 02117 010 (Brazil); Allegrini, Marcia Rivellino Facci [São Paulo Fire Department (SPFD) of the Militar Police, Dentistry Section, São Paulo, SP, 01018 001 (Brazil); Pistarini, Luciana Crepaldi Yazawa; Braga, Francisco Jose Correa; Bressiani, Ana Helena de Almeida [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute – IPEN/USP, São Paulo, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate alterations and bone tissue response on laser treated implant surfaces (Nd:YAG – 100 W). Sixty grade II titanium (ASTM F67) mini-implants (1.5 mm × 4.0 mm) were installed in femurs of 30 Wistar rats. The animals were divided into two groups: thirty mini-implants were machined elements (Machined Group) and the other thirty had laser beamed surfaces (Laser Group). The animals were subdivided into three groups, according to bone healing periods of 15, 30 and 60 days. The samples were analyzed under light, scanning electron and confocal 3D microscopy as well as by EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy) and Student's t test was used for statistical analyses. Light microscopy results showed new bone trabeculae formation toward laser-treated implants at 15 days’ bone repair as well as thin layers of osteoid matrix, indicating high biocompatibility. Similar features were observed in the Machined Group but only after 30 days. Bone/implant contact was better evidenced on laser-treated surfaces compared to that on simply machined implants. The only group that demonstrated change in level of significance was the laser-treated group at the 15-day-healing period (p < 0.05). Higher oxygen concentration possibly provides more efficient response of osteoblasts during new bone tissue deposition. Implant treated surfaces altered by laser beaming, their composition, surface topography and surface energy may be the future scene in implant dentistry.

  3. Bone compaction enhances implant fixation in a canine gap model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, Søren Vedding; Rahbek, Ole; Toft, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    A new bone preparation technique, compaction, has increased fixation of implants inserted with exact-fit or press-fit to bone. Furthermore, a demonstrated spring-back effect of compacted bone might be of potential value in reducing the initial gaps that often exist between clinical inserted...... implants and bone. However, it is unknown whether the compression and breakage of trabeculae during the compaction procedure results in impaired gap-healing of compacted bone. Therefore, we compared compaction with conventional drilling in a canine gap model. Grit-blasted titanium implants (diameter 6 mm......) were bilaterally inserted into cavities initially expanded to 8 mm diameters in the proximal humeri. Each dog served as its own control; thus, one humerus had the implant cavity prepared with compaction, the other with drilling. Eight dogs were euthanized after 2 weeks, and 7 dogs after 4 weeks. Humeri...

  4. Conduction in ion implanted single crystal diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunn, J.D.; Parikh, N.R.; Swanson, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    We have implanted sodium, phosphorus and arsenic into single crystal type IIa diamond as possible n-type dopants. Particular emphasis was applied to the implantation of sodium at different temperatures and doses; combined implantation energies of 55,80 and 120 keV were used to provide a uniformly doped layer over approximately 100 nm depth. The implanted layers exhibited semiconducting behavior with a single exponential activation energy between 0.40 and 0.48 eV, as determined by temperature dependent resistance measurements. A sample implanted to a concentration of 5.10 19 Na + /cm 3 at 550 degrees C exhibited a single activation energy of 0.415 eV over a temperature range from 25 to 500 degrees C. Thermal annealing above 900 degrees C was found to remove implantation damage as measured by optical absorption and RBS/channeling. However, concomitant increases in the resistance and the activation energy were observed. Implantation of 22 Ne was used to introduce a damage density equivalent to the 23 Na implant, while not introducing an electrically active species. The activation energy and electrical resistance were similar but higher than those produced by implantation with sodium. We conclude that the electrical properties of the Na-implanted samples were at least partly due to electrically active Na, but that residual implantation damage was still important

  5. Evaluation of peri-implant bone using fractal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yun Hoa

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the fractal dimension of successive panoramic radiographs of bone after implant placement is useful in the characterization of structural change in alveolar bone. Twelve subjects with thirty-five implants were retrospectively followed-up from one week to six months after implantation. Thirty-six panoramic radiographs from twelve patients were classified into 1 week. 1-2 months and 3-6 months after implantation and digitized. The windows of bone apical and mesial or distal to the implant were defined as peri apical region of interest (ROI) and inter dental ROI; the fractal dimension of the image was calculated. There was not a statistically significant difference in fractal dimensions during the period up to 6 months after implantation. The fractal dimensions were higher in 13 and 15 mm than 10 and 11.5 mm implant length at inter dental ROIs in 3-6 months after implantation (p<0.01). Longer fixtures showed the higher fractal dimension of bone around implant. This investigation needs further exploration with large numbers of implants for longer follow-up periods.

  6. Adhesive bone bonding prospects for lithium disilicate ceramic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennila Thirugnanam, Sakthi Kumar

    Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) implants articulating mandible with temporal bone in humans have a very high failure rate. Metallic TMJ implants available in the medical market are not osseointegrated, but bond only by mechanical interlocking using screws which may fail, mandating a second surgery for removal. Stress concentration around fixture screws leads to aseptic loosening or fracture of the bone. It has been proposed that this problem can be overcome by using an all-ceramic TMJ implant bonded to bone with dental adhesives. Structural ceramics are promising materials with an excellent track record in the field of dentis.

  7. Impact of dental implant insertion method on the peri-implant bone tissue: Experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatović Novak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The function of dental implants depends on their stability in bone tissue over extended period of time, i.e. on osseointegration. The process through which osseointegration is achieved depends on several factors, surgical insertion method being one of them. The aim of this study was to histopathologically compare the impact of the surgical method of implant insertion on the peri-implant bone tissue. Methods. The experiment was performed on 9 dogs. Eight weeks following the extraction of lower premolars implants were inserted using the one-stage method on the right mandibular side and two-stage method on the left side. Three months after implantation the animals were sacrificed. Three distinct regions of bone tissue were histopathologically analyzed, the results were scored and compared. Results. In the specimens of one-stage implants increased amount of collagen fibers was found in 5 specimens where tissue necrosis was also observed. Only moderate osteoblastic activity was found in 3 sections. The analysis of bone-to-implant contact region revealed statistically significantly better results regarding the amount of collagen tissue fibers for the implants inserted in the two-stage method (Wa = 59 105, α = 0.05. No necrosis and osteoblastic activity were observed. Conclusion. Better results were achieved by the two-stage method in bone-to-implant contact region regarding the amount of collagen tissue, while the results were identical regarding the osteoblastic activity and bone tissue necrosis. There was no difference between the methods in the bone-implant interface region. In the bone tissue adjacent to the implant the results were identical regarding the amount of collagen tissue, osteoblastic reaction and bone tissue necrosis, while better results were achieved by the two-stage method regarding the number of osteocytes.

  8. Influence of immediate/delayed implant placement and implant platform on the peri-implant bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passoni, Bernardo B; Marques de Castro, Daniel S; de Araújo, Maria Angelica R; de Araújo, Carlos D R P; Piatelli, Adriano; Benfatti, César A M

    2016-11-01

    To determinate the influence of the timing and position of the implant placement, as well as the presence and absence of a buccal gap, associated with different implant platforms on bone formation around implants. In a first surgical stage, two premolars in one side of the mandibular arch of 07 mongrel dogs were extracted. After a 120-day healing period, a second-stage surgery was performed, in which a full flap was raised and two implants were installed. At this same stage, two contralateral premolars were extracted and two immediate implants were placed into the fresh sockets, through the "palatal approach technique" without flap elevation, totaling four implants per animal. The 28 installed implants constituted groups according to the timing (Immediate or delayed) of placement and the type of surface treatment. After 4 months, samples were collected and histomorphometric analysis was performed to determinate buccal surface BIC, lingual surface BIC, total BIC, buccal area, and lingual area of all implants. Kruskal-Wallis and pared Wilcoxon (P immediate implants presented better BIC scores, mainly on the buccal surface. Data also suggest better bone area formation around the implants of these same groups. Concerning the type of implant platform, better results were found using Morse taper. The flapless technique with "palatal approach," Morse taper implants, and immediate implant placement all have favorable influence on the bone formation around the implants. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Implant-Guided Vertical Bone Augmentation Around Extra-Short Implants for the Management of Severe Bone Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Murias-Freijo, Alia; Alkhraisat, Mohammad H; Orive, Gorka

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the conservative treatment of severe vertical bone atrophy by combining the insertion of extra-short implants and implant-guided bone augmentation. For that, a low-speed drilling protocol was selected to facilitate the collection of bone particles and to maintain graft osteogenic properties. Extra-short implants were incompletely inserted because of the severe atrophy, and the denuded implant surface was covered by autologous bone particles held together by the adhesive properties of plasma rich in growth factors. The surgical site was then covered with resorbable fibrin membrane, and the flap was repositioned and sutured. Eight patients with a mean residual bone height of 4.19 ± 0.97 mm were treated according to the described treatment protocol. The distance between the implant shoulder and the bony crest was 1.77 ± 0.18, 2.16 ± 0.23, and 1.97 ± 0.26 mm at the mesial, central, and distal aspects, respectively. Vertical bone augmentation resulted in the coverage of 85% of exposed surface by stimulating 1.6 ± 0.5 mm of supra-alveolar bone growth. All 10 extra-short implants placed were successfully osseointegrated. After a mean of 5 ± 1.6 months, provisional screw-retained prostheses were placed. Within the limitations of this study, we conclude that the minimally invasive approach described may successfully rehabilitate extreme vertical bone atrophy in the posterior mandible.

  10. Bone-Implant Contact around Crestal and Subcrestal Dental Implants Submitted to Immediate and Conventional Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Ana Emília Farias; Ribeiro, Fernando Salimon; Pires, Juliana Rico; Zuza, Elizangela Partata; Piattelli, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the influence of apicocoronal position and immediate and conventional loading in the percentage of bone-implant contact (BIC). Thus, 36 implants were inserted in the edentulous mandible from six dogs. Three implants were installed in each hemimandible, in different positions in relation to the ridge: Bone Level (at crestal bone level), Minus 1 (one millimeter apical to crestal bone), and Minus 2 (two millimeters apical to crestal bone). In addition, each hemimandible was submitted to a loading protocol: immediate (prosthesis installed 24 hours after implantation) or conventional (prosthesis installed 120 days after implantation). Ninety days after, animals were killed, and implant and adjacent tissues were prepared for histometric analysis. BIC values from immediate loaded implants were 58.7%, 57.7%, and 51.1%, respectively, while conventional loaded implants were 61.8%, 53.8%, and 68.4%. Differences statistically significant were not observed among groups (P = 0.10, ANOVA test). These findings suggest that different apicocoronal positioning and loading protocols evaluated did not interfere in the percentage of bone-implant contact, suggesting that these procedures did not jeopardize osseointegration. PMID:25371911

  11. Bone-Implant Contact around Crestal and Subcrestal Dental Implants Submitted to Immediate and Conventional Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Emília Farias Pontes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the influence of apicocoronal position and immediate and conventional loading in the percentage of bone-implant contact (BIC. Thus, 36 implants were inserted in the edentulous mandible from six dogs. Three implants were installed in each hemimandible, in different positions in relation to the ridge: Bone Level (at crestal bone level, Minus 1 (one millimeter apical to crestal bone, and Minus 2 (two millimeters apical to crestal bone. In addition, each hemimandible was submitted to a loading protocol: immediate (prosthesis installed 24 hours after implantation or conventional (prosthesis installed 120 days after implantation. Ninety days after, animals were killed, and implant and adjacent tissues were prepared for histometric analysis. BIC values from immediate loaded implants were 58.7%, 57.7%, and 51.1%, respectively, while conventional loaded implants were 61.8%, 53.8%, and 68.4%. Differences statistically significant were not observed among groups (P=0.10, ANOVA test. These findings suggest that different apicocoronal positioning and loading protocols evaluated did not interfere in the percentage of bone-implant contact, suggesting that these procedures did not jeopardize osseointegration.

  12. Bone Conduction: Anatomy, Physiology, and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Society of America 1956, 28, 1277-1284. Franke, E.; Gierke , H.; von Grossman, F.; Wittern, W. The Jaw Motions Relative to the Skull and their...Studies by von Bekesy in 1930s were conducted in cadavers rather than in live humans. The mechanical properties can account for the slope of the...one who suffers from a genetic disease caused by the accumulation of a watery fluid within the brain. There are 14 facial bones on the human skull

  13. Vertical fracture and marginal bone loss of internal-connection implants: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimbo, Ryo; Halldin, Anders; Janda, Martin; Wennerberg, Ann; Vandeweghe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Marginal bone loss around implants is of great concern, and its cause may be multifactorial. Recently, clinical cases presenting marginal bone loss, in most cases accompanied by vertical fracture of internal-connection implants in the buccolingual direction, have been reported, in which unfavorable stress distribution is one possible cause of marginal bone resorption. The purpose of the current study was to characterize this type of marginal bone loss and implant fracture by conducting a finite element analysis (FEA). Clinical and radiographic evaluations showed that the prostheses of all reported cases had implant-level setups and were directly screwed to the internal implants. Intriguingly, all vertical fractures reported were in the buccolingual direction. Therefore, to characterize the specific implant fractures, FEA was conducted with misfit models created for two different setups, abutment-level and implant-level, both with screw-retained prostheses. The models were subjected to initial misfits of 0 μm (representing perfect fit), 50 μm, 100 μm, 150 μm, or 200 μm, and vertical loading was then applied. FEA revealed that, for the implant-level setup, excessive stress at the neck of the implant gradually increased in the buccolingual direction as the misfit increased. This result was not seen for the abutment-level setup. A broad maximum stress distribution was evident for the implant-level setup but not for the abutment-level setup. Broad distribution of excessive stress in the FEA correlated to the clinical cases, and marginal bone loss in these cases may be associated with mechanical alterations. To avoid unnecessary complications, selection of an abutment-level setup is strongly suggested.

  14. Bone Cells Dynamics during Peri-Implantitis: a Theoretical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Fernandes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present manuscript aims a detailed characterization of the bone cells dynamics during physiological bone remodelling and, subsequently, to address the cellular and molecular mechanisms that play a fundamental role in the immune-inflammatory-induced uncoupled bone remodelling observed in peri-implantitis. Results: An intimate relationship between the immune system and bone is acknowledged to be determinant for bone tissue remodelling and integrity. Due to the close interaction of immune and bone cells, the two systems share a number of surface receptors, cytokines, signalling pathways and transcription factors that are involved in mutual regulatory mechanisms. This physiological equilibrium is disturbed in pathological conditions, as verified in peri-implantitis establishment and development. Activation of the innate and adaptive immune response, challenged by the local bacterial infection, induces the synthesis of high levels of a variety of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that disturb the normal functioning of the bone cells, by uncoupling bone resorption and formation, ending up with a net alveolar bone loss and subsequent implant failure. Most data points to an immune-inflammatory induced osteoclast differentiation and function, as the major underlying mechanism to the uncoupled bone resorption to bone formation. Further, the disturbed functioning of osteoblasts, reflected by the possible expression of a fibro-osteoblastic phenotype, may also play a role. Conclusions: Alveolar bone loss is a hallmark of peri-implantitis. A great deal of data is still needed on the cellular and humoral crosstalk in the context of an integrated view of the osteoimmunologic interplay occurring in the peri-implantitis environment subjacent to the bone loss outcome.

  15. Bone cement implantation syndrome in hip replacement procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Palabiyik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Total hip replacement procedures are common in geriatric patients with osteoarthrosis of the hip or femur fracture. We planned combined spinal epidural anesthesia for total hip replacement operation due to femur fracture in a ninety-five female case with cardiorespiratory failure. Although the regional anesthesia had applied smoothly, intraoperative cardiac arrest during the placement of cement was thought to be a case with bone cement implantation syndrome. Bone cement implantation syndrome is occured in cemented prosthesis operations and a life-threatened complication. Clinic presentation is characterized by hypoxia, hypotension, unexpected loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest. Mortality rate due to bone cement implantation syndrome is approximately 0.1%. In this present, we examined bone cement implantation syndrome, which is a severe complication. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(2.000: 121-124

  16. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Muñoz, Roberto [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de [Private Practice, P° San Francisco, 43 A-1°, 20400 Tolosa (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm{sup 2}) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  17. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braceras, Iñigo; Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana; Muñoz, Roberto; Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia; Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm 2 ) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  18. Stability of simultaneously placed dental implants with autologous bone grafts harvested from the iliac crest or intraoral jaw bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Min; Byun, June-Ho; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Sung, Iel-Yong; Cho, Yeong-Cheol; Park, Bong-Wook

    2015-12-30

    Jaw bone and iliac bone are the most frequently used autologous bone sources for dental implant placement in patients with atrophic alveolar ridges. However, the comparative long-term stability of these two autologous bone grafts have not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the stability of simultaneously placed dental implants with autologous bone grafts harvested from either the iliac crest or the intraoral jaw bone for severely atrophic alveolar ridges. In total, 36 patients (21 men and 15 women) were selected and a retrospective medical record review was performed. We compared the residual increased bone height of the grafted bone, peri-implantitis incidence, radiological density in newly generated bones (HU values), and implant stability using resonance frequency analysis (ISQ values) between the two autologous bone graft groups. Both autologous bone graft groups (iliac bone and jaw bone) showed favorable clinical results, with similar long-term implant stability and overall implant survival rates. However, the grafted iliac bone exhibited more prompt vertical loss than the jaw bone, in particular, the largest vertical bone reduction was observed within 6 months after the bone graft. In contrast, the jaw bone graft group exhibited a slower vertical bone resorption rate and a lower incidence of peri-implantitis during long-term follow-up than the iliac bone graft group. These findings demonstrate that simultaneous dental implantation with the autologous intraoral jaw bone graft method may be reliable for the reconstruction of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges.

  19. Bone Adaptation Around Orthopaedic Implants of Varying Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Mette

    1998-01-01

    The bone adaptation around orthopaedic implants is simulated using a three-dimensional finite element model. The remodeling scheme has its origin in optimization methods, and includes anisotropy and time-dependent loading......The bone adaptation around orthopaedic implants is simulated using a three-dimensional finite element model. The remodeling scheme has its origin in optimization methods, and includes anisotropy and time-dependent loading...

  20. Evaluation of peri-implant bone resorption around Straumann Bone Level implants placed in areas reconstructed with autogenous vertical onlay bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapasco, Matteo; Casentini, Paolo; Zaniboni, Marco; Corsi, Elena

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the survival and success rate of Straumann Bone Level implants placed in vertically atrophied edentulous jaws previously reconstructed with autogenous onlay bone grafts taken from the calvarium or the mandibular ramus. From 2007 to 2009, 18 patients presenting with vertical deficits of the edentulous ridges were treated with autogenous cortical bone grafts harvested from the mandibular ramus or the calvarium. Four to seven months afterward, 60 Straumann Bone Level implants were placed in the reconstructed areas. After a further waiting period of 2-3 months, patients were rehabilitated with implant-supported fixed prostheses. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 36 months (mean: 19 months) after the start of prosthetic loading. Graft resorption before implant placement, as well as survival and success rates of implants, were recorded. The mean bone resorption prior to implant placement was 0.18 mm for calvarial grafts and 0.42 mm for ramus grafts. Survival rate was 100% either for implants placed in calvarial grafts or implants placed in ramus grafts, while success rate was 90.3% for implants placed in calvarial grafts, and 93.1% for implants placed in ramus grafts. Results from this study seem to demonstrate that implants with a platform-switching design may predictably integrate in edentulous areas reconstructed with autogenous bone grafts, with survival rates consistent with those reported in recent literature reviews on the same topic, and also with implants placed in native bone. Conversely, this study was not able to demonstrate that implants with platform-switching design may reduce bone resorption around implants placed in reconstructed areas. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Transmission of acoustic emission in bones, implants and dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossi, Zannar; Abdou, Wael; Reuben, Robert L; Ibbetson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    There is considerable interest in using acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasound to assess the quality of implant-bone interfaces and to monitor for micro-damage leading to loosening. However, remarkably little work has been done on the transmission of ultrasonic waves though the physical and biological structures involved. The aim of this in vitro study is to assess any differences in transmission between various dental materials and bovine rib bones with various degrees of hydration. Two types of tests have been carried out using pencil lead breaks as a standard AE source. The first set of tests was configured to assess the surface propagation of AE on various synthetic materials compared with fresh bovine rib bone. The second is a set of transmission tests on fresh, dried and hydrated bones each fitted with dental implants with various degrees of fixity, which includes components due to bone and interface transmission. The results indicate that transmission through glass ionomer cement is closest to the bone. This would suggest that complete osseointegration could potentially be simulated using such cement. The transmission of AE energy through bone was found to be dependent on its degree of hydration. It was also found that perfusing samples of fresh bone with water led to an increase in transmitted energy, but this appeared to affect transmission across the interface more than transmission through the bone. These findings have implications not only for implant interface inspection but also for passive AE monitoring of implants.

  2. Steroid implants and markers of bone turnover in steers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jannes

    and reflect steroid-induced bone maturity in the periphery: non-implanted controls; 25.7 mg estradiol-17β ... accelerated ageing effects of the widely used steroidal implants, trenbolone acetate (TBA) and estradiol-17β ..... Roles of IGF-I and the estrogen, androgen and IGF-I receptors in estradiol-17 beta- and trenbolone ...

  3. Animal models for implant biomaterial research in bone: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A I Pearce

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of an optimal interface between bone and orthopaedic and dental implants has taken place for many years. In order to determine whether a newly developed implant material conforms to the requirements of biocompatibility, mechanical stability and safety, it must undergo rigorous testing both in vitro and in vivo. Results from in vitro studies can be difficult to extrapolate to the in vivo situation. For this reason the use of animal models is often an essential step in the testing of orthopaedic and dental implants prior to clinical use in humans. This review discusses some of the more commonly available and frequently used animal models such as the dog, sheep, goat, pig and rabbit models for the evaluation of bone-implant interactions. Factors for consideration when choosing an animal model and implant design are discussed. Various bone specific features are discussed including the usage of the species, bone macrostructure and microstructure and bone composition and remodelling, with emphasis being placed on the similarity between the animal model and the human clinical situation. While the rabbit was the most commonly used of the species discussed in this review, it is clear that this species showed the least similarities to human bone. There were only minor differences in bone composition between the various species and humans. The pig demonstrated a good likeness with human bone however difficulties may be encountered in relation to their size and ease of handling. In this respect the dog and sheep/goat show more promise as animal models for the testing of bone implant materials. While no species fulfils all of the requirements of an ideal model, an understanding of the differences in bone architecture and remodelling between the species is likely to assist in the selection of a suitable species for a defined research question.

  4. Hydroxyapatite particles maintain peri-implant bone mantle during osseointegration in osteoporotic bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tami, Andrea E; Leitner, Melanie M; Baucke, Michelle G; Mueller, Thomas L; van Lenthe, G Harry; Müller, Ralph; Ito, Keita

    2009-12-01

    In osteoporotic bones, resorption exceeds formation during the remodelling phase of bone turnover. As a consequence, decreased bone volume and bone contact result in the peri-implant region. This may subsequently lead to loss of fixation. In this study we investigated whether the presence of nonresorbable, osteoconductive hydroxyapatite (HA) particles could help maintain a denser and more functional peri-implant bone structure. Titanium screws were implanted into the proximal tibial metaphysis of four months old, ovariectomized Wistar rats (n=60). In the right tibia, the drill hole was first filled with HA particles, while the left tibia served as a control without HA particles. Histological analysis demonstrated that during the remodelling phase the amount of newly formed bone was significantly higher on the HA over the control side. Micro-CT analysis corroborated the significant changes over time as well as differences in peri-implant bone volume density between treatment and control group. Mechanical tests demonstrated that the pull-out force was greater with HA particles. These results indicate that HA particles are able to induce and maintain for a longer time a denser peri-implant bone mantle in osteoporotic bone, which may have important implications in the prevention of implant migration and cut-outs.

  5. Functional results after Bonebridge implantation in adults and children with conductive and mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahne, Torsten; Seiwerth, Ingmar; Götze, Gerrit; Heider, Cornelia; Radetzki, Florian; Herzog, Michael; Plontke, Stefan K

    2015-11-01

    In patients with conductive hearing loss caused by middle ear disorders or atresia of the ear canal, a Bonebridge implantation can improve hearing by providing vibratory input to the temporal bone. The expected results are improved puretone thresholds and speech recognition. In the European Union, approval of the Bonebridge implantation was recently extended to children. We evaluated the functional outcome of a Bonebridge implantation for eight adults and three children. We found significant improvement in the puretone thresholds, with improvement in the air-bone gap. Speech recognition after surgery was significantly higher than in the best-aided situation before surgery. The Bonebridge significantly improved speech recognition in noisy environments and sound localization. In situations relevant to daily life, hearing deficits were nearly completely restored with the Bonebridge implantation in both adults and children.

  6. Bone reactions at implants subjected to experimental peri-implantitis and static load. A study in the dog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Berglundh, T; Lindhe, J

    2002-01-01

    . The animals were sacrificed and block biopsies of all implant sites dissected and prepared for histological analysis. RESULTS: It was demonstrated that the lateral static load failed to induce peri-implant bone loss at implants with mucositis and failed to enhance the bone loss at implants with experimental...

  7. Steroid implants and markers of bone turnover in steers | Knetter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty-two crossbred yearling steers were given one of four treatments to determine whether these markers of bone turnover could be detected and reflect steroid-induced bone maturity in the periphery: non-implanted controls; 25.7 mg estradiol-17β (E2); 120 mg trenbolone acetate (TBA); or 120 mg TBA and 24 mg E2 (T+E) ...

  8. Combining bisphosphonates with allograft bone for implant fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijssen, N.M.C.; Buma, P.; Hannink, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to discuss the current state of research of combining bisphosphonates with allograft bone for implant fixation. The allograft bone can only be reached by the bisphosphonate once it has been revascularized. However, this can be circumvented by local administration of

  9. Effect of Healing Time on Bone-Implant Contact of Orthodontic Micro-Implants: A Histologic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Fatemi, Kazem; Dehghani, Mahboobe; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Jahanbin, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed loading of orthodontic micro-implants on bone-implant contact. Materials and Methods. Sixty four micro-implants were implanted in dog's jaw bone. The micro-implants were divided into loaded and unloaded (control) groups. The control group had two subgroups: four and eight weeks being implanted. The loaded group had two subgroups of immediate loading and delayed (after four weeks healing) loading. Loaded samples were ...

  10. Comparison of Audiological Results Between a Transcutaneous and a Percutaneous Bone Conduction Instrument in Conductive Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Timo; Salcher, Rolf Benedikt; Schwab, Burkard; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2016-07-01

    In conductive, mixed hearing losses and single-sided-deafness bone-anchored hearing aids are a well-established treatment. The transcutaneous transmission across the intact skin avoids the percutaneous abutment of a bone-anchored device with the usual risk of infections and requires less care.In this study, the audiological results of the Bonebridge transcutaneous bone conduction implant (MED-EL) are compared to the generally used percutaneous device BP100 (Cochlear Ltd., Sydney, Australia). Ten patients implanted with the transcutaneous hearing implant were compared to 10 matched patients implanted with a percutaneous device. Tests included pure-tone AC and BC thresholds and unaided and aided sound field thresholds. Speech intelligibility was determined in quiet using the Freiburg monosyllable test and in noise with the Oldenburg sentence test (OLSA) in sound field with speech from the front (S0). The subjective benefit was assessed with the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit. In comparison with the unaided condition there was a significant improvement in aided thresholds, word recognition scores (WRS), and speech reception thresholds (SRT) in noise, measured in sound field, for both devices. The comparison of the two devices revealed a minor but not significant difference in functional gain (Bonebridge: PTA = 27.5 dB [mean]; BAHA: PTA = 26.3 dB [mean]). No significant difference between the two devices was found when comparing the improvement in WRSs and SRTs (Bonebridge: improvement WRS = 80% [median], improvement SRT = 6.5 dB SNR [median]; BAHA: improvement WRS = 77.5% [median], BAHA: improvement SRT = 6.9 dB SNR [median]). Our data show that the transcutaneous bone conduction hearing implant is an audiologically equivalent alternative to percutaneous bone-anchored devices in conductive hearing loss with a minor sensorineural hearing loss component.

  11. Demineralized bone matrix and human cancellous bone enhance fixation of titanium implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan; Ding, Ming; Overgaard, Søren

    from human tissue were included (IsoTis OrthoBiologics, Inc. USA). Both materials are commercially available. Titanium alloy implants (Biomet Inc.) of 10 mm in length and 10 mm in diameter were inserted bilaterally into the femoral condyles of 8 skeletally mature sheep. Thus four implants......Best Poster 5Demineralized bone matrix and human cancellous bone enhance fixation of titanium implants AuthorsBabiker , H.; Ding M.; Overgaard S.InstitutionOrthopaedic Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Clinical Institute, University of Southern......- and autograf as they have the capability of inducing new bone and improving implant fixation through enhancing bone ingrowth. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of DBM alone or with CB on the fixation of porous-coated titanium implants.Material and MethodsDBM100 (pure DBM) and CB produced...

  12. Preventing Bacterial Infections using Metal Oxides Nanocoatings on Bone Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceac, L. D.; Straticiuc, S.; Hanganu, E.; Stafie, L.; Calin, G.; Gavrilescu, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays bone implant removal is caused by infection that occurs around it possibly acquired after surgery or during hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to reveal some metal oxides applied as coatings on bone implant thus limiting the usual antibiotics-resistant bacteria colonization. Therefore ZnO, TiO2 and CuO were synthesized and structurally and morphologically analized in order to use them as an alternative antimicrobial agents deposited on bone implant. XRD, SEM, and FTIR characterization techniques were used to identify structure and texture of these nanoscaled metal oxides. These metal oxides nanocoatings on implant surface play a big role in preventing bacterial infection and reducing surgical complications.

  13. A systematic review on marginal bone loss around short dental implants (implant-supported fixed prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Alberto; Suarez, Fernando; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; García-Nogales, Agustín; Fu, Jia-Hui; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2014-10-01

    This systematic review aimed to evaluate the effect of implant length on peri-implant marginal bone loss (MBL) and its associated influencing factors. An electronic search of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases for relevant studies published in English from November 2006 to July 2012 was performed by one examiner (AM). Selected studies were randomized clinical trials, human experimental clinical trials or prospective studies (e.g., cohort as well as case series) with a clear aim of investigating marginal bone loss of short dental implants (implant length." Additionally, a subgroup analysis, by means of a random-effect one-way ANOVA model, comparing mean MBL values at different levels of each factor ("type of connection" and "type of prostheses") was also performed. The meta-regression of mean MBL on the moderator "implant length" was found to be insignificant (P = 0.633). Therefore, it could not be concluded that implant length had an effect on peri-implant MBL. In addition, standardized differences in mean MBL on the subgroups short (implants, as determined by the meta-analysis (random-effect model), were found to be statistically insignificant (P = 0.222). Within limitations of the present systematic review, it could be concluded that short dental implants (implant MBL as standard implants (≥ 10 mm) for implant-supported fixed prostheses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Usage of demineralized bone powder in dental implant surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Joon Yim

    1999-01-01

    While there is much concern in the dental community about the risk of disease transfer with processed bone a] iografts, there has never been a case of disease transfer with DFDB. Exclusionary techniques and chemical processing of the allogeneic bone has rendered these grafts safe for human implantation. The literature indicates that there has been considerable interest in the biology and applied science of osteoinduction. The accumulated evidence supports the concept of cartilage and bone cell differentiation induced by a unique bone motphogenetic protein (BMP). Currently clinical usage has been focused on the alveolar bone defects associated with the dental implant surgery, which has become one of the most important areas in dental outpatient clinic. Increased application of the endosseous dental implant system results in a lot of demands to regenerate the alveolar bone defects around the dental implants. Anderegg et al.(1991) reported the excellent results from the combination of DFDB powder and expanded PTFE (polytetrafluorethylene) membranes. Since 1980 the author experienced the human DFDB powders for the oral and maxillofacial surgery and the dental implant surgery. Yim and Kim(1993) evaluated 93 surgical sites where DFDB was used and found 96.7% of success rates at re-entry surgery. Mellonig and Triplett (1993) reported 97% of success rates, and Gelb (1993) obtained 98% of success rates. Fugazzotto (1994) placed 59 dental implants at the time of sinus lifts with the composite graft of DFDB and resorbable tricalcium phosphate and none of implants was lost on uncovering and only one was lost while functioning. Yim (1994) placed 44 dental implants at the time of sinus lifts with DFDB, and none of implants was lost on uncovering. Zinner and Small (1996) placed 215 dental implants at the time of sinus lifts (52 sinuses) with the composite graft of DFDB, and other materials, 3 implants of which were failed on uncovering. To date, maxillary sinus lift graft with

  15. Bone graft materials in fixation of orthopaedic implants in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Bone graft is widely used within orthopaedic surgery especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion. The early implant fixation in the revision situation of loose joint prostheses is important for the long-term survival. Bone autograft has been considered as gold standard in many...... orthopaedic procedures, whereas allograft is the gold standard by replacement of extensive bone loss. However, the use of autograft is associated with donor site morbidity, especially chronic pain. In addition, the limited supply is a significant clinical challenge. Limitations in the use of allograft include...... skeletal bones. The osteoconductive properties of the composite might be improved by adding bone marrow aspirate (BMA), which can be harvested during surgery. Other alternatives to bone graft are demineralised bone matrix (DBM) and human cancellous bone (CB). DBM is prepared by acid extraction of human...

  16. Bone morphology changes around two types of bone-level implants installed in fresh extraction sockets - a histomorphometric study in Beagle dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alharbi, H.M.; Babay, N.; Alzoman, H.; Basudan, S.; Anil, S.; Jansen, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minimizing crestal bone loss following immediate implant placement is considered the most challenging aspect in implant therapy. Implant surface topography and chemical modifications have been shown to influence the success of Osseointegration. The Straumann((R)) Bone Level implant,

  17. Osseointegration of zirconia implants: an SEM observation of the bone-implant interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naujoks Christian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The successful use of zirconia ceramics in orthopedic surgery led to a demand for dental zirconium-based implant systems. Because of its excellent biomechanical characteristics, biocompatibility, and bright tooth-like color, zirconia (zirconium dioxide, ZrO2 has the potential to become a substitute for titanium as dental implant material. The present study aimed at investigating the osseointegration of zirconia implants with modified ablative surface at an ultrastructural level. Methods A total of 24 zirconia implants with modified ablative surfaces and 24 titanium implants all of similar shape and surface structure were inserted into the tibia of 12 Göttinger minipigs. Block biopsies were harvested 1 week, 4 weeks or 12 weeks (four animals each after surgery. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis was performed at the bone implant interface. Results Remarkable bone attachment was already seen after 1 week which increased further to intimate bone contact after 4 weeks, observed on both zirconia and titanium implant surfaces. After 12 weeks, osseointegration without interposition of an interfacial layer was detected. At the ultrastructural level, there was no obvious difference between the osseointegration of zirconia implants with modified ablative surfaces and titanium implants with a similar surface topography. Conclusion The results of this study indicate similar osseointegration of zirconia and titanium implants at the ultrastructural level.

  18. Biomimetics of Bone Implants: The Regenerative Road

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Brett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current strategies for healing bone defects are numerous and varied. At the core of each bone healing therapy is a biomimetic mechanism, which works to enhance bone growth. These range from porous scaffolds, bone mineral usage, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan substitutes to transplanted cell populations. Bone defects face a range of difficulty in their healing, given the composite of dense outer compact bone and blood-rich inner trabecular bone. As such, the tissue possesses a number of inherent characteristics, which may be clinically harnessed as promoters of bone healing. These include mechanical characteristics, mineral composition, native collagen content, and cellular fraction of bone. This review charts multiple biomimetic strategies to help heal bony defects in large and small osseous injury sites, with a special focus on cell transplantation.

  19. Implantable Prosthesis of Osseous Conduction (BAHA: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stumpf, Claudia Mittelmann

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The implantable prosthesis of osseous conduction (BAHA is deemed to be an excellent option in the auditory rehabilitation of patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss, unilaterally or bilaterally, and unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. It has been a good advantage over the conservative bone conduction apparatus and those of individual sound-amplifier apparatus (ISAA, when their usage becomes unfeasible because of chronic otitis externa, which has a hard clinic control. Objective: To introduce the first BAHA case performed in Brazil, as duly authorized by ANVISA (National Agency for Sanitary Surveillance, to rehabilitate the mixed hearing loss with occurrences of chronic otitis externa. Method: 50-year-old female patient with right-ear moderate and left-ear severe hearing loss, bilateral tinnitus derived from otosclerosis, was submitted to 04 surgeries of stapedotomy and unable to use ISAA as a result of otorrhea and bilateral otalgia. The medical and audiological evaluation indicated the benefit of using BAHA. Having surgery been performed and BAHA implemented, the patient showed a significant improvement in audiometric thresholds, speech perception and distinction, as well as she declared to be extremely satisfied with the esthetic factor. Final commentaries: BAHA surgical process is safe, simple and swift, thus providing excellent audiological results and a higher degree of satisfaction to patients.

  20. Conductive hearing loss and bone conduction devices: restored binaural hearing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agterberg, Martijn J H; Hol, Myrthe K S; Cremers, Cor W R J; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; van Opstal, John; Snik, Ad F M

    2011-01-01

    An important aspect of binaural hearing is the proper detection of interaural sound level differences and interaural timing differences. Assessments of binaural hearing were made in patients with acquired unilateral conductive hearing loss (UCHL, n = 11) or congenital UCHL (n = 10) after unilateral application of a bone conduction device (BCD), and in patients with bilateral conductive or mixed hearing loss after bilateral BCD application. Benefit (bilateral versus unilateral listening) was assessed by measuring directional hearing, compensation of the acoustic head shadow, binaural summation and binaural squelch. Measurements were performed after an acclimatization time of at least 10 weeks. Unilateral BCD application was beneficial, but there was less benefit in the patients with congenital UCHL as compared to patients with acquired UCHL. In adults with bilateral hearing loss, bilateral BCD application was clearly beneficial as compared to unilateral BCD application. Binaural summation was present, but binaural squelch could not be proven. To explain the poor results in the patients with congenital UCHL, two factors seemed to be important. First, a critical period in the development of binaural hearing might affect the binaural hearing abilities. Second, crossover stimulation, referring to additional stimulation of the cochlea contralateral to the BCD side, might deteriorate binaural hearing in patients with UCHL. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Enhancement of electrical conductivity of ion-implanted polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, S.

    1985-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of ion-implanted films of Nylon 66, Polypropylene (PP), Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (Teflon) and mainly Poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was determined by DC measurements at voltages up to 4500 V and compared with the corresponding values of pristine films. Measurements were made at 21 0 C +/- 1 0 C and 65 +/- 2% RH. The electrical conductivity of PET films implanted with F + , Ar + , or As + ions at energies of 50 keV increases by seven orders of magnitude as the fluence increases from 1 x 10 18 to 1 x 10 20 ions/m 2 . The conductivity of films implanted with As + was approximately one order greater than those implanted with Ar + , which in turn was approximately one-half order greater than those implanted with F + . The conductivity of the most conductive film ∼1 S/m) was almost 14 orders of magnitude greater than the pristine PET film. Except for the three PET samples implanted at fluences near 1 x 10 20 ions/m 2 with F + , Ar + , and As + ions, all implanted films were ohmic up to an electric field strength of 600 kV/m. The temperature dependence of the conductivity of the three PET films implanted near a fluence of 1 x 10 20 ions/m 2 was measured over the range of 80 K < T < 300 K

  2. Marginal bone loss in implants placed in grafted maxillary sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Fernández-Jiménez, Andrés; O'Valle, Francisco; Silvestre, Francisco J; Sánchez-Fernández, Elena; Monje, Alberto; Catena, Andrés

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the vertical and horizontal graft bone resorption (GR) in grafted maxillary sinuses and the marginal bone loss (MBL) around implants placed in the sinuses with different prosthetic connections and to determine the effect of other clinical factors on these tissue responses at 6 and 18 months postloading. A total of 254 implants were placed in 150 grafted maxillary sinuses of 101 patients (51.5% female) with mean age of 52.2 years (range, 32-82 years). GR and MBL measurements were made in implants placed with two different prosthetic connections (internal and external) at 6 and 18 months postloading. The complex samples general linear model was used to analyze the influence of patient age, gender, smoking habit, history of periodontal disease, implantation timing (simultaneous vs deferred), and prosthetic abutment length on radiographic GR and MBL values. At 18 months postloading, the MBL ranged from 0 mm to 5.89 mm; less than 1 mm was lost around 49.0% (mesial) and 44.3% (distal) of the implants, while no bone was lost around 32.9% (mesial) and 26.7% (distal). The GR was significantly affected by smoking, remnant alveolar bone height, graft length, graft height, gender, and age, and it significantly decreased over time. The MBL was influenced by the type of connection, implantation timing, and prosthetic abutment length. The MBL was greater with longer postloading interval and higher patient age and in smokers. Resorption of grafts that combine autogenous cortical bone with anorganic bovine bone is dependent on the anatomic features of the sinus and is not affected by the time elapsed after the first 6 months. The MBL in implants placed in these grafted areas is time dependent and mainly related to potentially modifiable clinical decisions and patient habits. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Animal Models for Evaluation of Bone Implants and Devices: Comparative Bone Structure and Common Model Uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wancket, L M

    2015-09-01

    Bone implants and devices are a rapidly growing field within biomedical research, and implants have the potential to significantly improve human and animal health. Animal models play a key role in initial product development and are important components of nonclinical data included in applications for regulatory approval. Pathologists are increasingly being asked to evaluate these models at the initial developmental and nonclinical biocompatibility testing stages, and it is important to understand the relative merits and deficiencies of various species when evaluating a new material or device. This article summarizes characteristics of the most commonly used species in studies of bone implant materials, including detailed information about the relevance of a particular model to human bone physiology and pathology. Species reviewed include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, dogs, sheep, goats, and nonhuman primates. Ultimately, a comprehensive understanding of the benefits and limitations of different model species will aid in rigorously evaluating a novel bone implant material or device. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Coating on Titanium Implant Surface: a Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haim Haimov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the study is to systematically review the osseointegration process improvement by bone morphogenetic protein coating on titanium implant surface. Material and Methods: An electronic literature search was conducted through the MEDLINE (PubMed and EMBASE databases. The search was restricted for articles published during the last 10 years from October 2006 to September 2016 and articles were limited to English language. Results: A total of 41 articles were reviewed, and 8 of the most relevant articles that are suitable to the criteria were selected. Articles were analysed regarding concentration of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP, delivery systems, adverse reactions and the influence of the BMP on the bone and peri-implant surface in vivo. Finally, the present data included 340 implants and 236 models. Conclusions: It’s clearly shown from most of the examined studies that bone morphogenetic protein increases bone regeneration. Further studies should be done in order to induce and sustain bone formation activity. Osteogenic agent should be gradually liberated and not rapidly released with priority to three-dimension reservoir (incorporated titanium implant surface in order to avoid following severe side effects: inflammation, bleeding, haematoma, oedema, erythema, and graft failure.

  5. Rank Protein Immunolabeling during Bone-Implant Interface Healing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisley Ávila Souza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the expression of RANK protein during bone-healing process around machined surface implants. Twenty male Wistar rats, 90 days old, after having had a 2 mm diameter and 6 mm long implant inserted in their right tibias, were evaluated at 7, 14, 21, and 42 days after healing. After obtaining the histological samples, slides were subjected to RANK immunostaining reaction. Results were quantitatively evaluated. Results. Immunolabeling analysis showed expressions of RANK in osteoclast and osteoblast lineage cells. The statistical analysis showed an increase in the expression of RANK in osteoblasts at 7 postoperative days and a gradual decrease during the chronology of the healing process demonstrated by mild cellular activity in the final stage (P<.05. Conclusion. RANK immunolabeling was observed especially in osteoclast and osteoblast cells in primary bone during the initial periods of bone-healing/implant interface.

  6. Rank Protein Immunolabeling during Bone-Implant Interface Healing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila Souza, Francisley; Pereira Queiroz, Thallita; Rodrigues Luvizuto, Eloá; Nishioka, Renato Sussumu; Garcia-JR, Idelmo Rangel; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; Okamoto, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the expression of RANK protein during bone-healing process around machined surface implants. Twenty male Wistar rats, 90 days old, after having had a 2 mm diameter and 6 mm long implant inserted in their right tibias, were evaluated at 7, 14, 21, and 42 days after healing. After obtaining the histological samples, slides were subjected to RANK immunostaining reaction. Results were quantitatively evaluated. Results. Immunolabeling analysis showed expressions of RANK in osteoclast and osteoblast lineage cells. The statistical analysis showed an increase in the expression of RANK in osteoblasts at 7 postoperative days and a gradual decrease during the chronology of the healing process demonstrated by mild cellular activity in the final stage (P < .05). Conclusion. RANK immunolabeling was observed especially in osteoclast and osteoblast cells in primary bone during the initial periods of bone-healing/implant interface. PMID:20706673

  7. Radiographic evaluation of marginal bone level around implants with different neck designs after 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young-Kyu; Han, Chong-Hyun; Heo, Seong-Joo; Kim, Sunjai; Chun, Heoung-Jae

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of macro- and microstructure of the implant surface at the marginal bone level after functional loading. Sixty-eight patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. The first group received 35 implants with a machined neck (Ankylos); the second group, 34 implants with a rough-surfaced neck (Stage 1); and the third, 38 implants with a rough-surfaced neck with microthreads (Oneplant). Clinical and radiographic examinations were conducted at baseline (implant loading) and 3, 6, and 12 months postloading. Two-way repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the significance of marginal bone change of each tested group at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 month follow-ups and 1-way ANOVA was also used to compare the bone loss of each time interval within the same implant group (P < .05). At 12 months, significant differences were noted in the amount of alveolar bone loss recorded for the 3 groups (P < .05). The group with the rough-surfaced microthreaded neck had a mean crestal bone loss of 0.18 +/- 0.16 mm; the group with the rough-surfaced neck, 0.76 +/- 0.21 mm; and the group with the machined neck, 1.32 +/- 0.27 mm. In the rough-surfaced group and the rough-surfaced microthreaded group, no statistically significant changes were observed after 3 months, whereas the machined-surface group showed significant bone loss for every interval (P < .05). To minimize marginal bone loss, in addition to the use of a rough surface at the marginal bone level, a macroscopic modification such as the addition of microthreads could be recommended. A rough surface and microthreads at the implant neck not only reduce crestal bone loss but also help with early biomechanical adaptation against loading in comparison to the machined neck design. A rough surface with microthreads at the implant neck was the most effective design to maintain the marginal bone level against functional loading.

  8. De novo alveolar bone formation adjacent to endosseous implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglundh, Tord; Abrahamsson, Ingemar; Lang, Niklaus P; Lindhe, Jan

    2003-06-01

    To describe a model for the investigation of different phases of wound healing that are involved in the process resulting in osseointegration. The implants used for the study of early healing had a geometry that corresponded to that of a solid screw implant with an SLA surface configuration. A circumferential trough had been prepared within the thread region (intra-osseous portion) that established a geometrically well-defined wound compartment. Twenty Labrador dogs received 160 experimental devices totally to allow the evaluation of healing between 2 h and 12 weeks. Both ground sections and decalcified sections were prepared from different implant sites. The experimental chamber used appeared to be conducive for the study of early phases of bone formation. The ground sections provided an overview of the various phases of soft and hard tissue formation, while the decalcified, thin sections enabled a more detailed study of events involved in bone tissue modeling and remodeling. The initially empty wound chamber became occupied with a coagulum and a granulation tissue that was replaced by a provisional matrix. The process of bone formation started already during the first week. The newly formed bone present at the lateral border of the cut bony bed appeared to be continuous with the parent bone, but woven bone was also found on the SLA surface at a distance from the parent bone. This primary bone that included trabeculae of woven bone was replaced by parallel-fibered and/or lamellar bone and marrow. Between 1 and 2 weeks, the bone tissue immediately lateral to the pitch region, responsible for primary mechanical stability of the device, became resorbed and replaced with newly formed viable bone. Despite this temporary loss of hard tissue contact, the implants remained clinically stable at all times. Osseointegration represents a dynamic process both during its establishment and its maintenance. In the establishment phase, there is a delicate interplay between bone

  9. Porous architected biomaterial for a tibial-knee implant with minimum bone resorption and bone-implant interface micromotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimizadeh, Amirmohammad; Nourmohammadi, Zahra; Arabnejad, Sajad; Tanzer, Michael; Pasini, Damiano

    2018-02-01

    This investigation presents the numerical development of a fully porous tibial knee implant that is suggested to alleviate the clinical problems associated with current prostheses that are fully solid. A scheme combining multiscale mechanics and topology optimization is proposed to handle the homogenized analysis and property tailoring of the porous architecture with the aim of reducing the stiffness mismatch between the implant and surrounding bone. The outcome of applying this scheme is a graded lattice microarchitecture that can potentially offer the implant an improved degree of load bearing capacity while reducing concurrently bone resorption and interface micromotion. Asymptotic Homogenization theory is used to characterize the mechanics of its building block, a tetrahedron based unit cell, and the Soderberg fatigue criterion to represent the implant fatigue resistance under multiaxial physiological loadings. The numerical results suggest that the overall amount of bone resorption around the graded porous tibial stem is 26% lower than that around a conventional, commercially available, fully dense titanium implant of identical shape and size. In addition, an improved interface micromotion is observed along the tibial stem, with values at the tip of the stem as low as 17µm during gait cycle and 22µm for deep bend compared to a fully dense implant. This decrease in micromotion compared to that of an identical solid implant made of titanium can reasonably be expected to alleviate post-operative end of stem pain suffered by some patients undergoing surgery at the present time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Osteogenic protein 1 device increases bone formation and bone graft resorption around cementless implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas B; Overgaard, Søren; Lind, Martin

    2002-01-01

    In each femoral condyle of 8 Labrador dogs, a non weight-bearing hydroxyapatite-coated implant was inserted surrounded by a 3 mm gap. Each gap was filled with bone allograft or ProOsteon with or without OP-1 delivered in a bovine collagen type I carrier (OP-1 device). 300 microg OP-1 was used...... in the 0.75 cc gap surrounding the implant. After 3 weeks, the OP-1 device enhanced implant fixation by 800% (p...

  11. Rank Protein Immunolabeling during Bone-Implant Interface Healing Process

    OpenAIRE

    ?vila Souza, Francisley; Pereira Queiroz, Thallita; Rodrigues Luvizuto, Elo?; Nishioka, Renato Sussumu; Garcia-JR, Idelmo Rangel; de Carvalho, Paulo S?rgio Perri; Okamoto, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the expression of RANK protein during bone-healing process around machined surface implants. Twenty male Wistar rats, 90 days old, after having had a 2?mm diameter and 6 mm long implant inserted in their right tibias, were evaluated at 7, 14, 21, and 42 days after healing. After obtaining the histological samples, slides were subjected to RANK immunostaining reaction. Results were quantitatively evaluated. Results. Immunolabeling analysis showed expre...

  12. Vertical crestal bone changes around implants placed into fresh extraction sockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covani, Ugo; Cornelini, Roberto; Barone, Antonio

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze bone healing and vertical bone remodeling for implants placed immediately after tooth removal without guided bone regeneration techniques. Twenty patients received 20 implants immediately after the removal of 20 teeth. All implants were placed within the undamaged alveoli confines, and the cervical portion of each implant was positioned at coronal bone level. The distance from implant shoulder and bone crest was measured for each implant at four sites (mesial, buccal, distal, and palatal/lingual). No membranes or filling materials were used. Primary flap closure was performed in all clinical cases. All peri-implant bone defects had healed completely 6 months after implant placement. The pattern of bone healing around the neck of the implants showed an absence of peri-implant defects. The vertical distance between the implant shoulder and bone crest ranged from 0 to 2 mm. The bone remodeling of implants placed in fresh extraction sockets showed a healing pattern with new bone apposition around the implant's neck and horizontal and vertical bone reabsorption. The vertical bone reabsorption, which has been observed at buccal sites, was not associated with any negative esthetic implications.

  13. Bone augmentation as an adjunct to dental implant rehabilitation in patients with diabetes mellitus: A review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ladha, Komal; Sharma, Ankit; Tiwari, Bhawana; Bukya, Dwaraka N

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to review the success of bone augmentation performed as an adjunct to dental implant rehabilitation in patients with diabetes mellitus. A literature review was conducted in PubMed on this topic, which yielded a total of 102 publications. For inclusion, publications had to be human studies, written in English language and should report on the success of bone augmentation as an adjunct to dental implant rehabilitation in diabetic patients. After screening the t...

  14. Dental implant surfaces after insertion in bone: an in vitro study in four commercial implant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, Herbert; Wolff, Carolina; Bauer, Florian; Ruthenberg, Ricarda; Sculean, Anton; Mücke, Thomas

    2017-10-24

    Primary healing of dental implants is influenced by their surface morphology. However, little is known about any alterations in morphology during their insertion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the surface morphology of four different implant systems, following their insertion in porcine jaw bones. Four fresh porcine mandible specimens were used. Six new implants of four systems (Ankylos® 4.5 × 14 mm, Frialit Synchro® 4.5 × 15 mm, NobelReplace ® Tapered Groovy RP 4.3 × 13 mm, Straumann SLA® Bone Level 3.3 × 14 mm) were inserted, whereas one implant of each system served as a control. After their removal, implants were cleaned in an ultrasonic bath. All 28 implants were examined quantitatively by 3D confocal microscopy for surface characteristics. In the evaluated zones, implants of the Ankylos, Frialit, and Straumann systems showed mostly a reduction of the mean surface roughness Sa, the maximal surface roughness Sz, and the developed surface area ratio Sdr; Nobel implants showed an increase in these parameters. With respect to all three parameters Sa, Sz, and Sdr, statistical analysis revealed that differences between the four systems were highly significant in the apical region of implants. Controls showed no morphologic alterations. The insertion process had an impact on the surface of all four implant systems. Anodized implant surface modification seems to result in more alterations compared with subtractive surface modifications. Therefore, surgical planning should take into consideration the choice of surface treatment because the characteristics of the implants may be modified during the installation process. The given information is of value for daily implantation practice and the course of osseointegration.

  15. Short implants compared to implants in vertically augmented bone: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisand, D; Picard, N; Rocchietta, I

    2015-09-01

    To assess relevant data comparing short implants or implants associated with vertical ridge augmentation derived from RCT's and CCT's. A PubMed and hand search was performed to identify all RCT's and CCT's published in English language comparing short implants to implants associated with vertical ridge augmentation. The initial search resulted in 3387 articles. A total of 17 articles were eligible for full-text analysis and four were finally included. This review tends to demonstrate similar implant survival rates between implants placed in vertically augmented bone and short implants (95.09% vs. 96.24%, respectively) with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 5 years. In terms of prosthetic survival rates, there were no differences between the treatments. More surgical complications were reported when using implants placed in vertically augmented bone compared to short implants (56 patients with surgical complications compared to 18 patients, respectively). This evidence should, however, be interpreted with caution as it is derived from four RCT's with limited sample size (ranging from 15 to 30 per group), limited follow-up and performed by the same research group. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Buccal cortical bone thickness on CBCT for mini-implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Jong Gook; Lim, Sung Hoon; Lee, Byoung Jin; Kim, Jae Duk [School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Cortical bone thickness is one of the important factor in mini-implant stability. This study was performed to investigate the buccal cortical bone thickness at every interdental area as an aid in planning mini-implant placement. Two-dimensional slices at every interdental area were selected from the cone-beam computed tomography scans of 20 patients in third decade. Buccal cortical bone thickness was measured at 2, 4, and 6 mm levels from the alveolar crest in the interdental bones of posterior regions of both jaws using the plot profile function of Ez3D2009TM (Vatech, Yongin, Korea). The results were analyzed using by Mann-Whitney test. Buccal cortical bone was thicker in the mandible than in the maxilla. The thickness increased with further distance from the alveolar crest in the maxilla and with coming from the posterior to anterior region in the mandible (p?0.01). The maximum CT value showed an increasing tendency with further distance from the alveolar crest and with coming from posterior to anterior region in both jaws. Interdental buccal cortical bone thickness varied in both jaws, however our study showed a distinct tendency. We expect that these results could be helpful for the selection and preparation of mini-implant sites.

  17. The effects of bone marrow aspirate, bone graft, and collagen composites on fixation of titanium implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan; Ding, Ming; Sandri, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Replacement of extensive local bone loss especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion is a significant clinical challenge. Allograft and autograft have been considered as gold standards for bone replacement. However, there are several disadvantages such as donor site pain, bacterial...... on the early fixation of bone implants in this sheep model. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2012....

  18. Annual bone loss and success rates of dental implants based on radiographic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraets, W.; Zhang, L.; Liu, Y.; Wismeijer, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Bone loss around dental implants is generally measured by monitoring changes in marginal bone level using radiographs. After the first year of implantation, an implant should have <0.2 mm annual loss of marginal bone level to satisfy the criteria of success. However, the process of

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta1 adsorbed to tricalciumphosphate coated implants increases peri-implant bone remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, M.; Overgaard, S; Glerup, H

    2001-01-01

    Increasing experimental interest has emerged for the use of growth factors to stimulate bone healing and bone formation in various clinical situations. We and others have demonstrated that recombinant human transforming growth factor-beta1 (rhTGF-beta1) adsorbed onto tricalcium phosphate (TCP......)-coated implants can improve mechanical fixation and bone ongrowth. The present study evaluated bone remodeling in newly formed bone and adjacent trabecular bone around TCP-coated implants with and without rhTGF-beta1 adsorption. Unloaded cylindrical grit-blasted titanium alloy implants coated with TCP were.......6% in the control group to 5.9% in the rhTGF-beta1 group (p = 0.02). In the surrounding trabecular bone no significant changes in bone remodeling parameters was demonstrated. This study suggests that rhTGF-beta1 adsorbed onto TCP-ceramic coated implants accelerates repair activity in the newly formed bone close...

  20. Micromotion analysis of different implant configuration, bone density, and crestal cortical bone thickness in immediately loaded mandibular full-arch implant restorations: A nonlinear finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Horita, Satoshi; Murakami, Kazuhiro; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2018-02-01

    Excessive micromotion may cause failure of osseointegration between the implant and bone. This study investigated the effects of implant configuration, bone density, and crestal cortical bone thickness on micromotion in immediately loaded mandibular full-arch implant restorations. A finite element model of the edentulous mandible was constructed. Four implants were inserted in two different configurations, which were four parallel implants or tilted distal implants according to the all-on-four concept. Different cancellous bone densities and crestal cortical bone thicknesses were simulated. The framework was made of acrylic resin. A vertical load of 200 N was applied at the cantilever or on the distal implant (noncantilever loading). The maximum extent of micromotion was significantly influenced by the density of cancellous bone and to a lesser extent by implant configuration and the crestal cortical bone thickness. The all-on-four configuration showed less micromotion than the parallel implant configuration in some circumstances. The maximum micromotion detected with noncantilever loading was less than 1/3 of that with cantilever loading. Implant configuration had a limited influence on micromotion. Avoiding cantilever loading during the healing period should effectively reduce the risk of excessive micromotion in patients with low-density cancellous bone and thin crestal cortical bone. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A Bone-Thickness Map as a Guide for Bone-Anchored Port Implantation Surgery in the Temporal Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignard, Jérémie; Arnold, Andreas; Weisstanner, Christian; Caversaccio, Marco; Stieger, Christof

    2013-01-01

    The bone-anchored port (BAP) is an investigational implant, which is intended to be fixed on the temporal bone and provide vascular access. There are a number of implants taking advantage of the stability and available room in the temporal bone. These devices range from implantable hearing aids to percutaneous ports. During temporal bone surgery, injuring critical anatomical structures must be avoided. Several methods for computer-assisted temporal bone surgery are reported, which typically add an additional procedure for the patient. We propose a surgical guide in the form of a bone-thickness map displaying anatomical landmarks that can be used for planning of the surgery, and for the intra-operative decision of the implant’s location. The retro-auricular region of the temporal and parietal bone was marked on cone-beam computed tomography scans and tridimensional surfaces displaying the bone thickness were created from this space. We compared this method using a thickness map (n = 10) with conventional surgery without assistance (n = 5) in isolated human anatomical whole head specimens. The use of the thickness map reduced the rate of Dura Mater exposition from 100% to 20% and suppressed sigmoid sinus exposures. The study shows that a bone-thickness map can be used as a low-complexity method to improve patient’s safety during BAP surgery in the temporal bone. PMID:28788390

  2. Complications of bone-anchored hearing aid implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, J C; Roper, A J; Andrew, R; Rothera, M P; Hill, P; Green, K M

    2010-02-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aid implantations have been performed in Manchester for over 20 years. This study examined a range of variables that can occur during the implantation process, and the effect they may have on successful outcome. Retrospective study and literature review. Tertiary referral centre in central Manchester. Details of 602 bone-anchored hearing aid implantation procedures were retrieved from the departmental database. The overall complication rate was 23.9 per cent. The rate of revision surgery was 12.1 per cent. This study involved a significantly larger number of patients than any previously reported, similar study. Possible reasons for differences in outcomes, and recommendations for best practice, are discussed.

  3. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C

    2011-05-03

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P < 10 -4 , and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P < 10 -8 . Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  4. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P<10−4, and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P<10−8. Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  5. The effect of implant angulation and splinting on stress distribution in implant body and supporting bone: A finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnaz, Ebadian; Ramin, Mosharraf; Abbasi, Samaneh; Pouya, Memar Ardestani; Mahmood, Farzin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of implant crown splinting and the use of angulated abutment on stress distribution in implant body and surrounding bone by three-dimensional finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: For this study, three models with two implants at the site of mandibular right second premolar and first molar were designed (1): Both implants, parallel to adjacent teeth, with straight abutments (2): Anterior implant with 15 mesial angulations and posterior implant were placed parallel to adjacent tooth, (3): Both implants with 15 mesial angulations and parallel to each other with 15° angulated abutments. Restorations were modeled in two shapes (splinted and nonsplinted). Loading in tripod manner as each point 50 N and totally 300 N was applied. Stress distribution in relation to splinting or nonsplinting restorations and angulations was done with ABAQUS6.13. Results: Splinting the restorations in all situations, led to lower stresses in all implant bodies, cortical bone and spongy bone except for the spongy bone around angulated first molar. Angulated implant in nonsplinted restoration cause lower stresses in implant body and bone but in splinted models more stresses were seen in implant body in comparison with straight abutment (model 2). Stresses in nonsplinted and splinted restorations in cortical bone of angulated molar region were more than what was observed in straight molar implant (model 3). Conclusion: Implant restorations splinting lead to a better distribution of stresses in implant bodies and bone in comparison with nonsplinted restorations, especially when the load is applied off center to implant body. Angulations of implant can reduce stresses when the application of the load is in the same direction as the implant angulation. PMID:26430356

  6. Effects of Ultraviolet Photofunctionalization on Bone Augmentation and Integration Capabilities of Titanium Mesh and Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Makoto; Ikeda, Takayuki; Tabuchi, Masako; Ozawa, Tomomichi; Tohnai, Iwai; Ogawa, Takahiro

    Ultraviolet (UV)-mediated photofunctionalization has earned considerable attention for the enhancement of the biologic capabilities of titanium. The effects of photofunctionalization on bone augmentation and gap closure were examined using titanium implants and mesh in a rat femur model. An acid-etched titanium implant (4-mm length, 1-mm diameter) was placed in the gluteal tuberosity that resembles a knife-edge-like edentulous ridge. The lower half of the implant was located in a 2-mm-diameter defect created in the bone without cortical bone support; the upper half was exposed and covered with a titanium mesh to provide augmentation space. After 12 and 24 days of healing, specimens were subjected to microcomputed tomography (micro-CT)- and histology-based bone morphometry in three zones of analysis: augmentation, cortical bone-implant gap, and bone marrow. A biomechanical push-in test was performed to examine the strength of bone-implant integration. Photofunctionalization was performed by treating titanium implants and mesh with UV light for 12 minutes. Photofunctionalized titanium mesh and implants were hydrophilic, whereas untreated controls were hydrophobic. Bone volume was significantly greater in photofunctionalized implants and mesh than in untreated implants in all zones on days 12 and 24. Bone-to-implant contact of photofunctionalized implants was greater than that of untreated implants, not just in the bone marrow but also in the gap and augmented zones. The strength of osseointegration was three times greater for photofunctionalized implants than for untreated implants. Use of photofunctionalized titanium mesh and implants effectively enhanced vertical bone augmentation, cortical bone-implant gap closure, and osseointegration without innate bone support.

  7. The Effect of Implant Length and Diameter on the Primary Stability in Different Bone Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Barikani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The focus of this paper is to evaluate the influence of mechanical characteristics of the implant on primary stability in different bone types, based on resonance frequency analysis (RFA.Materials and Methods: A number of 60 Nobel Biocare Replace Select TiUnit Tapered implants of two different lengths (10 mm and 13 mm and three different widths as 3.4 mm (narrow platform (NP, 4.3 mm (regular platform (RP and 5 mm (wide platform (WP were placed into two different groups of bone blocks. Bone blocks were different in bone quality, but similar to bone types D1 and D3. Immediately, after implant placement, implant stability quotient (ISQ was measured using the Osstell mentor device.Results: ISQ values for implant placements in D1 bone were significantly higher than those for implants placed in D3 bone. In D1 bone, the implant length did not make any significant difference in primary stability; however, in D3 bone, the primary stability of the implant increased when longer implants were utilized. NP implants presented significantly lower ISQ values compared to the two wider implants.Conclusion: In cases of low bone quality, the optimum increase in the implant length and diameter should be taken into account to achieve higher primary stability.

  8. Implant survival and crestal bone loss around extra-short implants supporting a fixed denture: the effect of crown height space, crown-to-implant ratio, and offset placement of the prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Alkhraist, Mohammad Hamdan; Piñas, Laura; Begoña, Leire; Orive, Gorka

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of crown height space, crown-to-implant ratio, and offset placement of a prosthesis on implant survival, crestal bone loss, and prosthetic complications; and to determine whether detrimental values for crown height space and crown-to-implant ratio exist for implant-supported restorations. Extra-short implants (length ≤6.5 mm) supporting a fixed denture in the posterior mandible and followed for at least 12 months were analyzed. Radiographic and clinical examinations were conducted to retrieve data about patients' dental and medical history, prosthetic complications, antagonist type, crown height space, crown-to-implant ratio, offset placement of the prosthesis, crestal bone loss, and implant failure. Thirty-four patients (mean age, 60 ± 10 years) with 45 extra-short implants participated in this study. Patients were followed for up to 4 years (mean, 2 years) and no implants were lost. The mean crown-to-implant ratio was 2.4 (range, 1.5 to 3.69). Mean crown height space was 17.05 ± 3.05 mm, and 65.4% of the implants had a crown height space in the range of 15 to 20 mm. About 90% of the implants had a distal or mesial offset placement greater than 1 mm. The type of antagonist significantly affected marginal bone loss around extra-short implants: bone loss was greatest for implants opposing a partial denture (mean, 1.28 ± 1.09 mm) and was lower for implants opposing a natural dentition (mean, 0.73 ± 0.60 mm) or a complete denture (mean, 0.89 ± 0.60 mm). Analysis of marginal bone loss and the factors crown-to-implant ratio, crown height space, and offset placement according to antagonist dentition indicated a significant positive correlation only between bone loss and crown height space. When an increased crown-to-implant ratio is present, crown height space may influence crestal bone loss more significantly.

  9. Histologic analysis of human peri-implant bone in type 1 osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibli, Jamil Awad; Aguiar, Kelly Christine Dias de Souza; Melo, Leandro; Ferrari, Daniel Sanchez; D'Avila, Susana; Iezzi, Giovanna; Piattelli, Adriano

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease that influences the quality of bone tissue. At present, osteoporosis represents a contraindication or a risk factor for osseointegration. The aim of this report was to evaluate the bone-to-implant contact of 2 loaded implants retrieved after prosthetic failure in a woman with type 1 osteoporosis. Histologically, only one implant was osseointegrated, and it appeared surrounded by healthy bone tissue. The bone-to-implant contact presented a mean of 51.25%. No foreign body reaction was found at the bone-to-implant contact, although epithelial downgrowth was observed at the interface. Data from this case report demonstrate that the peri-implant bone histology of the dental implant retrieved from an osteoporotic patient presented no alteration. However, the role of osteoporosis in the long-term success of dental implants needs further investigation.

  10. Role of clinician's experience and implant design on implant stability. An ex vivo study in artificial soft bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Georgios E; Basha-Hijazi, Abdulaziz; Gupta, Bhumija; Ren, Yan-Fang; Malmstrom, Hans

    2014-04-01

    Clinical experience in implant placement is important in order to prevent implant failures. However, the implant design affects the primary implant stability (PS) especially in poor quality bones. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effect of clinician surgical experience on PS, when placing different type of implant designs. A total of 180 implants (90 parallel walled-P and 90 tapered-T) were placed in freshly slaughtered cow ribs. Bone quality was evaluated by two examiners during surgery and considered as 'type IV' bone. Implants (ø 5 mm, length: 15 mm, Osseotite, BIOMET 3i, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, USA) were placed by three different clinicians (master/I, good/II, non-experienced/III, under direct supervision of a manufacturer representative; 30 implants/group). An independent observer assessed the accuracy of placement by resonance frequency analysis (RFA) with implant stability quotient (ISQ) values. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc test were used to detect the surgical experience of the clinicians and their interaction and effects of implant design on the PS. All implants were mechanically stable. The mean ISQ values were: 49.57(± 18.49) for the P-implants and 67.07(± 8.79) for the T-implants. The two-way ANOVA showed significant effects of implant design (p bone. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Mecanobiología de la interfase hueso-implante dental Mechanobiology of bone-dental implant interphase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Vanegas Acosta

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available La osteointegración es la conexión estructural y funcional entre el hueso y un implante. Cuando un implante se inserta en el hueso, se crea la denominada interfase hueso-implante, una zona de unión entre la superficie del biomaterial del implante y el hueso circundante. La cicatrización de esta interfase depende de las condiciones biológicas del hueso, las características de diseño del implante y la distribución de cargas entre hueso e implante. En este artículo se hace una revisión del proceso de cicatrización de la interfase hueso-implante para el caso de un implante dental. El objetivo es describir la secuencia de eventos biológicos iniciados con la lesión causada por la inserción del implante y que concluyen con la formación de nuevo hueso en la interfase. Esta descripción incluye una novedosa clasificación de los fenómenos mecánicos que intervienen durante el proceso de cicatrización de los tejidos lesionados. Esta descripción mecanobiológica de la interfase hueso-implante dental se utiliza para determinar las características más relevantes a tener en cuenta en la formulación de un modelo matemático de la osteointegración de implantes dentales.The osteointegration is the structural and functional connection between bone and implant. When an implant is inserted in bone, it creates the so-called bone-implant interphase, a joint zone between implant biomaterial surface and the surrounding bone. The healing of this interphase depends on bone biological conditions, characteristic of implant design and the distribution of loads between bone and implant. The aim of present article is to review of healing process of bone-implant interphase for a dental implant and also to describe the sequence of biological events beginning with lesion caused by implant insertion and leading to the formation of a new bone in the interphase. This description includes a novel classification of mechanical phenomena present in the healing

  12. Marginal bone loss around implants placed in maxillary native bone or grafted sinuses: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Moreno, P; Fernández-Jiménez, A; Avila-Ortiz, G; Silvestre, F J; Hernández-Cortés, P; Wang, H L

    2014-03-01

    To assess differences in marginal bone loss around implants placed in maxillary pristine bone and implants placed following maxillary sinus augmentation over a period of 3 years after functional loading. Two cohorts of subjects (Group 1: Subjects who received sinus augmentation with simultaneous implant placement; Group 2: Subjects who underwent conventional implant placement in posterior maxillary pristine bone) were included in this retrospective study. Radiographic marginal bone loss was measured around one implant per patient on digitized panoramic radiographs that were obtained at the time of prosthesis delivery (baseline) and 12, 24, and 36 months later. The influence of age, gender, smoking habits, history of periodontal disease, and type of prosthetic connection (internal or external) on marginal bone loss was analyzed in function of the type of osseous support (previously grafted or pristine). A total of 105 subjects were included in this study. Cumulative radiographic marginal bone loss ranged from 0 mm to 3.9 mm after 36 months of functional loading. There were statistically significant differences in marginal bone loss between implants placed in grafted and pristine bone at the 12-month assessment, but not in the subsequent progression rate. External prosthetic connection, smoking, and history of periodontitis negatively influenced peri-implant bone maintenance, regardless of the type of osseous substrate. Implants placed in sites that received maxillary sinus augmentation exhibited more marginal bone loss than implants placed in pristine bone, although marginal bone loss mainly occurred during the first 12 months after functional loading. Implants with external implant connection were strongly associated with increased marginal bone loss overtime. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. The effect of implant and abutment diameter on peri-implant bone stress: A three-dimensional finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Mary Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Load transfer mechanisms from the implant to surrounding bone and failure of osseointegrated implants are affected by implant geometry and mechanical properties of the site of placement as well as crestal bone resorption. Estimation of such effects allows for a correct design of implant geometry to minimize crestal bone loss and implant failure. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of implant and abutment diameter on stress distribution in the peri-implant area. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional finite element models created to replicate completely osseointegrated endosseous titanium implants and were used for the purpose of stress analysis. Two study groups that consisting of a regular platform (RP group and narrow platform (NP group were used with a standard bone density and loaded using the ANSYS Workbench software to calculate the von Mises and Principal (maximum tensile and minimum compressive stress. Results: The von Mises, compressive, and tensile stresses in the peri-implant bone were lower in the RP model compared to the NP model. Conclusion: RP model yielded a positive result with regard to lowering of peri-implant bone stress levels, in healthy as well as compromised bone qualities when compared to NP designs.

  14. Porous NiTi for bone implants: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansiddhi, A.; Sargeant, T.D.; Stupp, S.I.; Dunand, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    NiTi foams are unique among biocompatible porous metals because of their high recovery strain (due to the shape-memory or superelastic effects) and their low stiffness facilitating integration with bone structures. To optimize NiTi foams for bone implant applications, two key areas are under active study: synthesis of foams with optimal architectures, microstructure and mechanical properties; and tailoring of biological interactions through modifications of pore surfaces. This article reviews recent research on NiTi foams for bone replacement, focusing on three specific topics: (i) surface modifications designed to create bio-inert porous NiTi surfaces with low Ni release and corrosion, as well as bioactive surfaces to enhance and accelerate biological activity; (ii) In vitro and in vivo biocompatibility studies to confirm the long-term safety of porous NiTi implants; and (iii) biological evaluations for specific applications, such as in intervertebral fusion devices and bone tissue scaffolds. Possible future directions for bio-performance and processing studies are discussed that could lead to optimized porous NiTi implants. PMID:18348912

  15. Comparison of implant and provisional placement protocols in sinus-augmented bone: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Lisa A; Edgin, Wendell A; Garcia, Lily T; Olvera, Norma; Verrett, Ronald; Bohnenkamp, David; Haney, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate preliminary data on clinical outcomes associated with timing of placement of single implant-supported provisional crowns and implants in augmented bone. Twenty patients underwent sinus elevation bone grafting followed by a 6-month healing period before implant placement and immediate placement of a provisional crown (group [G] 1); 20 patients received sinus elevation bone grafting at the time of implant placement and immediate placement of a provisional crown (G2); 20 patients required no bone augmentation before implant placement and immediate placement of a provisional crown (G3); and 20 patients received sinus elevation bone grafting followed by a 6-month healing period before implant placement followed by a 6-month healing period before restoration (G4). The height of the crestal bone was measured and recorded to determine mean bone changes, and success rates were determined. Mean bone level comparisons were made between G2 and G3, G2 and G4, and G3 and G4. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups (P crown placement. Implants that were restored immediately regardless of the timing of bone augmentation showed greater failure rates than implants in augmented bone with delayed restoration protocols or those that were restored immediately in sites without bone augmentation. Neither the timing of loading nor timing of implant placement in relation to bone augmentation surgery affected mean bone loss.

  16. Relationship of implant stability and bone density derived from computerized tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merheb, Joe; Vercruyssen, Marjolein; Coucke, Wim; Quirynen, Marc

    2018-02-01

    Implant stability is one of the most important factors influencing osseointegration. Using stereolithographical guides for maximizing precision, this study aimed at investigating the relationship between implant stability and bone density derived from computerized tomography analysis. One hundred ninety-five implants were placed in 48 patients using digitally designed stereolithographical surgical guides. Ninety-five implants were placed using a mucosa supported guide and 100 implants were placed using a bone supported guide. Implant stability was measured by means of resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and damping capacity assessment (Periotest, PTV). Bone density (Hounsfield units) was measured at different regions of interest (ROI) and cortex thickness was measured around each implant. Implant stability correlated significantly with the different ROI. The best correlation for RFA was obtained for the spongious bone ROI (r = .64) and PTV best correlated with the coronal cortex density (r = -.41). Shorter implants (9 mm) had a significantly lower primary stability than longer implants (11, 13, 15 mm). Primary stability was also significantly higher in 4 mm diameter implants than in 3.5 mm diameter implants. A formula for the prediction of primary stability based on the different variables investigated was developed. Bone density and cortex thickness have a significant influence on implant primary stability. Longer and wider implants reached higher primary stability than shorter and narrower implants. These correlations lose their significance after osseointegration has taken place. Implant stability can be predicted based on an preoperative analysis of bone characteristics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bone formation around zirconia implants combined with rhBMP-2 gel in the canine mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Chul; Yeo, In-Sung; Kim, Dae-Joon; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun; Han, Jung-Suk

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effects of zirconia implants and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) gel on the acceleration of local bone formation and osseointegration in the canine mandible. Four groups of 48 implants with identical geometry were installed in the mandibles of beagle dogs: alumina-blasted zirconia implants applied with rhBMP-2, alumina-blasted zirconia implants applied with demineralized bone matrix (DBM), alumina-blasted zirconia implants, and resorbable blast media-treated titanium (Ti) implants. For the first two groups, zirconia implants were inserted after the surgical sites were filled with rhBMP-2 or DBM gel. For the other two groups, zirconia or Ti implants were installed with no adjunctive treatment. Fluorescent bone markers were administered to monitor bone remodeling at weeks 2, 4, and 5 postimplantation. After healing periods of 3 weeks and 6 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and fluorescent microscopy, histology, and histomorphometric analyses were performed. Fluorescent microscopy showed that bone formation around the zirconia implants installed with rhBMP-2 gel was the most prominent at 2 weeks postimplantation, while the Ti implants acquired bone apposition mainly at week 5. No significant differences were found in bone area among the groups (P > 0.05). The zirconia implants showed similar bone-to-implant contact to the Ti implants. There were no significant differences in bone-to-implant contact between the zirconia implants with rhBMP-2 gel and those with DBM (P > 0.05). The zirconia implants with alumina-blasted surfaces may achieve osseointegration in much the same manner as the well-established Ti implants. The area influenced by rhBMP-2 gel, including the alveolar crest, may cause active remodeling and early bone formation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Objective and subjective outcome of a new transcutaneous bone conduction hearing device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eberhard, Kristine Elisabeth; Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Miyazaki, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the objective and subjective outcome of a new transcutaneous bone conduction hearing device. Study Design: Prospective, consecutive case series. Patients: Twelve patients were implanted. Eight patients had a conductive/mixed (con/mix) hearing loss. Four had single sided...... to beneficial outcome. In Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale 12, ''quality of hearing'' scored especially high. The con/mix hearing loss group showed larger benefit especially in SDS, SRT50% in noise and the subjective evaluations, whereas frequency and duration of use were similar. Conclusion......: This study on the first 12 Nordic patients implanted with a new transcutaneous bone conduction hearing device demonstrates significant objective, as well as subjective hearing benefit. Patient satisfaction was high, as was the frequency of use....

  19. Comparison of Bone Loss around Bone Platform Shift and Non-Bone Platform Shift Implants After 12 Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AmirReza Rokn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present randomized clinical trial was to evaluate marginal bone loss around two types of implants modified at the neck area: Nobel Active and Nobel Replace Groovy, both manufactured by Nobel Biocare.Materials and Methods: A total of 25 Nobel Active and 21 Nobel Replace Groovy implants were included in the present study. The implants were placed based on the relevant protocol and patient inclusion and exclusion criteria. The amount of bone loss around implants was compared at 6 and 12-month intervals using digital periapical radiographs.Results: The mean bone loss values in the Nobel Active and Nobel Replace Groovy groups were 0.682 mm and 0.645 mm, respectively, with no statistically significant difference based on the results of independent t-test (P=0.802.Conclusion: Use of both implant types yielded favorable results, with high durability.The two implant types exhibited no superiority over each other in terms of bone loss.

  20. Implant stability and marginal bone level of microgrooved zirconia dental implants: A 3-month experimental study on dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgado-Ruíz Rafael Arcesio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The modification of implant surfaces could affect mechanical implant stability as well as dynamics and quality of peri-implant bone healing. The aim of this 3-month experimental study in dogs was to investigate implant stability, marginal bone levels and bone tissue response to zirconia dental implants with two laser-micro-grooved intraosseous surfaces in comparison with nongrooved sandblasted zirconia and sandblasted, high-temperature etched titanium implants. Methods. Implant surface characterization was performed using optical interferometric profilometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A total of 96 implants (4 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length were inserted randomly in both sides of the lower jaw of 12 Fox Hound dogs divided into groups of 24 each: the control (titanium, the group A (sandblasted zirconia, the group B (sandblasted zirconia plus microgrooved neck and the group C (sandblasted zirconia plus all microgrooved. All the implants were immediately loaded. Insertion torque, periotest values, radiographic crestal bone level and removal torque were recorded during the 3-month follow-up. Qualitative scanning electon micro-scope (SEM analysis of the bone-implant interfaces of each group was performed. Results. Insertion torque values were higher in the group C and control implants (p the control > the group B > the group A (p the control > the group B > the group A (p < 0.05. SEM showed that implant surfaces of the groups B and C had an extra bone growth inside the microgrooves that corresponded to the shape and direction of the microgrooves. Conclusion. The addition of micro-grooves to the entire intraosseous surface of zirconia dental implants enhances primary and secondary implant stability, promotes bone tissue ingrowth and preserves crestal bone levels.

  1. Comparison of peri-implant bone formation around injection-molded and machined surface zirconia implants in rabbit tibiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Kyun; Woo, Kyung mi; Shon, Won-Jun; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare osseointegration and surface characteristics of zirconia implants made by the powder injection molding (PIM) technique and made by the conventional milling procedure in rabbit tibiae. Surface characteristics of 2 types of implant were evaluated. Sixteeen rabbits received 2 types of external hex implants with similar geometry, machined zirconia implants and PIM zirconia implants, in the tibiae. Removal torque tests and histomorphometric analyses were performed. The roughness of PIM zirconia implants was higher than that of machined zirconia implants. The PIM zirconia implants exhibited significantly higher bone-implant contact and removal torque values than the machined zirconia implants (P zirconia implant is promising, and PIM, using the roughened mold etching technique, can produce substantially rough surfaces on zirconia implants. PMID:26235717

  2. Influence of trabecular bone quality and implantation direction on press-fit mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, Niklas B; Morlock, Michael M; Bishop, Nicholas E

    2017-02-01

    Achieving primary stability of uncemented press-fit prostheses in patients with poor quality bone can involve axial implantation forces large enough to cause bone fracture. Radial implantation eliminates intraoperative impaction forces and could prevent this damage. Platens of two commercial implant surfaces ("Beaded" and "Flaked") were implanted onto trabecular bone specimens of varying quality in a press-fit simulator. Samples were implanted with varying interference, either axially (shear) or radially (normal). Push-in and pull-out forces were measured to assess stability. Microstructural changes in the bone were determined from μCT analysis. For force-defined implantation analysis, push-in and pull-out forces both increased proportionally with increasing radial force, independent of implantation direction, bone quality or implant surface. For position-defined implantation analysis, pull-out forces were generally found to increase with interference and to be greater for radial than axial implantation direction, and to be lower for poor quality bone. Bone density increased locally at the tested interface due to implantation, in particular for the Beaded surface under axial implantation. If a safe radial stress can be determined for cortical bone in a particular patient, the associated implantation force, and pull-out force which represents primary stability, can be directly derived, regardless of implantation direction, bone quality or implant surface. Radial implantation delivers primary stability that is no worse than that for axial implantation and may eliminate potentially damaging impaction forces. Development of implant designs based on this principal might improve implant fixation. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:224-233, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Biomechanical study of the bone tissue with dental implants interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navrátil P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the stress-strain analysis of human mandible in the physiological state and after the dental implant application. The evaluation is focused on assessing of the cancellous bone tissue modeling-level. Three cancellous bone model-types are assessed: Non-trabecular model with homogenous isotropic material, nontrabecular model with inhomogeneous material obtained from computer tomography data using CT Data Analysis software, and trabecular model built from mandible section image. Computational modeling was chosen as the most suitable solution method and the solution on two-dimensional level was carried out. The results show that strain is more preferable value than stress in case of evaluation of mechanical response in cancellous bone. The non-trabecular model with CT-obtained material model is not acceptable for stress-strain analysis of the cancellous bone for singularities occurring on interfaces of regions with different values of modulus of elasticity.

  4. Implant survival rate and marginal bone loss of 6-mm short implants: a 2-year clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratu, Emanuel; Chan, Hsun-Liang; Mihali, Sorin; Karancsi, Olimpiu; Bratu, Dana Cristina; Fu, Jia-Hui; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate (1) the association between implant diameter and marginal bone loss (MBL) of short (6 mm) implants and (2) the survival rates of short implants. Thirty-three 6-mm implants were placed in the mandibles of 16 qualified patients. The selected sites had > 5 mm ridge width and implant sites required bone augmentation procedures. All implants were uncovered 3 months after placement, and all patients were rehabilitated with 2- or 3-unit implant-supported fixed partial dentures. Standardized periapical films were taken after 24 months of function. Radiographs were digitalized, and MBL was assessed. For all implants, the mean MBL was 0.17 mm at the point of uncovering. At the 2-year follow-up, all implants were immobile and functional. Implants with 4.2-mm diameters had significantly more MBL (1.95 mm) than wider implants (0.47 mm and 0.35 mm for 5.0-mm and 6.0-mm implants, respectively). This 2-year study illustrated that short implants are a viable option in selected clinical scenarios. Short implants with wider diameters are preferred because they have less marginal implant bone loss.

  5. Does surface anodisation of titanium implants change osseointegration and make their extraction from bone any easier?

    OpenAIRE

    Langhoff, J; Mayer, J; Faber, L; Kästner, S B; Guibert, G; Zlinszky, K; Auer, J A; von Rechenberg, B

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Titanium implants have a tendency for high bone-implant bonding, and, in comparison to stainless steel implants are more difficult to remove. The current study was carried out to evaluate, i) the release strength of three selected anodized titanium surfaces with increased nanohardness and low roughness, and ii) bone-implant bonding in vivo. These modified surfaces were intended to give improved anchorage while facilitating easier removal of temporary implants. Material and methods...

  6. Remodeling of the Mandibular Bone Induced by Overdentures Supported by Different Numbers of Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Xin, Haitao; Zhao, Yanfang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wu, Yulu

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the process of mandibular bone remodeling induced by implant-supported overdentures. computed tomography (CT) images were collected from edentulous patients to reconstruct the geometry of the mandibular bone and overdentures supported by implants. Based on the theory of strain energy density (SED), bone remodeling models were established using the user material subroutine (UMAT) in abaqus. The stress distribution in the mandible and bone density change was investigated to determine the effect of implant number on the remodeling of the mandibular bone. The results indicated that the areas where high Mises stress values were observed were mainly situated around the implants. The stress was concentrated in the distal neck region of the distal-most implants. With an increased number of implants, the biting force applied on the dentures was almost all taken up by implants. The stress and bone density in peri-implant bone increased. When the stress reached the threshold of remodeling, the bone density began to decrease. In the posterior mandible area, the stress was well distributed but increased with decreased implant numbers. Changes in bone density were not observed in this area. The computational results were consistent with the clinical data. The results demonstrate that the risk of bone resorption around the distal-most implants increases with increased numbers of implants and that the occlusal force applied to overdentures should be adjusted to be distributed more in the distal areas of the mandible.

  7. A retrospective radiographic study on the effect of natural tooth-implant proximity and an introduction to the concept of a bone-loading platform switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdaneta, Rainer A; Seemann, Rudolf; Dragan, Irina-Florentina; Lubelski, William; Leary, Joseph; Chuang, Sung-Kiang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth-implant proximity using an implant system with a double platform shift that was designed to load bone coronal to the implant-abutment cohort study was conducted between January 2008 and December 2009. The sample was composed of patients who had received at least one 5-mm-wide hydroxyapatite-coated single-tooth Bicon implant that had been placed adjacent to at least one natural tooth. Descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate linear mixed-effects regression models, adjusted for multiple implants in the same patient, were utilized. The primary predictor variable was the horizontal distance between implant and adjacent tooth, and the primary outcome variable was the change in peri-implant bone levels over time. Two hundred six subjects who received 235 plateau root-form implants were followed for an average of 42 months. Tooth-implant distance ranged between 0 and 14.6 mm. Out of 235 implants, 43 implants were placed tooth on mesial and/or distal sides. The proximity of a plateau root-form implant was not associated with complications on the adjacent tooth such as bone loss, root resorption, endodontic treatment, pain, or extraction. The proximity of an adjacent tooth was not a risk factor for the failure of a plateau root-form implant. After adjusting for other covariates in a multivariate model, the proximity of a natural tooth did not have a statistically significant effect on peri-implant bone levels (P = .13). The extraction of an adjacent tooth was associated with a significant increase in peri-implant bone loss (P = .008). The placement of a plateau root-form implant with a sloping shoulder in close proximity to an adjacent tooth did not cause damage to that tooth or lead to bone loss or the failure of the implant.

  8. Peri-operative cerebrospinal fluid leak during single-stage bone-anchored hearing aid implantation: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimbleby, G; Mitchell-Innes, A; Murphy, J

    2014-12-01

    A bone-anchored hearing aid uses the principle of bone conduction and osseointegration to transfer sound vibrations to a functioning inner ear. It consists of a permanent titanium implant, and removable abutment and sound processor. Informed consent requires discussion of the procedural benefits, alternatives and complications. The risks of bone-anchored hearing aid surgery include infection, soft tissue hypertrophy, skin graft or flap failure, osseointegration failure, and the need for further surgery. A case of cerebrospinal fluid leak in a patient undergoing bone-anchored hearing aid surgery is reported and discussed. Bone-anchored hearing aid surgery poses a risk of breaching the inner table of the temporal bone and dura, resulting in a cerebrospinal fluid leak; the risk of meningitis is rare but serious. The surgeon should discuss the possibility of cerebrospinal fluid leak when consenting patients. Pre-operative computerised tomography scanning should be considered in certain individuals to aid implant placement.

  9. Electrical conductivity of platinum-implanted polymethylmethacrylate nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2011-12-01

    Platinum/polymethylmethacrylate (Pt/PMMA) nanocomposite material was formed by low energy ion implantation of Pt into PMMA, and the transition from insulating to conducting phase was explored. In situ resistivity measurements were performed as the implantation proceeded, and transmission electron microscopy was used for direct visualization of Pt nanoparticles. Numerical simulation was carried out using the TRIDYN computer code to calculate the expected depth profiles of the implanted platinum. The maximum dose for which the Pt/PMMA system remains an insulator/conductor composite was found to be ϕ0 = 1.6 × 1016 cm-2, the percolation dose was 0.5 × 1016 cm-2, and the critical exponent was t = 1.46, indicating that the conductivity is due only to percolation. The results are compared with previously reported results for a Au/PMMA composite.

  10. Metals for bone implants. Part 1. Powder metallurgy and implant rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andani, Mohsen Taheri; Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Haberland, Christoph; Dean, David; Miller, Michael J; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    New metal alloys and metal fabrication strategies are likely to benefit future skeletal implant strategies. These metals and fabrication strategies were looked at from the point of view of standard-of-care implants for the mandible. These implants are used as part of the treatment for segmental resection due to oropharyngeal cancer, injury or correction of deformity due to pathology or congenital defect. The focus of this two-part review is the issues associated with the failure of existing mandibular implants that are due to mismatched material properties. Potential directions for future research are also studied. To mitigate these issues, the use of low-stiffness metallic alloys has been highlighted. To this end, the development, processing and biocompatibility of superelastic NiTi as well as resorbable magnesium-based alloys are discussed. Additionally, engineered porosity is reviewed as it can be an effective way of matching the stiffness of an implant with the surrounding tissue. These porosities and the overall geometry of the implant can be optimized for strain transduction and with a tailored stiffness profile. Rendering patient-specific, site-specific, morphology-specific and function-specific implants can now be achieved using these and other metals with bone-like material properties by additive manufacturing. The biocompatibility of implants prepared from superelastic and resorbable alloys is also reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Method for histological preparation of bone sections containing titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, J A; Brunski, J B; Cochran, G V

    1987-07-01

    A thin sectioning technique involving hand grinding has been developed to produce 20-40-microns-thick sections of bone-titanium implant sites. Components include: 1) surface staining of sections prior to mounting on slides so bone labels (oxytetracycline-HCl and 2,4-bis(N,N-dicarbomethyl)aminomethylfluorescein (DCAF] can be seen in sections viewed with transmitted light, 2) a pneumatic sample press for bonding sections to slides with a thin, uniform glue line and without trapped air bubbles, and 3) bonding methyl methacrylate embedded sections to clear acrylic slides with methyl methacrylate monomer to provide enhanced bond strength and grinding properties compared to those obtainable with glass slides. Sample cracking and distortion is minimized and the tissue-implant interface can be kept intact. The expense of start-up equipment for this technique is minimal.

  12. Comparison of Peri-Implant Bone Loss and Survival of Maxillary Intrasinus and Extrasinus Implants After 2 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hemati

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Low quality of the bone and insufficient bone due to the size of the sinus and resorption of the alveolar ridge decrease the long-term survival of implants in the posterior maxilla compared to other regions of the jaws. Surgical procedures to increase bone volume make it possible to place implants longer than 8 mm. In this situation sinus elevation makes it possible to place implants. We intend to evaluate peri-implant bone loss and survivalof implants placed in elevated sinuses after 2 years and to compare with implants placed in the native posterior maxilla.Materials and Methods:Twenty-five implants placed in sinuses that had been reconstructed with Bio-Oss and healed after 9 months were compared with 30 implants placed in the posterior maxilla without any surgery. The groups were compared using probing pocket depth, bleeding on probing, Plaque Index and bone loss immediately after implant placement surgery and 2 years postoperatively. The criterion for implant survival was presence or absence of the implant in the oral cavity, which was recorded in relevant forms in both groups.Results: Three implants were lost; one in control and two in grafted sinuses. No significant differences were observed in the survival rates. In general, the mean bone loss around intrasinus and extrasinus implants was not significantly different. In the same context, no differences were observed between bleeding on probing, Plaque Index and probing pocket depths of two groups (P=0.397, P=0.637 and P=0.224, respectively.Conclusion: The survival and bone loss around intrasinus and extrasinus implants are similar.

  13. Finite element analysis of stress extent at peri-implant bone surrounding external hexagon or Morse taper implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, J P; Pereira, J; Faria, J; Pereira, C A; Alves, J L; Henriques, B; Souza, J C M; López-López, J

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the distribution of stresses and consequent bone volume affected surrounding external hexagon or Morse taper dental implant systems by finite element analysis. Two different dental implant-abutment designs were assessed: external hexagon or Morse taper joints. A mandibular bone model obtained from a computed tomography scan was used. The implant-abutment systems were axially or obliquely (45°) loaded on 150 N relatively to the central axis of the implant. The von Mises stresses were analysed in terms of magnitude and volume of affected surrounding bone. The von Mises equivalent values found on the cortical bone were higher than that recorded on the trabecular bone. Additionally, the bone volume associated with high stress values was higher in cortical and trabecular bone for oblique loading compared to axial loading. The values of von Mises equivalent stress around Morse taper implant-abutment system were lower on both axial and oblique loads than those recorded for external hexagon implant-abutment systems. Morse taper implant joints revealed a proper biomechanical behavior when compared to external hexagon systems concerning a significant volume of surrounding peri-implant bone subjected to lower stresses values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Photofunctionalization enhances bone-implant contact, dynamics of interfacial osteogenesis, marginal bone seal, and removal torque value of implants: a dog jawbone study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Se-Wook; Park, Young Bum; Moon, Hong Seok; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2013-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light treatment of titanium, ie, photofunctionalization, has been extensively reported to enhance the osteoconductivity of titanium in animal and in vitro studies. This is the first study to examine whether photofunctionalization is effective on commercial dental implants in vivo. Dental implants with a microroughened surface were placed into dog jawbones. Photofunctionalization was performed by treating implants with UV light for 15 minutes using a photo device immediately before placement. Four weeks after placement, bone-implant integration was evaluated using a removable torque test and static and dynamic histology. Implant surfaces were converted from hydrophobic to super-hydrophilic after photofunctionalization. Removable torque for photofunctionalized implants was significantly higher by 50% than that for untreated implants. Bone-implant contact (BIC) was significantly higher for photofunctionalized implants in all zones examined: marginal, cortical, and bone marrow zones. An intensive mineralized layer was exclusively present in marginal bone at photofunctionalized interface. Dynamic histology identified early-onset, long-lasting robust bone deposition at photofunctionalized interface. Photofunctionalization enhanced the morphology, quality, and behavior of periimplant osteogenesis, including the increased BIC, expedited robust interfacial bone deposition, and improved marginal bone seal and support.

  15. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Baranowski

    Full Text Available Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES, and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants

  16. Results of the implantation of bone-anchored hearing aids in patients with treacher-collins syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Alexandra Kolontai de Sousa; Ferro,Lília Pereira Abreu; Silva,Jaiede Nicacio da; Okada,Daniel Mochida

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction:?Treacher-Collins syndrome is characterized by craniofacial malformations, narrowing of the external auditory canal (EAC), and, in 30% of cases, agenesis of the canal and ossicular chain defects. The use of hearing aids (HA) is not possible in cases in which agenesis or stenosis of the EAC accompanies conductive deafness. In contrast, bone conduction implants such as the Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA?) allow direct stimulation of the cochlea and are thus superior to con...

  17. Quantifying air-conducted acoustic radiation from the bone-conduction vibrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkrider, A W; Martin, F N

    1998-12-01

    Sound pressure levels in the external auditory canals of 50 subjects were measured at 2000 and 4000 Hz with a bone-conduction vibrator on the forehead, the mastoid ipsilateral to the probe microphone, and the mastoid contralateral to the probe microphone. A plug was placed in the external auditory canal to minimize sound pressure levels in the external auditory canal produced by the osseotympanic mode of bone conduction. Results suggest that clinically significant false air-bone gaps (greater than 10 dB) due to acoustic radiation into the concha from the bone-conduction vibrator are most likely to occur at 4000 Hz when the bone-conduction vibrator is placed on the mastoid of the test ear. To minimize the possible confounding effects of acoustic radiation, the bone-conduction vibrator may be placed on the forehead or the mastoid contralateral to the test ear while masking the nontest ear.

  18. Effects of directly autotransplanted tibial bone marrow aspirates on bone regeneration and osseointegration of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Michael; Lohberger, Birgit; Strunk, Dirk; Reich, Karoline M; Acham, Stephan; Jakse, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    Aim of the pilot trial was to evaluate applicability and effects of directly autotransplanted tibial bone marrow (BM) aspirates on the incorporation of porous bovine bone mineral in a sinus lift model and on the osseointegration of dental implants. Six edentulous patients with bilaterally severely resorbed maxillae requiring sinus augmentation and implant treatment were included. During surgery, tibial BM was harvested and added to bone substitute material (Bio-Oss(®) ) at the randomly selected test site. At control sites, augmentation was performed with Bio-Oss(®) alone. The cellular content of each BM aspirate was checked for multipotency and surface antigen expression as quality control. Histomorphometric analysis of biopsies from the augmented sites after 3 and 6 months (during implantation) was used to evaluate effects on bone regeneration. Osseointegration of implants was evaluated with Periotest(®) and radiographic means. Multipotent cellular content in tibial BM aspirates was comparable to that in punctures from the iliac crest. No significant difference in amount of new bone formation and the integration of bone substitute particles was detected histomorphometrically. Periotest(®) values and radiographs showed successful osseointegration of inserted implants at all sites. Directly autotransplanted tibial BM aspirates did not show beneficial regenerative effects in the small study population (N = 6) of the present pilot trial. However, the proximal tibia proved to be a potential donor site for small quantities of BM. Future trials should clarify whether concentration of tibial BM aspirates could effect higher regenerative potency. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Long-term evaluation of osseointegrated implants in regenerated and nonregenerated bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrente, G; Abundo, R; Cardaropoli, D; Cardaropoli, G; Martuscelli, G

    2000-08-01

    This investigation evaluated the predictability of dental implants subjected to bone regeneration procedures at the time of insertion. Fifty-two test implants were inserted into sites with periimplant bone defects. A calcium carbonate allograft material with or without a fibrin-fibronectin sealing system was used to fill the defects. Sixty control implants were inserted into an adequate volume of nonaugmented bone. Each of the 29 study patients received at least one test implant and one control implant. At the second-stage surgery, fill of the bone defect was assessed as complete or incomplete. The cumulative success rate was 91.7% (mean follow-up 55 mo) for the test implants and 93.2% (mean follow-up 59 mo) for the control implants. Within the test group, implants with complete bone fill achieved 97.6% success versus 59.1% success for implants with incomplete bone fill. These preliminary results suggest that implants placed with simultaneous bone regeneration procedures achieve long-term predictability that is comparable to that of implants placed in an adequate volume of bone, provided that complete bone fill of the periimplant defect is achieved. Long-term studies with other augmentation materials are needed to fully validate these findings.

  20. The Influence of implant geometry and surface composition on bone response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Farraj Aldosari, A.; Anil, S.; Alasqah, M.; Wazzan, K.A. Al; Jetaily, S.A. Al; Jansen, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The implant design and surface modification are independent conditions that can alter the implant bone response. The objective of this study is to compare the bone response to roughened tapered and cylindrical screw-type implants with and without hydroxyapatite (HA) surface coating in

  1. [Clinical application of bone-anchored hearing aid implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yin; Zhang, Hua; Gong, Shu-sheng; Wang, Dan-ni; Zheng, Ya-li; Li, Yu-ling; Dong, Bo-ya; Han, De-min

    2013-08-01

    To discuss the indications, surgery methods and effects of the BAHA implantation by analyzing the patients' medical records of bone-anchored hearing aids(BAHA). Retrospective analyzed the records of 16 patients of BAHA implantation, including nine males and seven females. Their average age was 31 years old (8-53ys). Nine of them were congenital ear malformation, two were chronic suppurative otitis media, two were otosclerosis and three were unilateral severe sensorineural deafness. We evaluated their pure tone audiometry (PTA), speech audiometry and temporal CT before the surgery, and evaluated the aided PTA in soundfield and speech audiometry in sound field. These patients received BAHA implantation and installed the speech processor their months later. The average preoperative PTA measurements (PTA at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz) was (63.2 ± 19.0) dB HL and postoperative aided PTA in sound field was (35.5 ± 10.9)dB HL. The average improvement in Hearing In Noise Test (HINT) was 37.0% ± 31.7%. The average improvement in Mandarin Speech Test was 76.0% ± 19.7%. After 4-16 months' follow-up, no significant complications were recorded. BAHA is a safe and effective bone implantable hearing device.

  2. The effect of bone marrow aspirate, bone graft and collagen composites on fixation of bone implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan; Ding, Ming; Overgaard, Søren

    2007-01-01

     Introduction: Replacement of extensive local bone loss especially in revision joint arthroplasties is a significant clinical challenge. Autogenous and allogenic cancellous bone grafts have been the gold standard in reconstructive orthopaedic surgery, but it is well known that there is morbidity...... to be sought. Hydroxyapatite and collagen composites have the potential in mimicking and replacing skeletal bones. Aim: This study attempted to determine the effect of hydroxyapatite/collagen composites in the fixation of bone implants. The composites used in this study is produced by Institute of Science...... part of the implant. Specimens are preserving now at - 20°C and wait for the push-out test which is destructive and will be performed on an 858 Bionex MTS hydraulic material testing machine (MTS system cooperation, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA). The specimens for histological analysis were taken from...

  3. Conductive polymer sensor arrays for smart orthopaedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micolini, Carolina; Holness, F. B.; Johnson, James A.; Price, Aaron D.

    2017-04-01

    This study proposes and demonstrates the design, implementation, and characterization of a 3D-printed smartpolymer sensor array using conductive polyaniline (PANI) structures embedded in a polymeric substrate. The piezoresistive characteristics of PANI were studied to evaluate the efficacy of the manufacturing of an embedded pressure sensor. PANI's stability throughout loading and unloading cycles together with the response to incremental loading cycles was investigated. It is demonstrated that this specially developed multi-material additive manufacturing process for polyaniline is a good candidate for the manufacture of implant components with smart-polymer sensors embedded for the analysis of joint loads in orthopaedic implants.

  4. Radiographic analysis of dental implant extensions using bone grafts on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Álida Lúcia; Lima, Cirilo Antônio de Paula; Montebello Filho, Agenor; Pereira, Adriano Alves

    2018-01-10

    Despite the wide use of dental implants they can bring inconveniences, as the moment one reaches osseointegration, these can no longer be extended. Therefore, if a problem occurs regarding its positioning, the options open are substitution or burial of the implant. With implant substitution, there exists the risk of local bone loss and/or future loss of the new implant. This study proposes a new device (implant extender) for extending the dental implant. The feasibility of this technique is verified through installing dental implant extensions onto the humerus bone of dogs with autogenous bone grafts. Implants of 3.3 mm in diameter by 6 mm in length and implant extensions with a 3.3 mm diameter and 2.2 mm length were installed onto humerus of 4 healthy dogs, using an autogenous bone graft in a block made from ilium. The biomechanical percussion tests were performed on the implant extensions and then the implant-extension sets were removed for radiographic analysis. In the biomechanical percussion, none of the extensions present clinical mobility. As for the x-rays, these were analyzed by 20 professionals, who concluded that there was a 100% success rate with bone formation around the implants, 74.1% for bone neoformation of the implant extensions, and 80.1% referring to the adaptation of the implant extension. Bone formation occurred in every installed dental implant. In most cases, there occurred bone neoformation of the extensions and adaptation of the extension/implant set, according to the x-ray analysis performed by the evaluators. An absence of clinical mobility in the extensions was also observed. Although the results were promising, these techniques still need to be researched in humans, as an alternative for reducing elongated prosthetic crowns or poorly installed implants, as well as the modification of the type of implants among other applications. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Body composition and bone mineral density in users of the etonogestrel-releasing contraceptive implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto, Waleska; Dal Ava, Natália; Monteiro, Ilza; Bahamondes, Luis

    2015-12-01

    There is scarce information about bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition (BC) among users of the etonogestrel (ENG)-releasing implant. To evaluate BC and BMD in ENG-releasing implant users as compared to copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD)-users. A prospective study was conducted on 75 users of both contraceptive methods. BMD was evaluated at femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine (LS) (L1-L4) and BC at baseline and at 12 months after insertion. The mean (±SD) age was 30.4 ± 6.8 and 29.8 ± 8.4 years and body mass index (kg/m(2)) was 24.9 ± 4.1 and 24.6 ± 3.5 in ENG-releasing implant- and Cu-IUD-users, respectively. ENG-releasing implant users did not show significant differences on BMD at the LS and FN at 12 months of use. Furthermore, ENG-implant users had an increase in body weight at 12 months (p < 0.001) and an increase of 2 % in the percentage of body fat, when compared with Cu-IUD users. There was a significant increase in lean mass in ENG-implant users at 12 months (p = 0.020). No significant changes of BMD were seen after the first year of use among the ENG-releasing implant-users, albeit an increase of weight and fat mass was seen when compared to Cu-IUD users.

  6. Insufficient irrigation induces peri-implant bone resorption: an in vivo histologic analysis in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisi, Paolo; Berardini, Marco; Falco, Antonello; Podaliri Vulpiani, Michele; Perfetti, Giorgio

    2014-06-01

    To measure in vivo impact of dense bone overheating on implant osseointegration and peri-implant bone resorption comparing different bur irrigation methods vs. no irrigation. Twenty TI-bone implants were inserted in the inferior edge of mandibles of sheep. Different cooling procedures were used in each group: no irrigation (group A), only internal bur irrigation (group B), both internal and external irrigation (group C), and external irrigation (group D). The histomorphometric parameters calculated for each implant were as follows: %cortical bone-implant contact (%CBIC) and %cortical bone volume (%CBV). Friedman's test was applied to test the statistical differences. In group A, we found a huge resorption of cortical bone with %CBIC and %CBV values extremely low. Groups B and C showed mean %CBIC and %BV values higher than other groups The mean %CBV value was significantly different when comparing group B and group C vs. group A (P irrigation, of hard bone caused massive resorption of the cortical bone and implant failure. Drilling procedures on hard bone need an adequate cooling supply because the bone matrix overheating may induce complete resorption of dense bone around implants. Internal-external irrigation and only internal irrigation showed to be more efficient than other types of cooling methods in preventing bone resorption around implants. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. In vitro osteogenic potential of bone debris resulting from placement of titanium screw-type implants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhore, C.R.; Snel, S.J.; Jacques, S.V.; Naert, I.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Histological sections of preclinical animal studies have shown that new bone formation around dental implants frequently contains debris derived from the original bone. Whether such debris by itself is osteogenic, i.e., can influence the process of new bone formation after implant

  8. Placement of fin type dental implant in three different surgical situations of alveolar bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen Pramono D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Three different dental implant placements according to surgical implant bed situations were observed in its bone integration 3 months after dental implant insertion. This observation was done on implant system which has plateau or fin system. Elf implants were placed in the upper jaw in two patients. In case one, two implants were inserted immediately after tooth extraction, and the other six implants were placed in the alveolar crest regions in delayed implantation or in which the teeth had been extracted over 6 months of period. In case two, three implants were inserted in the post trauma region in the anterior maxilla, which the labial plate had been lost and reconstructed with bone grafting procedure using a mixture of alloplastic and autogenous bones. The alveolar reconstruction was needed to be performed due to only thin alveolar crest width was left intact. All of those implants observed showed in good integration.

  9. Electrical conductivity enhancement of polyethersulfone (PES) by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridwell, L.B.; Giedd, R.E.; Wang Yongqiang; Mohite, S.S.; Jahnke, T.; Brown, I.M.

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous polyethersulfone (PES) films have been implanted with a variety of ions (He, B, C, N and As) at a bombarding energy of 50 keV in the dose range 10 16 -10 17 ions/cm 2 . Surface resistance as a function of dose indicates a saturation effect with a significant difference between He and the other ions used. ESR line shapes in the He implanted samples changed from a mixed Gaussian/Lorentzian to a pure Lorentzian and narrowed with increasing dose. Temperature dependent resistivity indicates an electron hopping mechanism for conduction. Infrared results indicate cross-linking or self-cyclization occurred for all implanted ions with further destruction in the case of As. (orig.)

  10. Air-borne radiation from bone conduction transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, G R

    1979-05-01

    The relative magnitudes of air-borne radiation and mechanical vibration from three types of bone conduction transducer have been measured. The study suggests that the presence of excess air-borne radiation can lead to the observation of a false air-bone gap in audiometry. Some methods of overcoming this effect are considered.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Bone Stress for Miniscrew Implant Proximal to Root Under Occlusal Force and Implant Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Li-Hua; Guo, Na; Zhou, Guan-jun; Qie, Hui; Li, Chen-Xi; Lu, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Because of the narrow interradicular spaces and varying oral anatomies of individual patients, there is a very high risk of root proximity during the mini implants inserting. The authors hypothesized that normal occlusal loading and implant loading affected the stability of miniscrew implants placed in proximity or contact with the adjacent root. The authors implemented finite element analysis (FEA) to examine the effectiveness of root proximity and root contact. Stress distribution in the bone was assessed at different degrees of root proximity by generating 4 finite element models: the implant touches the root surface, the implant was embedded in the periodontal membrane, the implant touches the periodontal surface, and the implant touches nothing. Finite element analysis was then carried out with simulations of 2 loading conditions for each model: condition A, involving only tooth loading and condition B, involving both tooth and implant loading. Under loading condition A, the maximum stress on the bone for the implant touching the root was the distinctly higher than that for the other models. For loading condition B, peak stress areas for the implant touching the root were the area around the neck of the mini implant and the point of the mini implant touches the root. The results of this study suggest that normal occlusal loading and implant loading contribute to the instability of the mini implant when the mini implant touches the root.

  12. Alveolar Bone Grafting in Cleft Patients from Bone Defect to Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuletić, Marko; Knežević, Predrag; Jokić, Dražen; Rebić, Jerko; Žabarović, Domagoj; Macan, Darko

    2014-12-01

    Cleft lip and palate is the most common congenital deformity affecting craniofacial structures. Orofacial clefts have great impact on the quality of life which includes aesthetics, function, psychological impact, dental development and facial growth. Incomplete fusion of facial prominences during the fourth to tenth week of gestation is the main cause. Cleft gaps are closed with alveolar bone grafts in surgical procedure called osteoplasty. Autogenic bone is taken from the iliac crest as the gold standard. The time of grafting can be divided into two stages: primary and secondary. The alveolar defect is usually reconstructured between 7 and 11 years and is often related to the development of the maxillary canine root. After successful osteoplasty, cleft defect is closed but there is still a lack of tooth. The space closure with orthodontic treatment has 50-75% success. If the orthodontic treatment is not possible, in order to replace the missing tooth there are three possibilities: adhesive bridgework, tooth transplantation and implants. Dental implant has the role of holding dental prosthesis, prevents pronounced bone atrophy and loads the augmentation material in the cleft area. Despite the fact that autologous bone from iliac crest is the gold standard, it is not a perfect source for reconstruction of the alveolar cleft. Bone morphogenic protein (BMP) is appropriate as an alternative graft material. The purpose of this review is to explain morphology of cleft defects, historical perspective, surgical techniques and possibilities of implant and prosthodontic rehabilitation.

  13. Relation between insertion torque and bone-implant contact percentage: an artificial bone study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Huang, Heng-Li; Chen, Michael Yuan-Chien; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Su, Kuo-Chih; Chang, Chih-Han; Wu, Aaron Yu-Jen

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between the peak insertion torque value (ITV) of a dental implant and the bone-implant contact percentage (BIC%). Dental implants were inserted into specimens comprising a 2-mm-thick artificial cortical shell representing cortical bone and artificial foam bone representing cancellous bone with four densities (groups 1 to 4--0.32, 0.20, 0.16, and 0.12 g/cm(3)). Each specimen with an inserted implant was subjected to micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanning, from which the 3D BIC% values were calculated. Pearson's correlation coefficients (r) between the ITV and BIC% were calculated. The ITVs in groups 1 to 4 were 56.2 ± 4.6 (mean±standard deviation), 45.6 ± 0.9, 43.3 ± 4.3, and 38.5 ± 3.4 N cm, respectively, and the corresponding BIC% values were 41.5 ± 0.5%, 39.0 ± 1.0%, 30.8 ± 1.1%, and 26.2 ± 1.6%. Pearson's correlation coefficient between the ITV and BIC% was r = 0.797 (P < 0.0001). The initial implant stability, quantified as the ITV, was strongly positively correlated with the 3D BIC% obtained from micro-CT images. The ITV of a dental implant can be used to predict the initial BIC%; this information may provide the clinician with important information on the optimal loading time.

  14. Conduction Abnormalities and Pacemaker Implantations After SAPIEN 3 Vs SAPIEN XT Prosthesis Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husser, Oliver; Kessler, Thorsten; Burgdorf, Christof; Templin, Christian; Pellegrini, Costanza; Schneider, Simon; Kasel, Albert Markus; Kastrati, Adnan; Schunkert, Heribert; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is increasingly used in patients with aortic stenosis. Post-procedural intraventricular conduction abnormalities and permanent pacemaker implantations remain a serious concern. Recently, the Edwards SAPIEN 3 prosthesis has replaced the SAPIEN XT. We sought to determine the incidences of new-onset intraventricular conduction abnormalities and permanent pacemaker implantations by comparing the 2 devices. We analyzed the last consecutive 103 patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation with SAPIEN XT before SAPIEN 3 was used in the next 105 patients. To analyze permanent pacemaker implantations and new-onset intraventricular conduction abnormalities, patients with these conditions at baseline were excluded. Electrocardiograms were recorded at baseline, after the procedure, and before discharge. SAPIEN 3 was associated with higher device success (100% vs 92%; P=.005) and less paravalvular leakage (0% vs 7%; P<.001). The incidence of permanent pacemaker implantations was 12.6% (23 of 183) with no difference between the 2 groups (SAPIEN 3: 12.5% [12 of 96] vs SAPIEN XT: 12.6% [11 of 87]; P=.99). SAPIEN 3 was associated with a higher rate of new-onset intraventricular conduction abnormalities (49% vs 27%; P=.007) due to a higher rate of fascicular blocks (17% vs 5%; P=.021). There was no statistically significant difference in transient (29% [20 of 69] vs persistent 19% [12 of 64]; P=.168) left bundle branch blocks (28% [19 of 69] vs 17% [11 of 64]; P=.154) when SAPIEN 3 was compared with SAPIEN XT. We found a trend toward a higher rate of new-onset intraventricular conduction abnormalities with SAPIEN 3 compared with SAPIEN XT, although this did not result in a higher permanent pacemaker implantation rate. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Intravitreal Implantation of Genetically Modified Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells for Treating Retinal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Christopher J; Sanders, Douglas N; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Jensen, Cheryl A; Castaner, Leilani J; Kirk, Mark D; Katz, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    A number of retinal degenerative diseases may be amenable to treatment with continuous intraocular delivery of therapeutic agents that cannot be delivered effectively to the retina via systemic or topical administration. Among these disorders are lysosomal storage diseases resulting from deficiencies in soluble lysosomal enzymes. Most cells, including those of the retina, are able to take up these enzymes and incorporate them in active form into their lysosomes. In theory, therefore, continuous intraocular administration of a normal form of a soluble lysosomal enzyme should be able to cure the molecular defect in the retinas of subjects lacking this enzyme. Experiments were conducted to determine whether genetically modified bone marrow-derived stem cells implanted into the vitreous could be used as -vehicles for continuous delivery of such enzymes to the retina. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from normal mice were implanted into the vitreous of mice undergoing retinal degeneration as a result of a mutation in the PPT1 gene. The implanted cells appeared to survive indefinitely in the vitreous without proliferating or invading the retina. This indicates that intravitreal implantation of MSCs is likely a safe means of long-term delivery of proteins synthesized by the implanted cells. Experiments have been initiated to test the efficacy of using genetically modified autologous MSCs to inhibit retinal degeneration in a canine model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

  16. Neutron tomographic imaging of bone-implant interface: Comparison with X-ray tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Hanna; Le Cann, Sophie; Perdikouri, Christina; Turunen, Mikael J; Kaestner, Anders; Tägil, Magnus; Hall, Stephen A; Tudisco, Erika

    2017-10-01

    Metal implants, in e.g. joint replacements, are generally considered to be a success. As mechanical stability is important for the longevity of a prosthesis, the biological reaction of the bone to the mechanical loading conditions after implantation and during remodelling determines its fate. The bone reaction at the implant interface can be studied using high-resolution imaging. However, commonly used X-ray imaging suffers from image artefacts in the close proximity of metal implants, which limit the possibility to closely examine the bone at the bone-implant interface. An alternative ex vivo 3D imaging method is offered by neutron tomography. Neutrons interact with matter differently than X-rays; therefore, this study explores if neutron tomography may be used to enrich studies on bone-implant interfaces. A stainless steel screw was implanted in a rat tibia and left to integrate for 6weeks. After extracting the tibia, the bone-screw construct was imaged using X-ray and neutron tomography at different resolutions. Artefacts were visible in all X-ray images in the close proximity of the implant, which limited the ability to accurately quantify the bone around the implant. In contrast, neutron images were free of metal artefacts, enabling full analysis of the bone-implant interface. Trabecular structural bone parameters were quantified in the metaphyseal bone away from the implant using all imaging modalities. The structural bone parameters were similar for all images except for the lowest resolution neutron images. This study presents the first proof-of-concept that neutron tomographic imaging can be used for ex-vivo evaluation of bone microstructure and that it constitutes a viable, new tool to study the bone-implant interface tissue remodelling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of annual bone loss and different bone quality on dental implant success - A finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linetskiy, Igor; Demenko, Vladyslav; Linetska, Larysa; Yefremov, Oleg

    2017-12-01

    For dental implant success, experimentally established thresholds should limit bone stresses and strains. From these metrics, the ultimate functional load, which determines the implant load-carrying capacity, can be calculated. Obviously, its decrease due to bone loss shortens implant service life. A comparison of how bone loss affects the ultimate functional loads of various implants can provide the clinician with meaningful feedback concerning the suitability and longevity of implants. The aim of this study is to evaluate the lifetime of different dental implants placed in I-IV bone types on the basis of a comparison of their ultimate functional loads with consideration of the bone loss factor. Von Mises stress and first principal strain distributions in bone-implant interface were studied and ultimate functional loads were calculated. Models of I-IV bone types were designed. 3.3 × 8.0 mm (A), 4.1 × 12.0 mm (B) and 4.8 × 14.0 mm (C) implants were analyzed at 10 levels of bone loss. Ultimate functional loads, which generated the ultimate von Mises stress and first principal strain in bone, were computed. For the implants A, B, and C placed in type I bone, ultimate functional load values were above 120.92 N experimental functional load, which corresponded to 10+, 10+, and 10 + years of service with 0.2 mm annual bone loss. For type II bone, the lifetime was 4, 10+, and 10 + years. For type III bone, the lifetime was 4, 5, and 5 years. For type IV bone, first principal strains were initially deleterious for all implants. In oral implantology, bone loss is an essential factor for implant longevity prognosis. While evaluating implant load-carrying capacity, clinicians should take into account the factor of implant longevity decrease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influences of microgap and micromotion of implant-abutment interface on marginal bone loss around implant neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiawei

    2017-11-01

    To review the influences and clinical implications of micro-gap and micro-motion of implant-abutment interface on marginal bone loss around the neck of implant. Literatures were searched based on the following Keywords: implant-abutment interface/implant-abutment connection/implant-abutment conjunction, microgap, micromotion/micromovement, microleakage, and current control methods available. The papers were then screened through titles, abstracts, and full texts. A total of 83 studies were included in the literature review. Two-piece implant systems are widely used in clinics. However, the production error and masticatory load result in the presence of microgap and micromotion between the implant and the abutment, which directly or indirectly causes microleakage and mechanical damage. Consequently, the degrees of microgap and micromotion further increase, and marginal bone absorption finally occurs. We summarize the influences of microgap and micromotion at the implant-abutment interface on marginal bone loss around the neck of the implant. We also recommend some feasible methods to reduce their effect. Clinicians and patients should pay more attention to the mechanisms as well as the control methods of microgap and micromotion. To reduce the corresponding detriment to the implant marginal bone, suitable Morse taper or hybrid connection implants and platform switching abutments should be selected, as well as other potential methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bone reactions adjacent to titanium implants subjected to static load. A study in the dog (I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Berglundh, T; Lindhe, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of lateral static load induced by an expansion force on the bone/implant interface and adjacent peri-implant bone. In 3 beagle dogs, the 2nd, 3rd and 4th mandibular premolars were extracted bilaterally. Twelve weeks later 8 implants of the ITI Dental...... Implant System were placed in each dog. Crowns connected in pairs were screwed on the implants 12 weeks after implant installation. The connected crowns contained an orthodontic expansion screw yielding 4 loading units in each dog. Clinical registrations, standardized radiographs and fluorochrome labeling...... were carried out during the 24-week loading period. Biopsies were harvested and processed for ground sectioning. The sections were subjected to histological examination. No evident marginal bone loss was observed at either test or control sites. The bone density and the mineralized bone-to-implant...

  20. A morphometric and biomechanic comparison of titanium implants inserted in rabbit cortical and cancellous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennerby, L; Thomsen, P; Ericson, L E

    1992-01-01

    The removal torques for screw-shaped pure titanium implants inserted in rabbit tibia and the femoral part of the knee joint and the tissue response to these implants, as quantitated with light microscopic morphometry on ground sections, were compared after 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. The bone surrounding the femoral intra-articular implants was mostly cancellous, while cortical bone was formed around the tibial implants. The torque needed to remove the intra-articular implants increased with time, but there was no such increase for the tibial implants. At 6 weeks, significantly less torque was needed to remove the intra-articular implants in spite of the fact that significantly more bone was found in the threads of these implants as compared with the tibial implants. When calculating the amount of bone in threads situated in the cortical and subchondral passage, more was found in the threads of the tibial implants, which corresponded to the higher removal torque. Additional light microscopic observations on implants unscrewed after 12 months in rabbit tibia indicated that rupture occurred between the implant surface and calcified bone. Findings indicate that the resistance to unscrewing is dependent on the amount of compact bone surrounding a titanium implant.

  1. A study of the bone healing kinetics of plateau versus screw root design titanium dental implants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, Gary

    2009-03-01

    This study was designed to compare the bone healing process around plateau root from (PRF) and screw root from (SRF) titanium dental implants over the immediate 12 week healing period post implant placement.

  2. Effect of surface contamination on osseointegration of dental implants surrounded by circumferential bone defects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohamed, Seif

    2010-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of surface contamination on osseointegration of dental implants surrounded by a circumferential bone defect and to compare osseointegration around Osseotite with that around Nanotite implants.

  3. Effect of surface contamination on osseointegration of dental implants surrounded by circumferential bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Seif; Polyzois, Ioannis; Renvert, Stefan; Claffey, Noel

    2010-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of surface contamination on osseointegration of dental implants surrounded by a circumferential bone defect and to compare osseointegration around Osseotite with that around Nanotite implants. The premolars on both sides of the mandible in four beagle dogs were extracted. Following 4 months healing, two Nanotite implants and two Osseotite implants were partially inserted in the left side of each mandible. Some threads protruded from the tissues into the oral cavity. Following a 5 week healing period, the implants were removed and the contaminated part of each implant was cleaned. They were then installed to the full implant length on the contra lateral side of the mandibles. The coronal 5 mm of each implant was surrounded by 1 mm circumferential bone defect. Following 12 weeks of healing period, the dogs were sacrificed and biopsies were obtained. Ground sections were prepared for histomorphometric analysis. All implants were associated with direct bone-to-implant contact on the portion of the implant surface contaminated previously and surrounded by bone defect. Nanotite implants performed better than Osseotite implants. The results demonstrated that implant surfaces, which were contaminated previously and were surrounded by bone defects, can osseointegrate.

  4. New bone formation in a bone defect associated to dental implant using absorbable or non-absorbable membrane in a dog model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Maria de Almeida; Olate, Sergio; Lanata-Flores, Antonio; Pozzer, Leandro; Cavalieri-Pereira, Lucas; Cantín, Mario; Vásquez, Bélgica; de Albergaria-Barbosa, José

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the bone formation capacity in fenestration defects associated with dental implants using absorbable and non-absorbable membranes. Six dogs were used in the study. In both tibias of each animal 3 implants were installed, and around these 5 mm circular defects were created. The defects were covered with absorbable membranes (experimental group 1), non-absorbable membranes (experimental group 2), and the third defect was not covered (control group). At 3 and 8 weeks post-surgery, the animals were euthanized and the membranes with the bone tissue around the implants were processed for histological analysis. The statistical analysis was conducted with Tukey’s test, considering statistical significance when p0.1). In the defects without membrane, continuous connective tissue invasions and bone repair deficiency were observed. There were no significant differences in the characteristics and volume of the neoformed bone in the defects around the implants covered by the different membranes, whereas the control defects produced significantly less bone. The use of biological membranes contributes to bone formation in three-wall defects. PMID:24228090

  5. Evaluation of bone loss in antibacterial coated dental implants: An experimental study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina; Sevilla, Pablo; Nart, José; Manzanares, Norberto; Manero, José M.; Gil, Francisco Javier; Boyd, Steven K.; Rodríguez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effect of antibacterial modified dental implants in the first stages of peri-implantitis. Thirty dental implants were inserted in the mandibular premolar sites of 5 beagle dogs. Sites were randomly assigned to Ti (untreated implants, 10 units), Ti-Ag (silver electrodeposition treatment, 10 units), and Ti-TSP (silanization treatment, 10 units). Coated implants were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two months after implant insertion, experimental peri-implantitis was initiated by ligature placement. Ligatures were removed 2 months later, and plaque formation was allowed for 2 additional months. Clinical and radiographic analyses were performed during the study. Implant-tissue samples were prepared for micro computed tomography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, histomorphometric and histological analyses and ion release measurements. X-ray, SEM and histology images showed that vertical bone resorption in treated implants was lower than in the control group (P < 0.05). This effect is likely due to the capacity of the treatments to reduce bacteria colonization on the implant surface. Histological analysis suggested an increase of peri-implant bone formation on silanized implants. However, the short post-ligature period was not enough to detect differences in clinical parameters among implant groups. Within the limits of this study, antibacterial surface treatments have a positive effect against bone resorption induced by peri-implantitis. - Highlights: • Dental implants were modified with two antibacterial treatments, silver and TESPSA silanization. • Performance of the modified dental implants was studied in vivo. • Treated implants showed less peri-implant bone resorption. • Decrease in bone resorption was attributed to the antibacterial surface treatments. • Silane treatment enhanced bone regeneration around dental implants.

  6. Collapse of the ear canal during masking for bone conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, R C; Ford, C N

    1986-01-01

    Although it is well recognized that collapse of the external meatus can mimic a conductive hearing loss in the test ear, attention must also be directed to the masked ear during masked bone conduction threshold testing. Failure to recognize collapse of the masked ear may result in a false air-bone gap in the test ear. Two such cases are presented and the mechanism analyzed. Suggestions as to identification and resolution of this problem are discussed.

  7. Changes in Bone Levels Around Mini-Implants in Edentulous Arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Torsten; Schwahn, Christian; Biffar, Reiner; Heinemann, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate changes in marginal bone levels around maxillary and mandibular mini-implants stabilizing complete dentures and to explore possible risk factors associated with bone loss. All eligible patients from nine private dental practices were invited to participate. Panoramic radiographs were obtained postoperatively and at the follow-up examination. The changes in bone level were estimated with linear mixed models that included the factors sex, age, jaw, region (anterior versus posterior), smoking habits, and loading concept. Of the 180 invited patients, 133 participated in the follow-up (response rate: 73.9%). Of 336 mini-implants in 54 maxillas and 402 mini-implants in 95 mandibles, 15 maxillary implants and 11 mandibular implants were lost after insertion, and 4 mandibular implants fractured. Radiographic evaluations in 11 participants were not possible. The mean marginal bone loss at the remaining 634 mini-implants in 122 patients was 0.8 mm in the maxilla and 0.5 mm in the mandible over a mean observation time of 2.2 ± 1.0 years. This difference in univariate estimation lost significance after adjusting for the other variables. Implants in former smokers showed more bone loss than implants in participants who had never smoked. Implants that were loaded 3 to 4 months after placement (delayed loading) showed more marginal bone loss than immediately loaded implants. No statistically significant differences were found between men and women, different age groups, or anterior and posterior implants. Mean marginal bone loss around mini-implants used to stabilize complete dentures was insignificantly higher in the maxilla than in the mandible after a mean observation period of 2.3 years. These values are comparable with marginal bone loss around standard-diameter implants. A previous smoking habit and delayed loading after implant placement with a low insertion torque were shown to be possible risk factors for bone loss.

  8. Transcription factor and bone marrow stromal cells in osseointegration of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, S G; Zhang, J; Tu, Q; Ye, J H; Luo, E; Schuler, M; Dard, M M; Yu, Y; Murray, D; Cochran, D L; Kim, S H; Yang, P; Chen, J

    2013-12-19

    Titanium implants are widely used in dental clinics and orthopaedic surgery. However, bone formation surrounding the implant is relatively slow after inserting the implant. The current study assessed the effects of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) with forced expression of special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 2 (SATB2) on the osseointegration of titanium implants. To determine whether SATB2 overexpression in BMSCs can enhance the osseointegration of implants, BMSCs were infected with the retrovirus encoding Satb2 (pBABE-Satb2) and were locally applied to bone defects before implanting the titanium implants in the mouse femur. Seven and twenty-one days after implantation, the femora were isolated for immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, haematoxylin eosin (H&E) staining, real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and micro-computed tomography (μCT) analysis. IHC staining analysis revealed that SATB2-overexpressing BMSCs were intensely distributed in the bone tissue surrounding the implant. Histological analysis showed that SATB2-overexpressing BMSCs significantly enhanced new bone formation and bone-to-implant contact 3 weeks after implantation. Real-time qRT-PCR results showed that the local delivery of SATB2-overexpressing BMSCs enhanced expression levels of potent osteogenic transcription factors and bone matrix proteins in the implantation sites. μCT analysis demonstrated that SATB2-overexpressing BMSCs significantly increased the density of the newly formed bone surrounding the implant 3 weeks post-operatively. These results conclude that local delivery of SATB2-overexpressing BMSCs significantly accelerates osseointegration of titanium implants. These results provide support for future pharmacological and clinical applications of SATB2, which accelerates bone regeneration around titanium implants.

  9. Optimal selection of dental implant for different bone conditions based on the mechanical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sandipan; DAS, Mainak; Chakraborty, Pratyaya; Biswas, Jayanta Kumar; Chatterjee, Subhomoy; Khutia, Niloy; Saha, Subrata; Chowdhury, Amit Roy

    2017-01-01

    Bone quality varies from one patient to another extensively. Young's modulus may deviate up to 40% of normal bone quality, which results into alteration of bone stiffness immensely. The prime goal of this study is to design the optimum dental implant considering the mechanical response at bone implant interfaces for a patient with specific bone quality. 3D models of mandible and natural molar tooth were prepared from CT scan data, while dental implants were modelled using different diameter, length and porosity and FE analysis was carried out. Based on the variation in bone density, five different bone qualities were considered. First, failure analysis of implants, under maximum biting force of 250 N had been performed. Next, the implants that remained were selected for observation of mechanical response at bone implant interfaces under common chewing load of 120 N. Maximum Von Mises stress did not surpass the yield strength of the implant material (TiAl4V). However, factor of safety of 1.5 was considered and all but two dental implants survived the design stress or allowable stress. Under 120 N load, distribution of Von Mises stress and strain at the boneimplant interface corresponding to the rest of the implants for five bone conditions were obtained and enlisted. Implants exhibiting interface strain within 1500-3000 microstrain range show the best bone remodelling and osseointegration. So, implant models having this range of interface strains were selected corresponding to the particular bone quality. A set of optimum dental implants for each of the bone qualities were predicted.

  10. Finite element analysis of the stress distributions in peri-implant bone in modified and standard-threaded dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Dundar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the stress distributions with three different loads in two different geometric and threaded types of dental implants by finite element analysis. For this purpose, two different implant models, Nobel Replace and Nobel Active (Nobel Biocare, Zurich, Switzerland, which are currently used in clinical cases, were constructed by using ANSYS Workbench 12.1. The stress distributions on components of the implant system under three different static loadings were analysed for the two models. The maximum stress values that occurred in all components were observed in FIII (300 N. The maximum stress values occurred in FIII (300 N when the Nobel Replace implant is used, whereas the lowest ones, in the case of FI (150 N loading in the Nobel Active implant. In all models, the maximum tensions were observed to be in the neck region of the implants. Increasing the connection between the implant and the bone surface may allow more uniform distribution of the forces of the dental implant and may protect the bone around the implant. Thus, the implant could remain in the mouth for longer periods. Variable-thread tapered implants can increase the implant and bone contact.

  11. Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Comparing Clinical Outcomes Between Short Implants and Long Implants with Bone Augmentation Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qingchun; Zhang, Xingwen; Yu, Liming

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to assess and compare clinical outcomes of short implants versus long implants placed in conjunction with a bone augmentation procedure. The eligible studies were searched from PubMed, Embase, Springer link, and the Cochrane library databases up to 23 January 2015. Prosthesis failures, implant failures, complications, and marginal bone loss were the clinical outcomes measured. The pooled weighted mean difference (WMD) or risk ratios (RRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to measure the effect size of continuous variables and dichotomous variables, respectively. A random-effects model was performed to assess the effect size. Nine eligible studies including 480 short implants (≤ 8 mm) and 503 long implants (≥ 9.3 mm) were selected for this meta-analysis. Compared with the long-implant group, a notable decrease in the short-implant group was found for complications at the 5-year follow-up (RR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.15 to 0.79, P short-implant and long-implant groups for other variables (P > .05). Moreover, the results were not obviously changed when stratified by implants placed in the mandible and maxilla. Implants ≤ 8 mm in length are considered to be a suitable alternative treatment when bone height is not adequate for standard implants.

  12. Middle ear implant in conductive and mixed congenital hearing loss in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Stéphane; Denoyelle, Françoise; Farinetti, Anne; Garabedian, Erea-Noel; Triglia, Jean-Michel

    2012-12-01

    Active middle ear implant can be used in children and adolescents with congenital hearing loss. The authors report their experience with the semi implantable Medel Vibrant Soundbridge(®) (VSB) in the audiologic rehabilitation of such patients. In this retrospective study, audiological and surgical data of 10 children (10.5±4 years) implanted with 12 VSB in 2 tertiary cares ENT Departments were analysed. Two children with bilateral external auditory canal (EAC) atresia and mixed hearing loss (mean air conduction (AC) thresholds=65dB HL) were bilaterally implanted. Eight children presented with microtia associated with EAC atresia bilaterally (n=3) and unilaterally (n=5). All of them had a conductive hearing loss in the implanted ear (mean (AC) thresholds were 58.75dB HL preoperatively). The Floating Mass Transducer was crimped on the long process of the incus (n=8) or on the suprastructure of the stapes (n=4). There were no intra- or postoperative surgical complications. All the children wore their implants after 5 weeks. Postoperative mean bone conduction (BC) thresholds were unchanged. The mean aided thresholds with VSB (four frequencies warble tones at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz) were 28dB HL (± 10). Word discrimination threshold in quiet conditions in free field with the VSB unilaterally activated was 50% at 38dB SPL (± 9). The results indicate that satisfaction of the children and their parents is very encouraging but surgeons should be cautious with this new approach in relation to the pinna reconstruction and to possible risks to inner ear and facial nerve. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Calcium Phosphate Nanocrystals on Osseointegration of Titanium Implant in Irradiated Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yuan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy may compromise the integration of implant and cause implant loss. Implant surface modifications have the possibility of promoting cell attachment, cell growth, and bone formation which ultimately enhance the osseointegration process. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of calcium phosphate nanocrystals on implant osseointegration in irradiated bone. Sixteen rabbits were randomly assigned into control and nano-CaP groups, receiving implants with dual acid-etched surface or dual acid-etched surface discretely deposited of nanoscale calcium-phosphate crystals, respectively. The left leg of all the rabbits received 15 Gy radiation, followed by implants placement one week after. Four animals in each group were sacrificed after 4 and 12 weeks, respectively. Implant stability quotient (ISQ, ratio of bone volume to total volume (BV/TV, bone growth rate, and bone-to-implant contact (BIC were evaluated. The nano-CaP group showed significantly higher ISQ (week 12, P=0.031 and bone growth rate (week 6, P=0.021; week 9, P=0.001 than that in control group. No significant differences in BV/TV and BIC were found between two groups. Titanium implant surface modified with CaP nanocrystals provides a potential alternative to improve bone healing around implant in irradiated bone.

  14. Marginal Bone Level Evaluation after Functional Loading Around Two Different Dental Implant Designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Ning Ho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate peri-implant alveolar bone changes using periapical radiographs before and after prosthetic delivery in submerged and nonsubmerged dental implants. Methods. Digital periapical films of 60 ITI Straumann nonsubmerged dental implants and 60 Xive Dentsply submerged dental implants were taken before, immediately after, and 12 and 24 weeks after the prosthetic restoration was delivered. Results. The 60-nonsubmerged dental implant group showed mean marginal bone resorption at baseline of 0.10 ± 0.23 mm and 24 weeks later, marginal bone resorption was 0.16 ± 0.25 mm. The submerged dental implant group showed a significantly higher distal marginal bone resorption over the mesial side. Mean marginal bone resorption at baseline was 0.16 ± 0.32 on the mesial and 0.41 ± 0.56 on the distal side. Twenty-four weeks later, it was 0.69 ± 0.69 mm on the mesial and 0.99 ± 0.90 mm on the distal side. Conclusion. First, it was possible to determine that submerged implants had a higher mean marginal bone resorption and less bone-to-implant contact than nonsubmerged implants. And second, the distal side of submerged dental implants presented higher marginal bone loss than the mesial side.

  15. Low elastic modulus titanium–nickel scaffolds for bone implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; Yang, Hailin; Wang, Huifeng; Ruan, Jianming, E-mail: jianming@csu.edu.cn

    2014-01-01

    The superelastic nature of repeating the human bones is crucial to the ideal artificial biomedical implants to ensure smooth load transfer and foster the ingrowth of new bone tissues. Three dimensional interconnected porous TiNi scaffolds, which have the tailorable porous structures with micro-hole, were fabricated by slurry immersing with polymer sponge and sintering method. The crystallinity and phase composition of scaffolds were studied by X-ray diffraction. The pore morphology, size and distribution in the scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The porosity ranged from 65 to 72%, pore size was 250–500 μm. Compressive strength and elastic modulus of the scaffolds were ∼ 73 MPa and ∼ 3GPa respectively. The above pore structural and mechanical properties are similar to those of cancellous bone. In the initial cell culture test, osteoblasts adhered well to the scaffold surface during a short time, and then grew smoothly into the interconnected pore channels. These results indicate that the porous TiNi scaffolds fabricated by this method could be bone substitute materials. - Highlights: • A novel approach for the fabrication of porous TiNi scaffolds • Macroporous structures are replicated from the polymer sponge template. • The pore characteristics and mechanical properties of TiNi scaffolds agree well with the requirement of trabecular bone. • Cytocompatibility of TiNi scaffolds is assessed, and it closely associated with pore property.

  16. Minimal guided bone regeneration procedure for immediate implant placement in the esthetic zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nettemu Sunil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior maxilla presents a challenging milieu interior for ideal placement of implants because of the compromised bone quality. With the advent of intraoral bone harvesting and augmentation techniques, immediate implant placement into fresh extraction sockets have become more predictable. Immediate implant placement has numerous advantages compared to the delayed procedure including superior esthetic and functional outcomes, maintenance of soft and hard tissue integrity and increased patient compliance. This case report exhibits immediate implant placement in the maxillary esthetic zone by combining a minimal invasive autogenous block bone graft harvest technique for ensuring successful osseointegration of the implant at the extraction site.

  17. Effect of misfit of cement-retained implant single crowns on crestal bone changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Jung; Papaspyridakos, Panos; Guze, Kevin; Singh, Medha; Weber, Hans-Peter; Gallucci, German O

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to compare peri-implant crestal bone levels between misfitting (overhanging/open margin) cement-retained implant single crowns (SCs) vs accurately fitted implant SCs. Seventeen subjects were divided into two groups: test group (misfitting crowns, n = 10) and control group (accurately fitted crowns, n = 7). Crestal bone level changes were assessed using digital software. The average differences in mean bone loss within and between the two groups were statistically significant. Cement-retained implant SCs with marginal misfit resulted in more crestal bone loss than accurately fitted crowns after a mean of 3 years in function.

  18. Implant design and its effects on osseointegration over time within cortical and trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Bryan G; Danna, Natalie R; Granato, Rodrigo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Marin, Charles; Tovar, Nick; Suzuki, Marcelo; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-08-01

    Healing chambers present at the interface between implant and bone have become a target for improving osseointegration. The objective of the present study was to compare osseointegration of several implant healing chamber configurations at early time points and regions of interest within bone using an in vivo animal femur model. Six implants, each with a different healing chamber configuration, were surgically implanted into each femur of six skeletally mature beagle dogs (n = 12 implants per dog, total n = 72). The implants were harvested at 3 and 5 weeks post-implantation, non-decalcified processed to slides, and underwent histomorphometry with measurement of bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupied (BAFO) within healing chambers at both cortical and trabecular bone sites. Microscopy demonstrated predominantly woven bone at 3 weeks and initial replacement of woven bone by lamellar bone by 5 weeks. BIC and BAFO were both significantly increased by 5 weeks (p < 0.001), and significantly higher in cortical than trabecular bone (p < 0.001). The trapezoidal healing chamber design demonstrated a higher BIC than other configurations. Overall, a strong temporal and region-specific dependence of implant osseointegration in femurs was noted. Moreover, the findings suggest that a trapezoidal healing chamber configuration may facilitate the best osseointegration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1091-1097, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Nanostructured implant surface effect on osteoblast gene expression and bone-to-implant contact in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo_mendonca@dentistry.unc.edu [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Genomicas e Biotecnologia, SGAN Quadra 916, Modulo B, Av. W5 Norte 70.790-160-Asa Norte Brasilia/DF (Brazil); Bone Biology and Implant Therapy Laboratory, Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 404 Brauer Hall, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27511 (United States); Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Curso de Odontologia, Taguatinga/DF (Brazil); Baccelli Silveira Mendonca, Daniela [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Genomicas e Biotecnologia, SGAN Quadra 916, Modulo B, Av. W5 Norte 70.790-160-Asa Norte Brasilia/DF (Brazil) and Bone Biology and Implant Therapy Laboratory, Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 404 Brauer Hall, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27511 (United States); Pagotto Simoes, Luis Gustavo; Araujo, Andre Luis; Leite, Edson Roberto [Departmento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos-UFSCAR, Rod. Washington Luiz, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Golin, Alexsander Luiz [Departmento de Engenharia Mecanica, Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Curitiba, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Aragao, Francisco J.L. [Universidade Catolica de Brasilia, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Genomicas e Biotecnologia, SGAN Quadra 916, Modulo B, Av. W5 Norte 70.790-160-Asa Norte Brasilia/DF (Brazil); Embrapa Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia, Laboratorio de Introducao e Expressao de Genes, PqEB W5 Norte, 70770-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Cooper, Lyndon F., E-mail: lyndon_cooper@dentistry.unc.edu [Bone Biology and Implant Therapy Laboratory, Department of Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 404 Brauer Hall, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27511 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the response of nanostructured implant surfaces at the level of osteoblast differentiation and its effects in bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and removal-torque values (RTV). CpTi grade IV implants (1.6 x 4.0 mm) were machined or machined and subsequently coated with an oxide solution. The surfaces were divided into: machined (M), titania-anatase (An), titania-rutile (Ru), and zirconia (Zr). Surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and by X-ray microanalysis. Implants were inserted in rat tibia and harvested from 0 to 21 days for measurement of Alkaline Phosphatase, Bone Sialoprotein, Osteocalcin, Osteopontin, and RUNX-2 mRNA levels by real time PCR; from 0 to 56 days for RTV; and from 0 to 56 days for BIC. The roughness parameter (Sa) was compared by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey Test. Comparison of Torque removal values and histomorphometric measurements on implants in vivo was performed by Kruskal-Wallis test and the significance level for all statistical analyses was set at p {<=} 0.05. mRNA levels on all nanostructured surfaces were increased compared to M. At 56 days, the mean RTV in Ncm was 11.6 {+-} 2.5, 11.3 {+-} 2.4, 11.1 {+-} 3.5, 9.7 {+-} 1.4 for An, Ru, Zr, and M, respectively. Higher BIC (%) was measured for all the nanostructured surfaces versus M at 21 and 56 days (p < 0.05). Nanostructured topographic features composed of TiO{sub 2} or ZrO{sub 2} applied to machined cpTi implant promoted greater mesenchymal stem cell commitment to the osteoblast phenotype and associated increased BIC and physical association with bone. Highlights: {yields} Nanostructured surfaces using a sol-gel technique coated cpTi with TiO{sub 2} or ZrO{sub 2}. {yields} Evaluated molecular and mechanical effect of nanofeatures in vivo in rat tibiae. {yields} Nanofeatures improved the differentiation of rat MSCs into osteoblasts. {yields} Nanofeatures improved increased bone-to-implant contact and

  20. Nanostructured implant surface effect on osteoblast gene expression and bone-to-implant contact in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, Gustavo; Baccelli Silveira Mendonca, Daniela; Pagotto Simoes, Luis Gustavo; Araujo, Andre Luis; Leite, Edson Roberto; Golin, Alexsander Luiz; Aragao, Francisco J.L.; Cooper, Lyndon F.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the response of nanostructured implant surfaces at the level of osteoblast differentiation and its effects in bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and removal-torque values (RTV). CpTi grade IV implants (1.6 x 4.0 mm) were machined or machined and subsequently coated with an oxide solution. The surfaces were divided into: machined (M), titania-anatase (An), titania-rutile (Ru), and zirconia (Zr). Surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and by X-ray microanalysis. Implants were inserted in rat tibia and harvested from 0 to 21 days for measurement of Alkaline Phosphatase, Bone Sialoprotein, Osteocalcin, Osteopontin, and RUNX-2 mRNA levels by real time PCR; from 0 to 56 days for RTV; and from 0 to 56 days for BIC. The roughness parameter (Sa) was compared by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey Test. Comparison of Torque removal values and histomorphometric measurements on implants in vivo was performed by Kruskal-Wallis test and the significance level for all statistical analyses was set at p ≤ 0.05. mRNA levels on all nanostructured surfaces were increased compared to M. At 56 days, the mean RTV in Ncm was 11.6 ± 2.5, 11.3 ± 2.4, 11.1 ± 3.5, 9.7 ± 1.4 for An, Ru, Zr, and M, respectively. Higher BIC (%) was measured for all the nanostructured surfaces versus M at 21 and 56 days (p 2 or ZrO 2 applied to machined cpTi implant promoted greater mesenchymal stem cell commitment to the osteoblast phenotype and associated increased BIC and physical association with bone. Highlights: → Nanostructured surfaces using a sol-gel technique coated cpTi with TiO 2 or ZrO 2 . → Evaluated molecular and mechanical effect of nanofeatures in vivo in rat tibiae. → Nanofeatures improved the differentiation of rat MSCs into osteoblasts. → Nanofeatures improved increased bone-to-implant contact and removal torque values. → TiO 2 or ZrO 2 nanofeatures improved the biological response of machined titanium.

  1. Bone-anchored hearing aids in conductive and mixed hearing losses: why do patients reject them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, Richard T K; Dhillon, Baljeet; Siau, Derrick; Green, Kevin M J

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to report the bone-anchored hearing aid uptake rate and the reasons for their rejection by patients with conductive and mixed hearing losses. A retrospective review was performed of 113 consecutive patients with unilateral or bilateral conductive or mixed hearing loss referred to the Greater Manchester bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) programme between September 2008 and August 2011. 98 (86.7 %) patients were deemed audiologically suitable for BAHA implantation. Of these, 38 (38.8 %) had BAHA implanted; 60 (61.2 %) patients declined. Of those who declined, 27 (45 %) cited anxiety over surgery, 18 (30 %) cited cosmetic reasons, 16 (26.7 %) perceived limited benefit from the device and six (10 %) preferred conventional hearing aids. Our study highlights a 38.8 % BAHA uptake rate in audiologically suitable patients. The main reasons cited for rejection of BAHA were anxiety over surgery and cosmetic concerns. It is important that clinicians address these early during consultation with prospective BAHA recipients and avoid rushing to implant these patients with a bone-anchored hearing aid.

  2. Influence of simulated bone-implant contact and implant diameter on secondary stability: a resonance frequency in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Mario; González-Martín, Oscar; Belser, Urs C

    2014-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis of no differences in resonance frequency for standardized amounts of simulated bone-implant contact around implants with different diameters. In addition, it was evaluated if resonance frequency is able to detect a difference between stable and rotation mobile ("spinning") implants. Implants with diameters of 3.3, 4.1 and 4.8 mm were placed in a purposely designed metal mould where liquid polyurethane resin was then poured to obtain a simulated bone-implant specimen. By regulating the mould, it was possible to create the following simulated bone-implant contact groups: 3.3 mm (198.6 mm(2)); 4.1 mm (198.8 mm(2)); 4.8 mm (200.2 mm(2)); 4.8 mm (231.7 mm(2)); 4.8 mm (294.7 mm(2)). Each group included 10 specimens. After resin setting, resonance frequency was measured. On the last group, measurements were repeated after establishing implant rotational mobility. One-way ANOVA tests with post hoc comparisons, a Pearson's correlation coefficient and a t-test for repeated measurements were used to evaluate statistically significant differences. Implants with different diameters but with the same amount of simulated osseointegration revealed no differences in resonance frequency. On the contrary, an increase of simulated bone-implant contact resulted in significantly higher resonance frequency. A clear direct linear correlation resulted between resonance frequency and simulated bone-implant contact. Furthermore, a significant difference resulted between resonance frequency measured before and after creation of rotational mobility. Within the conditions of this study, the secondary stability was correlated with the simulated bone-implant contact. In addition, resonance frequency was able to discern between stable and rotation mobile implants. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Marginal bone loss as success criterion in implant dentistry: beyond 2 mm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; León-Cano, Ana; Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; Monje, Alberto; O'Valle, Francisco; Catena, Andrés

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze marginal bone loss (MBL) rates around implants to establish the difference between physiological bone loss and bone loss due to peri-implantitis. Five hundred and eight implants were placed in the posterior maxilla in 208 patients. Data were gathered on age, gender, bone substratum (grafted or pristine), prosthetic connection, smoking and alcohol habits, and previous periodontitis. MBL was radiographically analyzed in three time frames (5 months post-surgery and at 6 and 18 months post-loading). Nonparametric receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis and mixed linear model analysis were used to determine whether implants could be classified as high or low bone loser type (BLT) and to establish the influence of this factor on MBL rates. Marginal bone loss rates were significantly affected by BLT, connection type, bone substratum, and smoking. Bone loss rates at 18 months were associated with initial bone loss rates: 96% of implants with an MBL of >2 mm at 18 months had lost 0.44 mm or more at 6 months post-loading. Implants with increased MBL rates at early stages (healing and immediate post-loading periods) are likely to reach MBL values that compromise their final outcome. Initial (healing, immediate post-loading) MBL rates around an implant of more than 0.44 mm/year are an indication of peri-implant bone loss progression. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effect of immediate loading on the biomechanical properties of bone surrounding the miniscrew implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro; Nakagaki, Susumu; Yasuda, Yoshitaka; Handa, Keisuke; Koike, Toshiyuki; Muguruma, Takeshi; Saito, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of immediate loading on the biomechanical properties of bone surrounding a miniscrew implant. Forty titanium alloy miniscrew implants were placed on the buccal side of the maxillae and mandibles in four beagle dogs. Twelve pairs of miniscrew implants were immediately loaded with approximately 150 g of continuous force using nickel-titanium coil springs and the remaining 16 implants were left unloaded for 8 weeks. Nanoindentation testing was performed (peak load 10 mN) and the hardness and elastic modulus were calculated. Two series of indentations (in cortical and trabecular bone) for both the compression and tension sides were made. For each site, five indentations were placed approximately 25 μm from the implant-bone interface and 250 μm from the screw thread. The mean hardness and elastic modulus were generally higher in mandibles than maxillae and were higher in cortical bone than in trabecular bone. The trabecular bone near the implant-bone interface on the compression side was significantly harder than that at other locations in trabecular bone. In conclusion, this is the first study that has investigated the biomechanical properties of bone surrounding a miniscrew implant under immediate loading using nanoindentation testing. The mechanical properties of bone surrounding a miniscrew implant may be influenced by immediate loading.

  5. Implant survival, adverse events, and bone remodeling of osseointegrated percutaneous implants for transhumeral amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikandylakis, Georgios; Berlin, Örjan; Brånemark, Rickard

    2014-10-01

    Osseointegrated percutaneous implants provide direct anchorage of the limb prosthesis to the residual limb. These implants have been used for the rehabilitation of transhumeral amputees in Sweden since 1995 using a two-stage surgical approach with a 6-month interval between the stages, but results on implant survival, adverse events, and radiologic signs of osseointegration and adaptive bone remodeling in transhumeral amputees treated with this method are still lacking. This study reports on 2- and 5-year implant survival, adverse events, and radiologic signs of osseointegration and bone remodeling in transhumeral amputees treated with osseointegrated prostheses. Between 1995 and 2010, we performed 18 primary osseointegrated percutaneous implants and two implant revisions in 18 transhumeral amputees; of those, 16 patients were available for followup at a minimum of 2 years (median, 8 years; range, 2-19 years). These include all transhumeral amputees who have received osseointegrated prostheses and represented approximately 20% of the all transhumeral amputees we evaluated for potential osseointegration during that time; general indications for this approach included transhumeral amputation resulting from trauma or tumor, inability to wear or severe problems wearing a conventional socket prosthesis, eg, very short residual limb, and compliant patients. Medical charts and plain radiographs were retrospectively evaluated. The 2- and 5-year implant survival rates were 83% and 80%, respectively. Two primary and one revised implant failed and were removed because of early loosening. A fourth implant was partially removed because of ipsilateral shoulder osteoarthritis and subsequent arthrodesis. The most common adverse event was superficial infection of the skin penetration site (15 infections in five patients) followed by skin reactions of the skin penetration site (eight), incomplete fracture at the first surgery (eight), defective bony canal at the second surgery

  6. Results of the implantation of bone-anchored hearing aids in patients with treacher-collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alexandra Kolontai de Sousa; Ferro, Lília Pereira Abreu; da Silva, Jaiede Nicacio; Okada, Daniel Mochida

    2013-04-01

     Treacher-Collins syndrome is characterized by craniofacial malformations, narrowing of the external auditory canal (EAC), and, in 30% of cases, agenesis of the canal and ossicular chain defects. The use of hearing aids (HA) is not possible in cases in which agenesis or stenosis of the EAC accompanies conductive deafness. In contrast, bone conduction implants such as the Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA(®)) allow direct stimulation of the cochlea and are thus superior to conventional hearing aids in cases of severe conductive hearing loss.  To present 2 cases of patients with Treacher-Collins syndrome who underwent implantation of BAHA(®).  The first patient was a 52-year-old woman diagnosed with Treacher-Collins syndrome who presented with severe bilateral mixed hearing loss and a history of unsuccessful previous use of a bone contact conduction device. The BAHA(®) implantation was uneventful, and the post-operative results were good. The second patient was a 14-year-old girl who was also diagnosed with Treacher-Collins Syndrome with bilateral moderate conductive hearing loss by audiometry. The use of a bone vibrator contact device did not improve her hearing; however, implantation of a BAHA(®) resulted in a decreased gap postoperatively. Final comments: BAHA(®) hearing devices provide adequate rehabilitation and consequent improvement of the quality of life in patients with Treacher-Collins syndrome.

  7. Results of the implantation of bone-anchored hearing aids in patients with treacher-collins syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kolontai de Sousa Oliveira1

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treacher-Collins syndrome is characterized by craniofacial malformations, narrowing of the external auditory canal (EAC, and, in 30% of cases, agenesis of the canal and ossicular chain defects. The use of hearing aids (HA is not possible in cases in which agenesis or stenosis of the EAC accompanies conductive deafness. In contrast, bone conduction implants such as the Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA® allow direct stimulation of the cochlea and are thus superior to conventional hearing aids in cases of severe conductive hearing loss. Objective: To present 2 cases of patients with Treacher-Collins syndrome who underwent implantation of BAHA®. Cases Reports: The first patient was a 52-year-old woman diagnosed with Treacher-Collins syndrome who presented with severe bilateral mixed hearing loss and a history of unsuccessful previous use of a bone contact conduction device. The BAHA® implantation was uneventful, and the post-operative results were good. The second patient was a 14-year-old girl who was also diagnosed with Treacher-Collins Syndrome with bilateral moderate conductive hearing loss by audiometry. The use of a bone vibrator contact device did not improve her hearing; however, implantation of a BAHA® resulted in a decreased gap postoperatively. Final comments: BAHA® hearing devices provide adequate rehabilitation and consequent improvement of the quality of life in patients with Treacher-Collins syndrome.

  8. Results of the implantation of bone-anchored hearing aids in patients with treacher-collins syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alexandra Kolontai de Sousa; Ferro, Lília Pereira Abreu; da Silva, Jaiede Nicacio; Okada, Daniel Mochida

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Treacher-Collins syndrome is characterized by craniofacial malformations, narrowing of the external auditory canal (EAC), and, in 30% of cases, agenesis of the canal and ossicular chain defects. The use of hearing aids (HA) is not possible in cases in which agenesis or stenosis of the EAC accompanies conductive deafness. In contrast, bone conduction implants such as the Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA®) allow direct stimulation of the cochlea and are thus superior to conventional hearing aids in cases of severe conductive hearing loss. Objective: To present 2 cases of patients with Treacher-Collins syndrome who underwent implantation of BAHA®. Cases Reports: The first patient was a 52-year-old woman diagnosed with Treacher-Collins syndrome who presented with severe bilateral mixed hearing loss and a history of unsuccessful previous use of a bone contact conduction device. The BAHA® implantation was uneventful, and the post-operative results were good. The second patient was a 14-year-old girl who was also diagnosed with Treacher-Collins Syndrome with bilateral moderate conductive hearing loss by audiometry. The use of a bone vibrator contact device did not improve her hearing; however, implantation of a BAHA® resulted in a decreased gap postoperatively. Final comments: BAHA® hearing devices provide adequate rehabilitation and consequent improvement of the quality of life in patients with Treacher-Collins syndrome. PMID:25992018

  9. Surgical outcome of bone anchored hearing aid (baha) implant surgery: a 10 years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asma, A; Ubaidah, M A; Hasan, Siti Salbiah; Wan Fazlina, W H; Lim, B Y; Saim, L; Goh, B S

    2013-07-01

    Bone anchored hearing aid (Baha) implant is an option for patient with canal atresia, single sided deafness(SSD) and chronically discharging ears despite treatments. This retrospective study was conducted from 2001 to 2011 to evaluate the surgical outcome of Baha implant surgery. Thirty-three patients were identified during this study period. Their age at implantation ranged from 5 to 40 years. Of 33 patients, 29 (87.9 %) patients had bilateral microtia and canal atresia, 3 (9.1 %) patients had unilateral microtia and canal atresia and 1 (3.0 %) patients have SSD following labyrinthitis. One patient (3.2 %) had major complication which is lost of implant due to failure of osseointegration. Soft tissue reactions were seen 7 patients (21.1 %). Of these 7 patients, 4 patients required 3-4 procedures as day care operation for excision of the skin overgrowth surrounding the abutment. Recurrent antibiotic treatment was required in 3 patients (9.7 %). None of our patient had history of intraoperative or peri-operative complication following Baha surgery. The commonest complications are local infection and inflammation at the implant site. None of our patient had history of intraoperative or peri-operative complication following Baha implant surgery.

  10. Does surface anodisation of titanium implants change osseointegration and make their extraction from bone any easier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhoff, J D; Mayer, J; Faber, L; Kaestner, S B; Guibert, G; Zlinszky, K; Auer, J A; von Rechenberg, B

    2008-01-01

    Titanium implants have a tendency for high bone-implant bonding, and, in comparison to stainless steel implants are more difficult to remove. The current study was carried out to evaluate, i) the release strength of three selected anodized titanium surfaces with increased nanohardness and low roughness, and ii) bone-implant bonding in vivo. These modified surfaces were intended to give improved anchorage while facilitating easier removal of temporary implants. The new surfaces were referenced to a stainless steel implant and a standard titanium implant surface (TiMAX). In a sheep limb model, healing period was 3 months. Bone-implant bonding was evaluated either biomechanically or histologically. The new surface anodized screws demonstrated similar or slightly higher bone-implant-contact (BIC) and torque release forces than the titanium reference. The BIC of the stainless steel implants was significant lower than two of the anodized surfaces (p = 0.04), but differences between stainless steel and all titanium implants in torque release forces were not significant (p = 0.06). The new anodized titanium surfaces showed good bone-implant bonding despite a smooth surface and increased nanohardness. However, they failed to facilitate implant removal at 3 months.

  11. Peri-implant bone changes following tooth extraction, immediate placement and loading of implants in the edentulous maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Lieven; Abeloos, Johan; De Clercq, Calix; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clinically and radiographically evaluate peri-implant bone level changes after rehabilitation of a fully edentulous maxilla by placement of six implants in either fresh extraction sites or healed edentulous ridges up till 18 months after implant placement. Twenty patients with a terminal dentition in the maxillae (11 men, 9 women) received a total of 120 OsseoSpeed implants; 118 implants could be loaded immediately of which 59 were placed in extraction sockets and 59 were placed in healed sites. Within 24 h after surgery, all patients received a chairside-assembled, fibre-reinforced temporary fixed prosthetic reconstruction in occlusion. Six months post-surgery, final screw-retained CoCr (15) or Ti (5) computer numerical control-milled and acrylic-veneered frameworks were placed directly at implant level without interposing abutments. Intraoral radiographs were taken 6 and 18 months after implant placement. Implant survival rate was 100%. Mean marginal bone level was located on average -0.35 mm below the reference point (standard deviation 0.29, range -1.20 to +0.02 mm) 18 months after loading. Whether implants were placed in healed bone sites or fresh extraction sockets did not significantly affect the bone level changes. Furthermore, the use of either CoCr or Ti at the implant level did not significantly affect marginal bone loss. Within the limits of this prospective clinical trial, results seem to indicate that immediate placement and occlusal loading of five to six implants in the edentulous maxilla can be carried out successfully. Whether or not those implants are placed in fresh extraction sockets does not seem to alter the outcome. The present data show a successful 1-year outcome of a treatment protocol involving tooth extraction immediately combined with implant placement and loading.

  12. Evaluation of marginal bone loss of dental implants with internal or external connections and its association with other variables: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Rodrigo Antonio; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Vechiato Filho, Aljomar José; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2016-10-01

    Different factors can influence marginal bone loss around dental implants, including the type of internal and external connection between the implant and the abutment. The evidence needed to evaluate these factors is unclear. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate marginal bone loss by radiographic analysis around dental implants with internal or external connections. A systematic review was conducted following the criteria defined by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). Initially, a population, intervention, comparison, and outcome(s) (PICO) question was defined: does the connection type (internal or external) influence marginal bone loss in patients undergoing implantation? An electronic search of PubMed/MEDLINE and Scopus databases was performed for studies in English language published between January 2000 and December 2014 by 2 independent reviewers, who analyzed the marginal bone loss of dental implants with an internal and/or external connection. From an initial screening yield of 595 references and after considering inclusion and exclusion criteria, 17 articles were selected for this review. Among them, 10 studies compared groups of implants with internal and external connections; 1 study evaluated external connections; and 6 studies analyzed internal connections. A total of 2708 implants were placed in 864 patients. Regarding the connection type, 2347 implants had internal connections, and 361 implants had external connections. Most studies showed lower marginal bone loss values for internal connection implants than for external connection implants. Osseointegrated dental implants with internal connections exhibited lower marginal bone loss than implants with external connections. This finding is mainly the result of the platform switching concept, which is more frequently found in implants with internal connections. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

  13. The Effects of Subcrestal Implant Placement on Crestal Bone Levels and Bone-to-Abutment Contact: A Microcomputed Tomographic and Histologic Study in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetner, Michael; Fetner, Alan; Koutouzis, Theofilos; Clozza, Emanuele; Tovar, Nick; Sarendranath, Alvin; Coelho, Paulo G; Neiva, Kathleen; Janal, Malvin N; Neiva, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Implant design and the implant-abutment interface have been regarded as key influences on crestal bone maintenance over time. The aim of the present study was to determine crestal bone changes around implants placed at different depths in a dog model. Thirty-six two-piece dental implants with a medialized implant-abutment interface and Morse taper connection (Ankylos, Dentsply) were placed in edentulous areas bilaterally in six mongrel dogs. On each side of the mandible, three implants were placed randomly at the bone crest, 1.5 mm subcrestally, or 3.0 mm subcrestally. After 3 months, the final abutments were torqued into place. At 6 months, the animals were sacrificed and samples taken for microcomputed tomographic (micro-CT) and histologic evaluations. Micro-CT analysis revealed similar crestal or marginal bone loss among groups. Both subcrestal implant groups lost significantly less crestal and marginal bone than the equicrestal implants. Bone loss was greatest on the buccal of the implants, regardless of implant placement depth. Histologically, implants placed subcrestally were found to have bone in contact with the final abutment and on the implant platform. Implants with a centralized implant-abutment interface and Morse taper connection can be placed subcrestally without significant loss of crestal or marginal bone. Subcrestal placement of this implant system appears to be advantageous in maintaining bone height coronal to the implant platform.

  14. Bone reactions adjacent to titanium implants subjected to static load. A study in the dog (I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Berglundh, T; Lindhe, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of lateral static load induced by an expansion force on the bone/implant interface and adjacent peri-implant bone. In 3 beagle dogs, the 2nd, 3rd and 4th mandibular premolars were extracted bilaterally. Twelve weeks later 8 implants of the ITI Dental...... Implant System were placed in each dog. Crowns connected in pairs were screwed on the implants 12 weeks after implant installation. The connected crowns contained an orthodontic expansion screw yielding 4 loading units in each dog. Clinical registrations, standardized radiographs and fluorochrome labeling...

  15. [Risk factors and strategies of dental implants in the maxillary posterior without sufficient bone available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiansheng

    2012-02-01

    There are two ways to place dental implants in the maxillary posterior without sufficient bone available, one is the maxillary sinus floor bone augmentation technique, the other is to evade maxillary sinus. The maxillary sinus floor bone augmentation technique may result in a series of complication, and reduce obedience of patients for implant surgery. According to principles of the best bone utilization, the evaded maxillary sinus implant technique is more simple, more economic, more predictable, and more shortage of time, compared with the maxillary sinus floor bone augmentation technique, and has certain technological advantages in some special cases.

  16. Relationship between the CT Value and Cortical Bone Thickness at Implant Recipient Sites and Primary Implant Stability with Comparison of Different Implant Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howashi, Miori; Tsukiyama, Yoshihiro; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Isoda-Akizuki, Kei; Kihara, Masafumi; Imai, Yu; Sogo, Motofumi; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Studies have shown that bone quality at the implant recipient site can influence primary stability. The aims of this study were to explore the quantitative estimation of the primary stability of implants preoperatively using CT values and to examine the effect of different implant designs with recommended socket preparation on primary stability. Forty-four fresh porcine femoral heads were prepared. The bone surrounding implant sockets was preoperatively evaluated by helical CT. Forty-four implants (φ 4.3 × 10 mm), 22 straight and 22 tapered, were placed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The insertion torque value (ITV), implant stability quotient (ISQ), and removal torque value (RTV) were recorded as indicators of primary implant stability. Significant correlations and linear relationships were found between the CT value and ITV, ISQ, and RTV for both straight and tapered implants (Spearman's correlation coefficient, p < .001; linear regression analysis, p < .01). Tapered implants had a significantly higher ITV than straight implants (analysis of covariance, p < .01). Obtained results suggest that the primary stability of implants could be quantitatively estimated using the CT value preoperatively, indicating the CT value of bone surrounding an implant can contribute considerably to implant planning and design choice in clinical situations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bio-activated titanium surface utilizable for mimetic bone implantation in dentistry—Part III: Surface characteristics and bone implant contact formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnad, Jakub; Strnad, Zdeněk; Šesták, Jaroslav; Urban, Karel; Povýšil, Ctibor

    2007-05-01

    This study was carried out to quantify the effect of an alkali-modified surface on the bone implant interface formation during healing using an animal model. A total of 24 screw-shaped, self-tapping, (c.p.) titanium dental implants, divided into test group B—implants with alkali-modified surface (Bio surface) and control group M—implants with turned, machined surface, were inserted without pre-tapping in the tibiae of three beagle dogs. The animals were sacrificed after 2, 5 and 12 weeks and the bone implant contact (BIC%) was evaluated histometrically. The surface characteristics that differed between the implant surfaces, i.e. specific surface area, contact angle, may represent factors that influence the rate of osseointegration and the secondary implant stability. The alkali-treated surface enhances the BIC formation during the first 2 5 weeks of healing compared to the turned, machined surface.

  18. Priming the Surface of Orthopedic Implants for Osteoblast Attachment in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The development of better orthopedic implants is incessant. While current implants can function reliably in the human body for a long period of time, there are still a significant number of cases for which the implants can fail prematurely due to poor osseointegration of the implant with native bone. Increasingly, it is recognized that it is extremely important to facilitate the attachment of osteoblasts on the implant so that a proper foundation of extracellular matrix (ECM) can be laid down for the growth of new bone tissue. In order to facilitate the osseointegration of the implant, both the physical nanotopography and chemical functionalization of the implant surface have to be optimized. In this short review, however, we explore how simple chemistry procedures can be used to functionalize the surfaces of three major classes of orthopedic implants, i.e. ceramics, metals, and polymers, so that the attachment of osteoblasts on implants can be facilitated in order to promote implant osseointegration.

  19. Bone conditioning to enhance implant osseointegration: an experimental study in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Kloss, Frank Rudolf; Kessler, Peter; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan; Nkenke, Emeka; Wiltfang, Joerg

    2003-01-01

    Osseointegration of implants depends on time and the local bone conditions regarding quality and quantity. This led to the bone classification by Lekholm and Zarb. The aim of the present study was to enhance osseointegration of implants through conditioning of the bone bed and to compare in this context the efficacy of bone condensation, an osteoinductive collagen (Colloss), and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Porcine frontal skull bone was used for the preparation of Identical-size implant beds. Before placement of the implants (Ankylos, 3.5 x 4 mm), the implant beds were untreated (control) or conditioned with condensation, Colloss, or PRP. The animals were sacrificed after 2, 4, and 8 weeks. The specimens were then compared and analyzed by microradiography, and statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. At the early observation times, significant effects on the sites of topical bone conditioning in comparison to the control group could be seen regarding the implant-bone interface (2 weeks: control 31%, Colloss 60%, condensation 73%, PRP 47%; 4 weeks: control 39%, Colloss 51%, condensation 40%, PRP 42%) and peri-implant bone density (2 weeks: control 31%, Colloss 48%, condensation 59%, PRP 39%; 4 weeks: control 47%, Colloss 53%, condensation 41%, PRP 50%). A leveling of the results between groups was found at 8 weeks (implant-bone interface: control 51%, Colloss 58%, condensation 55%, PRP 62%; peri-implant bone density: control 50%, Colloss 55%, condensation 51%, PRP 51%). Overall, bone condensation and Colloss apparently influenced bone formation process from the onset, but over the entire 8-week healing period, differences in bone formation were not significant It can be stated that, in the initial healing phase, an effect of topical bone conditioning may be achieved by the different described methods.

  20. Contemporary guided bone regeneration therapy for unaesthetic anterior peri-implantitis case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benso Sulijaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental implant is one of an alternative solutions reconstruction therapy for missing teeth. Complication of dental implant could occurs and leading to implant failure. In order to restore the complication, surgical treatment with guided bone regeneration (GBR is indicated. The potential use of bone substitutes is widely known to be able to regenerate the bone surrounding the implant and maintain bone volume. Purpose: The study aimed to demonstrate the effectiveness of implant-bone fully coverage by using sandwich technique of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP and demineralized freeze-dried bone allografts (DFDBA bone substitutes combined with collagen resorbable membrane. Case: A 24-year-old male came with diagnosis of peri-implantitis on implant #11. Clinical finding indicated that implant thread was exposed on the labial aspect. Case management: After initial therapy including oral hygiene improvement performed, an operator did a contemporary GBR to correct the defect. Bone graft materials used were 40% β-tri calcium phosphate (β-TCP-60% hydroxyapatite (HA on the outer layer and DFDBA on the inner layer of the defect. Resorbable collagen membrane was used to cover the graft. Conclusion: GBR with sandwich technique could serve as one of the treatment choices for correcting an exposed anterior implant that would enhance the successful aesthetic outcome.

  1. Partially Biodegradable Distraction Implant to Replace Conventional Implants in Alveolar Bone of Insufficient Height: A Preliminary Study in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zhang, Yongqiang; Shao, Bo; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Chen; Cao, Qiang; Kong, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Dental implants have been widely used in the last few decades. However, patients with insufficient bone height need reconstructive surgeries before implant insertion. The distraction implant (DI) has been invented to simplify the treatment procedure, but the shortcomings of DIs have limited their clinical use. We incorporated biodegradable polyester into a novel DI called the partially biodegradable distraction implant (PBDI). The purpose of this study was to assess the radiological, histological, and biomechanical properties of the PBDI in animal models. PBDIs were manufactured and inserted into the atrophied mandibles of nine dogs. Box-shaped alveolar bones were segmented and distracted. The dogs were randomly divided into three groups that were sacrificed 1, 2, and 3 months after the implant insertion. Actual augmentation height (AAH) of the bone segments was measured to evaluate the effect of distraction. X-ray examination and micro-CT reconstruction and analysis were used to evaluate the regenerated bone in the distraction gap and bone around the functional element. Histological sections were used to evaluate the osseointegration and absorption of the PBDI. Fatigue tests were used to evaluate the biomechanical properties of the PBDI. Little change was found in AAH among the three groups. X-ray examination and micro-CT reconstruction showed good growth of regenerated bone in the distraction gap. Alveolar bone volume around the functional element increased steadily. No obvious bone absorption occurred in the alveolar crest around PBDI. Three months after distraction, the functional element achieved osseointegration, and the support element began to be absorbed. All PBDIs survived the fatigue test. The PBDI is a novel and reliable dental implant. It becomes a conventional implant after the absorption of the support element and the removal of the distraction screw. It is a promising replacement for conventional implants in patients with insufficient alveolar bone

  2. Guided bone regeneration of peri-implant defects with particulated and block xenogenic bone substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benic, Goran I; Thoma, Daniel S; Muñoz, Fernando; Sanz Martin, Ignacio; Jung, Ronald E; Hämmerle, Christoph H F

    2016-05-01

    To test whether an equine bone substitute block used for guided bone regeneration (GBR) of peri-implant defects renders different results from bovine block or particulated bone substitutes regarding the dimensions of the augmented ridge and the amount of new bone. Mandibular premolars and molars were extracted in eight dogs. After 4 months, four semi-saddle bone defects were created in each mandible and one titanium implant was inserted into every site. Bone augmentation by GBR was attempted using the following randomly assigned modalities: (i) particulated deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) + a collagen membrane (CM), (ii) block DBBM + CM, (iii) equine bone substitute block + CM, and (iv) empty controls. After 4 months, one central and two lateral sections of each site were prepared. Descriptive histological and histomorphometrical assessments were performed evaluating the augmented area (AA) within the former bone defect, the area of mineralized tissue (MT), non-mineralized tissue (NMT), and residual bone substitute (BS) within AA, the horizontal thicknesses of the augmented region (HTaugm ) and of the mucosa (HTmucosa ). At the central sections, AA measured 11.2 ± 3.3 mm(2) for the equine block, 9.5 ± 2.6 mm(2) for DBBM block, 7.9 ± 4.8 mm(2) for particulated DBBM, and 2.4 ± 2.1 mm(2) for the empty control. All GBR groups rendered significantly higher values of AA in comparison with control (P ≤ 0.05). The differences in AA between GBR groups did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05). The equine block rendered the highest values in HTaugm , although only the differences between equine block and control as well as equine block and DBBM block were statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05). With respect to HTmucosa , all GBR groups reached significantly higher values compared to control (P ≤ 0.05). The equine block revealed the most pronounced signs of graft degradation. Guided bone regeneration lead to higher ridge dimensions and thicker

  3. Meta-Analysis of Correlations Between Marginal Bone Resorption and High Insertion Torque of Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoyan; Liang, Yongqiang; Zheng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate correlations between marginal bone resorption and high insertion torque value (> 50 Ncm) of dental implants and to assess the significance of immediate and early/conventional loading of implants under a certain range torque value. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to retrieve eligible articles from Ovid, PubMed, and EBSCO up to December 2013. Screening of eligible studies, quality assessment, and data extraction were conducted in duplicate. The results were expressed as random/fixed-effects models using weighted mean differences for continuous outcomes with 95% confidence intervals. Initially, 154 articles were selected (11 from Ovid, 112 from PubMed, and 31 from EBSCO). After exclusion of duplicate articles and articles that did not meet the inclusion criteria, six clinical studies were selected. Assessment of P values revealed that correlations between marginal bone resorption and high insertion torque were not statistically significant and that there was no difference between immediately versus early/conventionally loaded implants under a certain range of torque. None of the meta-analyses revealed any statistically significant differences between high insertion torque and conventional insertion torque in terms of effects on marginal bone resorption.

  4. A minimally invasive technique for the implantation of bone-anchored hearing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David F; Kim, Harold H

    2013-09-01

    To describe and evaluate a novel technique for the implantation of bone conduction hearing devices as compared with a common, conventional technique. Case series with chart review. Tertiary referral otology and neurotology practice. Individuals who underwent the implantation of bone-anchored hearing devices between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2011, were identified. Demographic data, surgical indications, surgical technique used, surgical time, and complications were recorded. Soft tissue complications were graded on the Holgers classification scheme. Group 1 was defined as those undergoing a traditional technique using a dermatome with subcutaneous tissue reduction. Group 2 was defined as those undergoing the described technique for implantation of the coupling hardware with minimal subcutaneous soft tissue reduction. Forty patients underwent the procedure, with 11 patients comprising group 1 and 29 patients comprising group 2. Group 2 required a shorter operative time (32.3 vs 56.1 minutes, P bone-anchored hearing devices using the described technique that necessitated minimal soft tissue reduction.

  5. Correlation between radiographic analysis of alveolar bone density around dental implant and resonance frequency of dental implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawoko, S. S.; Nelwan, L. C.; Odang, R. W.; Kusdhany, L. S.

    2017-08-01

    The histomorphometric test is the gold standard for dental implant stability quantification; however, it is invasive, and therefore, it is inapplicable to clinical patients. Consequently, accurate and objective alternative methods are required. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and digital radiographic analysis are noninvasive methods with excellent objectivity and reproducibility. To analyze the correlation between the radiographic analysis of alveolar bone density around a dental implant and the resonance frequency of the dental implant. Digital radiographic images for 35 samples were obtained, and the resonance frequency of the dental implant was acquired using Osstell ISQ immediately after dental implant placement and on third-month follow-up. The alveolar bone density around the dental implant was subsequently analyzed using SIDEXIS-XG software. No significant correlation was reported between the alveolar bone density around the dental implant and the resonance frequency of the dental implant (r = -0.102 at baseline, r = 0.146 at follow-up, p > 0.05). However, the alveolar bone density and resonance frequency showed a significant difference throughout the healing period (p = 0.005 and p = 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: Digital dental radiographs and Osstell ISQ showed excellent objectivity and reproducibility in quantifying dental implant stability. Nonetheless, no significant correlation was observed between the results obtained using these two methods.

  6. Implants in reconstructed bone: a comparative study on the outcome of Straumann® tissue level and bone level implants placed in vertically deficient alveolar ridges treated by means of autogenous onlay bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapasco, Matteo; Casentini, Paolo; Zaniboni, Marco

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate: (1) the survival rate of Straumann® Tissue Level and Bone Level implants placed in atrophic edentulous jaws previously reconstructed by means of autogenous onlay bone grafts; (2) to compare peri-implant bone resorption values over time. From 2005 to 2010, 50 patients presenting with vertical or tridimensional defects of the edentulous ridges were treated with autogenous bone grafts. Three to 7 months afterward, 192 implants were placed (Group A: 97 Tissue Level implants; Group B: 95 Bone Level implants) in the reconstructed areas. After a further waiting period of 2 to 3 months, patients were rehabilitated with implant-supported fixed prostheses. The follow-up ranged from 12 to 68 months after the start of prosthetic loading (mean: 33 months). No implants were removed (survival rate: 100%), but in Group B 13 implants (8 placed in iliac grafts, 2 placed in ramus grafts, and 3 placed in calvarial grafts) presented peri-implant bone resorption values higher than those proposed by Albrektsson and colleagues. for successful implants: the overall implant success rate was then 100% for Group A and 86.8% for Group B. No prosthetic failures were recorded, thus leading to a 100% prostheses success rate. No significant differences were found between the two types of implants as far as implant survival rate is concerned, but results from this study seem to demonstrate that Tissue Level implants may present better long-term results in terms of peri-implant bone maintenance, as compared with Bone Level implants, when placed in reconstructed areas. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Five-year outcome of bone remodelling around implants in the maxillary sinus: assessment of differences between implants placed in autogenous inlay bone blocks and in ungrafted maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martuscelli, R; Toti, P; Sbordone, L; Guidetti, F; Ramaglia, L; Sbordone, C

    2014-09-01

    The placement of implants in the posterior maxillary area is considered a reliable procedure, offering recognized rehabilitative advantages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of dental implants placed in the sinus floor augmented with a block autograft by comparing the outcomes over 5 years with those of dental implants positioned in non-augmented bone. This retrospective cohort study included 16 patients who had undergone prosthetic rehabilitation supported by dental implants between 2000 and 2006. One implant per patient was included and assigned to one of two predictor groups: grafted versus ungrafted maxillary sinus. Changes in marginal bone level (MBL) and apical bone level (ABL) over time, at 1, 3, and 5 years, were the primary outcome variables. Appropriate pair-wise comparison tests were performed. No significant differences were seen with regard to ABLs and among times between the grafted group (nine implants) and the ungrafted group (seven implants). Significant marginal bone resorption was found over time, primarily at the buccal aspect, in both study groups. The bone surrounding the apex of dental implants appeared stable after sinus augmentation in the grafted area. The behaviour of the two groups with regard to loss of MBLs over time was very similar. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Laser and Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing Methods of Fabricating Titanium Bone Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Wysocki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Additive Manufacturing (AM methods are generally used to produce an early sample or near net-shape elements based on three-dimensional geometrical modules. To date, publications on AM of metal implants have mainly focused on knee and hip replacements or bone scaffolds for tissue engineering. The direct fabrication of metallic implants can be achieved by methods, such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM or Electron Beam Melting (EBM. This work compares the SLM and EBM methods used in the fabrication of titanium bone implants by analyzing the microstructure, mechanical properties and cytotoxicity. The SLM process was conducted in an environmental chamber using 0.4–0.6 vol % of oxygen to enhance the mechanical properties of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy. SLM processed material had high anisotropy of mechanical properties and superior UTS (1246–1421 MPa when compared to the EBM (972–976 MPa and the wrought material (933–942 MPa. The microstructure and phase composition depended on the used fabrication method. The AM methods caused the formation of long epitaxial grains of the prior β phase. The equilibrium phases (α + β and non-equilibrium α’ martensite was obtained after EBM and SLM, respectively. Although it was found that the heat transfer that occurs during the layer by layer generation of the component caused aluminum content deviations, neither methods generated any cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, in contrast to SLM, the EBM fabricated material met the ASTMF136 standard for surgical implant applications.

  9. Effects of mechanical repetitive load on bone quality around implants in rat maxillae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Uto

    Full Text Available Greater understanding and acceptance of the new concept "bone quality", which was proposed by the National Institutes of Health and is based on bone cells and collagen fibers, are required. The novel protein Semaphorin3A (Sema3A is associated with osteoprotection by regulating bone cells. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of mechanical loads on Sema3A production and bone quality based on bone cells and collagen fibers around implants in rat maxillae. Grade IV-titanium threaded implants were placed at 4 weeks post-extraction in maxillary first molars. Implants received mechanical loads (10 N, 3 Hz for 1800 cycles, 2 days/week for 5 weeks from 3 weeks post-implant placement to minimize the effects of wound healing processes by implant placement. Bone structures, bone mineral density (BMD, Sema3A production and bone quality based on bone cells and collagen fibers were analyzed using microcomputed tomography, histomorphometry, immunohistomorphometry, polarized light microscopy and birefringence measurement system inside of the first and second thread (designated as thread A and B, respectively, as mechanical stresses are concentrated and differently distributed on the first two threads from the implant neck. Mechanical load significantly increased BMD, but not bone volume around implants. Inside thread B, but not thread A, mechanical load significantly accelerated Sema3A production with increased number of osteoblasts and osteocytes, and enhanced production of both type I and III collagen. Moreover, mechanical load also significantly induced preferential alignment of collagen fibers in the lower flank of thread B. These data demonstrate that mechanical load has different effects on Sema3A production and bone quality based on bone cells and collagen fibers between the inside threads of A and B. Mechanical load-induced Sema3A production may be differentially regulated by the type of bone structure or distinct stress distribution

  10. Posterior atrophic jaws rehabilitated with prostheses supported by 6 mm long 4 mm wide implants or by longer implants in augmented bone. One-year post-loading results from a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistilli, Roberto; Felice, Pietro; Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Piatelli, Maurizio; Corvino, Valeria; Barausse, Carlo; Buti, Jacopo; Soardi, Elisa; Esposito, Marco

    2013-01-01

    patients with mandibular implants at least 10 mm long lost 1.07 mm. These differences were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Patients with maxillary 6 mm-long implants lost an average of 1.02 mm of peri-implant bone at 1 year and patients with maxillary implants at least 10 mm long lost 1.09 mm. These differences were statistically significant (P < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in bone level changes up to 1 year between 6 mm and at least 10 mm-long implants in both jaws (mandibles n = 18, mean difference -0.02 mm, 95% CI -0.16 to 0.12, P = 0.7384; maxillae n = 20, mean difference -0.07 mm, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.05, P = 0.2547). Short-term data (1 year after loading) indicate that 6 mm-long implants with a conventional diameter of 4 mm achieved similar if not better results than longer implants placed in augmented bone. Short implants might be a preferable choice to bone augmentation, especially in posterior mandibles since the treatment is faster, cheaper and associated with less morbidity. However, data obtained 5 to 10 years after loading are necessary before making reliable recommendations. CONFLICT OF INTEREST STATEMENT: Tecnoss and Southern Implants partially supported this trial and donated biomaterials, implants and prosthetic components used in this study. However, the data belonged to the authors and by no means did the manufacturers interfere with the conduct of the trial or the publication of its results.

  11. Posterior atrophic jaws rehabilitated with prostheses supported by 5 x 5 mm implants with a novel nanostructured calcium-incorporated titanium surface or by longer implants in augmented bone. One-year results from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistilli, Roberto; Felice, Pietro; Piattelli, Maurizio; Gessaroli, Manlio; Soardi, Elisa; Barausse, Carlo; Buti, Jacopo; Corvino, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    short implants in the mandible (P = 0.0079; difference in proportion = -0.45; 95% CI -0.67 to -0.15), and 5 sinus-lift patients versus none treated with maxillary short implants (P = 0.047; difference in proportion = -0.25; 95% CI -0.44 to -0.06). Patients with mandibular short implants lost on average 0.94 mm of peri-implant bone at 1 year and patients with 10 mm or longer mandibular implants lost 1.03 mm. Patients with maxillary short implants lost on average 0.87 mm of peri-implant bone at 1 year and patients with 10 mm or longer maxillary implants lost 1.15 mm. There were no statistically significant differences in bone level changes up to 1 year between short and longer implants in maxillae (mean difference -0.28 mm, 95% CI -0.56 to 0.01, P = 0.051) and in mandibles (mean difference -0.09 mm, 95% CI -0.26 to 0.08, P = 0.295). One year after loading, 5 × 5 mm implants achieved similar results compared to longer implants placed in augmented bone. Short implants might be a preferable choice to bone augmentation especially in posterior mandibles since the treatment is faster, cheaper and associated with less morbidity, however 5 to 10 years of post-loading data are necessary before making reliable recommendations. MegaGen partially supported this trial and donated implants and prosthetic components used in this study, whereas Tecnoss donated the biomaterials. The data belonged to the authors and by no means did the manufacturers interfere with the conduct of the trial or the publication of its results.

  12. Effect of implant position, angulation, and attachment height on peri-implant bone stress associated with mandibular two-implant overdentures: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hae Ryong; Pae, Ahran; Kim, Yooseok; Paek, Janghyun; Kim, Hyeong-Seob; Kwon, Kung-Rock

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the level and distribution of peri-implant bone stresses associated with mandibular two-implant overdentures with different implant positions. Mathematical models of mandibles and overdentures were designed using finite element analysis software. Two intraosseous implants and ball attachment systems were placed in the interforaminal region. The overdenture, which was supported by the two implants, was designed to withstand bilateral and unilateral vertical masticatory loads (total 100 N). In all, eight types of models, which differed according to assigned implant positions, height of attachments, and angulation, were tested: MI (model with implants positioned in the lateral incisor sites), MC (implants in canine sites), MP (implants in premolar sites), MI-Hi (greater height of attachments), MC-M (canine implants placed with mesial inclination), MC-D (canine implants placed with distal inclination), MC-B (canine implants placed with buccal inclination), and MC-L (canine implants placed with lingual inclination). Peri-implant bone stress levels associated with overdentures retained by lateral incisor implants resulted in the lowest stress levels and the highest efficiency in distributing peri-implant stress. MI-Hi showed increased stress levels and decreased efficiency in stress distribution. As the implants were inclined, stress levels increased and the efficiency of stress distribution decreased. Among the inclined models, MC-B showed the lowest stress level and best efficiency in stress distribution. The lowest stress and the best stability of implants in mandibular two-implant overdentures were obtained when implants were inserted in lateral incisor areas with shorter attachments and were placed parallel to the long axes of the teeth.

  13. Digital subtraction radiography evaluation of longitudinal bone density changes around immediate loading implants: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, L S; da Cunha, H A; Leles, C R; Mendonça, E F

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess longitudinal quantitative changes in bone density around different implant loading protocols and implant surfaces measured by digital subtraction radiography (DSR). 12 patients received bilateral homologous standard and TiUnite® (Nobel Biocare, Kloten, Switzerland) single-tooth implants under 2 implant-loading protocols: immediate loading (8 patients, 16 implants, 12 maxillary) and conventional loading (4 patients, 8 implants, 4 maxillary). Standardized periapical radiographs were taken immediately after implant placement (baseline image) and at the 3-month, 6-month and 12-month follow ups. Radiographic images were digitized and submitted to digital subtraction using the DSR system® (Electro Medical System, Nyon, Switzerland), resulting in three subtracted images. Quantitative analysis of bone density was performed using Image Tool® software (University of Texas Health Science Centre, San Antonio, TX) to assess pixel value changes in five areas around the implants (crestal, subcrestal, medial third, apical-lateral and apical). Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that grey levels were significantly influenced by follow-up time and implant-loading protocol. A linear increase in grey levels was found for immediate loading (IML) implants and a significant decrease in grey levels was observed in the 12-month follow up for conventional loading implants. No effect of implant surface treatment was observed. In conclusion, IML protocol induced mineral bone gain around single-tooth implants after the first year under function for cases with favourable bone conditions.

  14. Osseointegration Of Implants In Rabbit Bone With A Low Calcium Diet And Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, So Jung; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    2000-01-01

    To investigate osseointergration of titanium implants into the tibia of rabbits, which were fed a low calcium diet and irradiated. To prepare the experimental model, control group was fed a normal diet and experimental group was fed a low calcium diet for 4 weeks. And then, titanium implants were inserted into the tibia of each rabbit. Experimental group was subdivided into two groups; low calcium diet/non-irradiation group and low calcium diet/irradiation group. The low calcium diet/irradiation group was irradiated with a single absorbed dose of 15 Gy at the 5th postoperative days. On the 12th, 19th, 33rd, 47th, and 61st days after implantation(1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after irradiation), the bone formation in the bone-implant interface area was examined by light microscopy and fluorescent microscopy. 1. In the control group, there began to form woven bone in the bone-implant interface area on the 12th days after implantation. As the experimental time was going on, the amount of bone which was in contact with the implant was increased. 2. In the low calcium diet/non-irradiation group, there began to form woven bone in the bone-implant interface area on the 19th days after implantation. Although the amount of bone which was in contact with the implant was increased as the experimental time was going on, the extent of increased bone was slightly weak as compared with control group. 3. In the low calcium diet/irradiation group, there began to form woven bone incompletely in the bone-implant interface area on the 19th days after implantation, but there were vascular connective tissues in the bone- implant interface area over the entire experimental period. 4. In the control group and low calcium diet/non-irradiation group, bone labeling bands were observed on the 33rd days after implantation, which suggests that the bone formation and remodeling was in process, but interstitial bone remodeling was not observed in the low calcium diet/irradiation group.

  15. Vibrant Soundbridge and Bone Conduction Hearing Aid in Patients with Bilateral Malformation of External Ear

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    Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hearing loss is the most common clinical finding in patients with malformation of the external ear canal. Among the possibilities of treatment, there is the adaptation of hearing aids by bone conduction and the adaptation of implantable hearing aids. Objective To assess speech perception with the use of Vibrant Soundbridge (VBS - MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria associated with additional amplification in patients with bilateral craniofacial malformation. Method We evaluated 11 patients with bilateral malformation over 12 years with mixed hearing loss or bilateral conductive. They were using the Softband (Oticon Medical, Sweden and bone conduction hearing aid in the ear opposite the one with the VSB. We performed the evaluation of speech perception using the Hearing in Noise Test. Results Participants were eight men and three women with a mean of 19.5 years. The signal / noise ratio presented significant results in patients fitted with VSB and bone conduction hearing aid. Conclusion The results of speech perception were significantly better with use of VBS combined with bone conduction hearing aids.

  16. Effect of Implant Height Differences on Different Attachment Types and Peri-Implant Bone in Mandibular Two-Implant Overdentures: 3D Finite Element Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozan, Oguz; Ramoglu, Serhat

    2015-06-01

    Implant-supported overdentures with self-aligning attachment systems are preferred to improve the stability and retention of complete dentures. The positioning of the implant attachments is a very important aspect of two-implant overdentures in obtaining better stress distribution. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare two different attachment systems in a two-implant overdenture by evaluating the stress distributions in peri-implant bone and stresses on the attachments with positioning at different height levels using the 3D FEA method. Six models with ball attachments and 6 models with locator attachments-totaling 12 models (including 2 controls)-with the left implant positioned unilaterally at different height levels were subjected to 3 loading conditions (anterior, right posterior, and left posterior). Data for Von Misses stresses were produced numerically, color coded, and compared among the models for attachments and peri-implant cortical bone. The configurations in which implants presented 3 mm height differences in the bone level showed the most successful results in the peri-implant bone. When stresses on the attachments were compared, greater stress values were obtained from the ball attachments. As a conclusion, the configurations with a considerable (3 mm) height difference between quadrants of the mandible in the anterior segment showed the most successful results in the peri-implant bone. On the contrary, peak stress values around the implant observed from the models with less (1 mm) bone height difference may require leveling of the bone during surgery. However, these findings should be corroborated with clinical studies.

  17. Bone loss at implants and teeth in the same inter-proximal unit: A radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchinato, Denis; Marino, Massimiliano; Toia, Marco; Cecchinato, Francesca; Lindhe, Jan

    2018-02-10

    This study was performed to determine whether the distance between an implant and a tooth present in an inter-proximal unit influenced the amount of marginal bone loss that occurred at the two facing (adjacent) surfaces. One hundred and eighty patients with a total of 278 inter-proximal units were included. Radiographs of implants that also included adjacent (facing) natural tooth/teeth were digitalized, and various linear measurements were performed using a software program. The marginal bone level and the bone level change that had occurred during a mean of 5.8 years were assessed as well as distance between the implant and the adjacent tooth/teeth. The mean amount of additional marginal bone loss that took place during the observation period was about 0.4 mm at both implants and adjacent tooth surfaces. The horizontal distance between an implant and the facing tooth did not influence the amount of marginal bone loss that had occurred. In most inter-proximal units, more advanced bone loss (>1 mm, >2 mm) had ensued either at the implant or at the facing tooth surface. Advanced additional bone loss occurred at both the implant and the tooth in only about 3% of the examined subjects. Bone loss at implants and teeth appears to be a site-specific phenomenon and not dependent on the inter-proximal distance. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Assessment of activated porous granules on implant fixation and early bone formation in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ding

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, despite nice bone formation and implant fixation in all groups, bioreactor activated graft material did not convincingly induce early implant fixation similar to allograft, and neither bioreactor nor by adding BMA credited additional benefit for bone formation in this model.

  19. Bone changes in ridge split with immediate implant placement: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. Dohiem

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Alveolar ridge splitting might be considered a predictable approach that demonstrates a high implant survival rate, adequate horizontal bone gain and minimal postoperative complications. Weak evidence showed the effect of flap design and immediate implantation on marginal bone loss and survival rate.

  20. Analysis nuclear punctual method of the interface between an implanted bio coral and bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irigaray, J.L.; Oudadesse, H.; Braye, F.

    1994-01-01

    We adopted the Particles Induced X-ray Emission nuclear analysis, which allows to obtain informations on the atomic element distribution at level of bone surfaces and of the implanted biomaterial. It characterizes the consolidation between bone and bio material, a few weeks after its implant. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  1. Bone response to immediate loading through titanium implants with different surface roughness in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoko; Kuwana, Toshie; Yamamoto, Miou; Suenaga, Hanako; Anada, Takahisa; Koyama, Shigeto; Suzuki, Osamu; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-07-01

    Because of its high predictability of success, implant therapy is a reliable treatment for replacement of missing teeth. The concept of immediate implant loading has been widely accepted in terms of early esthetic and functional recovery. However, there is little biological evidence to support this concept. The objective of this study was to examine the interactive effects of mechanical loading and surface roughness of immediately loaded titanium implants on bone formation in rats. Screw-shaped anodized titanium implants were either untreated (smooth) or acid-etched. Two implants were inserted parallel to each other in the tibiae of rats, and a closed coil spring (2.0 N) was immediately applied. Trabecular and cortical bone around both implants was analyzed using microtomographic images, and a removal torque test was performed at weeks 1, 2, and 4. Immediate loading of acid-etched implants resulted in significant decreases in bone mineral density, contact surface area, and cortical bone thickness. These effects were not observed after immediate loading of smooth implants. Conversely, loading did not influence acid-etched implant fixation; however, smooth implant fixation at week 1 was significantly reduced. These results imply that surface roughness regulates bone response to mechanical stress and that immediate loading might not inhibit osseointegration for smooth and rough implants in the late healing stages.

  2. Strain of bone-implant interface and insertion torque regarding different miniscrew thread designs using an artificial bone model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jung-Yul; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Kwon, Sung Hwang; Jung, Han-Sung; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Yu, Hyung Seog

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the initial stability of dual-thread miniscrews by analyzing the strain at the bone-implant interface and insertion torque during implantation in artificial bone models with different cortical bone thicknesses. Insertion torque, and strain, measured with a five-element strain gauge in 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0-mm artificial cortical bone, during insertion of single- (OAS-T1507) and dual-thread (MPlant-U3) type self-drilling miniscrews were assessed. Both dual- and single-thread miniscrews showed greater than 7790 μstrain for all cortical bone thicknesses, and dual-thread miniscrews reached up to 19580 μstrain in 2.00 m m cortical bone. The strain of dual-thread miniscrews increased with increasing cortical bone thicknesses of 1.0-2.0mm. For single-thread miniscrews, the maximum insertion torque was relatively constant, but maximum insertion torque increased significantly in dual-thread groups with increasing cortical bone thicknesses (P bone thicknesses was significantly lower with single- than dual-thread types (P bone remodelling limit at the bone-implant interface in thick cortical bone layers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Effect on Bone Architecture of Marginal Grooves in Dental Implants Under Occlusal Loaded Conditions in Beagle Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hatsumi; Kuroshima, Shinichiro; Inaba, Nao; Uto, Yusuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify whether marginal grooves on dental implants affect osseointegration, bone structure, and the alignment of collagen fibers to determine bone quality under loaded conditions. Anodized Ti-6Al-4V alloy dental implants, with and without marginal grooves (test and control implants, respectively), were used (3.7 × 8.0 mm). Fourth premolars and first molars of 6 beagle mandibles were extracted. Two control and test implants were placed in randomly selected healed sites at 12 weeks after tooth extraction. Screw-retained single crowns for first molars were fabricated. Euthanasia was performed at 8 weeks after the application of occlusal forces. Implant marginal bone level, bone to implant contact (BIC), bone structure around dental implants, and the alignment of collagen fibers determining bone quality were analyzed. The marginal bone level in test implants was significantly higher than that in control implants. Occlusal forces significantly increased BIC in test implants ( P = .007), whereas BIC did not change in control implants, irrespective of occlusal forces ( P = .303). Moreover, occlusal forces significantly increased BIC in test implants compared with control implants ( P = .032). Additionally, occlusal forces preferentially aligned collagen fibers in test implants, but not control implants. Hence, marginal grooves on dental implants have positive effects on increased osseointegration and adapted bone quality based on the preferential alignment of collagen fibers around dental implants under loaded conditions.

  4. Electrical conduction in 100 keV Kr+ ion implanted poly (ethylene terephthalate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, P. K.; Kumar, V.; Gupta, Renu; Mahendia, S.; Anita, Kumar, S.

    2012-06-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) samples have been implanted to 100 keV Kr+ ions at the fluences 1×1015-- 1×1016 cm-2. From I-V characteristics, the conduction mechanism was found to be shifted from ohmic to space charge limited conduction (SCLC) after implantation. The surface conductivity of these implanted samples was found to increase with increasing implantation dose. The structural alterations in the Raman spectra of implanted PET samples indicate that such an increase in the conductivity may be attributed to the formation of conjugated double bonded carbonaceous structure in the implanted layer of PET.

  5. Real-time thermographic analysis of low-density bone during implant placement: a randomized parallel-group clinical study comparing lateral condensation with bone drilling surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Aleksa; Mišić, Tijana; Mančić, Dragan; Jovanović, Igor; Šćepanović, Miodrag; Jezdić, Zoran

    2014-08-01

    To compare the effect of two surgical techniques, lateral condensation and bone drilling, on changes in temperature of the adjacent low-density bone during implant placement into posterior maxilla and to investigate the influence of the host factors - age, gender, region of implantation, bone density, and thickness of the cortical bone at the recipient sites. Local bone temperature was measured thermographically during implant placement into posterior maxilla following lateral bone condensing (test group) or bone drilling (controls). The main study outcomes were baseline bone temperature prior to implantation and maximum bone temperature recorded during implantation. Early implant success was evaluated after 6 months of healing. A total of 40 implants were randomly allocated to test and control groups and placed into maxillary premolar and/or molar region of 18 participants of both genders and average age of 51.74 years. All recorded bone temperatures were below the threshold for thermal necrosis. Although both groups showed significant increase in bone temperature during implant placement procedure (P ≤ 0.0005), it was significantly higher for bone condensing compared with drilling (P ≤ 0.0005; 3.79 ± 1.54°C; 1.91 ± 0.70°C respectively). No host factor was singled out as a significant predictor of bone temperature changes, although trend of higher increase was observed in young patients, regardless of gender, during implant placement procedure into maxillary first premolar region with bone density type 3 and cortical layer thicker than 1 mm. Early implant success rate after 6 months follow-up was 100%. Although both surgical techniques, bone condensing and bone drilling, can be considered safe regarding their thermal effect on the bone of posterior maxilla, bone drilling is associated with fewer local bone heating during implantation. Host factors do not affect the bone thermal changes significantly. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  6. Crestal Bone Level Around Tissue-Level Implants Restored with Platform Matching and Bone-Level Implants Restored with Platform Switching: A 5-Year Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Laura; da Silva, Luis; Martinez-Silva, Isabel; Rilo, Benito

    The aim of this randomized clinical trial with a 5-year follow-up was to assess the differences in radiographic levels of peri-implant bone crest between tissue-level implants restored with platform matching (control group) and bone-level implants restored with platform switching (test group) in the posterior region. To assess marginal bone level changes, periapical radiographs were taken at the moment of prosthesis delivery (baseline), at 1 year, and at 5 years after the definitive restoration. One hundred subjects, partially edentulous in the posterior region, were selected for this study. There were 54 men and 46 women between the ages of 25 and 70 years (mean = 50.5 years). A total of 202 implants were assigned to both groups using a randomized procedure (100 implants in the control group and 102 in the test group). The mean marginal bone level (MBL) changes for tissue-level implants restored with platform matching were 0.26 ± 0.55 mm at baseline to 1 year, 0.34 ± 0.54 mm at 1 year to 5 years, and 0.61 ± 0.73 mm at baseline to 5 years. The mean MBL changes for bone-level implants restored with platform switching were -0.03 ± 0.74 mm at baseline to 1 year, -0.17 ± 0.67 mm at 1 year to 5 years, and -0.20 ± 0.75 mm at baseline to 5 years. The mean difference between the two groups was 0.31 mm at baseline to 1 year, 0.53 mm at 1 year to 5 years, and 0.85 mm at baseline to 5 years. There was a statistically significant difference in MBL (P implant systems showed good and similar survival rates (98% for tissue-level implants restored with platform matching and 96.1% for bone-level implants restored with platform switching). In this randomized controlled trial, the following observations were made. Radiographic levels of peri-implant bone crest in tissue-level implants restored by platform matching were statistically significant in the three interval times. Meanwhile, MBL changes for bone-level implants restored with platform switching were not statistically

  7. Stability, survival, and tolerability of a 4.5-mm-wide bone-anchored hearing implant: 6-month data from a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelissen, Rik C; den Besten, Christine A; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Hol, Myrthe K S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the stability, survival, and tolerability of 2 percutaneous osseointegrated titanium implants for bone conduction hearing: a 4.5-mm diameter implant (test) and a 3.75-mm diameter implant (control). Fifty-seven adult patients were included in this randomized controlled clinical trial. Sixty implants were allocated in a 2:1 (test-control) ratio. Follow-up visits were scheduled at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days; 6 and 12 weeks; and 6 months. At every visit, implant stability quotient (ISQ) values were recorded by means of resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and skin reactions were evaluated according to the Holgers classification. Implants were loaded with the bone conduction device at 3 weeks. Hearing-related quality of life was evaluated using the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB), the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), and the Glasgow Health Status Inventory (GHSI). ISQ values were statistically significantly higher for the test implant compared to the control implant. No implants were lost and soft tissue reactions were comparable for both implants. Positive results were reported in the hearing-related quality of life questionnaires. These 6-month results indicate that both implants and their corresponding hearing devices are safe options for hearing rehabilitation in patients with the appropriate indications. Loading at 3 weeks did not affect the stability of either implant.

  8. Bone implant sockets made using three different procedures: a stability study in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Cano Sánchez, Jorge; Campo, Julián

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study compared the effects of three different methods of preparing bone implant sockets (drilling, osteotomes, and piezoelectric device) on osseointegration using resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Study Design: An experimental prospective study was designed. Material and Methods: Ten adult beagle dogs were studied. After 5 weeks, 23 out of 28 initially placed implants in the iliac crest were evaluated, comparing these three different procedures of bone implant socket. Studen...

  9. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahini, Aref; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Walker, Kenneth J; Eastman, Margaret A; Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Smith, Brenda J; Ricci, John L; Madihally, Sundar V; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent microscope. Increasing the concentration of the conductive polymer in the scaffold enhanced the cell viability, indicating the improved microstructure of the scaffolds or boosted electrical signaling among cells. These results show that these conductive scaffolds are not only structurally more favorable for bone tissue engineering, but also can be a step forward in combining the tissue engineering techniques with the method of enhancing the bone healing by electrical stimuli.

  10. AICRG, Part II: Crestal bone loss associated with the Ankylos implant: loading to 36 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cherng-Tzeh; Morris, Harold F; Ochi, Shigeru; Walker, Lori; DesRosiers, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    The Ankylos endosseous dental implant is a new implant design that will be available in the United States in early 2004. It features an internal tapered abutment connection, a smooth polished collar without threads at the coronal part of the implant body, and a roughened surface with variable threads on the body of the implant fixture. A precise, tapered, conical abutment connection eliminates the microgap often found in 2-stage implant systems. This microgap may allow the accumulation of food debris and bacteria, as well as micromovement between the parts during clinical function, both of which can lead to a localized inflammation and crestal bone loss. The purpose of this section of the study was to assess any crestal bone loss associated with this new implant. The clinical performance of this new implant design was studied under well-controlled clinical conditions. Over 1500 implants were placed and restored. The vertical crestal bone loss was measured "directly" between the time of implant placement and uncovering, using a periodontal probe. Serial dental radiographs were taken between loading, and the 12-, 24-, and 36-month follow-up visits to determine "indirect" crestal bone loss within a specific period. Bone loss varied among the participating centers from less than 0.5 mm to 2.0 mm. The largest amount of bone loss occurred between the time of placement and uncovering. Following loading, the mean bone loss for all implants for a period of 3 years was about 0.2 mm/y. The extent of the crestal bone loss after loading was minimal for patients regardless of age, gender, prosthetic applications, bone density, and remote or crestal incisions, as well as for smokers or nonsmokers. Bone loss per year is well within the guidelines of 0.2 mm/y proposed by others.

  11. Clinical Outcome of a Wide-diameter Bone-anchored Hearing Implant and a Surgical Technique With Tissue Preservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowinckel, Marius S; Møller, Martin N; Wielandt, Kirsten N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical outcome of a surgical technique with tissue preservation for a wide bone-anchored hearing implant concerning postoperative complications, skin reactions, implant loss, and implant stability. STUDY DESIGN: Consecutive, prospective case series. SETTING: Tertia...

  12. Measurements of inter-cochlear level and phase differences of bone-conducted sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcleod, Robert W. J.; Culling, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aids are a widely used method of treating conductive hearing loss, but the benefit of bilateral implantation is limited due to interaural cross-talk. The present study measured the phase and level of pure tones reaching each cochlea from a single, mastoid placed bone transducer on normal hearing participants. In principle, the technique could be used to implement a cross-talk cancellation system in those with bilateral bone conductors. The phase and level of probe tones over two insert earphones was adjusted until they canceled sound from a bone transducer (i.e., resulting in perceived silence). Testing was performed in 50-Hz steps between 0.25 and 8 kHz. Probe phase and level results were used to calculate inter-cochlear level and phase differences. The inter-cochlear phase differences of the bone-conducted sound were similar for all three participants showing a relatively linear increase between 4 and 8 kHz. The attenuation characteristics were highly variable over the frequency range as well as between participants. This variability was thought to be related to differences in skull dynamics across the ears. Repeated measurements of cancellation phase and level of the same frequency produced good consistency across sessions from the same participant. PMID:28599562

  13. Bone Healing Around Dental Implants: Simplified vs Conventional Drilling Protocols at Speed of 400 rpm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Luiz Fernando; Sarendranath, Alvin; Neiva, Rodrigo; Marão, Heloisa F; Tovar, Nick; Bonfante, Estevam A; Janal, Malvin N; Castellano, Arthur; Coelho, Paulo G

    This study evaluated whether simplified drilling protocols would provide comparable histologic and histomorphometric results to conventional drilling protocols at a low rotational speed. A total of 48 alumina-blasted and acid-etched Ti-6Al-4V implants with two diameters (3.75 and 4.2 mm, n = 24 per group) were bilaterally placed in the tibiae of 12 dogs, under a low-speed protocol (400 rpm). Within the same diameter group, half of the implants were inserted after a simplified drilling procedure (pilot drill + final diameter drill), and the other half were placed using the conventional drilling procedure. After 3 and 5 weeks, the animals were euthanized, and the retrieved bone-implant samples were subjected to nondecalcified histologic sectioning. Histomorphology, bone-to-implant contact (BIC), and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) analysis were performed. Histology showed that new bone was formed around implants, and inflammation or bone resorption was not evident for both groups. Histomorphometrically, when all independent variables were collapsed over drilling technique, no differences were detected for BIC and BAFO; when drilling technique was analyzed as a function of time, the conventional groups reached statistically higher BIC and BAFO at 3 weeks, but comparable values between techniques were observed at 5 weeks; 4.2-mm implants obtained statistically higher BAFO relative to 3.75-mm implants. Based on the present methodology, the conventional technique improved bone formation at 3 weeks, and narrower implants were associated with less bone formation.

  14. Peri-implant bone response to retrieved human zirconia oral implants after a 4-year loading period: A histologic and histomorphometric evaluation of 22 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohal, Ralf-Joachim; Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Bächle, Maria; Spies, Benedikt Christopher

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the bone tissue response to surface modified zirconia oral implants retrieved from humans. Twenty-nine one-piece zirconia implants showed increased marginal bone loss and did not response to the applied peri-implantitis therapy. After their removal using a trephine bur, 22 of the implant-bone biopsies were suitable for an evaluation and immediately immersed in formalin for two weeks. Subsequent, the retrieved specimens were histologically prepared and the regions still showing osseointegration computer-assisted analyzed regarding the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone density using a transmitted-light microscope. The removed implants were in situ for a mean time period of 47.7 months. After their removal, compact bone could be depicted at the apical regions. The remaining bone that was attached to the implants contained a regular lamellar structure with osteons and osteocytes. The BIC ranged from 58.1% to 93.7% (mean: 76.5%) and the bone area/density within the implant threads ranged from 57% to 97.2% (mean: 84.8%). The porous zirconia implants showed a sufficient BIC in the areas where bone still was attached. Although the implants had to be removed due to increased bone loss, it seems that the presented zirconia implant surface per se elicited appropriate osseointegration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1622-1631, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Air-bone gap component of inner-ear origin in audiograms of cochlear implant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Joseph; Ulanovski, David; Shemesh, Rafael; Kornreich, Liora; Nageris, Benny; Preis, Michal; Peled, Miriam; Efrati, Michal; Raveh, Eyal

    2012-06-01

    Experimental studies have shown that creating a window in the bony cover of the cochlea and vestibular parts of the inner ear, with preservation of membranous and middle-ear functions, induces an air-bone gap (ABG). This study sought to determine if a similar mechanism explains the ABG frequently observed in audiograms of cochlear implant candidates. The study group included 47 candidates for a cochlear implant (94 ears) attending a university-affiliated tertiary medical center who had an ABG component in the audiogram in the absence of external or middle-ear abnormalities. Air- and bone-conduction thresholds on pure-tone audiometry were analyzed for 250 to 8,000 Hz and 250 to 4,000 Hz, respectively. In the 25 patients operated on during the study period, differences in the ABG and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak were compared between those with and without anomalies on computed tomography. Imaging revealed an abnormal inner-ear structure in 46% of cases, mostly a large vestibular aqueduct, alone or combined with other cochlear or vestibular malformations. ABG was evident over high and low frequencies and was significantly larger at low frequencies and in ears with structural anomalies. A high rate of CSF leak was observed in patients with an ABG and structural anomalies imaging as well as in those with an ABG and normal imaging findings. In cochlear implant candidates, the presence of a third window could cause an ABG because of stapes motion-induced shunting of acoustic energy outside the cochlear duct in response to air-conducted stimuli while bone conduction is preserved.

  16. Bone density around the fixture after function of implant molar prosthesis using CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jae Hyun; Hwang, In Taik; Jung, Byung Hyun; Kim, Jae Duk; Kang, Dong Wan [School of Dentistry, Oral Biology Research Institute, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the significance of increased bone density according to whether bone grafts were applied using demographic data with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and to compare the bone densities between before and after implant prosthesis using the Hounsfield index. Thirty-six randomly selected computed tomography (CT) scans were used for the analysis. The same sites were evaluated digitally using the Hounsfield scale with V-Implant 2.0TM, and the results were compared with maxillary posterior bone graft. Statistical data analysis was carried out to determine the correlation between the recorded Hounsfield unit (HU) of the bone graft and implant prosthesis using a Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon Matched-pairs test. The bone grafted maxillary posterior teeth showed an increase in the mean values from-157 HU to 387 HU, whereas non-grafted maxillary posterior teeth showed an increase from 62 HU to 342 HU. After implantation, the grafted and non-grafted groups showed significantly higher bone density than before implantation. However, the grafted group showed significantly more changes than the non-grafted group. Bone density measurements using CBCT might provide an objective assessment of the bone quality as well as the correlation between bone density (Hounsfield scale) and bone grafts in the maxillary molar area.

  17. Novel expandable short dental implants in situations with reduced vertical bone height-technical note and first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Waldemar; Schweyen, Ramona; Heinzelmann, Christian; Hey, Jeremias; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Eckert, Alexander Walter

    2017-10-30

    Short implants often have the disadvantage of reduced primary stability. The present study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a new expandable short dental implant system intended to increase primary stability. As a "proof of concept", a prospective clinical cohort study was designed to investigate intraoperative handling, primary and secondary implant stability (resonance frequency analysis), crestal bone changes, implant survival and implant success, of an innovative short expandable screw implant. From 2014 until 2015, 9 patients (7-9-mm vertical bone height) with 30 implants (length 5-7 mm, diameter 3.75-4.1 mm) were recruited consecutively. All 30 implants in the 9 patients (age 44 to 80 years) could be inserted and expanded without intraoperative problems. Over the 3-year follow-up period, the implant success rate was 28/30 (93.3%). The mean implant stability quotients (ISQ) were as follows: primary stability, 69.7 ± 10.3 ISQ units, and secondary stability, 69.8 ± 10.2 ISQ units (p = 0.780), both without significant differences between the maxilla and mandible (p ≥ 0.780). The mean crestal bone changes after loading were (each measured from the baseline) as follows: in the first year, 1.0 ± 0.9 mm in the maxilla and 0.7 ± 0.4 mm in the mandible, and in the second year, 1.3 ± 0.8 mm and 1.0 ± 0.7 mm, respectively. Compared to other prospective studies, in this indication, the success rate is acceptable. Implant stability shows high initial and secondary stability values. The system might present an extension of functional rehabilitation to the group of elderly patients with limited vertical bone height. Further long-term investigations should directly compare this compressive implant with standard short implants.

  18. Radiographic Examination of Periimplant Bone Level Using Ankylos Implant System after Prosthetic Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Gebhardt, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    In the present retrospective study periimplant bone loss of 57 patients (173 implants) was examined on orthopantomogramms using digital software. Measurements of bone level performed twice mesial and distal of all implants immediately after insertion and after restauration with varios superstructures. The observation period for the second measurement was between 18 and 78 month. The results of the radiographic evaluation demonstrated that bone loss was significantly affected on different supe...

  19. Protocol for Bone Augmentation with Simultaneous Early Implant Placement: A Retrospective Multicenter Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fairbairn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To present a novel protocol for alveolar bone regeneration in parallel to early implant placement. Methods. 497 patients in need of extraction and early implant placement with simultaneous bone augmentation were treated in a period of 10 years. In all patients the same specific method was followed and grafting was performed utilizing in situ hardening fully resorbable alloplastic grafting materials consisting of β-tricalcium phosphate and calcium sulfate. The protocol involved atraumatic extraction, implant placement after 4 weeks with simultaneous bone augmentation, and loading of the implant 12 weeks after placement and grafting. Follow-up periods ranged from 6 months to 10 years (mean of 4 years. Results. A total of 601 postextraction sites were rehabilitated in 497 patients utilizing the novel protocol. Three implants failed before loading and three implants failed one year after loading, leaving an overall survival rate of 99.0%. Conclusions. This standardized protocol allows successful long-term functional results regarding alveolar bone regeneration and implant rehabilitation. The concept of placing the implant 4 weeks after extraction, augmenting the bone around the implant utilizing fully resorbable, biomechanically stable, alloplastic materials, and loading the implant at 12 weeks seems to offer advantages when compared with traditional treatment modalities.

  20. Implantation of tetrapod-shaped granular artificial bones or β-tricalcium phosphate granules in a canine large bone-defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungjin; Liu, I-Li; Yamamoto, Kenichi; Honnami, Muneki; Sakai, Takamasa; Ohba, Shinsuke; Echigo, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Shigeki; Nishimura, Ryouhei; Chung, Ung-Il; Sasaki, Nobuo; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2014-03-01

    We investigated biodegradability and new bone formation after implantation of tetrapod-shaped granular artificial bone (Tetrabone®) or β-tricalcium phosphate granules (β-TCP) in experimental critical-size defects in dogs, which were created through medial and lateral femoral condyles. The defect was packed with Tetrabone® (Tetrabone group) or β-TCP (β-TCP group) or received no implant (control group). Computed tomography (CT) was performed at 0, 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. Micro-CT and histological analysis were conducted to measure the non-osseous tissue rate and the area and distribution of new bone tissue in the defect at 8 weeks after implantation. On CT, β-TCP was gradually resorbed, while Tetrabone® showed minimal resorption at 8 weeks after implantation. On micro-CT, non-osseous tissue rate of the control group was significantly higher compared with the β-TCP and Tetrabone groups (Pbone tissue of the β-TCP group was significantly greater than those of the Tetrabone and control groups (Pbone distribution of the Tetrabone group was significantly greater than those of the β-TCP and control groups (Pbone defects in dogs.

  1. Enhanced Bone Repair by Guided Osteoblast Recruitment Using Topographically Defined Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong-Kee; Kim, Hong Nam; Bhang, Suk Ho; Shin, Jung-Youn; Han, Jin; La, Wan-Geun; Jeong, Gun-Jae; Kang, Seokyung; Lee, Ju-Ro; Oh, Jaesur; Kim, Min Sung; Jeon, Noo Li; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2016-04-01

    The rapid recruitment of osteoblasts in bone defects is an essential prerequisite for efficient bone repair. Conventionally, osteoblast recruitment to bone defects and subsequent bone repair has been achieved using growth factors. Here, we present a methodology that can guide the recruitment of osteoblasts to bone defects with topographically defined implants (TIs) for efficient in vivo bone repair. We compared circular TIs that had microgrooves in parallel or radial arrangements with nonpatterned implants for osteoblast migration and in vivo bone formation. In vitro, the microgrooves in the TIs enhanced both the migration and proliferation of osteoblasts. Especially, the microgrooves with radial arrangement demonstrated a much higher efficiency of osteoblast recruitment to the implants than did the other types of implants, which may be due to the efficient guidance of cell migration toward the cell-free area of the implants. The expression of the intracellular signaling molecules responsible for the cell migration was also upregulated in osteoblasts on the microgrooved TIs. In vivo, the TI with radially defined topography demonstrated much greater bone repair in mouse calvarial defect models than in the other types of implants. Taken together, these results indicate that implants with physical guidance can enhance tissue repair by rapid cell recruitment.

  2. Evaluation of bone-to-implant contact and bone density adjacent to titanium implants using a stereological technique on ground sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balatsouka, Dimitra; Gotfredsen, Klaus; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb

    2006-01-01

    using stereological principles. The aim of the study was to describe an unbiased design for evaluating boneto- implant contact (BIC) and peri-implant bone density (BD-i) in three-dimensions. The unbiased design was based on a fixed axis vertical random sampling technique. Three bone-implant blocks were...... collected from 3 rabbits. Four sections were obtained from each animal using a fixed axis vertical random sampling technique. The BIC was estimated by creating a stereological method based on a systematic test line set. The BD-i was estimated using a design based on a systematic point set. The efficiency...

  3. Dental Implants in an Aged Population: Evaluation of Periodontal Health, Bone Loss, Implant Survival, and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, William; Hujoel, Philippe; Becker, Burton E; Wohrle, Peter

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate aged partially and fully edentulous patients who received dental implants and were maintained over time. Further, to determine how the partially and edentulous ageing populations (65 and above) with dental implants maintain bone levels, proper oral hygiene, and perceive benefits of dental implants. Since 1995, patients receiving dental implants have been prospectively entered into an Access-based computerized program (Triton Tacking System). Patient demographics (age, sex), bone quality, quantity, implant location, and type of surgery have been continuously entered into the database. The database was queried for patients receiving implants (first stage) between 66 and 93 years of age. Thirty-one patients were within this age group. Twenty-five patients returned to the clinic for periodontal and dental implant evaluation. The Periodontal Index was used to evaluate selected teeth in terms of probing depth, bleeding on probing, plaque accumulation, and mobility. Using NIH Image J, radiographs taken at second stage and last examination were measured for changes in interproximal bone levels. Once identified, each patient anomalously filled out an abbreviated quality of health life form. Due to small sample size, descriptive statistics were used to compare clinical findings. Fifteen males ranging from 78 to 84 (mean age 84 years) years and 16 females from 66 to 93 (mean age 83 years) (age range 66-93) were contacted by phone or mail and asked to return to our office for a re-examination. For this group, the first dental implants were placed in 1996 (n = initial two implants) and continuously recorded through 2013 (n = last seven implants). Thirty-one patients received a total of 84 implants. Two patients were edentulous, and the remaining were partially edentulous. Four implants were lost. Between implant placement and 6- to 7-year interval, 13 patients with 40 implants had a cumulative survival rate of 94.6%. Of the original group (n = 33), three

  4. Nanosized Hydroxyapatite Coating on PEEK Implants Enhances Early Bone Formation: A Histological and Three-Dimensional Investigation in Rabbit Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Johansson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyether ether ketone (PEEK has been frequently used in spinal surgery with good clinical results. The material has a low elastic modulus and is radiolucent. However, in oral implantology PEEK has displayed inferior ability to osseointegrate compared to titanium materials. One idea to reinforce PEEK would be to coat it with hydroxyapatite (HA, a ceramic material of good biocompatibility. In the present study we analyzed HA-coated PEEK tibial implants via histology and radiography when following up at 3 and 12 weeks. Of the 48 implants, 24 were HA-coated PEEK screws (test and another 24 implants served as uncoated PEEK controls. HA-coated PEEK implants were always osseointegrated. The total bone area (BA was higher for test compared to control implants at 3 (p < 0.05 and 12 weeks (p < 0.05. Mean bone implant contact (BIC percentage was significantly higher (p = 0.024 for the test compared to control implants at 3 weeks and higher without statistical significance at 12 weeks. The effect of HA-coating was concluded to be significant with respect to early bone formation, and HA-coated PEEK implants may represent a good material to serve as bone anchored clinical devices.

  5. Potential Bone to Implant Contact Area of Short Versus Standard Implants: An In Vitro Micro-Computed Tomography Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Alessandro; DʼIsidoro, Orlando; Bambini, Fabrizio; Putignano, Angelo

    2016-02-01

    To compare the available potential bone-implant contact (PBIC) area of standard and short dental implants by micro-computed tomography (μCT) assessment. Three short implants with different diameters (4.5 × 6 mm, 4.1 × 7 mm, and 4.1 × 6 mm) and 2 standard implants (3.5 × 10 mm and 3.3 × 9 mm) with diverse design and surface features were scanned with μCT. Cross-sectional images were obtained. Image data were manually processed to find the plane that corresponds to the most coronal contact point between the crestal bone and implant. The available PBIC was calculated for each sample. Later on, the cross-sectional slices were processed by a 3-dimensional (3D) software, and 3D images of each sample were used for descriptive analysis and display the microtopography and macrotopography. The wide-diameter short implant (4.5 × 6 mm) showed the higher PBIC (210.89 mm) value followed by the standard (178.07 mm and 185.37 mm) and short implants (130.70 mm and 110.70 mm). Wide-diameter short implants show a surface area comparable with standard implants. Micro-CT analysis is a promising technique to evaluate surface area in dental implants with different macrodesign, microdesign, and surface features.

  6. Effects of implant length and 3D bone-to-implant contact on initial stabilities of dental implant: a microcomputed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jui-Ting; Wu, Aaron Yu-Jen; Fuh, Lih-Jyh; Huang, Heng-Li

    2017-11-21

    The influences of potential bone-to-implant contact (BIC) area (pBICA), BIC area (BICA), and three dimensional (3D) BIC percentage (3D BIC%; defined as BICA divided by pBICA) in relation to the implant length on initial implant stability were studied. Correlations between these parameters were also evaluated. Implants with lengths of 8.5, 10, 11.5, and 13 mm were placed in artificial bone specimens to measure three indexes of the initial implant stability: insertion torque value (ITV), Periotest value (PTV), and implant stability quotient (ISQ). The implants and bone specimens were also scanned by microcomputed tomography, and the obtained images were imported into Mimics software to reconstruct the 3D models and calculate the parameters of 3D bone-to-implant contact including pBICA, BICA, and 3D BIC%. The Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxon rank-sum test with Bonferroni adjustment, and Spearman correlations were applied for statistical and correlation analyses. The implant length affected ITV more than PTV and ISQ, and significantly affected pBICA, BICA, and 3D BIC%. A longer implant increased pBICA and BICA but decreased 3D BIC%. The Spearman coefficients were high (>0.78) for the correlations between the three 3D BIC parameters and the three indexes of the initial implant stability. pBICA, BICA, and 3D BIC% are useful when deciding on treatment plans related to various implant lengths, since these 3D BIC parameters are predictive of the initial implant stability.

  7. Combined influence of implant diameter and alveolar ridge width on crestal bone stress: a quantitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wonjae; Jang, Yoon-Je; Kyung, Hee-Moon

    2009-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the combined influence of implant diameter and alveolar ridge width on crestal bone stress. ITI solid-screw implants, 10 mm in length and 3.3, 4.1, and 4.8 mm in diameter, and the alveolar bone were modeled using axisymmetric finite elements. Four different alveolar ridge geometries were selected for each implant: 5-, 6-, 7-, and 8-mm-wide ridges for the 3.3-mm implants; 6-, 7-, 8-, and 9-mm-wide ridges for the 4.1-mm implants; and 7-, 8-, 9-, and 10-mm-wide ridges for the 4.8-mm implants. A nonaxial oblique load of 100 N was applied at 30 degrees to the implant axis. Regression analysis was used to avoid ambiguity when estimating the peak stress occurring at the coronal contact point between the implant and the crestal bone, ie, the singularity point. Peak stresses were dependent on both implant diameter and alveolar ridge width. Substantially lower stresses were recorded around the implants placed in narrower ridges. A regression analysis may be used to quantify the peak stress at the singularity point. An implant with a diameter that is at least half the ridge width is recommended to reduce the stress concentration in the crestal bone.

  8. Marginal bone loss around platform-switched and non-platform switched implants after two years of placement: a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarandi, Ali; Novin, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Background. The present study was conducted to investigate the marginal bone loss around two different types of implant‒abutment junctions, called platform-switched (Implantium system) and non-platform switched (XiVE system) after two years of loading. Methods. Sixty-four implants in 49 patients were included in the study. The implants were placed in the posterior mandibular region according to the relevant protocols. The extent of bone loss around the implants was measured and compared after 24 months, using digital parallel periapical radiographs. Results. The means ± SE of bone loss values in the platform-switched and non-platform-switched groups were 0.47 ± 0.048 mm and 1.87 ± 0.124 mm, respectively. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P technique seems to reduce the periimplant crestal bone resorption, which supports the long-term predictability of implant therapy.

  9. Bone reactions adjacent to titanium implants with different surface characteristics subjected to static load. A study in the dog (II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Berglundh, T; Lindhe, J

    2001-01-01

    extracted bilaterally. 12 weeks later, 2 implants with a TPS surface were placed in one side and 2 implants with a machined surface were placed in the contralateral side. Twelve weeks after implant installation, crowns, connected in pairs with orthodontic expansion screws, were fitted to the implants......The purpose of the present study was to compare bone reactions adjacent to titanium implants with either a titanium plasma-sprayed (TPS) or a machined surface subjected to lateral static loading induced by an expansion force. In 3 labrador dogs, the 2nd, 3rd and 4th mandibular premolars were...... and histometric examination. A higher marginal bone level was observed around implants with a TPS surface compared to machined implants. Furthermore, the values describing the amount of bone-to-implant contact at the bone/implant interface as well as the density of the peri-implant bone were lower at the machined...

  10. Bone augmentation as an adjunct to dental implant rehabilitation in patients with diabetes mellitus: A review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladha, Komal; Sharma, Ankit; Tiwari, Bhawana; Bukya, Dwaraka N

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to review the success of bone augmentation performed as an adjunct to dental implant rehabilitation in patients with diabetes mellitus. A literature review was conducted in PubMed on this topic, which yielded a total of 102 publications. For inclusion, publications had to be human studies, written in English language and should report on the success of bone augmentation as an adjunct to dental implant rehabilitation in diabetic patients. After screening the titles and abstracts, 11 full texts publications were obtained, of which seven were included in the review. These studies provided data on various bone augmentation techniques such as sinus floor elevation (SFE), guided bone regeneration (GBR), and onlay bone grafting. Even though the current review revealed that there are not many studies reporting data relevant to the analyzed topic, the data obtained suggests that; (1) staged GBR technique should be considered more feasible and predictable for bone augmentation, (2) clinicians must take meticulous care when planning and conducting SFE, and (3) block bone augmentation technique should be avoided.

  11. Effects of uncontrolled periodontitis on marginal bone alterations around implants: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Qin, Lei; Lei, Chi; Li, Yu; Li, Dehua

    2017-08-01

    The hypothesis of bacterial infection initiating marginal bone loss around dental implant in analogy with natural tooth is still in debate. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the effects of uncontrolled periodontitis on marginal bone alterations around implants compared with the periodontal health group at a mean follow-up of at least 6 years. Thirty consecutive uncontrolled periodontally compromised patients (PCP) and 30 periodontally healthy patients (PHP), with a total of 96 Straumann implants (PCP = 55, PHP = 41) were matched for age, gender, smoking, and implant characteristics. The inclusion criteria for PCPs were continuing tooth loss due to uncontrolled periodontal disease and no supportive periodontal maintenance after implant therapy. Peri-implant conditions were examined and the number of teeth lost during the follow-up periods was recorded in both groups. Radiographic marginal bone loss of implants and adjacent teeth was calculated having the restoration time point as baseline. No implant loss occurred in both groups. The mean number of teeth lost during the follow-up periods was 0.67 ± 0.80 in the PHP group, 3.93 ± 2.36 in the PCP group with statistical significance. The average overall bone loss was significantly greater at teeth than that around implants in the PCP group (0.54 ± 0.27 versus 0.22 ± 0.25 mm, P implant marginal bone loss. No significant correlations were found between teeth loss and crestal bone loss at implants sites in both groups. This study indicated that the marginal bone level around implants seemed more stable in comparison to that around the natural teeth when exposed to uncontrolled periodontal disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Impaired bone formation in ovariectomized mice reduces implant integration as indicated by longitudinal in vivo micro-computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihui Li

    Full Text Available Although osteoporotic bone, with low bone mass and deteriorated bone architecture, provides a less favorable mechanical environment than healthy bone for implant fixation, there is no general agreement on the impact of osteoporosis on peri-implant bone (remodeling, which is ultimately responsible for the long term stability of the bone-implant system. Here, we inserted an implant in a mouse model mimicking estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss and we monitored with longitudinal in vivo micro-computed tomography the spatio-temporal changes in bone (remodeling and architecture, considering the separate contributions of trabecular, endocortical and periosteal surfaces. Specifically, 12 week-old C57BL/6J mice underwent OVX/SHM surgery; 9 weeks after we inserted special metal-ceramics implants into the 6th caudal vertebra and we measured bone response with in vivo micro-CT weekly for the following 6 weeks. Our results indicated that ovariectomized mice showed a reduced ability to increase the thickness of the cortical shell close to the implant because of impaired peri-implant bone formation, especially at the periosteal surface. Moreover, we observed that healthy mice had a significantly higher loss of trabecular bone far from the implant than estrogen depleted animals. Such behavior suggests that, in healthy mice, the substantial increase in peri-implant bone formation which rapidly thickened the cortex to secure the implant may raise bone resorption elsewhere and, specifically, in the trabecular network of the same bone but far from the implant. Considering the already deteriorated bone structure of estrogen depleted mice, further bone loss seemed to be hindered. The obtained knowledge on the dynamic response of diseased bone following implant insertion should provide useful guidelines to develop advanced treatments for osteoporotic fracture fixation based on local and selective manipulation of bone turnover in the peri-implant region.

  13. Retrospective analysis of survival rates and marginal bone loss on short implants in the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draenert, Florian G; Sagheb, Keyvan; Baumgardt, Katharina; Kämmerer, Peer W

    2012-09-01

    Short implants have become an interesting alternative to bone augmentation in dental implantology. Design of shorter implants and longer surveillance times are a current research issue. The goal of this study was to show the survival rates of short implants below 9 mm in the partly edentulous mandibular premolar and molar regions with fixed prosthetics. Marginal vertical and 2D bone loss was evaluated additionally. Different implant designs are orientationally evaluated. A total of 247 dental implants with fixed prosthetics (crowns and bridges) in the premolar and molar region of the mandible were evaluated; 47 implants were 9 mm or shorter. Patient data were evaluated to acquire implant survival rates, implant diameter, gender and age. Panoramic X-rays were analysed for marginal bone loss. Average surveillance time was 1327 days. Cumulative survival rate (CSR) of short implants was 98% (1 implants lost) compared to 94% in the longer implants group without significance. Thirty-five of the short implants were Astratech (0 losses) and 12 were Camlog Screw Line Promote Plus (1 loss). Early vertical and two-dimensional marginal bone loss was not significantly different in short and regular length implant group with an average of 0.6 mm and 0.7 mm(2) in short implants over the observation period. Within the limitations of this study, we conclude that short implants with a length of 9 mm or less have equal survival rates compared with longer implants over the observation period of 1-3 years. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. The impact of glucocorticosteroids administered for systemic diseases on the osseointegration and survival of dental implants placed without bone grafting-A retrospective study in 31 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsinis, Vassilis; Kamperos, Georgios; Alexandridi, Foteini; Alexandridis, Konstantinos

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of glucocorticosteroids, administered for the treatment of systemic diseases, on the osseointegration and survival of dental implants placed without bone grafting. A retrospective study was conducted in search of patients treated with dental implants while receiving glucocorticosteroid therapy for various systemic diseases. In these cases, a conventional two-stage surgical protocol was used, without bone regeneration procedures. The osseointegration was clinically and radiographically tested at the uncovering of the implants. The follow-up after loading was set at a minimum of 3 years. A total of 31 patients were included in the study. Of the 105 dental implants placed, 104 were osseointegrated (99%). No bone absorption was radiographically noted at the uncovering of the osseointegrated implants. All of the osseointegrated implants were successfully loaded for the prosthetic restoration. The mean follow-up period after loading was 71 months, with an implant survival rate of 99%. Glucocorticosteroid intake for systemic diseases does not have a significant impact on the osseointegration and the 3-year survival of dental implants placed with a conventional two-stage surgical protocol and without bone grafting. Therefore, it should not be considered a contraindication for dental implant placement. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Immediately loaded mini dental implants as overdenture retainers: 1-Year cohort study of implant stability and peri-implant marginal bone level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šćepanović, Miodrag; Todorović, Aleksandar; Marković, Aleksa; Patrnogić, Vesna; Miličić, Biljana; Moufti, Adel M; Mišić, Tijana

    2015-05-01

    This 1-year cohort study investigated stability and peri-implant marginal bone level of immediately loaded mini dental implants used to retain overdentures. Each of 30 edentulous patients received 4 mini dental implants (1.8 mm × 13 mm) in the interforaminal mandibular region. The implants were immediately loaded with pre-made overdentures. Outcome measures included implant stability and bone resorption. Implant stability was measured using the Periotest Classic(®) device immediately after placement and on the 3rd and 6th weeks and the 4th, 6th and 12th months postoperatively. The peri-implant marginal bone level (PIBL) was evaluated at the implant's mesial and distal sides from the polished platform to the marginal crest. Radiographs were taken using a tailored film holder to reproducibly position the X-ray tube at the 6th week, 4th and 12th months postoperatively. The primary stability (Periotest value, PTV) measured -0.27 ± 3.41 on a scale of -8 to + 50 (lower PTV reflects higher stability). The secondary stability decreased significantly until week 6 (mean PTV = 7.61 ± 7.05) then increased significantly reaching (PTV = 6.17 ± 6.15) at 12 months. The mean PIBL measured -0.40 mm after 1 year of functional loading, with no statistically significant differences at the various follow-ups (p = 0.218). Mini dental implants placed into the interforaminal region could achieve a favorable primary stability for immediate loading. The follow-up Periotest values fluctuated, apparently reflecting the dynamics of bone remodeling, with the implants remaining clinically stable (98.3%) after 1 year of function. The 1-year bone resorption around immediately loaded MDIs is within the clinically acceptable range for standard implants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Insertion Torques of Self-Drilling Mini-Implants in Simulated Mandibular Bone: Assessment of Potential for Implant Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein, Yara K; Smith, Angie; Dunning, Cynthia E; Tassi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of orthodontic mini-implants during insertion is a limiting factor for their clinical success. The purpose of this study was to determine the fracture potential of commonly used self-drilling orthodontic mini-implants when placed into simulated thick, dense mandibular bone. Six mini-implant systems were assessed for the potential for fracture (Aarhus, Medicon; Dual-Top, Jeil Medical; OrthoEasy, Forestadent; tomas-pin, Dentaurum; Unitek, 3M; and VectorTAS, Ormco). First, mini-implants were inserted manually, without predrilling, into bone substitutes (Sawbones) with a 3-mm-thick, dense (1.64 g/cm(3)) cortical layer. A custom-made insertion device was used for placement of mini-implants. A sixaxis force/torque transducer was secured at the base of the bone blocks to measure the maximum torque experienced during insertion. Measured insertion torques were compared with previously reported fracture torques, yielding a torque ratio (insertion torque as a percentage of fracture torque), which was used as an indicator of the potential for mini-implant fracture. Mini-implants that experienced torque ratios ≥ 75% upon insertion underwent further testing, following the manufacturer's recommendations for predrilling in thick, dense bone conditions. Significant differences in torque ratios were found among all mini-implants, except between OrthoEasy and Dual-Top, and OrthoEasy and VectorTAS. Overall, Aarhus had the highest torque ratio (91% ± 3%), with Unitek showing the lowest ratio (37% ± 3%). Aarhus and tomas-pin mini-implants displayed torque ratios ≥ 75% and experienced fracture upon insertion. When the manufacturer's specific predrilling recommendations were followed, no changes in torque ratio were found for Aarhus and tomas-pin. However, while Aarhus continued to fracture upon insertion, all tomas-pin mini-implants were inserted fully without fracture following predrilling. These findings support the safe use of Unitek, VectorTAS, Dual-Top, and Ortho

  17. Bone Inflammation, Bone Infection and Dental Implants Failure: Histological and Cytological Aspects Related to Cement Excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatullo, Marco; Marrelli, Massimo; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Gherlone, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dental implant failure can recognize several causes and many of them are quite preventable with the right knowledge of some clinical critical factors. Aim of this paper is to investigate about the histological aspects related to dental implants failure in such cases related to cement excess, how such histological picture can increase the risk of bacterial infections and how the different type of cement can interact with osteoblasts in-vitro. Methods: We randomly selected 5 patients with a diagnosis of dental implant failure requiring to be surgically removed: in all patients was observed an excess of dental cement around the failed implants. Histological investigations were performed of the perimplant bone. Cell culture of purchased human Osteoblasts was performed in order to evaluate cell proliferation and cell morphology at 3 time points among 3 cement types and a control surface. Results: Dental cement has been related to a pathognomonic histological picture with a foreign body reaction and many areas with black particles inside macrophage cells. Finally, cell culture on different dental cements resulted in a lower osteoblasts survival rate. Conclusions: It is appropriate that the dentist puts a small amount of dental cement in the prosthetic crown, so to avoid the clinical alterations related to the excess of cement. PMID:28529868

  18. Deproteinized bovine bone mineral particles and osseointegration of implants without primary bone contact: an experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivolella, Stefano; Bressan, Eriberto; Salata, Luiz A; Quiñones, Maria E; Lang, Niklaus P; Botticelli, Daniele

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the influence on osseointegration of Deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) particles used to fill defects of at least 1 mm around implants having no primary contact with bone. Premolars and first molars were extracted bilaterally from the mandible of six Labrador dogs. After 3 months of healing, mucoperiosteal full-thickness flaps were elevated, and one recipient site was prepared in the molar region of each hemi-mandible to place implants. These were installed with a deliberate circumferential and periapical space to the bone walls of 1.2 mm. All implants were stabilized with passive fixation plates to maintain the implants in situ and without any contact with the implant bed. The control sites were left to be filled with coagulum, while at the test sites, the residual gap was filled with DBBM. After 3 months of submerged healing, the animals were sacrificed. Ground sections were prepared and analyzed histomorphometrically. Mineralized bone-to-implant contact was 4.0% and 3.9% for control and test sites, respectively. The width of the residual defects was 0.48 mm and 0.88 mm at the control and test sites, respectively. The percentage of implant surface covered by a layer of dense connective tissue of 0.12 mm of width on average was 84.9% and 88.5% at the control and test sites, respectively. A minor and not predictable degree of contact or distance osteogenesis was obtained on the implant surface when primary contact of the implant surface with the implant bed had deliberately been avoided. DBBM grafting of the artificial gap did not favor osseointegration. Neither did it enhance the ability to bridge the gap with newly formed bone in an artificial defect wider than 1 mm. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Bone-anchored hearing devices in children with unilateral conductive hearing loss: a patient-carer perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banga, Rupan; Doshi, Jayesh; Child, Anne; Pendleton, Elizabeth; Reid, Andrew; McDermott, Ann-Louise

    2013-09-01

    We sought to determine the outcome of implantation of a bone-anchored hearing device in children with unilateral conductive hearing loss. A retrospective case note analysis was used in a tertiary referral pediatric hospital to study 17 consecutive cases of pediatric patients with unilateral conductive hearing loss who were fitted with a bone-anchored hearing device between 2005 and 2010. The average age of the patients at the time of bone-anchored hearing device fitting was 10 years 6 months (range, 6 years 3 months to 16 years). Qualitative subjective outcome measures demonstrated benefit. The vast majority of patients reported improved social and physical functioning and improved quality of life. All 17 patients are currently using their bone-anchored hearing device on a daily basis after a follow-up of 6 months. This study has shown improved quality of life in children with unilateral hearing loss after implantation of their bone-anchored hearing device. There was a high degree of patient satisfaction and improvement in health status reported by children and/or carers. Bone-anchored hearing devices have an important role in the management of children with symptomatic unilateral hearing loss. Perhaps earlier consideration of a bone-anchored hearing device would be appropriate in selected cases.

  20. The influence of crown-to-implant ratio on marginal bone levels around splinted short dental implants: A radiological and clincial short term analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingsammer, Lukas; Watzek, Georg; Pommer, Bernhard

    2017-12-01

    The amount of marginal bone resorption around dental implants is considered to have a significant impact on implant stability as well as implant survival rates. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the influence of prosthetic as well as patient specific factors on marginal bone loss around short dental implants. Seventy-six implants, which supported splinted crowns were included for investigation. All implants were from the same type and had an intraosseous length of 6.5 mm and a diameter of 4.0 mm. Twenty implants were additionally splinted onto longer ones. Measurements of marginal bone loss were performed at a mean of 12.38 months after prosthetic loading and the mean follow-up for clinical evaluation was 20.52 months. Overall two implant failures were recorded, revealing a survival rate of 97.3%. Marginal bone resorption around 72 short implants measured 0.71 mm (SD: 0.74 mm) and was found to have a strong correlation with calculated Crown-to-Implant ratio (r = .71; P implant surface area, location, position, bone quality, and insertion torque did not influence peri-implant bone loss after one year of loading. Within the limitations of the study, it is suggested that Crown-to-Implant ratios should not exceed 1.7 to avoid increased early marginal bone loss. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effects of different loading protocols on the secondary stability and peri-implant bone density of the single implants in the posterior maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoğlan, Mücahide; Tatli, Ufuk; Kurtoğlu, Cem; Salimov, Fariz; Kürkçü, Mehmet

    2017-08-01

    Immediate or early loading of dental implants becomes a clinically feasible concept. The aim was to evaluate the effects of different loading protocols (immediate, early, and delayed) on secondary stability and peri-implant bone density of single implants in the posterior maxilla. Thirty-nine implants (Dentium, South-Korea) were placed in 39 patients. After placement, implant stability values (ISQ) and baseline peri-implant bone density values derived from cone-beam computed tomography were recorded. Thirteen implants were included randomly in each loading groups. The secondary ISQ values were recorded during follow-up visits. Peri-implant bone density values were measured 1 year after placement again. Data was statistically analyzed. Immediate-loaded group showed the lowest ISQ values, 1 month after placement. During the next follow-up visits, delayed-loaded group showed the lowest ISQ values while other groups showed comparable results. Early loading increased the peri-implant bone density greater than the other groups. The peri-implant bone of early-loaded implants was significantly denser than that of immediate- and delayed-loaded implants, 1 year after placement. Density increment can be judged as the radiological findings of loaded-bone, which may also reduce the need for histomorphometric analysis of human biopsy to evaluate the bone reaction around the implants. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Periosteal augmentation of allograft bone and its effect on implant fixation - an experimental study on 12 dogs()

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barckman, Jeppe; Baas, Jorgen; Sørensen, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Periosteum provides essential cellular and biological components necessary for fracture healing and bone repair. We hypothesized that augmenting allograft bone by adding fragmented autologous periosteum would improve fixation of grafted implants.......Periosteum provides essential cellular and biological components necessary for fracture healing and bone repair. We hypothesized that augmenting allograft bone by adding fragmented autologous periosteum would improve fixation of grafted implants....

  3. Chronological Age as Factor Influencing the Dental Implant Osseointegration in the Jaw Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Papež

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate osseointegration of dental implant in the jaw bone in the young and elderly population and comparing the results to assess indicators and risk factors as age for the success or failure of dental implants. A retrospective study of 107 implants (Impladent, LASAK, Czech Republic was prepared. The patients at implants surgery were divided in three groups. The patients were followed-up for a 7-year period. We evaluated osseointegration from long term point of view as a change of marginal bone levels close to dental implant. Marginal bone levels were recorded and analysed with regard to different patient- and implant-related factors. An influence of chronological age on change of marginal bone levels during 6-year retrospective study vas evaluated. The study examined 47 patient charts and 107 implants from the Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and University Hospital Motol. We proved that young healthy patients with long bridges or Branemarks have the same progression of marginal bone levels changes. The chronological age hasn’t therefore direct influence on the osseointegration from long term point of view. But we found that the length of dental suprastrucure-prosthetic construction negatively influences marginal bone changes, though these results weren’t statistically significant. More extensive dental implant suprastrucure undergoes smaller osseointegration. On the other hand the length of dental suprastrucure (prosthetic construction negatively influences dental osseointegration in both groups of patient.

  4. Maintenance of bone mineral density after implantation of a femoral neck hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decking, Ralf; Rokahr, Christoph; Zurstegge, Matthias; Simon, Ulrich; Decking, Jens

    2008-01-31

    Stress shielding of the proximal femur has been observed in a number of conventional cementless implants used in total hip arthroplasty. Short femoral-neck implants are claiming less interference with the biomechanics of the proximal femur. The goal of this study was to investigate the changes of bone-mineral density in the proximal femur and the clinical outcome after implantation of a short femoral-neck prosthesis. We prospectively assessed the clinical outcome and the changes of bone mineral density of the proximal femur up to one year after implantation of a short femoral neck prosthesis in 20 patients with a mean age of 47 years (range 17 to 65). Clinical outcome was assessed using the Harris Hip Score. The WOMAC was used as a patient-relevant outcome-measure. The bone mineral density was determined using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, performed 10 days, three months and 12 months after surgery. The Harris Hip Score improved from an average preoperative score of 46 to a postoperative score at 12 months of 89 points, the global WOMAC index from 5,3 preoperatively to 0,8 at 12 months postoperatively. In contrast to conventional implants, the DEXA-scans overall revealed a slight increase of bone mineral density in the proximal femur in the 12 months following the implantation. The short femoral neck stem lead to a distinct bone reaction. This was significantly different when compared to the changes in bone mineral density reported after implantation of conventional implants.

  5. Insertion torque and orthodontic mini-implants: a systematic review of the artificial bone literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meursinge Reynders, Reint; Ronchi, Laura; Ladu, Luisa; Van Etten-Jamaludin, Faridi; Bipat, Shandra

    2013-11-01

    This article systematically reviewed the literature to (1) identify variables that were associated with maximum insertion torque values during the insertion of orthodontic mini-implants into artificial bone, (2) quantify such associations and (3) assess adverse effects of this procedure. Computerized and manual searches were conducted up to 24 February 2012. Selection criteria included studies that (1) recorded maximum insertion torque during the insertion of orthodontic mini-implants into artificial bone, (2) used sample sizes of five screws or more, (3) assessed maximum insertion torque with electronic torque sensors, and (4) used orthodontic mini-implants with a diameter smaller than 2.5 mm. ASTM Standards F543-07(ε1) and F1839-08(ε1) and the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews were used as guidelines for this systematic review. Quality assessments were rated according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. A total of 23 studies were selected, many of which were multiple publications of the same study. Many domains in the risk of bias assessments were scored as "high" or "unclear" risk of bias. A wide variety of implant, test block, and insertion procedure-related associations with maximum insertion torque were recorded. The quality of most outcomes was classified as "moderate." Outcomes could not be combined in a meta-analysis because of high risk of bias, poor standardization, high heterogeneity, or inconsistency in direction of outcomes within or between studies. Adverse effects were only assessed in one study. Future studies should control publication bias, consult existing standards for conducting torque tests, and focus on transparent reporting.

  6. Buccal bone loss after immediate implantation can be reduced by the flapless approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTHUR BELÉM NOVAES JR

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the buccal bone remodeling after immediate implantation with flap or flapless approach. Material and Methods: The mandibular bilateral premolars of 3 dogs were extracted and immediately three implants were placed in both hemi-arches of each dog. Randomly, one hemi-arch was treated with the flapless approach, while in the contra lateral hemi-arch tooth extractions and implant placement were done after mucoperiosteal flap elevation. Non-submerged healing of 12 weeks was provided for both groups. Histomorphometric analysis was done to compare buccal and lingual bone height loss, bone density and bone-to-implant contact in the groups. Fluorescence analysis was performed to investigate the dynamic of bone remodeling in the different groups. Results: There was a significant association between the surgical flap and the extent of bone resorption around immediate implants. The loss of buccal bone height was significantly lower in the flapless group when compared to the flap group (0.98 mm x 2.14 mm, respectively, p<0.05. The coronal and apical buccal bone densities of the flap group were significantly higher when compared to the lingual components, showing anatomical differences between the bone plates. Fluorescence analysis showed no major differences in bone healing between the flap and flapless groups, supporting that the higher loss of buccal bone height is linked to the anatomic characteristics of this plate and to the negative influence of the detachment of the periosteum in immediate implant therapy. Conclusion: The flapless approach for immediate post-extraction implants reduces the buccal bone height loss.

  7. Comparison of conventional and synchrotron-radiation-based microtomography of bone around dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Paolo M.; Dalstra, Michel; Beckmann, Felix; Donath, Tilman; Melsen, Birte

    2004-10-01

    This study explores the application of conventional micro tomography (μCT) and synchrotron radiation (SR) based μCT to evaluate the bone around titanium dental implants. The SR experiment was performed at beamline W2 of HASYLAB at DESY using a monochromatic X-ray beam of 50 keV. The testing material consisted of undecalcified bone segments harvested from the upper jaw of a macaca fascicularis monkey each containing a titanium dental implant. The results from the two different techniques were qualitatively compared with conventional histological sections examined under light microscopy. The SR-based μCT produced images that, especially at the bone-implant interface, are less noisy and sharper than the ones obtained with conventional μCT. For the proper evaluation of the implant-bone interface, only the SR-based μCT technique is able to display the areas of bony contact and visualize the true 3D structure of bone around dental implants correctly. This investigation shows that both conventional and SR-based μCT scanning techniques are non-destructive methods, which provide detailed images of bone. However with SR-based μCT it is possible to obtain an improved image quality of the bone surrounding dental implants, which display a level of detail comparable to histological sections. Therefore, SR-based μCT scanning could represent a valid, unbiased three-dimensional alternative to evaluate osseointegration of dental implants

  8. Intermediate outcomes of a transcutaneous bone conduction hearing device in a paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Panagiotis A; Carrick, Suzanne; Ray, Jaydip

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to review the outcomes of Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA ® ) Attract implantation in a cohort of paediatric patients. Prospective data collection and case review were undertaken in a paediatric tertiary referral centre. We have included patients under the age of 16 years with unilateral or bilateral hearing loss that met the criteria for BAHA ® Attract implantation. The main outcome measures were surgical complications and Patient Reported Outcomes including the 'Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing scale' (SSQ-12) and 'Qualitative Feedback for BAHA ® 5 Hearing Aids'. Twenty-five paediatric patients were implanted with the BAHA ® Attract between June 2014 and July 2016. Nine of them had a conversion from a percutaneous Bone Conduction Hearing Device (BCHD). Four children had minor skin problems that settled with conservative measures. Two children with a previous percutaneous BCHD developed skin dehiscence over the magnet after conversion to the transcutaneous version. The SSQ-12 was completed by 6 children and an improvement of 22% was noted between the unaided and aided condition. The patients and their parents were generally satisfied with the BAHA ® Attract. The BAHA ® Attract offers a good solution for hearing rehabilitation in appropriately selected and counseled patients. The complication rate was low for primary surgery but higher in cases of conversion from a percutaneous device. Large, prospective data is needed to evaluate the relative risks and benefits of this BCHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Stress and strain analysis of the bone-implant interface: a comparison of fiber-reinforced composite and titanium implants utilizing 3-dimensional finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinya, Akikazu; Ballo, Ahmed M; Lassila, Lippo V J; Shinya, Akiyoshi; Närhi, Timo O; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-03-01

    This study analyzed stress and strain mediated by 2 different implant materials, titanium (Ti) and experimental fiber-reinforced composite (FRC), on the implant and on the bone tissue surrounding the implant. Three-dimensional finite element models constructed from a mandibular bone and an implant were subjected to a load of 50 N in vertical and horizontal directions. Postprocessing files allowed the calculation of stress and strain within the implant materials and stresses at the bone-to-implant interface (stress path). Maximum stress concentrations were located around the implant on the rim of the cortical bone in both implant materials; Ti and overall stresses decreased toward the Ti implant apex. In the FRC implant, a stress value of 0.6 to 2.0 MPa was detected not only on the screw threads but also on the implant surface between the threads. Clear differences were observed in the strain distribution between the materials. Based on the results, the vertical load stress range of the FRC implant was close to the stress level for optimal bone growth. Furthermore, the stress at the bone around the FRC implant was more evenly distributed than that with Ti implant.

  10. 2D FEA of evaluation of micromovements and stresses at bone-implant interface in immediately loaded tapered implants in the posterior maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikar R Desai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the influence implant length on stress distribution at bone implant interface in single immediately loaded implants when placed in D4 bone quality. Materials and Methods: A 2-dimensional finite element models were developed to simulate two types of implant designs, standard 3.75 mm-diameter tapered body implants of 6 and 10 mm lengths. The implants were placed in D4 bone quality with a cortical bone thickness of 0.5 mm. The implant design incorporated microthreads at the crestal part and the rest of the implant body incorporated Acme threads. The Acme thread form has a 29° thread angle with a thread height half of the pitch; the apex and valley are flat. A 100 N of force was applied vertically and in the oblique direction (at an angle of 45° to the long axis of the implants. The respective material properties were assigned. Micro-movements and stresses at the bone implant interface were evaluated. Results: The results of total deformation (micro-movement and Von mises stress were found to be lower for tapered long implant (10 mm than short implant (6 mm while using both vertical as well as oblique loading. Conclusion: Short implants can be successfully placed in poor bone quality under immediate loading protocol. The novel approach of the combination of microthreads at the crestal portion and acme threads for body portion of implant fixture gave promising results.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Stress and Strain Distribution in the Bone around the Implants used for Orthodontic Anchorage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Vijayalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomechanical influences on bone structure play an important role in the longevity of bone around an implant. The quantity and direction of applied force influence the implant and cause deformation of the bone. FEA was used to analyze the changes in the bone on loading the implant with orthodontic force in oblique and vertical directions and orthopedic force. The Mini-implants used in the present study efficiently resisted the oblique loading. But their use, for the purpose of orthopedic loading is questionable. FE models showed the area with the highest stress and strain to be around the neck of the implant and the surrounding bone at the cervical margin.

  12. Relationship Between Osteoporosis and Marginal Bone Loss in Osseointegrated Implants: A 2-Year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcuera-Flores, José R; Alonso-Domínguez, Ana M; Serrera-Figallo, M Ángeles; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Machuca-Portillo, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Fitting implants in osteoporotic patients has traditionally been controversial, and there is little scientific evidence relating osteoporosis to marginal bone loss (MBL). The aims of this study are as follows: 1) to evaluate the possibility of a correlation between osteoporosis, as measured by the mandibular cortical index (MCI), and MBL and 2) to assess how various systemic diseases, periodontitis, and placement of implants in regenerated bone are correlated with MBL and MCI. This retrospective study examines 212 implants inserted in 67 patients. To take a possible cluster failure into account, an implant for each patient was selected (n = 67 implants). MBL was assessed. Osteoporosis was evaluated using the MCI. Both MBL and MCI were assessed from panoramic radiographs. χ(2) test was performed (Haberman post hoc test). Significance was P implant (N = 212) was evaluated, a significant association was found between the presence of osteoporosis and MCI (P implants in regenerated sites (P periodontitis (P implants (one per patient, n = 67), significant differences appear to relate only to the MBL with the placement of implants in regenerated bone sites (P periodontitis and especially the placement of implants at sites of bone regeneration.

  13. Methods to Improve Osseointegration of Dental Implants in Low Quality (Type-IV Bone: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdan S. Alghamdi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, dental implants have become more common treatment for replacing missing teeth and aim to improve chewing efficiency, physical health, and esthetics. The favorable clinical performance of dental implants has been attributed to their firm osseointegration, as introduced by Brånemark in 1965. Although the survival rate of dental implants over a 10-year observation has been reported to be higher than 90% in totally edentulous jaws, the clinical outcome of implant treatment is challenged in compromised (bone conditions, as are frequently present in elderly people. The biomechanical characteristics of bone in aged patients do not offer proper stability to implants, being similar to type-IV bone (Lekholm & Zarb classification, in which a decreased clinical fixation of implants has been clearly demonstrated. However, the search for improved osseointegration has continued forward for the new evolution of modern dental implants. This represents a continuum of developments spanning more than 20 years of research on implant related-factors including surgical techniques, implant design, and surface properties. The methods to enhance osseointegration of dental implants in low quality (type-IV bone are described in a general manner in this review.

  14. Methods to Improve Osseointegration of Dental Implants in Low Quality (Type-IV) Bone: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Hamdan S

    2018-01-13

    Nowadays, dental implants have become more common treatment for replacing missing teeth and aim to improve chewing efficiency, physical health, and esthetics. The favorable clinical performance of dental implants has been attributed to their firm osseointegration, as introduced by Brånemark in 1965. Although the survival rate of dental implants over a 10-year observation has been reported to be higher than 90% in totally edentulous jaws, the clinical outcome of implant treatment is challenged in compromised (bone) conditions, as are frequently present in elderly people. The biomechanical characteristics of bone in aged patients do not offer proper stability to implants, being similar to type-IV bone (Lekholm & Zarb classification), in which a decreased clinical fixation of implants has been clearly demonstrated. However, the search for improved osseointegration has continued forward for the new evolution of modern dental implants. This represents a continuum of developments spanning more than 20 years of research on implant related-factors including surgical techniques, implant design, and surface properties. The methods to enhance osseointegration of dental implants in low quality (type-IV) bone are described in a general manner in this review.

  15. Dental Implant Thread Design and the Consequences on Long-Term Marginal Bone Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormianer, Zeev; Matalon, Shlomo; Block, Jonathan; Kohen, Jerry

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to present the implant macrostructure effect on marginal bone loss using 3 dental implant thread designs with differences in thread pitch, lead, and helix angle. All implants used were sourced from the same company and had the same microstructured surface. This is a nonrandomized, retrospective, double-blind study. Data were collected by an independent Tel Aviv University group from a general practitioner's private practice patient records. In total, 1361 implants met the inclusion criteria representing the 3 types of implants macrostructure. Overall survival rate was 96.3% with 50 implants failing (3.7%) out of a total of 1361 implants. Survival rates for the 3 groups were: group A 96.6%, group B 95.9%, and in group C 100%. Average bone loss for groups A, B, and C were 2.02 (±1.70) mm, 2.10 (±1.73) mm, and 1.90 (±1.40) mm, respectively. Pairwise comparisons revealed that less bone loss occurred in group A compared with group B (P = 0.036). Favorable long-term bone loss results were found in implants with a larger pitch, deeper apical threads, and a narrower implant core. One-piece V-thread design implants demonstrated 100% survival rate.

  16. Increased bone quantity around an ailing implant in esthetic zone using progressive bone loading: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoura Ghodsi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Progressive loading protocol is a high-demanding procedure suggested to increase the quality of bone when the implant is inserted in D3 or D4-typed bone. The purpose of this study was to present a case report regarding simultaneously progressive and immediately loading implants in the anterior position of the maxilla. Case report: One patient whose implants in the anterior maxilla (in site of teeth #7, #9, #11 had questionable to poor prognosis who was treated immediate and delayed progressive loading protocol and was followed up for 2 years. Discussion: Although the number of studies in this field is limited, it can be concluded that the progressive loading protocol can predictably enhance the treatment success in immediate-loaded implants with poor prognosis and when inserted in low quality bone such as the present case.

  17. Bone level changes in dental implants with platform-switched design after immediate and delayed placement in the maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Friedhelm; Biffar, Reiner; Schwahn, Christian; Mundt, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate platform-switched implants for immediate placement. A total of 136 implants were placed in 58 patients using either an immediate or delayed implant protocol. Bone level changes of the implants were measured mesially and distally and statistically analyzed with linear mixed models. No implant was lost. There was no significant difference between immediate and delayed implants in approximal bone level changes during the first year (95% confidence interval: -0.10 to -0.01 for immediate versus -0.14 to -0.07 for delayed implants). Subsequent bone resorption was negligible in both groups.

  18. The role of bone conduction hearing aids in congenital unilateral hearing loss: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C Carrie; Livingstone, Devon; Yunker, Warren K

    2017-03-01

    To systematically review the literature on the audiological and/or quality of life benefits of a bone conduction hearing aid (BCHA) in children with congenital unilateral conductive or sensorineural deafness. A systematic search was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines using the PubMed, Medline, and Embase databases. Data were collected on the following outcomes of interest: speech reception threshold, speech discrimination, sound localization, and quality of life measures. Given the heterogeneity of the data for quantitative analysis, the results are qualitatively summarized. Eight studies were included in the review. Four studies examined the audiological outcomes associated with bone conduction hearing aid implantation. There was a consistent gain in speech reception thresholds and speech discrimination, especially in noisy environments. Results pertaining to sound localization was inconsistent. The studies that examined quality of life measures reported a high usage rate of BCHAs among children. Quality of life improvements are reported with suggested benefit in the subdomain of learning. Given the potential benefits of a BCHA, along with the fact that it can be safely trialed using a headband, it is reasonable to trial a BCHA in children with congenital unilateral deafness. Should the trial offer audiological and/or quality of life benefits for the individual child, then BCHA implantation can be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A finite element analysis of two different dental implants: stress distribution in the prosthesis, abutment, implant, and supporting bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaresma, Sergio E T; Cury, Patricia R; Sendyk, Wilson R; Sendyk, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluates the influence of 2 commercially available dental implant systems on stress distribution in the prosthesis, abutment, implant, and supporting alveolar bone under simulated occlusal forces, employing a finite element analysis. The implants and abutments evaluated consisted of a stepped cylinder implant connected to a screw-retained, internal, hexagonal abutment (system 1) and a conical implant connected to a solid, internal, conical abutment (system 2). A porcelain-covered, silver-palladium alloy was used as a crown. In each case, a simulated, 100-N vertical load was applied to the buccal cusp. A finite element model was created based on the physical properties of each component, and the values of the von Mises stresses generated in the prosthesis, abutment, implant, and supporting alveolar bone were calculated. In the prostheses, the maximum von Mises stresses were concentrated at the points of load application in both systems, and they were greater in system 1 (148 N/mm2) than in system 2 (55 N/mm2). Stress was greater on the abutment of system 2 than of system 1 on both the buccal (342 N/mm2 x 294 N/mm2) and lingual (294 N/mm2 x 148 N/ mm2) faces. Stress in the cortical, alveolar bone crest was greater in system 1 than in system 2 (buccal: 99.5 N/mm2 x 55 N/mm2, lingual: 55 N/mm2 x 24.5 N/mm2, respectively). Within the limits of this investigation, the stepped cylinder implant connected to a screw-retained, internal hexagonal abutment produces greater stresses on the alveolar bone and prosthesis and lower stresses on the abutment complex. In contrast, the conical implant connected to a solid, internal, conical abutment furnishes lower stresses on the alveolar bone and prosthesis and greater stresses on the abutment.

  20. Prevalence of Dental Implants and Evaluation of Peri-implant Bone Levels in Patients Presenting to a Dental School: A Radiographic Cross-Sectional 2-Year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Eylem Ayhan; Mau, Lian Ping; Schoolfield, John; Guest, Gary F; Cochran, David L

    To evaluate the number of patients with dental implants who present to a dental school clinic for screening and to report the prevalence of peri-implant bone level change detected on digital panoramic radiographs of those subjects. Patient screening files for 9,422 patients over a 2-year period were examined to see how many patients presented with dental implants. Those patients with at least one implant were further evaluated by measuring the bone level on the mesial and distal sides of the implant using the screening radiograph. A total of 187 patients (2%) had at least one implant. In regard to implants, 423 were examined and 146 (33%) had no detectable bone loss defined as bone level below the top of the implant. When thresholds of bone loss were evaluated, 109 implants (25%) had ≥ 2 mm of bone loss on either the mesial or distal sides or both. The median bone loss was 1.74 mm for the 277 implants with detectable bone loss and 2.97 mm for the 109 implants that had ≥ 2 mm bone loss. Interestingly, patients who were ≥ 70 years of age had significantly (P = .03) more bone loss in the mandible compared with the maxilla, while patients who were 60 to 69 years of age had significantly greater loss in the maxilla. These data reveal that for patients presenting to the dental school for a screening over a 2-year period, 1.98% had one or more dental implants. Furthermore, those patients with implants had a minimum amount of bone loss as measured from the top of the implant.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Marginal Bone Level Changes in Delayed and Early Implant Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshhal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of modern dentistry is to restore the patient’s health with predictable techniques. Implant-supported prostheses can be used to restore the patient’s function, comfort, esthetic, speech, oral health and the integrity of tooth with adjacent hard and soft tissues to some extent. Intraosseous implants can be placed using three different techniques, including the immediate, the early and delayed technique. Due to the longer healing period and formation of bone in the delayed technique, it is hypothesized that the marginal bone around the implants will undergo less resorption compared to the early technique. Objectives The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the changes in the levels of marginal bone around implants placed using early and delayed implant placement techniques. Patients and Methods In the present retrospective cohort study, 38 implants from the BEGO system were used. These implants were placed in 17 patients in 2 different groups. In group 1, 20 implants were placed early (1 - 2 months after extraction, and in group 2, 18 implants were placed with a delay of more than 4 months after tooth extraction. The marginal bone level was measured on periapical radiographs taken using the parallel technique at three different intervals: at implant placement time, and 6 and 12 months after implant placement. The measurements were made using a digital caliper with an accuracy of 0.01 mm, and the data were analyzed using a repeated-measures ANOVA in association with Mauchly’s sphericity test. The statistical significance was set a P 0.05. Conclusions The amount of crestal bone loss around the implants placed early was greater than that around the implants placed with a delay; however, the differences were not significant.

  2. Effects of bone-conducted music on swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Angela R; Gennings, Chris; Hoffman, Regina A; Strittmatter, Andrew P; Retchin, Sheldon M

    2012-04-01

    Music has been shown to be a useful adjunct for many forms of exercise and has been observed to improve athletic performance in some settings. Nonetheless, because of the limited availability of practical applications of sound conduction in water, there are few studies of the effects of music on swimming athletes. The SwiMP3 is a novel device that uses bone conduction as a method to circumvent the obstacles to transmitting high fidelity sound in an aquatic environment. Thus, we studied the influence of music on swimming performance and enjoyment using the SwiMP3. Twenty-four competitive swimmers participated in a randomized crossover design study in which they completed timed swimming trials with and without the use of music delivered via bone conduction with the SwiMP3. Each participant swam four 50-m trials and one 800-m trial and then completed a physical enjoyment survey. Statistically significant improvements in swimming performance times were found in both the 50-m (0.32 seconds; p = 0.013) and 800-m (6.5 seconds; p = 0.031) trials with music using the SwiMP3. There was no significant improvement in physical enjoyment with the device as measured by a validated assessment tool. Bone-conducted music appears to have a salutary influence on swimming performance in a practice environment among competitive adult swimmers.

  3. New Osseodensification Implant Site Preparation Method to Increase Bone Density in Low-Density Bone: In Vivo Evaluation in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisi, Paolo; Falco, Antonello; Podaliri Vulpiani, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate a new surgical technique for implant site preparation that could allow to enhance bone density, ridge width, and implant secondary stability. Materials and Methods: The edges of the iliac crests of 2 sheep were exposed and ten 3.8 × 10-mm Dynamix implants (Cortex) were inserted in the left sides using the conventional drilling method (control group). Ten 5 × 10-mm Dynamix implants (Cortex) were inserted in the right sides (test group) using the osseodensification procedure (Versah). After 2 months of healing, the sheep were killed, and biomechanical and histological examinations were performed. Results: No implant failures were observed after 2 months of healing. A significant increase of ridge width and bone volume percentage (%BV) (approximately 30% higher) was detected in the test group. Significantly better removal torque values and micromotion under lateral forces (value of actual micromotion) were recorded for the test group in respect with the control group. Conclusion: Osseodensification technique used in the present in vivo study was demonstrated to be able to increase the %BV around dental implants inserted in low-density bone in respect to conventional implant drilling techniques, which may play a role in enhancing implant stability and reduce micromotion. PMID:26584202

  4. Alveolar bone density and its clinical implication in the placement of dental implants and orthodontic mini-implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasoud, Naif N; Tanneru, Nagaraju; Marei, Hesham F

    2016-06-01

    To assess the bone density in maxilla and mandible in dentate and edentulous patients in Saudi population. This study involved a retrospective analysis of cone beam CT images of 100 patients (50 male and 50 female) who have come to College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2014 and 2015. Using the bone density option in the Simplant software, the Hounsfield unit (HU) was calculated at the edentulous sites. While for dentate sites, a region of interest was selected coronally at 3-5 mm to the root apex using I-CAT vision software. The densities of the buccal bone and cancellous bone were measured at interradicular areas of a specific teeth.  The highest bone density at the edentulous sites was at the mandibular anterior region (776.5 ± 65.7 HU), followed by the mandibular posterior region (502.2 ± 224.2 HU). Regarding the dentate sites, the highest bone density was at the buccal cortical plate of the lower incisor teeth (937.56 ± 176.92 HU) and the lowest bone density was at the cancellous bone around the posterior maxillary teeth (247.12 ± 46.75 HU).  The alveolar bone density at dentate and edentulous sites in our population is generally lower than the norm reference density of other populations, which dictates the need for quantitative assessment of bone density before implants and mini-implants placement.

  5. Friction coefficient and effective interference at the implant-bone interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, Niklas B; Morlock, Michael M; Bishop, Nicholas E

    2015-09-18

    Although the contact pressure increases during implantation of a wedge-shaped implant, friction coefficients tend to be measured under constant contact pressure, as endorsed in standard procedures. Abrasion and plastic deformation of the bone during implantation are rarely reported, although they define the effective interference, by reducing the nominal interference between implant and bone cavity. In this study radial forces were analysed during simulated implantation and explantation of angled porous and polished implant surfaces against trabecular bone specimens, to determine the corresponding friction coefficients. Permanent deformation was also analysed to determine the effective interference after implantation. For the most porous surface tested, the friction coefficient initially increased with increasing normal contact stress during implantation and then decreased at higher contact stresses. For a less porous surface, the friction coefficient increased continually with normal contact stress during implantation but did not reach the peak magnitude measured for the rougher surface. Friction coefficients for the polished surface were independent of normal contact stress and much lower than for the porous surfaces. Friction coefficients were slightly lower for pull-out than for push-in for the porous surfaces but not for the polished surface. The effective interference was as little as 30% of the nominal interference for the porous surfaces. The determined variation in friction coefficient with radial contact force, as well as the loss of interference during implantation will enable a more accurate representation of implant press-fitting for simulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of implant drilling parameters for pilot and twist drills on temperature rise in bone analog and alveolar bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Chuan; Hsiao, Chih-Kun; Ciou, Ji-Sih; Tsai, Yi-Jung; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2016-11-01

    This study concerns the effects of different drilling parameters of pilot drills and twist drills on the temperature rise of alveolar bones during dental implant procedures. The drilling parameters studied here include the feed rate and rotation speed of the drill. The bone temperature distribution was analyzed through experiments and numerical simulations of the drilling process. In this study, a three dimensional (3D) elasto-plastic dynamic finite element model (DFEM) was proposed to investigate the effects of drilling parameters on the bone temperature rise. In addition, the FE model is validated with drilling experiments on artificial human bones and porcine alveolar bones. The results indicate that 3D DFEM can effectively simulate the bone temperature rise during the drilling process. During the drilling process with pilot drills or twist drills, the maximum bone temperature occurred in the region of the cancellous bones close to the cortical bones. The feed rate was one of the important factors affecting the time when the maximum bone temperature occurred. Our results also demonstrate that the elevation of bone temperature was reduced as the feed rate increased and the drill speed decreased, which also effectively reduced the risk region of osteonecrosis. These findings can serve as a reference for dentists in choosing drilling parameters for dental implant surgeries. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of the etonogestrel contraceptive implant (Implanon®) on bone metabolism during lactation: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltemir Duvan, Candan; Onaran, Yuksel; Aktepe Keskin, Esra; Yüce, Ebru; Yanık, Burcu; Kafali, Hasan; Ozturk Turhan, Nilgun

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of the etonogestrel contraceptive implant (Implanon ® ) on bone metabolism in lactating women using markers for bone formation and resorption. This single-centre, prospective cohort study was conducted in Turgut Ozal University Medical Faculty Obstetrics and Gynecology Department with healthy lactating women aged between 24 and 38 years to compare the effect on bone metabolism of 6 months' use of either the implant or a non-hormonal contraceptive method. The study group ( n =25) used an implant and the control group ( n =25) used a non-hormonal contraceptive intrauterine device inserted 40 days' postpartum. Bone metabolism differences at the time of insertion and after 6 months were assessed quantitatively by biochemical analysis of serum and urine samples. At baseline, serum levels of bone metabolism parameters were similar for the two groups. In the implant group, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels decreased ( p =0.004) and total protein levels increased ( p =0.045) at 6 months. In the control group, serum levels of bone metabolism parameters did not change at 6 months compared to baseline. However, serum levels of phosphorus ( p =0.013) and ALP ( p =0.003) decreased at 6 months compared to baseline. Six months' postpartum use of Implanon was found to have no deleterious impact on bone turnover in healthy lactating women. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Influence of Behavior on Complications of Osseointegrated Bone Conduction Devices in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, Michael E; Cox, Matthew D; Nelson, Kurt L; Richter, Gresham T; Dornhoffer, John L

    2017-04-01

    Compare incidences of complications following implantation of osseointegrated bone conduction devices (OBCD) between children with and without behavioral disorders. Case series with chart review. Tertiary referral center otology and neurotology practice. Pediatric patients who underwent implantation of OBCD between May 2009 and July 2014 at Arkansas Children's Hospital. Implantation with Cochlear BAHA 200 series, Cochlear BAHA BI300, or Oticon OBCD. Osseointegration failure (OIF) with resulting loss of flange-fixture and/or skin and soft tissue reactions. The total rate of complications was 66.2%, with the majority being minor complications (39.4%). There was no difference in the total rate of complication (p = 0.461), minor complications (p = 0.443), major complications (p = 0.777), and minor and major complications (p = 0.762) between the control group and children with behavioral disorders. Behavior was not observed to influence the incidence of OIF or skin/soft tissue reactions after implantation of OBCD in pediatric patients.

  9. Autogenous bone graft and ePTFE membrane in the treatment of peri-implantitis. II. Stereologic and histologic observations in cynomolgus monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Søren; Holmstrup, Palle; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2003-01-01

    autogenous bone graft; guided bone regeneration; histology; membrane; non-human primates; oral implants; osseointegration; pathalogy; peri-implantitis; stereology; treatment......autogenous bone graft; guided bone regeneration; histology; membrane; non-human primates; oral implants; osseointegration; pathalogy; peri-implantitis; stereology; treatment...

  10. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahini A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aref Shahini,1 Mostafa Yazdimamaghani,2 Kenneth J Walker,2 Margaret A Eastman,3 Hamed Hatami-Marbini,4 Brenda J Smith,5 John L Ricci,6 Sundar V Madihally,2 Daryoosh Vashaee,1 Lobat Tayebi2,7 1School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, 2School of Chemical Engineering, 3Department of Chemistry, 4School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA; 6Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, New York, NY; 7School of Material Science and Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK, USA Abstract: Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene poly(4-styrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS, in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent

  11. Stability of dental implants in grafted bone in the anterior maxilla: longitudinal study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Al-Khaldi, Nasser

    2010-06-06

    We aimed to assess the stability over time of dental implants placed in grafted bone in the maxilla using resonance frequency analysis, and to compare the stability of implants placed in grafted and non-grafted bone. Data were collected from 23 patients (15 test and 8 controls) in whom 64 implants (Brånemark system, Nobel Biocare, Göteborg, Sweden) were placed in accordance with the two-stage surgical protocol. In the test group 36 fixtures were placed in grafted bone, and in the control group 28 fixtures were placed in non-grafted bone. Resonance frequency analysis was used to assess the test sites at implant placement and abutment connection. The mean (SD) implant stability quotient (ISQ) for test sites at the time of implant placement was 61.91 (6.68), indicating excellent primary stability, and was 63.53 (5.76) at abutment connection. ISQ values at abutment connection were similar for test and control sites. Implants placed in grafted bone compared favourably with those in non-grafted bone, and showed excellent stability.

  12. The Influence of Partial Knee Replacement Designs on Tensile Strain at Implant-Bone Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial knee replacement (PKR results in fast recovery and good knee mechanics and is ideal to treat medial knee osteoarthritis. Cementless PKR depends on bone growing into the implant surface for long-term fixation. Implant loosening may occur due to high tensile strain resulted from large mechanical loads during rehab exercises. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether external fixations such as superior screw and frontal flange could reduce the tensile strain at the implant-bone interface. Three medial PKRs were designed. The first PKR had no external fixations. A superior screw and a frontal flange were then added to the first PKR to form the second and third PKR designs, respectively. Finite element analysis was performed to examine the tensile strain at the implant-bone interface during weight-bearing exercises. The PKR with no external fixations exhibited high tensile strain at the anterior implant-bone interface. Both the screwed and flanged PKRs effectively reduced the tensile strain at the anterior implant-bone interface. Furthermore, the flanged PKR resulted in a more uniform reduction of the tensile strain than the screwed PKR. In conclusion, external fixations are necessary to alleviate tensile strain at the implant-bone interface during knee rehab exercises.

  13. Increased osseointegration effect of bone morphogenetic protein 2 on dental implants: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Daniel; Tovar, Nick; Jimbo, Ryo; Marin, Charles; Anchieta, Rodolfo B; Machado, Lucas S; Montclare, Jin; Guastaldi, Fernando P S; Janal, Malvin N; Coelho, Paulo G

    2014-06-01

    Application of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) to implant surfaces has been of great interest due to its osteoinductive potential. However, the optimal coating methodology has not been clarified. The objective of the study was to determine whether the application of rhBMP-2 onto plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite implant surfaces by immersion in protein solution before implant installation would result in significantly improved bone apposition. Using a sheep iliac model, titanium (Ti) and plasma-sprayed calcium-phosphate (PSCaP)-coated implants uncoated and coated with rhBMP-2 were assessed for their osteogenic effects in the peri-implant area over time in terms of osseointegration and de novo bone formation. After 3 and 6 weeks postoperatively, the samples were retrieved and were subjected to bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) evaluation. When rhBMP-2 was applied to the PSCaP surface, significant increases in BIC and BAFO were observed at 3 weeks in vivo, whereas when adsorbed directly onto the titanium implant surface, rhBMP-2 did not as effectively improve the bone response (although significantly higher than control Ti). The outcomes of the present study suggested that the combination of plasma-sprayed calcium-phosphate surface and rhBMP-2 coating significantly enhanced osseointegration, which validated the postulated hypothesis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Modeling of the buccal and lingual bone walls of fresh extraction sites following implant installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Mauricio G; Wennström, Jan L; Lindhe, Jan

    2006-12-01

    To determine whether the reduction of the alveolar ridge that occurs following tooth extraction and implant placement is influenced by the size of the hard tissue walls of the socket. Six beagle dogs were used. The third premolar and first molar in both quadrants of the mandible were used. Mucoperiostal flaps were elevated and the distal roots were removed. Implants were installed in the fresh extraction socket in one side of the mandible. The flaps were replaced to allow a semi-submerged healing. The procedure was repeated in the contra later side of the mandible after 2 months. The animals were sacrificed 1 month after the final implant installation. The mandibles were dissected, and each implant site was removed and processed for ground sectioning. Marked hard tissue alterations occurred during healing following tooth extraction and implant installation in the socket. The marginal gap that was present between the implant and the walls of the socket at implantation disappeared as a result of bone fill and resorption of the bone crest. The modeling in the marginal defect region was accompanied by marked attenuation of the dimensions of both the delicate buccal and the wider lingual bone wall. Bone loss at molar sites was more pronounced than at the premolar locations. Implant placement failed to preserve the hard tissue dimension of the ridge following tooth extraction. The buccal as well as the lingual bone walls were resorbed. At the buccal aspect, this resulted in some marginal loss of osseointegration.

  15. A new wide-diameter bone-anchored hearing implant-prospective 1-year data on complications, implant stability, and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate a new wide bone-anchored hearing implant considering initial stability, stability over time, implant loss, and skin reaction. STUDY DESIGN: Consecutive, prospective case series. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Twenty adult patients were enrolled. All operati...

  16. Effects of rhBMP-2 on Sandblasted and Acid Etched Titanium Implant Surfaces on Bone Regeneration and Osseointegration: Spilt-Mouth Designed Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Ho Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate effects of rhBMP-2 applied at different concentrations to sandblasted and acid etched (SLA implants on osseointegration and bone regeneration in a bone defect of beagle dogs as pilot study using split-mouth design. Methods. For experimental groups, SLA implants were coated with different concentrations of rhBMP-2 (0.1, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL. After assessment of surface characteristics and rhBMP-2 releasing profile, the experimental groups and untreated control groups (n = 6 in each group, two animals in each group were placed in split-mouth designed animal models with buccal open defect. At 8 weeks after implant placement, implant stability quotients (ISQ values were recorded and vertical bone height (VBH, mm, bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %, and bone volume (BV, % in the upper 3 mm defect areas were measured. Results. The ISQ values were highest in the 1.0 group. Mean values of VBH (mm, BIC (%, and BV (% were greater in the 0.5 mg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL groups than those in 0.1 and control groups in buccal defect areas. Conclusion. In the open defect area surrounding the SLA implant, coating with 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL concentrations of rhBMP-2 was more effective, compared with untreated group, in promoting bone regeneration and osseointegration.

  17. Autologous implantation of BMP2-expressing dermal fibroblasts to improve bone mineral density and architecture in rabbit long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Weisbrode, Steve E; Bertone, Alicia L

    2015-10-01

    Cell-mediated gene therapy may treat bone fragility disorders. Dermal fibroblasts (DFb) may be an alternative cell source to stem cells for orthopedic gene therapy because of their rapid cell yield and excellent plasticity with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) gene transduction. Autologous DFb or BMP2-expressing autologous DFb were administered in twelve rabbits by two delivery routes; a transcortical intra-medullar infusion into tibiae and delayed intra-osseous injection into femoral drill defects. Both delivery methods of DFb-BMP2 resulted in a successful cell engraftment, increased bone volume, bone mineral density, improved trabecular bone microarchitecture, greater bone defect filling, external callus formation, and trabecular surface area, compared to non-transduced DFb or no cells. Cell engraftment within trabecular bone and bone marrow tissue was most efficiently achieved by intra-osseous injection of DFb-BMP2. Our results suggested that BMP2-expressing autologous DFb have enhanced efficiency of engraftment in target bones resulting in a measurable biologic response by the bone of improved bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture. These results support that autologous implantation of DFb-BMP2 warrants further study on animal models of bone fragility disorders, such as osteogenesis imperfecta and osteoporosis to potentially enhance bone quality, particularly along with other gene modification of these diseases. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mucosal inflammation and incidence of crestal bone loss among implant patients: a 10-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchinato, Denis; Parpaiola, Andrea; Lindhe, Jan

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to determine the prevalence and incidence of marginal bone loss and, in addition, peri-implantitis in subjects and implant sites after 10 years in function. One hundred and thirty-three subjects with a total of 407 implants that had been in function for about 5 years attended a follow-up visit in 2007 (visit 2; V2). 100 of the 133 subjects returned for a new clinical and radiographic examination in 2012 (visit 3; V3). The clinical examination included assessment of "bleeding on probing" (BoP+) and "probing pocket depth." Subjects with implant sites that in the radiograph exhibited crater-shaped marginal bone loss of >0.5 mm were identified as losers. During the interval between V2 and V3 (about 5 years), 13 implants in 7 subjects exhibited progressive bone loss and were removed. The overall amount of crestal bone loss that had occurred at the remaining implants between visit 1 (V1; ≥1 year of loading) and V3 (10 years) was small (0.36 ± 1.4 mm). The bone-level reduction was twice as great between V2 and V3 as between V1 and V2. Forty subjects and 75 (26%) implant sites exhibited marginal bone loss of >0.5 mm between V1 and V3. In the interval between V2 and V3, 37 new implant sites lost significant amounts of bone. During the entire 10-year period (V1-V3), 12% of patients and 5% of implants displayed signs of peri-implantitis (bone loss >0.5 mm, BoP+, PPD ≥6 mm), while in the V2-V3 interval, the corresponding numbers were 10% (patients) and 4% (implant sites). Sites with marginal bone loss of ≥1 mm were not common among implant patients. Peri-implantitis occurred in about 10% of patients and 4% of implant sites. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Comparative study of longitudinal changes in peri-implant bone microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Satoru; Abe, Shinichi; Ide, Yoshinobu; Usami, Akinobu

    2010-01-01

    The load applied to an implant is directly transmitted to the jaw and is considered to be one of the causes of remodeling of internal trabecular bones. However, the longitudinal changes during loading and the rearrangement of the trabecular bone structure are mostly unknown. The aim of this study was to clarify the changes in internal jaw bone structure longitudinally during natural tooth eruption as well as tooth extraction and post-implantation periods in a dog model by micro computed tomography (micro-CT). Maxillae of 16 male beagle dogs were used in this study. First, 4 dogs with all maxillary molar teeth erupted were euthanized as a control group. Next, 6 teeth consisting of the bilateral maxillary fourth premolars, and first and second molars were extracted from each of the 12 dogs. Then, 4 dogs of the tooth-extracted group were euthanized 3 months after extraction of the teeth. At this time, three implants were inserted in the left side of the maxilla of the remaining 8 dogs, and the superstructures were placed after 3 months. Four of these 8 dogs with implants were euthanized at 3 months and the other 4 at 1 year after placement of the superstructure. Then, the maxillary bone was removed from each dog as a specimen and sequential micro-CT images were taken. After reconstruction of three-dimensional images, morphological and metrical observation of the jaw trabecular bone structure was performed. A decrease of the trabecular bone in the tooth-extracted group was morphologically and morphometrically observed, whereas the implanted group showed thick, rich trabecular bone. Although a longitudinal decrease in the bone tissue volume was recognized both in the tooth-extracted and the implanted groups, the amount was smaller in the implanted group than in the tooth-extracted group. The results suggested that the application of load by implants in the case of tooth loss inhibits resorption of the alveolar bone and prevents thinning of the jaw. (author)

  20. The combined use of rhBMP-2/ACS, autogenous bone graft, a bovine bone mineral biomaterial, platelet-rich plasma, and guided bone regeneration at nonsubmerged implant placement for supracrestal bone augmentation. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclar, Anthony G; Best, Steven P

    2013-01-01

    This case report presents the clinical application and outcomes of the use of a combined approach to treat a patient with a severe alveolar defect. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in an absorbable collagen sponge carrier, along with autogenous bone graft, bovine bone mineral, platelet-rich plasma, and guided bone regeneration, were used simultaneous with nonsubmerged implant placement. At 1 year postsurgery, healthy peri-implant soft tissues and radiographically stable peri-implant crestal bone levels were observed along with locally increased radiographic bone density. In addition, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan demonstrated apparent supracrestal peri-implant bone augmentation with the appearance of normal alveolar ridge contours, including the facial bone wall.

  1. Crestal bone loss and periimplant inflammatory parameters around zirconia implants: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Fahim; Al-Kheraif, Abdul Aziz; Ab Ghani, Siti Mariam; Abu Hassan, Mohamed Ibrahim; Alnassar, Talal; Javed, Fawad

    2015-09-01

    Zirconia implants have been used for oral rehabilitation; however, evidence of their ability to maintain crestal bone and periimplant soft tissue health is not clear. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate crestal bone loss (CBL) around zirconia dental implants and clinical periimplant inflammatory parameters. The focus question addressed was, "Do zirconia implants maintain crestal bone levels and periimplant soft tissue health?" Databases were searched for articles from 1977 through September 2014 with different combinations of the following MeSH terms: "dental implants," "zirconium," "alveolar bone loss," "periodontal attachment loss," "periodontal pocket," "periodontal index." Letters to the editor, case reports, commentaries, review articles, and articles published in languages other than English were excluded. Thirteen clinical studies were included. In 8 of the studies, the CBL around zirconia implants was comparable between baseline and follow-up. In the other 5 studies, the CBL around zirconia implants was significantly higher at follow-up. Among the studies that used titanium implants as controls, 2 studies showed significantly higher CBL around zirconia implants, and in 1 study, the CBL around zirconia and titanium implants was comparable. The reported implant survival rates for zirconia implants ranged between 67.6% and 100%. Eleven studies selectively reported the periimplant inflammatory parameters. Because of the variations in study design and methodology, it was difficult to reach a consensus regarding the efficacy of zirconia implants in maintaining crestal bone levels and periimplant soft tissue health. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of the implantation in the lateral part of the mandible between short tissue level (TE) and bone level (BL) implant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzik, Jakub; Botzenhart, Ute; Krawiec, Maciej; Gedrange, Tomasz; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Vegh, Andras; Dominiak, Marzena

    2017-09-01

    Short dental implants can be an alternative method of treatment to a vertical bone augmentation procedure at sites of reduced alveolar height. However, for successful treatment, an implant system that causes a minimal marginal bone loss (MBL) should be taken into consideration. The aim of the study has been to evaluate implantation effectiveness for bone level and tissue level short implants provided in lateral aspects of partially edentulous mandible and limited alveolar ridge height. The MBL and primary as well as secondary implant stability were determined in the study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups according to the method of treatment provided. Sixteen short Bone Level Implants (OsseoSpeed TX, Astra tech) and 16 short Tissue Level Implants (RN SLActive ® , Straumann) were successfully placed in the edentulous part of the mandible. The determination of the marginal bone level was based on radiographic evaluation after 12 and 36 weeks. Implant stability was measured immediately after insertion and after 12 weeks. The marginal bone level of Bone Level Implants was significantly lower compared to Tissue Level Implants. Furthermore, the Bone Level Implants had greater primary and secondary stability in comparison with Tissue Level Implants (Primary: 77.8 ISQ versus 66.5 ISQ; Secondary: 78.9 ISQ versus 73.9 ISQ, respectively). Since short Bone Level Implants showed a significantly decreased MBL 12 and 36 weeks after implantation as well as better results for the primary stability compared to Tissue Level Implants, they should preferentially be used for this mentioned indication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. [Influence of implants prepared by selective laser melting on early bone healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J Y; Chen, F; Ge, Y J; Wei, L; Pan, S X; Feng, H L

    2018-02-18

    To evaluate the influence of the rough surface of dental implants prepared by selective laser melting (SLM) on early bone healing around titanium implants. A total of sixteen titanium implants were involved in our research, of which eight implants were prepared by SLM (TIXOS Cylindrical, Leader-Novaxa, Milan, Italy; 3.3 mm×10 mm, internal hex) and the other eight were sandblasted, large-grit and acid-etched (SLA) implants (IMPLUS Cylindrical, Leader-Novaxa, Milan, Italy; 3.3 mm×10 mm, internal hex). All of the dental implants were inserted into the healed extraction sockets of the mandible of two adult male Beagle dogs. Half of the dental implants were designed to be healed beneath the mucosa and the other half were intended to be healed transgingivally and were immediately loaded by acrylic resin bridge restoration. Three types of tetracycline fluorescent labels, namely calcein blue, alizarin complexone and calcein, were administered into the veins of the Beagle dogs 2, 4, and 8 weeks after implant placement respectively for fluorescent evaluation of newly formed bone peri-implant. Both Beagle dogs were euthanized 12 weeks after implant insertion and the mandible block specimens containing the titanium implants and surrounding bone and soft tissue of each dog were carefully sectioned and dissected. A total of 16 hard tissue slices were obtained and stained with toluidine blue for microscopic examination and histomorphometric measurements. Histological observation was made for each slice under light microscope and laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM). Comparison on new bone formation around titanium implants of each group was made and mineral apposition rate (MAR) was calculated for each group. Dental implants prepared by selective laser melting had achieved satisfying osseointegration to surrounding bone tissue after the healing period of 12 weeks. Newly formed bone tissue was observed creeping on the highly porous surface of the SLM implant and growing

  4. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of copolymerized Polylactic/polyglycolic acids as a bone filler in combination with a cellular dermal matrix graft around immediate implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Mahitab M.; Zaki, Azza Abdulrahman; El Gazaerly, Hanaa Mohamed; Shemmrani, Ammar Al; Sorour, Abd El Latif

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate clinically and radiographically the use of a cellular dermal matrix allograft (Alloderm) in combination with PLA/PGA (Fisiograft) around immediate implants. Materials and Methods Fourteen patients were included in this study, three patients received two implants, total of seventeen implants were placed. Periapical radiographs and orthopantomographs were taken. The selected teeth were extracted atraumatically after the reflection of full thickness flaps. One-piece Zimmer implants were placed immediately into the sockets. Weeks from implantation, radiographic evaluation was made at 6 Fisiograft in powder form was placed in the osseous defects around the implants. The implants were immediately restored with provisional crowns free from occlusion. Patients were clinically evaluated at 3, 6, and 14 months after loading which was done after 6 weeks from implantation. Radiographic evaluation was made at 6 and 14 months from implant placement. Results showed that immediate implantation was successful in sixteen out of seventeen implants, clinical parameters regarding plaque index, gingival index, there was a slight decrease through the follow-up periods from 3 to 14 months but it was non-significant, while there was a significant decrease in the probing depth. Radiographically there was a significant increase in the bone density from 6 to 14 months post loading, while the vertical bone defect was significantly decreased. The fisiograft functioned well as space maker and scaffolding material. The Alloderm performed well as a membrane to be used in association with immediate implants and it has a good potentiality for increasing the width of the keratinized gingiva, which is an important feature for implant esthetics. Conclusion the combination technique between the bone graft and the membrane proved to be successful to overcome dehiscence and osseous defects around immediate implants. PMID:25780357

  5. SINUS FLOOR AUGMENTATION WITH BONE BLOCK GRAFTING AND SIMULTANEOUS IMPLANT PLACEMENT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George S. Manev

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Placement of dental implants in the posterior maxillary edentulous areas is often compromised by the limited volume of bone due to the anatomy of the maxillary sinuses. In such cases, the technique of Sinus Lift is indicated to provide a sufficient volume of hard tissue in order to achieve primary stability at implant placement. Simultaneous augmentation of the sinus floor and implant placement is severely limited by the amount of residual bone of the floor of the sinus.A clinical case of minimal residual bone at the bottom of the sinus is demonstrated. A sinus floor augmentation with bone block harvested from the mandibular symphysis is performed. The bone block is placed in the sinus after membrane elevation and fixed with a screw to the sinus floor. After fixation of the bone block in the sinus implant (10/4.1 mm TSV (Zimmer is placed in reconstructed bone with good primary stability. Healing occurs without complications and the third month X-ray showed normal density of bone around the implant. The technique is very sensitive to surgeon’s skills.

  6. Successful bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, M B; Marques, C; Mendes, G J; Gonçalves, C

    2015-11-01

    To report a case of successful bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in an adult patient with type III osteogenesis imperfecta, which is commonly regarded as a contraindication to this procedure. A 45-year-old man with type III osteogenesis imperfecta presented with mixed hearing loss. There was a mild sensorineural component in both ears, with an air-bone gap between 45 and 50 dB HL. He was implanted with a bone-anchored hearing aid. The audiological outcome was good, with no complications and good implant stability (as measured by resonance frequency analysis). To our knowledge, this is the first recorded case of bone-anchored hearing aid implantation in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

  7. Technique to assess the alveolar bone width for immediate implant placement in fresh extraction sockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar Chandraker

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: This technique will help the surgeon understand the thickness of labial plate especially the apical region without reflecting the flap, also aid in selection of proper dimension of dental implant, and if bone graft is needed.

  8. Marginal bone behavior around the dental implants with regard to the patient’s characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szpak Piotr

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the relationship between marginal bone loss around dental implants and selected personal characteristics of patients (gender, age and cigarette smoking undergoing dental rehabilitation because of missing teeth. The study comprised 28 patients aged 37-66 years (11 men and 17 women who had 240 implants inserted. The assessment of marginal bone loss in the examined patient cohort was made based on ortho-pantomographic X-ray images. For evaluation of the condition of the marginal bone around the implants during 46-month follow-up, with relation to the sociodemographic features of the patient, multi-generational linear models were used. Studies show that the loss of marginal bone around the implant increased with the age of the patient, but did not correlate significantly with the patient’s gender or smoking habit.

  9. The fabrication of bioresorbable implants for bone defects replacement using computer tomogram and 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, P. G.; Tverdokhlebov, S. I.; Goreninskii, S. I.; Bolbasov, E. N.; Popkov, A. V.; Kulbakin, D. E.; Grigoryev, E. G.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2017-09-01

    The present work demonstrates the possibility of production of personalized implants from bioresorbable polymers designed for replacement of bone defects. The stages of creating a personalized implant are described, which include the obtaining of 3D model from a computer tomogram, development of the model with respect to shape of bone fitment bore using Autodesk Meshmixer software, and 3D printing process from bioresorbable polymers. The results of bioresorbable polymer scaffolds implantation in pre-clinical tests on laboratory animals are shown. The biological properties of new bioresorbable polymers based on poly(lactic acid) were studied during their subcutaneous, intramuscular, bone and intraosseous implantation in laboratory animals. In all cases, there was a lack of a fibrous capsule formation around the bioresorbable polymer over time. Also, during the performed study, conclusions were made on osteogenesis intensity depending on the initial state of bone tissue.

  10. A comparative analysis of periimplant bone levels of immediate and conventionally loaded implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruprasada; Thapliyal, G.K.; Pawar, V.R.

    2012-01-01

    Background With the trend of shortening the treatment time and reducing patient discomfort/inconveniences immediate loading of implants has emerged as an alternative approach for replacing missing natural teeth. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of immediate implant loading protocol over conventional implant loading protocol in partially edentulous mandible. Methods Twenty patients were selected from out patients department who needed the replacement of one of the missing mandibular first molar. They were divided into two groups. In Group A patients implants were loaded with immediate implant loading protocol, whereas in Group B they were loaded with conventional loading protocol. Periimplant bone loss and soft tissue health were measured and compared using OPG and IOPA radiographs 06 and 12 months after implant placement. Results One implant failed in immediate loading group (Group A), whereas all implants survived in conventional loading group (Group B). The average periimplant bone loss after 6 months and 1 year for Group A were 0.69 mm and 1.09 mm respectively, whereas it was 0.74 mm and 1.13 mm respectively for Group B. The difference in the bone loss between Group A and B was not statistically significant. Conclusion Immediate implant loading protocol has a highly acceptable clinical success rate in partially edentulous lower jaw although implant survival rate is slightly inferior to conventional loading protocol. PMID:24532933

  11. Peri-implant bone formation and surface characteristics of rough surface zirconia implants manufactured by powder injection molding technique in rabbit tibiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Seok; Chung, Shin-Hye; Shon, Won-Jun

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate osseointegration in rabbit tibiae and to investigate surface characteristics of novel zirconia implants made by powder injection molding (PIM) technique, using molds with and without roughened inner surfaces. A total of 20 rabbits received three types of external hex implants with identical geometry on the tibiae: machined titanium implants, PIM zirconia implants without mold etching, and PIM zirconia implants with mold etching. Surface characteristics of the three types of implant were evaluated. Removal torque tests and histomorphometric analyses were performed. The roughness of PIM zirconia implants was higher than that of machined titanium implants. The PIM zirconia implants exhibited significantly higher bone-implant contact and removal torque values than the machined titanium implants (P mold showed significantly higher removal torque values than PIM zirconia implants without using roughened mold (P mold etching technique can produce substantially rough surfaces on zirconia implants. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Dental Implant Stability Analysis and Investigating the Influence of Efective Factors on Bone-Implant Contact Applying Frictional Model of Contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefi E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Relative displacement of the implant with respect to bone and quality of bone-implant contact play critical roles in the dental implant stability. The goal of this study was to investigate the dental implant stability using non-linear finite elements method. Therefore, bone-implant relative displacement due to applied force to the implant was calculated, and then an appropriate factor for defining quality of bone-implant contact was presented.Materials and Methods: In order to develop a three dimensional model and compare the results with clinical studies, computed tomography (CT scan data of a rabbit tibia was considered as a base. The model was exported to ABAQUS 6.9-1 to be analyzed using nonlinear finite elements method. Dynamic analysis was done on the model using the proper boundary condition and dynamic loads.Results: Force-displacement curves in bone-implant interface were nonlinear. Friction coefficient, which is a criterion for implant stability and relative displacement, approximately became doubled as the vertical contact force was halved. However, the friction coefficient decreased with reduction of coulomb frictional coefficient.Conclusion: Friction coefficient, which is calculated upon force-displacement curves, could be considered as a criterion to evaluate the dental implant stability. Decrease of the vertical contact force and also using rough surfaces improved the quality of bone-implant contact and stability of dental implant.

  13. Bone compaction enhances fixation of weightbearing titanium implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, Søren Vedding; Rahbek, Ole; Vestermark, Marianne Toft

    2005-01-01

    Implant stability is crucial for implant survival. A new surgical technique, compaction, has increased in vitro implant stability and in vivo fixation of nonweightbearing implants. However, the in vivo effects of compaction on weightbearing implants are unknown. As implants inserted clinically...... are weightbearing, the effects of compaction on weightbearing implants were examined. The hypothesis was that compaction would increase implant fixation compared with conventional drilling. Porous-coated titanium implants were inserted bilaterally into the weightbearing portion of the femoral condyles of dogs....... In each dog, one knee had the implant cavity prepared with drilling, and the other knee was prepared with compaction. Eight dogs were euthanized after 2 weeks, and eight dogs were euthanized after 4 weeks. Femoral condyles from an additional eight dogs represented Time 0. Compacted specimens had higher...

  14. Bone Mineral Density Measurements Around Osseointegrated Implants: A Precision Study and Validation of Scan Protocol for Transfemoral Amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Rehne Lessmann; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Jørgensen, Peter Holmberg; Petersen, Klaus Kjær; Søballe, Kjeld; Stilling, Maiken

    Visual evaluation of bone changes around an osseointegration (OI) implant in femoral amputees examined on plain radiographs shows that periprosthetic bone resorption takes place during the first years after OI surgery, but the bone mineral density (BMD) change has not been previously quantified by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Precision is vital when monitoring BMD changes around implants, and thus the aim of this study was to evaluate the precision and feasibility of a scan protocol for BMD measurements in proximity of OI implants. The proximal part of 2 human cadaveric femoral bones (specimens A and B) with OI implants were mounted in a positioning jig and DXA scans were repeated 5 times in increments of 5° from neutral (0°) to 20° flexion and rotation. BMD changes as a result of change in leg position were evaluated. Repeated patient examinations (n = 20) were conducted in a clinical setting and the precision error was calculated for each of 7 periprosthetic custom-made regions of interest (ROIs). The precision of cadaveric BMD measurements in neutral position was square standard deviation ranged from 0.031 g/cm 2 to 0.047 g/cm 2 and %CV ranged from 3.12% to 6.57% depending on ROI. Simulated hip flexion or rotation of the femur affected periprosthetic BMD measurements around OI implants in cadaveric femoral bones, which stresses the importance of a reproducible set-up during DXA scans to reduce measurement errors caused by variation in leg position. Adherence to the scan protocol with a relaxed position of the residual limb resulted in an acceptable short-term precision below 6.6%. Copyright © 2017 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of hazards caused by magnetic field emitted from magnetotherapy applicator to the users of bone conduction hearing prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patryk Zradziński

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low frequency magnetic field, inducing electrical field (Ein inside conductive structures may directly affect the human body, e.g., by electrostimulation in the nervous system. In addition, the spatial distribution and level of Ein are disturbed in tissues neighbouring the medical implant. Material and Methods: Numerical models of magneto-therapeutic applicator (emitting sinusoidal magnetic field of frequency 100 Hz and the user of hearing implant (based on bone conduction: Bonebridge type – IS-BB or BAHA (bone anchorde hearing aid type – IS-BAHA were worked out. Values of Ein were analyzed in the model of the implant user’s head, e.g., physiotherapist, placed next to the applicator. Results: It was demonstrated that the use of IS-BB or IS-BAHA makes electromagnetic hazards significantly higher (up to 4-fold compared to the person without implant exposed to magnetic field heterogeneous in space. Hazards for IS-BAHA users are higher than those for IS-BB users. It was found that applying the principles of directive 2013/35/EU, at exposure to magnetic field below exposure limits the direct biophysical effects of exposure in hearing prosthesis users may exceed relevant limits. Whereas applying principles and limits set up by Polish labor law or the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP guidelines, the compliance with the exposure limits also ensures the compliance with relevant limits of electric field induced in the body of hearing implant user. Conclusions: It is necessary to assess individually electromagnetic hazard concerning hearing implant users bearing in mind significantly higher hazards to them compared to person without implant or differences between levels of hazards faced by users of implants of various structural or technological solutions. Med Pr 2017;68(4:469–477

  16. Average annual crestal bone loss of ITI implants following the first year of loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hosseinzadeh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long term success of dental implants directly depends on marginal bone resorption. The aim of this study was to determine the annual average bone loss on the mesial and distal aspects of implants following the first year of implantation. METHODS: This was a descriptive analytical study of patients treated with ITI (International Team of Implantology implants at the Dental School of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences from 1998-2002 (1377-81. A total of 15 patients with 41 implants were selected by convenience sampling method. The height of the alveolar bone was measured using panoramic radiography before and after loading with calipers to determine the average bone loss. Other information such as pocket depth, bleeding index, plaque index, gingival recession, was obtained by clinical examinations. The mean bone loss on the mesial & distal sides was analyzed by ANOVA at 0.05 level of significance. RESULTS: The average bone loss on the proximal sides of ITI implants obtained annually after the first year of loading was 0.084 ± 0.035 mm with slight difference on the mesial (0.092 ± 0.035 and distal (0.072 ± 0.033 sides. There was negligible difference between male and female patients. The average survival rate for thirty three months was 95.1%. CONCLUSION: The average bone loss on the mesial and distal sides of ITI implants compared with other studies was satisfactory. Survival and success rates were acceptable. KEYWORDS: Dental implants, bone resorption, survival rate, dental plaque index.

  17. Peri- and intra-implant bone response to microporous Ti coatings with surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braem, Annabel; Chaudhari, Amol; Vivan Cardoso, Marcio; Schrooten, Jan; Duyck, Joke; Vleugels, Jozef

    2014-02-01

    Bone growth on and into implants exhibiting substantial surface porosity is a promising strategy in order to improve the long-term stable fixation of bone implants. However, the reliability in clinical applications remains a point of discussion. Most attention has been dedicated to the role of macroporosity, leading to the general consensus of a minimal pore size of 50-100 μm in order to allow bone ingrowth. In this in vivo study, we assessed the feasibility of early bone ingrowth into a predominantly microporous Ti coating with an average thickness of 150 μm and the hypothesis of improving the bone response through surface modification of the porous coating. Implants were placed in the cortical bone of rabbit tibiae for periods of 2 and 4 weeks and evaluated histologically and histomorphometrically using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Bone with osteocytes encased in the mineralized matrix was found throughout the porous Ti coating up to the coating/substrate interface, highlighting that osseointegration of microporosities (coating in the host bone in the long term is possible. When surface modifications inside the porous structure further reduced the interconnective pore size to the submicrometer level, bone ingrowth was impaired. On the other hand, application of a sol-gel-derived bioactive glass-ceramic coating without altering the pore characteristics was found to significantly improve bone regeneration around the coating, while still supporting bone ingrowth. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound enhances bone formation around miniscrew implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzorig, Khaliunaa; Kuroda, Shingo; Maeda, Yuichi; Mansjur, Karima; Sato, Minami; Nagata, Kumiko; Tanaka, Eiji

    2015-06-01

    Miniscrew implants (MSIs) are currently used to provide absolute anchorage in orthodontics; however, their initial stability is an issue of concern. Application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) can promote bone healing. Therefore, LIPUS application may stimulate bone formation around MSIs and enhance their initial stability. To investigate the effect of LIPUS exposure on bone formation after implantation of titanium (Ti) and stainless steel (SS) MSIs. MSIs made of Ti-6Al-4V and 316L SS were placed on rat tibiae and treated with LIPUS. The bone morphology around MSIs was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and three-dimensional micro-computed tomography. MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on Ti and SS discs were treated with LIPUS, and the temporary expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was examined. Bone-implant contact increased gradually from day 3 to day 14 after MSI insertion. LIPUS application increased the cortical bone density, cortical bone thickness, and cortical bone rate after implantation of Ti and SS MSIs (P<0.05). LIPUS exposure induced ALP upregulation in MC3T3-E1 cells at day 3 (P<0.05). LIPUS enhanced bone formation around Ti and SS MSIs, enhancing the initial stability of MSIs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Clinical observation of alveolar bone status of ankylos dental implants with completion of restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tie; Li, Yinghua; Li, Zejian; Lai, Renfa

    2012-06-01

    To provide basis for clinical application of ANKYLOS dental implants by following up alveolar bone status of 318 pieces of restored ANKYLOS dental implants. Between February 2008 and August 2009, 170 patients with dentition defect underwent placement of ANKYLOS dental implants (318 pieces). There were 74 males (133 pieces) and 96 females (185 pieces) with an average age of 43.8 years (range, 23-68 years). After operation, the periapical X-ray films were taken to observe osseointegration around the neck of implant, alveolar bone resorption, and survival of implants. All patients were followed up at 6, 12, and 24 months after operation. There were 9 failure implants with a total dental implants survival rate of 97.17% (309/318): 3 at 6 months, 4 at 6-12 months, and 2 at 12-24 months, showing no significant difference in dental implants survival rate among 3 time points (chi2=0.470 3, P=0.492 8). New bone formed around the neck of implant in 4 cases at 6 months and in 31 cases at 12 months; at 6, 12, and 24 months, the bone increase was (0.392 7 +/- 0.217 4), (0.633 5 +/- 0.202 1), and (0.709 0 +/- 0.199 1) mm, respectively, showing significant differences among 3 time points (P ANKYLOS dental implant, alveolar bone status is good and the implant success rate is high during short-term follow-up. But further observation and study are required for long-term effectivness.

  20. Bone compaction enhances fixation of weight-bearing hydroxyapatite-coated implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, Søren Vedding; Rahbek, Ole; Vestermark, Marianne Toft

    2006-01-01

    The effect of bone compaction vs conventional drilling on the fixation of hydroxyapatite-coated implants was examined in a weight-bearing canine model. In each dog, one knee joint had the implant cavity prepared with drilling, the other with compaction. Eight dogs were euthanized after 2 weeks...... and 8 dogs after 4 weeks. Femoral condyles from additional 7 dogs represented time 0. Compacted specimens had significantly higher bone implant contact and energy absorption at time 0. Compaction significantly increased ultimate shear strength at 0 and 2 weeks. There was no significant difference...... in implant fixation after 4 weeks. The results of this study suggest that compaction may be beneficial in optimizing the crucial initial implant stability, even when hydroxyapatite-coated implants with osteoconductive properties are inserted in vivo....

  1. Quantitative mandibular and maxillary CT bone densitometry in surgical planning for osseointegrated dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Chafetz, N.; Schwarz, M.S.; Rhodes, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scanning of the jaw is important in the preoperative evaluation of osseointegrated dental implants. The degree of bone mineralization may have a bearing on the likelihood of successful implantation. A phantom for analysis was scanned prior to CT studies. Measurements were made in 20 patients. Bone density was sampled inferior to normal teeth and in comparable but edentulous regions, in an attempt to define the limits of normal ossification. A wide variation in bone mineral was noted in normal teeth-bearing and in edentulous bone. Three patterns of ossification are identifiable with CT. Bone densitometry may indicate those patients for whom a longer recovery period between implantation and prosthetic placement is advised

  2. Matrix Vesicle Enzyme Activity and Phospholipid Content in Endosteal Bone Following Implantation of Osseointegrating and Non-Osseointegrating Implant Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    bone repair ( Branemark , 1983). According to Dr. Branemark , osseointegration is a direct structural and functional connection between ordered living...bone and the surface of the load-carrying implant ( Branemark et al., 1985). In the 1960’s, Branemark and associates found that titanium optical chambers...stimuli required for remodeling and maintenance ( Branemark , 1983). The lack of mineralization has been attributed to a variety of conditions. In

  3. Effects of Osteotomy Lengths on the Temperature Rise of the Crestal Bone During Implant Site Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katic, Zvonimir; Jukic, Tomislav; Stubljar, David

    2018-02-13

    To compare temperatures of the crestal bone during implant site preparation for different osteotomy lengths and implant systems. Bovine ribs were used to simulate the cortical bone of the human mandible. Three different implant systems were tested: Astra Tech, Ankylos, and XiVE. Six drills per system were performed, meaning each drilling set was used for 2 drills per 3 osteotomy lengths (8, 12, and 16 mm). Drilling force, drilling speed, drilling length, and temperature were recorded. Differences in the maximum temperature of the crestal bone during the first drilling for various osteotomy lengths (P = 0.021) and all implant systems (P = 0.013) were observed. A similar result was showed during the second drilling; osteotomy lengths (P = 0.014) and drilling systems (P = 0.003). Second drillings showed lower temperatures of the crestal bone with statistical differences on all measurements (P Ankylos implant systems showed similar performance; XiVE had lower temperature and higher temperature differences between osteotomy lengths. Different drilling lengths contributed to the variation in temperature regardless of the implant system. Longer drills and osteotomies induced higher temperatures on the crestal bone. The maximum temperature difference between the shortest and the longest osteotomy was under 1°C. Temperature above 47°C that could cause bone necrosis was not recorded at any time. The XiVE system showed the best performance.

  4. Assessment of trabecular bone changes around endosseous implants using image analysis techniques: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuki, Mervet El; Omami, Galal; Horner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the trabecular bone changes that occurred around functional endosseous dental implants by means of radiographic image analysis techniques. Immediate preoperative and postoperative periapical radiographs of de-identified implant patients at the University Dental Hospital of Manchester were retrieved, screened for specific inclusion criteria, digitized, and quantified for structural elements of the trabecular bone around the endosseous implants, by using image analysis techniques. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5. P values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of 12 implants from 11 patients were selected for the study, and 26 regions of interest were obtained. There was a significant increase in the bone area in terms of the mean distance between nodes (p=0.006) and a significant decrease in the marrow area in terms of the bone area (p=0.006) and the length of marrow spaces (p=0.032). It appeared that the bone around the implant underwent remodeling that resulted in a net increase in bone after implant placement.

  5. Assessment of trabecular bone changes around endosseous implants using image analysis techniques: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuki, Mervet El [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Benghazi University College of Dentistry, Benghazi (Libya); Omami, Galal [Oral Diagnosis and Polyclinics, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Horner, Keith [Dept. of Oral Radiology, University Dental Hospital of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the trabecular bone changes that occurred around functional endosseous dental implants by means of radiographic image analysis techniques. Immediate preoperative and postoperative periapical radiographs of de-identified implant patients at the University Dental Hospital of Manchester were retrieved, screened for specific inclusion criteria, digitized, and quantified for structural elements of the trabecular bone around the endosseous implants, by using image analysis techniques. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5. P values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of 12 implants from 11 patients were selected for the study, and 26 regions of interest were obtained. There was a significant increase in the bone area in terms of the mean distance between nodes (p=0.006) and a significant decrease in the marrow area in terms of the bone area (p=0.006) and the length of marrow spaces (p=0.032). It appeared that the bone around the implant underwent remodeling that resulted in a net increase in bone after implant placement.

  6. Influence of immediate and early loading on bone metabolic activity around dental implants in rat tibiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Miou; Ogawa, Toru; Yokoyama, Masayoshi; Koyama, Shigeto; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of immediate and early loading on dynamic changes in bone metabolism around dental implants using bone scintigraphy. Two titanium implants were inserted in the right tibiae of 21 rats. Closed coil springs with 4.0-N loads were applied parallel to the upper portion of the implants for 35 days. According to the load application timing, rats were divided into three groups: immediate loading (IL) group, early loading 1 day after implant insertion (1-D early loading [EL]) group, and loading 3 days after implant insertion (3-D EL) group. Rats were intravenously injected with technetium-99 m-methylene diphosphonate (Tc99 m-MDP) (74 MBq/rat) and scanned by bone scintigraphy at 1, 4, 7, 11, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days after load application. The ratio of accumulation of Tc99 m-MDP around the implants to that of a reference site (uptake ratio) was calculated to evaluate bone metabolism. In every group, the uptake ratio increased until 7 days after load application and then gradually decreased. It was significantly higher than baseline at 4, 7, 11, and 14 days (P load timing. Increases in bone metabolic activity differed according to load application timing; the later the load application, the more enhanced the bone metabolism. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The influence of implant diameter and length on stress distribution of osseointegrated implants related to crestal bone geometry: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggi, Luigi; Cappelloni, Ilaria; Di Girolamo, Michele; Maceri, Franco; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    Load transfer mechanisms and possible failure of osseointegrated implants are affected by implant shape, geometrical and mechanical properties of the site of placement, as well as crestal bone resorption. Suitable estimation of such effects allows for correct design of implant features. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of implant diameter and length on stress distribution and to analyze overload risk of clinically evidenced crestal bone loss at the implant neck in mandibular and maxillary molar periimplant regions. Stress-based performances of 5 commercially available implants (2 ITI, 2 Nobel Biocare, and 1 Ankylos implant; diameters of 3.3 mm to 4.5 mm, bone-implant interface lengths of 7.5 mm to 12 mm) were analyzed by linearly elastic 3-dimensional finite element simulations, under a static load (lateral component: 100 N; vertical intrusive component: 250 N). Numerical models of maxillary and mandibular molar bone segments were generated from computed tomography images, and local stress measures were introduced to allow for the assessment of bone overload risk. Different crestal bone geometries were also modelled. Type II bone quality was approximated, and complete osseous integration was assumed. Maximum stress areas were numerically located at the implant neck, and possible overloading could occur in compression in compact bone (due to lateral components of the occlusal load) and in tension at the interface between cortical and trabecular bone (due to vertical intrusive loading components). Stress values and concentration areas decreased for cortical bone when implant diameter increased, whereas more effective stress distributions for cancellous bone were experienced with increasing implant length. For implants with comparable diameter and length, compressive stress values at cortical bone were reduced when low crestal bone loss was considered. Finally, dissimilar stress-based performances were exhibited for mandibular and maxillary

  8. Radiographic assessment of changes in marginal bone around endosseous implants supporting mandibular overdentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, RHK; Meijer, HJA; Geraets, WGM; van der Stelt, PF

    Objectives: To evaluate the reliability of a new method for quantification of radiographic changes in the marginal bone around implants. Methods: Three groups of seven patients treated with an overdenture supported by two endosseous implants (Branemark, n = 7 patients; IMZ, n = 7 patients; ITI

  9. Bone response to zirconia ceramic implants: an experimental study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, Antonio; Di Carlo, Fabio; Quaranta, Manlio; Piattelli, Adriano

    2003-01-01

    This study analyzes the bone response to zirconia ceramic implants inserted in New Zealand white mature male rabbits. The implants were inserted into the tibia, and each rabbit received 4 implants. All the animals were euthanatized after 4 weeks. A total of 20 implants were retrieved. Implants and surrounding tissues were immediately fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and 0.1% glutaraldehyde in 0.15 molar cacodylate buffer at 4 degrees C and pH 7.4 to be processed for histology. The specimens were processed to obtain thin ground sections with the Precise 1 Automated System. The slides were observed in normal transmitted light under a Leitz Laborlux microscope. A great quantity of newly formed bone was observed in close contact with zirconia ceramic surfaces; in some areas, many osteoblasts were present directly on the zirconia. Percentage of bone-implant contact was 68.4% +/- 2.4%. Mature bone, with few marrow spaces, was present. Small actively secreting osteoblasts were present in the most coronal and apical portions of the implant. No inflamed or multinucleated cells were present. This study concluded that these implants are highly biocompatible and osteoconductive.

  10. No effect of platelet-rich plasma with frozen or processed bone allograft around noncemented implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T B; Rahbek, O; Overgaard, S

    2005-01-01

    by isolating the buffy coat from autologous blood samples. Bone allograft was used fresh-frozen or processed by defatting, freeze drying, and irradiation. Cylindrical hydroxyapatite-coated titanium implants were inserted bilaterally in the femoral condyles of eight dogs. Each implant was surrounded by a 2.5-mm...

  11. Evaluation of periprosthetic bone mineral density and postoperative migration of humeral head resurfacing implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mechlenburg, Inger; Klebe, Thomas Martin; Døssing, Kaj Verner

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant migration, bone mineral density (BMD), length of glenohumeral offset (LGHO), and clinical results were compared for the Copeland (Biomet Inc, Warsaw, IN, USA) and the Global C.A.P. (DePuy Int, Warsaw, IN, USA) humeral head resurfacing implants (HHRIs). METHODS: The study...

  12. Immediate Loaded Implants Placed in Fresh Extraction Sockets - Effect on Marginal Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Neergaard-Richardt, Tobias; Väkiparta, Teemu

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the immediate implant placement in the maxillary aesthetic zone without flap elevation or enhancement of the hard tissue component with filler or membrane material. The aim of this paper is to study treatment outcome for immediate implant placement in fresh extraction socket in the maxillary anterior region regarding marginal bone level. This retrospective cross-sectional study includes data on 41 patients, total of 54 implants (n = 54), treated for immediate placed im...

  13. Bone-anchored titanium implants for auricular rehabilitation: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumieiro, Emne Hammoud; Dib, Luciano Lauria; Jahn, Ricardo Schmitutz; Santos Junior, João Ferreira dos; Nannmark, Ulf; Granström, Gösta; Abrahão, Márcio

    2009-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants have acquired an important role in the prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with craniofacial defects. The main indications are lack of local tissue for autogenous reconstruction, previous reconstruction failure and selection of this technique by the patient. This paper presents a clinical case and discusses indications and advantages of the osseointegrated implant technique for retention of auricular prostheses. Case report, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP). A female patient received three auricular implants after surgical resection of a hemangioma in her left ear. The time taken for osseointegration of the temporal bone was three months. After fabrication of the implant-retained auricular prosthesis, the patient was monitored for 12 months. The clinical parameters evaluated showed good postoperative healing, healthy peri-implant tissue, good hygiene and no loss of implants. Good hygiene combined with thin and immobile peri-implant soft tissues resulted in minimal complications. Craniofacial implant integration appears to be site-dependent; increasing age affects osseointegration in the temporal bone. The frequency of adverse skin reactions in peri-implant tissues is generally low. The surgical technique for rehabilitation using implant-retained auricular prostheses seems to be simple. It is associated with low rates of adverse skin reactions and long-term complications. Prostheses anchored by osseointegrated implants seem to provide better retention than do prostheses supported on spectacle frames, less risk of discoloration through the use of adhesives and better esthetic results than do prostheses anchored in the surgical cavity.

  14. Bone-anchored hearing aid implant location in relation to skin reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Hubert T; de Wolf, Maarten J F; de Rooy, Jacky W J; Hol, Myrthe K S; Cremers, Cor W R J; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of implant location and skin thickness on the frequency and degree of adverse skin reactions around the abutment. Retrospective multivariate analysis of implant position related to skin thickness and clinical variables. Tertiary referral center. Random sample of 248 patients with bone-anchored hearing aids. Bone-anchored hearing aid implant placement by means of the linear incision technique. Type and number of skin reactions and implant loss. The mean (SD) distance from the external auditory ear canal to implant was 48.8 (8.0) mm (range, 29-84 mm). The mean skin thickness was 5.5 (1.9) mm. Severe skin reactions (Holgers classification, 2-4) were seen in 46 of the 248 patients (18.5%). Implant loss occurred in 4 patients (1.6%). Three implants were lost owing to failed osseointegration (1.3%), and another implant was removed because of deterioration of cochlear function (0.9%). No implant was lost as a result of infection. Implant location and skin thickness were not correlated with implant loss or the frequency or degree of adverse skin reactions around the abutment.

  15. Tantalum implanted entangled porous titanium promotes surface osseointegration and bone ingrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Qiao, Yuqin; Cheng, Mengqi; Jiang, Guofeng; He, Guo; Chen, Yunsu; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-05-01

    Porous Ti is considered to be an ideal graft material in orthopaedic and dental surgeries due to its similar spatial structures and mechanical properties to cancellous bone. In this work, to overcome the bioinertia of Ti, Ta-implanted entangled porous titanium (EPT) was constructed by plasma immersion ion implantation & deposition (PIII&D) method. Ca-implanted and unimplanted EPTs were investigated as control groups. Although no difference was found in surface topography and mechanical performances, both Ca- and Ta-implanted groups had better effects in promoting MG-63 cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization than those of unimplanted group. The expression of osteogenic-related markers examined by qRT-PCR and western blotting was upregulated in Ca- and Ta-implanted groups. Moreover, Ta-implanted EPT group could reach a higher level of these effects than that of Ca-implanted group. Enhanced osseointegration of both Ca- and Ta-implanted EPT implants was demonstrated through in vivo experiments, including micro-CT evaluation, push-out test, sequential fluorescent labeling and histological observation. However, the Ta-implanted group possessed more stable and continuous osteogenic activity. Our results suggest that Ta-implanted EPT can be developed as one of the highly efficient graft material for bone reconstruction situations.

  16. The effect of Hydroxyapatite/collagen I composites, bone marrow aspirate and bone graft on fixation of bone implants in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan

      The effect of Hydroxyapatite/collagen I composites, bone marrow aspirate and bone graft on fixation of bone implants IN SHEEP   Ph.D. Student, Hassan Babiker; Associate Professor, Ph.D. Ming Ding; Professor, dr.med., Soren Overgaard. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Odense University Hospital......, Odense, Denmark   Background: Hydroxyapatite and collagen composites (HA/coll) have the potential in mimicking and replacing skeletal bones. This study attempted to determine the effect of newly developed HA/coll-composites with and without bone marrow aspirate (BMA) in order to enhance the fixation...

  17. Clinical Parameters and Crestal Bone Loss in Internal Versus External Hex Implants at One Year after Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HamidReza Arab

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The survival of an implant system is affected by the choice of antirotational design, which can include an external or internal hex. Implant success also is affected by the maintenance of the crestal bone around implants. The aim of present study was to evaluate the crestal bone loss and clinical parameters related to bone loss in patients loaded with an external or internal hex 3i implant (3i Implant Innovation, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, USA. The evaluations were performed one year after loading. Materials and Methods: A total of 39 implants (23 external hex, 16 internal hex were placed randomly in 23 patients (10 male, 13 female by a submerged approach. None of patients had compromised conditions or parafunctional habits. At placement and at one year after loading, periapical radiographs were taken via the parallel method from the implant sites. Results: Crestal bone loss was -0.712±0.831 mm in implants with an internal hex connection and -0.139±0.505 mm in implants with an external hex connection (P≤0.05. No correlation was found between crestal bone loss and parameters such as age, gender, jaw, implant location (anterior, premolar, or molar, implant diameter, or implant length. Conclusions: Crestal bone loss was greater in patients with internal hex 3i implants than in those with external implants. Similar results in other clinical factors were found between the groups.

  18. Evaluation of bone remodeling around single dental implants of different lengths: a mechanobiological numerical simulation and validation using clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Mercuri, Emílio Graciliano Ferreira; Senna, Plinio Mendes; Assis, Neuza Maria Souza Picorelli; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic models have been proposed to explain adaptive behavior of bone to loading; however, these models have not been applied to explain the biomechanics of short dental implants. Purpose of present study was to simulate bone remodeling around single implants of different lengths using mechanoregulatory tissue differentiation model derived from the Stanford theory, using finite elements analysis (FEA) and to validate the theoretical prediction with the clinical findings of crestal bone loss. Loading cycles were applied on 7-, 10-, or 13-mm-long dental implants to simulate daily mastication and bone remodeling was assessed by changes in the strain energy density of bone after a 3, 6, and 12 months of function. Moreover, clinical findings of marginal bone loss in 45 patients rehabilitated with same implant designs used in the simulation (n = 15) were computed to validate the theoretical results. FEA analysis showed that although the bone density values reduced over time in the cortical bone for all groups, bone remodeling was independent of implant length. Clinical data showed a similar pattern of bone resorption compared with the data generated from mathematical analyses, independent of implant length. The results of this study showed that the mechanoregulatory tissue model could be employed in monitoring the morphological changes in bone that is subjected to biomechanical loads. In addition, the implant length did not influence the bone remodeling around single dental implants during the first year of loading.

  19. Bone integration capability of nanopolymorphic crystalline hydroxyapatite coated on titanium implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki T

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Masahiro Yamada*, Takeshi Ueno*, Naoki Tsukimura, Takayuki Ikeda, Kaori Nakagawa, Norio Hori, Takeo Suzuki, Takahiro OgawaLaboratory of Bone and Implant Sciences, The Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, Division of Advanced Prosthodontics, Biomaterials and Hospital Dentistry, UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The mechanism by which hydroxyapatite (HA-coated titanium promotes bone–implant integration is largely unknown. Furthermore, refining the fabrication of nanostructured HA to the level applicable to the mass production process for titanium implants is challenging. This study reports successful creation of nanopolymorphic crystalline HA on microroughened titanium surfaces using a combination of flame spray and low-temperature calcination and tests its biological capability to enhance bone–implant integration. Sandblasted microroughened titanium implants and sandblasted + HA-coated titanium implants were subjected to biomechanical and histomorphometric analyses in a rat model. The HA was 55% crystallized and consisted of nanoscale needle-like architectures developed in various diameters, lengths, and orientations, which resulted in a 70% increase in surface area compared to noncoated microroughened surfaces. The HA was free from impurity contaminants, with a calcium/phosphorus ratio of 1.66 being equivalent to that of stoichiometric HA. As compared to microroughened implants, HA-coated implants increased the strength of bone–implant integration consistently at both early and late stages of healing. HA-coated implants showed an increased percentage of bone–implant contact and bone volume within 50 µm proximity of the implant surface, as well as a remarkably reduced percentage of soft tissue intervention between bone and the implant surface. In contrast, bone volume outside the 50 µm border was lower around HA-coated implants. Thus, this study

  20. Comparison of implant stability measurement devices for bone-anchored hearing aid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westover, Lindsey; Faulkner, Gary; Hodgetts, William; Raboud, Don

    2018-01-01

    The success of implants for bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHA) relies on proper osseointegration at the bone-implant interface. Clinical evaluation of implant stability is important in prescribing loading, identifying the risk of failure, and monitoring the long-term health of the implant. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate 2 measurement systems for BAHA implant stability: the most commonly used, Osstell implant stability quotient (ISQ), and a newly developed advance system for implant stability testing (ASIST). BAHA implants (Oticon Medical Ponto and Cochlear BAHA Connect systems) were installed in plastic materials with adhesive to simulate implants integrated in bone with varying levels of interface stiffness. Different lengths of BAHA abutments were used with each implant specimen, and stability measurements were obtained with both the Osstell ISQ and the ASIST systems. The measurement systems were evaluated in terms of sensitivity to differences in interface stiffness and the effect of abutment length on the stability measurement. Repeated measures ANOVA followed by post hoc t tests were used for the comparisons with a Bonferroni adjusted alpha value of .05/15 = .003 to control for potential type 1 errors. Changing the abutment length of a single implant installation had minimal effect on the ASIST stability coefficient, whereas large variations were observed in the Osstell implant stability quotient (ISQ). The Osstell showed a clear relationship of decreasing ISQ with increasing abutment length for both the Oticon Medical and the Cochlear implant systems. Both the ASIST and the Osstell were found to be sensitive to changes in interface properties, with the ASIST being more sensitive to these changes. The ASIST system is more sensitive to changes in interface properties and shows smaller variation because of changes in abutment length than the Osstell ISQ system. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

  1. Comparison of dental implant stabilities by impact response and resonance frequencies using artificial bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Seung; Lee, Woo-Jin; Choi, Soon-Chul; Lee, Sam-Sun; Heo, Min-Suk; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Kim, Tae-Il; Yi, Won-Jin

    2014-06-01

    We compared implant stability as determined by the peak frequency from the impact response with the implant stability quotient (ISQ) by resonance frequency analysis (RFA) in various artificial bone conditions. The clinical bone conditions were simulated using an artificial bone material with different cortical thicknesses and trabecular densities. The artificial bone material was solid, rigid polyurethane. The polyurethane foam of 0.8g/cm(3) density was used for the cortical bone layer, and that of 0.08, 0.16, 0.24, 0.32, and 0.48g/cm(3) densities for the trabecular bone layer. The cortical bone material of 4 different thicknesses (1.4, 1.6, 1.8, and 2.0mm) was attached to the trabecular bone with varying density. Two types of dental implants (10 and 13mm lengths of 4.0mm diameter) were placed into the artificial bone blocks. An inductive sensor was used to measure the vibration caused by tapping the adapter-implant assembly. The peak frequency of the power spectrum of the impact response was used as the criterion for implant stability. The ISQ value was also measured for the same conditions. The stability, as measured by peak frequency (SPF) and ISQ value, increased as the trabecular density and the cortical density increased in linear regression analysis. The SPF and ISQ values were highly correlated with each other when the trabecular bone density and cortical bone thickness changed (Pearson correlation=0.90, pbone thickness showed higher goodness of fit (R(2) measure) than the ISQ value with the cortical bone thickness. The SPF could differentiate implantation conditions as many as the ISQ value when the trabecular bone density and the cortical density changed. However, the ISQ value was not consistent with the general stability tendency in some conditions. The SPF showed better consistency and differentiability with implant stability than the ISQ value by resonance frequency analysis in the various implantation conditions. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by

  2. Crestal bone remodeling around implants placed using a short drilling protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratu, Emanuel; Mihali, Sorin; Shapira, Lior; Bratu, Dana Cristina; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the influence of a short drilling protocol on peri-implant crestal bone levels. Forty implants were placed in the posterior mandibles of 20 patients. The implants (diameter, 4.2 mm; length, 10 to 11.5 mm) were inserted in pairs: one implant was inserted using the standard drilling protocol (five drills in sequence), while the other was inserted using the short drilling protocol sequence (three drills). All implants received healing abutments and were restored with single-unit restorations after 3 months of healing. Analysis of crestal bone level was based on radiographs taken at insertion and at 3, 6, and 12 months after insertion. The results were analyzed using software Image J 1.46r (National Institutes of Health). Crestal bone level was measured in millimeters at the distal aspect of each implant. None of the implants in either group was lost during the 12-month follow-up period, and all patients completed the follow-up examination. The drilling time for the insertion of one implant with the short drilling protocol was 1.03 ± 3.63 minutes compared to 1.57 ± 2.88 minutes for the standard protocol. The mean values of crestal bone loss at 12 months were 0.94 ± 0.43 mm for implants placed using the standard protocol and 0.90 ± 0.33 mm for implants placed using the short drilling protocol. No statistically significant differences were noted. Using the short drilling protocol reduced the surgery time by approximately 50% and did not affect crestal bone remodeling during the first year postinsertion.

  3. One-piece implants: placement timing, surgical technique, loading protocol, and marginal bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prithviraj, D R; Gupta, Vikas; Muley, Ninad; Sandhu, Pushpinder

    2013-04-01

    Osseointegration being an accepted and well-documented concept, attention is now directed towards simplification of the mechanical design of implants and towards achieving biomechanical success. The aim of this literature review is to provide an overview of the one-piece implant, with its advantages and disadvantages over a conventional two-piece implant. The PubMed database was searched in the English language using the keywords one-piece implant, single-piece implant, single-stage implant surgery, and two-piece implant. Articles were selected on the basis of whether they had sufficient information related to placement timing, surgical procedure used, loading protocol, follow-up periods, marginal bone loss, and implant success rates of one-piece implants. For inclusion, a study group must have had a minimum of 30 one-piece implants followed for at least 1 year. Nineteen articles were subjected to the selection criteria. Out of 19 clinical trials only 11 met the selection criteria. Five parameters were taken into consideration for studying one-piece implants: placement timing, surgical technique, loading protocol, marginal bone loss, and implant survival rate. The data from the identified studies were tabulated according to these parameters and discussed. Delayed placement of one-piece implants is more commonly practiced than extraction and immediate placement. Most surgeons prefer surgeries using flaps as compared to flapless surgeries, and in most cases, one-piece implants were loaded immediately. Limited literature reveals both positive and negative results regarding the effect of a one-piece implant system on surrounding hard and soft tissues. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Laser-Modified Surface Enhances Osseointegration and Biomechanical Anchorage of Commercially Pure Titanium Implants for Bone-Anchored Hearing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Omar; Simonsson, Hanna; Palmquist, Anders; Thomsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants inserted in the temporal bone are a vital component of bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS). Despite low implant failure levels, early loading protocols and simplified procedures necessitate the application of implants which promote bone formation, bone bonding and biomechanical stability. Here, screw-shaped, commercially pure titanium implants were selectively laser ablated within the thread valley using an Nd:YAG laser to produce a microtopography with a superimposed nanotexture and a thickened surface oxide layer. State-of-the-art machined implants served as controls. After eight weeks’ implantation in rabbit tibiae, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) values increased from insertion to retrieval for both implant types, while removal torque (RTQ) measurements showed 153% higher biomechanical anchorage of the laser-modified implants. Comparably high bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC) were recorded for both implant types but with distinctly different failure patterns following biomechanical testing. Fracture lines appeared within the bone ~30–50 μm from the laser-modified surface, while separation occurred at the bone-implant interface for the machined surface. Strong correlations were found between RTQ and BIC and between RFA at retrieval and BA. In the endosteal threads, where all the bone had formed de novo, the extracellular matrix composition, the mineralised bone area and osteocyte densities were comparable for the two types of implant. Using resin cast etching, osteocyte canaliculi were observed directly approaching the laser-modified implant surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed canaliculi in close proximity to the laser-modified surface, in addition to a highly ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils aligned parallel to the implant surface contour. It is concluded that the physico-chemical surface properties of laser-modified surfaces (thicker oxide, micro- and nanoscale texture) promote bone bonding

  5. Bone replacement following dental trauma prior to implant surgery - present status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallman, Mats; Mordenfeld, Arne; Strandkvist, Tomas

    Dento-alveolar trauma often leads to a need for reconstruction of the alveolar crest before an implant can be placed. Although autogenous bone grafts is considered the 'gold standard', this may be associated with patient morbidity and graft resorption. Consequently, the use of bone substitutes has

  6. Simultaneous maxillary sinus lifting and implant placement with autogenous parietal bone graft: outcome of 17 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Salah; Krenkel, Christian

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the surgical technique of sinus floor elevation with autogenous parietal bone grafting in conjunction with immediate dental implants for the reconstruction of the maxilla in deficient maxillary alveolar ridges. Seventeen patients who underwent sinus floor elevation with bone graft from the parietal bone between 2005 and 2007 were included in the study. Cases of extremely deficient bone level in the alveolar ridgeAnkylos®) with different length and diameter were placed immediately after the graft was placed. Strict oral hygiene was required for the patients. Presurgical and postsurgical panoramic radiographs were taken. A high-quality reconstruction with an increase in lifted sinus bone height was achieved with parietal bone particulates. Seventy-three implants were clinically osseointegrated and four implants were lost giving a success rate 94.8%. No correlation was found between failure and the surgery. The encouraging results of this study suggest that the technique of reconstruction of the sinus floor and the resorbed alveolar ridge using an autogenous parietal bone graft is reliable, giving the surgeon the opportunity to successfully perform immediate implant placement in more difficult and deficient maxillary alveolar bone height. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Maxillary bone grafting for insertion of endosseous implants : results after 12-124 months

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar, GM; Timmenga, NM; Reintsema, H; Stegenga, B; Vissink, A

    Insertion of endosseous implants in the atrophic maxilla is often complicated because of lack of supporting bone. Augmentation of the floor of the maxillary sinus with autogenous bone graft has been proven to be a reliable treatment modality, at least in the short term. The long-term clinical and

  8. Alveolar Bone Expansion for Implant Placement in Compromised Aesthetic Zone – Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Jumshad B; Alam, Md Nazish; Singh, Gurudeep; Chandrasekaran, S.N

    2014-01-01

    Implant placement and restoration of compromised alveolar ridges in the aesthetic zone has always been a challenge to the oral implantologists. The use of bone expanders and bone condensers without the use of traditional drilling sequences in this scenario is becoming popular because of its predictable results. Xenograft along with Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) used as scaffold also provides growth factors to accelerate both soft and hard tissue healing as well as regeneration. The paper highlights this combined approach in the placement of implants in compromised alveolar ridges with good results. All implants were successfully restored and followed up for one year. PMID:24701543

  9. In vivo biocompatibility and mechanical study of novel bone-bioactive materials for prosthetic implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X S; Revell, P A; Evans, S L; Tuke, M A; Gregson, P J

    1999-08-01

    Two epoxy materials with or without adhesively bonded hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings were studied for their biocompatibility and mechanical pushout strength using in vivo implantation in the rabbit lower femur for a duration of 10 days to 6 months. Both were two-part epoxies cured at room temperature for 24 h, with material 1 (Ampreg 26; SP Systems Limited, Cowes, UK) postcured at 110 degrees C (Tg approximately 80 degrees C) and Material 2 (CG5052; Ciba Geigy Limited, Cambridge, UK) at 125 degrees C (Tg approximately 120 degrees C). Implantation in dead rabbit bone was performed to provide mechanical baseline levels. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and conventionally HA-coated titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) were used as control materials. In the biological study, different fluorescent dyes were used to label newly formed bone. After 6 weeks of implantation, results from mechanical pushout tests showed that the interfacial shear strength (ISS) values were significantly higher than for dead bones with each of the different implants (p epoxies were fractured within the HA-coatings or the bone, while with HA-coated Ti-6Al-4V cracked between the coating and metal implant. The percentage of bone in contact with the implant surface was obtained by image analysis which showed that there were no significant differences between different materials after short time implantation (up to 6 week). Long-term implantation of the HA-coated material 2 showed that the percentage of bone contact had increased from 52.8+/-1.1% (6 week) to 80.0+/-0.3% (3 months) (p epoxy materials. In addition, there were always lower BMRs during the third week of implantation than other periods regardless of biomaterial implanted. The study indicated that the adhesively bonded HA-coated novel epoxy materials were superior to conventional plasma-sprayed Ti-6Al-4V implants with respect to both BMR and bone integration with the implant surfaces. Adhesively bonded HA-coated epoxy materials had similar ISS values

  10. Assessment of the increased calcification of the jaw bone with CT-Scan after dental implant placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunus, Barunawaty

    2011-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the changes of jaw bone density around the dental implant after placement using computed tomography scan (CT-Scan). This retrospective study consisted of 30 patients who had lost 1 posterior tooth in maxilla or mandible and installed dental implant. The patients took CT-Scan before and after implant placement. Hounsfield Unit (HU) was measured around the implants and evaluated the difference of HU before and after implant installation. The mean HU of jaw bone was 542.436 HU and 764.9 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). The means HUs for male were 632.3 HU and 932.2 HU and those for female 478.2 HU and 645.5 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). Also, the jaw bone with lower density needed longer period for implant procedure and the increased change of HU of jaw bone was less in the cases which needed longer period for osseointegration. CT-Scan could be used to assess the change of bone density around dental implants. Bone density around dental implant was increased after placement. The increased rate of bone density could be determined by the quality of jaw bone before implant placement.

  11. Assessment of the increased calcification of the jaw bone with CT-Scan after dental implant placement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunus, Barunawaty [Faculty of Dentistry, Hasanuddin University, Makassar (Malaysia)

    2011-06-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the changes of jaw bone density around the dental implant after placement using computed tomography scan (CT-Scan). This retrospective study consisted of 30 patients who had lost 1 posterior tooth in maxilla or mandible and installed dental implant. The patients took CT-Scan before and after implant placement. Hounsfield Unit (HU) was measured around the implants and evaluated the difference of HU before and after implant installation. The mean HU of jaw bone was 542.436 HU and 764.9 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). The means HUs for male were 632.3 HU and 932.2 HU and those for female 478.2 HU and 645.5 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). Also, the jaw bone with lower density needed longer period for implant procedure and the increased change of HU of jaw bone was less in the cases which needed longer period for osseointegration. CT-Scan could be used to assess the change of bone density around dental implants. Bone density around dental implant was increased after placement. The increased rate of bone density could be determined by the quality of jaw bone before implant placement.

  12. Evaluation of the Survival Rate and Bone Loss of Implants with Various Lengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR. Rokn

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The replacement of missing teeth with implant-associated restorations has become a widely used treatment modality in recent years. The length of dental implants may be a critical factor in achieving and maintaining osseointegration.Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival rate and bone loss of dental implants with different lengthsMaterials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed on 60 ITI-system implants, evenly distributed into three groups including 8, 10 and 12 mm high implants in the posterior segments of both jaws. Demographic information, oral hygiene,cigarette smoking, implant length, duration of implant placement (at least 24 months,bleeding on probing index and pocket probing depth were recorded for all participants.Bone loss was calculated using pre- and post-operative panoramic radiographs.Results: The mean rate of bone loss was different among the three groups and were found to be 0.21 (0.45, 0.3 (0.41 and 0.43 (0.55 mm in the 8, 10, and 12 mm high implants, respectively. Neither mean bone loss nor bleeding on probing index showed significant differences with implant length. A significant correlation was found between implant length and pocket probing depth (P<0.0001.Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that both short (8 mm high and long (10 or 12 mm high implants may be used with nearly equal success rates in the posterior segments of the jaws.

  13. Assessment of alveolar bone height and width using 64-MDCT examination for dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiya, Kotaro; Kaneda, Takashi; Sekiya, Keiko; Mori, Shintaro; Sakayanagi, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    There have been many reports showing the usefulness of CT examinations for preoperative dental implant treatment, and some reports on clinical statistics using CT examinations. However, there have been few reports on alveolar bone height and width of over 1,000 Japanese cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate alveolar bone height and width of 4,123 sites in 1,056 Japanese cases using preoperative CT examinations. The subjects consisted of 4,123 regions in 1,056 cases (370 males and 686 females, mean age 56.1 years old, range 15-87) of preoperative CT examinations conducted from January 2008 to March 2009. The CT examinations were performed using the Aquilion TM 64 (Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation) as the multi detector row CT (MDCT) unit, and ZIOSTATION (ZIOSOFT) as the workstation. The CT images were displayed on the workstation, and the alveolar bone height and width were measured to one decimal place (rounded off to two decimal places). The average alveolar bone height was 14.8 mm (SD±3.8) in the upper anterior area, 11.2 mm (SD±5.5) in the upper premolar area, 6.8 mm (SD±5.4) in the upper molar area, 19.5 mm (SD±5.4) in the lower anterior area, 14.2 mm (SD±3.9) in the lower premolar area, and 13.4 mm (SD±3.4) in the lower molar area. The average alveolar bone width was 4.3 mm (SD±1.9) in the anterior area, 5.7 mm (SD±2.3) in the upper premolar area, 7.9 mm (SD±3.1) in the upper molar area, 4.8 mm (SD±2.1) in the lower anterior area, 5.9 mm (SD±2.2) in the lower premolar area, and 6.9 mm (SD±2.5) in the lower molar area. Our results using preoperative CT examinations indicated that many of the Japanese cases had insufficient alveolar bone height and width for dental implants. (author)

  14. Bone compaction enhances fixation of weightbearing titanium implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, Søren Vedding; Rahbek, Ole; Vestermark, Marianne Toft

    2005-01-01

    are weightbearing, the effects of compaction on weightbearing implants were examined. The hypothesis was that compaction would increase implant fixation compared with conventional drilling. Porous-coated titanium implants were inserted bilaterally into the weightbearing portion of the femoral condyles of dogs...

  15. Performance of the Straumann Bone Level Implant system for anterior single-tooth replacements in augmented and nonaugmented sites: a prospective cohort study with 60 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santing, Hendrik J; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Vissink, Arjan; den Hartog, Laurens; Meijer, Henny J A

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate radiographic, clinical and aesthetic outcomes and patient satisfaction of cases treated with platform-switched single implant restorations in the aesthetic region of the maxilla. Furthermore, the influence of an augmentation procedure 3 months before implant placement and the type of restoration (screw-retained vs. cement-retained) was evaluated. Sixty patients with a missing anterior tooth in the maxilla were treated with a Straumann Bone Level Implant. Bone augmentation was performed in 29 patients at 3 months before implant placement. Implants were loaded after 3 months of submerged healing. Follow-up was conducted at 7 and 18 months after implant placement. Peri-implant mucosa and implant crown aesthetic outcomes were determined using the Implant Crown Aesthetic Index (ICAI) and the Pink Esthetic Score-White Esthetic Score (PES-WES). No implants were lost. At 18 months after implant placement, mean bone level change was -0.10 ± 0.27 mm and mean probing pocket depth was 2.57 mm. No differences were found between augmented and nonaugmented sites (P = 0.28). The ICAI indicated satisfactory mucosa and crown aesthetics in 67% and 75% of the cases, respectively, while the PES score was 14.4. ICAI mucosa (P = 0.004) and PES (P = 0.02) scores were significantly less favourable for augmented sites compared with nonaugmented sites. Patient satisfaction was high (8.9 ± 1.1 on VAS-score). From the present prospective, clinical study, it can be concluded that the Straumann Bone Level Implant shows an excellent survival rate, marginal bone stability and good clinical and aesthetic results. Bone augmentation before implant placement does not lead to more marginal bone loss. However, less favourable pink aesthetic outcomes were found in augmented sites compared with nonaugmented sites, while no differences were found between cement-retained and screw-retained restorations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Clinical and Radiographic Assessment of Peri-Implant Tissue in Posterior Areas with and Without the Need for Guided Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Arabi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Dental implants are increasingly used in resorbed alveolar ridges, and the success of implants inserted concomitantly with guided bone regeneration (GBR needs to be evaluated. Objectives This study aimed to clinically and radiographically assess the peri-implant tissues in the posterior maxilla and mandible in cases in which dehiscence or fenestration occurred at the time of implant surgery and treated with GBR (simultaneously with implant placement in one session. A comparison was also made between the above-mentioned patients and controls in which implants were placed in intact bone (entire length of implant in bone. Patients and Methods This study was conducted on 12 patients as cases who received 17 standard implants (dehiscence or fenestration occurred after placement of 4 mm diameter standard implants and GBR was performed and 10 patients as the control group (those who received 17 standard implants, 4 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length, in adequate bone. Periapical (PA radiographs were obtained in the first 24 hours post-surgery. Radiographs were repeated at one month, at the time of loading (two months post-surgery, and at three and six months after loading to assess marginal bone loss. To assess the peri-implant soft tissue, thickness and width of the keratinized gingiva were evaluated. Data were analyzed using t-test and repeated measures analysis of variance. The level of significance was set to P = 0.05. Results The difference in distance from the bone crest to the implant shoulder between the two groups of cases and controls was significant at the following time points: baseline and 2 months post-surgery (P = 0.000, baseline and 6 months after loading (P = 0.01, 2 months post-surgery and 3 months after loading (P = 0.00, and 2 months post-surgery and 6 months after loading (P = 0.00. Changes in the width of the keratinized gingiva were not significant in the two groups of cases and controls at 2 months post-surgery (P = 0

  17. Bone dimensional variations at implants placed in fresh extraction sockets: a multilevel multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Cristiano; Sanz, Mariano; Cecchinato, Denis; Pjetursson, Bjarni; Ferrus, Jorge; Lang, Niklaus P; Lindhe, Jan

    2010-01-01

    To use multilevel, multivariate models to analyze factors that may affect bone alterations during healing after an implant immediately placed into an extraction socket. Data included in the current analysis were obtained from a clinical trial in which a series of measurements were performed to characterize the extraction site immediately after implant installation and at re-entry 4 months later. A regression multilevel, multivariate model was built to analyze factors affecting the following variables: (i) the distance between the implant surface and the outer bony crest (S-OC), (ii) the horizontal residual gap (S-IC), (iii) the vertical residual gap (R-D) and (iv) the vertical position of the bone crest opposite the implant (R-C). It was demonstrated that (i) the S-OC change was significantly affected by the thickness of the bone crest; (ii) the size of the residual gap was dependent of the size of the initial gap and the thickness of the bone crest; and (iii) the reduction of the buccal vertical gap was dependent on the age of the subject. Moreover, the position of the implant opposite the alveolar crest of the buccal ridge and its bucco-lingual implant position influenced the amount of buccal crest resorption. Clinicians must consider the thickness of the buccal bony wall in the extraction site and the vertical as well as the horizontal positioning of the implant in the socket, because these factors will influence hard tissue changes during healing.

  18. Micro-computerised tomography optimisation for the measurement of bone mineral density around titanium dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C.; Swain, M.; Duncan, W.

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dental implants (screws) are commonly used to replace missing teeth by forming a biological union with bone ('osseointegration'). Micro-computerised tomography (μCT) may be useful for measuring bone mineral density around dental implants. Major issues arise because of various artefacts that occur with polychromatic X-rays associated bench type instruments that may compromise interpretation of the observations. In this study various approaches to minimise artefacts such as; beam hardening, filtering and edge effects are explored with a homogeneous polymeric material, Teflon, with and without an implant present. The implications of the limitations of using such polychromatic μCT systems to quantify bone mineral density adjacent to the implant are discussed. (author)

  19. Identification of induced and naturally occurring conductive hearing loss in mice using bone conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhan, David; McKinnon, Melissa L; Rosowski, John J

    2017-03-01

    While many mouse models of hearing loss have been described, a significant fraction of the genetic defects in these models affect both the inner ear and middle ears. A common method used to separate inner-ear (sensory-neural) from middle-ear (conductive) pathologies in the hearing clinic is the combination of air-conduction and bone-conduction audiometry. In this report, we investigate the use of air- and bone-conducted evoked auditory brainstem responses to perform a similar separation in mice. We describe a technique by which we stimulate the mouse ear both acoustically and via whole-head vibration. We investigate the sensitivity of this technique to conductive hearing loss by introducing middle-ear lesions in normal hearing mice. We also use the technique to investigate the presence of an age-related conductive hearing loss in a common mouse model of presbycusis, the BALB/c mouse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Marginal bone level changes and implant stability after loading are not influenced by baseline microstructural bone characteristics: 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Danilo Rocha; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Lindh, Christina; Ribeiro-Rotta, Rejane Faria

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different bone tissue characteristics of implant sites on changes in marginal bone level and implant stability over time. One hundred and one implants were inserted in 41 patients. Cortical bone thickness of the alveolar ridge was measured on computed tomography (CT) images. Histomorphometric and microtomographic analyses (microCT) were performed in bone specimens obtained by using a trephine bur, at first drilling. Implant stability quotient (ISQ) measured by resonance frequency analysis (RFA) was registered at implant insertion. Implant stability quotient was measured also at the stages of uncovering, loading and at the 1-year follow-up, when standardized periapical radiographs were taken to measure the marginal bone level (MBL). Descriptive statistics, Spearman's rho correlation and multiple linear regression were used for data analysis (P  0.05). Bivariate correlation also showed no association among these microstructural parameters and the outcomes evaluated. There was no correlation between cortical thickness and MBL changes (r = -0.029; P = 0.832) and between cortical thickness and ISQ changes (r = 0.145; P = 0.292). Microstructural bone characteristics of implant sites have no effect on changes in marginal bone level and implant stability as measured by RFA. Bone morphology cannot predict implant treatment success over time. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Follow-up study of dental implants with bioactive oxide films on bone tissue healing and osseointegration: clinical radiography and bone quality analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsi-Jen; Cheng, Han-Yi; Ou, Keng-Liang; Sinrang, Andi Wardihan; Huang, Mao-Suan; Lin, Li Hsiang

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate osseointegration and bone stress resulted during the first 3 months after the installation of functional implants modified with bioactive oxide. Several studies have investigated finite element models for dental implants; however, only a few have examined a model for the implants during different stages of osseointegration. In this study, mandible models were reconstructed using computer tomographic data, and bone qualities and stress distributions were investigated as well. Bone quality increased rapidly within the 3-month bone healing time. Data analysis indicated that the bone stresses increased with the progress of osseointegration, and the maximum stresses were obtained at the position around the first screw. The results confirmed that functional films could improve the biomechanical properties of the implants and promote the initial bone stability. Furthermore, potential clinical benefit can be obtained due to the inducing superior biomechanical behavior in dental implants.

  2. Virtual quad zygoma implant placement using cone beam computed tomography: sufficiency of malar bone volume, intraosseous implant length, and relationship to the sinus according to the degree of alveolar bone atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertos Quílez, J; Guijarro-Martínez, R; Aboul-Hosn Centenero, S; Hernández-Alfaro, F

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the malar bone volume and length that a zygomatic implant can engage, and the relationship to the sinus according to the degree of alveolar bone atrophy. A three-dimensional evaluation was performed using cone beam computed tomography scans from 23 patients with a totally edentulous maxilla; quad zygoma implants were virtually placed. The predictor variable was the amount of malar bone volume and length that a zygomatic implant can engage. The primary outcome variable was the relationship to the sinus according to the degree of alveolar bone atrophy. Other variables were the residual alveolar bone height to the floor of the sinus and the nasal cavity. The mean volume of malar bone engaged in this sample of 92 zygomatic implants was 0.19±0.06cm 3 . The implant had an extrasinus path in 60.9% of cases, a parasinus path in 25%, and an intrasinus path in 14.1%. The results suggest that the average volume of malar bone engaged by a zygomatic implant is constant regardless of implant position and the degree of alveolar bone atrophy. As alveolar atrophy increases, the trajectory of the implant becomes more parasinus and intrasinus. The examiners were able to find enough bone to adequately distribute the implants in all cases. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and Assessment of a 3D-Printed Scaffold with rhBMP-2 for an Implant Surgical Guide Stent and Bone Graft Material: A Pilot Animal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Cheol Bae

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new concept of a 3D-printed scaffold was introduced for the accurate placement of an implant and the application of a recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2-loaded bone graft. This preliminary study was conducted using two adult beagles to evaluate the 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP/bone decellularized extracellular matrix (bdECM scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 for the simultaneous use as an implant surgical guide stent and bone graft material that promotes new bone growth. Teeth were extracted from the mandible of the beagle model and scanned by computed tomography (CT to fabricate a customized scaffold that would fit the bone defect. After positioning the implant guide scaffold, the implant was placed and rhBMP-2 was injected into the scaffold of the experimental group. The two beagles were sacrificed after three months. The specimen block was obtained and scanned by micro-CT. Histological analysis showed that the control and experimental groups had similar new bone volume (NBV, % but the experimental group with BMP exhibited a significantly higher bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %. Within the limitations of this preliminary study, a 3D-printed scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 can be used simultaneously as an implant surgical guide and a bone graft in a large bone defect site. Further large-scale studies will be needed to confirm these results.

  4. Development and Assessment of a 3D-Printed Scaffold with rhBMP-2 for an Implant Surgical Guide Stent and Bone Graft Material: A Pilot Animal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Cheol; Lee, Jin-Ju; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Park, Keun-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Seok; Bae, Eun-Bin; Choi, Jae-Won; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a new concept of a 3D-printed scaffold was introduced for the accurate placement of an implant and the application of a recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2)-loaded bone graft. This preliminary study was conducted using two adult beagles to evaluate the 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP)/bone decellularized extracellular matrix (bdECM) scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 for the simultaneous use as an implant surgical guide stent and bone graft material that promotes new bone growth. Teeth were extracted from the mandible of the beagle model and scanned by computed tomography (CT) to fabricate a customized scaffold that would fit the bone defect. After positioning the implant guide scaffold, the implant was placed and rhBMP-2 was injected into the scaffold of the experimental group. The two beagles were sacrificed after three months. The specimen block was obtained and scanned by micro-CT. Histological analysis showed that the control and experimental groups had similar new bone volume (NBV, %) but the experimental group with BMP exhibited a significantly higher bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %). Within the limitations of this preliminary study, a 3D-printed scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 can be used simultaneously as an implant surgical guide and a bone graft in a large bone defect site. Further large-scale studies will be needed to confirm these results. PMID:29258172

  5. Finite element stress analysis of edentulous mandibles with different bone types supporting multiple-implant superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Ericka Oliverira; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Freitas, Amilcar Chagas; Freitas, Manoel Martin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different types of bone on the stress distribution in the mandibular bone supporting a prefabricated bar-type implant prosthesis using three-dimensional finite element analysis. Four finite element models (M) of a completely edentulous mandibular arch were built. The bone types varied from type 1 to type 4 (M1, M2, M3, M4). The arch was restored using a prefabricated bar system supported by four interforaminal implants for the protocol prosthesis. Computer software was used to determine the stress fields. Three unilateral posterior loads (L) of 150 N were exerted on the prosthesis: L1, perpendicular to the prefabricated bar; L2, oblique (30 degrees) in the buccolingual direction; and L3, oblique (30 degrees) in the linguobuccal direction. The maximum principal stress (Omax) and the maximum principal strain (Emax) were obtained for cortical and trabecular bone. Types 3 and 4 bone showed the highest smax (MPa) in the cortical bone (19.9 and 18.2 for L1, 34.6 and 31.3 for L2, and 3.88 and 24.4 for L3, respectively). The maximum principal strain (Emax) was observed in type 4 cortical bone for all loads (1.80 for L1, 2.4 for L2, and 2.36 for L3). The cortical bone in M3 and M4 showed the highest stress concentration in the axial and buccolingual loading conditions. Bone types 1 and 2 showed the lowest stress concentrations. For the linguobuccal loading condition, the cortical bone in M4 showed the highest stress concentration, followed by bone types 3, 2, and 1. Cortical bone in M4 showed the highest strain for all loading conditions. The bone type might not be the only decisive factor to influence the stress distribution the bone supporting an implant prosthesis anchored by a prefabricated bar.

  6. Characterization of drug-release kinetics in trabecular bone from titania nanotube implants

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    Aw MS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Moom Sinn Aw,1 Kamarul A Khalid,2,3 Karan Gulati,1 Gerald J Atkins,2 Peter Pivonka,4 David M Findlay,2 Dusan Losic11School of Chemical Engineering, 2Discipline of Orthopaedics and Trauma, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 3Department of Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, International Islamic University Malaysia, Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia; 4Engineering Computational Biology Group, School of Computer Science and Software Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, AustraliaPurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the application of the three-dimensional bone bioreactor for studying drug-release kinetics and distribution of drugs in the ex vivo cancellous bone environment, and to demonstrate the application of nanoengineered titanium (Ti wires generated with titania nanotube (TNT arrays as drug-releasing implants for local drug deliveryMethods: Nanoengineered Ti wires covered with a layer of TNT arrays implanted in bone were used as a drug-releasing implant. Viable bovine trabecular bone was used as the ex vivo bone substrate embedded with the implants and placed in the bone reactor. A hydrophilic fluorescent dye (rhodamine B was used as the model drug, loaded inside the TNT–Ti implants, to monitor drug release and transport in trabecular bone. The distribution of released model drug in the bone was monitored throughout the bone structure, and concentration profiles at different vertical (0–5 mm and horizontal (0–10 mm distances from the implant surface were obtained at a range of release times from 1 hour to 5 days.Results: Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that well-ordered, vertically aligned nanotube arrays were formed on the surface of prepared TNT–Ti wires. Thermogravimetric analysis proved loading of the model drug and fluorescence spectroscopy was used to show drug-release characteristics in-vitro. The drug release from implants inserted into bone ex

  7. Evaluation of 4 mm implants in mandibular edentulous patients with reduced bone height. Surgical preliminary results

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    J.L. Calvo-Guirado

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Growing evidence has suggested the utility of short dental implants for oral reconstructive procedures in clinical situations of limited vertical bone height. The aim of this short comunication was to evaluate the clinical use of implants < 10 mm in length and to determine short implant-supported prosthesis success in the atrophic jaw. Materials and methods: Six women and three men were recruited for the treatment of edentulous mandibles. A total of 6 implants were inserted in each patient: two anterior implants of conventional lenght and four posterior 4 mm Titanium Zirconium (TiZr implants. The insertion torque and bone denisty were evaluated. Results: The mean insertion torque for the 4 mm implants was lower than for conventional ones, without any statistical difference. Moreover, most of the patients (88% showed a D2 bone type. Conclusion: The provision of short implant-supported prostheses in patients with atrophic alveolar ridges appears to be a successful treatment option in the short term; however, more scientific evidence is needed for the long term.

  8. Do dual-thread orthodontic mini-implants improve bone/tissue mechanical retention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yang-Sung; Chang, Yau-Zen; Yu, Jian-Hong; Lin, Chun-Li

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to understand whether the pitch relationship between micro and macro thread designs with a parametrical relationship in a dual-thread mini-implant can improve primary stability. Three types of mini-implants consisting of single-thread (ST) (0.75 mm pitch in whole length), dual-thread A (DTA) with double-start 0.375 mm pitch, and dual-thread B (DTB) with single-start 0.2 mm pitch in upper 2-mm micro thread region for performing insertion and pull-out testing. Histomorphometric analysis was performed in these specimens in evaluating peri-implant bone defects using a non-contact vision measuring system. The maximum inserted torque (Tmax) in type DTA was found to be the smallest significantly, but corresponding values found no significant difference between ST and DTB. The largest pull-out strength (Fmax) in the DTA mini-implant was found significantly greater than that for the ST mini-implant regardless of implant insertion orientation. Mini-implant engaged the cortical bone well as observed in ST and DTA types. Dual-thread mini-implant with correct micro thread pitch (parametrical relationship with macro thread pitch) in the cortical bone region can improve primary stability and enhanced mechanical retention.

  9. Navigated implantation after microsurgical bone transfer using intraoperatively acquired cone-beam computed tomography data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiland, M; Pohlenz, P; Blessmann, M; Werle, H; Fraederich, M; Schmelzle, R; Blake, F A S

    2008-01-01

    The use of a combination of intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and a navigation system via a spinal software platform for the navigated implantation of oral implants after microsurgical bone transfer is described. Intraoperative data sets were generated using Arcadis Orbic 3D (Siemens, Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) and immediately transferred to the VectorVision(2) navigation system (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany) via the NaviLink interface. In two patients who underwent microsurgical bone transfer for midfacial reconstruction, implants were placed using intraoperatively acquired CBCT data sets for planning and navigated insertion. In both cases, successful realization of the planned implant sites was achieved by the guidance of the drill, leading to rehabilitation of both patients. CBCT data generated by mobile systems are sufficient for the planning of implant position, and can be used for navigated insertion using tools originally developed for spinal surgery.

  10. Preoperative implant planning considering alveolar bone grafting needs and complication prediction using panoramic versus CBCT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Jacobs, Reinhilde [OIC, OMFS IMPATH Research Group, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Noriega, Jorge [Master of Periodontology, Universidad San Martin de Porres, Lima (Peru)

    2014-09-15

    This study was performed to determine the efficacy of observers' prediction for the need of bone grafting and presence of perioperative complications on the basis of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic radiographic (PAN) planning as compared to the surgical outcome. One hundred and eight partially edentulous patients with a need for implant rehabilitation were referred for preoperative imaging. Imaging consisted of PAN and CBCT images. Four observers carried out implant planning using PAN image datasets, and at least one month later, using CBCT image datasets. Based on their own planning, the observers assessed the need for bone graft augmentation as well as complication prediction. The implant length and diameter, the need for bone graft augmentation, and the occurrence of anatomical complications during planning and implant placement were statistically compared. In the 108 patients, 365 implants were installed. Receiver operating characteristic analyses of both PAN and CBCT preoperative planning showed that CBCT performed better than PAN-based planning with respect to the need for bone graft augmentation and perioperative complications. The sensitivity and the specificity of CBCT for implant complications were 96.5% and 90.5%, respectively, and for bone graft augmentation, they were 95.2% and 96.3%, respectively. Significant differences were found between PAN-based planning and the surgery of posterior implant lengths. Our findings indicated that CBCT-based preoperative implant planning enabled treatment planning with a higher degree of prediction and agreement as compared to the surgical standard. In PAN-based surgery, the prediction of implant length was poor.

  11. Implant angulation: 2-year retrospective analysis on the influence of dental implant angle insertion on marginal bone resorption in maxillary and mandibular osseous onlay grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaglia, Luca; Toti, Paolo; Sbordone, Carolina; Guidetti, Franco; Martuscelli, Ranieri; Sbordone, Ludovico

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the existence of correlations between marginal peri-implant linear bone loss and the angulation of implants in maxillary and mandibular augmented areas over the course of a 2-year survey. Dependent variables described the sample of the present retrospective chart review. By using three-dimensional radiographs, input variables, describing the implant angulation (buccal-lingual angle [φ] and mesial-distal angle [θ]) were measured; outcome variables described survival rate and marginal bone resorption (MBR) around dental implants in autogenous grafts (10 maxillae and 14 mandibles). Pairwise comparisons and linear correlation coefficient were computed. The peri-implant MBR in maxillary buccal and palatal areas appeared less intensive in the presence of an increased angulation of an implant towards the palatal side. Minor MBR was recorded around mandibular dental implants positioned at a right angle and slightly angulated towards the mesial. Resorption in buccal areas may be less intensive as the angulation of placed implants increases towards the palatal area in the maxilla, whereas for the mandible, a greater inclination towards the lingual area could be negative. In the mandibular group, when the implant was slightly angulated in the direction of the distal area, bone resorption seemed to be more marked in the buccal area. In the planning of dental implant placement in reconstructed alveolar bone with autograft, the extremely unfavourable resorption at the buccal aspect should be considered; this marginal bone loss seemed to be very sensitive to the angulation of the dental implant.

  12. Crestal bone preservation: A review of different approaches for successful implant therapy

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    D Krishna Prasad

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review all the possible methods to preserve the crestal bone, when each method should be used and their success rates in an attempt to address this complex problem of crestal bone resorption. "PubMed" and "Google Scholar" were used to find out any studies involving platform switching concept from 1990 up to 2009. Twenty-four studies involving methods for preservation of crestal bone were evaluated, which included 26% studies on platform switching, 22% on non-submerged approach, 17% on scalloped implants, 13% on progressive loading and 22% on immediate implant placement. Crestal bone preservation should be thought of starting from the design of the implant to be placed. The technique to be followed in a given case will depend upon the density of bone, force factors by the patient, bone volume and amount of soft tissues, etc. The best possible method or the combination of the methods should be used to preserve the crestal bone for the long-term success of the implants.

  13. Influence of implantoplasty on stress distribution of exposed implants at different bone insertion levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribst, João Paulo Mendes; Dal Piva, Amanda Maria de Oliveira; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Tango, Rubens Nisie

    2017-12-07

    This study evaluated the effect of implantoplasty on different bone insertion levels of exposed implants. A model of the Bone Level Tapered implant (Straumann Institute, Waldenburg, Switzerland) was created through the Rhinoceros software (version 5.0 SR8, McNeel North America, Seattle, WA, USA). The abutment was fixed to the implant through a retention screw and a monolithic crown was modeled over a cementation line. Six models were created with increasing portions of the implant threads exposed: C1 (1 mm), C2 (2 mm), C3 (3 mm), C4 (4 mm), C5 (5 mm) and C6 (6 mm). The models were made in duplicates and one of each pair was used to simulate implantoplasty, by removing the threads (I1, I2, I3, I4, I5 and I6). The final geometry was exported in STEP format to ANSYS (ANSYS 15.0, ANSYS Inc., Houston, USA) and all materials were considered homogeneous, isotropic and linearly elastic. To assess distribution of stress forces, an axial load (300 N) was applied on the cusp. For the periodontal insert, the strains increased in the peri-implant region according to the size of the exposed portion and independent of the threads' presence. The difference between groups with and without implantoplasty was less than 10%. Critical values were found when the inserted portion was smaller than the exposed portion. In the exposed implants, the stress generated on the implant and retention screw was higher in the models that received implantoplasty. For the bone tissue, exposure of the implant's thread was a damaging factor, independent of implantoplasty. Implantoplasty treatment can be safely used to control peri-implantitis if at least half of the implant is still inserted in bone.

  14. A Radiographic Comparison of Progressive and Conventional Loading on Crestal Bone Loss and Density in Single Implants

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    Majid Sorouri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Crestal bone loss is a biologic complication in implant dentistry. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of progressive and conventional loading on crestal bone height and bone density around single osseointegrated implants in posterior maxilla by a longitudinal radiographic assessment technique.Materials and methods: Twenty micro thread implants were placed in 10 patients (two implants per patient. One of the two implants of each patient was assigned to progressive and the other to conventional loading groups. Eight weeks after surgery, conventional implants were restored with a metal ceramic crown and progressive group underwent a progressive loading protocol. The progressive loading group takes different temporary acrylic crowns at 2, 4 and 6 months. After eight months, acrylic crowns were replaced with metal ceramic crown. Computer radiography of both progressive and conventional implants was taken at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. Image analysis was performed to measure height of crestal bone loss and bone density.Results: The mean values of crestal bone loss at month 12 were 0.11 (0.19 mm for progressively and 0.36 (0.36 mm for conventionally loaded implants, with a statistically significant difference (P 0.05.Conclusion: Progressive group showed less crestal bone loss in single osseointegrated implant than conventional group. Bone density around progressively loaded implants showed increase in crestal, middle and apica

  15. Narrow- versus mini-implants at crestal and subcrestal bone levels. Experimental study in beagle dogs at three months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Pérez-Albacete, Carlos; Aguilar-Salvatierra, Antonio; de Val Maté-Sánchez, José E; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael A; Abboud, Marcus; Velasco, Eugenio; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Romanos, Georgios E

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the osseointegration and crestal bone loss (CBL) in two implant designs with different diameters (Mini Sky® and Narrow Sky®) implants, placed at different vertical levels at healed canine ridges. The second, third, and fourth mandibular premolars of six Beagle dogs were extracted bilaterally. After 2 months healing, four implants divided into two groups according to their diameters (i.e., Narrow Sky® and Mini Sky®) were placed in each hemi-mandible at the level of the bone crest or 2 mm subcrestally. The animals were euthanized at 12 weeks and undecalcified samples were processed for histology. Histomorphometric analysis was carried out to compare bone-to-implant contacts (BIC) and crestal bone loss (CBL). There were not significant differences in CBL between groups when the implants were placed at subcrestal bone level (p > 0.05), meanwhile the CBL was significantly higher for both groups when the implants were inserted at crestal level (p mini-implants. Subcrestal insertion of both implants favors crestal bone preservation but crestal insertion of both designs is associated with crestal bone loss The study shows that narrow implants protect peri-implant crestal bone.

  16. No influence of simultaneous bone-substitute application on the success of immediately loaded dental implants: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Sigmar; Behrend, Detlef; Kundt, Günther; Ottl, Peter; Frerich, Bernhard; Warkentin, Mareike

    2013-06-01

    To examine the influence of bone-substitute application during implantation on the success of immediately placed and loaded dental implants. A total of 147 consecutive patients (age, 16.5-80.4 years) were provided with 696 immediately loaded implants. The mean follow-up time was 34.1 months. Of these implants, 50.4% (n=351) were immediately placed into extraction sockets. A total of 119 implants were added by simultaneous bone-substitute application (NanoBone, Artoss GmbH, Rostock Germany), whereas the other implants were placed in healed bone. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using IBM SPSS V.20. The overall implant success rate was 96.1%. Implants with simultaneous bone replacement had a hazard ratio of 0.877 (p=0.837); 95% CI, 0.253-3.04). Factors found to be statistically significant modifiers of success on multivariate analysis (p<0.05) included type of superstructure (p<0.001), implant-abutment connection (p<0.001), membrane use (p=0.010), and jaw (p=0.026). None of the other factors investigated were significant modifiers. The present study demonstrates high success rates for immediately loaded implants and their superstructures independent of the simultaneous application of bone substitute. The declared aim of socket preservation, the prevention avoiding bone loss, is achieved in the immediate implant placement scenario under immediate-loading conditions.

  17. Flapless Postextraction Socket Implant Placement, Part 2: The Effects of Bone Grafting and Provisional Restoration on Peri-implant Soft Tissue Height and Thickness- A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Stephen J; Salama, Maurice A; Garber, David A; Salama, Henry; Sarnachiaro, Guido O; Sarnachiaro, Evangelina; Gotta, Sergio Luis; Reynolds, Mark A; Saito, Hanae; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of evaluating the changes in peri-implant soft tissue dimensions associated with immediate implant placement into anterior postextraction sockets for four treatment groups: no BGPR (no bone graft, no provisional restoration), PR (no bone graft, provisional restoration), BG (bone graft, no provisional restoration), and BGPR (bone graft, provisional restoration). The vertical distance of the peri-implant soft tissue was greater for grafted sites than for nongrafted ones (2.72 mm vs 2.29 mm, P provisional restorations compared to sites without them (2.81 mm vs 2.37 mm, P provisional restoration.

  18. Significance of buccopalatal implant position, biotype, platform switching, and pre-implant bone augmentation on the level of the midbuccal mucosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiderveld, Elise G; den Hartog, Laurens; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Meijer, Henny J A

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed whether buccopalatal implant position, biotype, platform switching, and pre-implant bone augmentation affects the level of the midbuccal mucosa (MBM). Ninety patients with a single-tooth implant in the esthetic zone were included. The level of the MBM was measured on photographs

  19. A 3-year post-loading report of a randomised controlled trial on the rehabilitation of posterior atrophic mandibles: short implants or longer implants in vertically augmented bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Cannizarro, Gioacchino; Soardi, Elisa; Pellegrino, Gerardo; Pistilli, Roberto; Felice, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether 6.3 mm-long implants could be a suitable alternative to longer implants placed in vertically augmented atrophic posterior mandibles. Sixty partially edentulous patients having 7 to 8 mm of residual crestal height and at least 5.5 mm thickness measured on CT scans above the mandibular canal were randomised according to a parallel group design either to receive 1 to 3 submerged 6.3 mm-long implants or 9.3 mm or longer implants (30 patients per group) placed in vertically augmented bone. Bone was augmented with interpositional an organic bovine bone blocks covered by resorbable barriers. Grafts were left to heal for 5 months before implant placement. Four months later, provisional acrylic prostheses were delivered, and were then replaced after another 4 months by definitive metal-ceramic prostheses. Outcome measures were prosthesis and implant failures, complications, and radiographic peri-implant marginal bone level changes. All patients were followed up to 3 years after loading. Four patients dropped out, two from each group. The augmentation procedure failed in two patients and only 6.3 mm-long implants could be inserted. There were no statistically significant differences for prosthesis and implant failures. Three prostheses could not be placed or had to be remade in the short implant group versus 4 prostheses in the augmented group. Two short implants failed versus 3 long implants, all in different patients. There were statistically significantly more complications in augmented patients (22 complications in 20 augmented patients versus 5 complications in 5 patients of the short implant group). Both groups gradually lost peri-implant bone in a statistically significant way at 4 months, and 1 and 3 years after loading. Three years after loading, patients of the short implant group lost an average of 1.24 mm of peri-implant bone compared with 1.76 mm in the long implant group. Short implants experienced statistically significantly less bone loss

  20. A 3-D Finite Element Analytical Study to Evaluate the Effects of Newer Variable Implant Thread Pattern in Different Bone Densities

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    Abhijeet Ramchandra Kore

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Success of dental implant treatment depends on number of patient related and procedure dependent parameters. Various studies have shown that bone quality and implant design are two important factors in the success of dental implant treatment. Today, many implant systems are coming up with variable thread patterns. There is not much literature available on the effects of such variable thread patterns within different bone densities. Aim: The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of two different implant thread patterns in two different bone densities using three dimensional finite element analyses. Materials and Methods: A three-dimensional finite element model of a mandibular section of bone and an implant was developed. 4.2x12 mm screw type dental implants with two different thread designs (buttress thread design and variable thread design and a metal ceramic crown using Co-Cr and feldspathic porcelain were modelled. The model was developed with finite element software and two types of bone qualities were prepared (D2 and D4. A load of 450 N was applied in a vertical direction and in an oblique direction to the central fossa, buccal cusp and distal fossa of the mandibular first molar crown. Results: For the variable thread design, von Mises stresses developed within bone were 109.89 MPa and 257.46 MPa for vertical and oblique loading respectively, in D2 type of bone. While in D4, the stresses were 243.91 MPa and 371.81 MPa for vertical and oblique loading respectively. Similarly, for buttress thread design, stresses were 113.51 MPa and 176.14 MPa for vertical and oblique loading respectively in D2 type of bone; while in D4 type of bone the stresses were 290.99 MPa and 481.27 MPa respectively within the bone. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the von Mises stresses were more in D4 type of bone as compared to D2 type of bone for both, the variable and buttress thread designs. The study also compared the

  1. Expression of bone matrix proteins during the osseus healing of topical conditioned implants: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Thorwarth, Michael; Plesinac, Alexandra; Wiltfang, Joerg; Rupprecht, Stephan

    2006-12-01

    Osseointegration of implants depends on time and local bone conditions regarding quality and quantity. This led to the bone classification by Lekholm et al. The aim of the present study was to follow the expression of bone matrix proteins during the phase of osseointegration after conditioning of the bone bed by means of immunohistochemistry. In the porcine frontal skull, implant beds of identical size were created. Before placement of the implants (Ankylos 4 x 3.5 mm), the implant beds were conditioned using bone condensation (cond), an osteoinductive collagen (Co) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). These conditioning methods were compared with standard procedure. The animals were sacrificed after 2, 4 and 8 weeks. The specimens were then analyzed by light microcopy and immunohistochemistry for expression of bone morphogenic proteins (BMP)2, procollagen I and osteocalcin (OC). Light microscopy revealed an initial effect of condensation and the bovine collagen at 2 weeks in comparison with the standard group. The PRP did not achieve a significant effect. At 8 weeks, the results of the standard, bone condensation and the bovine collagen group had aligned. The PRP group showed a significantly lower bone-implant contact (BIC) (P=0.003) compared with the standard group. BMP2 expression was significantly higher in all evaluated test groups at 4 and 8 weeks, as well as at 2 weeks in the condensation group. The procollagen I expression at 2 weeks was significantly increased for PRP and lower in the collagen and condensation group compared with standard procedure. Values for 4 and 8 weeks were slightly higher than in the standard group. No significant differences were obvious in the OC group at any time. During the initial healing phase, an effect of the evaluated methods of topical bone conditioning can be demonstrated by differences in the expression of BMP2 and procollagen I. These findings had leveled at 8 weeks and were, in contrast, not detectable in the expression of

  2. Alveolar bone preservation subsequent to miniscrew implant placement in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsen, B; Huja, S S; Chien, H-H; Dalstra, M

    2015-05-01

    To assess the effects of transcortical screws on alveolar (bone) ridge preservation following extraction. Four adult beagle dogs had mandibular premolars extracted bilaterally. After 6 weeks, using a split-mouth design, two transcortical screws were inserted unilaterally below the alveolar crest on the experimental side in the region of the extraction. The dogs were killed after 12 weeks. The bone at the extraction sites was analyzed using μCT and 3D analysis. A cylindrical core was placed around the actual and a virtual screw placed in the identical location on the control side. The bone volume within the cylinders was quantified. An insertion of a dental implant was simulated bilaterally at the insertion site. The height of the clinical crown and the alveolar crest were determined on both sides. The bone turnover was assessed histomorphometrically on un-decalcified bucco-lingual sections stained with basic fuchsine and toluidine blue. Comparison of the two sides revealed a significant difference both with regard to the bone volume and morphology. The transcortical screw caused an increase in bone density and less ridge atrophy. When simulating a dental implant placement on both sides, the bone preservation on the experimental side led to a need for a shorter clinical crown compared to the control side. A higher activity level of the bone in the experimental side was demonstrated histologically. In this dog model the insertion of a mini-implant across the healing alveolar process results in increased density not only adjacent to the screws, but also in the region where a potential dental implant would be inserted. In humans, the insertion of transcortical screws may maintain bone when for various reasons insertion of a permanent dental implant has to be postponed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Osteogenic effect of inflammatory macrophages loaded onto mineral bone substitute in subcutaneous implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Jelena M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the influence of inflammatory macrophages on the osteogenic process in subcutaneous implants composed of mineral bone substitute. Thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages (TEPMs were characterized as inflammatory. This was confirmed microscopically by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT test and the production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α. The implants (M-type were made of mineral bone substitute (Bio-Oss® mixed with TEPMs and blood clot. Implants without macrophages served as the control (C-type. Subcutaneous implantation in the interscapular area was performed on BALB/c mice. Implants were extracted after 2 and 8 weeks. In M-type implants, phagocytosis and angiogenesis were more pronounced, and osteoblast-like cells aligned onto granules of implanted material and osteoid structures can be seen. The observed higher osteocalcin and lower osteopontin immunoexpression in M-type implants when compared to the control after 8 weeks suggest a more advanced osteogenic process. Our results indicate that the presence of inflammatory macrophages in the composition of an implant may have a beneficial effect on the osteogenic process. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41017

  4. A cross-sectional study on the prevalence of marginal bone loss among implant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchinato, Denis; Parpaiola, Andrea; Lindhe, Jan

    2013-01-01